Science.gov

Sample records for buses final evaluation

  1. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2006-12-01

    Final technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. The evaluation lasted 12 months.

  2. Hybrid-Electric Transit Buses: NYCT (New York City Transit) Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses: Final Results (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-07-01

    Final results of the New York City Transit Hybrid-Electric Transit Bus Study. Hybrid buses had lower emissions, higher fuel economy, and higher operating costs compared with diesel buses. New York City Transit (NYCT), part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority in New York, began operating the first of 10 heavy-duty diesel hybrid-electric transit bus prototypes (Model VI) from Orion Bus Industries in 1998. All 10 buses were in revenue service by mid-2000. The hybrid buses are intended to provide NYCT with increased fuel economy and lower levels of harmful exhaust emissions, compared with NYCT's diesel transit buses. Between 1999 and 2001 (over various predefined fuel and maintenance evaluation periods), these first 10 hybrid buses were part of a data collection and analysis project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The operating costs, efficiency, emissions, and overall performance of these low-floor hybrid buses were compared against those of 14 conventional high-floor diesel transit buses (7 each from NovaBUS Corporation and Orion) operated by NYCT in similar service. Results indicate that the hybrid buses operate with greater fuel efficiency and much lower emissions, compared with the diesel buses. Maintenance costs for the prototype hybrid buses were significantly higher than those of the diesel buses during this evaluation. However, these costs are expected to decline for the next-generation Orion VII buses, currently being procured by NYCT, as repair technicians become more familiar with the advanced hybrid propulsion systems.

  3. NREL Evaluates Performance of Fast-Charge Electric Buses

    SciTech Connect

    2016-09-16

    This real-world performance evaluation is designed to enhance understanding of the overall usage and effectiveness of electric buses in transit operation and to provide unbiased technical information to other agencies interested in adding such vehicles to their fleets. Initial results indicate that the electric buses under study offer significant fuel and emissions savings. The final results will help Foothill Transit optimize the energy-saving potential of its transit fleet. NREL's performance evaluations help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and help fleet managers select fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their bottom line and operational goals. help Foothill Transit optimize the energy-saving potential of its transit fleet. NREL's performance evaluations help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and help fleet managers select fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their bottom line and operational goals.

  4. Project Startup: Evaluating the Performance of Electric Buses

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating the in-service performance of fast-charge battery electric buses compared to compressed natural gas (CNG) buses operated by Foothill Transit in West Covina, California. Launched in 2015 in collaboration with the California Air Resources Board, this study aims to improve understanding of the overall use and effectiveness of fast-charge electric buses and associated charging infrastructure in transit operation.

  5. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2007-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of three prototype fuel cell-powered transit buses operating at AC Transit in Oakland, California, and six baseline diesel buses similar in design to the fuel cell buses.

  6. Evaluation of Orion/BAE Hybrid Buses and Orion CNG Buses at New York City Transit: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

    2005-05-01

    This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses the NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric transit buses operated by New York City Transit.

  7. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  8. Procurement guidelines for battery-electric buses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    These guidelines detail the preparation of procurement documents for purchasing battery-electric buses. The example document in this report is intended as a guide and is aimed at bus-transportation professionals knowledgeable in the acquisition of rolling stock and contractual laws for their particular jurisdictions. The document focuses on technical specifications of battery-electric buses to ensure that minimum safety and utility requirements are met. Specifications came from a variety of sources, including statutes and regulations, industry standards, and accepted practices. These specifications are the means by which procuring agencies translate their particular requirements into documents that are mutually understood by all parties to a procurement. Electric-Bus Procurement Guidelines provides a comprehensive set of materials that guides bus-transportation professionals through the procurement process. Presented in the format of an actual set of documents a bidder might receive, the guidelines are easily modified to a locale`s specific conditions. In addition to a thorough set of vehicle specifications, the document includes other requirements bus builders must be familiar with to satisfy a buyer`s needs. Guideline sections detailing these requirements include Vehicle Acceptance Requirements, Project Requirements and Schedule, and Warranty Provisions.

  9. To Evaluate Zero Emission Propulsion and Support Technology for Transit Buses

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Chandler; Leslie Eudy

    2006-11-01

    This report provides evaluation results for prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) in San Jose, California, in partnership with the San Mateo County Transit District in San Carlos, California. VTA has been operating three fuel cell transit buses in extra revenue service since February 28, 2005. This report provides descriptions of the equipment used, early experiences, and evaluation results from the operation of the buses and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure from March 2005 through July 2006.

  10. Interim Evaluation Results from New Flyer/Allison Hybrid Buses at King County Metro: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

    2005-05-01

    This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric articulated transit buses operated by King County Metro.

  11. Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    2000-11-07

    In 1998, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, a public transit agency in Dallas, Texas, began operating a large fleet of heavy-duty buses powered by liquefied natural gas. As part of a $16 million commitment to alternative fuels, DART operates 139 LNG buses serviced by two new LNG fueling stations.

  12. COMPARISON OF CLEAN DIESEL BUSES TO CNG BUSES

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, D.; Parsley, W.; Bush,C; Zupo, D.

    2003-08-24

    Using previously published data on regulated and unregulated emissions, this paper will compare the environmental performance of current generation transit buses operated on compressed natural gas (CNG) to current generation transit buses operated on ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) and incorporating diesel particulate filters (DPF). Unregulated emissions evaluated include toxic compounds associated with adverse health effects (carbonyl, PAH, NPAH, benzene) as well as PM particle count and size distribution. For all regulated and unregulated emissions, both technologies are shown to be comparable. DPF equipped diesel buses and CNG buses have virtually identical levels of PM mass emissions and particle number emissions. DPF-equipped diesel buses have lower HC and CO emissions and lower emissions of toxic substances such as benzene, carbonyls and PAHs than CNG buses. CNG buses have lower NOx emissions than DPF-equipped buses, though CNG bus NOx emissions are shown to be much more variable. In addition, this paper will compare the capital and operating costs of CNG and DPF-equipped buses. The cost comparison is primarily based on the experience of MTA New York City Transit in operating CNG buses since 1995 and DPF-equipped buses fueled with ULSD since 2001. Published data on the experience of other large transit agencies in operating CNG buses is used to validate the NYCT experience. The incremental cost (compared to ''baseline'' diesel) of operating a typical 200-bus depot is shown to be six times higher for CNG buses than for ''clean diesel'' buses. The contributors to this increased cost for CNG buses are almost equally split between increased capital costs for purchase of buses and installation of fueling infrastructure, and increased operating costs for purchase of fuel, bus maintenance, and fuel station maintenance.

  13. Demonstration and evaluation of gas turbine transit buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Gas Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Program was designed to demonstrate and evaluate the operation of gas turbine engines in transit coaches in revenue service compared with diesel powered coaches. The main objective of the program was to accelerate development and commercialization of automotive gas turbines. The benefits from the installation of this engine in a transit coach were expected to be reduced weight, cleaner exhaust emissions, lower noise levels, reduced engine vibration and maintenance requirements, improved reliability and vehicle performance, greater engine braking capability, and superior cold weather starting. Four RTS-II advanced design transit coaches were converted to gas turbine power using engines and transmissions. Development, acceptance, performance and systems tests were performed on the coaches prior to the revenue service demonstration.

  14. In-Use Fleet Evaluation of Fast-Charge Battery Electric Transit Buses

    SciTech Connect

    Prohaska, Robert; Kelly, Kenneth; Eudy; Leslie

    2016-06-27

    With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts real-world performance evaluations of advanced medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles. Evaluation results can help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and assist fleet managers in selecting fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their economic and operational goals. In 2015, NREL launched an in-service evaluation of 12 battery electric buses (BEBs) compared to conventional compressed natural gas (CNG) buses operated by Foothill Transit in West Covina, California. The study aims to improve understanding of the overall usage and effectiveness of fast-charge BEBs and associated charging infrastructure in transit operation. To date, NREL researchers have analyzed more than 148,000 km of in-use operational data, including driving and charging events. Foothill Transit purchased the BEBs with grant funding from the Federal Transit Administration's Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction Program.

  15. Evaluation of a high efficiency cabin air (HECA) filtration system for reducing particulate pollutants inside school buses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eon S; Fung, Cha-Chen D; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-03-17

    An increasing number of studies have reported deleterious health effects of vehicle-emitted particulate matter (PM), including PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter≤2.5 μm), black carbon (BC), and ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter≤100 nm). When commuting inside school buses, children are exposed to high level of these pollutants due to emissions from both school bus itself and other on-road vehicles. This study developed an on-board high efficiency cabin air (HECA) filtration system for reducing children's exposure inside school buses. Six school buses were driven on two typical routes to evaluate to what extent the system reduces particulate pollutant levels inside the buses. The testing routes included freeways and major arterial roadways in Los Angeles, CA. UFP number concentrations and size distributions as well as BC and PM2.5 concentrations were monitored concurrently inside and outside of each bus. With the HECA filtration system on, in-cabin UFP and BC levels were reduced by 88±6% and 84±5% on averages across all driving conditions, respectively. The system was less effective for PM2.5 (55±22%) but successfully kept its levels below 12 μg/m3 inside all the buses. For all three types of particulate pollutants, in-cabin reductions were higher on freeways than on arterial roadways.

  16. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  17. NYCT Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Program Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-03-01

    Program status update focuses on the experiences gathered during New York City Transit's deployment of hybrid electric buses in its fleet. This report is part of an ongoing Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies program to study heavy-duty alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles in the United States. DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is conducting the Transit Bus Evaluation Project to compare alternative fuel or advanced technology and diesel fuel buses. Information for the comparison comes from data collected on the operational, maintenance, performance, and emissions characteristics of alternative fuel or advanced technology buses currently being used in vehicle fleets and comparable diesel fuel buses serving as controls within the same fleet. This report highlights the New York City Transit (NYCT) alternative fuel and advanced technology programs including its diesel hybrid-electric buses. As part of the NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project, data collection and evaluation of the Orion VI diesel hybrid-electric buses at NYCT are nearly complete. Final reports from the evaluation are being prepared by NREL and Battelle (NREL's support contractor for the project) and will be available in early 2002. If you want to know more about this transit bus program, its components, advanced technology vehicles, or incentive programs, contact any of the following personnel or visit the Web sites listed.

  18. Long Beach Transit: Two-Year Evaluation of Gasoline-Electric Hybrid Transit Buses

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, M.

    2008-06-01

    This report focuses on a gasoline-electric hybrid transit bus propulsion system. The propulsion system is an alternative to standard diesel buses and allows for reductions in emissions (usually focused on reductions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen) and petroleum use. Gasoline propulsion is an alternative to diesel fuel and hybrid propulsion allows for increased fuel economy, which ultimately results in reduced petroleum use.

  19. Evaluation of retrofit crankcase ventilation controls and diesel oxidation catalysts for reducing air pollution in school buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenbath, Kim; Hannigan, Michael P.; Milford, Jana B.

    2009-12-01

    This study evaluates the effect of retrofit closed crankcase ventilation filters (CCFs) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) on the in-cabin air quality in transit-style diesel school buses. In-cabin pollution levels were measured on three buses from the Pueblo, CO District 70 fleet. Monitoring was conducted while buses were driven along their regular routes, with each bus tested three times before and three times after installation of control devices. Ultrafine number concentrations in the school bus cabins were 33-41% lower, on average, after the control devices were installed. Mean mass concentrations of particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) were 56% lower, organic carbon (OC) 41% lower, elemental carbon (EC) 85% lower, and formaldehyde 32% lower after control devices were installed. While carbon monoxide concentrations were low in all tests, mean concentrations were higher after control devices were installed than in pre-retrofit tests. Reductions in number, OC, and formaldehyde concentrations were statistically significant, but reductions in PM2.5 mass were not. Even with control devices installed, during some runs PM2.5 and OC concentrations in the bus cabins were elevated compared to ambient concentrations observed in the area. OC concentrations inside the bus cabins ranged from 22 to 58 μg m -3 before and 13 to 33 μg m -3 after control devices were installed. OC concentrations were correlated with particle-bound organic tracers for lubricating oil emissions (hopanes) and diesel fuel and tailpipe emissions (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and aliphatic hydrocarbons). Mean concentrations of hopanes, PAH, and aliphatic hydrocarbons were lower by 37, 50, and 43%, respectively, after the control devices were installed, suggesting that both CCFs and DOCs were effective at reducing in-cabin OC concentrations.

  20. Computer simulations and literature survey of continuously variable transmissions for use in buses. Final report, June-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, T.

    1981-12-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted on the concept of flywheel energy storage for buses. Flywheel systems require a continuously variable transmission (CVT) of some type to transmit power between the flywheel and the drive wheels. However, a CVT can provide some fuel economy benefit with or without an energy-storing flywheel, which is the focus of this report. This computer study and literature review is intended to provide insight into the potential applicability of CVTs to buses. It has been suggested that such transmissions may be of interest for two reasons: (1) simple substitution of a CVT in the place of a conventional transmission may offer fuel savings by allowing the engine to operate at its most efficient speed and (2) the combination of a CVT and a flywheel allows regenerative braking, in which the vehicle kinetic energy during deceleration is captured for later re-use. This computer study and literature survey considers several examples of CVTs in buses, both with and without flywheel energy storage, and finds a predicted energy savings of 10 to 32 percent. The analysis focuses on the use of a CVT alone, without regenerative braking. Computer simulations are made to compute the fuel use of a bus with two different CVTs - one with a ratio range of 6, and the other of an infinite ratio range. For the former, assuming an efficiency of 85 percent, a fuel savings of 12 to 22 percent is predicted, depending upon the driving cycle. It is shown that a substantial part of this saving arises from the simple fact that the accessories operate at a lower speed. For this reason, a separate study of accessory speed control has been conducted, yielding a predicted fuel saving of as high as 17 percent. The report concludes that such accessory speed control may represent an attractive way to reduce fuel consumption. In comparison with the CVT, the concept is more compatible with present bus technology.

  1. Power sources for hybrid buses: comparative evaluation of the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bossche, Peter

    Due to their beneficial effect on environment, electric vehicles are an important factor for the improvement of urban traffic and, more particularly, for a healthier living environment. A particularly promising field of application is the hybrid-electric city bus, which offers unprecedented opportunities for reducing energy consumption and emissions. Nowadays, various hybrid bus configurations are being proposed and are being demonstrated in several European cities with the support of the European Union's `Thermie' programme. The most important hybrid bus project within Thermie is the Sagittaire project [EU Thermie Project Sagittaire, Newsletter 2, September 1998; EU Thremie project Sagittaire, unpublished documents], aiming to introduce hybrid buses in nine European cities: Luxembourg, Besançon, Alicante, Sintra, Stavanger, Trento, Savona, Athens and Bruges.

  2. Was Busing the Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    On 15 April 2002, the Dayton Board of Education, the Ohio State Department of Education, and the NAACP reached an agreement ending busing for racial balance in the city schools. Participants agreed that the era for litigated desegregation was over because busing had failed to raise academic achievement of African American children and court…

  3. School Buses Buckle Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    After a 20-year fight, advocates in New Jersey get a mandate for seat belts on school buses, and the controversial law could spark a new national trend. Half of the states have pending legislation on seat belts for school buses. Summarizes the arguments for and against seat belts. (MLF)

  4. Was Busing the Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    On 15 April 2002, the Dayton Board of Education, the Ohio State Department of Education, and the NAACP reached an agreement ending busing for racial balance in the city schools. Participants agreed that the era for litigated desegregation was over because busing had failed to raise academic achievement of African American children and court…

  5. Description and planned use of a data distribution evaluation system for fiber optic data buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.; Himka, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of a laboratory data distribution evaluation system (DDES) is given and some plans to use the system. The DDES is a microprocessor-based evaluation system consisting of three identical terminals. The DDES provides the capability for evaluating different system protocols and data word structures by making appropriate software changes, and different transmission medias and modulation schemes by making front-end hardware changes. A data multiplexing standard for fiber optic data transmission which parallels MIL-STD-1553B has proposed four different data modulation schemes. These modulation schemes will be described along with the plans to evaluate each of them. NASA-Langley has also been developing a data distribution approach which utilizes optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM). A four-port, four-wavelength WDM system will be described along with the planned use of the DDES to evaluate its performance.

  6. Data Collection, Testing, and Analysis of Hybrid Electric Trucks and Buses Operating in California Fleets. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Matthew; Duran, Adam; Ragatz, Adam; Cosgrove, Jon; Sindler, Petr; Russell, Robert; Johnson, Kent

    2015-06-12

    The objective of this project was to evaluate and quantify the emission impacts of commercially available hybrid medium- and heavy-duty vehicles relative to their non-hybrid counterparts. This effort will allow the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and other agencies to more effectively encourage development and commercial deployment of the most efficient, lowest emitting hybrid technologies needed to meet air quality and climate goals.

  7. ASEDRA Evaluation Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J; Detwiler, Dr. Rebecca; Sjoden, Dr, Glenn E.

    2008-09-01

    The performance of the Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm (ASEDRA) was evaluated by performing a blind test of 29 sets of gamma-ray spectra that were provided by DNDO. ASEDRA is a post-processing algorithm developed at the Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security at the University of Florida (UF/FINDS) that extracts char-acteristic peaks in gamma-ray spectra. The QuickID algorithm, also developed at UF/FINDS, was then used to identify nuclides based on the characteristic peaks generated by ASEDRA that are inferred from the spectra. The ASEDRA/QuickID analysis results were evaluated with respect to the performance of the DHSIsotopeID algorithm, which is a mature analysis tool that is part of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Data that were used for the blind test were intended to be challenging, and the radiation sources included thick shields around the radioactive materials as well as cargo containing naturally occurring radio-active materials, which masked emission from special nuclear materials and industrial isotopes. Evaluation of the analysis results with respect to the ground truth information (which was provided after the analyses were finalized) showed that neither ASEDRA/QuickID nor GADRAS could identify all of the radiation sources correctly. Overall, the purpose of this effort was primarily to evaluate ASEDRA, and GADRAS was used as a standard against which ASEDRA was compared. Although GADRAS was somewhat more accurate on average, the performance of ASEDRA exceeded that of GADRAS for some of the unknowns. The fact that GADRAS also failed to identify many of the radiation sources attests to the difficulty of analyzing the blind-test data that were used as a basis for the evaluation. This evaluation identified strengths and weaknesses of the two analysis approaches. The importance of good calibration data was also clear because the performance of both analysis methods was impeded by the

  8. Broadsides for Your Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Tibbett L.

    1995-01-01

    Some cash-strapped school districts are selling advertising space on their buses. Colorado Springs District 11 pioneered the 1st school-bus ad program more than 2 years ago, raising approximately $80,000 to date. However, the 12th National Conference on School Transportation argues that ads might distract motorists and cause accidents. (MLF)

  9. Evaluation of the use of bioethanol fuelled buses based on ambient air pollution screening and on-road measurements.

    PubMed

    López-Aparicio, S; Hak, C

    2013-05-01

    Mitigation measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions may have adverse effects on urban air quality and human exposure to harmful pollutants. The use of bioethanol fuelled vehicles is increasing worldwide and may create new undesired pollution effects. Different measurement campaigns were performed in a pilot study to contribute to the understanding of the consequences associated with the use of bioethanol blended fuel (E95) on a series of pollutants. Ambient screening measurements of NO2, O3, acetic acid, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were performed at different urban locations, exposed and not exposed to the circulation of bioethanol buses. In addition, volatile organic compounds were measured at the exhaust pipe of a bioethanol fuelled bus, both under idling conditions (carbonyls; DNPH cartridge) and under on-road driving conditions applying online monitoring (PTR-TOF). Higher ambient acetaldehyde values were measured at locations exposed to bioethanol fuelled buses than at locations not exposed, and very high acetaldehyde and acetic acid values were measured from the exhaust pipe during driving conditions (acetaldehyde>150 ppm; acetic acid ≈ 20-30 ppm) and modelled at close distance to the bioethanol bus. Human exposure to high concentration of acetaldehyde is expected, and it may involve a significantly increased chance in developing cancer. The high concentration of acetic acid will involve odour annoyance and significant material degradation or corrosion.

  10. Training evaluation final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Jose A.

    1992-01-01

    In the area of management training, 'evaluation' refers both to the specific evaluation instrument used to determine whether a training effort was considered effective, and to the procedures followed to evaluate specific training requests. This report recommends to evaluate new training requests in the same way new procurement or new projects are evaluated. This includes examining training requests from the perspective of KSC goals and objectives, and determining expected ROI of proposed training program (does training result in improved productivity, through savings of time, improved outputs, and/or personnel reduction?). To determine whether a specific training course is effective, a statement of what constitutes 'good performance' is required. The user (NOT the Training Branch) must define what is 'required level of performance'. This 'model' will be the basis for the design and development of an objective, performance-based, training evaluation instrument.

  11. Evaluating real-world CO2 and NOX emissions for public transit buses using a remote wireless on-board diagnostic (OBD) approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuhanzi; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Chen, Qizheng; Niu, Tianlin; Huang, Xu; Zhang, Shida; Zhang, Liangjun; Zhou, Yu; Hao, Jiming

    2016-11-01

    The challenge to mitigate real-world emissions from vehicles calls for powerful in-use compliance supervision. The remote on-board diagnostic (OBD) approach, with wireless data communications, is one of the promising next-generation monitoring methods. We collected second-by-second profiles of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions, driving conditions and engine performance for three conventional diesel and three hybrid diesel buses participating in a remote OBD pilot program in Nanjing, China. Our results showed that the average CO2 emissions for conventional diesel and hybrid diesel buses were 816 ± 83 g km(-1) and 627 ± 54 g km(-1), respectively, under a typical driving pattern. An operating mode binning analysis indicated that CO2 emissions reduction by series-parallel hybrid technology was largely because of the significant benefits of the technology under the modes of low speed and low power demand. However, significantly higher CO2 emissions were observed for conventional diesel buses during rush hours, higher than 1200 g km(-1). The OBD data suggested no improvement in NOX emission reduction for hybrid buses compared with conventional buses; both were approximately 12 g km(-1) because of poor performance of the selective catalyst reduction (SCR) systems in the real world. Speed-dependent functions for real-world CO2 and NOX emissions were also constructed. The CO2 emissions of hybrid buses were much less sensitive to the average speed than conventional buses. If the average speed decreased from 20 km h(-1) to 10 km h(-1), the estimated CO2 emission factor for conventional buses would be increased by 34%. Such a change in speed would increase NOX emissions for conventional and hybrid buses by 38% and 56%, respectively. This paper demonstrates the useful features of the remote OBD system and can inform policy makers how to take advantage of these features in monitoring in-use vehicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. After Busing: Education and Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armor, David J.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that mandatory busing, while resulting in cases of "White flight," has had positive consequences in the re-emergence of "choice" programs and magnet schools. Contends that choice programs can be expanded on intradistrict, metropolitan, and statewide levels. Suggests that Federal funding and private education should be…

  13. Sociology and School Busing Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armor, David J.

    This paper cites some of the contributions that sociology has made to desegregation policy. The major contribution, made by public opinion research, is establishing the level of support or opposition to busing policy. A second contribution to desegregation policy has been made by those sociologists and social psychologists who have studied the…

  14. Student Management on School Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Robert L.

    This report of a Colorado school district's program for student management on school buses includes descriptions of discipline procedures and the "Safe Ridership" program which is offered at the elementary and junior high levels and which of instructs students on ridership rules and regulations. Also included are copies of the relevant…

  15. St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.; Lammert, M.

    2008-07-01

    The St. Louis Metro Bodiesel Transit Bus Evaluation project is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between NREL and the National Biodiesel Board to evaluate the extended in-use performance of buses operating on B20 fuel. The objective of this research project is to compare B20 and ultra-low sulfur diesel buses in terms of fuel economy, veicles maintenance, engine performance, component wear, and lube oil performance.

  16. BAE/Orion Hybrid Electric Buses at New York City Transit: A Generational Comparison (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, R.

    2008-03-01

    Paper describes the evaluation of hybrid-electric transit buses purchased by New York City Transit (NYCT) in an order group of 200 (Gen II) and compares their performance to those of similar hybrid-electric transit buses purchased by NYCT in an order group of 125 (Gen I).

  17. Busing: A Moral Issue. Fastback Series, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmon, Howard; Craver, Sam

    This report discusses the current school busing crisis, examines the history of busing, and looks into the future of busing. In discussing the current crisis the authors examine recent court cases mandating busing to achieve desegregation. They go back into history to trace the tradition of busing, to obtain facts and figures, and to look at past…

  18. Header design evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubenhofer, R.L.

    1993-08-01

    An evaluation was conducted of two new six-pin header designs. This evaluation consisted of designing, evaluating, procuring, and building contact module subassemblies with each of the two designs. The study was initiated as a result of the high scrap costs associated with the current product design. Two new designs were found to be feasible alternative to the current design.

  19. Processor arrays with asynchronous TDM optical buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, S. Q.

    1997-04-01

    We propose a pipelined asynchronous time division multiplexing optical bus. Such a bus can use one of the two hardwared priority schemes, the linear priority scheme and the round-robin priority scheme. Our simulation results show that the performances of our proposed buses are significantly better than the performances of known pipelined synchronous time division multiplexing optical buses. We also propose a class of processor arrays connected by pipelined asynchronous time division multiplexing optical buses. We claim that our proposed processor array not only have better performance, but also have better scalabilities than the existing processor arrays connected by pipelined synchronous time division multiplexing optical buses.

  20. Operating conditions of buses in use in the Ile-de-France region of France for the evaluation of pollutant emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Michel; Garrot, Bénédicte; Roynard, Yves; Vidon, Robert; Tassel, Patrick; Perret, Pascal

    This study is intended to link the pollutant emissions from buses to their driving conditions and to the urban context. Envisaged in the case of the Ile-de-France region of France, this procedure constitutes a methodological basis for characterising bus networks by using geographic and bus operation databases. Firstly, the bus routes are characterised by linking analyses of bus operating conditions and urban characteristics collected and managed by a Geographic Information System. This multidimensional analysis provides bus-route profiles according to the types of areas served. Secondly, one vehicle of a bus route from each of the categories thus defined was instrumented in order to measure its operating parameters during commercial use. The parameters measured include engine operation, the speed and location of the vehicle, passenger load, load linked to the road profile, and electrical and pneumatic loads. After outlining the methodological approach to network characterisation, a description is given of the instrumental protocol followed by the general results of the experiments. In all, over 25,000 km were recorded over 1600 h of driving, for which the main operating parameters were measured at time intervals of 1 s. Preliminary analyses (characterisation of urban areas) and the localisation of the recordings enable linking bus operating conditions with local specificities. The bus operating conditions (speeds, congestion, load, etc.) are analysed as a function of the routes and the geographical and urban specificities of the areas served. This data is then analysed in order to formulate driving cycles representative of real traffic conditions and that serve as the basis for measuring the real pollutant emissions of buses on a vehicle test bench. These driving cycles will then enable associating pollutant emissions with the corresponding driving conditions and geographical areas.

  1. Transforming Writing. Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooke, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Transforming Writing was a two-year action research project, sponsored by the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, which developed a model for the teaching and learning of writing that embedded formative assessment. This report evaluates to what extent the model of writing developed by the teachers during the research period impacted on children's writing…

  2. Program Evaluation Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadco Rehabilitation Center, Inc., Stryker, OH.

    The purpose of the project was to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of those rehabilitation facilities which were utilized by the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission (RSC) through the development, installation, and utilization of a program evaluation system and a management information system. The two systems were developed and…

  3. School Buses & Seat Belts: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    Safety belts are not installed in school buses for several reasons. School buses are constructed differently from automobiles in terms of (1) the locations of doors and instrument panels relative to passengers, (2) outer construction, (3) seat design and padding, and (4) visibility on the road. Under current regulations, bus seats are constructed…

  4. Busing: A Review of "the Evidence."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Thomas F.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    David Armor's "The Evidence on Busing" presented a distorted and incomplete review of this politically charged topic. We respect Armor's right to publish his views against "mandatory busing." But we challenge his claim that these views are supported by scientific evidence. A full discussion of our reading of the relevant…

  5. Busing in Boston: Weighing the Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, George W.

    1975-01-01

    Notes that not all opposition to busing derives from socially, unhealthy, or immoral values and provides alternatives such as fear of sending children into high crime areas. Most Bostonians are said to hate forced busing because of the violence it is spawning. [Available from America, 106 West 56th Street, New York, New York 10019]. (Author/AM)

  6. PROJECT CONCERN, HARTFORD'S EXPERIMENTAL BUSING PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHAW, PEG

    THIS REPRINTED SERIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ABOUT PROJECT CONCERN, HARTFORD'S EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM WHICH BUSES INNER CITY CHILDREN TO SUBURBAN SCHOOLS, IS COMPOSED PRIMARILY OF ANECDOTAL REPORTS FROM MOTHERS, CHILDREN, AND TEACHERS. THE INDIVIDUAL ARTICLES DEAL WITH THE CHILDREN'S REACTIONS TO THE BUSING AND TO THEIR NEW SCHOOLS, THEIR ADJUSTMENT,…

  7. Desalination technology evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bene, J.V.; Loh, G.T.; Schleicher, R.W.; Sgammato, T.A.; Sinha, A.K.

    1992-12-01

    The shortage of potable water has hindered economic development in South Florida and other areas of the United States. This project, cosponsored with Florida Power & Light (FPL), examines the economics of colocation of a water desalination plant with an electric power plant to take advantage of shared facilities, personnel, and equipments well as existing intake and outfall structures. In combination, these factors should reduce the cost of desalinated water. The first step in determining the viability of colocation is identification of desalination technologies best suited for dual-purpose applications in retrofits at existing fossil plants. Based on energy efficiency and commercial maturity, reverse osmosis (RO) and low-temperature multieffect distillation (LT-MED) technologies appear to be the best candidates for such application. In fact, RO provides the best economics for the plants and conditions studied. Of the emerging technologies evaluated, sodium molecular pumping and solvent extraction technologies should be further investigated for their potential in significantly reducing desalination costs.

  8. Comparison of on-road emissions for hybrid and regular transit buses.

    PubMed

    Hallmark, Shauna L; Wang, Bo; Sperry, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Hybrid technology offers an attractive option for transit buses, since it has the potential to significantly reduce operating costs for transit agencies. The main impetus behind use of hybrid transit vehicles is fuel savings and reduced emissions. Laboratory tests have indicated that hybrid transit buses can have significantly lower emissions compared with conventional transit buses. However the number of studies is limited and laboratory tests may not represent actual driving conditions, since in-use vehicle operation differs from laboratory test cycles. This paper describes an on-road evaluation of in-use emission differences between hybrid-electric and conventional transit buses for the Ames, Iowa transit authority, CyRide. Emissions were collected on-road using a portable emissions monitoring system (PEMS) for three hybrid and two control buses. Emissions were collected for at least one operating bus day. Each bus was evaluated over the same route pattern, which utilizes the same driver. The number of passengers embarking or disembarking at each stop was collected by an on-board data collector so that passenger load could be included. Vehicle emissions are correlated to engine load demand, which is a function of factors such as vehicle load, speed, and acceleration. PEMS data are provided second by second and vehicle-specific power (VSP) was calculated for each row of data. Instantaneous data were stratified into the defined VSP bins and then average modal emission rates and standard errors were calculated for each bus for each pollutant. Pollutants were then compared by bus type. Carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbon emissions were higher for the regular buses across most VSP bins than for the hybrid buses. Nitrogen oxide emissions were unexpectedly higher for the hybrid buses than for the control buses.

  9. Crashworthiness of Small Poststandard School Buses: Safety Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Transportation Safety Board (DOT), Washington, DC.

    In 1977, a series of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) for school buses became effective, mandating different performance standards for school buses compared to other buses. Because data on the crash performance of school buses built to these standards were lacking, the National Transportation Safety Board conducted a series of…

  10. Un-Regulated Emissions from CRT-Equipped Transit Buses

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Richard

    2000-08-20

    Demonstrate applicability of the CRT TM to both new 4-stroke and older 2-stroke diesel engines Document the emissions reductions available using CRT TM retrofits in conjunction with reduced sulfur diesel fuel Evaluate the durability of CRTs in rigorous New York City bus service Apply new measurement and monitoring technologies for PM and toxic emissions Compare diesel-CRTTM with CNG and diesel-electric hybrid buses

  11. In-use fuel economy of hybrid-electric school buses in Iowa.

    PubMed

    Hallmark, Shauna; Sperry, Bob; Mudgal, Abhisek

    2011-05-01

    Although it is much safer and more fuel-efficient to transport children to school in buses than in private vehicles, school buses in the United States still consume 822 million gal of diesel fuel annually, and school transportation costs can account for a significant portion of resource-constrained school district budgets. Additionally, children in diesel-powered school buses may be exposed to higher levels of particulates and other pollutants than children in cars. One solution to emission and fuel concerns is use of hybrid-electric school buses, which have the potential to reduce emissions and overall lifecycle costs compared with conventional diesel buses. Hybrid-electric technologies are available in the passenger vehicle market as well as the transit bus market and have a track record indicating fuel economy and emissions benefits. This paper summarizes the results of an in-use fuel economy evaluation for two plug-in hybrid school buses deployed in two different school districts in Iowa. Each school district selected a control bus with a route similar to that of the hybrid bus. Odometer readings, fuel consumption, and maintenance needs were recorded for each bus. The buses were deployed in 2008 and data were collected through May 2010. Fuel consumption was calculated for each school district. In Nevada, IA, the overall average fuel economy was 8.23 mpg for the hybrid and 6.35 mpg for the control bus. In Sigourney, IA, the overall average fuel economy was 8.94 mpg for the hybrid and 6.42 mpg for the control bus. The fuel consumption data were compared for the hybrid and control buses using a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results indicate that fuel economy for the Nevada hybrid bus was 29.6% better than for the Nevada control bus, and fuel economy for the Sigourney hybrid bus was 39.2% higher than for the Sigourney control bus. Both differences were statistically significant.

  12. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

    2006-03-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

  13. Some experiences using system-on-chip buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo, Pedro P.; Santos, Pablo; Marrero, Margarita; Nunez, Antonio

    2003-04-01

    by the SoC buses. The two main characteristics of these wrappers are that the increased in latency and area would be as low as possible. The second solution is to design the IP with the final environment in mind.

  14. A case study of real-world tailpipe emissions for school buses using a 20% biodiesel blend.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, Claudio; Kuhns, Hampden D; Moosmüller, Hans; Witt, Jay; Nussbaum, Nicholas J; Oliver Chang, M-C; Parthasarathy, Gayathri; Nathagoundenpalayam, Suresh Kumar K; Nikolich, George; Watson, John G

    2007-10-15

    Numerous laboratory studies report carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter emission reductions with a slight nitrogen oxides emission increase from engines operating with biodiesel and biodiesel blends as compared to using petroleum diesel. We conducted a field study on a fleet of school buses to evaluate the effects of biodiesel use on gaseous and particulate matter fuel-based emission factors under real-world conditions. The field experiment was carried out in two phases during winter 2004. In January (phase I), emissions from approximately 200 school buses operating on petroleum diesel were measured. Immediately after the end of the first phase measurement period, the buses were switched to a 20% biodiesel blend. Emission factors were measured again in March 2004 (phase II) and compared with the January emission factors. To measure gaseous emission factors we used a commercial gaseous remote sensor. Particulate matter emission factors were determined with a combination of the gaseous remote sensor, a Lidar (light detection and ranging), and transmissometer system developed at the Desert Research Institute of Reno, NV, U.S.A. Particulate matter emissions from school buses significantly increased (up to a factor of 1.8) after the switch from petroleum diesel to a 20% biodiesel blend. The fuel used during this campaign was provided by a local distributor and was independently analyzed at the end of the on-road experiment. The analysis found high concentrations of free glycerin and reduced flash points in the B 100 parent fuel. Both measures indicate improper separation and processing of the biodiesel product during production. The biodiesel fuels used in the school buses were not in compliance with the U.S.A. ASTM D6751 biodiesel standard that was finalized in December of 2001. The U.S.A. National Biodiesel Board has formed a voluntary National Biodiesel Accreditation Program for producers and marketers of biodiesel to ensure product quality and

  15. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in evaluating the durability and reliability of fuel cell buses being demonstrated in transit service. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technology Validation team in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  16. Two Maine School Bus Fleets Get Funds for New Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Two school districts in ME, in Kennebunk &in Sullivan, were chosen to receive a total of $200,000 from the USEPA to help pay for new school buses. The new buses emit less pollution than their older buses, which will help reduce pollution...

