Science.gov

Sample records for business model innovation

  1. New business models for antibiotic innovation.

    PubMed

    So, Anthony D; Shah, Tejen A

    2014-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance and the dearth of novel antibiotics have become a growing concern among policy-makers. A combination of financial, scientific, and regulatory challenges poses barriers to antibiotic innovation. However, each of these three challenges provides an opportunity to develop pathways for new business models to bring novel antibiotics to market. Pull-incentives that pay for the outputs of research and development (R&D) and push-incentives that pay for the inputs of R&D can be used to increase innovation for antibiotics. Financial incentives might be structured to promote delinkage of a company's return on investment from revenues of antibiotics. This delinkage strategy might not only increase innovation, but also reinforce rational use of antibiotics. Regulatory approval, however, should not and need not compromise safety and efficacy standards to bring antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action to market. Instead regulatory agencies could encourage development of companion diagnostics, test antibiotic combinations in parallel, and pool and make transparent clinical trial data to lower R&D costs. A tax on non-human use of antibiotics might also create a disincentive for non-therapeutic use of these drugs. Finally, the new business model for antibiotic innovation should apply the 3Rs strategy for encouraging collaborative approaches to R&D in innovating novel antibiotics: sharing resources, risks, and rewards.

  2. Business Model Innovation: A Blueprint for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Business model innovation is one of the most challenging components of 21st-century leadership. Making incremental improvements to a business model--creating new efficiencies, expanding into adjacent markets--is hard enough. Developing and experimenting with new business models that truly transform how an institution delivers value (while…

  3. Organizational Learning, Strategic Flexibility and Business Model Innovation: An Empirical Research Based on Logistics Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yaodong; Cheng, Lin; Zhang, Jian

    Using the data of 237 Jiangsu logistics firms, this paper empirically studies the relationship among organizational learning capability, business model innovation, strategic flexibility. The results show as follows; organizational learning capability has positive impacts on business model innovation performance; strategic flexibility plays mediating roles on the relationship between organizational learning capability and business model innovation; interaction among strategic flexibility, explorative learning and exploitative learning play significant roles in radical business model innovation and incremental business model innovation.

  4. Business model innovation in the water sector in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Heiko; Saul, Caroline Jennings

    2014-08-01

    Various technologies have been deployed in household devices or micro-water treatment plants for mitigating fluoride and arsenic, and thereby provide safe and affordable drinking water in low-income countries. While the technologies have improved considerably, organizations still face challenges in making them financially sustainable. Financial sustainability questions the business models behind these water technologies. This article makes three contributions to business models in the context of fluoride and arsenic mitigation. Firstly, we describe four business models: A) low-value devices given away to people living in extreme poverty, B) high-value devices sold to low-income customers, C) communities as beneficiaries of micro-water treatment plants and D) entrepreneurs as franchisees for selling water services and highlight the emergence of hybrid business models. Secondly, we show current business model innovations such as cost transparency & cost reductions, secured & extended water payments, business diversification and distribution channels. Thirdly, we describe skills and competencies as part of capacity building for creating even more business model innovations. Together, these three contributions will create more awareness of the role of business models in scaling-up water treatment technologies.

  5. Business model innovation in the water sector in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Heiko; Saul, Caroline Jennings

    2014-08-01

    Various technologies have been deployed in household devices or micro-water treatment plants for mitigating fluoride and arsenic, and thereby provide safe and affordable drinking water in low-income countries. While the technologies have improved considerably, organizations still face challenges in making them financially sustainable. Financial sustainability questions the business models behind these water technologies. This article makes three contributions to business models in the context of fluoride and arsenic mitigation. Firstly, we describe four business models: A) low-value devices given away to people living in extreme poverty, B) high-value devices sold to low-income customers, C) communities as beneficiaries of micro-water treatment plants and D) entrepreneurs as franchisees for selling water services and highlight the emergence of hybrid business models. Secondly, we show current business model innovations such as cost transparency & cost reductions, secured & extended water payments, business diversification and distribution channels. Thirdly, we describe skills and competencies as part of capacity building for creating even more business model innovations. Together, these three contributions will create more awareness of the role of business models in scaling-up water treatment technologies. PMID:24612490

  6. Creating Institutional Space for Business Model Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Robert; Crawford, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    From college campuses to the halls of Congress, there is broad agreement that higher education is experiencing a major wave of innovation. This article holds that the changes are significant, but that the resulting threats to existing institutions are manageable if key leaders understand them and if institutions adapt to the new environment. The…

  7. Open Innovation at NASA: A New Business Model for Advancing Human Health and Performance Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.; Keeton, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new business model for advancing NASA human health and performance innovations and demonstrates how open innovation shaped its development. A 45 percent research and technology development budget reduction drove formulation of a strategic plan grounded in collaboration. We describe the strategy execution, including adoption and results of open innovation initiatives, the challenges of cultural change, and the development of virtual centers and a knowledge management tool to educate and engage the workforce and promote cultural change.

  8. Early Phases of Business Model Innovation: An Ideation Experience Workshop in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoveskog, M.; Halila, F.; Danilovic, M.

    2015-01-01

    As the mantra "innovate your business model or die" increases in popularity among practitioners and academics, so does the need for novel and feasible business models. In this article, we describe an ideation experience workshop, conducted in an undergraduate business course, in which students, guided by their lecturers and two industry…

  9. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of QASE RT is to enable system analysts and software engineers to evaluate performance and reliability implications of design alternatives. The program resulted from two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects. After receiving a description of the system architecture and workload from the user, QASE RT translates the system description into simulation models and executes them. Simulation provides detailed performance evaluation. The results of the evaluations are service and response times, offered load and device utilizations and functional availability.

  10. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The PER-Force Handcontroller was originally developed for the International Space Station under a Johnson Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. Produced by Cybernet Systems Corporation, the unit is a force-reflecting system that manipulates robots or objects by "feel." The Handcontroller moves in six degrees of freedom, with real and virtual reality forces simulated by a 3-D molecular modeling software package. It is used in molecular modeling in metallurgy applications, satellite docking research, and in research on military unmanned ground vehicles.

  11. Small Business Innovations (Helicopters)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The amount of engine power required for a helicopter to hover is an important, but difficult, consideration in helicopter design. The EHPIC program model produces converged, freely distorted wake geometries that generate accurate analysis of wake-induced downwash, allowing good predictions of rotor thrust and power requirements. Continuum Dynamics, Inc., the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) company that developed EHPIC, also produces RotorCRAFT, a program for analysis of aerodynamic loading of helicopter blades in forward flight. Both helicopter codes have been licensed to commercial manufacturers.

  12. Development of Innovative Business Model of Modern Manager's Qualities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yashkova, Elena V.; Sineva, Nadezda L.; Shkunova, Angelika A.; Bystrova, Natalia V.; Smirnova, Zhanna V.; Kolosova, Tatyana V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper defines a complex of manager's qualities based on theoretical and methodological analysis and synthesis methods, available national and world literature, research papers and publications. The complex approach methodology was used, which provides an innovative view of the development of modern manager's qualities. The methodological…

  13. Analysing stratified medicine business models and value systems: innovation-regulation interactions.

    PubMed

    Mittra, James; Tait, Joyce

    2012-09-15

    Stratified medicine offers both opportunities and challenges to the conventional business models that drive pharmaceutical R&D. Given the increasingly unsustainable blockbuster model of drug development, due in part to maturing product pipelines, alongside increasing demands from regulators, healthcare providers and patients for higher standards of safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of new therapies, stratified medicine promises a range of benefits to pharmaceutical and diagnostic firms as well as healthcare providers and patients. However, the transition from 'blockbusters' to what might now be termed 'niche-busters' will require the adoption of new, innovative business models, the identification of different and perhaps novel types of value along the R&D pathway, and a smarter approach to regulation to facilitate innovation in this area. In this paper we apply the Innogen Centre's interdisciplinary ALSIS methodology, which we have developed for the analysis of life science innovation systems in contexts where the value creation process is lengthy, expensive and highly uncertain, to this emerging field of stratified medicine. In doing so, we consider the complex collaboration, timing, coordination and regulatory interactions that shape business models, value chains and value systems relevant to stratified medicine. More specifically, we explore in some depth two convergence models for co-development of a therapy and diagnostic before market authorisation, highlighting the regulatory requirements and policy initiatives within the broader value system environment that have a key role in determining the probable success and sustainability of these models.

  14. Small Business Innovations (MISER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Lightwave Electronics Corporation, Mountain View, CA, developed the Series 120 and 122 non-planner diode pumped ring lasers based on a low noise ring laser with voltage tuning that they delivered to Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The voltage tuning feature allows "phase-locking" the lasers, making them "electronic," similar to radio and microwave electronic oscillators. The Series 120 and 122 can be applied to fiber sensing, coherent communications and laser radar.

  15. Small Business Innovations (Photodetector)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Epitaxx, Inc. of Princeton, NJ, developed the Epitaxx Near Infrared Room Temperature Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) Photodetector based on their Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract work to develop a linear detector array for satellite imaging applications using InGaAs alloys that didn't need to be cooled to (difficult and expensive) cryogenic temperatures. The photodetectors can be used for remote sensing, fiber optic and laser position-sensing applications.

  16. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract resulted in a series of commercially available lasers, which have application in fiber optic communications, difference frequency generation, fiber optic sensing and general laboratory use. Developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Phase Doppler Particles Analyzer is a non-disruptive, highly accurate laser-based method of determining particle size, number density, trajectory, turbulence and other information about particles passing through a measurement probe volume. The system consists of an optical transmitter and receiver, signal processor and computer with data acquisition and analysis software. A variety of systems are offered for applications including spray characterization for paint, and agricultural and other sprays. The Microsizer, a related product, is used in medical equipment manufacturing and analysis of contained flows. High frequency components and subsystems produced by Millitech Corporation are marketed for both research and commercial use. These systems, which operate in the upper portion of the millimeter wave, resulted from a number of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects. By developing very high performance mixers and multipliers, the company has advanced the state of the art in sensitive receiver technology. Components are used in receivers and transceivers for monitoring chlorine monoxides, ozone, in plasma characterization and in material properties characterization.

  17. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under an Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Symbiotics, Inc. developed a software system that permits users to upgrade products from standalone applications so they can communicate in a distributed computing environment. Under a subsequent NASA SBIR grant, Symbiotics added additional tools to the SOCIAL product to enable NASA to coordinate conventional systems for planning Shuttle launch support operations. Using SOCIAL, data may be shared among applications in a computer network even when the applications are written in different programming languages. The product was introduced to the commercial market in 1993 and is used to monitor and control equipment for operation support and to integrate financial networks. The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry. InQuisiX is a reuse library providing high performance classification, cataloging, searching, browsing, retrieval and synthesis capabilities. These form the foundation for software reuse, producing higher quality software at lower cost and in less time. Software Productivity Solutions, Inc. developed the technology under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects funded by NASA and the Army and is marketing InQuisiX in conjunction with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry.

  18. Small Business Innovations (Cryostat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    General Pneumatics Corporation, Scottsdale, AZ, developed an anti- clogging cryostat that liquifies gases by expansion for high pressure through a nozzle to produce cryorefrigeration based on their Kennedy Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) work to develop a Joule-Thomson (JT) expansion valve that is less susceptible to clogging by particles or condensed contaminants in the flow than a non-contaminating compressor in a closed cycle Linde-Hampson cryocooler used to generate cryogenic cooling for infrared sensors, super conductors, supercooled electronics and cryosurgery.

  19. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to Kennedy Space Center, EIC Laboratories invented a Raman Spectrograph with fiber optic sampling for space applications such as sensing hazardous fuel vapors and making on-board rapid analyses of chemicals and minerals. Raman spectroscopy is a laser-based measurement technique that provides through a unique vibrational spectrum a molecular 'fingerprint,' and can function in aqueous environments. EIC combined optical fiber technology with Raman methods to develop sensors that can be operated at a distance from the spectrographic analysis instruments and the laser excitation source. EIC refined and commercialized the technology to create the Fiber Optic Raman Spectrograph and the RamanProbe. Commercial applications range from process control to monitoring hazardous materials.