  17. Clean School Bus USA: Tomorrow's Buses for Today's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is ensuring that all new buses meet tighter standards developed to reduce diesel emissions and improve safety. Today's new buses are cleaner--60 times cleaner than buses built before 1990--and feature additional emergency exits, improved mirror systems, and pedestrian safety devices. But replacing…

  18. The School Busing Controversy: 1970-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buncher, Judith F., Ed.

    Even though transportation of school children was long accepted by the public prior to the conflict over school integration, the school bus became a symbol representing the divergent emotions of both the integrationists and the supporters of "neighborhood schools." Busing was used as a means of overcoming the resistance and procrastination of…

  19. Seat Belts on School Buses: Some Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soule, David

    1982-01-01

    A representative of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration weighs advantages and discusses issues associated with installing seat belts in school buses. Federal regulations and research findings are considered. A list of guideline questions for school districts planning to install seat belts is included. (PP)

  20. Diesel Powered School Buses: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Robert

    1984-01-01

    Because diesel engines are more economical and longer-lasting than gasoline engines, school districts are rapidly increasing their use of diesel buses. Dependence on diesel power, however, entails vulnerability to cost increases due to the unreliability of crude oil supplies and contributes to air pollution. (MCG)

  1. A Busing Program for Child Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Alan S.; Hung, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (Canada) dental school has implemented a clinical experience program in which children in grades 2-4 are bused to the university for dental treatment. The program has helped maintain undergraduate pediatric dental experiences, benefited the children's dental health, and cost parents less than traditional dental…

  2. Diesel Powered School Buses: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Robert

    1984-01-01

    Because diesel engines are more economical and longer-lasting than gasoline engines, school districts are rapidly increasing their use of diesel buses. Dependence on diesel power, however, entails vulnerability to cost increases due to the unreliability of crude oil supplies and contributes to air pollution. (MCG)

  3. Emergency building temperature restrictions. Final evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    On July 5, 1979, DOE promulgated final regulations of the Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions program, placing emergency restrictions on thermostat settings for space heating, space cooling, and hot water in commercial, industrial, and nonresidential public buildings. The final regulations restricted space heating to a maximum of 65/sup 0/F, hot water temperature to a maximum of 105/sup 0/F, and cooling temperature to a minimum of 78/sup 0/F. A comprehensive evaluation of the entire EBTF program for a nine-month period from July 16, 1979 is presented. In Chapter 1, an estimate of the population of buildings covered by EBTR is presented. In Chapter 2, EBTR compliance by building type and region is reported. Exemptions are also discussed. In Chapter 3, the simulations of building energy use are explained and the relative impact of various building characteristics and effectiveness of different control strategies are estimated. Finally, in Chapter 4, the methodology for scaling the individual building energy savings to the national level is described, and estimated national energy savings are presented.

  4. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2011-11-01

    This status report, fifth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), discusses the achievements and challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transit and summarizes the introduction of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. Progress this year includes an increase in the number of fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs), from 15 to 25, operating at eight transit agencies, as well as increased diversity of the fuel cell design options for transit buses. The report also provides an analysis of the combined results from fuel cell transit bus demonstrations evaluated by NREL with a focus on the most recent data through July 2011 including fuel cell power system reliability and durability; fuel economy; roadcall; and hydrogen fueling results. These evaluations cover 22 of the 25 FCEBs currently operating.

  5. Battery capacity and recharging needs for electric buses in city transit service

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Zhiming; Lin, Zhenhong; LaClair, Tim J.; ...

    2017-01-27

    Our paper evaluates the energy consumption and battery performance of city transit electric buses operating on real day-to-day routes and standardized bus drive cycles, based on a developed framework tool that links bus electrification feasibility with real-world vehicle performance, city transit bus service reliability, battery sizing and charging infrastructure. The impacts of battery capacity combined with regular and ultrafast charging over different routes have been analyzed in terms of the ability to maintain city transit bus service reliability like conventional buses. These results show that ultrafast charging via frequent short-time boost charging events, for example at a designated bus stopmore » after completing each circuit of an assigned route, can play a significant role in reducing the battery size and can eliminate the need for longer duration charging events that would cause schedule delays. Furthermore, the analysis presented shows that significant benefits can be realized by employing multiple battery configurations and flexible battery swapping practices in electric buses. These flexible design and use options will allow electric buses to service routes of varying city driving patterns and can therefore enable meaningful reductions to the cost of the vehicle and battery while ensuring service that is as reliable as conventional buses.« less

  6. Accessible bus service in St. Louis. Final report. UMTA/TSC project evaluation series

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, D.; Varker, F.; Bowlin, R.

    1980-02-01

    The Bi-State Development Agency in St. Louis began operating buses equipped with hydraulic lifts for boarding persons in wheelchairs in August of 1977. This was the first large scale accessible bus project in transit history. One hundred fifty-seven lift equipped buses were put into revenue service over a three and one-half month period. Seventeen routes were selected for accessible bus service. In September of 1978, scheduled accessible service was cut back by two-thirds due to malfunctions of the lift equipment. Wheelchair user ridership decreased gradually during the first year of service but dropped off markedly during the last ten months of the evaluation period. The evaluation covered the development planning, the implementation process, operations, service and equipment reliability, travel behavior, productivity, economics, and service impacts. The results of the St. Louis accessible service which have important implications for other operators are also discussed.

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL- AND CNG-POWERED URBAN BUSES

    SciTech Connect

    COROLLER, P; PLASSAT, G

    2003-08-24

    Couple years ago, ADEME engaged programs dedicated to the urban buses exhaust emissions studies. The measures associated with the reduction of atmospheric and noise pollution has particular importance in the sector of urban buses. In many cases, they illustrate the city's environmental image and contribute to reinforcing the attractiveness of public transport. France's fleet in service, presently put at about 14,000 units, consumes about 2 per cent of the total energy of city transport. It causes about 2 per cent of the HC emissions and from 4 to 6 per cent of the NOx emissions and particles. These vehicles typically have a long life span (about 15 years) and are relatively expensive to buy, about 150.000 euros per unit. Several technical solutions were evaluated to quantify, on a real condition cycle for buses, on one hand pollutants emissions, fuel consumption and on the other hand reliability, cost in real existing fleet. This paper presents main preliminary results on urban buses exhaust emission on two different cases: - existing Diesel buses, with fuel modifications (Diesel with low sulphur content), Diesel with water emulsion and bio-Diesel (30% oil ester in standard Diesel fuel); renovating CNG powered Euro II buses fleet, over representative driving cycles, set up by ADEME and partners. On these cycles, pollutants (regulated and unregulated) were measured as well as fuel consumption, at the beginning of a program and one year after to quantify reliability and increase/decrease of pollutants emissions. At the same time, some after-treatment technologies were tested under real conditions and several vehicles. Information such as fuel consumption, lubricant analysis, problem on the technology were following during a one year program. On the overall level, it is the combination of various action, pollution-reduction and renewal that will make it possible to meet the technological challenge of reducing emissions and fuel consumption by urban bus networks.

  8. Alternative Fuels for Washington's School Buses: A Report to the Washington State Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John Kim; McCoy, Gilbert A.

    This document presents findings of a study that evaluated the use of both propane and compressed natural gas as alternative fuels for Washington State school buses. It discusses air quality improvement actions by state- and federal-level regulators and summarizes vehicle design, development, and commercialization activities by all major engine,…

  9. Busing: Ground Zero in School Desegregation. A Literature Review With Policy Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunterton, C. Stanley; And Others

    The contents of this document are organized in six sections. Section one, "Overview," discusses the parameters of the busing controversy. It indicates that the basic issue in the busing debate is racial desegregation in our nation's schools. Section two, "Busing in Perspective," examines the history, scope, and cost of busing; the law and busing;…

  10. Indoor-outdoor relationships of airborne particles and nitrogen dioxide inside Parisian buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molle, Romain; Mazoué, Sophie; Géhin, Évelyne; Ionescu, Anda

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated passengers' exposure to traffic air pollution inside the articulated buses of the line 91 in Paris during 10 working days in May, 2010. Twenty articulated buses were studied on 32 routes in order to determine the influence of the sampling position on the pollutant concentrations. This parameter is still poorly known for the rigid buses and is even less known for the articulated ones. However this parameter must be studied for articulated buses because the greater length may cause a pollutant concentration gradient in the cabin. Portable devices were used to measure pollutants in the presence of passengers from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., time periods corresponding to the peak traffic and travellers. PM2.5 mass concentration, particle number concentration between 0.3 and 20 μm and nitrogen dioxide concentration were simultaneously measured on three positions inside the buses (front, middle and rear) in order to study the spatial distribution of these compounds. These measurements inside the buses were compared to the outdoor concentrations at the same moment of the day provided by the Parisian air quality monitoring network; they were also compared to the results of a previous monitoring campaign performed in 2008. The results obtained during the 2010 campaign revealed that in-cabin NO2 mean concentrations were 1.5-3.5 times higher than the outside concentration levels; a maximum concentration of 234 ± 40 μg m-3 was found in the rear position (location of the engine and exhaust gas). Mean in-cabin PM2.5 mass concentrations varied from one week to another one, but they were globally the same at the three positions inside the instrumented buses. In order to determine the impact of outdoor levels, correlations have been calculated between the results measured inside the buses and those measured by the outdoor air monitoring stations. The highest Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.29 for NO2 data whereas the highest Pearson

  11. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Temperatures within Tour Buses under Real-Time Traffic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ming-Hung; Chang, Feng-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    This study monitored the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and temperatures of three 43-seat tour buses with high-passenger capacities in a course of a three-day, two-night school excursion. Results showed that both driver zones and passenger zones of the tour buses achieved maximum CO2 concentrations of more than 3000 ppm, and maximum daily average concentrations of 2510.6 and 2646.9 ppm, respectively. The findings confirmed that the CO2 concentrations detected in the tour buses exceeded the indoor air quality standard of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (8 hr-CO2: 1000 ppm) and the air quality guideline of Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department (1 hr-CO2: 2500 ppm for Level 1 for buses). Observations also showed that high-capacity tour bus cabins with air conditioning system operating in recirculation mode are severely lacking in air exchange rate, which may negatively impact transportation safety. Moreover, the passenger zones were able to maintain a temperature of between 20 and 25°C during travel, which effectively suppresses the dispersion of volatile organic compounds. Finally, the authors suggest that in the journey, increasing the ventilation frequency of tour bus cabin, which is very beneficial to maintain the travel safety and enhance the quality of travel. PMID:25923722

  12. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Temperatures within Tour Buses under Real-Time Traffic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ming-Hung; Chang, Feng-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    This study monitored the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and temperatures of three 43-seat tour buses with high-passenger capacities in a course of a three-day, two-night school excursion. Results showed that both driver zones and passenger zones of the tour buses achieved maximum CO2 concentrations of more than 3000 ppm, and maximum daily average concentrations of 2510.6 and 2646.9 ppm, respectively. The findings confirmed that the CO2 concentrations detected in the tour buses exceeded the indoor air quality standard of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (8 hr-CO2: 1000 ppm) and the air quality guideline of Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department (1 hr-CO2: 2500 ppm for Level 1 for buses). Observations also showed that high-capacity tour bus cabins with air conditioning system operating in recirculation mode are severely lacking in air exchange rate, which may negatively impact transportation safety. Moreover, the passenger zones were able to maintain a temperature of between 20 and 25°C during travel, which effectively suppresses the dispersion of volatile organic compounds. Finally, the authors suggest that in the journey, increasing the ventilation frequency of tour bus cabin, which is very beneficial to maintain the travel safety and enhance the quality of travel.

  13. How Busing Burdened Blacks: Critical Race Theory and Busing for Desegregation in Nashville-Davidson County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses critical race theory, court opinions, newspapers, and interviews to explain how the burden of busing for desegregation was placed upon Blacks in Nashville, Tennessee and why the agenda of the litigants in the Kelley v. Metropolitan Board of Education cases shifted over time. The deliberate pace of the initial desegregation…

  14. How Busing Burdened Blacks: Critical Race Theory and Busing for Desegregation in Nashville-Davidson County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses critical race theory, court opinions, newspapers, and interviews to explain how the burden of busing for desegregation was placed upon Blacks in Nashville, Tennessee and why the agenda of the litigants in the Kelley v. Metropolitan Board of Education cases shifted over time. The deliberate pace of the initial desegregation…

  15. Characterizing ultrafine particles and other air pollutants in and around school buses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yifang; Zhang, Qunfang

    2014-03-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated toxic effects of ultrafine particles (UFP*, diameter < 100 nm). Children are particularly at risk because of their immature respiratory systems and higher breathing rates per body mass. This study aimed to characterize UFP, PM2.5 (particulate matter < or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter), and other vehicular-emitted pollutants in and around school buses. Four sub-studies were conducted, including: 1. On-road tests to measure in-cabin air pollutant levels while school buses were being driven; 2. Idling tests to determine the contributions of tailpipe emissions from idling school buses to air pollutant levels in and around school buses under different scenarios; 3. Retrofit tests to evaluate the performance of two retrofit systems, a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) muffler and a crankcase filtration system (CFS), on reducing tailpipe emissions and in-cabin air pollutant concentrations under idling and driving conditions; and 4. High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter air purifier tests to evaluate the effectiveness of in-cabin filtration. In total, 24 school buses were employed to cover a wide range of school buses commonly used in the United States. Real-time air quality measurements included particle number concentration (PNC), fine and UFP size distribution in the size range 7.6-289 nm, PM2.5 mass concentration, black carbon (BC) concentration, and carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. For in-cabin measurements, instruments were placed on a platform secured to the rear seats inside the school buses. For all other tests, a second set of instruments was deployed to simultaneously measure the ambient air pollutant levels. For tailpipe emission measurements, the exhaust was diluted and then measured by instruments identical to those used for the in-cabin measurements. The results show that when driving on roads, in-cabin PNC, fine and UFP size distribution, PM2.5, BC, and CO varied by engine age

  16. Electric buses in operation: The Chattanooga experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, T.W.

    1994-10-01

    In the early 1990s the City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA) were looking for an innovative approach to the need for a downtown shuttle. As a result of finding a solution to this problem, the transit system has embarked on the most extensive electric transit vehicle program in the United States. The program now uses electric buses made with existing technology and actively participates in developing new electric vehicle technologies, testing vehicles and components, manufacturing electric transit vehicles, and formatting the Electric Transit Vehicle Institute. The history of the program, the policy and operational issues that were addressed by the CARTA governing board and management staff, and the areas of consideration for transit systems considering the use of electric transit vehicles are provided, as are the author`s thoughts concerning the future of electric transit vehicles. Emphasis is given to the policy and organizational concerns that face a transit system seeking to implement a new technology from the perspective of an agency whose focus is on the actual real-life operation of electric buses rather than short-term demonstration programs.

  17. Conceptual Design of the TPF-O SC Buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R.

    2007-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder - Occulter (TPF-O) mission has two Spacecraft (SC) buses, one for a space telescope and the other for a formation-flying occulter. SC buses typically supply the utilities (support structures, propulsion, attitude control, power, communications, etc) required by the payloads. Unique requirements for the occulter SC bus are to provide the large delta V required for the slewing maneuvers of the occulter, and comunications for formation flying. The TPF-O telescope SC bus shares some key features of the one for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST): both support space telescopes designed to observe in the visible to near infrared range of wavelengths with comparable primary mirror apertures (2.4 m for HST, 2.4 - 4.0 m for TPF-O). However, TPF-O is expected to have a Wide Field Camera (WFC) with a Field of View (FOV) much larger than that of HST. Ths WFC is also expected to provide fine guidance. TPF-O is designed to operate in an orbit around the Sun-Earth Lagrange 2 (SEL2) point. The longer communications range to SEL2 and the large science FOV require higher performance communications than HST. Maintaining a SEL2 orbit requires TPF-O, unlike HST, to have a propulsion system. The velocity required for reachng SEL2 and the limited capabilities of affordable launch vehicles require both TPF-O elements to have compact, low-mass designs. Finally, it is possible that TPF-O may utilize a modular design derived fiom that of HST to allow servicing in the SEL2 orbit.

  18. The Medical Case for Seat Belts on School Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, Arthur

    1985-01-01

    A group is actively supporting legislation to require seat belts on only newly manufactured school buses. However, misinformation is being circulated to oppose the installation of seat belts in school buses. If the industry continues to block the installation of seat belts, punitive legislation may be passed. (MLF)

  19. 46 CFR 111.30-19 - Buses and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buses and wiring. 111.30-19 Section 111.30-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-19 Buses and wiring. (a) General. Each bus must meet the requirements of...

  20. Whites' Opposition to "Busing": Self-Interest of Symbolic Politics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, David O.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines whether opposition to busing springs from self-interest (such as having children susceptible to busing) or merely racial attitudes on the part of those not involved. Concludes that self-interest is overestimated as a determinant of public opinion. Available from The American Political Science Association, 1527 New Hampshire Ave., N.W.,…

  1. School Buses Answer Calls for Help in Crises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2005-01-01

    Five days after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, a convoy of 142 air-conditioned school buses from the 209,000-student Texas district rumbled to life. Loaded with food and bottled water, staffed by 350 school employees, and accompanied by bus-repair trucks and a phalanx of school police cars, the yellow buses traveled all night to reach the…

  2. 49 CFR 393.91 - Buses, aisle seats prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buses, aisle seats prohibited. 393.91 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.91 Buses, aisle seats prohibited. No bus shall be equipped with aisle seats unless such seats are so designed and installed as...

  3. 49 CFR 393.90 - Buses, standee line or bar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buses, standee line or bar. 393.90 Section 393.90... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.90 Buses, standee line or bar. Except as provided below, every bus, which is designed and constructed so as to allow standees, shall...

  4. 49 CFR 393.89 - Buses, driveshaft protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buses, driveshaft protection. 393.89 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.89 Buses, driveshaft protection. Any driveshaft extending lengthways under the floor of the passenger compartment of a bus...

  5. 49 CFR 393.89 - Buses, driveshaft protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buses, driveshaft protection. 393.89 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.89 Buses, driveshaft protection. Any driveshaft extending lengthways under the floor of the passenger compartment of a bus...

  6. 49 CFR 392.62 - Safe operation, buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safe operation, buses. 392.62 Section 392.62... VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.62 Safe operation, buses. No person shall drive a bus and a motor carrier shall not require or permit a person to drive a bus unless— (a) All standees on the bus...

  7. 49 CFR 393.89 - Buses, driveshaft protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buses, driveshaft protection. 393.89 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.89 Buses, driveshaft protection. Any driveshaft extending lengthways under the floor of the passenger compartment of a bus...

  8. 49 CFR 393.91 - Buses, aisle seats prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buses, aisle seats prohibited. 393.91 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.91 Buses, aisle seats prohibited. No bus shall be equipped with aisle seats unless such seats are so designed and installed as...

  9. 49 CFR 393.90 - Buses, standee line or bar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buses, standee line or bar. 393.90 Section 393.90... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.90 Buses, standee line or bar. Except as provided below, every bus, which is designed and constructed so as to allow standees, shall...

  10. 49 CFR 393.91 - Buses, aisle seats prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Buses, aisle seats prohibited. 393.91 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.91 Buses, aisle seats prohibited. No bus shall be equipped with aisle seats unless such seats are so designed and installed as...

  11. 49 CFR 392.63 - Towing or pushing loaded buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Towing or pushing loaded buses. 392.63 Section 392... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.63 Towing or pushing loaded buses. No disabled bus with passengers aboard shall be towed or pushed; nor shall any person use or permit to be used a bus...

  12. 49 CFR 393.89 - Buses, driveshaft protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Buses, driveshaft protection. 393.89 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.89 Buses, driveshaft protection. Any driveshaft extending lengthways under the floor of the passenger compartment of a bus...

  13. 49 CFR 392.62 - Safe operation, buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Safe operation, buses. 392.62 Section 392.62... VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.62 Safe operation, buses. No person shall drive a bus and a motor carrier shall not require or permit a person to drive a bus unless— (a) All standees on the bus...

  14. 49 CFR 392.63 - Towing or pushing loaded buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Towing or pushing loaded buses. 392.63 Section 392... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.63 Towing or pushing loaded buses. No disabled bus with passengers aboard shall be towed or pushed; nor shall any person use or permit to be used a bus...

  15. 49 CFR 393.91 - Buses, aisle seats prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buses, aisle seats prohibited. 393.91 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.91 Buses, aisle seats prohibited. No bus shall be equipped with aisle seats unless such seats are so designed and installed as...

  16. 49 CFR 393.90 - Buses, standee line or bar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buses, standee line or bar. 393.90 Section 393.90... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.90 Buses, standee line or bar. Except as provided below, every bus, which is designed and constructed so as to allow standees, shall...

  17. 49 CFR 392.63 - Towing or pushing loaded buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Towing or pushing loaded buses. 392.63 Section 392... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.63 Towing or pushing loaded buses. No disabled bus with passengers aboard shall be towed or pushed; nor shall any person use or permit to be used a bus...

  18. 49 CFR 393.89 - Buses, driveshaft protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buses, driveshaft protection. 393.89 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.89 Buses, driveshaft protection. Any driveshaft extending lengthways under the floor of the passenger compartment of a bus...

  19. 49 CFR 393.91 - Buses, aisle seats prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buses, aisle seats prohibited. 393.91 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.91 Buses, aisle seats prohibited. No bus shall be equipped with aisle seats unless such seats are so designed and installed as...

  20. 49 CFR 392.63 - Towing or pushing loaded buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Towing or pushing loaded buses. 392.63 Section 392... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.63 Towing or pushing loaded buses. No disabled bus with passengers aboard shall be towed or pushed; nor shall any person use or permit to be used a bus...

  1. 49 CFR 392.63 - Towing or pushing loaded buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Towing or pushing loaded buses. 392.63 Section 392... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.63 Towing or pushing loaded buses. No disabled bus with passengers aboard shall be towed or pushed; nor shall any person use or permit to be used a bus...

  2. 49 CFR 392.62 - Safe operation, buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safe operation, buses. 392.62 Section 392.62... VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.62 Safe operation, buses. No person shall drive a bus and a motor carrier shall not require or permit a person to drive a bus unless— (a) All standees on the bus...

  3. 46 CFR 111.30-19 - Buses and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buses and wiring. 111.30-19 Section 111.30-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-19 Buses and wiring. (a) General. Each bus must meet the requirements...

  4. 46 CFR 111.30-19 - Buses and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buses and wiring. 111.30-19 Section 111.30-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-19 Buses and wiring. (a) General. Each bus must meet the requirements...

  5. 46 CFR 111.30-19 - Buses and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Buses and wiring. 111.30-19 Section 111.30-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-19 Buses and wiring. (a) General. Each bus must meet the requirements...

  6. 46 CFR 111.30-19 - Buses and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buses and wiring. 111.30-19 Section 111.30-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-19 Buses and wiring. (a) General. Each bus must meet the requirements...

  7. 49 CFR 393.90 - Buses, standee line or bar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Buses, standee line or bar. 393.90 Section 393.90... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.90 Buses, standee line or bar. Except as provided below, every bus, which is designed and constructed so as to allow standees, shall...

  8. 49 CFR 392.62 - Safe operation, buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safe operation, buses. 392.62 Section 392.62... VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.62 Safe operation, buses. No person shall drive a bus and a motor carrier shall not require or permit a person to drive a bus unless— (a) All standees on the bus...

  9. 49 CFR 393.90 - Buses, standee line or bar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buses, standee line or bar. 393.90 Section 393.90... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.90 Buses, standee line or bar. Except as provided below, every bus, which is designed and constructed so as to allow standees, shall...

  10. Whites' Opposition to "Busing": Self-Interest of Symbolic Politics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, David O.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines whether opposition to busing springs from self-interest (such as having children susceptible to busing) or merely racial attitudes on the part of those not involved. Concludes that self-interest is overestimated as a determinant of public opinion. Available from The American Political Science Association, 1527 New Hampshire Ave., N.W.,…

  11. Big Brother Is Watching: Video Surveillance on Buses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloggett, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Many school districts in North America have adopted policies to permit cameras on their properties and, when needed, on buses used to transport students. With regard to school buses, the camera is typically a tool for gathering information to monitor behavior or to help investigate a complaint about behavior. If a picture is worth a thousand…

  12. School Buses Answer Calls for Help in Crises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2005-01-01

    Five days after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, a convoy of 142 air-conditioned school buses from the 209,000-student Texas district rumbled to life. Loaded with food and bottled water, staffed by 350 school employees, and accompanied by bus-repair trucks and a phalanx of school police cars, the yellow buses traveled all night to reach the…

  13. Evaluation of Resource Acquisition Approaches : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, Maura L.; Mortimer, Tom; Palermini, Debbi; Nelson, Kari

    1991-09-12

    Over the last few years, Bonneville has been addressing this need and has developed numerous ways of acquiring resources. Four of these Approaches, the Competitive Acquisition, Billing Credits, and Targeted Acquisition Programs, and the Cowlitz Falls Hydroelectric Project, were the subject of this evaluation project. Each Approach is currently in different stages of a process, and Bonneville felt it was an appropriate time that an evaluation be conducted. The purpose of this evaluation is to analyze the various Approaches` processes, to learn what`s working and what`s not, and to offer recommendations as to how Bonneville might improve their resources acquisition efforts. The evaluation was conducted with no preconceived biases.

  14. The PIE Institute Project: Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark; Carroll, Becky; Helms, Jen; Smith, Anita

    2008-01-01

    The Playful Invention and Exploration (PIE) Institute project was funded in 2005 by the National Science Foundation (NSF). For the past three years, Inverness Research has served as the external evaluator for the PIE project. The authors' evaluation efforts have included extensive observation and documentation of PIE project activities; ongoing…

  15. Evaluation Model for Career Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Richard L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to provide and test an evaluative model that could be utilized in providing curricular evaluation of the various career programs. Two career fields, dental assistant and auto mechanic, were chosen for study. A questionnaire based upon the actual job performance was completed by six groups connected with the auto mechanics and…

  16. High strength composites evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  17. IUC/OCLC Network Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat Research, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    The operation of the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC) on-line bibliographic system in Texas and New Mexico Libraries was evaluated. The economic aspects of automated cataloging and card production were compared with previous methods; the effectiveness of the system as a tool for pre-order searching was evaluated; and the impact of the system's…

  18. Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Alleman, T. L.

    2005-08-01

    Document details the evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch diesel, a gas-to-liquid fuel, in medium-duty delivery vehicles at Yosemite Waters. The study was conducted by NREL at the company's Fullerton, California, bottling headquarters.

  19. [Energy Conservation and Emissions Reduction Benefits Analysis for Battery Electric Buses Based on Travel Services].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-dan; Tian, Liang; Lü, Bin; Yang, Jian-xin

    2015-09-01

    Battery Electric Bus (BEB) has become one of prior options of urban buses for its "zero emission" during the driving stage. However, the environmental performance of electric buses is affected by multi-factors from the point of whole life cycle. In practice, carrying capacity of BEB and power generation structures can both implement evident effects on the energy consumption and pollutants emission of BEB. Therefore, take the above factors into consideration, in this article, Life Cycle Assessment is employed to evaluate the energy conservation and emissions reduction benefits of BEB. Results indicate that, travel service is more reasonable as the functional unit, rather than mileage, since the carrying capacity of BEB is 15% lower than the diesel buses. Moreover, compared with diesel buses, the energy conservation and emissions reduction benefits of battery electric buses are all different due to different regional power structures. Specifically, the energy benefits are 7. 84%, 11. 91%, 26. 90%, 11. 15%, 19. 55% and 20. 31% respectively in Huabei, Huadong, Huazhong, Dongbei, Xibei and Nanfang power structure. From the point of comprehensive emissions reduction benefits, there is no benefit in Huabei power structure, as it depends heavily on coal. But in other areas, the comprehensive emissions reduction benefits of BEB are separately 3. 46%, 26. 81%, 1. 17%, 13. 74% and 17. 48% in Huadong, Huazhong, Dongbei, Xibei and Nanfang. Therefore, it suggests that, enlargement of carrying capacity should be taken as the most prior technology innovation direction for BEB, and the grids power structure should be taken into consideration when the development of BEB is in planning.

  20. Adolescent Vocational Exploration. Final Evaluation Report 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAGI Educational Services, Inc., Larchmont, NY.

    The 1985 evaluation of the Adolescent Vocational Exploration Program (AVE) found that this New York State Department of Labor intervention and pre-employment project has been successful in increasing young people's chances of gaining employment and functioning productively in the labor market. Primarily for 14- and 15-year-olds, AVE seeks to…

  1. Michigan Occupational Information System Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Eric M.; And Others

    An evaluation of the Michigan Occupational Information System (MOIS) was conducted. (The MOIS is a system designed to provide reliable and current career information organized in a readily accessible system for individuals involved in career exploration and decision making.) Three types of survey instruments (site, staff, and client surveys) were…

  2. Civil Highway Curriculum Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prindiville, Gerald

    The purpose of the civil highway curriculum evaluation was to provide data for course review and revision. As civil engineering is a rapidly changing occupational field, it is important to determine what skills are currently essential for civil highway technicians. The associate degree programs in the four Wisconsin technical institutes offering…

  3. National STEM Consortium Evaluation. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Acting as the lead agency for the "National STEM Consortium" (NSC), Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) engaged Hezel Associates to provide an independent program and impact evaluation of the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL)-funded STEM certificate initiative. This report is comprehensive and covers the findings from all 4 years of the…

  4. Boston Workplace Education Collaborative. Final External Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Mark L.; Pansar, Eleanor

    An evaluation of the Boston Workplace Education Collaborative (BWEC) was conducted during 1989. The BWEC is a partnership among Roxbury Community College, the Boston Private Industry Council, and the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) of Massachusetts to provide workplace literacy educational opportunities…

  5. Adolescent Vocational Exploration. Final Evaluation Report 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAGI Educational Services, Inc., Larchmont, NY.

    The 1985 evaluation of the Adolescent Vocational Exploration Program (AVE) found that this New York State Department of Labor intervention and pre-employment project has been successful in increasing young people's chances of gaining employment and functioning productively in the labor market. Primarily for 14- and 15-year-olds, AVE seeks to…

  6. Porous dike intake evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ketschke, B.A.; Toner, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    The hydraulic performance and screening potential of a porous-dike intake were evaluated in both a laboratory flume and a small-scale field test facility. Two stone sizes were tested, 7.5 cm and 20 cm. Dikes were of gabion construction. The following parameters were evaluated: hydraulic performance, fouling, siltation, zooplankton-screening effectiveness, ichthyoplankton-screening effectiveness, and finfish-screening effectiveness. Flow volume through the porous dike induced by a relatively fixed hydraulic head was dependent upon cross-sectional area (tidal height). Flow resistance increased with time, causing a reduction in flow volume. Flow resistance could be reduced by back flushing. Zooplankton and ichthyoplankton did not appear to avoid entrainment, although some actively-swimming larval fish may avoid entrainment. A high percentage of the entrained plankton is filtered out by the stones or fouling material. Juvenile and adult fish were neither entrained nor impinged by the stone dike.

  7. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

  8. Skeletal and body composition evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mazess, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    Research on radiation detectors for absorptiometry analysis of errors affecting single photon absorptiometry and development of instrumentation, analysis of errors affecting dual photon absorptiometry and development of instrumentation, comparison of skeletal measurements with other techniques, cooperation with NASA projects for skeletal evaluation in spaceflight (Experiment MO-78) and in laboratory studies with immobilized animals, studies of postmenopausal osteoporosis, organization of scientific meetings and workshops on absorptiometric measurement, and development of instrumentation for measurement of fluid shifts in the human body were performed. Instrumentation was developed that allows accurate and precise (2% error) measurements of mineral content in compact and trabecular bone and of the total skeleton. Instrumentation was also developed to measure fluid shifts in the extremities. Radiation exposure with those procedures is low (2-10 MREM). One hundred seventy three technical reports and one hundred and four published papers of studies from the University of Wisconsin Bone Mineral Lab are listed.

  9. Seat Belts in School Buses: Analyzing the Literature and Using the Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splaine, Pam; Frankel, Steven M.

    1987-01-01

    This literature review addresses three specific safety issues: installing seat belts in new buses, retrofitting existing buses with seat belts, and comparing seat belts with other safety features. While inconclusive evidence is provided concerning the first issue, studies do suggest retiring older buses and possibly equipping buses that meet PL…

  10. Waste Form Evaluation Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-09-01

    This report presents data that can be used to assess the acceptability of polyethylene and modified sulfur cement waste forms to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61. The waste streams selected for this study include dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash as representative wastes which result from advanced volume reduction technologies and ion exchange resins which remain problematic for solidification using commercially available matrix materials. Property evaluation tests such as compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, irradiation, biodegradation and leachability were conducted for polyethylene and sulfur cement waste forms over a range of waste-to-binder ratios. Based on the results of the tests, optimal waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash and 30 wt % ion exchange resins were established for polyethylene, although maximum loadings were considerably higher. For modified sulfur cement, optimal loadings of 40 wt % sodium sulfate, 40 wt % boric acid and 40 wt % incinerator ash are reported. Ion exchange resins are not recommended for incorporation into modified sulfur cement because of poor waste form performance even at very low waste concentrations. The results indicate that all waste forms tested within the range of optimal waste concentrations satisifed the requirements of the NRC Technical Position Paper on Waste Form.

  11. Landfill-impact evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-08

    The Army proposes expansion of the building complex and development of the outdoor training area at the Milwaukee USAR Center Complex and Training Area located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Land use history indicates that the Milwaukee Sanitation Department disposed of approximately 500,000 cubic yards of solid wastes on the present complex site between 1957 and 1966. In September of 1984 evaluations were conducted to determine the impact of the landfill on the nearby soils and ground water. Monitoring wells were installed to determine the water quality of the groundwater near the surface of the water table and at depth. During soil borings operations, soil samples were analyzed in the field to determine the presence of hydrocarbons. The air in the bore hole was also analyzed to determine the presence of methane or other hydrocarbons. The impact of the existing landfill on groundwater and surface water quality is small. The higher than expected concentrations of hardness, total dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in some wells which may be due to the landfill, do not warrant recovery or remedial action to cleanup the ground water.

  12. Final report : PATTON Alliance gazetteer evaluation project.

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakly, Denise Rae

    2007-08-01

    In 2005 the National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) proposed that the PATTON Alliance provide assistance in evaluating and obtaining the Integrated Gazetteer Database (IGDB), developed for the Naval Space Warfare Command Research group (SPAWAR) under Advance Research and Development Activity (ARDA) funds by MITRE Inc., fielded to the text-based search tool GeoLocator, currently in use by NGIC. We met with the developers of GeoLocator and identified their requirements for a better gazetteer. We then validated those requirements by reviewing the technical literature, meeting with other members of the intelligence community (IC), and talking with both the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA), the authoritative sources for official geographic name information. We thus identified 12 high-level requirements from users and the broader intelligence community. The IGDB satisfies many of these requirements. We identified gaps and proposed ways of closing these gaps. Three important needs have not been addressed but are critical future needs for the broader intelligence community. These needs include standardization of gazetteer data, a web feature service for gazetteer information that is maintained by NGA and USGS but accessible to users, and a common forum that brings together IC stakeholders and federal agency representatives to provide input to these activities over the next several years. Establishing a robust gazetteer web feature service that is available to all IC users may go a long way toward resolving the gazetteer needs within the IC. Without a common forum to provide input and feedback, community adoption may take significantly longer than anticipated with resulting risks to the war fighter.

  13. Should Seat Belts Be Required on All School Buses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the limited case law involving seat belts for school buses and explores emerging legal issues surrounding use of common law causes of action to challenge school bus safety. (51 footnotes) (MLF)

  14. The School Busing Controversy: Redistributive or Pluralist Politics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Paul E.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the busing controversy, the increasing demand for community control of schools, and the general discontent with the public school system through an analysis of school desegregation in Chicago. (Author)

  15. Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

  16. Get Kids out of Cars and into Your School Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Board Journal, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Briefly describes programs that some school districts have adopted to encourage students (and, in some cases, parents and other members of the community) to use school buses for transportation rather than private cars. (IRT)

  17. Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized its Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide. This assessment addresses the potential carcinogenicity from long-term inhalation exposure to ethylene oxide. Now final, this assessment updates the carcinogenicity information in EPA’s 1985 Hea...

  18. Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized its Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide. This assessment addresses the potential carcinogenicity from long-term inhalation exposure to ethylene oxide. Now final, this assessment updates the carcinogenicity information in EPA’s 1985 Hea...

  19. Predicting Airborne Particle Levels Aboard Washington State School Buses

    PubMed Central

    Adar, Sara D.; Davey, Mark; Sullivan, James R.; Compher, Michael; Szpiro, Adam; Liu, L.-J. Sally

    2008-01-01

    School buses contribute substantially to childhood air pollution exposures yet they are rarely quantified in epidemiology studies. This paper characterizes fine particulate matter (PM2.5) aboard school buses as part of a larger study examining the respiratory health impacts of emission-reducing retrofits. To assess onboard concentrations, continuous PM2.5 data were collected during 85 trips aboard 43 school buses during normal driving routines, and aboard hybrid lead vehicles traveling in front of the monitored buses during 46 trips. Ordinary and partial least square regression models for PM2.5 onboard buses were created with and without control for roadway concentrations, which were also modeled. Predictors examined included ambient PM2.5 levels, ambient weather, and bus and route characteristics. Concentrations aboard school buses (21 μg/m3) were four and two-times higher than ambient and roadway levels, respectively. Differences in PM2.5 levels between the buses and lead vehicles indicated an average of 7 μg/m3 originating from the bus's own emission sources. While roadway concentrations were dominated by ambient PM2.5, bus concentrations were influenced by bus age, diesel oxidative catalysts, and roadway concentrations. Cross validation confirmed the roadway models but the bus models were less robust. These results confirm that children are exposed to air pollution from the bus and other roadway traffic while riding school buses. In-cabin air pollution is higher than roadway concentrations and is likely influenced by bus characteristics. PMID:18985175

  20. Real-time passenger counting in buses using dense stereovision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiaoui, Tarek; Khoudour, Louahdi; Meurie, Cyril

    2010-07-01

    We are interested particularly in the estimation of passenger flows entering or exiting from buses. To achieve this measurement, we propose a counting system based on stereo vision. To extract three-dimensional information in a reliable way, we use a dense stereo-matching procedure in which the winner-takes-all technique minimizes a correlation score. This score is an improved version of the sum of absolute differences, including several similarity criteria determined on pixels or regions to be matched. After calculating disparity maps for each image, morphological operations and a binarization with multiple thresholds are used to localize the heads of people passing under the sensor. The markers describing the heads of the passengers getting on or off the bus are then tracked during the image sequence to reconstitute their trajectories. Finally, people are counted from these reconstituted trajectories. The technique suggested was validated by several realistic experiments. We showed that it is possible to obtain counting accuracy of 99% and 97% on two large realistic data sets of image sequences showing realistic scenarios.

  1. Walking School Buses as a Form of Active Transportation for Children--A Review of the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Liz; Norgate, Sarah H.; Cherrett, Tom; Davies, Nigel; Winstanley, Christopher; Harding, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background: Walking school buses (WSBs) offer a potentially healthier way for children to get to school while reducing traffic congestion. A number of pressing societal challenges make it timely to evaluate evidence of their value. Methods: Studies that focused solely on WSBs were identified through online and manual literature searches. Twelve…

  2. Walking School Buses as a Form of Active Transportation for Children--A Review of the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Liz; Norgate, Sarah H.; Cherrett, Tom; Davies, Nigel; Winstanley, Christopher; Harding, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background: Walking school buses (WSBs) offer a potentially healthier way for children to get to school while reducing traffic congestion. A number of pressing societal challenges make it timely to evaluate evidence of their value. Methods: Studies that focused solely on WSBs were identified through online and manual literature searches. Twelve…

  3. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-09-01

    Second report evaluating a fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL published its first report on the demonstration in February 2014. This report is an update to the previous report; it covers 3 full years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2014 and focuses on the final experiences and lessons learned.

  4. The Evaluation of the Management Assessment Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Joseph J.

    The Management Assessment Center (MAC) of the Dade County (Florida) Public Schools is a unique project, employing multiple techniques to evaluate behavior for school-level administrator personnel selection. This final report of an evaluation deals primarily with issues of the validity and the utility of the MAC. To ascertain validity of the MAC,…

  5. Student Assistance Program Demonstration Project Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, John A.; Houle, Denise M.

    This document presents the final report on the evaluation of California's model student assistance program (SAP) demonstration projects implemented in five locations across the state from July 1989 through June 1992. The report provides an overall, integrated review of the evaluation of the SAP demonstration projects, summarizes important findings…

  6. Final Evaluation for the Neighborhood Educational Cultural Centerette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Patricia

    Contained in this report is the final evaluation for the Neighborhood Educational Cultural Centerette Project. Objectives of the research project were to: (1) investigate, experiment with, create, and evaluate methods of instruction curriculum, and materials; analyze pupil learning styles and teacher-teaching styles; and to provide staff growth…

  7. Update from the NREL Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    1999-05-01

    The object of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty urban transit buses operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Final reports from this project were produced in 1996 from data collection and evaluation of 11 transit buses from eight transit sites. With the publication of these final reports, three issues were raised that needed further investigation: (1) the natural gas engines studied were older, open-loop control engines; (2) propane was not included in the original study; and (3) liquefied natural gas (LNG) was found to be in the early stages of deployment in transit applications. In response to these three issues, the project has continued by emissions testing newer natural gas engines and adding two new data collection sites to study the newer natural gas technology and specifically to measure new technology LNG buses.

  8. Particle and gaseous emissions from individual diesel and CNG buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallquist, Å. M.; Jerksjö, M.; Fallgren, H.; Westerlund, J.; Sjödin, Å.

    2012-10-01

    In this study size-resolved particle and gaseous emissions from 28 individual diesel-fuelled and 7 compressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled buses, selected from an in-use bus fleet, were characterised for real-world dilution scenarios. The method used was based on using CO2 as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. The particles were sampled by using an extractive sampling method and analysed with high time resolution instrumentation EEPS (10 Hz) and CO2 with non-dispersive infrared gas analyser (LI-840, LI-COR Inc. 1 Hz). The gaseous constituents (CO, HC and NO) were measured by using a remote sensing device (AccuScan RSD 3000, Environmental System Products Inc.). Nitrogen oxides, NOx, were estimated from NO by using default NO2/NOx ratios from the road vehicle emission model HBEFA 3.1. The buses studied were diesel-fuelled Euro II-V and CNG-fuelled Enhanced Environmental Friendly Vehicles (EEVs) with different after-treatment, including selective catalytic reduction (SCR), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and with and without diesel particulate filter (DPF). The primary driving mode applied in this study was accelerating mode. However, regarding the particle emissions also a constant speed mode was analysed. The investigated CNG buses emitted on average higher number of particles but less mass compared to the diesel-fuelled buses. Emission factors for number of particles (EFPN) were EFPN, DPF = 8.0 ± 3.1 × 1014, EFPN, no DPF =2.8 ± 1.6 × 1015 and EFPN, CNG = 7.8 ± 5.7 × 1015 (kg fuel-1). In the accelerating mode size-resolved EFs showed unimodal number size distributions with peak diameters of 70-90 nm and 10 nm for diesel and CNG buses, respectively. For the constant speed mode bimodal average number size distributions were obtained for the diesel buses with peak modes of ~10 nm and ~60 nm. Emission factors for NOx expressed as NO2 equivalents for the diesel buses were on average 27 ± 7 g (kg fuel)-1 and for the CNG buses 41 ± 26 g (kg fuel)-1. An anti

  9. Particle and gaseous emissions from individual diesel and CNG buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallquist, Å. M.; Jerksjö, M.; Fallgren, H.; Westerlund, J.; Sjödin, Å.

    2013-05-01

    In this study size-resolved particle and gaseous emissions from 28 individual diesel-fuelled and 7 compressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled buses, selected from an in-use bus fleet, were characterised for real-world dilution scenarios. The method used was based on using CO2 as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. The particles were sampled by using an extractive sampling method and analysed with high time resolution instrumentation EEPS (10 Hz) and CO2 with a non-dispersive infrared gas analyser (LI-840, LI-COR Inc. 1 Hz). The gaseous constituents (CO, HC and NO) were measured by using a remote sensing device (AccuScan RSD 3000, Environmental System Products Inc.). Nitrogen oxides, NOx, were estimated from NO by using default NO2/NOx ratios from the road vehicle emission model HBEFA3.1. The buses studied were diesel-fuelled Euro III-V and CNG-fuelled Enhanced Environmentally Friendly Vehicles (EEVs) with different after-treatment, including selective catalytic reduction (SCR), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and with and without diesel particulate filter (DPF). The primary driving mode applied in this study was accelerating mode. However, regarding the particle emissions also a constant speed mode was analysed. The investigated CNG buses emitted on average a higher number of particles but less mass compared to the diesel-fuelled buses. Emission factors for number of particles (EFPN) were EFPN, DPF = 4.4 ± 3.5 × 1014, EFPN, no DPF = 2.1 ± 1.0 × 1015 and EFPN, CNG = 7.8 ± 5.7 ×1015 kg fuel-1. In the accelerating mode, size-resolved emission factors (EFs) showed unimodal number size distributions with peak diameters of 70-90 nm and 10 nm for diesel and CNG buses, respectively. For the constant speed mode, bimodal average number size distributions were obtained for the diesel buses with peak modes of ~10 nm and ~60 nm. Emission factors for NOx expressed as NO2 equivalents for the diesel buses were on average 27 ± 7 g (kg fuel)-1 and for the CNG buses 41 ± 26 g (kg

  10. Non-CFC air conditioning for transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Parent, Y.O.; Bharathan, D.

    1992-11-01

    In the United Sates, more than 80% of transit city buses are air conditioned. Vapor compression refrigeration systems are standard for air conditioning buses and account for up to 25% of fuel consumption in the cooling season. Vapor compression devices use chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), chemicals that contributes to Earths`s ozone depletion and to global warming. Currently, evaporative cooling is an economical alternative to CFC vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning buses. It does not use CFCs but is restricted in use to arid climates. This limitation can be eliminated by dehumidifying the supply air using desiccants. We studied desiccant systems for cooling transit buses and found that the use of a desiccant-assisted evaporative cooling system is feasible and can deliver the required cooling. The weight and the size of the desiccant system though larger than vapor compression systems, can be easily accommodated within a bus. Fuel consumption for naming desiccant systems was about 70% less than CFC refrigeration system, resulting in payback periods of less than 2.5 years under most circumstances. This preliminary study indicated that desiccant systems combined with evaporative cooling is a CFC-free option to vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning of transit buses. The concept is ready to be tested in a fun prototype scale in a commercial bus.

  11. Non-CFC air conditioning for transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Parent, Y.O.; Bharathan, D.

    1992-11-01

    In the United Sates, more than 80% of transit city buses are air conditioned. Vapor compression refrigeration systems are standard for air conditioning buses and account for up to 25% of fuel consumption in the cooling season. Vapor compression devices use chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), chemicals that contributes to Earths's ozone depletion and to global warming. Currently, evaporative cooling is an economical alternative to CFC vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning buses. It does not use CFCs but is restricted in use to arid climates. This limitation can be eliminated by dehumidifying the supply air using desiccants. We studied desiccant systems for cooling transit buses and found that the use of a desiccant-assisted evaporative cooling system is feasible and can deliver the required cooling. The weight and the size of the desiccant system though larger than vapor compression systems, can be easily accommodated within a bus. Fuel consumption for naming desiccant systems was about 70% less than CFC refrigeration system, resulting in payback periods of less than 2.5 years under most circumstances. This preliminary study indicated that desiccant systems combined with evaporative cooling is a CFC-free option to vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning of transit buses. The concept is ready to be tested in a fun prototype scale in a commercial bus.

  12. Evaluation of Learning Money Matters (LMM). Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielhofer, Thomas; Kerr, David; Gardiner, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the final findings of research carried out by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER), as part of an independent evaluation on behalf of pfeg, of the Learning Money Matters (LMM) initiative. LMM provides help, support and advice for secondary schools in delivering personal finance education (PFE) to their…

  13. Development and Evaluation of the Science Careers Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Iris R.

    This report discusses the development of the Science Careers Program (SCP), describes the final product, presents the results of an evaluation study of the program, and discusses plans for dissemination. SCP is aimed at increasing the career relevance of science education for all students in grades 4-9, while at the same time particularly…

  14. Evaluation of the Farm Training Program in Wisconsin. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox Valley Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education District, Appleton, WI.

    The final report presents the findings of an evaluation project set up to obtain reactions to the farm training program in Wisconsin from trainees and instructors. Two hundred and fifty farmers were selected for personal interviews on their respective farms. Each interview session lasted approximately 50 minutes. Data were obtained from the…

  15. Evaluation of Navajo Community College, Summary. Final Report June, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Training and Technical Assistance Corp., Berkeley, CA.

    The final report represented a culmination of a 2 year assessment of the operation and impact of the first institution of higher learning under Indian control, Navajo Community College (CC) at Many Farms, Arizona. The major portion of the data were collected from July, 1970 - May, 1971, although conclusions can be based on evaluation which began…

  16. Head Start/EPSDT Collaboration Evaluation: Final Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Georgia; Sims, Robert

    This is the executive summary of the final report on the first year evaluation of the Head Start/Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) Collaborative Effort, a demonstration program initiated by the Office of Child Development (OCD)/HEW in 1974. In initiating the program, OCD/HEW set forth the following objectives:…

  17. Head Start/EPSDT Collaboration Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Young and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.

    This is the final report on the first year evaluation of the Head Start/Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) Collaborative Effort, a demonstration program that was initiated by the Office of Child Development OCD/HEW in 1974. In initiating the program, OCD/HEW set forth the following objectives: (1) to assess the…

  18. National Evaluation of the PUSH for Excellence Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Saundra R.; And Others

    This final report for the PUSH-EXCEL project was designed to provide readers with an idea of the major actors and events that shaped the project's history and implementation, and to describe results of a 3-year evaluation of its impact (Chapter 1). Chapter 2 describes the original impetus for PUSH-EXCEL as arising from the Reverend Jesse Jackson's…

  19. Latin American Literacy Partnership Project. Final Formative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, David L. E.

    This final evaluation of the 1991-92 program year of the Latin American literacy Project, designed to foster English language literacy in Spanish-speaking families in Canada, is intended as a formative report, American Literacy Project is intended as a formative report, assessing the changes in the students' language proficiency and the progress…

  20. Entrepreneurship Education in the Arab States. Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamloumi, Jilani

    2013-01-01

    The report involves the findings of the final evaluation of the regional entrepreneurship education project in Arab States component II (2011-2012) (see ED560497), which is a joint activity between UNESCO and StratREAL Foundation. It aims to help the development of educational policies enabling the integration of entrepreneurship education within…

  1. Traco Final Exam and Course Evaluation | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Numerous registrants have requested a certificate upon completion of the TRACO course.  To obtain a certificate you MUST answer 17 of the 26 questions listed below correctly AND you MUST complete the course evaluation.  In the final examination, 1 question is derived from each of the 1-hour lectures.  

  2. An Evaluation of the Favorable Alternate Sites Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Deborah; Vencill, Mary

    This final report describes and evaluates the Favorable Alternate Sites Project (FASP), developed in response to the oversettlement of refugees (particularly Southeast Asian refugees) in particular areas of the country. The project's goals were to reduce welfare dependency, increase the ability of FASP refugees to be self-supporting, and reduce…

  3. Peer Dynamics Final Evaluation Report. 1979/1980. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cathy; Walker, Connie

    This is Part I of a final evaluation of a program designed to reduce the incidence of destructive risk-taking behavior (e.g. drug-alcohol abuse, and juvenile delinquency) among school-age youth. Background research indicates that peer group pressure is the single most important factor in dictating the presence or absence of juvenile delinquency…

  4. An Evaluation of the Comp-Lab Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epes, Mary; And Others

    This final report summarizes an extensive evaluation of the COMP-LAB project, a course which integrates carefully defined classroom instruction with an autotutorial writing laboratory for teaching basic writing and rhetoric, particularly to students impaired by foreign language or nonstandard speech. Information on the project background and the…

  5. Special Education Evaluation Project for University Affiliated Facilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrello, Leonard C.; And Others

    The final report of the Special Education Evaluation Project for 16 University Affiliated Facilities (UAF) centers provides a chronological review of the project which focused on the training of persons to work with mentally retarded or other handicapped individuals. Outlined are project objectives including the development of descriptors useful…

  6. Final postflight hardware evaluation report RSRM-28 (STS-53)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrett, William David, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The final report for the Clearfield disassembly evaluation and a continuation of the KSC postflight assessment for the RSRM-28 (STS-53) RSRM flight set is presented. All observed hardware conditions were documented on PFOR's and are included in Appendices A through C. Appendices D and E contain the measurements and safety factor data for the nozzle and insulation components. This report, along with the KSC Ten-Day Postflight Hardware Evaluation Report (TWR-64215), represents a summary of the RSRM-28 hardware evaluation. The as-flown hardware configuration is documented in TWR-63638. Disassembly evaluation photograph numbers are logged in TWA-1989. The RSRM-28 flight set disassembly evaluations described were performed at the RSRM Refurbishment Facility in Clearfield, Utah. The final factory joint demate occurred on July 15, 1993. Additional time was required to perform the evaluation of the stiffener rings per special issue 4.1.5.2 because of the washout schedule. The release of this report was after completion of all special issues per program management direction. Detailed evaluations were performed in accordance with the Clearfield PEEP, TWR-50051, Revision A. All observations were compared against limits that are also defined in the PEEP. These limits outline the criteria for categorizing the observations as acceptable, reportable, or critical. Hardware conditions that were unexpected and/or determined to be reportable or critical were evaluated by the applicable team and tracked through the PFAR system.

  7. 48 CFR 225.7004 - Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses. 225.7004 Section 225.7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on acquisition of foreign buses....

  8. 48 CFR 225.7004 - Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses. 225.7004 Section 225.7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on acquisition of foreign buses....

  9. 48 CFR 225.7004 - Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses. 225.7004 Section 225.7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on acquisition of foreign buses....

  10. 48 CFR 225.7004 - Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses. 225.7004 Section 225.7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on acquisition of foreign buses....

  11. 48 CFR 225.7004 - Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses. 225.7004 Section 225.7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on acquisition of foreign buses....

  12. The Social Adjustment of Neighborhood and Bused Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willie, Charles V.

    A study was conducted during the 1964-65 school year to determine the kinds of social adaptation made by inner-city black children who were bused to two middle-class, predominantly white elementary schools and by white students new to the same schools. Two-way social adjustment ratings (from students and teachers) were obtained on about half of…

  13. EPA Rebates Will Fund Cleaner School Buses in 85 Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced the award of more than $7 million in rebates to replace or retrofit 400 older diesel school buses. The rebates are going to 85 school bus fleets in 35 states, each of which

  14. The Social Adjustment of Neighborhood and Bused Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willie, Charles V.

    A study was conducted during the 1964-65 school year to determine the kinds of social adaptation made by inner-city black children who were bused to two middle-class, predominantly white elementary schools and by white students new to the same schools. Two-way social adjustment ratings (from students and teachers) were obtained on about half of…

  15. The Politics of School Busing: Contextual Effects and Community Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherford, M. Stephen

    1980-01-01

    Establishes the existence of a contextual effect on attitudes toward busing and proposes a simple model of the interaction process through which the social environment influences individual attitudes. Available from "The Journal of Politics," University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. (Author/IRT)

  16. Life Cycle Assessment of Diesel and Electric Public Transportation Buses

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act identifies diesel powered motor vehicles, including transit buses, as significant sources of several criteria pollutants which contribute to ground level ozone formation or smog. The effects of air pollution in urban areas are often more significant due to con...

  17. A Model Involving the Public's Perception of Busing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessey, Gary

    In this review of the effect of busing the methodology used is a content analysis of articles and documents from educational journals, the New York Times, and transcripts of Congressional Hearings. An analysis of these sources revealed that the bulk of the material is often confusing sometimes contradictory, and usually unsubstantiated. The…

  18. Buses and Advertising: A Unique Way to Raise Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Tracy

    1996-01-01

    Colorado Springs (Colorado) School District 11 was the first to offer advertising opportunities via its school buses. This action was taken after new investment policies, self-insurance, contracting out, and salary freezes proved inadequate to offset voters' reluctance to increase taxes. Opposition was limited, due to strong community support and…

  19. Perspectives on Busing. Inequality in Education, Number Eleven, March 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Center for Law and Education.

    Contents of this issue of "Inequality in Education" include: (1) "Busing is not the issue," Reubin Askew, Governor of Florida; (2) "Pupil transportation: a brief history," Paul V. Smith; (3) "White parents' fears," Patricia Derian, which discusses the desegregation of the schools in Jackson, Mississippi in the late 1960's from the point of view of…

  20. Busing in Boston: Political Issues. Comparing Political Experiences, Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Judith A.; Lazarus, Stuart

    Unit two to the second-semester "Comparing Political Experiences" course focuses on a specific controversial political issue: court-ordered busing in Boston. A documentary approach represents the core of instruction in this 12th-grade unit. This approach avoids lengthy narratives of a theoretical approach and yet is more in-depth than…

  1. Fuels for urban transit buses: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joshua T; Hammitt, James K; Levy, Jonathan I

    2003-04-15

    Public transit agencies have begun to adopt alternative propulsion technologies to reduce urban transit bus emissions associated with conventional diesel (CD) engines. Among the most popular alternatives are emission controlled diesel buses (ECD), defined here to be buses with continuously regenerating diesel particle filters burning low-sulfur diesel fuel, and buses burning compressed natural gas (CNG). This study uses a series of simplifying assumptions to arrive at first-order estimates for the incremental cost-effectiveness (CE) of ECD and CNG relative to CD. The CE ratio numerator reflects acquisition and operating costs. The denominator reflects health losses (mortality and morbidity) due to primary particulate matter (PM), secondary PM, and ozone exposure, measured as quality adjusted life years (QALYs). We find that CNG provides larger health benefits than does ECD (nine vs six QALYs annually per 1000 buses) but that ECD is more cost-effective than CNG (dollar 270 000 per QALY for ECD vs dollar 1.7 million to dollar 2.4 million for CNG). These estimates are subject to much uncertainty. We identify assumptions that contribute most to this uncertainty and propose potential research directions to refine our estimates.

  2. 19. PLAN AND SECTION DRAWINGS OF ELECTRICAL SWITCH GEAR, BUSES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. PLAN AND SECTION DRAWINGS OF ELECTRICAL SWITCH GEAR, BUSES AND OTHER EQUIPMENT, AS INSTALLED IN POWERHOUSE Switchboard and Low Tension Bus Structure, drawing E1703. Drawn by L. M. Brown for the Washington Water Power Company, March 15, 1924. - Enloe Dam, Power House, On Similkameen River, Oroville, Okanogan County, WA

  3. The Busing Game. Working Paper Series, W2-30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Allen C.

    This monograph provides a format for teaching about busing, either to prospective teachers or to students, on all levels of the educational process. A model is developed that can be used by students themselves in the development of methods of improving human relations and studying problems of democracy and American life. The model presented here…

  4. No Breathing in the Aisles: Diesel Exhaust inside School Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Gina M.; Campbell, Todd R.; Feuer, Gail Ruderman; Masters, Julie; Samkian, Artineh; Paul, Kavita Ann

    There is evidence that diesel exhaust causes cancer and premature death, and also exacerbates asthma and other respiratory illness. Noting that the vast majority of the nation's school buses run on diesel fuel, this report details a study examining the level of diesel exhaust to which children are typically exposed as they travel to and from…

  5. Life Cycle Assessment of Diesel and Electric Public Transportation Buses

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act identifies diesel powered motor vehicles, including transit buses, as significant sources of several criteria pollutants which contribute to ground level ozone formation or smog. The effects of air pollution in urban areas are often more significant due to con...

  6. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Quasi-In-Motion Wireless Power Transfer for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Transit Buses from Fleet Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lijuan; Gonder, Jeff; Brooker, Aaron; Meintz, Andrew; Konan, Arnaud; Markel, Tony

    2016-05-16

    This study evaluated the costs and benefits associated with the use of stationary-wireless-power-transfer-enabled plug-in hybrid electric buses and determined the cost effectiveness relative to conventional buses and hybrid electric buses. A factorial design was performed over a number of different battery sizes, charging power levels, and f bus stop charging stations. The net present costs were calculated for each vehicle design and provided the basis for design evaluation. In all cases, given the assumed economic conditions, the conventional bus achieved the lowest net present cost while the optimal plug-in hybrid electric bus scenario beat out the hybrid electric comparison scenario. The parameter sensitivity was also investigated under favorable and unfavorable market penetration assumptions.

  7. Final postflight hardware evaluation report RSRM-32 (STS-57)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Greg

    1993-11-01

    This document is the final report for the postflight assessment of the RSRM-32 (STS-57) flight set. This report presents the disassembly evaluations performed at the Thiokol facilities in Utah and is a continuation of the evaluations performed at KSC (TWR-64239). The PEEP for this assessment is outlined in TWR-50051, Revision B. The PEEP defines the requirements for evaluating RSRM hardware. Special hardware issues pertaining to this flight set requiring additional or modified assessment are outlined in TWR-64237. All observed hardware conditions were documented on PFOR's which are included in Appendix A. Observations were compared against limits defined in the PEEP. Any observation that was categorized as reportable or had no defined limits was documented on a preliminary PFAR by the assessment engineers. Preliminary PFAR's were reviewed by the Thiokol SPAT Executive Board to determine if elevation to PFAR's was required.

  8. Final postflight hardware evaluation report RSRM-32 (STS-57)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, Greg

    1993-01-01

    This document is the final report for the postflight assessment of the RSRM-32 (STS-57) flight set. This report presents the disassembly evaluations performed at the Thiokol facilities in Utah and is a continuation of the evaluations performed at KSC (TWR-64239). The PEEP for this assessment is outlined in TWR-50051, Revision B. The PEEP defines the requirements for evaluating RSRM hardware. Special hardware issues pertaining to this flight set requiring additional or modified assessment are outlined in TWR-64237. All observed hardware conditions were documented on PFOR's which are included in Appendix A. Observations were compared against limits defined in the PEEP. Any observation that was categorized as reportable or had no defined limits was documented on a preliminary PFAR by the assessment engineers. Preliminary PFAR's were reviewed by the Thiokol SPAT Executive Board to determine if elevation to PFAR's was required.

  9. Cost-benefit analysis of safety belts in Texas school buses.

    PubMed

    Begley, C E; Biddle, A K

    1988-01-01

    Although safety belts have been shown to reduce the risk of serious injury or death in automobile crashes, evidence of their effectiveness in school buses is uncertain. In this paper, the potential costs and benefits of mandatory safety belts in Texas school buses are estimated, based on the assumption that their effectiveness is less than or equal to rear seatbelt effectiveness in autos. Costs are based on both retrofitting old buses with belts and installing them in new buses. Benefits include the direct and indirect (forgone earnings) cost-savings from preventable injuries and fatalities. Results indicate that a law mandating safety belts in Texas school buses would not be cost-beneficial. Annual benefits would exceed the annual costs of installing belts in new school buses. However, the benefits would not be large enough to compensate for the five-year costs associated with retrofitting old buses.

  10. Fine urban and precursor emissions control for diesel urban transit buses.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Particulate emission from diesel engines is one of the most important pollutants in urban areas. As a result, particulate emission control from urban bus diesel engines using particle filter technology is being evaluated at several locations in the US. A project entitled "Clean Diesel Air Quality Demonstration Program" has been initiated by the New York City Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) under the supervision of New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and with active participation from Johnson Matthey, Corning, Equilon, Environment Canada and RAD Energy. Under this program, several MTA transit buses with DDC Series 50 engines were equipped with Continuously Regenerating Technology (CRTTM) particulate filter systems and have been operated with ultra low sulfur diesel (<30 ppm S) in transit service in Manhattan since February 2000. These buses were evaluated over a 9-month period for durability and maintainability of the particulate filter. In addition, an extensive emissions testing program was carried out using transient cycles on a chassis dynamometer to evaluate the emissions reductions obtained with the particle filter. In this paper, the emissions testing data from the Clean Diesel Air Quality Demonstration Program are discussed in detail.

  11. Adopting Clean Fuels and Technologies on School Buses. Pollution and Health Impacts in Children

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Jennifer; Sheppard, Lianne; Kaufman, Joel D.; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Davey, Mark E.; Sullivan, James R.; Jahnke, Jordan; Koenig, Jane; Larson, Timothy V.; Liu, L. J. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: More than 25 million American children breathe polluted air on diesel school buses. Emission reduction policies exist, but the health impacts to individual children have not been evaluated. Methods: Using a natural experiment, we characterized the exposures and health of 275 school bus riders before, during, and after the adoption of clean technologies and fuels between 2005 and 2009. Air pollution was measured during 597 trips on 188 school buses. Repeated measures of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), lung function (FEV1, FVC), and absenteeism were also collected monthly (1,768 visits). Mixed-effects models longitudinally related the adoption of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs), closed crankcase ventilation systems (CCVs), ultralow-sulfur diesel (ULSD), or biodiesel with exposures and health. Measurements and Main Results: Fine and ultrafine particle concentrations were 10–50% lower on buses using ULSD, DOCs, and/or CCVs. ULSD adoption was also associated with reduced FeNO (−16% [95% confidence interval (CI), −21 to −10%]), greater changes in FVC and FEV1 (0.02 [95% CI, 0.003 to 0.05] and 0.01 [95% CI, −0.006 to 0.03] L/yr, respectively), and lower absenteeism (−8% [95% CI, −16.0 to −0.7%]), with stronger associations among patients with asthma. DOCs, and to a lesser extent CCVs, also were associated with improved FeNO, FVC growth, and absenteeism, but these findings were primarily restricted to patients with persistent asthma and were often sensitive to control for ULSD. No health benefits were noted for biodiesel. Extrapolating to the U.S. population, changed fuel/technologies likely reduced absenteeism by more than 14 million/yr. Conclusions: National and local diesel policies appear to have reduced children’s exposures and improved health. PMID:25867003

  12. Adopting Clean Fuels and Technologies on School Buses. Pollution and Health Impacts in Children.

    PubMed

    Adar, Sara D; D'Souza, Jennifer; Sheppard, Lianne; Kaufman, Joel D; Hallstrand, Teal S; Davey, Mark E; Sullivan, James R; Jahnke, Jordan; Koenig, Jane; Larson, Timothy V; Liu, L J Sally

    2015-06-15

    More than 25 million American children breathe polluted air on diesel school buses. Emission reduction policies exist, but the health impacts to individual children have not been evaluated. Using a natural experiment, we characterized the exposures and health of 275 school bus riders before, during, and after the adoption of clean technologies and fuels between 2005 and 2009. Air pollution was measured during 597 trips on 188 school buses. Repeated measures of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), lung function (FEV1, FVC), and absenteeism were also collected monthly (1,768 visits). Mixed-effects models longitudinally related the adoption of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs), closed crankcase ventilation systems (CCVs), ultralow-sulfur diesel (ULSD), or biodiesel with exposures and health. Fine and ultrafine particle concentrations were 10-50% lower on buses using ULSD, DOCs, and/or CCVs. ULSD adoption was also associated with reduced FeNO (-16% [95% confidence interval (CI), -21 to -10%]), greater changes in FVC and FEV1 (0.02 [95% CI, 0.003 to 0.05] and 0.01 [95% CI, -0.006 to 0.03] L/yr, respectively), and lower absenteeism (-8% [95% CI, -16.0 to -0.7%]), with stronger associations among patients with asthma. DOCs, and to a lesser extent CCVs, also were associated with improved FeNO, FVC growth, and absenteeism, but these findings were primarily restricted to patients with persistent asthma and were often sensitive to control for ULSD. No health benefits were noted for biodiesel. Extrapolating to the U.S. population, changed fuel/technologies likely reduced absenteeism by more than 14 million/yr. National and local diesel policies appear to have reduced children's exposures and improved health.

  13. Passive solar design: final evaluation, the Passive Studio

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, Duncan S.; Rose, Stuart

    1980-08-01

    The further evaluation of the workshops in passive design for practicing architects and engineers through delayed interviews with a sample of the participants is reported with particular emphasis on the extent to which the participants have practiced passive design in the three-four months since attending. Also discussed is an unsuccessful attempt to conduct a lower-cost version of the program outside of normal office hours. Finally, the follow-on programs and improvements that the interviews indicated are needed are identified. (MHR)

  14. Weatherization works: Final report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kinney, L.F.

    1994-09-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation`s largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year (supplemented by data from 1991-92). The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it (1) saves energy, (2) lowers fuel bills, and (3) improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years.

  15. Weatherization Works: Final Report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    2001-02-01

    In 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation's largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year. The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it saves energy, lowers fuel bills, and improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years. The Program's mission is to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families--particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Substantial progress has been made, but the job is far from over. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports that the average low-income family spends 12 percent of its income on residential energy, compared to only 3% for the average-income family. Homes where low-income families live also have a greater need for energy efficiency improvements, but less money to pay for them.

  16. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew; Gikakis, Christina

    2015-12-11

    This report, published annually, summarizes the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discusses the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. Various stakeholders, including FCEB developers, transit agencies, and system integrators, have expressed the value of this annual status report, which provides a summary of results from evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The annual status report tracks the progress of the FCEB industry toward meeting technical targets, documents the lessons learned, and discusses the path forward for commercial viability of fuel cell technology for transit buses. The 2015 summary results primarily focus on the most recent year for each demonstration, from August 2014 through July 2015. The results for these buses account for more than 1,045,000 miles traveled and 83,000 hours of fuel cell power system operation. The primary results presented in the report are from two demonstrations of fuel-cell-dominant bus designs: the Zero Emission Bay Area Demonstration Group led by Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) in California and the American Fuel Cell Bus Project at SunLine Transit Agency in California.

  17. A Preliminary Assessment of Pollution from Passenger Cars and Buses at Stapleton International Airport,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    CARS AND BUSES AT T.. (U) EDERAL AVIATION I ADMINISTRATION UASHINGTON DC...8217~~~~~~~~~~~~...- ..,.. ,-.-. .. . - ,- ,.. .-....,. .,. ... ..... ... ,......,.......,... .... -... ..-... ’.. ; , A PRELIMNARY ASSESSMENT OF POLLUTION FROM PASSENGER CARS AND BUSES AT STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT U. S. Department of...July 1986 • 6. Performing Organization Code CARS AND BUSES AT STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 7.___8. Performing Organization Report No. 7. Aut

  18. On-road measurement of regulated pollutants from diesel and CNG buses with urea selective catalytic reduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiadong; Ge, Yunshan; Hao, Lijun; Tan, Jianwei; Li, Jiaqiang; Feng, Xiangyu

    2014-12-01

    In this study, emissions from 13 buses operated in Beijing, including two Euro-III diesel buses, four Euro-IV diesel buses, three Euro-V diesel buses and four Euro-V CNG buses, were characterized in real world conditions. All of the buses tested were fitted with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems except for the Euro-III diesel buses. A SEMTECH-DS was used for testing the gaseous pollutants, and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI) was used for measuring of particle numbers and size distributions. A comparison was made based on emission performance of these buses by employing the VSP approach and fuel- based emissions factors. Diesel buses emitted less CO and THC but more NOx and PM pollutants than CNG buses. The NOx reduction efficiencies of the SCR systems for CNG buses were higher because of the high exhaust temperature and high NO2/NOx ratio, whereas the efficiencies for diesel buses were lower. This resulted in extremely low NOx emissions from CNG buses, but the high NO2/NOx ratio needs further study. Failures of urea injection in the SCR systems were detected in this research, which resulted in very high NOx emissions. The CNG buses also emitted smaller numbers of particles and less particle mass with the presence of oxidation catalysts. Diesel buses satisfying the Euro-V standard performed better than Euro-IV and Euro-III diesel buses in terms of emission performance, except for more nuclei mode particles. Most of time, the Euro-IV diesel buses show no advantages in CO and NOx emissions compared with the Euro-III diesel buses.

  19. High Energy Batteries for Hybrid Buses

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Lu

    2010-12-31

    EnerDel batteries have already been employed successfully for electric vehicle (EV) applications. Compared to EV applications, hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) bus applications may be less stressful, but are still quite demanding, especially compared to battery applications for consumer products. This program evaluated EnerDel cell and pack system technologies with three different chemistries using real world HEV-Bus drive cycles recorded in three markets covering cold, hot, and mild climates. Cells were designed, developed, and fabricated using each of the following three chemistries: (1) Lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC) - hard carbon (HC); (2) Lithium manganese oxide (LMO) - HC; and (3) LMO - lithium titanium oxide (LTO) cells. For each cell chemistry, battery pack systems integrated with an EnerDel battery management system (BMS) were successfully constructed with the following features: real time current monitoring, cell and pack voltage monitoring, cell and pack temperature monitoring, pack state of charge (SOC) reporting, cell balancing, and over voltage protection. These features are all necessary functions for real-world HEV-Bus applications. Drive cycle test data was collected for each of the three cell chemistries using real world drive profiles under hot, mild, and cold climate conditions representing cities like Houston, Seattle, and Minneapolis, respectively. We successfully tested the battery packs using real-world HEV-Bus drive profiles under these various climate conditions. The NMC-HC and LMO-HC based packs successfully completed the drive cycles, while the LMO-LTO based pack did not finish the preliminary testing for the drive cycles. It was concluded that the LMO-HC chemistry is optimal for the hot or mild climates, while the NMC-HC chemistry is optimal for the cold climate. In summary, the objectives were successfully accomplished at the conclusion of the project. This program provided technical data to DOE and the public for assessing

  20. South Burlington Vermont Career Education Project. Final Financial Status Report and Project Performance Report; Final Evaluation Report, Final Report, January 30, 1979 through June 30, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Burlington School District, VT.

    This document contains the (1) final status report and project performance report and (2) final evaluation report of a career education project to develop a demonstration model to train school personnel to infuse career education into the curriculum. The first report outlines objectives and major activities involving parents, higher education, and…

  1. Fine particle concentrations in buses and taxis in Florence, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondelli, M. Cristina; Chellini, Elisabetta; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Cenni, Isabella; Gasparrini, Antonio; Nava, Silvia; Garcia-Orellana, Isabel; Lupi, Andrea; Grechi, Daniele; Mallone, Sandra; Jantunen, Matti

    On October 2004, a sampling survey was carried out in Florence to estimate urban fine particle exposure concentrations inside commuting vehicles during workdays characterized by heavy traffic. Portable samplers were positioned inside four regularly scheduled diesel-powered buses and four taxis during eight weekdays. Each sampler consisted of a 2.5 μm size pre-separator cyclone, a direct-reading data logging photometer (pDR-1200), and a 4 L min -1 filter sampler for the determination of PM 2.5 mass concentration. Based on reflectance analysis measurements, a PM 2.5 Black Smoke Index was determined for each filter, and the elemental composition of the PM 2.5 was analyzed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). PM 2.5 mass concentrations inside the vehicles correlated well with the urban ambient air PM 2.5 concentrations measured at the fixed-site monitoring stations. The PM 2.5 excess above the urban ambient level was on average 32 μg m -3 (range: 22-52 μg m -3) and 20 μg m -3 (range: 11-29 μg m -3) in buses and taxis, respectively. The PM 2.5-bound sulfur concentration was also higher in the buses than in the taxis. Based on daily Time-Microenvironment-Activity-Diary (TMAD) data, the Florentines spend on average 9.7% of their day in traffic, and the corresponding average exposure is approximately 12% of their daily PM 2.5 personal exposure. The obtained data could be used to plan interventions to minimize the PM 2.5 citizen exposures in commuting.