  20. A New Business Model for Problem Solving-Infusing Open Collaboration and Innovation Health and Human Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Eliabeth E.; Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Rando, Cynthia M.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) new business model for problem solving, with emphasis on open collaboration and innovation. The topics that are discussed are: an overview of the work of the Space Life Sciences Directorate and the strategic initiatives that arrived at the new business model. A new business model was required to infuse open collaboration/innovation tools into existing models for research, development and operations (research announcements, procurements, SBIR/STTR etc). This new model involves use of several open innovation partnerships: InnoCentive, Yet2.com, TopCoder and NASA@work. There is also a new organizational structure developed to facilitate the joint collaboration with other NASA centers, international partners, other U.S. Governmental organizations, Academia, Corporate, and Non-Profit organizations: the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  1. Small Business Innovations (Mass Microbalance)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Femtometrics of Costa Mesa, CA, developed the Model 200-1 SAW Mass Microbalance under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center. The product is described as "the next generation of aerosol mass microbalance technology," because a new type of sensor, the Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) piezoelectric crystal, offers mass resolution two orders of magnitude greater than the Quartz Crystal Microbalance cascade impactor (QCM) (used at Langley since 1979 for collection and measurement of aerosol particles in the upper atmosphere). The Model 200-1 SAW Mass Microbalance, which provides a 400-fold increase in mass sensitivity per unit area over the QCM, can be used for real-time particle monitoring in clean rooms, measuring chemical vapors in very low concentrations, measuring target chemicals in the stratosphere and in industry as a toxic vapor monitor.

  2. Small Business Innovations (Crystal Components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Scientific Materials Corporation, Bozeman, MT developed the SciMax line of improved Nd:Yag crystals under an Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center. They reduced the amount of water trapped in the crystals during growth to improve the optical quality and efficiency. Applications of the crystals include fiber optics, telecommunications, welding, drilling, eye surgery and medical instrumentation.

  3. Small Business Innovations (Integrated Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Because of the diversity of NASA's information systems, it was necessary to develop DAVID as a central database management system. Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Ken Wanderman and Associates, Inc. designed software tools enabling scientists to interface with DAVID and commercial database management systems, as well as artificial intelligence programs. The software has been installed at a number of data centers and is commercially available.

  4. Small Business Innovations (Robotic Wrist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Under a Langley Research Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. Minneapolis, MN, developed the Omni-Wrist actuator, which has a 25-pound capacity, 180 degrees of pitch/yaw, and 360 degrees of roll. Company literature calls it "the first successful singularity-free high-precision (robotic) wrist." Applications include spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, welding and a variety of nuclear industry, aerospace and military uses.

  5. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  6. High Technology Service Value Maximization through an MCDM-Based Innovative e-Business Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi-Yo; Tzeng, Gwo-Hshiung; Ho, Wen-Rong; Chuang, Hsiu-Tyan; Lue, Yeou-Feng

    The emergence of the Internet has changed the high technology marketing channels thoroughly in the past decade while E-commerce has already become one of the most efficient channels which high technology firms may skip the intermediaries and reach end customers directly. However, defining appropriate e-business models for commercializing new high technology products or services through Internet are not that easy. To overcome the above mentioned problems, a novel analytic framework based on the concept of high technology customers’ competence set expansion by leveraging high technology service firms’ capabilities and resources as well as novel multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) techniques, will be proposed in order to define an appropriate e-business model. An empirical example study of a silicon intellectual property (SIP) commercialization e-business model based on MCDM techniques will be provided for verifying the effectiveness of this novel analytic framework. The analysis successful assisted a Taiwanese IC design service firm to define an e-business model for maximizing its customer’s SIP transactions. In the future, the novel MCDM framework can be applied successful to novel business model definitions in the high technology industry.

  7. Academic retainer medicine: an innovative business model for cross-subsidizing primary care.

    PubMed

    Lucier, David J; Frisch, Nicholas B; Cohen, Brian J; Wagner, Michael; Salem, Deeb; Fairchild, David G

    2010-06-01

    Retainer-medicine primary care practices, commonly referred to as "luxury" or "concierge" practices, provide enhanced services to patients beyond those available in traditional practices for a yearly retainer fee. Adoption of retainer practices has been largely absent in academic health centers (AHCs). Reasons for this trend stem primarily from ethical concerns, such as the potential for patient abandonment when physicians downsize from larger, traditional practices to smaller, retainer-medicine practices.In 2004, the Department of Medicine at Tufts Medical Center developed an academic retainer-medicine primary care practice within the Division of General Medicine that not only generates financial support for the division but also incorporates a clinical and business model that is aligned with the mission and ethics of an academic institution.In contrast to private retainer-medicine practices, this unique business model addresses several of the ethical issues associated with traditional retainer practices-it does not restrict net access to care and it neutralizes concerns about patient abandonment. Addressing the growing primary care shortage, the model also presents the opportunity for a retainer practice to cross-subsidize the expansion of general medicine in an academic medical setting. The authors elucidate the benefits, as well as the inherent challenges, of embedding an academic retainer-medicine practice within an AHC.

  8. Cutting through the Hype: Evaluating the Innovative Potential of New Educational Technologies through Business Model Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Yoram M.

    2016-01-01

    In an era when novel educational technologies are constantly introduced to the marketplace, often accompanied by hyperbolic claims that these ground-breaking innovations will transform the educational landscape, decision makers in educational institutions need a methodological approach for examining the innovative potential of new educational…

  9. 78 FR 48537 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... Administration (SBA) is publishing the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program Commercialization Benchmark for the 11 participating agencies for public...

  10. 78 FR 59410 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... period for the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR... submitting comments. Mail/Hand Delivery/Courier: Edsel Brown, Jr., Assistant Director, Office of...

  11. UK businesses bag innovation awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Five UK firms have received innovation awards from the Institute of Physics (IOP), which publishes Physics World. Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging, Metrasens, M Squared Lasers, Silixa and Tracerco have all won an IOP award for developing new innovative products.

  12. Incubating Innovation: A standard model for nurturing new businesses, the incubator gains prominence in the world of biotech.

    PubMed

    Grifantini, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Incubators, accelerators, innovation centers, launch pads. Everyone defines the idea a bit differently, but, generally, these infrastructures refer to a subsidized space where fledgling companies get support?a combination of mentorship, funding, low rent, networking opportunities, and other training?with the goal of propelling early businesses to success. PMID:26583888

  13. Incubating Innovation: A standard model for nurturing new businesses, the incubator gains prominence in the world of biotech.

    PubMed

    Grifantini, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Incubators, accelerators, innovation centers, launch pads. Everyone defines the idea a bit differently, but, generally, these infrastructures refer to a subsidized space where fledgling companies get support?a combination of mentorship, funding, low rent, networking opportunities, and other training?with the goal of propelling early businesses to success.

  14. Technological innovations for a sustainable business model in the semiconductor industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2014-09-01

    Increasing costs of wafer processing, particularly for lithographic processes, have made it increasingly difficult to achieve simultaneous reductions in cost-per-function and area per device. Multiple patterning techniques have made possible the fabrication of circuit layouts below the resolution limit of single optical exposures but have led to significant increases in the costs of patterning. Innovative techniques, such as self-aligned double patterning (SADP) have enabled good device performance when using less expensive patterning equipment. Other innovations have directly reduced the cost of manufacturing. A number of technical challenges must be overcome to enable a return to single-exposure patterning using short wavelength optical techniques, such as EUV patterning.

  15. Business innovation symposium ‘At what price? IP-related thoughts on new business models for space information’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Lesley Jane

    2011-09-01

    Spatial data and imagery generators are set to become tomorrow's key players in the information society. This is why satellite owners and operators are examining new revenue-producing models for developing space-related products and services. The use and availability of broadband internet width and satellite data-based services will continue to increase in the future. With the capacity to deliver real time precision downstream data, space agencies and the satellite industry can respond to the demand for high resolution digital space information which, with the appropriate technology, can be integrated into a variety of web-based applications. At a time when the traditional roles of space agencies are becoming more hybrid, largely as a result of the greater drive towards commercial markets, new value-added markets for space-related information products are continuing to attract attention. This paper discusses whether traditional data policies on space data access and IP licensing schemes stand to remain the feasible prototype for distributing and marketing space data, and how this growth market might benefit from looking at an 'up and running' global IP management system already operating to manage end user digital demand. PrefaceThe terminology describing the various types of spatial data and space-based information is not uniformly used within the various principles, laws and policies that govern space data. For convenience only this paper refers to primary or raw data gathered by the space-based industry as spatial or raw data, and the data as processed and sold on or distributed by ground-based companies as space information products and services. In practise, spatial data range from generic to specific data sets, digital topography, through to pictures and imagery services at various resolutions, with 3-D perspectives underway. The paper addresses general IP considerations relating to spatial data, with some reference to remote sensing itself. Exact IP details

  16. e-Business Innovation: The Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marca, David A.

    Innovation is invention or application of technologies or theories that radically alters business and the economy. For many years, innovation and the economy have been locked in 80-year cycles, which might imply that innovation is an economic driver, and vice versa. Based on this, some forecast that innovation and the economy might decrease sharply due to several forces: a) decreasing economic growth, b) increasing demand for custom services, c) more entrepreneurial work environments, and d) urban and environmental degradation. Should such forecasts hold true, business may need to alter its offerings, operations and organization to survive. Such a scenario may also require applied e-Business innovation by combining existing internet, wireless, broadband, and video technologies. One possible result: flexible front offices integrated with efficient back offices. Such an e-Business could comprise: a) a customer-based and transaction-based organization, b) functions for adaptive offerings that anticipate need, c) highly responsive, real-time, operations having no inventory, and d) value-based front-end, and automated back-end, decision making.

  17. Partnerships in Pharma--An Economist Intelligence Unit Seminar--Building Innovation into Alliances and Business Models. 1 October 2010, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Kibble, Alexandra

    2010-12-01

    The Partnerships in Pharma seminar, held in London, included topics related to building innovation into alliances and business models within the pharmaceutical industry. This conference report highlights selected presentations on strategies for successful partnering, partnering alongside an evolving CRO industry, considering the pharma value chain, and partnerships between industry and academia. Approaches used by Ipsen, Merck Serono, Pfizer and ViiV Healthcare are also described.

  18. NASA Small Business Innovation Research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Harry W.

    1985-01-01

    NASA activities in the framework of the 11-agency federal Small Business Innovation Research program are outlined in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Statistics on the program are given; the technical topics covered are listed; and the procedures involved in evaluating applications for support are discussed. A number of typical defects in proposals are indicated, and recommendations for avoiding them are provided.

  19. Incentivizing biodiversity conservation in artisanal fishing communities through territorial user rights and business model innovation.

    PubMed

    Gelcich, Stefan; Donlan, C Josh

    2015-08-01

    Territorial user rights for fisheries are being promoted to enhance the sustainability of small-scale fisheries. Using Chile as a case study, we designed a market-based program aimed at improving fishers' livelihoods while incentivizing the establishment and enforcement of no-take areas within areas managed with territorial user right regimes. Building on explicit enabling conditions (i.e., high levels of governance, participation, and empowerment), we used a place-based, human-centered approach to design a program that will have the necessary support and buy-in from local fishers to result in landscape-scale biodiversity benefits. Transactional infrastructure must be complex enough to capture the biodiversity benefits being created, but simple enough so that the program can be scaled up and is attractive to potential financiers. Biodiversity benefits created must be commoditized, and desired behavioral changes must be verified within a transactional context. Demand must be generated for fisher-created biodiversity benefits in order to attract financing and to scale the market model. Important design decisions around these 3 components-supply, transactional infrastructure, and demand-must be made based on local social-ecological conditions. Our market model, which is being piloted in Chile, is a flexible foundation on which to base scalable opportunities to operationalize a scheme that incentivizes local, verifiable biodiversity benefits via conservation behaviors by fishers that could likely result in significant marine conservation gains and novel cross-sector alliances.

  20. Incentivizing biodiversity conservation in artisanal fishing communities through territorial user rights and business model innovation.