  2. Evaluation of concepts for safe speed enforcement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luedeke, J.F.; Thompson, R.E.

    1992-04-01

    The final report evaluates the suitability of existing and developmental safe speed enforcement concepts/systems for application to a high-speed maglev control system in the U.S. Requirements, functions and needs are identified and discussed for two major aspects of safe speed enforcement: (1) generation of safe speed commands, and (2) enforcement of safe speed limits as defined by those commands or otherwise imposed upon vehicles. The features, functions and general implementations of selected safe speed concepts utilized in maglev, high-speed rail and conventional rail transit systems, rubber-tired transit systems, and railroad systems are described. Emphasis in the descriptions is given to the general concept used to ensure safe speed and more specific aspects such as vehicle location detection, actual speed detection, safety related communications and implementation/configuration. An assessment is then made as to the suitability of the concepts in meeting the requirements and functions of safe speed enforcement in both long and short stator maglev applications. It is shown that while many of the non-maglev existing safe speed enforcement concepts are not directly applicable as is or with minimal modifications, they do incorporate various aspects and equipment which could fulfill the basic needs of a maglev system relative to safe speed enforcement.

  3. How to Evaluate Career Education: or, Frustrations of a Third Party Evaluator. Excerpts from a Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Carlyle W.

    The materials covered in this report are excerpts from a Final Evaluation Report of a project sponsored by USOE entitled "Articulation of Occupational Orientation, Education, and Placement in Private and Public Elementary, Secondary, and Post-Secondary Schools. The writer was the third party evaluation team Director. Major objectives of the…

  4. [Notes on Busing and School Integration in White Plains, Pasadena, and Harrisburg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Riverside. Western Regional School Desegregation Projects.

    This document includes five articles: (1) "Supt. Hornbeck blasts ten school busing myths, sells system to area realtors," by Tom Livingston and reprinted from the Pasadena "Star-News," Nov. 17, 1971. (2) "How can transportation be assigned so as to limit the burden of busing?", including an introduction by Kathleen…

  5. 76 FR 77888 - Student Transportation of America, Inc.-Control-Dairyland Buses, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... Surface Transportation Board Student Transportation of America, Inc.--Control--Dairyland Buses, Inc... Transaction. SUMMARY: Student Transportation of America, Inc., a motor carrier of passengers (Student Transportation), has filed an application under 49 U.S.C. 14303 for its acquisition of control of Dairyland Buses...

  6. EPA Rebates Will Fund Cleaner School Buses in Three Massachusetts Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Two towns and a public school district in Massachusetts have been selected to receive a total of $240,000 in rebates to help pay for 12 new school buses that emit less pollution than the older buses currently in use.

  7. EPA Rebates Will Fund Cleaner School Buses in Six Connecticut Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Two public schools and four school bus service providers in Connecticut have been selected to receive a total of $525,000 in rebates to help pay for 31 new school buses that emit less pollution than the older buses they now use.

  8. 78 FR 719 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Urban Buses; Request for Waiver of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... certification procedure for hybrid electric buses. The 2002 rulemaking was formally adopted by CARB on September... added optional exhaust emission standards for diesel-fueled hybrid-electric urban bus engines for....\\7\\ The February 2005 rulemaking clarified the optional standards for hybrid-electric buses that were...

  9. Concentrations and risk assessment of selected monoaromatic hydrocarbons in buses and bus stations of Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Chen, Shuguang; Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Xiasheng; Yao, Chaoying; Shen, Xueyou

    2009-03-01

    Air pollution surveys of ten selected monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHCs) were conducted in buses and bus stations in Hangzhou, China. The mean concentrations of MAHCs in the air of buses and bus stations were 95.9 and 36.5 microg/m(3), respectively, of which toluene was the highest in all the sampling sites. Mean concentrations of all MAHCs in buses were statistically higher than those nearby bus stations (p<0.05). MAHCs concentrations in buses largely depend on vehicle conditions (including vehicle type, fuel type, interior decoration, etc.) and traffic conditions (mainly traffic density). Among the investigated buses, microbuses had the highest MAHCs level, while electric buses had the lowest. Buses driven in downtown had the highest MAHCs level, followed by those in suburban areas and tourist areas. The mean concentration ratio of toluene to benzene was 2.1+/-0.9, indicating that vehicle emission was the dominant source of MAHCs. Interior decorations, such as painting and surface coating, could also contribute to the MAHCs in the buses. The mean lifetime carcinogenic risks for passengers and bus drivers were 1.11x10(-5) and 4.00x10(-5), respectively, which were way above the limit set by USEPA. The health risk caused by MAHCs in bus microenvironment should be cautioned.

  10. 78 FR 44112 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Urban Buses; Request for Waiver of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... standards for diesel- fueled hybrid-electric urban bus engines for authorized transit agencies with NO X... clarified the optional standards for hybrid-electric buses that were allowed in the 2004 rulemaking. The... the compliance of 2004 and later model year hybrid electric buses (HEB) with the urban bus standards...

  11. EPA Awards Rebates to 30 States to Replace 210 School Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the award of more than $3 million in rebates to replace 210 older diesel school buses with new buses that are more than 90 percent cleaner, reducing pollutants such as nitrogen.

  12. Boston against Busing: Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the 1960s and 1970s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Formisano, Ronald P.

    This study of the reaction to forced busing in Boston (Massachusetts) that emerged in 1974 illustrates the persistence of race and class discrimination and the counterproductiveness of some imposed solutions. It is focused on white antibusing groups and the complexities of opposition to busing. Racism is essential to understanding the Boston…

  13. 76 FR 53102 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Denial of Petition for Rulemaking; School Buses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ...; Denial of Petition for Rulemaking; School Buses AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration... school buses. We are denying the petition because we have not found a safety problem supporting a Federal... School Bus Safety, Public Citizen, Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety, Consumers Union, Kidsand...

  14. Reexamination of Resegregation: Did Carr Show That Busing Does Not Cause White Flight?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeller, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Examines what Carr found when he investigated the accuracy of David Armor's predictions on the effects of continuing and discontinuing busing in Norfolk (Virginia). Argues against Carr's assertions that because Armor's predictions were in error, there is no White flight in response to busing. (JS)

  15. 26 CFR 41.4483-2 - Exemption for certain transit-type buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption for certain transit-type buses. 41... Certain Highway Motor Vehicles § 41.4483-2 Exemption for certain transit-type buses. (a) In general. Use in any taxable period, or part thereof, of any bus of the transit type by any person who is...

  16. 26 CFR 41.4483-2 - Exemption for certain transit-type buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption for certain transit-type buses. 41... Certain Highway Motor Vehicles § 41.4483-2 Exemption for certain transit-type buses. (a) In general. Use in any taxable period, or part thereof, of any bus of the transit type by any person who is...

  17. 26 CFR 41.4483-2 - Exemption for certain transit-type buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption for certain transit-type buses. 41... Certain Highway Motor Vehicles § 41.4483-2 Exemption for certain transit-type buses. (a) In general. Use in any taxable period, or part thereof, of any bus of the transit type by any person who is...

  18. The Bus Stops Here: The Case for Biodiesel in School Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that diesel exhaust from most of the nation's school buses may be hazardous to children's health. Documents studies on the nature and potential magnitude of the risk to children and proposes replacing petroleum diesel with biodiesel as the fuel for school buses. Presents the merits and practicality of switching to biodiesel as a healthier…

  19. Bay Area Transit Agencies Propel Fuel Cell Buses Toward Commercialization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration of the next generation of fuel cells buses. Several transit agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area are participating in demonstrating the largest single fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States.

  20. A School District Should---Should Not---Own its Buses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olfson, Lewy

    1970-01-01

    Increasing multi-purpose utilization of school buses is forcing costs upward, and some school officials are considering contracting with outside agencies for their transportation needs. Two school business managers air contrasting opinions on ownership vs. leasing of school buses. (DE)

  1. Decreasing Disruptive Behavior among Students on School Buses through Comprehensive School Bus Safety Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jacquelyn

    A practicum was designed to reduce disruptive behavior of students riding school buses in a small multicultural community. It was determined that many students were disruptive when riding the school buses, making it difficult for the bus drivers to ensure riders' safety. The practicum implemented a school bus safety education and public awareness…

  2. Another Look at the "Evidence on Busing." NCRIEEO Newsletter, Volume 3, Number 5, May 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Thomas F.

    Dr. David Armor introduced his paper on "busing" of pupils as busing became the political battleground of American race relations. The paper includes brief descriptions of studies of school desegregation programs in the states of Connecticut, New York, Michigan, and California, together with a more extensive coverage of his own research on a…

  3. The Bus Stops Here: The Case for Biodiesel in School Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that diesel exhaust from most of the nation's school buses may be hazardous to children's health. Documents studies on the nature and potential magnitude of the risk to children and proposes replacing petroleum diesel with biodiesel as the fuel for school buses. Presents the merits and practicality of switching to biodiesel as a healthier…

  4. Reexamination of Resegregation: Did Carr Show That Busing Does Not Cause White Flight?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeller, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Examines what Carr found when he investigated the accuracy of David Armor's predictions on the effects of continuing and discontinuing busing in Norfolk (Virginia). Argues against Carr's assertions that because Armor's predictions were in error, there is no White flight in response to busing. (JS)

  5. A Description of Del Mod and Its Final Evaluation, Final Report, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purnell, Charlotte H.; Bolig, John R.

    This monograph presents an overview of five Del Mod System final reports, comments by the project director, financial structure of the Del Mod System, and descriptions of Del Mod Projects. The Del Mod System was concerned with changing the science and mathematics education programs in the state of Delaware. Between 1970 and 1976, Del Mod conducted…

  6. [Geriatric Authority of Holyoke Workplace Literacy Project.] Final Report. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This final report documents the development of a workplace literacy program for 100 employees of the Geriatric Authority of Holyoke, Massachusetts (GAH), a major nonprofit nursing home and rehabilitation facility. It describes how GAH employees received instruction in English as a Second Language, adult basic education, and General Educational…

  7. Design of a Mobile Low-Cost Sensor Network Using Urban Buses for Real-Time Ubiquitous Noise Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Alsina-Pagès, Rosa Ma; Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; Alías, Francesc; Angulo, Ignacio

    2016-12-29

    One of the main priorities of smart cities is improving the quality of life of their inhabitants. Traffic noise is one of the pollutant sources that causes a negative impact on the quality of life of citizens, which is gaining attention among authorities. The European Commission has promoted the Environmental Noise Directive 2002/49/EC (END) to inform citizens and to prevent the harmful effects of noise exposure. The measure of acoustic levels using noise maps is a strategic issue in the END action plan. Noise maps are typically calculated by computing the average noise during one year and updated every five years. Hence, the implementation of dynamic noise mapping systems could lead to short-term plan actions, besides helping to better understand the evolution of noise levels along time. Recently, some projects have started the monitoring of noise levels in urban areas by means of acoustic sensor networks settled in strategic locations across the city, while others have taken advantage of collaborative citizen sensing mobile applications. In this paper, we describe the design of an acoustic low-cost sensor network installed on public buses to measure the traffic noise in the city in real time. Moreover, the challenges that a ubiquitous bus acoustic measurement system entails are enumerated and discussed. Specifically, the analysis takes into account the feature extraction of the audio signal, the identification and separation of the road traffic noise from urban traffic noise, the hardware platform to measure and process the acoustic signal, the connectivity between the several nodes of the acoustic sensor network to store the data and, finally, the noise maps' generation process. The implementation and evaluation of the proposal in a real-life scenario is left for future work.

  8. Design of a Mobile Low-Cost Sensor Network Using Urban Buses for Real-Time Ubiquitous Noise Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Alsina-Pagès, Rosa Ma; Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; Alías, Francesc; Angulo, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    One of the main priorities of smart cities is improving the quality of life of their inhabitants. Traffic noise is one of the pollutant sources that causes a negative impact on the quality of life of citizens, which is gaining attention among authorities. The European Commission has promoted the Environmental Noise Directive 2002/49/EC (END) to inform citizens and to prevent the harmful effects of noise exposure. The measure of acoustic levels using noise maps is a strategic issue in the END action plan. Noise maps are typically calculated by computing the average noise during one year and updated every five years. Hence, the implementation of dynamic noise mapping systems could lead to short-term plan actions, besides helping to better understand the evolution of noise levels along time. Recently, some projects have started the monitoring of noise levels in urban areas by means of acoustic sensor networks settled in strategic locations across the city, while others have taken advantage of collaborative citizen sensing mobile applications. In this paper, we describe the design of an acoustic low-cost sensor network installed on public buses to measure the traffic noise in the city in real time. Moreover, the challenges that a ubiquitous bus acoustic measurement system entails are enumerated and discussed. Specifically, the analysis takes into account the feature extraction of the audio signal, the identification and separation of the road traffic noise from urban traffic noise, the hardware platform to measure and process the acoustic signal, the connectivity between the several nodes of the acoustic sensor network to store the data and, finally, the noise maps’ generation process. The implementation and evaluation of the proposal in a real-life scenario is left for future work. PMID:28036065

  9. The Busing Controversy. [NAESP] School Leadership Digest [Second Series, Number 6. ERIC/CEM Research Analysis Series, Number 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Dee

    To understand the controversy over busing, it is necessary to understand the relationship between busing and the issues that are actually at the root of the controversy: desegregation and freedom of choice. Much of the political activity surrounding busing is a subtle transfer of attention away from the basic issue of desegregation. Other…

  10. 49 CFR 661.12 - Certification requirement for procurement of buses, other rolling stock and associated equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certification requirement for procurement of buses... AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.12 Certification requirement for procurement of buses, other rolling stock and associated equipment. If buses or other rolling stock (including train control, communication, and...

  11. 49 CFR 661.12 - Certification requirement for procurement of buses, other rolling stock and associated equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Certification requirement for procurement of buses... AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.12 Certification requirement for procurement of buses, other rolling stock and associated equipment. If buses or other rolling stock (including train control, communication, and...

  12. 49 CFR 661.12 - Certification requirement for procurement of buses, other rolling stock and associated equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Certification requirement for procurement of buses... AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.12 Certification requirement for procurement of buses, other rolling stock and associated equipment. If buses or other rolling stock (including train control, communication, and...

  13. 78 FR 2287 - Daimler Buses North America, Inc., a Subsidiary of Daimler North America Corp, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... Employment and Training Administration Daimler Buses North America, Inc., a Subsidiary of Daimler North... Buses North America, Inc. a subsidiary of Daimler North America Corp., including leased workers from... related to the production of transit buses. The notice was published in the Federal Register on October...

  14. Using Task Clarification, Goal Setting, and Feedback to Decrease Table Busing Times in a Franchise Pizza Restaurant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amigo, Seth; Smith, Andrew; Ludwig, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of task-clarification, and manager verbal and graphic feedback on employee busing times at a pizza restaurant. Using an ABC design, task-clarification was provided in a memo, which described the process, priority, and goal time of busing. The busing time decreased slightly, from an average of 315 seconds…

  15. Using Task Clarification, Goal Setting, and Feedback to Decrease Table Busing Times in a Franchise Pizza Restaurant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amigo, Seth; Smith, Andrew; Ludwig, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of task-clarification, and manager verbal and graphic feedback on employee busing times at a pizza restaurant. Using an ABC design, task-clarification was provided in a memo, which described the process, priority, and goal time of busing. The busing time decreased slightly, from an average of 315 seconds…

  16. 76 FR 42762 - Final Written Re-Evaluation for Environmental Impact Statement: Sikorsky Memorial Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) has been completed for Sikorsky Memorial Airport in... Federal Aviation Administration Final Written Re-Evaluation for Environmental Impact Statement: Sikorsky Memorial Airport, Stratford, CT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice...

  17. Interim Evaluation of the National Literacy Program. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resources and Social Development Canada, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation examined issues related to: (1) Rationale and Relevance; (2) Implementation; and (3) Success. In addition, the interim evaluation was intended to: (1) Determine whether sufficient data was being collected to inform the summative evaluation and identify opportunities for improvement to fill any potential gaps; (2) Assess whether the…

  18. Resistojet control and power for high frequency ac buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Resistojets are operational on many geosynchronous communication satellites which all use dc power buses. Multipropellant resistojets were selected for the Initial Operating Capability (IOC) Space Station which will supply 208 V, 20 kHz power. This paper discusses resistojet heater temperature controllers and passive power regulation methods for ac power systems. A simple passive power regulation method suitable for use with regulated sinusoidal or square wave power was designed and tested using the Space Station multipropellant resistojet. The breadboard delivered 20 kHz power to the resistojet heater. Cold start surge current limiting, a power efficiency of 95 percent, and power regulation of better than 2 percent were demonstrated with a two component, 500 W breadboard power controller having a mass of 0.6 kg.

  19. Solar array deployment qualification for the LMX of buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kathy

    2005-07-01

    The solar array deployment system for the LMX line of buses deploys rigid Solar Array Wing Assemblies (SAWAs). Each SAWA has a set of Solar Array Deployment Mechanisms (SADM), which consists of two hinges, a strut, and two Hold Down Release Mechanisms (HDRMs). To qualify the SADM for flight, each mechanism component was qualified individually, then assembled to a qualification SAWA on Special Test Equipment (STE) and deployed in a thermal vacuum chamber at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures. These mechanisms were designed, built, and tested by the Power and Mechanisms part of the Power, Thermal, Structures & Mechanisms Product Center, which develops products for both internal and external customers. This paper will discuss the qualification effort for the LMX Solar Array deployment, including qualification hardware and STE. It will focus on unique challenges presented by each aspect of the qualification, and lessons learned from the hardware integration and the qualification testing.

  20. Appropriate protection for wheelchair riders on public transit buses.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Greg; Gillispie, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Securement of wheelchairs and occupant restraint for wheelchair riders on buses is one of the most difficult problems facing transit providers. The primary findings of this literature review show that (1) very little information has been published regarding transit bus safety and crash environment; (2) the focus of most reported wheelchair incidents involved noncollision events, in which inappropriate wheelchair securement or rider restraint resulted in minor injuries; and (3) studies spanning 30 years indicate that the large transit bus is an exceedingly safe form of transportation, so that wheelchair riders do not face undo risk of injury in this transportation environment. Further study is required to characterize the rare-occurring severe transit bus crashes. The resulting information is needed to establish an appropriate level of crash protection so that the next generation of U.S. wheelchair securement and occupant restraint systems not only are reasonably safe but also are easy to use and acceptable to wheelchair riders and transit bus operators.

  1. Project Recurso, 1989-1990. Final Evaluation Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Natasha

    This report presents final (fifth year) results of Project Recurso, a federally funded project which provided 147 Spanish-speaking special education students (grades 3-5) in 12 New York City schools with instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), Native Language Arts (NLA), and bilingual content area subjects. The project also provided…

  2. George Washington High School Study. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, David J.

    This study's purpose is to support educational planning and decision-making through systematic evaluation. Staff members of George Washington High School (GW), feeder junior high school staff members and the superintendent of Kanawha County Schools are the main audience. The School Based Evaluation Model provided the conceptual basis for this…

  3. Reliability of Student Evaluations of Student Performance. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Marvin A.; Westphal, Richard

    The objectives of the project were to (1) determine whether students making a subjective evaluation of other students will tend to grade their friends higher than others they do not know as well, (2) whether the use of an evaluation instrument reduces the subjectivitiy of student judgment, and (3) what differences there may be between a grade…

  4. Advisory Committee on Head Start Research and Evaluation: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Congress first called for the Advisory Committee on Head Start Research and Evaluation (the "Committee") in its 1998 reauthorization of the Head Start program, with a requirement that the Secretary of Health and Human Services convene a panel of experts to inform the Department about the design of a newly required national evaluation of…

  5. Evaluation of the National Remodelling Team: Year 3. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Claire; Eames, Anna; Wilson, Rebekah; Walker, Matthew; Sharp, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) evaluation was to examine the effectiveness and impact of the work of the National Remodelling Team (NRT) in completing the third phase of the remodeling program and its effectiveness in applying its model, tools and techniques to the extended schools program. This evaluation has…

  6. Student Assistance Program in Pennsylvania. Evaluation Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fertman, Carl I.; Schlesinger, Jo; Fichter, Cele; Tarasevich, Susan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wald, Holly

    This report contains the second year evaluation of the Student Assistance Program (SAP) in Pennsylvania. These school-based and school-linked programs address barriers to learning for youth at risk for social and emotional problems, drug and alcohol use and abuse, and depression. Second year evaluation focused on identifying essential components…

  7. Testing of a Program Evaluation Model: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagler, Phyllis J.; Marson, Arthur A.

    A program evaluation model developed by Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI) is described in this report. Following background material, the four main evaluation criteria employed in the model are identified as program quality, program relevance to community needs, program impact on MPTI, and the transition and growth of MPTI graduates in the…

  8. Course Content and Program Evaluation Model. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Mary Patricia; Marson, Arthur

    In order to evaluate the content of the courses and programs of the Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI) and to identify weaknesses and strengths in meeting the needs of the employee and employer, an in-depth evaluation of the school's five departments (trade and industry, business education, health occupations, agriculture, and general…

  9. Evaluating the Provision of Employer Services: A Methodology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camil Associates, Inc., Philadelphia, PA.

    A research project was done to develop a methodology for a national evaluation of the employer services program conducted by the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) at State and local levels. Two program evaluation methodologies, each requiring different approaches and resource expenditure, were developed that could provide the needed…

  10. A Special Training Project for Evaluators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, James H.

    This document reports on a program to train administrative, supervisory, and consultative personnel in evaluation methods, techniques, and procedures for instructional programs. Specific program objectives were: (1) to define each participant's role in planning and evaluating an instructional program, (2) to write specific behavioral objectives…

  11. Testing of a Program Evaluation Model: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagler, Phyllis J.; Marson, Arthur A.

    A program evaluation model developed by Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI) is described in this report. Following background material, the four main evaluation criteria employed in the model are identified as program quality, program relevance to community needs, program impact on MPTI, and the transition and growth of MPTI graduates in the…

  12. Skyline Wide Educational Plan. Final Evaluation Report 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Robert J.; Allan, Mary Ann

    The purposes of this terminal evaluation report are to determine the extent to which the major goals of the Skyline Wide Educational Plan (SWEP) project were achieved, to evaluate the utility of the products of SWEP studies, and to communicate the results to appropriate audiences. Information relative to four major project components is presented;…

  13. Evaluation Pilot Advisory Committee (EPAC): Final Report, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report represents the work of New Jersey's Evaluation Pilot Advisory Committee (EPAC) from 2011-2013. The EPAC Interim Report, published in February 2013, summarized the establishment of the EPAC, key lessons learned from the 2011-12 teacher evaluation pilot, and recommendations for statewide roll-out of a more effective educator evaluation…

  14. National Evaluation of Core Knowledge Sequence Implementation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringfield, Sam; Datnow, Amanda; Borman, Geoffrey; Rachuba, Laura

    This paper describes a 3-year evaluation of Core Knowledge Sequence implementation in 12 schools nationwide. The Core Knowledge Sequence, a whole-school curricular reform model, provides a planned progression of specific topics to teach in language arts, history, geography, math, science, and fine arts for grades 4-6. The evaluation determined…

  15. After-School Math PLUS (ASM+) Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from the Academy for Educational Development's (AED's) evaluation of After-School Math PLUS (ASM+). This program was designed to help students find the math in everyday experiences and create awareness about the importance of math skills for future career options. The evaluation was conducted by AED's Center for…

  16. Summative Evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2010

    2010-01-01

    A summative evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP) funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) was conducted during the spring, summer and fall of 2008. The main objective of the evaluation was to measure the relevance, impacts, and cost-effectiveness of the program. Given the timing of the evaluation…

  17. Three fuel cell buses: Did the promise live up to reality?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.

    1996-12-31

    A program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation`s Federal Transit Administration (DOT/FTA), and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) has resulted in the delivery of three 30-foot, methanol-fueled, phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC)/battery-powered buses. Since 1987, the design and fabrication of these first-of-a-kind vehicles proceeded along a complex and difficult pathway. Issues remain on whether the actual performances of the buses lived up to the expectations, how the buses will be utilized, and how commercialization efforts will continue.

  18. Guidelines for Implementing Training Effectiveness Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Clarence A.

    The document presents guidelines for planning, implementing, and documenting training effectiveness evaluations. The guidelines are intended to assist researchers in coping with many of the constraints associated with executing empirical research in operational settings. (NTIS)

  19. Guidelines for Implementing Training Effectiveness Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Clarence A.

    The document presents guidelines for planning, implementing, and documenting training effectiveness evaluations. The guidelines are intended to assist researchers in coping with many of the constraints associated with executing empirical research in operational settings. (NTIS)

  20. Final Evaluation Report of Top Secret Version 3.0,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-21

    evaluation is an in-depth examination of design plans . As with the preliminary assessment, no "hands- on" testing is required for a developmental...real storage location is fetch protected, the key in sto.age is compared to the key associated w1th the request and the resulting accion is dependent...Documentation Requirement: The system developer shall provide to the evaluators a docua;ent that describes the test plan and results of the security

  1. Evaluation of dense-gas simulation models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zapert, J.G.; Londergan, R.J.; Thistle, H.

    1991-05-01

    The report describes the approach and presents the results of an evaluation study of seven dense gas simulation models using data from three experimental programs. The models evaluated are two in the public domain (DEGADIS and SLAB) and five that are proprietary (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, SAFEMODE, and TRACE). The data bases used in the evaluation are the Desert Tortoise Pressurized Ammonia Releases, Burro Liquefied Natural Gas Spill Tests and the Goldfish Anhydrous Hydroflouric Acid Spill Experiments. A uniform set of performance statistics are calculated and tabulated to compare maximum observed concentrations and cloud half-width to those predicted by each model. None of the models demonstrated good performance consistently for all three experimental programs.

  2. Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, S

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  3. TITLE: Environmental, health, and safety issues offuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoricacid fuel-cell buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Shan

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase 1 of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase 3. After completing Phase 2, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase H1) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase 3 study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  4. Driver Improvement Training and Evaluation: Initial Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittenburg, John A.; And Others

    A driver improvement training program using multimedia classroom lessons and multiple car driving range exercises was given to U.S. Coast Guard recruits. Training was evaluated by comparing matched control and experimental groups. Baseline data including driving history, biographical, and physical characteristics was collected. Driving range,…

  5. Project Aprendizaje. 1990-91 Final Evaluation Profile. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    An evaluation was done of New York City Public Schools' Project Aprendizaje, which served disadvantaged, immigrant, Spanish-speaking high school students at Seward Park High School in Manhattan. The Project enrolled 290 students in grades 9 through 12, 93.1 percent of whom were eligible for the Free Lunch Program. The Project provided students of…

  6. Final Report on the Evaluation of Project Upswing's First Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plantec, P.; And Others

    This technical report describes the evaluation of the first year of Project Upswing, a 2-year experimental study to determine the potential contribution of volunteers in helping young children overcome learning difficulties. The three large groups of first grade children involved received tutoring either from specially trained volunteers,…

  7. Project Aprendizaje. Final Evaluation Report 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Andrew

    This report provides evaluative information regarding the effectiveness of Project Aprendizaje, a New York City program that served 269 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency (LEP). The project promoted parent and community involvement by sponsoring cultural events, such as a large Latin American festival. Students developed…

  8. Facts Program, 1985-1986. Final Report. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    Results of evaluating the Financial Aid for Colleges and Technical Schools (FACTS) Program are presented, along with recommendations for the program. The program placed college work/study students in New York City public high schools to help high school students complete financial aid applications for postsecondary education. In 1985-1986, more…

  9. A Program Evaluation Manual for Project Initiators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senf, Gerald; Anderson, David

    Intended for directors of special education projects, the manual provides guidelines for program evaluation. It is explained that the manual developed out of the experiences of the staff of the Leadership Training Institute in Learning Disabilities which provided technical assistance to 43 state projects. The manual's eight major sections focus on…

  10. Evaluating the Environmental Health Work Force. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This report contains all materials pertinent to an intensive evaluation of the environmental health work force conducted in 1986 and 1987. The materials relate to a workshop that was one of the key tools used in conducting the study to estimate environmental health personnel supply, demand, and need. The report begins with an overview and…

  11. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Brighter Futures Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emihovich, Catherine; Davis, Terry

    This report provides information on the longitudinal evaluation of the Brighter Futures program in Florida, a teen pregnancy prevention program which created support groups for mothers age 16 and younger in order to prevent their having second pregnancies. Other program goals were to ensure that the girls finish high school and plan for a career,…

  12. Driver Improvement Training and Evaluation: Initial Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittenburg, John A.; And Others

    A driver improvement training program using multimedia classroom lessons and multiple car driving range exercises was given to U.S. Coast Guard recruits. Training was evaluated by comparing matched control and experimental groups. Baseline data including driving history, biographical, and physical characteristics was collected. Driving range,…

  13. Final evaluation of the acoustics of the APS conference center

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    Along with a description of the changes that I prescribed on the original design, this report is an evaluation of the acoustical properties of the new Advanced Photon Source Auditorium at Argonne National Laboratory. Acoustical deficiencies in the hall are presented with several options for their expedient and economical solution.

  14. Superstart 1990-92. Final Evaluation Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    This report describes the development, introduction, and evaluation of the SuperStart comprehensive prekindergarten program adopted by the New York City Public Schools in 1990. By 1991, SuperStart offered 299 classes in 188 schools, providing a developmentally appropriate learning environment to foster cognitive, social, emotional, and physical…

  15. The Embassy Adoption Program. Final Evaluation Report, 1982-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Div. of Quality Assurance.

    A multicultural enrichment program in which selected fifth- and sixth-grade students from Washington, District of Columbia, public schools learned about other countries by studying a foreign embassy is evaluated. Chapter I outlines the main components of the program: joint educator-embassy planning, student research, student field visits and…

  16. Prevention Initiative Program. Final Evaluation Report Fiscal 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Patricia; Borger, Jeanne

    This report provides an evaluation of the Prevention Initiative Program's second-funded year in the Chicago Public Schools. The program's purpose was to reduce school failure by providing health and social services to young families, improving parenting skills, and assisting young mothers to complete high school. The program served pregnant or…

  17. Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative. Year 3 Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Paula; And Others

    An evaluation of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative brings together three phases: (1) a pilot outcome study conducted with a sample of six local workplace education programs and featuring the perspectives of workers, labor, and management; (2) program profiles for seven federally funded workplace education programs coordinated by the…

  18. EVALUATION OF HEADSTART EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM IN CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PORTER, PHILIP J.; AND OTHERS

    BEGINNING WITH A REVIEW OF THE NURSERY SCHOOL MOVEMENT (FROEBEL, MONTESSORI, AND MCMILLAN,) THIS EVALUATION RELATES THE HISTORICAL MATERIAL TO HEAD START, SPECIFICALLY IN CAMBRIDGE MASS. DURING THE SUMMER OF 1965, MATCHED GROUPS OF 33 HEAD START CHILDREN AND 33 NON-HEAD START CHILDREN (CONTROL GROUP) WERE STUDIED. SCHOOL PRE-REGISTRATION LISTS…

  19. Evaluation of Navajo Community College. Final Report -- June 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Training and Technical Assistance Corp., Berkeley, CA.

    Assessing the first institution of higher learning on an American Indian reservation in the U.S., this evaluation departs from the orthodox in that it addresses "need" areas observed during the Navajo Community College's first 12 months of operation (organization, budget and finance, communication, students and student services,…

  20. Title III ESEA - Evaluation Special Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    Presented are evaluation reports on four special education programs in the District of Columbia Public Schools: a daily program for the development of linguistic and conceptual ability in 12 aphasic children, emphasizing language reception and expression; a complete instructional program for some 18 multiply handicapped, hearing impaired rubella…

  1. Project Closeout: Guidance for Final Evaluation of Building America Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Burch, J.; Hendron, B.

    2008-03-01

    This report presents guidelines for Project Closeout. It is used to determine whether the Building America program is successfully facilitating improved design and practices to achieve energy savings goals in production homes. Its objective is to use energy simulations, targeted utility bill analysis, and feedback from project stakeholders to evaluate the performance of occupied BA communities.

  2. Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative. Year 3 Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Paula; And Others

    An evaluation of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative brings together three phases: (1) a pilot outcome study conducted with a sample of six local workplace education programs and featuring the perspectives of workers, labor, and management; (2) program profiles for seven federally funded workplace education programs coordinated by the…

  3. Automobile Mechanic Training Evaluation Project (AMTEP) Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losh, Charles

    A project was undertaken to identify, develop, and validate those performance, program, and personal standards judged necessary to operate and evaluate a quality automobile mechanic/technician training program. Included among the project activities were the following: (1) a review of existing literature on performance and program standards; (2)…

  4. Evaluation of the Appalachian Regional Commission's Educational Projects: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Gary; Bartfai, Nicole; Plishker, Laurie; Snow, Kyle; Frechtling, Joy

    This report presents findings from an evaluation of 84 educational projects funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) during the 1990's. Data were collected via document reviews, interviews, a mail survey completed by 78 projects, and eight site visits. Most projects provided services to rural areas or community segments most in need.…

  5. Experimental Evaluation of the ELS Teacher Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Donald P.; And Others

    This report presents the results of pragmatically selected tryouts of the English Language Services "Teacher Education Program" in the Regional English Language Centre in Singapore, the Central Institute of English in Hyderabad, and the Instituto Pedagogico in Caracas. American Institutes for Research, in submitting the present evaluation to the…

  6. Evaluation of Family Preservation and Reunification Programs: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This report presents an evaluation of family preservation programs in Kentucky, New Jersey, and Tennessee, and a county program in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Key goals of these programs were reducing foster care placement, maintaining child safety, and improving family functioning. The statewide programs employed the Homebuilders program…

  7. A Project for Research, Development, and Evaluation Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karr, Chadwick; Porter, Bette C.

    This report summarizes and evaluates the 1969-70 Consortium Research Development (CORD) training and dissemination project conducted by Teaching Research, Oregon State System of Higher Education. The project provided a 2-week summer institute to train selected college and university staff from CORD institutions in the use of individualized,…

  8. Project Familia. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Candice

    Project Familia was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII funded project that, in the year covered by this evaluation, served 41 special education students of limited English proficiency (LEP) from 5 schools, with the participation of 54 parents and 33 siblings. Participating students received English language enrichment and…

  9. Parent Services Project Evaluation: Final Report of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Alan R.; Haggard, Molly

    The Parent Services Project (PSP) is a family resource program which provides supportive activities for highly stressed and socially isolated parents based on the "social support as a stress-buffer" model of primary prevention. A PSP evaluation followed parents as they went through the PSP program and compared them with a matched control…

  10. After Busing, What? A Not-So-Good Idea Makes Its Move.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pell, Terence J.

    1986-01-01

    When the Norfolk, VA, school board voted to end mandatory busing to achieve racial integration, questions on the following issues were raised: (1) civil rights; (2) the property-based school tax system; and (3) impact on educational quality. (LHW)

  11. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2009-10-01

    This report documents progress in meeting the technological challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transportation based on current fuel cell transit bus demonstrations and plans for more fuel cell transit buses and hydrogen infrastructure.

  12. EPA Announces $7 Million in Funding to Reduce Diesel Emissions from School Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the availability of approximately $7 million in funding for rebates to public and private school bus fleet owners for the replacement and retrofit of older school buses. Repla

  13. U.S. EPA announces availability of $7 million to replace or retrofit old school buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is announcing the availability of approximately $7 million in funding for rebates to public and private school bus fleet owners for the replacement and retrofit of older school buses. This is

  14. Cool Science: K-12 Climate Change Art Displayed on Buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. F.; Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cool science is an art contest where K12 students create placards (7" x 22") to educate the public about climate change. Students are prompted to create their artwork in response to questions such as: What is the evidence for climate change? How does climate change impact your local community? What can you do to reduce the impacts of climate change? In each of three years, 500-600 student entrees have been submitted from more than 12 school districts across Massachusetts. A panel of judges including scientists, artists, rapid transit representatives, and educators chooses elementary, middle, and high school winners. Winners (6), runners-up (6), and honorable mentions (12) and their families and teachers are invited to an annual Cool Science Award Ceremony to be recognized and view winning artwork. All winning artwork is posted on the Cool Science website. The winning artwork (2 per grade band) is converted into placards (11" x 28") and posters (2.5' x 12') that are placed on the inside (placards) and outside (posters) of buses. Posters are displayed for one month. So far, Cool Science was implemented in Lowell, MA where over 5000 public viewers see the posters daily on the sides of Lowell Rapid Transit Authority (LRTA) buses, making approximately 1,000,000 impressions per year. Cool Science acts to increase climate literacy in children as well as the public, and as such promotes intergenerational learning. Using art in conjunction with science learning about climate change appears to be effective at engaging not just traditionally high achieving science students, but also those interested in the creative arts. Hearing winners' stories about how they created their artwork and what this contest meant to them supports the idea that Cool Science attracts a wide diversity of students. Parents discuss climate change with their children. Multiple press releases announcing the winners further promotes the awareness of climate change throughout school districts and their

  15. Process evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP Program). [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The ``Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,`` or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities` low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, and WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents the findings of a process evaluation and WRAP customer survey conducted by the Technical Development Corporation (TDC). TDC`s work is one part of a multi-part evaluation project being conducted under the management of ICF Resources, Inc.