    PubMed

    Gelcich, Stefan; Donlan, C Josh

    2015-08-01

    Territorial user rights for fisheries are being promoted to enhance the sustainability of small-scale fisheries. Using Chile as a case study, we designed a market-based program aimed at improving fishers' livelihoods while incentivizing the establishment and enforcement of no-take areas within areas managed with territorial user right regimes. Building on explicit enabling conditions (i.e., high levels of governance, participation, and empowerment), we used a place-based, human-centered approach to design a program that will have the necessary support and buy-in from local fishers to result in landscape-scale biodiversity benefits. Transactional infrastructure must be complex enough to capture the biodiversity benefits being created, but simple enough so that the program can be scaled up and is attractive to potential financiers. Biodiversity benefits created must be commoditized, and desired behavioral changes must be verified within a transactional context. Demand must be generated for fisher-created biodiversity benefits in order to attract financing and to scale the market model. Important design decisions around these 3 components-supply, transactional infrastructure, and demand-must be made based on local social-ecological conditions. Our market model, which is being piloted in Chile, is a flexible foundation on which to base scalable opportunities to operationalize a scheme that incentivizes local, verifiable biodiversity benefits via conservation behaviors by fishers that could likely result in significant marine conservation gains and novel cross-sector alliances. PMID:25737027

  1. METABO: a new paradigm towards diabetes disease management. An innovative business model.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Alejandra; Colás, Javier; Fico, Giuseppe; Guillén, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Dealing with a chronic disease and, more specifically, with Diabetes Mellitus and other metabolic disorders, represents a great challenge for care givers, patients and the healthcare systems as their treatment requires continuous medical care and patient self management. The engagement of patients in the adoption of healthy lifestyles with a positive impact in the progression of their diseases is fundamental to avoid the appearance of chronic complications or co-morbidities. This paper presents the externalization of the health management of diabetic patients as an alternative to the current models of care for these patients that can help improve the quality of follow up and care delivery and contribute to the sustainability of the healthcare systems.

  2. Small business innovation research program solicitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration invites eligible small business concerns to submit Phase 1 proposals for its 1994 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, which is described in this twelfth annual NASA SBIR Program Solicitation. The 1994 solicitation period for Phase 1 proposals begins April 4, 1994 and ends June 15, 1994. Eligible firms with research or research and development capabilities (R/R&D) in any of the listed topic and subtopic areas are encouraged to participate. Through SBIR, NASA seeks innovative concepts addressing the program needs described in the SBIR solicitation subtopics and offering commercial application potential. This document contains program background information, outlines eligibility requirements for SBIR participants, describes the three SBIR program phases, and provides the information qualified offerors need to prepare and submit responsive proposals.

  3. Key Knowledge Providers as Sources of Business Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Esquinas, Manuel; Merchan-Hernandez, Carmen; Ramos-Vielba, Irene; Martinez-Fernandez, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Studies of innovation are giving increasing attention to the relationships that businesses maintain with different participants in the innovation process. It is generally assumed that interaction with other businesses, universities and government organizations can generate knowledge that will improve the ability to innovate. However, there is…

  4. Applying business intelligence innovations to emergency management.

    PubMed

    Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Albanese, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The use of business intelligence (BI) is common among corporations in the private sector to improve business decision making and create insights for competitive advantage. Increasingly, emergency management agencies are using tools and processes similar to BI systems. With a more thorough understanding of the principles of BI and its supporting technologies, and a careful comparison to the business model of emergency management, this paper seeks to provide insights into how lessons from the private sector can contribute to the development of effective and efficient emergency management BI utilisation. PMID:25193454

  5. Applying business intelligence innovations to emergency management.

    PubMed

    Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Albanese, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The use of business intelligence (BI) is common among corporations in the private sector to improve business decision making and create insights for competitive advantage. Increasingly, emergency management agencies are using tools and processes similar to BI systems. With a more thorough understanding of the principles of BI and its supporting technologies, and a careful comparison to the business model of emergency management, this paper seeks to provide insights into how lessons from the private sector can contribute to the development of effective and efficient emergency management BI utilisation.

  6. Why business models matter.

    PubMed

    Magretta, Joan

    2002-05-01

    "Business model" was one of the great buzz-words of the Internet boom. A company didn't need a strategy, a special competence, or even any customers--all it needed was a Web-based business model that promised wild profits in some distant, ill-defined future. Many people--investors, entrepreneurs, and executives alike--fell for the fantasy and got burned. And as the inevitable counterreaction played out, the concept of the business model fell out of fashion nearly as quickly as the .com appendage itself. That's a shame. As Joan Magretta explains, a good business model remains essential to every successful organization, whether it's a new venture or an established player. To help managers apply the concept successfully, she defines what a business model is and how it complements a smart competitive strategy. Business models are, at heart, stories that explain how enterprises work. Like a good story, a robust business model contains precisely delineated characters, plausible motivations, and a plot that turns on an insight about value. It answers certain questions: Who is the customer? How do we make money? What underlying economic logic explains how we can deliver value to customers at an appropriate cost? Every viable organization is built on a sound business model, but a business model isn't a strategy, even though many people use the terms interchangeably. Business models describe, as a system, how the pieces of a business fit together. But they don't factor in one critical dimension of performance: competition. That's the job of strategy. Illustrated with examples from companies like American Express, EuroDisney, WalMart, and Dell Computer, this article clarifies the concepts of business models and strategy, which are fundamental to every company's performance.

  7. 77 FR 46909 - Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Policy Directives... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) Policy... (Reauthorization Act), which made several key changes to the programs relating to eligibility, the SBIR...

  8. 48 CFR 227.7204 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovation Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Business Innovation Research Program. 227.7204 Section 227.7204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... under the Small Business Innovation Research Program. When contracting under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, follow the procedures at 227-7104....

  9. 48 CFR 227.7204 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovation Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Business Innovation Research Program. 227.7204 Section 227.7204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... under the Small Business Innovation Research Program. When contracting under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, follow the procedures at 227-7104....

  10. 48 CFR 227.7204 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovation Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Business Innovation Research Program. 227.7204 Section 227.7204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... under the Small Business Innovation Research Program. When contracting under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, follow the procedures at 227-7104....

  11. 48 CFR 227.7204 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovation Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Business Innovation Research Program. 227.7204 Section 227.7204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... under the Small Business Innovation Research Program. When contracting under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, follow the procedures at 227-7104....

  12. 48 CFR 227.7204 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovative Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Business Innovative Research Program. 227.7204 Section 227.7204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... under the Small Business Innovative Research Program. When contracting under the Small Business Innovative Research Program, follow the procedures at 227-7104....

  13. Skill Development: Partnerships in Education. Guidelines, an Inventory of Business-Education Partnerships in Alberta and Some Innovative Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Teachers Association, Edmonton.

    Canada's ability to take advantage of the opportunities and mitigate the difficulties presented by today's economic, cultural, and social changes and global competition depends on the education and skill development of its youth. Meeting these challenges requires a common purpose involving students, parents, businesses, educators and others. To…

  14. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-01

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has supported much of Proton's technology development through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Awards and other non-SBIR funding.

  15. Navigating Disruptive Innovation in Undergraduate Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behara, Ravi S.; Davis, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    The undergraduate business education landscape is dramatically changing and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Many of the changes are being driven by increasing costs, advances in technology, rapid globalization, and an increasingly diverse workforce and customer base, and are occurring simultaneously in both the business world…

  16. Making the business case for innovation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Penny; Banks, Darla; Neely, Brunella

    2014-11-27

    In the current financial climate it is important for nurse leaders to be able to develop and present a business case for initiatives. This article describes how one US healthcare facility made a successful business case for implementation of clinical nurse leaders throughout the organisation.

  17. Thinking Outside the Box: Agile Business Models for CNOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loss, Leandro; Crave, Servane

    This paper introduces the idea of an agile Business Model for CNOs grounded on a new model of innovation based on the effects of globalization and of Knowledge Economy. The agile Business Model considers the resources that are spread out and available worldwide as well as the need for each customer to receive a unique customer experience. It aims at reinforcing in the context of the Knowledge Economy the different business models approaches developed so far. The paper also identifies the levers and the barriers of Agile Business Models Innovation in CNOs.

  18. Innovative Research Strategies for Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Bridget N.

    2007-01-01

    An internal, ongoing debate that all professional areas of study have is how to understand the impact of shifting economies, demographics, technologies, and globalization. Much business education research focuses on describing current practices. To this end, issues are often addressed by using surveys that are analyzed using descriptive analysis…

  19. 75 FR 15756 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Phase II award threshold amount from $750,000 to $1,000,000 (FR 48004). Congress established the current... (67 FR 6008, Sept. 24, 2002). SBA has determined that to restore the average economic value of the... ADMINISTRATION RIN 3244-AF61 Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive AGENCY: U.S....

  20. Small business innovation research. Abstracts of 1988 phase 1 awards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Non-proprietary proposal abstracts of Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects supported by NASA are presented. Projects in the fields of aeronautical propulsion, aerodynamics, acoustics, aircraft systems, materials and structures, teleoperators and robots, computer sciences, information systems, data processing, spacecraft propulsion, bioastronautics, satellite communication, and space processing are covered.

  1. Control of innovation activity in a competitive metallurgical business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    Certain competitive advantages of a manufacturer on a goods market can be provided if one creates conditions for bifurcation development of an innovation process in metallurgical business under conditions of market uncertainty of a demand for goods of a specified consumer quality and determines the technical-and-economic versions of stable operation of a production system for performing orders of metal product consumers.

  2. Federal research assessment of small business innovation research programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Since 1983, federal agencies with large research and development budgets have operated Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) programs to strengthen the role of small innovative firms in federally supported research and development. SBIR awards to small business have totaled over $1.35 billion through fiscal year 1988. In reauthorizing SBIR programs in 1986, the Congress directed GAO to study their effectiveness in meeting SBIR goals, which are to (1) stimulate technological innovation, (2) use small businesses to meet federal research and development needs, (3) increase private sector commercialization of innovations from federal research and development, and (4) encourage participation by minority and disadvantaged firms in technological innovation. The Congress also directed GAO to compare the quality of SBIR research with more traditional agency research and to obtain the views of agency and department heads on how SBIR programs have affected other research activities at their agencies. To obtain information on how well SBIR programs are meeting their goals and on the quality of research, GAO sent questionnaires to firms with SBIR projects and to government project officers responsible for SBIR and other research.

  3. A model for 'reverse innovation' in health care.

    PubMed

    Depasse, Jacqueline W; Lee, Patrick T

    2013-08-30

    'Reverse innovation,' a principle well established in the business world, describes the flow of ideas from emerging to more developed economies. There is strong and growing interest in applying this concept to health care, yet there is currently no framework for describing the stages of reverse innovation or identifying opportunities to accelerate the development process. This paper combines the business concept of reverse innovation with diffusion of innovation theory to propose a model for reverse innovation as a way to innovate in health care. Our model includes the following steps: (1) identifying a problem common to lower- and higher-income countries; (2) innovation and spread in the low-income country (LIC); (3) crossover to the higher-income country (HIC); and (4) innovation and spread in the HIC. The crucial populations in this pathway, drawing from diffusion of innovation theory, are LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators. We illustrate the model with three examples of current reverse innovations. We then propose four sets of specific actions that forward-looking policymakers, entrepreneurs, health system leaders, and researchers may take to accelerate the movement of promising solutions through the reverse innovation pipeline: (1) identify high-priority problems shared by HICs and LICs; (2) create slack for change, especially for LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators; (3) create spannable social distances between LIC early adopters and HIC innovators; and (4) measure reverse innovation activity globally.

  4. A model for 'reverse innovation' in health care.

    PubMed

    Depasse, Jacqueline W; Lee, Patrick T

    2013-01-01

    'Reverse innovation,' a principle well established in the business world, describes the flow of ideas from emerging to more developed economies. There is strong and growing interest in applying this concept to health care, yet there is currently no framework for describing the stages of reverse innovation or identifying opportunities to accelerate the development process. This paper combines the business concept of reverse innovation with diffusion of innovation theory to propose a model for reverse innovation as a way to innovate in health care. Our model includes the following steps: (1) identifying a problem common to lower- and higher-income countries; (2) innovation and spread in the low-income country (LIC); (3) crossover to the higher-income country (HIC); and (4) innovation and spread in the HIC. The crucial populations in this pathway, drawing from diffusion of innovation theory, are LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators. We illustrate the model with three examples of current reverse innovations. We then propose four sets of specific actions that forward-looking policymakers, entrepreneurs, health system leaders, and researchers may take to accelerate the movement of promising solutions through the reverse innovation pipeline: (1) identify high-priority problems shared by HICs and LICs; (2) create slack for change, especially for LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators; (3) create spannable social distances between LIC early adopters and HIC innovators; and (4) measure reverse innovation activity globally. PMID:24001367

  5. Small business innovation research: Program solicitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This, the seventh annual SBIR solicitation by NASA, describes the program, identifies eligibility requirements, outlines the required proposal format and content, states proposal preparation and submission requirements, describes the proposal evaluation and award selection process, and provides other information to assist those interested in participating in NASA's SBIR program. It also identifies the Technical Topics and Subtopics in which SBIR Phase 1 proposals are solicited in 1989. These Topics and Subtopics cover a broad range of current NASA interests, but do not necessarily include all areas in which NASA plans or currently conducts research. High-risk high pay-off innovations are desired.

  6. 10 CFR 600.381 - Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research... Organizations Additional Provisions § 600.381 Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants. (a) General. This section contains provisions applicable to the Small Business Innovation...

  7. 10 CFR 600.381 - Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research... Organizations Additional Provisions § 600.381 Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants. (a) General. This section contains provisions applicable to the Small Business Innovation...

  8. 10 CFR 600.381 - Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research... Organizations Additional Provisions § 600.381 Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants. (a) General. This section contains provisions applicable to the Small Business Innovation...

  9. 10 CFR 600.381 - Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research... Organizations Additional Provisions § 600.381 Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants. (a) General. This section contains provisions applicable to the Small Business Innovation...

  10. 10 CFR 600.381 - Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research... Organizations Additional Provisions § 600.381 Special provisions for Small Business Innovation Research Grants. (a) General. This section contains provisions applicable to the Small Business Innovation...

  11. Photovoltaic Research in the Small Business Innovative Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, W.I.; Bulawka, A.

    1997-02-01

    The Small Business Innovative Research Program (SBIR) is currently authorized to be funded through September 30, 2000. The National Photovoltaics Program is a contributor to the Department of Energy (DOE) SBIR program. The small business photovoltaic industry has been benefiting from the SBIR program through awards that have funded basic research, new processes and products that have PV and other commercial applications. This paper provides information on SBIR opportunities, selected details of the SBIR program, statistics from the 1995 and 1996 DOE SBIR program, and methods for improving PV industry participation and success in the SBIR program. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase I awards, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-01

    This booklet presents technical abstracts of Phase I awards made in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 under the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. SBIR research explores innovative concepts in important technological and scientific areas that can lead to valuable new technology and products. The work described in the abstracts is novel, high-risk research, but the benefits will also be potentially high if the objectives are met. Brief comments on the potential applications, as described by the awardee, are given after each abstract. Individuals and organizations, including venture capital and larger industrial firms, with an interest in the research described in any of the abstracts are encouraged to contact the appropriate small business directly.

  13. Business Semantics Management Supports Government Innovation Information Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grootel, Geert; Spyns, Peter; Christiaens, Stijn; Jörg, Brigitte

    The knowledge economy is one of the cornerstones of our society. Our economic prosperity and development is derived for a large part from technical knowledge. Knowledge unlocks innovation, which in turns spawns new products or services, thereby enabling further economic growth. Hence, an information system unlocking scientific technical knowledge is an important asset for government policy and strategic decisions by industry. In this paper it is explained how business semantics management and related tools are applied to realise the above mentioned endeavour.

  14. Building a New Business Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkey, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Monarch High School in Boulder, Colorado, is one of 25 schools piloting the High School of Business program, an accelerated business administration program developed by Columbus, Ohio-based MBA"Research" and Curriculum Center. This article describes the program which uses a heavily project-based pedagogy to teach a curriculum modeled after college…

  15. 48 CFR 227.7104 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. 227.7104 Section 227.7104 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. (a) Use the clause at 252.227-7018, Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, when technical data...

  16. 48 CFR 227.7104 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. 227.7104 Section 227.7104 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. (a) Use the clause at 252.227-7018, Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, when technical data...

  17. 48 CFR 227.7104 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. 227.7104 Section 227.7104 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. (a) Use the clause at 252.227-7018, Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, when technical data...

  18. 76 FR 28730 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2011 Business R&D and Innovation Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... that includes detailed innovation questions; a financial section focused on company R&D expenses; a... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2011 Business R&D and Innovation Survey... from the National Science Foundation (NSF), plans to conduct the Business R&D and Innovation...

  19. A Race to the Bottom: MOOCs and Higher Education Business Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Yoram M.

    2014-01-01

    This is a critical examination of the claims that innovations such as massive open online courses (MOOCs) will disrupt the business models of the higher education sector. It describes what business models are, analyses the business model of free MOOCs offered by traditional universities and compares that model to that of paid online courses…

  20. NASA's Management and Utilization of the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mexcur, Winfield Paul

    2003-01-01

    The United Space Congress established the SBIR program in 1982 for the following purposes: ( 1) Stimulate technological innovation (2) Increase private-sector commercialization derived from federal R&D (3) Use small business to meet federal R&D needs (4) Foster and encourage participation by disadvantaged persons and women in technological innovation The STTR program was established in 1992 with the additional requirement of having a small business partner with a research institution (usually a university) for the purpose of transferring intellectual property from the research institution to the small business concern for enabling a government technical need and furthering the technological development for the purpose of developing commercial products. The government of Japan has established a program that models portions of the U.S. SBIR and STTR programs. They are very interested in how NASA has been so successful in fulfilling the Congressional objectives of these programs. In particular, they want to understand the management practices and incentives that are provided to enable partnerships between business enterprises, academia and government. The speech will also focus on some of the many successful technologies (on a conceptual level) that have been developed through NASA s SBIR and STTR programs and mechanisms used to promote cooperation between small businesses, large businesses, academia and government agencies within the United States. The speech is on a conceptual level, focusing on U.S. and NASA policies and management implementation practices. No enabling technical discussion will be held.

  1. Business process modeling in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francisco; Garcia, Felix; Calahorra, Luis; Llorente, César; Gonçalves, Luis; Daniel, Christel; Blobel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the process point of view is not restricted to a specific enterprise sector. In the field of health, as a result of the nature of the service offered, health institutions' processes are also the basis for decision making which is focused on achieving their objective of providing quality medical assistance. In this chapter the application of business process modelling - using the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) standard is described. Main challenges of business process modelling in healthcare are the definition of healthcare processes, the multi-disciplinary nature of healthcare, the flexibility and variability of the activities involved in health care processes, the need of interoperability between multiple information systems, and the continuous updating of scientific knowledge in healthcare. PMID:22925789

  2. Business process modeling in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francisco; Garcia, Felix; Calahorra, Luis; Llorente, César; Gonçalves, Luis; Daniel, Christel; Blobel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the process point of view is not restricted to a specific enterprise sector. In the field of health, as a result of the nature of the service offered, health institutions' processes are also the basis for decision making which is focused on achieving their objective of providing quality medical assistance. In this chapter the application of business process modelling - using the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) standard is described. Main challenges of business process modelling in healthcare are the definition of healthcare processes, the multi-disciplinary nature of healthcare, the flexibility and variability of the activities involved in health care processes, the need of interoperability between multiple information systems, and the continuous updating of scientific knowledge in healthcare.

  3. Small Business Innovation Research: Abstracts of Phase 1 awards, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-31

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed here, this publication describes the technical efforts for SBIR Phase 1 awards in 1994. It is intended for the educated layman, and may be of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities. Contained in this booklet are abstracts of the Phase 1 awards made in FY 1994 under the DOE SBIR program. The 212 Phase 1 projects described here were selected in a highly competitive process from a total of 2,276 grant applications received in response to the 1994 DOE annual SBIR Solicitation. The selections for awards were made on scientific and technical merit, as judged against the specific criteria listed in the Solicitation. Conclusions were reached on the basis of detailed reports returned by reviewers drawn from DOE laboratories, universities, private industry, and government. (Any discrepancies noted in prior DOE releases naming the firms selected for awards are due either to the firm changing its name after the award selection or to the firm not proceeding to a signed grant.) It is expected that between one-third and one-half of the Phase 1 projects will be continued into Phase 2. The work described in the abstracts is novel, high-risk research, but the benefits will also be potentially high if the objectives are met. Brief comments on the potential applications are given after each abstract. Individuals and organizations with an interest in the research described are encouraged to contact the appropriate small business directly.

  4. Applying business management models in health care.

    PubMed

    Trisolini, Michael G

    2002-01-01

    Most health care management training programmes and textbooks focus on only one or two models or conceptual frameworks, but the increasing complexity of health care organizations and their environments worldwide means that a broader perspective is needed. This paper reviews five management models developed for business organizations and analyses issues related to their application in health care. Three older, more 'traditional' models are first presented. These include the functional areas model, the tasks model and the roles model. Each is shown to provide a valuable perspective, but to have limitations if used in isolation. Two newer, more 'innovative' models are next discussed. These include total quality management (TQM) and reengineering. They have shown potential for enabling dramatic improvements in quality and cost, but have also been found to be more difficult to implement. A series of 'lessons learned' are presented to illustrate key success factors for applying them in health care organizations. In sum, each of the five models is shown to provide a useful perspective for health care management. Health care managers should gain experience and training with a broader set of business management models. PMID:12476639

  5. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  6. Small business innovation research: Abstracts of 1984. Phase 1 awards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    On September 27, 1984, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced the selection of Phase I projects for the Small Business Innovation Research Program. These awards resulted from the evaluation of proposals submitted in response to the 1984 Program Solicitation, SBIR 84-1. In order to make available information on the technical content of the Phase I projects supported by the NASA SBIR Program, the abstracts of those proposals which resulted in awards of contracts are given. In addition, the name and address of the firm performing the work are given for those who may desired additional information about the project. Propulsion, aerodynamics, computer techniques, exobiology and composite materials are among the areas covered.

  7. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  8. Innovation, Corporate Strategy, and Cultural Context: What Is the Mission for International Business Communication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulijn, Jan; O'Hair, Dan; Weggeman, Mathieu; Ledlow, Gerald; Hall, H. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Reviews relevant literature in the areas of communication and innovation and explores how efforts toward innovative practices are directly related to globalism and business strategy. Focuses on issues associated with national culture, corporate culture, and professional culture that are relevant to strategies for researching business communication…

  9. Adoption of Innovation from the Business Sector by Post-Primary Education Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzan, Orit; Zelig, Dafna

    2016-01-01

    Business organizations adopt innovation with the objective of meeting competition and improving their business performance; education organizations, likewise, operate in a competitive environment, are evaluated by stakeholders, and adopt innovation. The research presented here links these two sectors; its objective was to characterize the process…

  10. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: FuelCell Energy Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-31

    This success story describes FuelCell Energy Inc., a small business that manufactures stationary fuel cells. In collaboration with Sustainable Innovations LLC, and with support from a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Award from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, FuelCell Energy Inc. has developed a highly efficient solid state electrochemical hydrogen compressor.

  11. A network-oriented business modeling environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisconti, Cristian; Storelli, Davide; Totaro, Salvatore; Arigliano, Francesco; Savarino, Vincenzo; Vicari, Claudia

    The development of formal models related to the organizational aspects of an enterprise is fundamental when these aspects must be re-engineered and digitalized, especially when the enterprise is involved in the dynamics and value flows of a business network. Business modeling provides an opportunity to synthesize and make business processes, business rules and the structural aspects of an organization explicit, allowing business managers to control their complexity and guide an enterprise through effective decisional and strategic activities. This chapter discusses the main results of the TEKNE project in terms of software components that enable enterprises to configure, store, search and share models of any aspects of their business while leveraging standard and business-oriented technologies and languages to bridge the gap between the world of business people and IT experts and to foster effective business-to-business collaborations.