  16. Small Commercial Program DOE Project: Impact evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bathgate, R.; Faust, S.

    1992-08-12

    In 1991, Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) implemented a Department of Energy grant to conduct a small commercial energy conservation project. The small commercial ``Mom, and Pop`` grocery stores within WEC`s service territory were selected as the target market for the project. Energy & Solid Waste Consultant`s (E&SWC) Impact Evaluation is documented here. The evaluation was based on data gathered from a variety of sources, including load profile metering, kWh submeters, elapsed time indicators, and billing histories. Five stores were selected to receive measures under this program: Waits River General Store, Joe`s Pond Store, Hastings Store, Walden General Store, and Adamant Cooperative. Specific measures installed in each store and description of each are included.

  17. Development of a School Bus Fuel System Integrity Compliance Procedure. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, G. W.; Johnson, N. B.

    This report presents a program that derived a compliance test procedure for school buses with a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds or greater. The objective of this program was to evaluate Fuel System Integrity (FMVSS 301) in relation to school buses, conduct a limited state-of-the-art survey and run full-scale dynamic tests to produce an…

  18. Methodology for evaluating energy R&D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, C.

    1997-04-23

    Recent budgetary shortfalls and hightened concern over balancing the federal budget have placed increasing demand on federal agencies to document the cost effectiveness of the programs they manage. In fact, the 1993 Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) requires that by 1997 each executive agency prepare a Strategic Plan that includes measurable performance goals. By the year 2000, the first round of Annual Reports will become due which describes actual program performance. Despite the growing emphasis on measuring performance of government programs, the technology policy literature offers little in terms of models that program managers can implement in order to assess the cost effectiveness of the programs they manage. While GPRA will pose a major challenge to all federal government agencies, that challenge is particularly difficult for research-oriented agencies such as the Department of Energy. Its basic research programs provide benefits that are difficult to quantify since their values are uncertain with respect to timing, but are usually reflected in the value assigned to applied programs. The difficulty with quantifying benefits of applied programs relates to the difficulties of obtaining complete information on industries that have used DOE`s supported technologies in their production processes and data on cost-savings relative to conventional technologies. Therefore, DOE is one of several research-oriented agencies that has a special need for methods by which program offices can evaluate the broad array of applied and basic energy research programs they administer. The general findings of this report are that few new methods are applicable for evaluation of R&D programs. It seems that peer review and bibliometrics are methods of choice for evaluating basic research programs while more quantitative approaches such as ROI, cost-benefits, etc. might be followed in evaluating applied programs.

  19. IR DirectFET Extreme Environments Evaluation Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burmeister, Martin; Mottiwala, Amin

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, International Rectifier (IR) introduced a new version of its DirectFET metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) packaging. The new version (referred to as 'Version 2') enhances device moisture resistance, makes surface mount (SMT) assembly of these devices to printed wiring boards (PWBs) more repeatable, and subsequent assembly inspection simpler. In the present study, the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in collaboration with Stellar Microelectronics (Stellar), continued an evaluation of the DirectFET that they started together in 2006. The present study focused on comparing the two versions of the DirectFET and examining the suitability of the DirectFET devices for space applications. This study evaluated both versions of two DirectFET packaged devices that had both been shown in the 2006 study to have the best electrical and thermal properties: the IRF6635 and IRF6644. The present study evaluated (1) the relative electrical and thermal performance of both versions of each device, (2) the performance through high reliability testing, and (3) the performance of these devices in combination with a range of alternate solder alloys in the extreme thermal environments of deep space....

  20. Wind tunnel evaluation of the RAAMP sampler. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderpool, R.W.; Peters, T.M.

    1994-11-01

    Wind tunnel tests of the Department of Energy RAAMP (Radioactive Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Program) monitor have been conducted at wind speeds of 2 km/hr and 24 km/hr. The RAAMP sampler was developed based on three specific performance objectives: (1) meet EPA PM10 performance criteria, (2) representatively sample and retain particles larger than 10 {micro}m for later isotopic analysis, (3) be capable of continuous, unattended operation for time periods up to 2 months. In this first phase of the evaluation, wind tunnel tests were performed to evaluate the sampler as a potential candidate for EPA PM10 reference or equivalency status. As an integral part of the project, the EPA wind tunnel facility was fully characterized at wind speeds of 2 km/hr and 24 km/hr in conjunction with liquid test aerosols of 10 {micro}m aerodynamic diameter. Results showed that the facility and its operating protocols met or exceeded all 40 CFR Part 53 acceptance criteria regarding PM10 size-selective performance evaluation. Analytical procedures for quantitation of collected mass deposits also met 40 CFR Part 53 criteria. Modifications were made to the tunnel`s test section to accommodate the large dimensions of the RAAMP sampler`s instrument case.

  1. IR DirectFET Extreme Environments Evaluation Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burmeister, Martin; Mottiwala, Amin

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, International Rectifier (IR) introduced a new version of its DirectFET metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) packaging. The new version (referred to as 'Version 2') enhances device moisture resistance, makes surface mount (SMT) assembly of these devices to printed wiring boards (PWBs) more repeatable, and subsequent assembly inspection simpler. In the present study, the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in collaboration with Stellar Microelectronics (Stellar), continued an evaluation of the DirectFET that they started together in 2006. The present study focused on comparing the two versions of the DirectFET and examining the suitability of the DirectFET devices for space applications. This study evaluated both versions of two DirectFET packaged devices that had both been shown in the 2006 study to have the best electrical and thermal properties: the IRF6635 and IRF6644. The present study evaluated (1) the relative electrical and thermal performance of both versions of each device, (2) the performance through high reliability testing, and (3) the performance of these devices in combination with a range of alternate solder alloys in the extreme thermal environments of deep space....

  2. On-road pollutant emission and fuel consumption characteristics of buses in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijuan; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; Fu, Mingliang; Shah, Asad Naeem; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Hong; Liang, Bin

    2011-01-01

    On-road emission and fuel consumption (FC) levels for Euro III and IV buses fueled on diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) were compared, and emission and FC characteristics of buses were analyzed based on approximately 28,700 groups of instantaneous data obtained in Beijing using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). The experimental results revealed that NOx and PM emissions from CNG buses were decreased by 72.0% and 82.3% respectively, compared with Euro IV diesel buses. Similarly, these emissions were reduced by 75.2% and 96.3% respectively, compared with Euro III diesel buses. In addition, CO2, CO, HC, NOx, PM emissions and FC of Euro IV diesel buses were reduced by 26.4%, 75.2%, 73.6%, 11.4%, 79.1%, and 26.0%, respectively, relative to Euro III diesel buses. The CO2, CO, HC, NOx, PM emissions and FC factors all decreased with bus speed increased, while increased as bus acceleration increased. At the same time, the emission/FC rates as well as the emission/FC factors exhibited a strong positive correlation with the vehicle specific power (VSP). They all were the lowest when VSP < 0, and then rapidly increased as VSP increased. Furthermore, both the emission/FC rates and emission/FC factors were the highest at accelerations, higher at cruise speeds, and the lowest at decelerations for non-idling buses. These results can provide a base reference to further estimate bus emission and FC inventories in Beijing.

  3. Measurements of ultrafine particles and other vehicular pollutants inside school buses in South Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qunfang; Zhu, Yifang

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated toxic effects of vehicular emitted ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter < 100 nm), with the highest human exposure usually occurring on and near roadways. Children are particularly at risk due to immature respiratory systems and faster breathing rates. In this study, children's exposure to in-cabin air pollutants, especially UFPs, was measured inside four diesel-powered school buses. Two 1990 and two 2006 model year diesel-powered school buses were selected to represent the age extremes of school buses in service. Each bus was driven on two routine bus runs to study school children's exposure under different transportation conditions in South Texas. The number concentration and size distribution of UFPs, total particle number concentration, PM 2.5, PM 10, black carbon (BC), CO, and CO 2 levels were monitored inside the buses. The average total particle number concentrations observed inside the school buses ranged from 7.3 × 10 3 to 3.4 × 10 4 particles cm -3, depending on engine age and window position. When the windows were closed, the in-cabin air pollutants were more likely due to the school buses' self-pollution. The 1990 model year school buses demonstrated much higher air pollutant concentrations than the 2006 model year ones. When the windows were open, the majority of in-cabin air pollutants came from the outside roadway environment with similar pollutant levels observed regardless of engine ages. The highest average UFP concentration was observed at a bus transfer station where approximately 27 idling school buses were queued to load or unload students. Starting-up and idling generated higher air pollutant levels than the driving state. Higher in-cabin air pollutant concentrations were observed when more students were on board.

  4. Evaluation of the potential carcinogenicity of DDD. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD) is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B2 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment. Evidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is Sufficient, and the evidence from human studies is Inadequate. The potency factor (F) for DDD is estimated to be 1.30 (mg/kg/day)(-1), placing it in potency group 2 according to the CAG's methodology for evaluating potential carcinogens. Combining the weight-of-evidence group and the potency group, DDD is assigned a MEDIUM hazard ranking.

  5. Low-cost solar collector test and evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, C M

    1983-01-01

    Project was to test and evaluate a highly efficient low cost solar collector and to make this technology available to the average homeowner. The basic collector design was for use in mass production, so approximately forty collector panels were made for testing and to make it simple to be hand built. The collectors performed better than expected and written and visual material was prepared to make construction easier for a first time builder. Publicity was generated to make public aware of benefits with stories by Associated Press and in publications like Popular Science.

  6. Apollo 16, LM-11 ascent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    The duty cycle for the LM-11 APS consisted of two firings, an ascent stage liftoff from the lunar surface, and the terminal phase initiation (TPI) burn. APS performance for the first firing was evaluated and found to be satisfactory. No propulsion data were received from the second APS burn; however, all indications were that the burn was nominal. Engine ignition for the APS lunar liftoff burn occured at the Apollo elapsed time (AET) of 175:31:47.9 (hours:minutes:seconds). Burn duration was 427.7 seconds.

  7. Savannah River Restart Peer Evaluation Program final examination report

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.P.; Draper, D.G.

    1991-12-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 6, 1991 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered during three distinct phases to 73 certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors, and Shift Technical Engineers assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This program was conceived and developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and it's implementation satisfies recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The review identified both strengths and weaknesses of the procedures and personnel.

  8. Savannah River Restart Peer Evaluation Program final examination report

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.P.; Draper, D.G.

    1991-12-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 6, 1991 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered during three distinct phases to 73 certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors, and Shift Technical Engineers assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This program was conceived and developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and it`s implementation satisfies recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The review identified both strengths and weaknesses of the procedures and personnel.

  9. Technical and systems evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnik, E.G.; DiPietro, J.P.

    1998-08-01

    During FY 1998 Energetics performed a variety of technology-based evaluations for the Hydrogen Program. Three evaluations are summarized below: hydrogen bromine-based electricity storage, carbon-based hydrogen storage, and hydrogen-fueled buses.

  10. Evaluation of solar collectors for heat pump applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Skartvedt, Gary; Pedreyra, Donald; McMordle, Dr., Robert; Kidd, James; Anderson, Jerome; Jones, Richard

    1980-08-01

    The study was initiated to evaluate the potential utility of very low cost (possibly unglazed and uninsulated) solar collectors to serve as both heat collection and rejection devices for a liquid source heat pump. The approach consisted of exercising a detailed analytical simulation of the complete heat pump/solar collector/storage system against heating and cooling loads derived for typical single-family residences in eight US cities. The performance of each system was measured against that of a conventional air-to-air heat pump operating against the same loads. In addition to evaluation of solar collector options, the study included consideration of water tanks and buried pipe grids to provide thermal storage. As a supplement to the analytical tasks, the study included an experimental determination of night sky temperature and convective heat transfer coefficients for surfaces with dimensions typical of solar collectors. The experiments were conducted in situ by placing the test apparatus on the roofs of houses in the Denver, Colorado, area. (MHR)

  11. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary.

  12. Design and evaluation of small water turbines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.A.

    1983-02-17

    An evaluation was made of the design and hydromechanical performance characteristics for three basic turbine types: axial flow (Jonval), inward radial flow (Francis) and crossflow (Banki). A single commercially available turbine representative of each type and within the appropriate power range (<5hp) was obtained for evaluation. Specific turbine selections were based on price, availability and suitability for operation at heads of 50 feet or less and flows under 2 cubic feet per second. In general, the peak operating efficiencies of each unit tended to be lower than anticipated, falling in the range of 40 to 50%. With sufficient flow, however, significant useful power outputs up to 3 hp were obtained. While the radial flow turbine (a centrifugal pump operated as a turbine) had the lowest initial unit cost, the axial and cross flow designs exhibited more stable operation, particularly under transient loadings. The crossflow turbine had the added advantage that it was essentially self-cleaning. With further developmental effort and appropriate design modifications it should be possible to bring each of these microhydro designs to their full performance potential.

  13. Thermionic Technology Program: A, Insulator test and evaluation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, J.C.; Witt, T.

    1987-11-30

    The Thermionic Technology Program (TTP) consisted of two major efforts, evaluation of insulators and evaluation of thermionic converters. This report details the work performed on the insulator phase of the program. Efforts were made to better understand the mechanisms involved in the electrochemistry of insulators at elevated temperatures by modelling the ionic transport through the various layers of the insulator package. Although rigorous analytic solutions could not be obtained owing to a lack of detailed data, a simplified model indicated that alumina should not fail by depletion of aluminum for thousands of years, whereas calculations for yttria revealed a far more rapid depletion of oxygen and consequently earlier failure. Methods for microscopic and electrical testing of cylindrical insulator samples were developed, and an improved test oven design was initiated. Testing of alumina/niobium cermet samples revealed rapid failure contrary to the theoretical predictions for alumina. Large discrepancies in the initial conduction activation energy among the various samples suggested that different mechanisms could have controlled the conduction and hence the failure in different samples, although all had undergone nominally identical processing. The short lifetimes reveal how rapidly ambient conditions in thermionic power conversion can degrade the performance of insulating oxides. It was concluded that minor dopants could have been responsible for the early breakdowns. Thus, high purity materials with precise quality control will be necessary for trilayer package development. 35 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Combustion Chemistry of Biodiesel for the Use in Urban Transport Buses: Experiment and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidvarborna, Hamid

    Biofuels, such as biodiesel, offer benefits as a possible alternative to conventional fuels due to their fuel source sustainability and their reduced environmental impact. Before they can be used, it is essential to understand their combustion chemistry and emission characterizations due to a number of issues associated with them (e.g., high emission of nitrogen oxides (NOx), lower heating value than diesel, etc.). During this study, emission characterizations of different biodiesel blends (B0, B20, B50, and B100) were measured on three different feedstocks (soybean methyl ester (SME), tallow oil (TO), and waste cooking oil (WCO)) with various characteristics, while an ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) was used as base fuel at low-temperature combustion (LTC). A laboratory combustion chamber was used to analyze soot formation, NOx emissions, while real engine emissions were measured for further investigation on PM and NOx emissions. For further study, carbon emissions (CO, CO 2, and CH4) were also measured to understand their relations with feedstocks' type. The emissions were correlated with fuel's characteristics, especially unsaturation degree (number of double bonds in methyl esters) and chain length (oxygen-to-carbon ratio). The experimental results obtained from laboratory experiments were confirmed by field experiments (real engines) collected from Toledo area regional transit authority (TARTA) buses. Combustion analysis results showed that the neat biodiesel fuels had longer ignition delays and lower ignition temperatures compared to ULSD at the tested condition. The results showed that biodiesel containing more unsaturated fatty acids emitted higher levels of NOx compared to biodiesel with more saturated fatty acids. A paired t-test on fuels showed that neat biodiesel fuels had significant reduction in the formation of NOx compared with ULSD. In another part of this study, biodiesel fuel with a high degree of unsaturation and high portion of long chains of

  15. Inspection of compressed natural gas cylinders on school buses

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring compressed natural gas (CNF)-powered school bus demonstrations in various locations around the country. Early in 1994, two non-DOE-sponsored CNG pickup trucks equipped with composite-reinforced-aluminum fuel cylinders experienced cylinder ruptures during refueling. As reported by the Gas Research Institute (GRI): ...analysis of the cylinder ruptures on the pickup trucks revealed that they were due to acid-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the overwrap. The overwrap that GRI refers to is a resin-impregnated fiber that is wrapped around the outside of the gas cylinder for added strength. Because ensuring the safety of the CNG vehicles it sponsors is of paramount concern to DOE, the Department, through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), conducted inspections of DOE-sponsored vehicles nationwide. The work had three objectives: inspection, documentation, and education. First, inspectors visited sites where CNG-powered school buses sponsored by DOE are based, and inspected the CNG cylinders for damage. Second, information learned during the inspections was collected for DOE. Third, the inspections found that the education and awareness of site personnel, in terms of cylinder damage detection, needed to be increased.

  16. An alternative fuel for urban buses-biodiesel blends

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, L.G.; Weber, J.A.; Russell, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative biodiesel fueling performance and operational data have been collected from urban mass transit buses at Bi-State Development Agency in St. Louis Missouri. A total of 10 vehicles were selected for fueling; 5-6V92 TA Detroit Diesel engines have been fueled with a 20/80 biodiesel/diesel fuel blend and 5-6V92 TA Detroit Diesel control vehicles have been fueled on petroleum based low sulfur diesel fuel (LSD). The real-world impact of a biodiesel blend on maintenance, reliability, cost, fuel economy and safety compared to LSD will be presented. In addition, engine exhaust emissions data collected by the University of West Virginia Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored mobile emissions laboratory will be presented. Operational data from Bi-State Development Agency is collected by the University of Missouri and quality control procedures are performed prior to placing the data in the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC). The AFDC is maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. This effort, which enables transit operators to review a real-world comparison of biodiesel and LSD, has been funded by the National Biodiesel Board with funds provided by the United Soybean Board with national checkoff dollars and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  17. Evaluation of recycled plastic lumber for marine applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levie, B.

    1993-09-01

    The report presents an evaluation of the recycled plastic materials (RPM) produced by California Recycling Company (CRC). The lumber is produced from difficult-to-market post consumer plastic materials which have been recovered from a mixed municipal solid waste stream at CR Transfer's New Stanton material recovery facility (MRF). A battery of tests was performed on the RPM to determine strength, creep, serviceability, biological compatibility, and toxicity of the plastic lumber. These tests were selected to characterize the behavior of the material for marine application. The findings show that the plastic lumber produced by CRC has significant creep characteristics which must be adequately addressed by appropriate architectural design when using this material. Flexural stiffness properties are less than 1/10 that of wood. Biological testing has indicated a far lower toxicity for the plastic than for chromium copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood.

  18. Shared-ride paratransit performance evaluation guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1989-11-01

    Shared-ride paratransit systems, ranging from public shared-ride taxis to human service agencies that provide specialized transit service for elderly and handicapped persons, provide essential, but often high-cost, mobility to residents in both urban and rural areas. Managers of these systems are increasingly being called upon to improve the cost-effectiveness of these services, and to provide performance reports to funding agencies, policy boards, and others to assure them that their funds are being spent wisely. The performance evaluation procedure described in the guide meets these two requirements by providing management with an important diagnostic tool to gauge the efficiency and effectiveness of shared-ride paratransit systems. It also provides external reviewers with a report card on the performance of the system. The guide offers recommendations on how to present the results of the analysis and to use the indicators to diagnose and correct problems with the system.

  19. A Model for the Stop Planning and Timetables of Customized Buses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Customized buses (CBs) are a new mode of public transportation and an important part of diversified public transportation, providing advanced, attractive and user-led service. The operational activity of a CB is planned by aggregating space–time demand and similar passenger travel demands. Based on an analysis of domestic and international research and the current development of CBs in China and considering passenger travel data, this paper studies the problems associated with the operation of CBs, such as stop selection, line planning and timetables, and establishes a model for the stop planning and timetables of CBs. The improved immune genetic algorithm (IIGA) is used to solve the model with regard to the following: 1) multiple population design and transport operator design, 2) memory library design, 3) mutation probability design and crossover probability design, and 4) the fitness calculation of the gene segment. Finally, a real-world example in Beijing is calculated, and the model and solution results are verified and analyzed. The results illustrate that the IIGA solves the model and is superior to the basic genetic algorithm in terms of the number of passengers, travel time, average passenger travel time, average passenger arrival time ahead of schedule and total line revenue. This study covers the key issues involving operational systems of CBs, combines theoretical research and empirical analysis, and provides a theoretical foundation for the planning and operation of CBs. PMID:28056041

  20. A Model for the Stop Planning and Timetables of Customized Buses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jihui; Zhao, Yanqing; Yang, Yang; Liu, Tao; Guan, Wei; Wang, Jiao; Song, Cuiying

    2017-01-01

    Customized buses (CBs) are a new mode of public transportation and an important part of diversified public transportation, providing advanced, attractive and user-led service. The operational activity of a CB is planned by aggregating space-time demand and similar passenger travel demands. Based on an analysis of domestic and international research and the current development of CBs in China and considering passenger travel data, this paper studies the problems associated with the operation of CBs, such as stop selection, line planning and timetables, and establishes a model for the stop planning and timetables of CBs. The improved immune genetic algorithm (IIGA) is used to solve the model with regard to the following: 1) multiple population design and transport operator design, 2) memory library design, 3) mutation probability design and crossover probability design, and 4) the fitness calculation of the gene segment. Finally, a real-world example in Beijing is calculated, and the model and solution results are verified and analyzed. The results illustrate that the IIGA solves the model and is superior to the basic genetic algorithm in terms of the number of passengers, travel time, average passenger travel time, average passenger arrival time ahead of schedule and total line revenue. This study covers the key issues involving operational systems of CBs, combines theoretical research and empirical analysis, and provides a theoretical foundation for the planning and operation of CBs.

  1. Oil/water separator test and evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, M.A.; Bitting, K.R.; Nordvik, A.

    1995-11-01

    Four oil/water separators were tested in 1992 in a project jointly sponsored by the U.S. Coast Guard RD Center and the Marine Spill Response Corporation. The objective of the test program was to evaluate the performance of oil/water separators under a variety of conditions that replicated operating conditions expected during an offshore oil spill recovery operation. The separators tested were the Alfa-Laval OFPX 413 disk-stack centrifuge. Conoco Specialty Products` Vortoil Oilspill Separation System, International Separation Technology`s Intr-Septor 250 and a simple gravity tank. Separation performance was documented for a range of influent oil/water ratios, using crude and a water-in-oil emulsion. Simulated sea motion, the addition of emulsion breaker, and debris in the influent were other variables included in the test program. Observations on separator operability, reliability, maintenance requirements, safety and transportability also were documented. Complete test results and analysis are included in the report. Recommended system improvements, based on manufacturers` input and performance analysis also are included. Test methods and parameters are fully documented in the report.

  2. QM-8 final performance evaluation report: SEALS, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelsen, L. V.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static test of Qualification Motor-8 (QM-8) was conducted. The QM-8 test article was the fifth full-scale, full-duration test, and the third qualification motor to incorporate the redesigned case field joint and nozzle-to-case joint. This was the second static test conducted in the T-97 test facility, which is equipped with actuators for inducing external side loads to a 360 degree external tank (ET) attach ring during test motor operation, and permits heating/cooling of an entire motor. The QM-8 motor was cooled to a temperature which ensured that the maximum propellant mean bulk temperature (PMBT) of 40 F was achieved at firing. All test results are not included, but rather, the performance of the metal case, field joints, and nozzle-to-case joint is addressed. The involvement is studied of the Structural Applications and Structural Design Groups with the QM-8 test which includes: assembly procedures of the field and nozzle-to-case joints, joint leak check results, structural test results, and post-test inspection evaluations.

  3. Electrolytic hydrogen production infrastructure options evaluation. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    Fuel-cell electric vehicles have the potential to provide the range, acceleration, rapid refueling times, and other creature comforts associated with gasoline-powered vehicles, but with virtually no environmental degradation. To achieve this potential, society will have to develop the necessary infrastructure to supply hydrogen to the fuel-cell vehicles. Hydrogen could be stored directly on the vehicle, or it could be derived from methanol or other hydrocarbon fuels by on-board chemical reformation. This infrastructure analysis assumes high-pressure (5,000 psi) hydrogen on-board storage. This study evaluates one approach to providing hydrogen fuel: the electrolysis of water using off-peak electricity. Other contractors at Princeton University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating the feasibility of producing hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas, probably the least expensive hydrogen infrastructure alternative for large markets. Electrolytic hydrogen is a possible short-term transition strategy to provide relatively inexpensive hydrogen before there are enough fuel-cell vehicles to justify building large natural gas reforming facilities. In this study, the authors estimate the necessary price of off-peak electricity that would make electrolytic hydrogen costs competitive with gasoline on a per-mile basis, assuming that the electrolyzer systems are manufactured in relatively high volumes compared to current production. They then compare this off-peak electricity price goal with actual current utility residential prices across the US.

  4. Evaluation of sediment contamination in Pearl Harbor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grovhoug, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    Pearl Harbor demonstrates remarkable resilience to natural and human-induced contaminant stresses. A review of more than fifty harbor-specific data sets reveals a complex contamination and recovery history. Siltation is a major contaminant pathway in Pearl Harbor. Dredging operations, which are necessary due to high siltation rates, reduce contaminant loading by periodically removing the upper harbor sediment layers. The response of test organisms during sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation studies showed negligible effects from sediment toxicity. The environmental quality at an offshore dredge disposal site for the harbor is not measurable affected. Urban runoff via storm drains and tributaries is an important nonpoint source of contaminant exposure to the Pearl Harbor ecosystem. Most contaminants experience extensive physical, chemical, and biological, modification after entering the harbor environment. Certain contaminants, including PCBs, petroleum hydrocarbons, and silver, were reported at sufficiently elevated sediment concentrations to warrant environmental concern in some harbor regions and may warrant further evaluation. The overall sediment quality in Pearl Harbor, however, is less degraded than that of many U.S. mainland coastal harbors. Further detailed study of the abundance and distribution of important marine resources in Pearl Harbor is recommended.

  5. Evaluation of irradiated fuel during RIA simulation tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, R.O.; Rashid, Y.R.

    1996-08-01

    A critical assessment of the RIA-simulation experiments performed to date on previously irradiated test rods is presented. Included in this assessment are the SPERT-CDC, the NSRR, and the CABRI REP Na experimental programs. Information was collected describing the base irradiation, test rod characterization, and test procedures and conditions. The representativeness of the test rods and test conditions to anticipated LWR RIA accident conditions was evaluated using analysis results from fuel behavior and three-dimensional spatial kinetics simulations. It was shown that the pulse characteristics and coolant conditions are significantly different from those anticipated in an LWR-Furthermore, the unrepresentative test conditions were found to exaggerate the mechanisms that caused cladding failure. The data review identified several test rods which contained unusual cladding damage incurred prior to the RIA-simulation test that produced the observed failures. The mechanisms responsible for the observed test rod failures have been shown to result from processes that have a second order effect of burnup. A correlation with burnup could not be appropriately established for the fuel enthalpy at failure. However, the successful test rods can be used to construct a conservative region of success for fuel rod behavior during an RIA event.

  6. Evaluation of new metal-insulator-semiconductor varistor: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.

    1988-08-01

    A new, composite varistor material containing a metal, an insulator, and a semiconductor was evaluated. Although other constituents can be substituted, the materials that were investigated contained varying proportions of nickel metal, silicon dioxide, and silicon carbide in a silicon rubber binder. The material has rubber-like flexibility and is easily formed into complex shapes. A higher leakage resistivity (/approximately/10/sup 12/ ohm cm) and greater nonlinearity (/approximately/10) than for commercial silicon carbide varistors will permit the material to be used as a gapless surge suppressor. The breakdown voltage (1 kV/cm-10 kV/cm) and other properties of the material vary with composition. High-current capability (>200 A/cm/sup 2/) and good energy absorption (>40 J/cm/sup 3/) are found. The material exhibits a low-temperature coefficient (/approximately/4 x 10/sup -3//K) and a low dielectric constant (/approximately/10) with no observed loss peak. These dielectric properties are suited to high-frequency applications, such as antenna protection. The material has a response time (<1 ns) that should provide some protection against fast pulses generated by nuclear and directed-beam weapons. At this stage, the physics of the material are mostly conjecture, but the electrical conduction is almost certainly controlled by grain-boundary barriers. However, the conduction is not thermally activated, and it probably has a percolative character. The material will not replace zinc oxide varistors at this time, but it will find specialized applications in which its flexibility, formability, and frequency response are advantageous. 8 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Electric vehicle/photovoltaic test and evaluation program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The University of South Florida (USF) in collaboration with Florida utilities and other organizations have executed a research and development program for the test and evaluation of Electric Vehicles. Its activity as one of 13 US Department of Energy (DOE) Electric Vehicle Test Site Operators was funded by DOE and the Florida Energy Office (FEO). The purpose of this program was to determine the efficiency of electric vehicles under commuter and fleet conditions in Florida. An additional feature of this program was the development of a utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) system for charging electric vehicles with solar energy. USF developed an effective and economical automated on board Mobile Data Acquisition System (MDAS) that records vehicle operating data with minimum operator interface. Computer programs were written by the USF team to achieve processing and analysis of the vehicles` MDAS data, again minimizing human involvement, human effort and human error. A large number of passenger cars, vans and pickup trucks were studied. Procedures for monitoring them were developed to a point where the equipment is commercially available and its operation has become routine. The nations first PV solar powered electric vehicle charging station and test facility was designed, developed and put into operation under this program. The charging station is capable of direct DC-DC (PV to battery) or AC-DC (power grid to battery) charging and it routes unused PV power to the University`s power grid for other use. The DC-DC charging system is more efficient, more dependable and safer than DC-AC-DC and traditional methods of DC-DC charging. A fortuitous correlation was observed between battery charging demand and solar power availability in commuter application of electric vehicles.

  8. Comparison of whole-body vibration exposures in buses: effects and interactions of bus and seat design.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Per M G; Rynell, Patrik W; Hagberg, Mats; Johnson, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Bus and seat design may be important for the drivers' whole-body vibration (WBV). WBV exposures in buses during actual operation were assessed. WBV attenuation performance between an air-suspension seat and a static pedestal seat in low-floor buses was compared; there were no differences in WBV attenuation between the seats. Air-suspension seat performance in a high-floor and low-floor bus was compared. Relative to the pedestal seat with its relatively static, limited travel seat suspension, the air-suspension seat with its dynamic, longer travel suspension provided little additional benefit. Relative to the measurement collected at the bus floor, the air-suspension seat amplified the WBV exposures in the high-floor bus. All WBV exposures were below European Union (EU) daily exposure action values. The EU Vibration Directive only allows the predominant axis of vibration exposure to be evaluated but a tri-axial vector sum exposure may be more representative of the actual health risks. Low back pain is common in bus drivers and studies have shown a relationship with whole body vibration. Relative to a pedestal seat with its limited travel seat suspension, the air-suspension seat with its longer travel suspension provided little additional benefit. Exposures were below European Union daily exposure action values.

  9. THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN EVALUATION MODEL FOR VOCATIONAL PILOT PROGRAMS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TUCKMAN, BRUCE W.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT WERE (1) TO DEVELOP AN EVALUATION MODEL IN THE FORM OF A HOW-TO-DO-IT MANUAL WHICH OUTLINES PROCEDURES FOR OBTAINING IMMEDIATE INFORMATION REGARDING THE DEGREE TO WHICH A PILOT PROGRAM ACHIEVES ITS STATED FINAL OBJECTIVES, (2) TO EVALUATE THIS MODEL BY USING IT TO EVALUATE TWO ONGOING PILOT PROGRAMS, AND (3) TO…

  10. A RULE-BASED SYSTEM FOR EVALUATING FINAL COVERS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter examines how rules are used as a knowledge representation formalism in the domain of hazardous waste management. A specific example from this domain involves performance evaluation of final covers used to close hazardous waste landfills. Final cover design and associ...

  11. Unregulated emissions from compressed natural gas (CNG) transit buses configured with and without oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Robert A; Kado, Norman Y; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Ayala, Alberto; Kobayashi, Reiko

    2006-01-01

    The unregulated emissions from two in-use heavy-duty transit buses fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and equipped with oxidation catalyst (OxiCat) control were evaluated. We tested emissions from a transit bus powered by a 2001 Cummins Westport C Gas Plus 8.3-L engine (CWest), which meets the California Air Resources Board's (CARB) 2002 optional NOx standard (2.0 g/bhp-hr). In California, this engine is certified only with an OxiCat, so our study did not include emissions testing without it. We also tested a 2000 New Flyer 40-passenger low-floor bus powered by a Detroit Diesel series 50G engine (DDCs50G) that is currently certified in California without an OxiCat. The original equipment manufacturer (OEM) offers a "low-emission" package for this bus that includes an OxiCat for transit bus applications, thus, this configuration was also tested in this study. Previously, we reported that formaldehyde and other volatile organic emissions detected in the exhaust of the DDCs50G bus equipped with an OxiCat were significantly reduced relative to the same DDCs50G bus without OxiCat. In this paper, we examine othertoxic unregulated emissions of significance. The specific mutagenic activity of emission sample extracts was examined using the microsuspension assay. The total mutagenic activity of emissions (activity per mile) from the OxiCat-equipped DDC bus was generally lower than that from the DDC bus without the OxiCat. The CWest bus emission samples had mutagenic activity that was comparable to that of the OxiCat-equipped DDC bus. In general, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions were lower forthe OxiCat-equipped buses, with greater reductions observed for the volatile and semivolatile PAH emissions. Elemental carbon (EC) was detected in the exhaust from the all three bus configurations, and we found that the total carbon (TC) composition of particulate matter (PM) emissions was primarily organic carbon (OC). The amount of carbon emissions far exceeded the

  12. Final Evaluation Report of Infosafe Corporation, X-Lock 50. Version 2. 00

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-12

    it. ard then relcasing it hack to the system. -9- September 12, 1988 X-LOCK 50 Final Evaluation Report PRODUCT TESTI NG PRODUCT TESTING Test...floppy drive encryption mode through the XUTII,50 program (if the superuser has not set this mode previ slv ), le can use either a user defined key or...decrypting the floppy disk when using the master floppy key. September 12, 1988 -12- X-LOCK 50 Final Evaluation Report PRODUCT TESTI NG Another

  13. Influence of malfunctions of the maintenance activities on the urban buses fuel consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Crişan; Nicolae, Filip

    2014-06-01

    Optimization of activities with the aim to provide quality service in conditions of high profitability, is one of the main objectives chased by managers in transportation companies. As a consequence, directing the attention towards monitoring of maintenance activities of vehicles fleet, can achieve desired results. Two of the most important issues related to the maintenance activity, is the increase of reliability and reduction of fuel consumption of the vehicles fleet. Aforementioned actions represents a way forward for raising the quality and profitability of services offered. In this paper, the main ways of monitoring the fuel consumption, in order to reduce it and increase the reliability of transportation vehicles fleet, are presented. For the evaluation of the maintenance system and the degree of influence of malfunctions recorded on the fuel consumption, using the Pareto -ABC method, following case study on a fleet of buses for urban public transport has been conducted. Results obtained highlights the deficiencies of the maintenance process carried out and constitutes a solid base for the reorganization of the maintenance activity, involving preventive maintenance activities, in order to contribute decisively to the results targeted by the management of transport companies.

  14. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew; Jeffers, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    This report, published annually, summarizes the progress of fuel cell electric bus development in the United States and discusses the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. The report provides a summary of results from evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Funding for this effort is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration. The 2016 summary results primarily focus on the most recent year for each demonstration, from August 2015 through July 2016. The results for these buses account for more than 550,000 miles traveled and 59,500 hours of fuel cell power system operation. The primary results presented in the report are from three demonstrations of two different fuel-cell-dominant bus designs: Zero Emission Bay Area Demonstration Group led by Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) in California; American Fuel Cell Bus Project at SunLine Transit Agency in California; and American Fuel Cell Bus Project at the University of California at Irvine.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in public transportation vehicles (buses): another piece to the epidemiologic puzzle.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jonathan K; van Balen, Joany; Crawford, John Mac; Wilkins, John R; Lee, Jiyoung; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C; Hoet, Armando E

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the occurrence and epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in public transportation in the United States. This research sought to determine the background prevalence and phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of MRSA strains circulating on buses from a large, metropolitan transportation agency. Electrostatic wipes were used to collect 237 surface samples from 40 buses randomly selected from July-October 2010. Six samples were collected from each bus immediately postservice and before any cleaning and disinfection. Positive isolates were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; and potential epidemiologic factors were examined. Of the buses, 68% (27/40) were contaminated with S aureus, and 63% (25/40) were contaminated with MRSA. Seats and seat rails were the surfaces most frequently contaminated, followed by the back door and stanchions. Most (62.9%) of the MRSA isolates were classified as community-associated MRSA clones (SCCmec type IV), and 22.9% were health care-associated MRSA clones (SCCmec type II). Of the MRSA strains, 65% (5/20) were multidrug resistant. MRSA was frequently isolated from commonly touched surfaces in buses serving both hospital and community routes. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis demonstrated that buses may be effective mixing vessels for MRSA strains of both community and health care-associated origin. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Quasi-Static Wireless Power Transfer for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Transit Buses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lijuan; Gonder, Jeff; Burton, Evan; Brooker, Aaron; Meintz, Andrew; Konan, Arnaud

    2015-10-19

    This study evaluates the costs and benefits associated with the use of a stationary-wireless- power-transfer-enabled plug-in hybrid electric bus and determines the cost effectiveness relative to a conventional bus and a hybrid electric bus. A sensitivity sweep was performed over many different battery sizes, charging power levels, and number/location of bus stop charging stations. The net present cost was calculated for each vehicle design and provided the basis for design evaluation. In all cases, given the assumed economic conditions, the conventional bus achieved the lowest net present cost while the optimal plug-in hybrid electric bus scenario beat out the hybrid electric comparison scenario. The study also performed parameter sensitivity analysis under favorable and high unfavorable market penetration assumptions. The analysis identifies fuel saving opportunities with plug-in hybrid electric bus scenarios at cumulative net present costs not too dissimilar from those for conventional buses.

  17. Comparison of on-road emissions for B-0, B-10, and B-20 in transit buses.

    PubMed

    Hallmark, Shauna; Qiu, Yu

    2012-04-01

    Biodiesels are often marketed as being cleaner than regular diesel for emissions. Emission test results depend on the biodiesel blend, but laboratory tests suggest that biodiesels decrease particulate matter, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and air toxins when compared to regular diesel. Results for the amount of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) have been less conclusive. Tests have also not evaluated the commonly available ranges of biodiesel blends in the laboratory. Additionally, little information is available from on-road studies, so the effectiveness of using biodiesels to reduce actual emissions is unknown. A more complex relationship exists between engine operation and the rate of emission production than is typically evaluated using engine or chassis dynamometer tests. On-road emissions can vary dramatically because emissions are correlated to engine mode. Additionally, activity such as idling, acceleration, deceleration, and operation against a grade can produce higher emissions than more stable engine operating modes. Because these modes are not well captured in a laboratory environment, understanding on-road relationships is critical in evaluating the emissions reductions that may be possible with biodiesels. More tests and quantifications of the effects of different blends on engine and vehicle performance are required to promote widespread use of biodiesel. The objective of this research was to conduct on-road tests to compare the emission impacts of different blends of biodiesel to regular diesel fuel under different operating conditions. The team conducted on-road tests that utilized a portable emissions monitoring system that was used to instrument transit buses. Regular diesel and different blends of biodiesel were evaluated during on-road engine operation by instrumenting three in-use transit buses, from the CyRide system of Ames, Iowa, along an existing transit route.

  18. Microbial air quality in mass transport buses and work-related illness among bus drivers of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority.

    PubMed

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Sundhiyodhin, Viboonsri; Luksamijarulkul, Soavalug; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan

    2004-06-01

    The air quality in mass transport buses, especially air-conditioned buses may affect bus drivers who work full time. Bus numbers 16, 63, 67 and 166 of the Seventh Bus Zone of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority were randomly selected to investigate for microbial air quality. Nine air-conditioned buses and 2-4 open-air buses for each number of the bus (36 air-conditioned buses and 12 open-air buses) were included. Five points of in-bus air samples in each studied bus were collected by using the Millipore A ir Tester Totally, 180 and 60 air samples collected from air-conditioned buses and open-air buses were cultured for bacterial and fungal counts. The bus drivers who drove the studied buses were interviewed towards histories of work-related illness while working. The results revealed that the mean +/- SD of bacterial counts in the studied open-air buses ranged from 358.50 +/- 146.66 CFU/m3 to 506 +/- 137.62 CFU/m3; bus number 16 had the highest level. As well as the mean +/- SD of fungal counts which ranged from 93.33 +/- 44.83 CFU/m3 to 302 +/- 294.65 CFU/m3; bus number 166 had the highest level. Whereas, the mean +/- SD of bacterial counts in the studied air-conditioned buses ranged from 115.24 +/- 136.01 CFU/m3 to 244.69 +/- 234.85 CFU/m3; bus numbers 16 and 67 had the highest level. As well as the mean +/- SD of fungal counts which rangedfrom 18.84 +/- 39.42 CFU/m3 to 96.13 +/- 234.76 CFU/m3; bus number 166 had the highest level. When 180 and 60 studied air samples were analyzed in detail, it was found that 33.33% of the air samples from open-air buses and 6.11% of air samples from air-conditioned buses had a high level of bacterial counts (> 500 CFU/m3) while 6.67% of air samples from open-air buses and 2.78% of air samples from air-conditioned buses had a high level of fungal counts (> 500 CFU/m3). Data from the history of work-related illnesses among the studied bus drivers showed that 91.67% of open-air bus drivers and 57.28% of air-conditioned bus drivers had

  19. Final Report on the Evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Instructional Materials Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tushnet, Naida C.; Millsap, Mary Ann; Abdullah-Welsh, Noraini; Brigham, Nancy; Cooley, Elizabeth; Elliott, Jeanne; Johnston, Karen; Martinez, Alina; Nierenberg, Marla; Rosenblum, Sheila

    This document presents the final report on the evaluation of the Instructional Materials Development (IMD) program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and focuses on issues related to the development, dissemination, adoption, implementation, and impact of new instructional materials. The IMD program evaluates products at each step, from…

  20. Aberdeen Area Final Evaluation Report, ESEA Title I Project, Fiscal Year 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Aberdeen, SD. Aberdeen Area Office.

    Compiled from the final evaluation reports of 36 direct instruction projects and 1 Area Technical Assistance project (94 percent of which were contracted and administered by American Indian tribes or Indian school boards), this report is a summative evaluation of 1974 Title I projects in North and South Dakota. A brief introduction describes the…

  1. Mobile Unit to Provide Vocational Evaluation for Handicapped Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltimore County Board of Education, Towson, MD.

    Presented is the final report of a 3-year project (1970-73) to provide vocational evaluation in a mobile unit for the 330 intellectually limited students in grade 10 special classes in the Baltimore County schools. Main project aims are given to be evaluation at home schools and subsequent development of recommendations for using school and…

  2. Title I Institutional Facilities Program. Final Evaluation Report, 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Educational Evaluation.

    This final report presents the results of a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the Title I Institutionalized Facilities Program in New York City for the 1980-81 school year. The areas of evaluation included: physical facilities, staff, instructional approaches in reading, mathematics and writing, materials selection and utilization,…

  3. Buses as fire hazards: a Swedish problem only? Suggestions for fire-prevention measures.

    PubMed

    Huss, Fredrik R M; Erlandsson, U; Sjöberg, F

    2004-01-01

    In Sweden, approximately 6% of all human transportation is made via buses. The Swedish Board of Accident Investigation and the Swedish Rescue Services Agency have pointed out repeatedly that buses are potential fire and burn hazards, not only when involved in collisions but also in other circumstances. The number of fire incidents is increasing, especially in newer buses. In conjunction with the Swedish Rescue Services Agency, we examined some of the recent bus fires in Sweden. We did not find any casualties, but the results of our study suggest that casualties as a result of bus fires are imminent unless preventive measures are taken. We also studied experiences from previous bus fires and suggest preventive measures.

  4. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gigakis, C.

    2010-11-01

    This status report, fourth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, summarizes progress and accomplishments from demonstrations of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. This year's assessment report provides the results from the fifth year of operation of five Van Hool, ISE, and UTC Power fuel cell buses operating at AC Transit, SunLine, and CTTRANSIT. The achievements and challenges of this bus design, implementation, and operating are presented, with a focus on the next steps for implementing larger numbers and new and different designs of fuel cell buses. The major positive result from nearly five years of operation is the dramatic increase in reliability experienced for the fuel cell power system.

  5. Pupil behaviour on school buses and potential risk factors for injury: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Kobi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To observe pupil behaviour on school buses in Israel and identify hazards as a basis for improving school bus safety. Methods Data on student, bus driver and chaperone behaviours and on hazards associated with school buses, bus loading zones and bus stops were collected during an observational study conducted on school buses in rural communities in Israel. This report focuses on observations of student behaviour during school bus rides. Future reports will discuss the other findings. Student behaviours were assessed by means of χ2 tests and logistic regression models. Findings Observations were made on 362 rides on 125 buses on which 11 000 pupils travelled to and from school. Seatbelt use among the pupils was limited: on 23% of the rides all pupils fastened seatbelts, while on 42% none did. Seatbelt use was more frequent among primary school pupils than among older pupils. Pupil behaviours, such as rowdiness, noisiness, conflicts between pupils and not remaining seated were observed. These and other unsafe behaviours were more frequent on afternoon bus rides (odds ratio, OR: 3.2, 95% confidence interval, CI: 2.1–5.3), on routes with 5+ bus stops (OR: 4.1; 95% CI: 2.5–6.5) and on rides with primary school pupils (OR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2–2.9). Conclusion Without enforcement, government regulations and seatbelt availability on school buses are not enough to ensure seatbelt usage among pupils. Bus drivers cannot be expected to enforce seatbelt use and deal with pupil misconduct while also driving safely. Innovative strategies for improving pupil behaviour on school buses are needed to increase pupil safety. PMID:20680121

  6. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Real-World Particle Number and Mass Emissions from City Buses in Finland.

    PubMed

    Pirjola, Liisa; Dittrich, Aleš; Niemi, Jarkko V; Saarikoski, Sanna; Timonen, Hilkka; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Järvinen, Anssi; Kousa, Anu; Rönkkö, Topi; Hillamo, Risto

    2016-01-05

    Exhaust emissions of 23 individual city buses at Euro III, Euro IV and EEV (Enhanced Environmentally Friendly Vehicle) emission levels were measured by the chasing method under real-world conditions at a depot area and on the normal route of bus line 24 in Helsinki. The buses represented different technologies from the viewpoint of engines, exhaust after-treatment systems (ATS) and fuels. Some of the EEV buses were fueled by diesel, diesel-electric, ethanol (RED95) and compressed natural gas (CNG). At the depot area the emission factors were in the range of 0.3-21 × 10(14) # (kg fuel)(-1), 6-40 g (kg fuel)(-1), 0.004-0.88 g (kg fuel)(-1), 0.004-0.56 g (kg fuel)(-1), 0.01-1.2 g (kg fuel)(-1), for particle number (EFN), nitrogen oxides (EFNOx), black carbon (EFBC), organics (EFOrg), and particle mass (EFPM1), respectively. The highest particulate emissions were observed from the Euro III and Euro IV buses and the lowest from the ethanol and CNG-fueled buses, which emitted BC only during acceleration. The organics emitted from the CNG-fueled buses were clearly less oxidized compared to the other bus types. The bus line experiments showed that lowest emissions were obtained from the ethanol-fueled buses whereas large variation existed between individual buses of the same type indicating that the operating conditions by drivers had large effect on the emissions.

  7. Options in Education, Transcript for March 8, 1976: Parent Tutors, Feminization of the Teaching Profession, Test Score Controversy, and Busing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    "Options in Education" is a radio news program which focuses on issues and developments in education. This transcript contains discussions of volunteer parent tutors in a junior high school, the feminization of the teaching profession, the test score controversy, busing as an issue in the political primaries, and busing and the role of…

  8. Evaluation of DCS III Transmission Alternatives, Phase II, Task 2 Final Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-16

    Phase IA Final Report", TRW Doc . No. 35142, May 1980 TRW, "Evaluation of DCS III Transmission Alternatives, Appendix A, Transmission Media ", TRW Doc ...of potential transmission media into the future, and to assess their comparative utility for DCS application in the years 2000 and beyond, The final...Transmission Media , AD 101360 3. Appendix B, Regulatory Barriers, AD 101361 4. Appendix C, Regional Consideration and Characterization, ’ mAD 101362 5. Phase

  9. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter in buses on highways in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Der-Jen; Huang, Hsiao-Lin

    2009-12-01

    Although airborne pollutants in urban buses have been studied in many cities globally, long-distance buses running mainly on highways have not been addressed in this regard. This study investigates the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and particulate matter (PM) in the long-distance buses in Taiwan. Analytical results indicate that pollutants levels in long-distance buses are generally lower than those in urban buses. This finding is attributable to the driving speed and patterns of long-distance buses, as well as the meteorological and geographical features of the highway surroundings. The levels of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) found in bus cabins exceed the proposed indoor VOC guidelines for aromatic compounds, and are likely attributable to the interior trim in the cabins. The overall average CO level is 2.3 ppm, with higher average level on local streets (2.9 ppm) than on highways (2.2 ppm). The average CO 2 level is 1493 ppm, which is higher than the guideline for non-industrial occupied settings. The average PM level in this study is lower than those in urban buses and IAQ guidelines set by Taiwan EPA. However, the average PM 10 and PM 2.5 is higher than the level set by WHO. Besides the probable causes mentioned above, fewer passenger movements and less particle re-suspension from bus floor might also cause the lower PM levels. Measurements of particle size distribution reveal that more than 75% of particles are in submicron and smaller sizes. These particles may come from the infiltration from the outdoor air. This study concludes that air exchange rates in long-distance buses should be increased in order to reduce CO 2 levels. Future research on long-distance buses should focus on the emission of VOCs from brand new buses, and the sources of submicron particles in bus cabins.

  10. Particle and gaseous emissions from compressed natural gas and ultralow sulphur diesel-fuelled buses at four steady engine loads.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Ristovski, Z D; Meyer, N; Morawska, L

    2009-04-01

    Exhaust emissions from thirteen compressed natural gas (CNG) and nine ultralow sulphur diesel in-service transport buses were monitored on a chassis dynamometer. Measurements were carried out at idle and at three steady engine loads of 25%, 50% and 100% of maximum power at a fixed speed of 60 km h(-1). Emission factors were estimated for particle mass and number, carbon dioxide and oxides of nitrogen for two types of CNG buses (Scania and MAN, compatible with Euro 2 and 3 emission standards, respectively) and two types of diesel buses (Volvo Pre-Euro/Euro1 and Mercedez OC500 Euro3). All emission factors increased with load. The median particle mass emission factor for the CNG buses was less than 1% of that from the diesel buses at all loads. However, the particle number emission factors did not show a statistically significant difference between buses operating on the two types of fuel. In this paper, for the very first time, particle number emission factors are presented at four steady state engine loads for CNG buses. Median values ranged from the order of 10(12) particles min(-)(1) at idle to 10(15) particles km(-)(1) at full power. Most of the particles observed in the CNG emissions were in the nanoparticle size range and likely to be composed of volatile organic compounds The CO2 emission factors were about 20% to 30% greater for the diesel buses over the CNG buses, while the oxides of nitrogen emission factors did not show any difference due to the large variation between buses.

  11. An Evaluative Review of Uses of Computers in Instruction, Project CLUE (Computer Learning Under Evaluation). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinn, Karl L.

    Project CLUE (Computer Learning Under Evaluation) was an extensive review of the state of the art of the instructional uses of computers. Students, laymen, administrators and teachers will find the first volume of the two volume final report directed to their needs. The introduction discusses the scope of computer uses considered and a timetable…

  12. EPA Awards Rebates to Two Louisiana School Districts to Replace Ten School Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Feb.11, 2015) Thousands of school bus drivers safely transport children to and from school every day and they should not have to worry about pollutants emitted from buses. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding a total

  13. Predicting self-pollution inside school buses using a CFD and multi-zone coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Lee, Eon S.; Liu, Junjie; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-04-01

    The in-cabin environment of a school bus is important for children's health. The pollutants from a bus's own exhaust contribute to children's overall exposure to air pollutants inside the school bus cabin. In this study, we adapted a coupled model originally developed for indoor environment to determine the relative contribution of the bus own exhaust to the in-cabin pollutant concentrations. The coupled model uses CFD (computational fluent dynamics) model to simulate outside concentration and CONTAM (a multi-zone model) for inside the school bus. The model was validated with experimental data in the literature. Using the validated model, we analyzed the effects of vehicle speed and tailpipe location on self-pollution inside the bus cabin. We confirmed that the pollution released from the tailpipe can penetrate into the bus cabin through gaps in the back emergency door. We found the pollution concentration inside school buses was the highest when buses were driven at a medium speed. In addition, locating the tailpipe on the side, behind the rear axle resulted in less self-pollution since there is less time for the suction effect to take place. The developed theoretical framework can be generalized to study other types of buses. These findings can be used in developing policy recommendations for reducing human exposure to air pollution inside buses.

  14. Seat Belts in School Buses: A Technical Analysis of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splaine, Pam; Frankel, Steven M.

    This report, prepared for the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools superintendent and board members, identifies the questions concerning seat belt use in school buses, examines relevant literature, and draws some conclusions. According to the literature, seat belts are one of many alternative and interdependent safety devices built into…

  15. Special Issue Busing. NCRIEEO Newsletter, Volume 3, Number 2, May 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edmund W., Ed.

    Contents of this issue of the NCRIEEO Newsletter include the following articles: (1) "Editor's commentary: background to the issue," by Edmund Gordon, which puts busing into perspective as an important educational resource--like physical facilities, instructional materials, and teachers--to be used to achieve educational and social…

  16. EPA Awards $123,161 to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Retrofit School Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $123,161 in Diesel Emission Reduction Act (DERA) funding to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to fund local school districts to replace four school buses. The older r

  17. Priority Shift: The Fate of Mandatory Busing for School Desegregation in Seattle and the Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Laura

    Focusing on the experience of Seattle (Washington), this paper attempts to determine why school districts across the country have recently sought to de-emphasize segregation. Concerns about the validity of pursuing integration, particularly through busing, have been present throughout the history of school desegregation, but only recently is there…

  18. Influence of diesel fuel sulfur on nanoparticle emissions from city buses.

    PubMed

    Ristovski, Z D; Jayaratne, E R; Lim, M; Ayoko, G A; Morawska, L

    2006-02-15

    Particle emissions from twelve buses, operating alternately on low sulfur (LS; 500 ppm) and ultralow sulfur (ULS; 50 ppm) diesel fuel, were monitored. The buses were 1-19 years old and had no after-treatment devices fitted. Measurements were carried out at four steady-state operational modes on a chassis dynamometer using a mini dilution tunnel (PM mass measurement) and a Dekati ejector diluter as a secondary diluter (SMPS particle number). The mean particle number emission rate (s(-1)) of the buses, in the size range 8-400 nm, using ULS diesel was 31% to 59% lower than the rate using LS diesel in all four modes. The fractional reduction was highest in the newest buses and decreased with mileage upto about 500,000 km, after which no further decrease was apparent. However, the mean total suspended particle (TSP) mass emission rate did not show a systematic difference between the two fuel types. When the fuel was changed from LS to ULS diesel, the reduction in particle number was mainly in the nanoparticle size range. Over all operational modes, 58% of the particles were smaller than 50 nm with LS fuel as opposed to just 45% with ULS fuel, suggesting that sulfur in diesel fuel was playing a major role in the formation of nanoparticles. The greatest influence of the fuel sulfur content was observed at the highest engine load, where 74% of the particles were smaller than 50 nm with LS diesel compared to 43% with ULS diesel.

  19. EPA Announces $7 Million in Funding to Reduce Diesel Emissions from School Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the availability of approximately $7 million in funding for rebates to public and private school bus fleet owners for the replacement and retrofit of older school buses. Replacin

  20. Alabama School Districts Awarded EPA Rebates to Replace Aging School Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2/10/15- ATLANTA -Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced Allendale County Schools via the South Carolina Department of Education has been awarded a portion of more than $3 million in rebates to replace older diesel school buse

  1. Comparative study of fuel cell, battery and hybrid buses for renewable energy constrained areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stempien, J. P.; Chan, S. H.

    2017-02-01

    Fuel cell- and battery-based public bus technologies are reviewed and compared for application in tropical urban areas. This paper scrutinizes the reported literature on fuel cell bus, fuel cell electric bus, battery electric bus, hybrid electric bus, internal combustion diesel bus and compressed natural gas bus. The comparison includes the capital and operating costs, fuel consumption and fuel cycle emissions. To the best of authors knowledge, this is the first study to holistically compare hydrogen and battery powered buses, which is the original contribution of this paper. Moreover, this is the first study to focus on supplying hydrogen and electricity from fossil resources, while including the associated emissions. The study shows that compressed natural gas and hybrid electric buses appear to be the cheapest options in terms of total cost of ownership, but they are unable to meet the EURO VI emissions' standard requirement. Only fuel cell based buses have the potential to achieve the emissions' standard when the fuel cycle based on fossil energy was considered. Fuel cell electric buses are identified as a technology allowing for the largest CO2 emission reduction, making ∼61% decrease in annual emissions possible.

  2. EPA Funds Cleaner School Buses with Diesel Rebates in Idaho, Oregon and Washington

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle - December 11, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced $115,000 in rebates to retrofit older diesel school buses at the Shelley School District in Idaho, North Wasco County School District in Oregon, and Moses Lake School Di

  3. 45 CFR 1310.12 - Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles. 1310.12 Section 1310.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION...

  4. 45 CFR 1310.12 - Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles. 1310.12 Section 1310.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION...

  5. 45 CFR 1310.12 - Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles. 1310.12 Section 1310.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION...

  6. 45 CFR 1310.12 - Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles. 1310.12 Section 1310.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION...

  7. 45 CFR 1310.12 - Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Required use of School Buses or Allowable Alternate Vehicles. 1310.12 Section 1310.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION...

  8. Transportation of Wheelchair Seated Students in School Buses: A Review of State Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Britta; Fuhrman, Susan; Karg, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This study quantitatively reviews publicly available state policies as they relate to the transportation of wheelchair-seated students in school buses. Inclusion of best practices in specially equipped school bus and driver training policies was assessed. Key points of interest within state policies were identified based on site visits, common…

  9. 40 CFR 52.263 - Priority treatment for buses and carpools-Los Angeles Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Priority treatment for buses and carpools-Los Angeles Region. 52.263 Section 52.263 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Freeway bus lane (I-10), to vicinity of Ontario Airport. (5) Priority Treatment in...

  10. The Clinical Teacher for Special Education. Final Report: Volume II; Evaluating the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Oseroff, Andrew

    Effectiveness of the clinical teaching model (CTM) developed at Florida State University is documented in Volume II of the project's final report. Reviewed is literature related to teacher effectiveness and conceptual changes, conceptual models and instructional systems, and evaluation research in education. Research design and procedures are…

  11. Maupin MegaSkills School-Wide Program. Final Evaluation Report [and] Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Denzil

    This report presents the final evaluation of the MegaSkills School Program pilot adoption at Maupin Elementary School in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1994-95. The MegaSkills programs are designed to help students develop skills and attitudes related to school success, confidence, motivation, effort, responsibility, initiative, caring, teamwork, common…

  12. National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers. Final Report. Executive Summary. NCEE 2011-4032

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Brenda J.; White, Richard N.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Riley, Derek L.; Pistorino, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This final report presents findings from a multi-year evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers, a federally funded program that provides technical assistance to states in connection with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. With the redesign of the Center…

  13. National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers. Final Report. NCEE 2011-4031

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Brenda J.; White, Richard N.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Riley, Derek L.; Pistorino, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This final report presents findings from a multi-year evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers, a federally funded program that provides technical assistance to states in connection with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. With the redesign of the Center…

  14. The Clinical Teacher for Special Education. Final Report: Volume II; Evaluating the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Oseroff, Andrew

    Effectiveness of the clinical teaching model (CTM) developed at Florida State University is documented in Volume II of the project's final report. Reviewed is literature related to teacher effectiveness and conceptual changes, conceptual models and instructional systems, and evaluation research in education. Research design and procedures are…

  15. An Evaluation of Non-Formal Education in Ecuador. Volume 4: Appendices. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laosa, Luis M.; And Others

    As the final volume in a 4-volume evaluation report on the University of Massachusetts Non-Formal Education Project (UMass NFEP) initiated in rural Ecuador in 1973, this volume presents appendices to volumes I-III. Appendix A includes the following items: (1) Community Demographic Profile; (2) Description of Introduction to the Community; (3)…

  16. An Evaluation of Non-Formal Education in Ecuador. Volume 4: Appendices. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laosa, Luis M.; And Others

    As the final volume in a 4-volume evaluation report on the University of Massachusetts Non-Formal Education Project (UMass NFEP) initiated in rural Ecuador in 1973, this volume presents appendices to volumes I-III. Appendix A includes the following items: (1) Community Demographic Profile; (2) Description of Introduction to the Community; (3)…

  17. The Semi-Alloys/Mercy College Workplace Education Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurmo, Paul

    The final evaluation of an English-as-a-Second-Language and mathematics basic skills program, provided by a college, for limited-English-proficient workers in a manufacturing company, is presented. The program was originally designed to teach job-related skills, but was amended by managers to build worker self-esteem and worker participation in…

  18. The National Evaluation of School Nutrition Programs. Final Report - Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radzikowski, Jack

    This is a summary of the final report of a study (begun in 1979) of the National School Lunch, School Breakfast, and Special Milk Programs. The major objectives of the evaluation were to (1) identify existing information on the school nutrition programs; (2) identify determinants of participation in the programs and develop statistical models for…

  19. Teens in Action: In Pursuit of Peace Curriculum. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Stephen; Price-Johnson, Connie

    The purpose of this final report is to provide a description and evaluation to the Camp Fire Greater Arizona Council of the results of Teens in Action: In Pursuit of Peace Curriculum delinquency prevention program. A total of 94 youths in grades 6 through 12 participated in the program in the spring of 2002 at four sites in Chandler. The Student…

  20. Current Interdisciplinary Science Research in the High School Classroom. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shann, Mary H.

    This is the final evaluation report of the On Growth and Form (OGAF): Learning Concepts of Probability and Fractals by Doing Science project that aimed at engaging high school students in hands-on science activities, experiments, and computer simulations that use probability and fractal geometry to model ragged structures in the real world.…

  1. National Evaluation of Student Support Services: Examination of Student Outcomes after Six Years. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Bradford W.

    2010-01-01

    This is the final report of the National Evaluation of Student Support Services (SSS). SSS is one of eight federally funded grant programs that are administered as part of the Federal TRIO Programs within the U.S. Department of Education (ED). The SSS program, in particular, focuses on students while they are enrolled in college. In general, SSS…

  2. Aberdeen Area Final Evaluation Report, ESEA Title I Projects, Fiscal Year 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Aberdeen, SD. Aberdeen Area Office.

    The final evaluation report on the 37 Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title I projects in the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Aberdeen Area, this report presents graphic and tabular descriptions for each of the 37 projects re: (1) Title I expenditures (graphic display of expenditures for reading, math, language, administration, area…

  3. Resident Supervisory Support for Teachers. Final Evaluation Report, E.C.I.A. Chapter 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    Resident Supervisory Support for Teachers (RSST) is a peer supervision program designed to improve classroom instruction by training school personnel to use effective clinical supervision techniques. Participants are trained to help teachers identify strengths and improve their weaknesses. This final evaluation report provides information on the…

  4. TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report Comparison Document and DOE Safety Evaluation Report Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Bond

    2001-04-01

    This document provides an overview of changes to the currently approved TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) that are included in the upgraded FSAR. The DOE Safety Evaluation Report (SER) requirements that are incorporated into the upgraded FSAR are briefly discussed to provide the starting point in the FSAR with respect to the SER requirements.

  5. Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites. The report provides an overview of an approach for assessing risk to ...

  6. Final Evaluation Report. 1976-1977. Title I Migrant Program. Publication Number: 76.59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    The final evaluation of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title I Migrant Program in the Austin, Texas Independent School District is reported. The program consisted of instructional, student recruitment, parental involvement, health services, and clothing components. The instructional component included programs for pre-kindergarten…

  7. Operation Breakthrough, 1973-1974. Final Evaluation Report. And: Fourth Quarterly Progress Report for Operation Breakthrough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDCON Associates, Willow Grove, PA.

    The document comprises the final evaluation report and the fourth quarterly progress report of Operation Breakthrough, an experimental demonstration project to upgrade Spanish-speaking workers in entry-level factory jobs. Ten classes at six sites with a total of 133 students were held; 53 attended at least 50 of the total 150 hours. Classes were…

  8. Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites. The report provides an overview of an approach for assessing risk to ...

  9. Wisconsin K-12 Career Education Consortium. Final Evaluation Report from Third-Party Evaluators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Orville; Halfin, Harold

    Third-party evaluation of the Wisconsin Career Education Consortium (WCEC) was conducted over two years, utilizing a time series evaluation design established in 1975. On-site interviews, surveys, and tests were used to collect data from students, teachers, counselors, parents, and administrators. The WCEC was effective in disseminating career…

  10. ECIA Chapter 2 Evaluation Unit Final Evaluation Report. E.C.I.A. Chapter 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Div. of Quality Assurance.

    The purpose of the Evaluation Unit is to facilitate educational accountability by providing information to the District of Columbia Public Schools; to fulfill the requirements of the Educational Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA) of 1981; and to give technical assistance in evaluation to project coordinators. For each project that was…

  11. EVALUATION CONFERENCE ON LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT SEMINARS, PROGRAM PLANNING, BUDGETING AND EVALUATION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HIMMELE, IRVIN H.; SMITH, CLODUS R.

    THIRTY-FOUR PARTICIPANTS REPRESENTING THE LEADERSHIP-ACTION LEVEL OF PERSONNEL THROUGHOUT THE NATION AND FROM THE U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION EVALUATED THE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRAM PLANNING, AND BUDGETING SEMINARS HELD DURING 1967. GUIDELINES FOR SEMINAR EVALUATION WERE PRESENTED--(1) "RATIONALE AND RETROSPECT" BY N. EDWIN CRAWFORD, (2)…

  12. ECIA Chapter 2 Evaluation Unit Final Evaluation Report. E.C.I.A. Chapter 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Div. of Quality Assurance.

    The purpose of the Evaluation Unit is to facilitate educational accountability by providing information to the District of Columbia Public Schools; to fulfill the requirements of the Educational Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA) of 1981; and to give technical assistance in evaluation to project coordinators. For each project that was…

  13. Universal-Free School Breakfast Program Evaluation Design Project: Final Evaluation Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponza, Michael; Briefel, Ronette; Corson, Walter; Devaney, Barbara; Glazerman, Steven; Gleason, Philip; Heaviside, Sheila; Kung, Susanna; Meckstroth, Alicia; Murphy, J. Michael; Ohls, Jim

    The Child Nutrition Act of 1998 authorized demonstration pilot projects in up to six school food authorities and a rigorous evaluation to assess the effects of providing free school breakfasts to elementary school children. This report describes the evaluation strategy and data collection plans. Part 1 of the report provides background…

  14. Combined comfort model of thermal comfort and air quality on buses in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shek, Ka Wing; Chan, Wai Tin

    2008-01-25

    Air-conditioning settings are important factors in controlling the comfort of passengers on buses. The local bus operators control in-bus air quality and thermal environment by conforming to the prescribed levels stated in published standards. As a result, the settings are merely adjusted to fulfill the standards, rather than to satisfy the passengers' thermal comfort and air quality. Such "standard-oriented" practices are not appropriate; the passengers' preferences and satisfaction should be emphasized instead. Thus a "comfort-oriented" philosophy should be implemented to achieve a comfortable in-bus commuting environment. In this study, the achievement of a comfortable in-bus environment was examined with emphasis on thermal comfort and air quality. Both the measurement of physical parameters and subjective questionnaire surveys were conducted to collect practical in-bus thermal and air parameters data, as well as subjective satisfaction and sensation votes from the passengers. By analyzing the correlation between the objective and subjective data, a combined comfort models were developed. The models helped in evaluating the percentage of dissatisfaction under various combinations of passengers' sensation votes towards thermal comfort and air quality. An effective approach integrated the combined comfort model, hardware and software systems and the bus air-conditioning system could effectively control the transient in-bus environment. By processing and analyzing the data from the continuous monitoring system with the combined comfort model, air-conditioning setting adjustment commands could be determined and delivered to the hardware. This system adjusted air-conditioning settings depending on real-time commands along the bus journey. Therefore, a comfortable in-bus air quality and thermal environment could be achieved and efficiently maintained along the bus journey despite dynamic outdoor influences. Moreover, this model can help optimize air

  15. Final report on the energy edge impact evaluation of 28 new, low-energy commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, M.A.; Diamond, R.; Nordman, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents the findings of the Energy Edge Impact Evaluation. It is the fourth and final report in a series of project impact evaluation reports. Energy Edge is a research-oriented demonstration of energy efficiency in 28 new commercial buildings. Beginning in 1985,the project, sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), was developed to evaluate the potential for electricity conservation in new commercial buildings. By focusing on the construction of new commercial buildings, Energy Edge meets the region`s goal of capturing otherwise lost opportunities to accomplish energy conservation. That is, the best time to add an energy-efficiency measure to a building is during the construction phase.

  16. Gas Phase Emission Ratios From In-Use Diesel and CNG Curbside Passenger Buses in New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, S. C.; Shorter, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J.; Nelson, D. D.; Wormhoudt, J. C.; Williams, P.; Silva, P. J.; Shi, Q.; Ghertner, A.; Zahniser, M.; Worsnop, D.; Kolb, C.; Lanni, T.; Drewnick, F.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2002-12-01

    The Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory simultaneously measured gas phase and particulate emissions from in use vehicles during two campaigns in New York City. The campaigns took place during two weeks in October, 2000 and four weeks in July-August, 2001. Passenger curbside buses were the primary focus of the study, but school buses and several other heavy duty diesel vehicles were also characterized. This paper describes the methodologies used to measure individual in use vehicles and presents the results of the gas phase measurements. Emission ratios for NO, NO2, SO2, N2O, CO, CH4 and H2CO relative to CO2 have been determined across several classes of buses. The gas phase concentrations were measured each second, using Tunable Infrared Laser Direct Absorption Spectroscopy (TILDAS). Some of the categories of buses into which the data has been sorted are; diesel (both 6V92 and Series 50) with and without the Continuous Regenerative Technology (CRT) retrofit, compressed natural gas powered(CNG) and hybrid diesel-electric buses. The New York Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) cooperated with this work, providing details about each of their buses followed. In addition to MTA buses, other New York City passenger bus operators were also measured. In September 2000, MTA began to switch to 30 ppm sulfur diesel fuel while it is believed the non MTA operators did not. The measured emission ratios show that low sulfur fuel greatly reduces the amount of SO2 per CO2. Roughly one third of the MTA fleet of diesel buses have been equipped with the CRT retrofit. The gas phase results of interest in this category show increased direct emission of NO2 and companion work (also submitted to the 12th CRC) show the impact the CRT refit has on particulate emissions. CNG buses show increased H2CO and CH4 emission ratios relative to diesel powered motors.

  17. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M; Pawlik, Michael T; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6% of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2%), histology (12.4%), and blood analysis (9.6%). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6%) and MRI (30.6%). In 52.2% of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. • Radiology was the most important specialty for finding the final diagnosis. • CT was the most successful problem-solving imaging modality followed by MRI. • MRI and CT had the best solution rates of more than 30%.

  18. Psychometric Evaluation of the Comprehensive Early Evaluation and Programming System (CEEPS). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricker, Diane; Bailey, Earletta

    The study examined psychometric properties of the Comprehensive Early Evaluation and Programming System (CEEPS), a criterion-referenced instrument designed for handicapped children birth to 3 years old. The instrument was intended to provide specific information to develop program objectives across a range of developmental areas and to assess…

  19. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  20. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes. Final separating media evaluation and test report (FSMER)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-19

    {open_quotes}Evaluation Engineering and Development of Advanced Cyclone Processes{close_quotes} is one of the DOE-PETC sponsored advanced coal cleaning projects, which share a number of specific goals. These goals are to produce a 6% ash product, reject 85% of the parent coal`s pyritic sulfur, recover 85% of the parent coal`s Btu value, and provide products that are less than 30% moisture. The process in this project, as the name implies, relies on a cyclone or cyclonic separator to achieve physical beneficiation based on the gravimetric differences between clean coal and its impurities. Just as important as the cyclonic separator, if not more so, is the selection of a parting liquid or medium for use in the separator. Selection of a separating medium is regarded as a significant portion of the project because it has a profound impact on the required unit operations, the performance of the separator, and economics of the process. The choice of medium especially influences selection of media recovery system(s), and the characteristics of clean coal and refuse products. Since medium selection is such an important aspect of the project, portions of the project are dedicated to the study, evaluation, and selection of the most desirable medium. Though separators are an important component, this project initially focused on media study, rather than the separators themselves. In coal processing, discussion of media requires description of the handling and recovery system(s), separation performance, interaction with coal, cost, and health, environmental and safety issues. In order to be effective, a candidate must perform well in all of these categories.