  12. Playful Collaboration (or Not): Using a Game to Grasp the Social Dynamics of Open Innovation in Innovation and Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how playing games can be used to teach intangible social interaction across boundaries, in particular within open collaborative innovation. We present an exploratory case study of how students learned from playing a board game in a graduate course of the international and interdisciplinary Innovation and Business master's…

  13. A review of telemedicine business models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengnan; Cheng, Alice; Mehta, Khanjan

    2013-04-01

    Telemedicine has become an increasingly popular option for long-distance/virtual medical care and education, but many telemedicine ventures fail to grow beyond the initial pilot stage. Studying the business models of successful telemedicine ventures can help develop business strategies for upcoming ventures. This article describes business models of eight telemedicine ventures from different regions of the world using Osterwalder's "Business Model Canvas." The ventures are chosen on the basis of their apparent success and their diverse value chains. The business models are compared to draw inferences and lessons regarding their business strategy and contextual factors that influenced it. Key differences between telemedicine business practices in developing and developed countries are also discussed. The purpose of this article is to inform and inspire the business strategy of the next generation of telemedicine ventures to be economically sustainable and to successfully address local healthcare challenges. PMID:23540278

  14. A review of telemedicine business models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengnan; Cheng, Alice; Mehta, Khanjan

    2013-04-01

    Telemedicine has become an increasingly popular option for long-distance/virtual medical care and education, but many telemedicine ventures fail to grow beyond the initial pilot stage. Studying the business models of successful telemedicine ventures can help develop business strategies for upcoming ventures. This article describes business models of eight telemedicine ventures from different regions of the world using Osterwalder's "Business Model Canvas." The ventures are chosen on the basis of their apparent success and their diverse value chains. The business models are compared to draw inferences and lessons regarding their business strategy and contextual factors that influenced it. Key differences between telemedicine business practices in developing and developed countries are also discussed. The purpose of this article is to inform and inspire the business strategy of the next generation of telemedicine ventures to be economically sustainable and to successfully address local healthcare challenges.

  15. Chemical Leasing business models and corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Moser, Frank; Jakl, Thomas; Joas, Reihard; Dondi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Chemical Leasing is a service-oriented business model that shifts the focus from increasing sales volume of chemicals towards a value-added approach. Recent pilot projects have shown the economic benefits of introducing Chemical Leasing business models in a broad range of sectors. A decade after its introduction, the promotion of Chemical Leasing is still predominantly done by the public sector and international organizations. We show in this paper that awareness-raising activities to disseminate information on this innovative business model mainly focus on the economic benefits. We argue that selling Chemical Leasing business models solely on the grounds of economic and ecological considerations falls short of branding it as a corporate social responsibility initiative, which, for this paper, is defined as a stakeholder-oriented concept that extends beyond the organization's boundaries and is driven by an ethical understanding of the organization's responsibility for the impact of its business activities. For the analysis of Chemical Leasing business models, we introduce two case studies from the water purification and metal degreasing fields, focusing on employees and local communities as two specific stakeholder groups of the company introducing Chemical Leasing. The paper seeks to demonstrate that Chemical Leasing business models can be branded as a corporate social responsibility initiative by outlining the vast potential of Chemical Leasing to improve occupational health and safety and to strengthen the ability of companies to protect the environment from the adverse effects of the chemicals they apply. PMID:24943884

  16. Chemical Leasing business models and corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Moser, Frank; Jakl, Thomas; Joas, Reihard; Dondi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Chemical Leasing is a service-oriented business model that shifts the focus from increasing sales volume of chemicals towards a value-added approach. Recent pilot projects have shown the economic benefits of introducing Chemical Leasing business models in a broad range of sectors. A decade after its introduction, the promotion of Chemical Leasing is still predominantly done by the public sector and international organizations. We show in this paper that awareness-raising activities to disseminate information on this innovative business model mainly focus on the economic benefits. We argue that selling Chemical Leasing business models solely on the grounds of economic and ecological considerations falls short of branding it as a corporate social responsibility initiative, which, for this paper, is defined as a stakeholder-oriented concept that extends beyond the organization's boundaries and is driven by an ethical understanding of the organization's responsibility for the impact of its business activities. For the analysis of Chemical Leasing business models, we introduce two case studies from the water purification and metal degreasing fields, focusing on employees and local communities as two specific stakeholder groups of the company introducing Chemical Leasing. The paper seeks to demonstrate that Chemical Leasing business models can be branded as a corporate social responsibility initiative by outlining the vast potential of Chemical Leasing to improve occupational health and safety and to strengthen the ability of companies to protect the environment from the adverse effects of the chemicals they apply.

  17. A Comparative of business process modelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangkawarow, I. R. H. T.; Waworuntu, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this era, there is a lot of business process modeling techniques. This article is the research about differences of business process modeling techniques. For each technique will explain about the definition and the structure. This paper presents a comparative analysis of some popular business process modelling techniques. The comparative framework is based on 2 criteria: notation and how it works when implemented in Somerleyton Animal Park. Each technique will end with the advantages and disadvantages. The final conclusion will give recommend of business process modeling techniques that easy to use and serve the basis for evaluating further modelling techniques.

  18. Determinants of the Use of Technological Innovation in Distance Learning: A Study with Business School Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo Leal, Edvalda; Luiz Albertin, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This study's overall purpose is to identify the factors determining the use of technological innovation in Distance Learning (DL), as perceived by instructors of Business Education programs. The theoretical basis for the study is the Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT). The study's sample is made up of 436 instructors; we used a quantitative…

  19. Business Models for Successfully Maintaining Games for Health.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Moderator Tom; Isaac, Participants Fikry; Ashford, Chris; Goldman, Ron; Lenihan, David J; Poole, Brent; Buday, Richard; van Rijswijk, Jurriaan

    2013-04-01

    Videogames for health provide innovative, exciting, and possibly highly effective new media for helping players change their behaviors or otherwise benefit their health. Getting the right videogames into the hands of players who can benefit most in a way that pays for the continued innovation and creation of such games is a current challenge. Entertainment videogame companies, which create games primarily to enhance players' enjoyment, have used the general business marketplace (e.g., online stores, walk-in stores, app stores) to deliver their products directly to consumers and earn enough capital to invest in making new products. No one believes, however, that enough kids or adults would use the general business marketplace to purchase games for health in sufficient volume to provide the down payment for the innovation and creation of new games for health. A successful business model is critical to the financial future of games for health. We asked members of our Editorial Board who are in health-related companies (Fikry Isaac, MD, MPH), in several game development companies (Chris Ashford, Ron Goldman, David J. Lenihan, Brent Poole, and Richard Buday, FAIA), and the head of the Games for Health Europe Foundation (Jurriaan van Rijswijk, MSc) to address questions in a roundtable about the current and possible future business models for games for health.

  20. Exploration on Building of Visualization Platform to Innovate Business Operation Pattern of Supply Chain Finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiangjun; Tang, Lingyun

    Supply Chain Finance, as a new financing pattern, has been arousing general attentions of scholars at home and abroad since its publication. This paper describes the author's understanding towards supply chain finance, makes classification of its business patterns in China from different perspectives, analyzes the existing problems and deficiencies of the business patterns, and finally puts forward the notion of building a visualization platform to innovate the business operation patterns and risk control modes of domestic supply chain finance.

  1. Landscape of business models in teledermatology.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Alex R; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Kovarik, Carrie L; Lipoff, Jules B

    2016-04-01

    Effective business models for teledermatology must be implemented to make the practice a feasible option for dermatologists to deliver care. This study sought to detect and report types of teledermatology business models in practice. We interviewed 19 private and academic dermatologists who have been reimbursed for teledermatology services. Most respondents described teledermatology business models fitting 4 categories-standard fee-for-service reimbursement from insurance, capitated service contracts, per-case service contracts, and direct to consumer-which are described in this article. We also anticipate new teledermatology business models will be needed as technology and insurance reimbursements evolve.

  2. 48 CFR 252.227-7018 - Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. 252.227-7018 Section... Clauses 252.227-7018 Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software—Small Business... Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program (MAR...

  3. 48 CFR 252.227-7018 - Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. 252.227-7018 Section... Clauses 252.227-7018 Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software—Small Business... Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program (MAR...

  4. 48 CFR 252.227-7018 - Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. 252.227-7018 Section... Clauses 252.227-7018 Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software—Small Business... Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program (FEB...

  5. 48 CFR 252.227-7018 - Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. 252.227-7018 Section... Clauses 252.227-7018 Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software—Small Business... Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program (MAY...

  6. 48 CFR 252.227-7018 - Rights in noncommercial technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... technical data and computer software-Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. 252.227-7018 Section... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. As prescribed in 227.7104(a), use the following clause: Rights in Noncommercial Technical Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program (JUN...

  7. 77 FR 23229 - Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program-Phase I-Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program--Phase I--Grant Application... for the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program (CFDA 84.133). This is in response to Public... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program--Phase I--Grant Application Package. OMB Control Number: 1820-0684....

  8. 77 FR 23228 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program-Phase II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program--Phase II--Grant... application for the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program (CFDA 84.133). This is in response to... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program--Phase II--Grant Application Package. OMB Control Number: 1820-0685....

  9. Extracting business vocabularies from business process models: SBVR and BPMN standards-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skersys, Tomas; Butleris, Rimantas; Kapocius, Kestutis

    2013-10-01

    Approaches for the analysis and specification of business vocabularies and rules are very relevant topics in both Business Process Management and Information Systems Development disciplines. However, in common practice of Information Systems Development, the Business modeling activities still are of mostly empiric nature. In this paper, basic aspects of the approach for business vocabularies' semi-automated extraction from business process models are presented. The approach is based on novel business modeling-level OMG standards "Business Process Model and Notation" (BPMN) and "Semantics for Business Vocabularies and Business Rules" (SBVR), thus contributing to OMG's vision about Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) and to model-driven development in general.

  10. The Space Laser Business Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Creating long-duration, high-powered lasers, for satellites, that can withstand the type of optical misalignment and damage dished out by the unforgiving environment of space, is work that is unique to NASA. It is complicated, specific work, where each step forward is into uncharted territory. In the 1990s, as this technology was first being created, NASA gave free reign to a group of "laser jocks" to develop their own business model and supply the Space Agency with the technology it needed. It was still to be a part of NASA as a division of Goddard Space Flight Center, but would operate independently out of a remote office. The idea for this satellite laboratory was based on the Skunk Works concept at Lockheed Martin Corporation. Formerly known as the Lockheed Corporation, in 1943, the aerospace firm, realizing that the type of advanced research it needed done could not be performed within the confines of a larger company, allowed a group of researchers and engineers to essentially run their own microbusiness without the corporate oversight. The Skunk Works project, in Burbank, California, produced America s first jet fighter, the world s most successful spy plane (U-2), the first 3-times-the-speed-of-sound surveillance aircraft, and the F-117A Nighthawk Stealth Fighter. Boeing followed suit with its Phantom Works, an advanced research and development branch of the company that operates independent of the larger unit and is responsible for a great deal of its most cutting-edge research. NASA s version of this advanced business model was the Space Lidar Technology Center (SLTC), just south of Goddard, in College Park, Maryland. Established in 1998 under a Cooperative Agreement between Goddard and the University of Maryland s A. James Clark School of Engineering, it was a high-tech laser shop where a small group of specialists, never more than 20 employees, worked all hours of the day and night to create the cutting- edge technology the Agency required of them. Drs

  11. [New business model for medical specialists].

    PubMed

    Houwen, L G H J Louis

    2013-01-01

    The reforms in the field of medical specialist care have important implications for the professional practice of medical specialists and their working relationship with the hospital. This leads to a considerable amount of pressure placed upon the way physicians have traditionally practiced their liberal professions, which is by forming partnerships and practicing from within the hospitals based on an admission agreement. As of 2015, the tax benefits for entrepreneurs will be abolished and the formation of regional partnerships will be discouraged. These developments not only pose threats but also offer opportunities for both the entrepreneurial medical specialist and the innovative hospital. In this article, the prospect of a future business model for specialist medical care will be outlined and explored by proposing three new organizational forms. The central vision of this model is that physicians who wish to retain their status of liberal professional practitioners in the twenty-first century should be more involved in the ownership structure of hospitals. The social importance of responsible patient care remains paramount.

  12. [New business model for medical specialists].

    PubMed

    Houwen, L G H J Louis

    2013-01-01

    The reforms in the field of medical specialist care have important implications for the professional practice of medical specialists and their working relationship with the hospital. This leads to a considerable amount of pressure placed upon the way physicians have traditionally practiced their liberal professions, which is by forming partnerships and practicing from within the hospitals based on an admission agreement. As of 2015, the tax benefits for entrepreneurs will be abolished and the formation of regional partnerships will be discouraged. These developments not only pose threats but also offer opportunities for both the entrepreneurial medical specialist and the innovative hospital. In this article, the prospect of a future business model for specialist medical care will be outlined and explored by proposing three new organizational forms. The central vision of this model is that physicians who wish to retain their status of liberal professional practitioners in the twenty-first century should be more involved in the ownership structure of hospitals. The social importance of responsible patient care remains paramount. PMID:23985238

  13. Teleradiology and emerging business models.

    PubMed

    Mun, Seong K; Tohme, Walid G; Platenberg, R Craig; Choi, Inyoung

    2005-01-01

    A number of new diagnostic radiology services have emerged which use teleradiology. The main themes include: (1) stand-alone teleradiology practice; (2) the "Nighthawk"/on-call coverage; (3) solo radiologist practice; (4) expert/second-opinion teleradiology; (5) a global virtual radiology service based on workload sharing and reallocation. More applications of teleradiology can be expected due to the continuing shortages and uneven distribution of radiologists, and the increasing use of radiological imaging for diagnosis. In a large enterprise, such as the US army, teleradiology will allow the creation of a global diagnostic organization where diagnostic images are distributed according to the availability of radiologists. Eventually the distinction between picture archiving and communication systems and teleradiology will be blurred and radiology will be provided by virtual organizations with distributed capabilities. As teleradiology services claim a bigger share of radiology practice, various legal and regulatory issues will need to be solved. Ultimately the successful business model will depend on the ability to produce the highest-quality product at the lowest cost.

  14. System of Indicators in the Innovation Management: Business Intelligence Applied to Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozada, Dayana; Araque, Francisco; Castillo, Jose Manuel; Salguero, Alberto; Delgado, Cecilia; Noda, Marcia; Hernández, Gilberto

    The work presents an approach to study mechanisms that allows managers the Innovation Management (IM) measurements. It is assumed, as main motivation, the analysis of patterns for the design of an integral system of indicators. A methodology that integrates the thought process, focusing on the Business Intelligence and the Balance Scorecard will be presented. A group of indexes based on the multidimensionality of IM in organizations of the sector of tourism is proposed. To approach this quality it is necessary to contextualize, in the conditions of sectoral operation, the theories, models and systems used in our approach. It has been used intervention methods like experts' criteria, consensus search techniques by means of surveys, consultation of documents, and statistical methods such as analysis of the main components.

  15. Successes of Small Business Innovation Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Bitler, Dean W.; Prok, George M.; Metzger, Marie E.; Dreibelbis, Cindy L.; Ganss, Meghan

    2002-01-01

    This booklet of success stories highlights the NASA Glenn Research Center's accomplishments and successes by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. These success stories are the results of selecting projects that support NASA missions and also have high commercialization potential. Each success story describes the innovation accomplished, commercialization of the technology, and further applications and usages. This booklet emphasizes the integration and incorporation of technologies into NASA missions and other government projects. The company name and the NASA contact person are identified to encourage further usage and application of the SBIR developed technologies and also to promote further commercialization of these products.

  16. From spare change to real change. The social sector as beta site for business innovation.

    PubMed

    Kanter, R M

    1999-01-01

    Corporations are continually looking for new sources of innovation. Today several leading companies are beginning to find inspiration in an unexpected place: the social sector. That includes public schools, welfare-to-work programs, and the inner city. Indeed, a new paradigm for innovation is emerging: a partnership between private enterprise and public interest that produces profitable and sustainable change for both sides. In this article, the author shows how some companies are moving beyond corporate social responsibility to corporate social innovation. Traditionally, companies viewed the social sector as a dumping ground for their spare cash, obsolete equipment, and tired executives. But that mind-set hardly created lasting change. Now companies are viewing community needs as opportunities to develop ideas and demonstrate business technologies; find and serve new markets; and solve long-standing business problems. They focus on inventing sophisticated solutions through a hands-on approach. This is not charity; it is R & D, a strategic business investment. The author concedes that it isn't easy to make the new paradigm work. But she has found that successful private-public partnerships share six characteristics: a clear business agenda, strong partners committed to change, investment by both parties, rootedness in the user community, links to other organizations, and a commitment to sustain and replicate the results. Drawing on examples of successful companies such as IBM and Bell Atlantic, the author illustrates how this paradigm has produced innovations that have both business and community payoffs.

  17. 77 FR 28520 - Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... the current affiliation rules relating to identity of interest, for purposes of the SBIR and STTR... identity of interest between family members with identical or substantially identical business or economic interests. SBA may also presume affiliation based on an identity of interest between business concerns...

  18. Genomics innovation: transforming healthcare, business, and the global economy.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2015-12-01

    The genomics revolution has generated an unprecedented number of assets to propel innovation. Initial availability of genomics-based applications show a significant potential to contribute addressing global challenges, such as human health, food security, alternative sources of energies, and environmental sustainability. In the last years, most developed and emerging nations have established bioeconomy agendas where genomics plays a major role to meet their local needs. Genomic medicine is one of the most visible areas where genomics innovation is likely to contribute to a more individualized, predictive, and preventive medical practice. Examples in agriculture, dairy and beef, fishery, aquaculture, and forests industries include the effective selection of genetic variants associated to traits of economic value. Some, in addition to producing more and better foods, already represent an important increase in revenues to their respective industries. It is reasonable to predict that genomics applications will lead to a paradigm shift in our ability to ease significant health, economic, and social burdens. However, to successfully benefit from genomics innovations, it is imperative to address a number of hurdles related to generating robust scientific evidence, developing lower-cost sequencing technologies, effective bioinformatics, as well as sensitive ethical, economical, environmental, legal, and social aspects associated with the development and use of genomics innovations. PMID:26632961

  19. Genomics innovation: transforming healthcare, business, and the global economy.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2015-12-01

    The genomics revolution has generated an unprecedented number of assets to propel innovation. Initial availability of genomics-based applications show a significant potential to contribute addressing global challenges, such as human health, food security, alternative sources of energies, and environmental sustainability. In the last years, most developed and emerging nations have established bioeconomy agendas where genomics plays a major role to meet their local needs. Genomic medicine is one of the most visible areas where genomics innovation is likely to contribute to a more individualized, predictive, and preventive medical practice. Examples in agriculture, dairy and beef, fishery, aquaculture, and forests industries include the effective selection of genetic variants associated to traits of economic value. Some, in addition to producing more and better foods, already represent an important increase in revenues to their respective industries. It is reasonable to predict that genomics applications will lead to a paradigm shift in our ability to ease significant health, economic, and social burdens. However, to successfully benefit from genomics innovations, it is imperative to address a number of hurdles related to generating robust scientific evidence, developing lower-cost sequencing technologies, effective bioinformatics, as well as sensitive ethical, economical, environmental, legal, and social aspects associated with the development and use of genomics innovations.

  20. Catalysts for Change: The Role of Small Business Funders in the Creation and Dissemination of Innovation.

    PubMed

    Shic, Frederick; Smith, Daniel; Horsburgh, Brian; Hollander, Eric; Rehg, James M; Goodwin, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    A gap exists between the expanding space of technological innovations to aid those affected by autism spectrum disorders, and the actual impact of those technologies on daily lives. This gap can be addressed through a very practical path of commercialization. However, the path from a technological innovation to a commercially viable product is fraught with challenges. These challenges can be mitigated through small business funding agencies, which are, more and more, catalyzing the dissemination of innovation by fostering social entrepreneurship through capital support and venture philanthropy. This letter describes the differences and nature of these agencies, and their importance in facilitating the translational and real-world impact of technological and scientific discoveries.

  1. A Model for Linking Organizational Culture and Performance. Innovative Session 6. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Cathy Bolton

    An innovative session was conducted to introduce session participants to a concept and researched model for linking organizational culture and performance. The session goals were as follows: (1) give participants a working knowledge of the link between business culture and key business performance indicators; (2) give participants a hands-on…

  2. Business, Babies & the Bottom Line: Corporate Innovations and Best Practices in Maternal and Child Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Miriam; Kolarek, Mary Hebert; Newton, Bonnie

    This publication presents the efforts and results of leading large employers to improve the health of mothers and children. Section 1 profiles the pioneering efforts and innovative practices of seven large employers and one business group: Haggar Clothing Co.; Honeywell Inc.; Los Angeles Department of Water and Power; Monfort, Inc.; First Chicago…

  3. Small business innovation research. Abstracts of completed 1987 phase 1 projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Non-proprietary summaries of Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects supported by NASA in the 1987 program year are given. Work in the areas of aeronautical propulsion, aerodynamics, acoustics, aircraft systems, materials and structures, teleoperators and robotics, computer sciences, information systems, spacecraft systems, spacecraft power supplies, spacecraft propulsion, bioastronautics, satellite communication, and space processing are covered.

  4. 48 CFR 227.7104 - Contracts under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Data and Computer Software—Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, when technical data or computer software will be generated during performance of contracts under the SBIR program. (b) Under the clause at 252.227-7018, the Government obtains SBIR data rights in technical data and computer...

  5. Experiential Learning Laboratories in Business Schools: The WD-40® for Curriculum Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boroff, Karen E.; Riley, Elven

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a case analysis of how a business school brought about curriculum innovation. The school used something borrowed, specifically experiential learning laboratories, and something new to attain measureable curriculum change, with only modest investments. The authors urge that the nimbleness of a medium-size school committed to…

  6. Use of Innovative Forms of Teaching Students to Create Business Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gennadyevna, Novikova Natalia; Mikhailovna, Zorina Natalia; Vadimovich, Kortunov Vadim

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights an important role of speech studies disciplines in teaching students to create business discourse, stresses practical orientation of teaching, a need to achieve a greater and more effective balance of theory and practice. The article presents innovative forms of teaching students to create and percept institutional business…

  7. The Introduction of Innovation in Teaching and Learning within Business, Management and Accounting: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Myra

    1998-01-01

    A case study of a business school in which a working group addressed the need for innovation in teaching, learning, and assessment showed that success factors included the use of learning sets, module documentation, and support from most of the faculty. (SK)

  8. 76 FR 77510 - Applications for New Awards; Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR)-Phase I

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Applications for New Awards; Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR)--Phase I AGENCY: Office of... Research Program (SBIR)--Phase I Notice is inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2012. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.133S-1. DATES: Applications Available:...

  9. Mastering the HRD Matrix: Generating ROI by Linking to Business Strategy. Innovative Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalata, Erica D.; Satterfield, Mary Ellen; Klees, Phyllis

    This innovative session provides a vehicle for facilitating dialogue and practical application of effective tools for linking human resource development (HRD) strategies with business/organizational strategies. The primary goal is to provide an increased understanding of and skill using practical, research-based approaches and techniques to build…

  10. Innovative Improvement and Intensification of Business Relationships Supported by Cooperative Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vančová, Viera; Čambál, Miloš; Cagáňová, Dagmar

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays, the opportunity for companies to be involved in cluster initiatives and international business associations is a major factor that contributes to the increase of their innovative potential. Companies organized in technological clusters have greater access to mutual business contacts, faster information transfer and deployment of advanced technologies. These companies cooperate more frequently with universities and research - development institutions on innovative projects. An important benefit of cluster associations is that they create a suitable environment for innovation and the transfer of knowledge by means of international cooperation and networking. This supportive environment is not easy to access for different small and mediumsized companies, who are not members of any clusters or networks. Supplier-customer business channels expand by means of transnational networks and exchanges of experience. Knowledge potential is broadened and joint innovative projects are developed. Reflecting the growing importance of clusters as driving forces of economic and regional development, a number of cluster policies and initiatives have emerged in the last few decades, oriented to encourage the establishment of new clusters, to support existing clusters, or to assist the development of transnational cooperation. To achieve the goals of the Europe 2020 Strategy, European countries should have an interest in building strong clusters and developing cluster cooperation by sharing specialized research infrastructures and testing facilities and facilitating knowledge transfer for crossborder cooperation. This requires developing a long term joint strategy in order to facilitate the development of open global clusters and innovative small and medium entrepreneurs.