  1. Computer simulation of waveforms on time division command/response multiplex data buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R. P.

    The use of multiterminal, time-division multiplexed, serial digital data buses in modern aircraft has increased significantly. There is a military standard covering such buses (MIL-STD-1553A/B), and most applications use this standard or something similar. This standard calls for a main data bus of twisted-shielded wire pair with transformer-coupled stubs leading to terminals. This paper describes the development of a computer-aided analysis routine that models data bus networks and permits an accurate prediction of the output at any stub for a given driving waveform. This MIL-STD-1553A/B data bus network simulation program is known as TLIAR (Transmission LIne Analysis Routine). TLIAR contains models of the cable, coupling transformers and transmitter/receiver loads.

  2. Gaseous emissions from compressed natural gas buses in urban road and highway tests in China.

    PubMed

    Yue, Tingting; Chai, Fahe; Hu, Jingnan; Jia, Ming; Bao, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhenhua; He, Liqang; Zu, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The natural gas vehicle market is rapidly developing throughout the world, and the majority of such vehicles operate on compressed natural gas (CNG). However, most studies on the emission characteristics of CNG vehicles rely on laboratory chassis dynamometer measurements, which do not accurately represent actual road driving conditions. To further investigate the emission characteristics of CNG vehicles, two CNG city buses and two CNG coaches were tested on public urban roads and highway sections. Our results show that when speeds of 0-10km/hr were increased to 10-20km/hr, the CO2, CO, nitrogen oxide (NOx), and total hydrocarbon (THC) emission factors decreased by (71.6±4.3)%, (65.6±9.5)%, (64.9±9.2)% and (67.8±0.3)%, respectively. In this study, The Beijing city buses with stricter emission standards (Euro IV) did not have lower emission factors than the Chongqing coaches with Euro II emission standards. Both the higher emission factors at 0-10km/hr speeds and the higher percentage of driving in the low-speed regime during the entire road cycle may have contributed to the higher CO2 and CO emission factors of these city buses. Additionally, compared with the emission factors produced in the urban road tests, the CO emission factors of the CNG buses in highway tests decreased the most (by 83.2%), followed by the THC emission factors, which decreased by 67.1%. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A Comparison of Time Division Multiplex Data Buses Based on Computer Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    BUSES BASED ON COMPUTER SIMULATION E. F. Boose R. A. Costa B . B . Mahler MAY 1975 Prepared for DEPUTY FOR DEVELOPMENT PLANS ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS...COVERED 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER MTR-2960 7. AUTHORS«) E. F. Boose R. A. Costa B . B . Mahler S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER...simulations are tabulated in Table II of Section III. 1. The simulations corroborate the results cited in B . Mahler’s recent report, ESD-TR-75-52 (3

  4. Exhaust emissions from engines of the Detroit Diesel Corporation in transit buses: a decade of trends.

    PubMed

    Prucz, J C; Clark, N N; Gautam, M; Lyons, D W

    2001-05-01

    In the U.S.A., exhaust emissions from city buses fueled by diesel are not characterized well because current emission standards require engine tests rather than tests of whole vehicles. Two transportable chassis dynamometer laboratories developed and operated by West Virginia University (WVU) have been used extensively to gather realistic emission data from heavy-duty vehicles, including buses, tested in simulated driving conditions. A subset of these data has been utilized for a comprehensive introspection into the trends of regulated emissions from transit buses over the last 7 years, which has been prompted by continuously tightening restrictions on one hand, along with remarkable technological progress, on the other hand. Two widely used models of diesel engines manufactured by the Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) have been selected as a case-study for such an overview, based on full-scale, on-site testing of actual city buses, driven in accordance with the SAE J1376 standard of a Commercial Business District (CBD) cycle. The results provide solid, quantitative evidence that most regulated emissions from engines produced by DDC have declined over the years, especially with the transition from the 6V-92TA to the Series 50 models. This improvement is remarkable mainly for the emissions of particulate matter (PM), that are lower by over 70%, on average, for the Series 50 engines, though the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) exhibit a reversed trend, showing a degradation of about 6%, on average, with the transition from 6V-92TA to the Series 50 engines. The expected trend of decreasing emission levels with the model year of the engine is clear and consistent for particulate matter (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NOx), starting with the 1990 models, although it is not conclusive for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

  5. Performance of optimised SCR retrofit buses under urban driving and controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, David C.; Priestman, Max; Williams, Martin L.; Stewart, Gregor B.; Beevers, Sean D.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive real-world emissions results from urban buses retrofitted with an optimised low-NO2 selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The SCRT system combines a CRT (Continuously Regenerating Trap) to reduce particle emissions and SCR to reduce NOx emissions. The optimised low-NO2 SCRT was designed to work under urban conditions where the vehicle exhaust gas temperature is often too low for many SCR systems to work efficiently. The system was extensively tested through on-road and test track measurements using a vehicle emission remote sensing instrument capable of measuring both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Over 700 on-road measurements of the SCRT system were made in London. Compared with identical buses operating under the same conditions fitted with a CRT, NO2 emissions were reduced by 61% and total NOx by 45%. Under test track conditions reductions in NOx of 77% were observed. The test track results do reveal however that compared with an original Euro III bus without a CRT, the SCRT retrofit bus emissions of NO2 are 50% higher. Engine-out and tailpipe measurements of several important engine parameters under test track conditions showed the important effect of SCR inlet temperature on NOx conversion efficiency. Overall, we conclude that retrofitting urban buses to use low-NO2 SCRT systems is an effective method for delivering NOx and NO2 emissions reduction.

  6. Evaluation of a "Subintern" Role: Action Over Observation For Final-Year Medical Students in Surgery.

    PubMed

    Morris, Marie Catherine; Hennessy, Martina; Conlon, Kevin C; Ridgway, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the potential of a subinternship apprentice role as a structured experiential learning opportunity by enabling final-year medical students to learn through action rather than observation. A convenience sample of 65 final-year medical students was allocated to "intern shadow" (control group) or "subintern" (research group) for 2 weeks during the first clinical attachment of their final year. "Intern shadow" involved direct observation of the intern role, whereas "subintern" involved a fully immersive performance of the intern role under direct supervision by the surgical team. All students completed an evaluation form that was devised in-house and based on course learning objectives. This consisted of Likert scales and free text. Wilcoxon rank sum test results showed that students participating in the "subintern" group had a statistically significantly better clinical experience than the "intern-shadow" group regarding role modeling (p = 0.0002), learning and teaching (p = 0.0021), organization and support (p = 0.0219), and patient interaction (p = 0.0063). The "subintern" apprentice role shows strong potential for enabling final-year students to learn on the job by actually performing the intern role rather than merely observing an intern at work. Subinterns reported feeling valued within the team structure and expressed a desire to emulate expert practice directly experienced through close collaboration with consultant surgeons. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Constructing and evaluating a validity argument for the final-year ward simulation exercise.

    PubMed

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-12-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's capability as a practitioner, professional, and scholar. Our purpose in conducting this study was to illustrate how assessment designers who are creating assessments to evaluate clinical performance might develop propositions and then collect and examine various sources of evidence to construct and evaluate a validity argument. The data were from all 154 medical students who were in their final year of study at the University of Dundee Medical School in the 2010-2011 academic year. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an analysis of senior medical students' clinical performance while they were taking responsibility for the management of a simulated ward. Using multi-facet Rasch measurement and a generalizability theory approach, we examined various sources of validity evidence that the medical school faculty have gathered for a set of six propositions needed to support their use of scores as measures of students' clinical ability. Based on our analysis of the evidence, we would conclude that, by and large, the propositions appear to be sound, and the evidence seems to support their proposed score interpretation. Given the body of evidence collected thus far, their intended interpretation seems defensible.

  8. Final Evaluation of RO9405 Phare VET Reform Programme, Ministry of National Education, Bucharest, Romania. Final Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Soren P.

    The Phare Vocational Education and Training (VET) Reform Programme in Romania was evaluated in May-June 1999. According to the two evaluators who conducted intensive visits to 14 pilot and demonstration schools and met with 9 zonal and local development committees and key representatives of Romanian government and educational agencies, the VET…

  9. Expectations and final evaluation of complete dentures by patients, dentist and dental technician.

    PubMed

    Marachlioglou, C R M Z; Dos Santos, J F F; Cunha, V P P; Marchini, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    There is a poor association between the dentist's evaluation of denture quality and patients' satisfaction with their dentures. Possible differences between dental professionals and patients' expectations might help explain differences in outcome evaluations. This study compared scores given by a dentist, a dental technician and patients for their expectations before and their final evaluation after complete dentures treatment. Twenty completely edentulous patients, a prosthodontist and a dental technician provided scores for the expected aesthetic and functional results of their dentures based on a visual analogue scale at baseline. Post-treatment completion ratings were given after adjustments, by dentist and patients. The dental technician provided post-treatment completion ratings after completing the dentures. The patients had higher expectations than the dental technician and the dentist perceived for both aesthetic and function (P < 0.001). The patients also presented higher post-treatment completion ratings than the dental professionals perceived for final aesthetics (P = 0.016, Kendall's W = 0.207) and function (P = 0.002, Kendall's W = 0.303). Only the dentist presented a statistically significant difference between expectations (lower) and final (higher) outcomes for aesthetics (P = 0.017) and function (P = 0.003). There was no correlation between expectations and post-treatment completion ratings according to the patients' age. There was also no correlation between the patients' gender and expectation scores. Patients presented higher expectations regarding their dentures than dental professionals. The dentist believed that dentures would bring fewer benefits than patients did, but his perception of denture benefits post-treatment was significantly higher than his expectations.

  10. Improving microbial air quality in air-conditioned mass transport buses by opening the bus exhaust ventilation fans.

    PubMed

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Arunchai, Nongphon; Luksamijarulkul, Soavalug; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan

    2005-07-01

    The air quality in air-conditioned mass transport buses may affect bus drivers' health. In-bus air quality improvement with the voluntary participation of bus drivers by opening the exhaust ventilation fans in the bus was implemented in the Seventh Bus Zone of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority. Four bus numbers, including bus numbers 16, 63, 67 and 166, were randomly selected to investigate microbial air quality and to observe the effect of opening the exhaust ventilation fans in the bus. With each bus number, 9 to 10 air-conditioned buses (total, 39 air-conditioned buses) were included. In-bus air samples were collected at 5 points in each studied bus using the Millipore Air Tester. A total of 195 air samples were cultured for bacterial and fungal counts. The results reveal that the exhaust ventilation fans of 17 air-conditioned buses (43.6%) were opened to ventilate in-bus air during the cycle of the bus route. The means +/- SD of bacterial counts and fungal counts in the studied buses with opened exhaust ventilation fans (83.8 +/- 70.7 and 38.0 +/- 42.8 cfu/m3) were significantly lower than those in the studied buses without opened exhaust ventilation fans (199.6 +/- 138.8 and 294.1 +/- 178.7 cfu/m3), p < 0.0005. All the air samples collected from the studied buses with opened exhaust ventilation fans were at acceptable levels (< 500 cfu/m3) compared with 4.6% of the air samples collected from the studied buses without opened exhaust ventilation fans, which had high levels (> 500 cfu/m3). Of the studied buses with opened exhaust ventilation fans (17 buses), the bacterial and fungal counts after opening the exhaust ventilation fans (68.3 +/- 33.8 and 28.3 +/- 19.3 cfu/m3) were significantly lower than those before opening the exhaust ventilation fans (158.3 +/- 116.9 and 85.3 +/- 71.2 cfu/m3), p < 0.005.

  11. Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T; Riordan, C; Bigger, J

    1992-11-01

    Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

  12. Final Overview of ACES Simulation for Evaluation SARP Well-Clear Definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, Confesor; Johnson, Marcus A.; Isaacson, Doug; Hershey, David

    2014-01-01

    The UAS in the NAS project is studying the minimum operational performance standards for unmanned aerial systems (UAS's) detect-and-avoid (DAA) system in order to operate in the National Airspace System. The DoD's Science and research Panel (SARP) Well-Clear Workshop is investigating the time and spatial boundary at which an UAS violates well-clear. NASA is supporting this effort through use of its Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES) simulation platform. This briefing presents the final results to the SARP, which will be used to judge the three candidate well-clear definitions, and for the selection of the most operationally suitable option.

  13. Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

    1992-11-01

    Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

  14. Traditional and nontraditional evaluations of student outcomes in a practical final examination of veterinary radiology.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Heli I

    2010-01-01

    The Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Helsinki recognized the lack of systems to measure the quality of education. At the department level, this meant lack of systems to measure the quality of students' outcomes. The aim of this article was to compare the quality of outcomes of a final examination in veterinary radiology by calculating the correlations between traditional (quantitative scores traditionally given by veterinary teachers) and nontraditional (qualitative Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome, or SOLO, method) grading results. Evaluation of the quality of the questions is also included. The results indicate that SOLO offers criteria for quality evaluation, especially for questions. A correlation of 0.60 (p<0.01) existed between qualitative and quantitative estimations, and a correlation of 0.79 (p<0.01) existed between evaluators, both using traditional scores. Two suggestions for a better system to evaluate quality in the future: First, development of problem-solving skills during the learning process should also be assessed. Second, both the scoring of factual correctness of answers (knowledge) and the grammatical structure of an answer and the quality of presentation should be included in the quality evaluation process.

  15. Evaluation of the Northern Squawfish Management Program : Final Report of Research, 1990-1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, David L.

    1998-10-28

    This document is the final report of research conducted from 1990-96 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) to evaluate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) project 90-077, the Northern Squawfish Management Program (NSMP). The Summary of Project summarizes and integrates the results, conclusions, and recommendations of the evaluation. The report contains research papers that describe how we addressed project objectives, how we reached our conclusions, and why we made our recommendations. The papers are listed and numbered consecutively in the Table of Contents and the numbers are used to reference each paper in the Summary of Project. It is the integration of these individual papers that provides the best picture of the current status of the NSMP.

  16. Evaluation of non-metallic fiber reinforced concrete in new full depth pcc pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, V.; Tolmare, N.S.

    1998-12-30

    This final report presents the construction and performance evaluation of a new full depth pavement, constructed with a new type non-metallic fiber reinforced concrete (NMFRC). The mixture proportions used, the quality control tests conducted for the evaluation of the fresh and hardened concrete properties, the procedure used for mixing, transporting, placing, consolidating, finishing, and curing of the concrete are described. Periodic inspection of the full depth pavement was done and this report includes the results of these inspections. The feasibility of using this NMFRC in the construction of highway structures has been discussed. The new NMFRC with enhanced fatigue, impact resistance, modulus of rupture, ductility and toughness properties is suitable for the construction of full depth pavements. However, a life-cycle cost analysis shows that NMFRC is not a favorable choice, because of it`s high initial cost.

  17. [Consequences drawn from the evaluation of logbook-based surgical training for final year students].

    PubMed

    Busemann, A; von Bernstorff, W; Heidecke, C-D

    2012-04-01

    The current training programme for final year medical students does not meet the requirements of surgery and is obviously not able to encourage young physicians to become surgeons. After finishing the surgical trimester, the motivation to become a doctor decreases considerably more strongly than after any other specialty during the final year programme. This emphasises the urgent need for a consequent redesign involving modern educational programmes. The present article represents a systematic analysis of 70 logbooks used by final year medical students, which accompanied them during the surgical trimester from August 2008 to December 2009 at the Department of Surgery at the University of Greifswald, Germany. This analysis was subsequently compared to an evaluation of the same students as to how valuable the logbook was for their surgical education by means of an anonymous questionnaire. The results indicate that the general quality of education during the surgical trimester was evaluated to be high, but that the use of a logbook in the current mode did not contribute to enhance medical/surgical training programmes. Although most of the requested examinations and procedures were carried out by at least 70 % of the students, less than half of them had the impression that the use of this specific logbook improved their education. The students ask for a more intense interaction with the tutor/mentor and request differentiated discussions about their personal stronger and weaker spots, as well as more bedside teaching, e. g., the terms of training ward rounds with the consultant surgeon. Besides, they demand more supervised practical skill training in contrast to the often commonly practiced "learning by doing". The logbook is a powerful and effective educational tool able to structure and examine medical training and skills. But the present evaluation of the surgical logbook indicates that there is a need to adapt the current version to student's and institution

  18. Design and evaluation of an air traffic control Final Approach Spacing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Erzberger, Heinz; Green, Steven M.; Nedell, William

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design and simulator evaluation of an automation tool for assisting terminal radar approach controllers in sequencing and spacing traffic onto the final approach course. The automation tool, referred to as the Final Approach Spacing Tool (FAST), displays speed and heading advisories for arriving aircraft as well as sequencing information on the controller's radar display. The main functional elements of FAST are a scheduler that schedules and sequences the traffic, a four-dimensional trajectory synthesizer that generates the advisories, and a graphical interface that displays the information to the controller. FAST has been implemented on a high-performance workstation. It can be operated as a stand-alone in the terminal radar approach control facility or as an element of a system integrated with automation tools in the air route traffic control center. FAST was evaluated by experienced air traffic controllers in a real-time air traffic control simulation. simulation results summarized in the paper show that the automation tools significantly reduced controller work load and demonstrated a potential for an increase in landing rate.

  19. Design and evaluation of an air traffic control Final Approach Spacing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Erzberger, Heinz; Green, Steven M.; Nedell, William

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design and simulator evaluation of an automation tool for assisting terminal radar approach controllers in sequencing and spacing traffic onto the final approach course. The automation tool, referred to as the Final Approach Spacing Tool (FAST), displays speed and heading advisories for arriving aircraft as well as sequencing information on the controller's radar display. The main functional elements of FAST are a scheduler that schedules and sequences the traffic, a four-dimensional trajectory synthesizer that generates the advisories, and a graphical interface that displays the information to the controller. FAST has been implemented on a high-performance workstation. It can be operated as a stand-alone in the terminal radar approach control facility or as an element of a system integrated with automation tools in the air route traffic control center. FAST was evaluated by experienced air traffic controllers in a real-time air traffic control simulation. simulation results summarized in the paper show that the automation tools significantly reduced controller work load and demonstrated a potential for an increase in landing rate.

  20. Rapid identification of high particle number emitting on-road vehicles and its application to a large fleet of diesel buses.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Morawska, L; Ristovski, Z D; He, C

    2007-07-15

    Pollutant concentrations measured in the exhaust plume of a vehicle may be related to the pollutant emission factor using the CO2 concentration as a measure of the dilution factor. We have used this method for the rapid identification of high particle number (PN) emitting on-road vehicles. The method was validated for PN using a medium-duty vehicle and successfully applied to measurements of PN emissions from a large fleet of on-road diesel buses. The ratio of PN concentration to CO2 concentration, Z, in the exhaust plume was estimated for individual buses. On the average, a bus emitted about 1.5 x 10(9) particles per mg of CO2 emitted. A histogram of the number of buses as a function of Z showed, for the first time, that the PN emissions from diesel buses followed a gamma distribution, with most of the values within a narrow range and a few buses exhibiting relatively large values. It was estimated that roughly 10% and 50% of the PN emissions came from just 2% and 25% of the buses, respectively. A regression analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between Z and age of buses, with the slope of the best line being significantly different from zero. The mean Z value for the pre-Euro buses was significantly greater than each of the values for the Euro I and II buses.

  1. Chemical and toxicological properties of emissions from CNG transit buses equipped with three-way catalysts compared to lean-burn engines and oxidation catalyst technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungju; Hu, Shaohua; Kado, Norman Y.; Thiruvengadam, Arvind; Collins, John F.; Gautam, Mridul; Herner, Jorn D.; Ayala, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Chemical and toxicological properties of emissions from compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled transit buses with stoichiometric combustion engines and three-way catalyst (TWC) exhaust control systems were measured using a chassis dynamometer testing facility and compared to the data from earlier CNG engine and exhaust control technologies. Gaseous and particulate matter emissions from buses with stoichiometric engines and TWC were significantly lower than the emissions from buses with lean-burn engines. Carbonyls and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from buses with stoichiometric engines and TWC were lower by more than 99% compared to buses with lean-burn engines. Elemental and organic carbons (EC and OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and trace elements from buses with stoichiometric engines and TWC were effectively controlled and significantly lower than the emissions from buses with lean-burn engines. Potential mutagenicity measured using a microsuspension modification of the Salmonella/microsome assay was lower by more than 99% for buses with stoichiometric engines and TWC, compared to buses with lean-burn engines and OxC.

  2. Real-time measurements of nitrogen oxide emissions from in-use New York City transit buses using a chase vehicle.

    PubMed

    Shorter, Joanne H; Herndon, Scott; Zahniser, Mark S; Nelson, David D; Wormhoudt, Joda; Demerjian, Kenneth L; Kolb, Charles E

    2005-10-15

    New diesel engine technologies and alternative fuel engines are being introduced into fleets of mass transit buses to try to meet stricter emission regulations of nitrogen oxides and particulates: Real-time instruments including an Aerodyne Research tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectrometer (TILDAS) were deployed in a mobile laboratory to assess the impact of the implementation of the new technologies on nitrogen oxide emissions in real world driving conditions. Using a "chase" vehicle sampling strategy, the mobile laboratory followed target vehicles, repeatedly sampling their exhaust. Nitrogen oxides from approximately 170 in-use New York City mass transit buses were sampled during the field campaigns. Emissions from conventional diesel buses, diesel buses with continuously regenerating technology (CRT), diesel hybrid electric buses, and compressed natural gas (CNG) buses were compared. The chase vehicle sampling method yields real world emissions that can be included in more realistic emission inventories. The NO, emissions from the diesel and CNG buses were comparable. The hybrid electric buses had approximately one-half the NOx emissions. In CRT diesels, NO2 accounts for about one-third of the NOx emitted in the exhaust, while for non-CRT buses the NO2 fraction is less than 10%.

  3. Performance comparison of two fuel cell hybrid buses with different powertrain and energy management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Minggao; Xu, Liangfei; Li, Jianqiu; Lu, Languang; Gao, Dawei; Xie, Qicheng

    In order to assess the influences of different powertrain structures and energy management strategies on the performance of hybrid fuel cell buses (FCB), two buses (FCB A and FCB B) were constructed with a "energy hybrid structure" and "power hybrid structure", respectively. Different energy management strategies were investigated based on analysis of the two systems. And the two buses were compared with each other in a bus cycle and constant speed testing. The Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) in FCB A showed an advantage in fuel economy for it worked usually in the high efficient range of the PEMFC engine. The hydrogen consumption rate in the cycle testing was 7.9 kg/100 km and 9.8 kg/100 km for FCB A and FCB B, and in the 40 kmph constant speed testing it was 3.3 kg/100 km and 4.0 kg/100 km, respectively. The fuel economy could be improved when the hydrogen and air supply subsystems are optimized and controlled with an advanced algorithm. It could also benefit from a braking energy regeneration system. Compared with FCB A, the PEMFC in FCB B worked under unfavorable operation conditions because its working range was comparatively wide, and the power changing rate was relatively large from a statistical point of view, which resulted in performance recession of the PEMFC in FCB B. After a mileage of 7000 km, the output power of the PEMFC in FCB B was reduced by 10%, compared with 2.4% in FCB A. An advanced energy management strategy is necessary to split the power between the PEMFC and a battery suitable for long durability of a PEMFC.

  4. High Prevalence of EMRSA-15 in Portuguese Public Buses: A Worrisome Finding

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Roméo Rocha; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta; Conceição, Teresa; Antunes, Filipa; da Costa, Paulo Martins; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2011-01-01

    Background The nosocomial prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Portugal remains one of the highest in Europe and is currently around 50%. Transmission of S. aureus, including MRSA, occurs principally by direct human-to-human skin contact. However, S. aureus can survive for long periods on inanimate objects, which may represent an important reservoir for dissemination as well. Methodology/Principal Findings Between May 2009 and February 2010, handrails of 85 public urban buses circulating in Oporto, Portugal, were screened for the occurrence of MRSA. Twenty-two (26%) buses showed MRSA contamination. The molecular characterization of a total of 55 MRSA, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing, spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), clustered the isolates into three clonal types. However, the overwhelming majority (n = 50; 91%) of the isolates belonged to a single clone (PFGE A, spa types t747, t032, t025 or t020, ST22, SCCmec type IVh) that exhibits the characteristics of the pandemic EMRSA-15, currently the major lineage circulating in Portuguese hospitals, namely in the Oporto region. Two additional clones were found but in much lower numbers: (i) PFGE B, ST5, spa type t002, SCCmec IVa (n = 3), and (ii) PFGE C, spa type t008, ST8, SCCmec IVa (n = 2). None of the 55 isolates was PVL positive. Conclusions/Significance Public buses in Oporto seem to be an important reservoir of MRSA of nosocomial origin, providing evidence that the major hospital-associated MRSA clone in Portugal is escaping from the primary ecological niche of hospitals to the community environment. Infection control measures are urgently warranted to limit the spread of EMRSA-15 to the general population and future studies are required to assess the eventual increase of MRSA in the Portuguese community, which so far remains low. PMID:21407807

  5. Analysis of the cost of hydrogen infrastructure for buses in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, S.; Hart, D.; Pearson, P.; Joffe, D.

    The use of hydrogen (H 2) as transport fuel is often said to suffer from the 'chicken and egg' problem: vehicles that depend on H 2 cannot go on the roads due to the lack of an adequate infrastructure, and the almost non-existent fleet of H 2 vehicles on the roads makes it economically unsound to build a H 2 infrastructure. Although both hydrogen vehicles (fuel cell and internal combustion engine) and the related infrastructure have been (and are being) developed and some are commercially available, cost is seen as a major barrier. With today's technologies, H 2 only becomes competitive with petrol and diesel when produced at large quantities, suitable for supplying e.g. thousands of H 2 buses. The question is, how might this point be reached, and are there least cost infrastructural pathways to reach it. This paper tries to address the latter question, using the early development of a H 2 infrastructure for buses in London as a case study. The paper presents some of the analyses and results from a Ph.D. project (in progress) being undertaken at Imperial College London, funded by EPSRC (Grant GR/R50790/01). The results presented here illustrate that cost of hydrogen production and delivery vary mainly with levels of hydrogen demand and delivery distances, as well as other logistic criteria; least cost production-delivery pathways have been identified for various hydrogen demand scenarios and refuelling station set-ups. Another important conclusion is that the pattern of converting a group of refuelling stations to hydrogen (e.g. a group of refuelling stations for buses in London) has a significant effect on the unit cost of hydrogen.

  6. 77 FR 41878 - Notice of Record of Decision on the Final Environmental Impact Statement that Evaluated the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Record of Decision on the Final Environmental Impact Statement that Evaluated the Proposed Airfield Improvement Project at Palm Beach International Airport, Palm... interested parties that it has issued a Record of Decision (ROD) for the Final Environmental Impact...

  7. 76 FR 14660 - Public Comment on the Development of Final Guidance for Evaluating the Vapor Intrusion to Indoor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... Air Pathway From Contaminated Groundwater and Soils (Subsurface Vapor Intrusion Guidance) AGENCY... Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Pathway from Contaminated Groundwater and Soil (Subsurface Vapor Intrusion... final guidance for Evaluating Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Pathway from Contaminated Groundwater and...

  8. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems. This technical paper recommends several ty...

  9. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems. This technical paper recommends several ty...

  10. First-year evaluation of IMERG - Final Run in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    For almost two years now, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission has provided worldwide satellite rainfall estimates at higher spatiotemporal resolutions than its predecessor TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission). Accurate rainfall estimates at higher resolutions are the main input in modeling physical processes relevant to society like floods, landslides, and weather extremes. Conversely to TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products, the Netherlands is within the coverage of GPM Level-3 products, i.e., IMERG (Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM). The IMERG spatiotemporal resolution is 0.1° x 0.1° every 30 min (180°W to 180°E, and 60°N to 60°S), with latencies of 6, 18 hours and 4 months. Here we evaluate the first full year of the IMERG Day 1 Final Run over the land surface of the Netherlands. IMERG Final Run is considered the research product, and provides the longest public data set among IMERG products. We compare half-hourly and daily IMERG rainfall maps against Dutch gauge-adjusted radar rainfall maps. Radar rainfall maps are provided by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), and are considered as the ground truth given its accuracy, spatiotemporal resolution and availability. In general, there is a tendency of GPM to underestimate rainfall intensities over the land surface of the Netherlands. Nevertheless, this underestimation is relatively low, which suggests a potential applicability of IMERG Final Run as a reliable source of rainfall estimates in diverse hydrological and hydrometeorological applications. The robustness and data availability of IMERG is an important asset, especially in places where rain gauge networks are scarce or poorly maintained, or where weather radar networks are too expensive to acquire and/or maintain.

  11. Thermal Safety of the Current Buses inthe Chimney of the D0 Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.P.; /Fermilab

    1998-01-20

    The thermal and electrical behaviour of the current buses in the chimney of the D0 solenoid during upset conditions is modeled to guide the selection of trip levels for magnet protection circuits which discharge the magnet if abnormal conditions are detected. The current buses in the chimney are designed to operate safely without likelihood of loss of superconductivity as long as normal cooling conditions are maintained. Helium liquid level probes, helium flow instrumentation, and thermometry all are provided to certify that proper cooling conditions exist in the subcooler and chimney at all times. Rising temperatures in any portion of the system, excessive voltage drops on the vapor cooled leads, or decreasing liquid level in the subcooler or flow rate in the system, will each cause the fast discharge system to be triggered. Postulated failures of the helium flow system, somehow undetected by any and all of the aforementioned instrumentation, can in principal eventually lead to loss of superconductivity in the buses. Quenching in one bus will rapidly lead to quenching in the other. Potential taps on the buses and magnet coil halves connected to voltage-detection bridges external to the system provide at least dually redundant signals which will unambiguously trigger the magnet rapid discharge system. The conservative design of the bus system ensures that it will not be damaged during such incidents, however improbable they may be. The transition leads in the subcooler are equally conservatively designed, and would not be damaged if they were operated in a fully non-superconducting state for several minutes. The loss of liquid helium in the sub cooler required to cause this condition would imply that helium flow from the magnet had stopped, which in turn would imply that flow to the magnet had also stopped. The lack of flow into the sub cooler would result in insufficient flow to the vapor cooled leads. Any or all of these conditions would be detected, as would

  12. Field evaluation of fog dispersal tests at Elmira, NY: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.W.; Wattle, B.J.; Mack, E.J.

    1987-06-01

    Calspan Corp., under contract to Energy Innovations, Inc., assisted in tests of the EGD Fog Precipiation System at Elmira/Corning Regional Airport in New York during the summer/fall fog season of 1986 by conducting an independent, objective evaluation of the EGD System during these tests. Specifically, Calspan's role was to: Establish and maintain a network of ground-based visibility monitors and supporting meteorological instrumentation for measuring fog characteristics during EGD System tests at Elmira; provide weather forecasts of the potential for fog at Elmira during the summer-fall fog season; analyze visibility and surface wind velocity measurements to determine the efficacy of the EGD system in producing visibility improvement during dispersal tests; and provide a final independent summary report documenting experiment protocol and the results of Calspan's analyses. 2 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s review of Atlas Corporation`s proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. An integrator final exam at the end of the engineering degrees to evaluate the acquired competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigones, A.; Sánchez, E.; Valiño, V.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade strong changes in the design of university degrees have occurred in Spain, affecting real competences acquired by graduates. The new degrees often provide students greater freedom in shaping their curriculum which results in many cases in a problem for their training. In engineering degrees of Spain, the final project, that allows to know the integrated skills of the students in engineering subjects, is not compulsory anymore; it can be substituted for other specific types of work that often do not involve skills valued by the companies of the industrial sector. This situation may create doubts about the real competences of the graduates. In the present study, a final exam (voluntary) has been carried out during three years to assess competences in engineering students in the last course of the degree in agricultural engineering (diploma of five years) and agricultural technical engineering (diploma of three years) at the Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain). They took part 132 students in the years 2006, 2007 and 2008. The exam had a common format, with three parts assessing skills in construction, machinery and electrical installations. The results showed the evolution in the training of students, and the relationship between skills acquired and late differences in the learning process. The most important conclusions were that the attainment levels was lower than expected, but generally consistent with the training received by each group of students. In particular, the low number of hours of subjects in electrical installations in certain groups of students was evident when evaluating the skills acquired. The results indicated that they aim to increase the number of hours in certain subjects and groups of students, if a graduate is to get qualified. The authors recommend an examination similar to the raised, integrator type, in all programs that do not have any overall final assessment in order to conduct a quality control of graduates

  15. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  16. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-12-14

    The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board or Board) is issuing a final rule that revises its existing accessibility guidelines for non-rail vehicles--namely, buses, over-the-road buses, and vans--acquired or remanufactured by entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act. The revised guidelines ensure that such vehicles are readily accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is required to revise its accessibility standards for transportation vehicles acquired or remanufactured by entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to be consistent with the final rule.

  17. Human Factors Assessment: The Passive Final Approach Spacing Tool (pFAST) Operational Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Katharine K.; Sanford, Beverly D.

    1998-01-01

    Automation to assist air traffic controllers in the current terminal and en route air traff ic environments is being developed at Ames Research Center in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration. This automation, known collectively as the Center-TRACON Automation System (CTAS), provides decision- making assistance to air traffic controllers through computer-generated advisories. One of the CTAS tools developed specifically to assist terminal area air traffic controllers is the Passive Final Approach Spacing Tool (pFAST). An operational evaluation of PFAST was conducted at the Dallas/Ft. Worth, Texas, Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facility. Human factors data collected during the test describe the impact of the automation upon the air traffic controller in terms of perceived workload and acceptance. Results showed that controller self-reported workload was not significantly increased or reduced by the PFAST automation; rather, controllers reported that the levels of workload remained primarily the same. Controller coordination and communication data were analyzed, and significant differences in the nature of controller coordination were found. Controller acceptance ratings indicated that PFAST was acceptable. This report describes the human factors data and results from the 1996 Operational Field Evaluation of Passive FAST.

  18. Post-Injection Geophysical Evaluation of the Winding Ridge Site CRADA 98-F012, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Connie Lyons; Richard Current; Terry Ackman

    1998-09-16

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) from underground mines is a major environmental problem. The disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCB) is also a major national problem due to the large volumes produced annually and the economics associated with transportation and environmentally safe disposal. The concept of returning large volumes of the CCB to their point of origin, underground mines, and using the typically alkaline and pozzolanic attributes of the waste material for the remediation of AMD has been researched rather diligently during the past few years by various federal and state agencies and universities. As the result, the State of Maryland initiated a full-scale demonstration of this concept in a small, 5-acre, unmapped underground mine located near Friendsville, MD. Through a cooperative agreement between the State of Maryland and the U.S. Department of Energy, several geophysical techniques were evaluated as potential tools for the post-injection evaluation of the underground mine site. Three non-intrusive geophysical surveys, two electromagnetic (EM) techniques and magnetometry, were conducted over the Frazee Mine, which is located on Winding Ridge near Friendsville, MD. The EM surveys were conducted to locate ground water in both mine void and overburden. The presence of magnetite, which is naturally inherent to CCB'S due to the combustion process and essentially transparent in sedimentary rock, provided the reason for using magnetometry to locate the final resting place of the CCB grout.

  19. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-02-01

    This report evaluates a fuel cell electric bus demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This evaluation report covers two years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2013.

  20. Lagrangian Hotspots of In-Use NOX Emissions from Transit Buses.

    PubMed

    Kotz, Andrew J; Kittelson, David B; Northrop, William F

    2016-06-07

    In-use, spatiotemporal NOX emissions were measured from a conventional powertrain transit bus and a series electric hybrid bus over gradients of route kinetic intensity and ambient temperature. This paper introduces a new method for identifying NOX emissions hotspots along a bus route using high fidelity Lagrangian vehicle data to explore spatial interactions that may influence emissions production. Our study shows that the studied transit buses emit higher than regulated emissions because on-route operation does not accurately represent the range of engine operation tested according to regulatory standards. Using the Lagrangian hotspot detection, we demonstrate that NOX hotspots occurred at bus stops, during cold starts, on inclines, and for accelerations. On the selected routes, bus stops resulted in 3.3 times the route averaged emissions factor in grams/km without significant dependence on bus type or climate. The buses also emitted 2.3 times the route averaged NOX emissions factor at the beginning of each route due to cold selective catalytic reduction aftertreatment temperature. The Lagrangian hotspot detection technique demonstrated here could be employed in future connected vehicles empowered by advances in computational power, data storage capability, and improved sensor technology to optimize emissions as a function of spatial location.

  1. Experimental study on the grip and hold strength for stanchions and handrails in buses.

    PubMed

    Uetake, Teruo; Shimoda, Masahiro

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effective use of stanchions and handrails in buses. We constructed experimental equipment resembling bus stanchions and handrails and examined the grip and hold strength exerted when used. The total number of subjects was 80: 30 elderly and 19 young males, and 22 elderly and 9 young females. The experimental equipment comprised four parts: a handle part to imitate safety devices in buses such as stanchions, handrails, and straps, which was pulled by a winch at a constant speed; and a load cell wired with an analyzing processor, which output the strength exerted. The handle part was designed to measure grip and hold strengths against pulling forces in three directions, that is, forward, in the direction of the back of the hand, and in the direction of the palm. The subjects were asked to grasp the handle part against a pulling force. The maximum grip and hold strengths were recorded and analyzed. The strengths when pulled forward were the largest independent of the sex and age of the subjects. The results indicate that standing bus passengers should grip the fixtures, such as a stanchion, with their right hand when they are standing on the right side in a bus facing the windows.

  2. Development of a driving cycle for intra-city buses in Chennai, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesamani, K. S.; Subramanian, K. P.

    2011-10-01

    In India the emissions rate and fuel consumption of intra-city buses are estimated using the European driving cycles, which don't represent Indian driving conditions and in-use operation of vehicles. This leads to underestimation or overestimation of emissions and fuel consumption. In this context, this paper offers some insight into the driving characteristics of intra-city buses using a Global Positioning System. The study has revealed that irrespective of road type and time of travel, a higher percentage of time is spent in idle mode. This is primarily due to alighting and boarding of passengers at regular intervals and fixed delays caused by traffic lights. More than 90 percent of trips have an average speed of less than 30 km h -1. This study has also developed an intra-city bus driving cycle for Chennai and compared it with some well-known international driving cycles. It has revealed that Chennai has unique driving characteristics and, therefore, it may not be appropriate to adopt a driving cycle of another country or city.

  3. Experimental studies on annoyance caused by noises from trams and buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrock, Stephan; Griefahn, Barbara; Kaczmarek, Tomasz; Hafke, Honorata; Preis, Anna; Gjestland, Truls

    2008-06-01

    Acute annoyance due to noise from trams and buses was ascertained and compared in two experimental studies. First, 22 healthy young persons (19-22 years) using a standardised scale, rated their annoyance caused by noise from trams, buses and trucks, which were each presented at seven sound levels. The noise of a tram was judged to be equally annoying as the noise of a bus with a 3 dB lower level, which corresponds to the calculated loudness difference. The noises of a tram and of a bus were superimposed onto a 2-h realistic road traffic scenario in the second study. This study was conducted with 60 healthy young persons (18-31 years). Twenty participants were each exposed either to the scenario with the tram or the bus ( LAeqT=55 dBA) or to a control condition ( LAeqT=43.6 dBA) while working on different mental tasks. Performance data did not differentiate between the noise conditions, but the participants were again less annoyed by the scenario with the tram, suggesting a possible bonus for the tram. This assumption has to be verified in future studies. The fact that calculated loudness could predict annoyance in the psychoacoustic tests and this annoyance due to the same noises presented in complex scenarios might indicate the possibility of a more economical approach, at least to noises between which loudness differs greatly.

  4. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Final ACT configuration evaluation. Final Report, October 1980-April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The Final ACT Configuration Evaluation Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology project within the energy efficient transport program is summarized. The Final ACT Configuration, through application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span, exhibits significant performance improvements over the conventional baseline configuration. At the design range for these configurations, 3590 km, the block fuel used is 10% less for the Final ACT Configuration, with significant reductions in fuel usage at all operational ranges. Results of this improved fuel usage and additional system and airframe costs and the complexity required to achieve it were analyzed to determine its economic effects. For a 926 km mission, the incremental return on investment is nearly 25% at 1980 fuel prices. For longer range missions or increased fuel prices, the return is greater. The technical risks encountered in the Final ACT Configuration design and the research and development effort required to reduce these risks to levels acceptable for commercial airplane design are identified.

  5. 26 CFR 48.6421-2 - Credits or payments to ultimate purchasers of gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses. 48.6421-2 Section 48.6421-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6421-2 Credits or payments to ultimate purchasers of gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses. (a) In general. If gasoline is used in an intercity or local bus while engaged in...

  6. 26 CFR 48.6421-2 - Credits or payments to ultimate purchasers of gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses. 48.6421-2 Section 48.6421-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6421-2 Credits or payments to ultimate purchasers of gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses. (a) In general. If gasoline is used in an intercity or local bus while engaged in...

  7. 26 CFR 48.6427-6 - Limitation on credit or refund of tax paid on fuel used in intercity, local or school buses after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fuel used in intercity, local or school buses after July 31, 1984. 48.6427-6 Section 48.6427-6 Internal... intercity, local or school buses after July 31, 1984. (a) Limitation on amount of credit or refund—(1) In general. In the case of fuel sold or used after July 31, 1984, on which tax was imposed under section 4041...

  8. 40 CFR 85.1403 - Particulate standard for pre-1994 model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... levels in grams per brake horsepower-hour (g/bhp-hr) are based on engine type and model year and are... model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or engine replacement. 85.1403 Section 85... for pre-1994 model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or engine replacement. (a...

  9. 40 CFR 85.1403 - Particulate standard for pre-1994 model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... levels in grams per brake horsepower-hour (g/bhp-hr) are based on engine type and model year and are... model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or engine replacement. 85.1403 Section 85... for pre-1994 model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or engine replacement. (a...

  10. 40 CFR 85.1403 - Particulate standard for pre-1994 model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... levels in grams per brake horsepower-hour (g/bhp-hr) are based on engine type and model year and are... model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or engine replacement. 85.1403 Section 85... for pre-1994 model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or engine replacement. (a...

  11. 40 CFR 85.1403 - Particulate standard for pre-1994 model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... levels in grams per brake horsepower-hour (g/bhp-hr) are based on engine type and model year and are... model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or engine replacement. 85.1403 Section 85... for pre-1994 model year urban buses effective at time of engine rebuild or engine replacement. (a...

  12. 26 CFR 48.6421-2 - Credits or payments to ultimate purchasers of gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses. 48.6421-2 Section 48.6421-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., or school buses. (a) In general. If gasoline is used in an intercity or local bus while engaged in... bus engaged in the transportation of students or employees of schools, a credit (under...

  13. 26 CFR 48.6427-6 - Limitation on credit or refund of tax paid on fuel used in intercity, local or school buses after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fuel used in intercity, local or school buses after July 31, 1984. 48.6427-6 Section 48.6427-6 Internal... intercity, local or school buses after July 31, 1984. (a) Limitation on amount of credit or refund—(1) In... except where fuel is used in a bus while such bus is being operated as a “qualified local bus” in...

  14. 26 CFR 48.6421-2 - Credits or payments to ultimate purchasers of gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... gasoline used in intercity, local, or school buses. 48.6421-2 Section 48.6421-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., or school buses. (a) In general. If gasoline is used in an intercity or local bus while engaged in... bus engaged in the transportation of students or employees of schools, a credit (under...

  15. 26 CFR 48.6427-6 - Limitation on credit or refund of tax paid on fuel used in intercity, local or school buses after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fuel used in intercity, local or school buses after July 31, 1984. 48.6427-6 Section 48.6427-6 Internal... intercity, local or school buses after July 31, 1984. (a) Limitation on amount of credit or refund—(1) In... except where fuel is used in a bus while such bus is being operated as a “qualified local bus” in...

  16. 26 CFR 48.6427-6 - Limitation on credit or refund of tax paid on fuel used in intercity, local or school buses after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fuel used in intercity, local or school buses after July 31, 1984. 48.6427-6 Section 48.6427-6 Internal... intercity, local or school buses after July 31, 1984. (a) Limitation on amount of credit or refund—(1) In... except where fuel is used in a bus while such bus is being operated as a “qualified local bus” in...

  17. Final evaluation of characterizing pipe-over-pack containers using high efficiency neutron counters

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Pete; Stanfield, Sean B; Wachter, Joe; Cramer, Doug; Harvill, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of Transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) packed in Pipe-over-Pack Containers (POC) contain a number of complexities. The POC is highly attenuating to both gamma rays and neutrons which presents a difficult waste matrix for correct quantification of material in the container. Currently there are a number ofPOC containers at LANL that require evaluation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. Updated data has been evaluated that finalizes the evaluation of characterizing Pipe-Over-Pack Containers. Currently at LANL, a single instrument has been used to explore the appropriateness of both passive neutron and quantitative gamma ray methods for measuring POC's. The passive neutron approach uses the Reals coincidence count rate to establish plutonium mass and other parameters of interest for TRU waste. The quantitative gamma ray method assumes a homogeneous distribution of radioactive source material with the surrounding material throughout the drum volume. Drums are assayed with a calibration based on the known density of the matrix. Both methods are supplemented by a simultaneous isotopic measurement using Multi-Group Analysis (MGA) to determine the plutonium isotopic composition. If MGA fails to provide a viable isotopic result Fixed Energy Response function Analysis with Multiple efficiencies (FRAM) has been used to replace the MGA results. Acceptable Knowledge (AK) may also be used in certain instances. This report will discuss the two methods in detail. Included in the discussion will be descriptions of the setup parameters and calibration techniques for the instrument. A number of test measurements have been performed to compare HENC data with certified historical data. Empty POCs loaded with known sources have also been measured to determine the viability of the technique. A comparison between calorimetry data, historical measurements and HENC data will also be

  18. Implementation and student evaluation of clinical final examination in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, Gunilla; Löfmark, Anna

    2013-12-01

    Clinical examinations have a distinct focus, the overall aim being to demonstrate through action whether nursing students have acquired the knowledge and skills necessary to be safe and accountable practitioners. This complexity of knowledge cannot be assessed using single examinations, thus there is a need to develop multiple assessment approaches. To describe the process of developing valid clinical examinations for nursing students at the end of the final semester and to evaluate students' perceptions of these examination formats. Based on earlier research, overall goals for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing and guided by both task-related and relational aspects of nursing, two clinical final examinations were developed and tested. One was a standardized test of performance in vitro using Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) based on five specific areas in which newly graduated nurses had shown deficiencies. The other was a test of performance in real conditions, in vivo, using Bedside Observation Examination (BOE) assessing nurse-patient relation, entirely based on patients' needs. Three classes of students (n=203) were asked to participate and answer a study-specific questionnaire. The students highly valued the two examinations and perceived that the knowledge and skills tested were relevant to nurses' work. They found the examinations stressful, but at the same time meaningful, and felt they could do themselves full justice through this form of examination. The assessment test should be chosen depending on the preferred outcome. The OSCE, with its high degree of standardization, is appropriate to use to assess task-related aspects of nursing (show how), while the BOE, with its low degree of standardization, is suitable in real settings and has the potential to capture the relational aspects of nursing (does). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Program To Teach Naturalistic Early Intervention Strategies in Inclusive Environments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Sarah

    This final report describes the development and evaluation of a project that was funded by the U.S. Department of Education to develop, evaluate, revise, and disseminate a video-assisted, competency-referenced curriculum to teach naturalistic intervention strategies in inclusive, early intervention settings. The project, called Strategies for…

  20. Evaluation of the New York City Dropout Prevention Initiative 1985-86 through 1987-88. Final Longitudinal Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grannis, Joseph; And Others

    This document, a two-volume report, provides in volume 1 the final longitudinal evaluation of the New York City Dropout Prevention Initiative (DPI), 1985-86 through 1987-88. (The second volume comprises appendices containing summaries of each previous evaluation for this time period.) The DPI was implemented in 13 high schools and 29 feeder middle…

  1. Evaluation of New Century High Schools: Profile of an Initiative to Create and Sustain Small, Successful High Schools. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Eileen M.; Klinge, Allan; Reisner, Elizabeth R.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of the New Century High Schools (NCHS) initiative examined operations and student outcomes in 75 schools from 2002-2003 through 2005-2006. This report, the final in a series of annual evaluation reports, presents data collected over those years, with a focus on school year 2005-2006. The NCHS initiative grew out of a program theory…

  2. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    B. C. Culp

    2007-05-01

    Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

  3. Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2005-09-29

    Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Report Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC) has performed a conceptual design study concerning aeroelastic tailoring of small wind turbine blades. The primary objectives were to evaluate ways that blade/rotor geometry could be used to enable cost-of-energy reductions by enhancing energy capture while constraining or mitigating blade costs, system loads, and related component costs. This work builds on insights developed in ongoing adaptive-blade programs but with a focus on application to small turbine systems with isotropic blade material properties and with combined blade sweep and pre-bending/pre-curving to achieve the desired twist coupling. Specific goals of this project are to: (A) Evaluate and quantify the extent to which rotor geometry can be used to realize load-mitigating small wind turbine rotors. Primary aspects of the load mitigation are: (1) Improved overspeed safety affected by blades twisting toward stall in response to speed increases. (2) Reduced fatigue loading affected by blade twisting toward feather in response to turbulent gusts. (B) Illustrate trade-offs and design sensitivities for this concept. (C) Provide the technical basis for small wind turbine manufacturers to evaluate this concept and commercialize if the technology appears favorable. The SolidWorks code was used to rapidly develop solid models of blade with varying shapes and material properties. Finite element analyses (FEA) were performed using the COSMOS code modeling with tip-loads and centripetal accelerations. This tool set was used to investigate the potential for aeroelastic tailoring with combined planform sweep and pre-curve. An extensive matrix of design variables was investigated, including aerodynamic design, magnitude and shape of planform sweep, magnitude and shape of blade pre-curve, material stiffness, and rotor diameter. The FEA simulations resulted in substantial insights into the structural

  4. Assigning unknown parent groups to reduce bias in genomic evaluations of final score in US Holsteins.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, S; Misztal, I; Lourenco, D A L; Lawlor, T J

    2014-09-01

    Assigning unknown parent groups (UPG) in mixed-model equations using single-step genomic BLUP was investigated to reduce bias and to increase accuracy in genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV). The original UPG were defined based on the animal's birth year and the sex of the animal's unknown parents. Combining the last 2 UPG for the animals' birth years and separating the UPG for US and non-US Holsteins were considered in the redefinition. A full data set in the 2011 national genetic evaluation of final score in US Holsteins was used to calculate estimated breeding values (EBV) for validation, and a subset of the 2011 data, which excluded phenotypes recorded after 2007, was used to calculate GEBV for all animals, including 34,500 genotyped bulls. The EBV and GEBV in 2007 were compared with EBV in the 2011 full data. The last group effects for unknown sires and dams were overestimated with the GEBV model using the reduced 2007 data. The genetic trends from EBV in 2011 and GEBV in 2007 with the original UPG in the last few years demonstrated inflation, whereas GEBV with the redefined UPG by combining the last 2 groups showed deflation. On the other hand, the redefined UPG by separating for US and non-US Holsteins reduced the bias in GEBV. Regression coefficients smaller than unity for GEBV for young genotyped bulls with no daughters in 2007 on progeny deviations in 2011 also indicated inflation. The redefining of UPG reduced bias and slightly increased accuracy in GEBV for both US and non-US genotyped bulls. Rank correlations between GEBV in 2007 and in 2011 with the redefined UPG were higher than those with no UPG and the original UPG, especially for non-US bulls. Redefining of UPG in genomic evaluation could improve reliability of GEBV and provide correct genetic trends.

  5. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Matthew

    2015-08-20

    By combining the top performing commercial laser beam stabilization system with the most ideal optical imaging configuration, the beamline for the Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will deliver the highest quality and most stable beam to the cathode. To determine the optimal combination, LCLS-II beamline conditions were replicated and the systems tested with a He-Ne laser. The Guidestar-II and MRC active laser beam stabilization systems were evaluated for their ideal positioning and stability. Both a two and four lens optical imaging configuration was then evaluated for beam imaging quality, magnification properties, and natural stability. In their best performances when tested over fifteen hours, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable over approximately 70-110um while the MRC system kept it stable over approximately 90-100um. During short periods of time, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable between 10-20um, but was more susceptible to drift over time, while the MRC system maintained the beam between 30-50um with less overall drift. The best optical imaging configuration proved to be a four lens system that images to the iris located in the cathode room and from there, imaged to the cathode. The magnification from the iris to the cathode was 2:1, within an acceptable tolerance to the expected 2.1:1 magnification. The two lens configuration was slightly more stable in small periods of time (less than 10 minutes) without the assistance of a stability system, approximately 55um compared to approximately 70um, but the four lens configurations beam image had a significantly flatter intensity distribution compared to the two lens configuration which had a Gaussian distribution. A final test still needs to be run with both stability systems running at the same time through the four lens system. With this data, the optimal laser beam stabilization system can be determined for the beamline of LCLS-II.

  6. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  7. High speed video analysis of rockfall fence system evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.A.; Lucero, J.P.

    1998-07-01

    Rockfall fence systems are used to protect motorists from rocks, dislodged from slopes near roadways, which would potentially roll onto the road at high speeds carrying significant energy. There is an unfortunate list of such rocks on unprotected roads that have caused fatalities and other damage. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel from the Engineering Science and Applications Division, Measurement Technology Group (ESA-MT), participated in a series of rockfall fence system tests at a test range in Rifle, Colorado during March 1998. The tests were for the evaluation and certification of four rockfall fence system designs of Chama Valley Manufacturing (CVM), a Small Business, located in Chama, New Mexico. Also participating in the tests were the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) who provided the test range and some heavy equipment support and High Tech Construction who installed the fence systems. LANL provided two high speed video systems and operators to record each individual rockfall on each fence system. From the recordings LANL then measured the linear and rotational velocities at impact for each rockfall. Using the LANL velocity results, CVM then could calculate the impact energy of each rockfall and therefore certify each design up to the maximum energy that each fence system could absorb without failure. LANL participated as an independent, impartial velocity measurement entity only and did not contribute to the fence systems design or installation. CVM has published a more detailed final report covering all aspects of the project.

  8. [Evaluation of the esthetic effect of resin cements on the final color of ceramic veneer restorations].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Shaopu; Xing, Wenzhong; Zhan, Kangru; Wang, Yining

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of various shades of resin cements on the final color of an improved lithium-disilicate pressed glass ceramic veneers and analyze the agreement of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes. Forty-eight artificial maxillary central incisor teeth were sequenced according to the measured color parameters and divided at random into 8 groups (n = 6). These artificial teeth were prepared following veneer preparation protocol. An improved lithium- disilicate pressed glass ceramic materials (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) were selected as the veneer material. The shape and curvature of each veneer wax pattern were duplicated with the same impression to guarantee the similarity. The ceramic veneer specimens were delivered on the artificial teeth using the corresponding try-in pastes of 8 shades (Variolink Veneer, shades of LV-3, LV-2, MV, HV+2, HV+3; and 3M RelyXTM Veneer, shades of WO, TR, A3) and bonded with the resin cements. A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of the ceramic veneers before the try-in, during the try-in procedure, and after cementation. ΔE values and C*ab values were calculated. The result of one-way ANOVA indicated that the color changes of ceramic veneer cementation with resin cements were statistically significantly different in the shades of resin cements (P < 0.001). The ΔE values of ceramic veneer after cementation ranged from 0.93 to 6.79. The color changes of ceramic veneer specimens using the shades of LV-3, HV+3, WO were 3.31, 4.90 and 6.79, respectively (ΔE>3.3). The ΔE values of the ceramic veneer specimens between the resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes were from 0.72 to 1.79 (except the shade of HV+3). The LV-3, HV+3, WO shades were able to change the final color of a ceramic veneer. The color of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes achieved high agreement (except the shade of HV+3).

  9. EPA Love the Bus awards $200,000 to Oregon School Districts for cleaner, healthier school buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle-Feb. 10, 2015) In conjunction with Love the Bus Month, dedicated to showing appreciation for school buses and their drivers, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is awarding the Reynolds and Springfield School Districts in Oregon $100,000 each

  10. EPA Love the Bus awards $90,000 to Puyallup School District for cleaner, healthier school buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle-Feb. 10, 2015) In conjunction with Love the Bus month, dedicated to showing appreciation for school buses and their drivers, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is awarding the Puyallup School District $90,000 to replace four diesel school

  11. Physical characterization of fine particulate matter inside the public transit buses fueled by biodiesel in Toledo, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, Kaushik K; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-06-15

    This study presents the physical characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM) collected inside the urban-public transit buses in Toledo, OH. These buses run on 20% biodiesel blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) (B20). For risk analysis, it is crucial to know the modality of the size distribution and the shape factor of PM collected inside the bus. The number-size distribution, microstructure, and aspect ratio of fine PM filter samples collected in the urban-public transit buses were measured for three years (2007-2009), using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Only the reproducible results from repeated experiments on ESEM and size distribution obtained by the GRIMM dust monitor were used in this study. The size distribution was found bi-modal in the winter and fall months and was primarily uni-modal during spring and summer. The aspect ratio for different filter samples collected inside the bus range from 2.4 to 3.6 in average value, with standard deviation ranging from 0.9 to 7.4. The square-shaped and oblong-shaped particles represent the single inhalable particle's morphology characteristics in the air of the Toledo transit buses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. NAA of an iridium tracer to determine soot exposure of students commuting on Baltimore`s buses

    SciTech Connect

    Ondov, J.M.; Wu, C.C.; Lin, Zhibo; Kidwell, C.B.

    1997-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that short-term increases in indices of particulate air pollution are associated with increased mortality and morbidity from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. An important component of urban aerosol, diesel soot, is a known respiratory irritant and contains mutagenic and carcinogenic organic compounds. In the United States, motor vehicles are thought to be the largest single source of atmospheric soot and account for {approximately}36% of the annual anthropogenic emission of toxic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Much of the motor-vehicle-derived PAH originates from diesel-powered vehicles because their PAH emissions are up to 50-fold greater than those from gasoline engines. In Baltimore, city high school students take public buses to school and, often, must stand at bus stops while many diesel buses pass or stop before their own buses arrive. To estimate student exposures to soot emitted from public diesel buses (MTA) during commutes to city high schools, the Baltimore municipal fuel supply was tagged with an iridium tracer, and exposure was monitored during commutes with personal aerosol monitors as a part of the Baltimore Environmental Justice Project.

  13. Simulations of the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Hybrid Transit Buses over Planned Local Routes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E; Franzese, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    We present simulated fuel economy and emissions city transit buses powered by conventional diesel engines and diesel-hybrid electric powertrains of varying size. Six representative city drive cycles were included in the study. In addition, we included previously published aftertreatment device models for control of CO, HC, NOx, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Our results reveal that bus hybridization can significantly enhance fuel economy by reducing engine idling time, reducing demands for accessory loads, exploiting regenerative braking, and shifting engine operation to speeds and loads with higher fuel efficiency. Increased hybridization also tends to monotonically reduce engine-out emissions, but trends in the tailpipe (post-aftertreatment) emissions involve more complex interactions that significantly depend on motor size and drive cycle details.

  14. Constructing and Evaluating a Validity Argument for the Final-Year Ward Simulation Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's…

  15. Constructing and Evaluating a Validity Argument for the Final-Year Ward Simulation Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's…

  16. Aerosol particles generated by diesel-powered school buses at urban schools as a source of children's exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstetler, Heather A.; Yermakov, Mikhail; Reponen, Tiina; Ryan, Patrick H.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2011-03-01

    Various heath effects in children have been associated with exposure to traffic-related particulate matter (PM), including emissions from school buses. In this study, the indoor and outdoor aerosol at four urban elementary schools serviced by diesel-powered school buses was characterized with respect to the particle number concentrations and size distributions as well as the PM2.5 mass concentrations and elemental compositions. It was determined that the presence of school buses significantly affected the outdoor particle size distribution, specifically in the ultrafine fraction. The time-weighted average of the total number concentration measured outside the schools was significantly associated with the bus and the car counts. The concentration increase was consistently observed during the morning drop-off hours and in most of the days during the afternoon pick-up period (although at a lower degree). Outdoor PM2.5 mass concentrations measured at schools ranged from 3.8 to 27.6 μg m-3. The school with the highest number of operating buses exhibited the highest average PM2.5 mass concentration. The outdoor mass concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) were also highest at the school with the greatest number of buses. Most (47/55) correlations between traffic-related elements identified in the outdoor PM2.5 were significant with elements identified in the indoor PM2.5. Significant associations were observed between indoor and outdoor aerosols for EC, EC/OC, and the total particle number concentration. Day-to-day and school-to-school variations in Indoor/Outdoor (I/O) ratios were related to the observed differences in opening windows and doors, which enhanced the particle penetration, as well as indoor activities at schools. Overall, the results on I/O ratio obtained in this study reflect the sizes of particles emitted by diesel-powered school bus engines (primarily, an ultrafine fraction capable of penetrating indoors).

  17. Assessing factors causing severe injuries in crashes of high-deck buses in long-distance driving on freeways.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hsing-Chung

    2014-01-01

    High-deck buses that have a higher center of gravity traveling at an excessive speed have a higher likelihood of causing serious and fatal accidents when drivers lose control of the vehicle. In addition, drivers who suffer from fatigue in long-distance driving increase the likelihood of serious accident. This paper examines the effects of risk factors contributing to severe crashes associated with high-deck buses used for long-distance driving on freeways. An ordered logit and latent class models are used to examine significant factors on the severity of injuries in crashes related to high-deck buses. Driver fatigue, drivers or passengers not wearing a seat belt, reckless driving, drunk driving, crashes occurred between midnight and dawn, and crashes occurred at interchange ramps were found to significantly affect the severity of injuries in crashes involving high-deck buses. Safety policies to prevent severe injuries in crashes involving high deck buses used for long-distance runs on freeways include: (1) restricting drivers from exceeding the limit of daily driving hours and mandating sufficient rest breaks; (2) installing an automatic sleep-warning device in the vehicle; (3) drivers with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or sleep disorders should be tested and treated before they are allowed to perform long hours of driving tasks; (4) educating the public or even amending the seatbelt legislation to require all passengers to wear a seat belt and thus reduce the chance of ejection from a high-deck bus and prevent serious injuries in a crash while traveling at a higher speed on freeways.

  18. Revised data book for evaluation of combustion and gasification models: Final report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, K.R.; Rasband, M.W.; Smoot, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    During the previous contract (DE-AC21-81MC16518) a major task was to identify, collect and publish detailed experimental data for evaluation of comprehensive gasification/combustion codes. A review of the literature was completed and prospective data were identified for inclusion in this data book in five categories of increasing complexity: (1) non-reacting, gaseous flows (58 cases); (2) non-reacting, particle-laden flows (43 cases); (3) gaseous combustion (34 cases); (4) pulverized coal combustion (57 cases); (5) entrained coal gasification (6 cases). Selection of these data was based on a set of criteria which included data completeness, availability of detailed, digital profiles for several properties (e.g., species concentrations, velocity, temperature) and data accuracy. From these 198 cases, which were referenced in the final report (Vol. III), the data base was reduced to a total of 35 sets of data from 8 laboratories, with at least 3 cases in each category above. For these 35 cases, the measured data, together with geometrical dimensions and test conditions were documented in a uniform tabular format. These data were also stored on a magnetic tape for distribution. During this follow-on contract (DE-AC21-85MC22059), the accuracy of the data was checked and several additional corrections were made. The format for reporting the data (Appendix B) was simplified. Also, a review of additional data sets available from the Combustion Laboratory and other sources was completed. In all, 213 cases from 52 investigators at 18 laboratories were considered and 37 cases are included in this data book from 22 different investigations at 8 independent laboratories. 81 refs.

  19. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining

  20. Evaluation of intergranular attack on Alloy 600: Volume 2, Effectiveness of boric acid: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hermer, R.E.; Wolfe, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of boric acid applied on-line and via crevice flushing was evaluated in this program as a remedial action for intergranular attack on mill annealed Alloy 600 steam generator tubing in tubesheet and support plate crevices. Single tube model boilers were used to simulate the full length of a steam generator tubesheet crevice and the support plate crevices at hot leg conditions. The tubesheet crevices had preloaded inventories of 10% sodium hydroxide/2.5% sodium sulfate solution. All of the crevices were exposed to on-line additions of 0.1 ppM hydroxide and 0.04 ppM sulfate as the sodium salts. These baseline conditions caused pre-existing IGA beneath eccentrically mounted support plates to increase in depth at a rate of 2.40 ..mu..m/day. In the tubesheet crevices the pre-existing IGA increased in depth at a rate of 1.6 ..mu..m/day. The virgin mill annealed tubing in the tubesheet crevice developed IGA at a rate of 0.73 ..mu..m/day during the final 60 days of the 90 day test. The first 30 days were an incubation period during which no IGA occurred. The results of this work suggest that boric acid can inhibit IGA on unattacked tubing when applied continuously at the field specifiation of 5 to 10 ppM in the blowdown. It can also slow down propagation of pre-existing IGA if present in the proper ratio (which requires adequate treatment levels) and if it can access the corrosion sites. Corrosion may progress in areas where boric acid is not able to penetrate in sufficient excess to the corrodent present. 10 refs., 85 figs., 39 tabs.

  1. Exposure assessment of particulates of diesel and natural gas fuelled buses in silico.

    PubMed

    Pietikäinen, Mari; Oravisjärvi, Kati; Rautio, Arja; Voutilainen, Arto; Ruuskanen, Juhani; Keiski, Riitta L

    2009-12-15

    Lung deposition estimates of particulate emissions of diesel and natural gas (CNG) fuelled vehicles were studied by using in silico methodology. Particulate emissions and particulate number size distributions of two Euro 2 petroleum based diesel buses and one Euro 3 gas bus were measured. One of the petroleum based diesel buses used in the study was equipped with an oxidation catalyst on the vehicle (DI-OC) while the second had a partial-DPF catalyst (DI-pDPF). The third bus used was the gas bus with an oxidation catalyst on the vehicle (CNG-OC). The measurements were done using a transient chassis dynamometer test cycle (Braunschweig cycle) and an Electric Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) with formed particulates in the size range of 7 nm to 10 microm. The total amounts of the emitted diesel particulates were 88-fold for DI-OC and 57-fold for DI-pDPF compared to the total amount of emitted CNG particulates. Estimates for the deposited particulates were computed with a lung deposition model ICRP 66 using in-house MATLAB scripts. The results were given as particulate numbers and percentages deposited in five different regions of the respiratory system. The percentages of particulates deposited in the respiratory system were 56% for DI-OC, 51% for DI-pDPF and 77% for CNG-OC of all the inhaled particulates. The result shows that under similar conditions the total lung dose of particulates originating from petroleum diesel fuelled engines DI-OC and DI-pDPF was more than 60-fold and 35-fold, respectively, compared to the lung dose of particulates originating from the CNG fuelled engine. The results also indicate that a majority (35-50%) of the inhaled particulates emitted from the tested petroleum diesel and CNG engines penetrate deep into the unciliated regions of the lung where gas-exchange occurs.

  2. In-vehicle measurement of ultrafine particles on compressed natural gas, conventional diesel, and oxidation-catalyst diesel heavy-duty transit buses.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Davyda; Jones, Steven; Lalor, Melinda

    2007-02-01

    Many metropolitan transit authorities are considering upgrading transit bus fleets to decrease ambient criteria pollutant levels. Advancements in engine and fuel technology have lead to a generation of lower-emission buses in a variety of fuel types. Dynamometer tests show substantial reductions in particulate mass emissions for younger buses (<10 years) over older models, but particle number reduction has not been verified in the research. Recent studies suggest that particle number is a more important factor than particle mass in determining health effects. In-vehicle particle number concentration measurements on conventional diesel, oxidation-catalyst diesel and compressed natural gas transit buses are compared to estimate relative in-vehicle particulate exposures. Two primary consistencies are observed from the data: the CNG buses have average particle count concentrations near the average concentrations for the oxidation-catalyst diesel buses, and the conventional diesel buses have average particle count concentrations approximately three to four times greater than the CNG buses. Particle number concentrations are also noticeably affected by bus idling behavior and ventilation options, such as, window position and air conditioning.

  3. Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  4. Film Evaluations of Eskimo Education. The National Study of American Indian Education, Series III, No. 4, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, John, Jr.

    As a part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, the educational environments of schools in 2 Alaskan tundra villages, in a state-consolidated school in Bethel, and in Anchorage public schools were filmed to provide empirical evidence for the evaluation of Eskimo education. This film study was pointed toward…

  5. The Design and Implementation of a Formative Evaluation Study for the Child and Family Resource Program. Executive Summary. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This executive summary of the final report of the formative evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) demonstration projects recommends that the Office of Child Development (OCD): (1) assign a full-time OCD project manager to the demonstration in the early stages of the project; (2) implement a systematic approach to assure that…

  6. Family Matters: Evaluation of the Parental Empowerment Program. A Summary of a Final Report to the National Institute of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Moncrieff; Henderson, Charles R., Jr.

    This report summarizes the final evaluation of the Parental Empowerment Program: an experimental program building on family strengths and local resources which was offered for an average of 24 months to 160 families in 10 Syracuse (New York) neighborhoods. Chapter 1 provides a conceptual overview, a program description, and a methodological…

  7. Junior-Senior High Tutor-Aide Program at Malcolm X Elementary School: An Evaluation Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Thomas

    This two-year project used students at the junior and senior high school level as tutors to elementary students in the basic skills of math and reading. Tutor selection was based on continuing interest, attendance, scholastic achievement, and overall attitude toward the program. The final evaluative report includes the following information: (1)…

  8. The Design and Implementation of a Formative Evaluation Study for the Child and Family Resource Program. Executive Summary. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This executive summary of the final report of the formative evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) demonstration projects recommends that the Office of Child Development (OCD): (1) assign a full-time OCD project manager to the demonstration in the early stages of the project; (2) implement a systematic approach to assure that…

  9. Report of Final Evaluation, ESEA Title I Projects, Fiscal Year 1972. Phoenix Area Bureau of Indian Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Title I projects operated in the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Phoenix Area, during Fiscal 1972 are described in this final evaluation report. An overview of the geographical location of Areas within the BIA is given, along with the organization of the BIA at large and of the Phoenix Area. Enrollments in the Phoenix Area projects are presented…

  10. An Assessment of Decision-Making Processes: Evaluation of Where Land Protection Planning Can Incorporate Climate Change Information (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, An Assessment of Decision-Making Processes: Evaluation of Where Land Protection Planning Can Incorporate Climate Change Information. This report is a review of decision-making processes of selected land protection prog...

  11. An Assessment of Decision-Making Processes: Evaluation of Where Land Protection Planning Can Incorporate Climate Change Information (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, An Assessment of Decision-Making Processes: Evaluation of Where Land Protection Planning Can Incorporate Climate Change Information. This report is a review of decision-making processes of selected land protection prog...

  12. 76 FR 29021 - Written Re-Evaluation and Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the Relocation of the Panama City-Bay County International Airport (2006..., Environmental Protection Specialist, Federal Aviation Administration, Orlando Airports District Office, 5950... Federal Aviation Administration Written Re-Evaluation and Record of Decision for the Final...

  13. Film Evaluations of Eskimo Education. The National Study of American Indian Education, Series III, No. 4, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, John, Jr.

    As a part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, the educational environments of schools in 2 Alaskan tundra villages, in a state-consolidated school in Bethel, and in Anchorage public schools were filmed to provide empirical evidence for the evaluation of Eskimo education. This film study was pointed toward…

  14. Final Report on Evaluation and Research of the Flexible Learning System: An Early Childhood Teacher Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Terry D.; And Others

    This is the final report on evaluation and research of the Flexible Learning System (FLS). The Flexible Learning System (FLS) began as an outgrowth of the Far West Laboratory's several years of investment in research and development of a Responsive Model of Early Childhood Education for young children. The model emphasizes the development of…

  15. Review of Final Year MSP Evaluations, Performance Period 2007. Analytic and Technical Support for Mathematics and Science Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobronnikov, Ellen; Rhodes, Hilary; Bradley, Cay

    2010-01-01

    This final report culminates the evaluation and technical assistance provided for the U.S. Department of Education's Mathematics and Science Partnership (MSP) Program and its projects since 2005. As part of this support, Abt Associates looked across the portfolio of projects funded by the MSP program to draw lessons on best practices. This…

  16. The Del Mod System: An External Evaluation, Final Report, Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Donald W.; And Others

    This is one of five volumes prepared to describe various aspects of the Del Mod System. This volume deals with the evaluation of the Del Mod System. Included are the following: (1) Del Mod Responsive Evaluation; (2) Evaluation Outcomes; (3) Validation of the Del Mod Responsive Evaluation Process; and (4) Conclusions. Appendices include: (A)…

  17. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report and Appendices, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 through October 2008. Evaluation results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, fuel cell bus operations at Golden Gate Transit, and evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and roadcalls).

  18. Fourth Meeting of the Panel for Evaluation of Experimental Literacy Projects. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    The work of this Panel for the Evaluation of Experimental Literacy Projects was the assessing of how the pattern of evaluation it had previously formulated had been applied in the Experimental World Literacy Programme (EWLP). In the judgment of the Panel, by 1974 evaluation specialists will be able to present a report that will enable Member…

  19. Development of Evaluation Instruments to Determine Effectiveness of World of Work Program: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethel School District, Eugene, OR.

    The report describes a project designed to evaluate the effectiveness of career awareness instruction in the Bethel District (Oregon) elementary schools' World of Work program. Teachers from each grade level developed formats for the evaluation instruments which were administered to students, with the results in turn being evaluated by an…

  20. Formative Evaluation of the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of the formative evaluation of the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program (ALLESP). Data collection related to this evaluation took place between November 2008 and May 2009. The evaluation resulted in the following four recommendations: (1) It is recommended that Program objectives and activities…