  11. From Business Value Model to Coordination Process Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Hassan; van Sinderen, Marten; Wieringa, Roel

    The increased complexity of business webs calls for modeling the collaboration of enterprises from different perspectives, in particular the business and process perspectives, and for mutually aligning these perspectives. Business value modeling and coordination process modeling both are necessary for a good e-business design, but these activities have different goals and use different concepts. Nevertheless, the resulting models should be consistent with each other because they refer to the same system from different perspectives. Hence, checking the consistency between these models or producing one based on the other would be of high value. In this paper we discuss the issue of achieving consistency in multi-level e-business design and give guidelines to produce consistent coordination process models from business value models in a stepwise manner.

  12. There Is No Business Model for Open Educational Resources: A Business Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Langen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The economic proverb "There is no such thing such as a free lunch" applies also to open educational resources (OER). In recent years, several authors have used revenue models and business models to analyse the different sources of possible funding for OER. In this article the business models of Osterwalder and Chesbrough are combined with research…

  13. Modeling approach for business process reengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Mitchell M.; Chen, Yuliu

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a modeling approach to define, simulate, animate, and control business processes. The intent is to introduce the undergoing methodology to build tools for designing and managing business processes. Similar to computer aided design (CAD) for mechanical parts, CAD tools are needed for designing business processes. It emphasizes the dynamic behavior of business process. The proposed modeling technique consists of a definition of each individual activity, the network of activities, a control mechanism that describes coordination of these activities, and events that will flow through these activities. Based on the formalism introduced in this modeling technique, users will be able to define business process with minimum ambiguity, take snap shots of particular events in the process, describe the accountability of participants, and view a replay of event streams in the process flow. This modeling approach, mapped on top of a commercial software, has been tested by using examples from real life business process. The examples and testing helped us to identify some of the strengths and weaknesses of this proposed approach.

  14. Innovate Washington Group Looks to Create State Business

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-04-11

    Monthly column for TCH - April 2012. Excerpt here: Change is inevitable. In fact, many say it’s the only constant. One can either wait for the waves to hit and try not to drown, or get ahead of them and maximize the ride. I believe being proactive is the harder, but more powerful option. Over the past couple years numerous people have proactively worked to effect a particular change across the state of Washington: create a thriving ecosystem to accelerate technology-based economic development and achieve sustainable job growth. The result is an organization called Innovate Washington.

  15. Managing business compliance using model-driven security management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ulrich; Schreiner, Rudolf

    Compliance with regulatory and governance standards is rapidly becoming one of the hot topics of information security today. This is because, especially with regulatory compliance, both business and government have to expect large financial and reputational losses if compliance cannot be ensured and demonstrated. One major difficulty of implementing such regulations is caused the fact that they are captured at a high level of abstraction that is business-centric and not IT centric. This means that the abstract intent needs to be translated in a trustworthy, traceable way into compliance and security policies that the IT security infrastructure can enforce. Carrying out this mapping process manually is time consuming, maintenance-intensive, costly, and error-prone. Compliance monitoring is also critical in order to be able to demonstrate compliance at any given point in time. The problem is further complicated because of the need for business-driven IT agility, where IT policies and enforcement can change frequently, e.g. Business Process Modelling (BPM) driven Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Model Driven Security (MDS) is an innovative technology approach that can solve these problems as an extension of identity and access management (IAM) and authorization management (also called entitlement management). In this paper we will illustrate the theory behind Model Driven Security for compliance, provide an improved and extended architecture, as well as a case study in the healthcare industry using our OpenPMF 2.0 technology.

  16. Discovery, innovation and the cyclical nature of the pharmaceutical business.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Esther F; Smith, Dennis A

    2002-05-15

    Unlike many recent articles, which paint the future of the pharmaceutical industry in gloomy colours, this article provides an optimistic outlook. It explores the foundations on which the pharmaceutical industry has based its outstanding successes. Case studies of important drug classes underpin the arguments made and provide the basis for the authors' argument that recent technological breakthroughs and the unravelling of the human genome will provide a new wave of high quality targets (substrate) on which the industry can build. The article suggests that in a conducive environment that understands the benefits that pharmaceuticals provide to healthcare, those players who can base their innovation on a sufficient scale and from a large capital base will reshape the industry. PMID:12047856

  17. 77 FR 76215 - Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-27

    ... to sizestandards@SBA.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background On May 15, 2012, at 77 FR 28520 (available at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-15/pdf/2012-11586.pdf ), the U.S. Small Business... FR 30227 (May 22, 2012). SBA held these outreach sessions in Washington, DC; Boston,...

  18. NASA Small Business Innovation Research Program. Composite List of Projects, 1983 to 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA SBIR Composite List of Projects, 1983 to 1989, includes all projects that have been selected for support by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program of NASA. The list describes 1232 Phase 1 and 510 Phase 2 contracts that had been awarded or were in negotiation for award in August 1990. The main body is organized alphabetically by name of the small businesses. Four indexes cross-reference the list. The objective of this listing is to provide information about the SBIR program to anyone concerned with NASA research and development activities.

  19. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers.

    PubMed

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current "value-for-money" oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies.

  20. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers

    PubMed Central

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current “value-for-money” oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies. PMID:22894953

  1. A Tale of Two Small Business Grants: The Best of Times, the Worst of Times from the NASA Ames Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Lee, Geoffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of the SBIR Program are to: stimulate technological innovation in the private sector; strengthen the role of Small Business Concerns (SBCs) in meeting Federal research and development needs; increase the commercial application of these research results; and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged persons and women-owned small businesses. The process can be highly rewarding, providing the small business with resources to pursue research and development with a focus on providing NASA with new and advanced capabilities. We present two examples of how the NASA Ames SBIR Program has addressed these purposes, nurturing innovative ideas from small, businesses into commercially viable products that also address analytical needs in space research. These examples, from the Science Instruments for Conducting Solar System Exploration Subtopic, describe the journey from innovative concept to analytical instrument, one successful and one hampered by numerous roadblocks (including some international intrigue}.

  2. Small business innovation research program solicitation: Closing date July 16, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This is the eighth annual solicitation by NASA addressed to small business firms, inviting them to submit proposals for research, or research and development, activities in some of the science and engineering areas of interest to NASA. The solicitation describes the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program, identifies eligibility requirements, outlines the required proposal format and content, states proposal preparation and submission requirements, describes the proposal evaluation and award selection process, and provides other information to assist those interested in participating in NASA's SBIR program. It also identifies the technical topics and subtopics for which SBIR proposals are solicited. These cover a broad range of current NASA interests, but do not necessarily include all areas in which NASA plans or currently conducts research. High-risk high pay-off innovations are desired.

  3. Small Business Innovation Research. Program solicitation. Closing date: July 22, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The sixth annual Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) solicitation by NASA, describes the program, identifies eligibility requirements, outlines proposal preparation and submission requirements, describes the proposal evaluation and award selection process, and provides other information to assist those interested in participating in the SBIR program. It also identifies in Section 8.0 and Appendix D, the specific technical topics and subtopics in which SBIR Phase 1 proposals are solicited in 1988.

  4. e-University Project: Business Model. Consultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This report describes the context and goals of the Higher Education Funding Council for England's e-University project to develop Internet-based higher education. It summarizes the proposed business model and outlines next steps in implementing the project. A February 2000 letter announced the project and invited higher education institutions…

  5. Small Business Training Models for Community Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellison, Holly M., Ed.

    Nine successful community college programs for small business management training are described in this report in terms of their college and economic context, purpose, offerings, delivery modes, operating and marketing strategies, community outreach, support services, faculty and staff, evaluation, and future directions. The model programs are…

  6. The CEO's role in business model reinvention.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Vijay; Trimble, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Fending off new competitors is a perennial struggle for established companies. Govindarajan and Trimble, of Dartmouth's Tuck School of Business, explain why: Many corporations become too comfortable with their existing business models and neglect the necessary work of radically reinventing them. The authors map out an alternative in their "three boxes" framework. They argue that while a CEO manages the present (box 1), he or she must also selectively forget the past (box 2) in order to create the future (box 3). Infosys chairman N.R. Narayana Murthy mastered the three boxes to reinvigorate his company and greatly increased its changes of enduring for generations.

  7. Catalysts for Change: The Role of Small Business Funders in the Creation and Dissemination of Innovation.

    PubMed

    Shic, Frederick; Smith, Daniel; Horsburgh, Brian; Hollander, Eric; Rehg, James M; Goodwin, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    A gap exists between the expanding space of technological innovations to aid those affected by autism spectrum disorders, and the actual impact of those technologies on daily lives. This gap can be addressed through a very practical path of commercialization. However, the path from a technological innovation to a commercially viable product is fraught with challenges. These challenges can be mitigated through small business funding agencies, which are, more and more, catalyzing the dissemination of innovation by fostering social entrepreneurship through capital support and venture philanthropy. This letter describes the differences and nature of these agencies, and their importance in facilitating the translational and real-world impact of technological and scientific discoveries. PMID:26481385

  8. A General Business Model for Marine Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Enric; Costello, Christopher; Dougherty, Dawn; Heal, Geoffrey; Kelleher, Kieran; Murray, Jason H.; Rosenberg, Andrew A.; Sumaila, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Marine reserves are an effective tool for protecting biodiversity locally, with potential economic benefits including enhancement of local fisheries, increased tourism, and maintenance of ecosystem services. However, fishing communities often fear short-term income losses associated with closures, and thus may oppose marine reserves. Here we review empirical data and develop bioeconomic models to show that the value of marine reserves (enhanced adjacent fishing + tourism) may often exceed the pre-reserve value, and that economic benefits can offset the costs in as little as five years. These results suggest the need for a new business model for creating and managing reserves, which could pay for themselves and turn a profit for stakeholder groups. Our model could be expanded to include ecosystem services and other benefits, and it provides a general framework to estimate costs and benefits of reserves and to develop such business models. PMID:23573192

  9. E-Commerce and Business Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Yasushi

    The development of IT will lead to the integration of computers and networks, and IT will become more function oriented service and result in an indispensable part of the social infrastructure. This means that the critical point will shift from prioritizing “ownership of IS (Information Systems) before anything else” to “how IT will be utilized.” By reaching this technology level, Western origin non-discretion oriented management concept where IT is used as an enabler and IT-based business tools can be flexible enough to accommodate highly discretion oriented practices in Japanese organizations. In other words, IT can finally be utilized in a Japanese way. Taking account of the technological development trend, there is a need to take a macro look at the meaning of the concept of business models, something that has become viewed in the “micro” as patent-related issues. Under such trends, the greater freedom in business design the multipurpose use of IT functions is providing, the more critical a capability in the design of an elaborate business model is becoming.

  10. 47 CFR 76.1906 - Encoding rules for undefined business models.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Encoding rules for undefined business models... facts or considerations relied on. Replies shall be due ten (10) days from the date for filing a... earlier release windows, more favorable terms, innovation or original programming, outweighs...

  11. Harnessing the Power of Information Technology: Open Business Models in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Robert G.; Crawford, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is under enormous pressure to improve outcomes and reduce costs. Information technology can help achieve these goals, but only if it is properly harnessed. This article argues that one key to harnessing information technology is business model innovation that results in more "open" and "unbundled" operations in learning and…

  12. An Analytical Framework for Evaluating E-Commerce Business Models and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chung-Shing

    2001-01-01

    Considers electronic commerce as a paradigm shift, or a disruptive innovation, and presents an analytical framework based on the theories of transaction costs and switching costs. Topics include business transformation process; scale effect; scope effect; new sources of revenue; and e-commerce value creation model and strategy. (LRW)

  13. Small Business Innovation Research. Program solicitation. Closing date: July 21, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) invites small businesses to submit Phase 1 proposals in response to its Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program Solicitation 92-1. Firms with research or research and development capabilities (R/R&D) in science or engineering in any of the areas listed are encouraged to participate. This, the tenth annual SBIR solicitation by NASA, describes the program, identifies eligibility requirements, describes the proposal evaluation and award selection process, and provides other information to assist those interested in participating in NASA's SBIR program. It also identifies, in Section 8.0, the technical topics and subtopics in which SBIR Phase 1 proposals are solicited in 1992. These topics and subtopics cover a broad range of current NASA interests but do not necessarily include all areas in which NASA plans or currently conducts research. The NASA SBIR program seeks innovative approaches that respond to the needs, technical requirements, and new opportunities described in the subtopics. The focus is on innovation through the use of emerging technologies, novel applications of existing technologies, exploitation of scientific breakthroughs, or new capabilities or major improvements to existing technologies. NASA plans to select about 320 high-quality research or research and development proposals for Phase 1 contract awards on the basis of this Solicitation. Phase 1 contracts are normally six months in duration and funded up to $50,000, including profit. Selections will be based on the competitive merits of the offers and on NASA needs and priorities.

  14. Liberating Expression: A Freehand Approach to Business Process Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Nicolas; Sukaviriya, Noi

    Tools that support business process modeling are designed for experienced users to draw a process with precision and professional appearance. These tools are not conducive to sketching quick business design ideas.This demo proposal presents Inkus, a non-intrusive business process sketching tool which allows freehand sketches of process ideas and slowly brings the users to the required common business vocabulary. Our goal is to help unleash creativity in business designers and enrich the design process with values beyond drawing.

  15. The Commercial Open Source Business Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Dirk

    Commercial open source software projects are open source software projects that are owned by a single firm that derives a direct and significant revenue stream from the software. Commercial open source at first glance represents an economic paradox: How can a firm earn money if it is making its product available for free as open source? This paper presents the core properties of com mercial open source business models and discusses how they work. Using a commercial open source approach, firms can get to market faster with a superior product at lower cost than possible for traditional competitors. The paper shows how these benefits accrue from an engaged and self-supporting user community. Lacking any prior comprehensive reference, this paper is based on an analysis of public statements by practitioners of commercial open source. It forges the various anecdotes into a coherent description of revenue generation strategies and relevant business functions.

  16. Workforce Development Innovations with Direct Care Workers: Better Jobs, Better Services, Better Business.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Wayne F; Morris, John A; Hoge, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    This study describes findings from a national search to identify innovative workforce practices designed to improve the lives of direct care workers serving individuals with mental health and substance use conditions, while simultaneously improving client care, and the business vitality of the employer. The search process, conducted by The Annapolis Coalition on the Behavioral Health Workforce, resulted in the selection of five programs to receive the Pacesetter Award from among 51 nominations received. Awardees understood the value of investing in direct care workers, who constitute an essential, but often overlooked, group within the behavioral health workforce. A review of these innovations yielded six cross-cutting principles that should inform future workforce efforts (a) supporting educational and career development (b) increasing wages and benefits PMID:25535046

  17. 45 CFR 2532.30 - Other innovative and model programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Other innovative and model programs. 2532.30... AND COMMUNITY SERVICE INNOVATIVE AND SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS § 2532.30 Other innovative and model programs. (a) The Corporation may support other innovative and model programs such as...

  18. 45 CFR 2532.30 - Other innovative and model programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Other innovative and model programs. 2532.30... AND COMMUNITY SERVICE INNOVATIVE AND SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS § 2532.30 Other innovative and model programs. (a) The Corporation may support other innovative and model programs such as...

  19. 45 CFR 2532.30 - Other innovative and model programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other innovative and model programs. 2532.30... AND COMMUNITY SERVICE INNOVATIVE AND SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS § 2532.30 Other innovative and model programs. (a) The Corporation may support other innovative and model programs such as...

  20. 45 CFR 2532.30 - Other innovative and model programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other innovative and model programs. 2532.30... AND COMMUNITY SERVICE INNOVATIVE AND SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS § 2532.30 Other innovative and model programs. (a) The Corporation may support other innovative and model programs such as...

  1. A Model International Business Education Program for Small Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister-May, Stephen

    To address the community need for international training for small business, Normandale Community College applied for and obtained a federal grant for a program to assist 20 small to middle-sized firms in increasing their export capabilities to the Netherlands and West Germany, countries to which Minnesota had already developed strong trade ties.…

  2. A mini-midwifery business institute in a midwifery professional roles course: an innovative teaching strategy for successful career planning and business management of practice.

    PubMed

    Jesse, D Elizabeth; Dewees, Connie; McDowell, William C

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to include teaching strategies in midwifery education that address career planning and the business aspects of practice. This article presents the Mini-Midwifery Business Institute (M-MBI), an innovative teaching strategy for midwives that can also be applied to other advanced practice professions. The M-MBI can be integrated into a professional roles course. Before and after graduation, midwifery students and other advanced practice professionals can use the information to gain confidence and skills for successful career planning and the business management of practice.

  3. Improving complementary feeding in Ghana: reaching the vulnerable through innovative business--the case of KOKO Plus.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shibani; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku; Aaron, Grant J; Otoo, Gloria; Strutt, Nicholas; Bomfeh, Kennedy; Kitamura, Satoshi; Suri, Devika J; Murakami, Hitoshi; Furuta, Chie; Sarpong, Daniel; Saalia, F; Nakao, Youzou; Amonoo-Kuofi, Harold; Uauy, Ricardo; Toride, Yasuhiko

    2014-12-01

    Reaching vulnerable populations in low-resource settings with effective business solutions is critical, given the global nature of food and nutrition security. Over a third of deaths of children under 5 years of age are directly or indirectly caused by undernutrition. The Lancet series on malnutrition (2013) estimates that over 220,000 lives of children under 5 years of age can be saved through the implementation of an infant and young child feeding and care package. A unique project being undertaken in Ghana aims to bring in two elements of innovation in infant and young child feeding. The first involves a public-private partnership (PPP) to develop and test the efficacy and effectiveness of the delivery of a low-cost complementary food supplement in Ghana called KOKO Plus™. The second involves the testing of the concepts of social entrepreneurship and social business models in the distribution and delivery of the product. This paper shares information on the ongoing activities in the testing of concepts of PPPs, social business, social marketing, and demand creation using different delivery platforms to achieve optimal nutrition in Ghanaian infants and young children in the first 2 years of life. It also focuses on outlining the concept of using PPP and base-of-the-pyramid approaches toward achieving nutrition objectives.

  4. Improving complementary feeding in Ghana: reaching the vulnerable through innovative business--the case of KOKO Plus.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shibani; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku; Aaron, Grant J; Otoo, Gloria; Strutt, Nicholas; Bomfeh, Kennedy; Kitamura, Satoshi; Suri, Devika J; Murakami, Hitoshi; Furuta, Chie; Sarpong, Daniel; Saalia, F; Nakao, Youzou; Amonoo-Kuofi, Harold; Uauy, Ricardo; Toride, Yasuhiko

    2014-12-01

    Reaching vulnerable populations in low-resource settings with effective business solutions is critical, given the global nature of food and nutrition security. Over a third of deaths of children under 5 years of age are directly or indirectly caused by undernutrition. The Lancet series on malnutrition (2013) estimates that over 220,000 lives of children under 5 years of age can be saved through the implementation of an infant and young child feeding and care package. A unique project being undertaken in Ghana aims to bring in two elements of innovation in infant and young child feeding. The first involves a public-private partnership (PPP) to develop and test the efficacy and effectiveness of the delivery of a low-cost complementary food supplement in Ghana called KOKO Plus™. The second involves the testing of the concepts of social entrepreneurship and social business models in the distribution and delivery of the product. This paper shares information on the ongoing activities in the testing of concepts of PPPs, social business, social marketing, and demand creation using different delivery platforms to achieve optimal nutrition in Ghanaian infants and young children in the first 2 years of life. It also focuses on outlining the concept of using PPP and base-of-the-pyramid approaches toward achieving nutrition objectives. PMID:25514865

  5. Declarative business process modelling: principles and modelling languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedertier, Stijn; Vanthienen, Jan; Caron, Filip

    2015-02-01

    The business process literature has proposed a multitude of business process modelling approaches or paradigms, each in response to a different business process type with a unique set of requirements. Two polar paradigms, i.e. the imperative and the declarative paradigm, appear to define the extreme positions on the paradigm spectrum. While imperative approaches focus on explicitly defining how an organisational goal should be reached, the declarative approaches focus on the directives, policies and regulations restricting the potential ways to achieve the organisational goal. In between, a variety of hybrid-paradigms can be distinguished, e.g. the advanced and adaptive case management. This article focuses on the less-exposed declarative approach on process modelling. An outline of the declarative process modelling and the modelling approaches is presented, followed by an overview of the observed declarative process modelling principles and an evaluation of the declarative process modelling approaches.

  6. Value increasing business model for e-hospital.

    PubMed

    Null, Robert; Wei, June

    2009-01-01

    This paper developed a business value increasing model for electronic hospital (e-hospital) based on electronic value chain analysis. From this model, 58 hospital electronic business (e-business) solutions were developed. Additionally, this paper investigated the adoption patterns of these 58 e-business solutions within six US leading hospitals. The findings show that only 36 of 58 or 62% of the e-business solutions are fully or partially implemented within the six hospitals. Ultimately, the research results will be beneficial to managers and executives for accelerating e-business adoptions for e-hospital.

  7. A Model for Occupational Safety and Health Intervention Diffusion to Small Businesses

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Raymond C.; Cunningham, Thomas R.; Schulte, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Smaller businesses differ from their larger counterparts in having higher rates of occupational injuries and illnesses and fewer resources for preventing those losses. Intervention models developed outside the United States have addressed the resource deficiency issue by incorporating intermediary organizations such as trade associations. Methods This paper extends previous models by using exchange theory and by borrowing from the diffusion of innovations model. It emphasizes that occupational safety and health (OSH) organizations must understand as much about intermediary organizations as they do about small businesses. OSH organizations (“initiators”) must understand how to position interventions and information to intermediaries as added value to their relationships with small businesses. Examples from experiences in two midwestern states are used to illustrate relationships and types of analyses implied by the extended model. Results The study found that intermediary organizations were highly attuned to providing smaller businesses with what they want, including OSH services. The study also found that there are opinion leader organizations and individual champions within intermediaries who are key to decisions and actions about OSH programming. Conclusions The model places more responsibility on both initiators and intermediaries to develop and market interventions that will be valued in the competitive small business environment where the resources required to adopt each new business activity could always be used in other ways. The model is a candidate for empirical validation, and it offers some encouragement that the issue of sustainable OSH assistance to small businesses might be addressed. PMID:24115112

  8. Distance Training: How Innovative Organizations Are Using Technology To Maximize Learning and Meet Business Objectives. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Deborah A.; Berge, Zane L.

    This book contains 19 papers examining ways in which innovative organizations are using distance learning technology to maximize learning and meet business objectives. The following papers are included: "Preface" (Deborah A. Schreiber, Zane L. Berge); "Organizational Technology and Its Impact on Distance Training" (Deborah A. Schreiber);…

  9. Comparative analysis of Goodwin's business cycle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S.; Todorov, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    We compare the behavior of solutions of Goodwin's business cycle equation in the form of neutral delay differential equation with fixed delay (NDDE model) and in the form of the differential equations of 3rd, 4th and 5th orders (ODE model's). Such ODE model's (Taylor series expansion of NDDE in powers of θ) are proposed in N. Dharmaraj and K. Vela Velupillai [6] for investigation of the short periodic sawthooth oscillations in NDDE. We show that the ODE's of 3rd, 4th and 5th order may approximate the asymptotic behavior of only main Goodwin's mode, but not the sawthooth modes. If the order of the Taylor series expansion exceeds 5, then the approximate ODE becomes unstable independently of time lag θ.

  10. Business Intelligence Modeling in Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Davis, Rodney D.

    2005-01-01

    This technology project is to advance an integrated Planning and Management Simulation Model for evaluation of risks, costs, and reliability of launch systems from Earth to Orbit for Space Exploration. The approach builds on research done in the NASA ARC/KSC developed Virtual Test Bed (VTB) to integrate architectural, operations process, and mission simulations for the purpose of evaluating enterprise level strategies to reduce cost, improve systems operability, and reduce mission risks. The objectives are to understand the interdependency of architecture and process on recurring launch cost of operations, provide management a tool for assessing systems safety and dependability versus cost, and leverage lessons learned and empirical models from Shuttle and International Space Station to validate models applied to Exploration. The systems-of-systems concept is built to balance the conflicting objectives of safety, reliability, and process strategy in order to achieve long term sustainability. A planning and analysis test bed is needed for evaluation of enterprise level options and strategies for transit and launch systems as well as surface and orbital systems. This environment can also support agency simulation .based acquisition process objectives. The technology development approach is based on the collaborative effort set forth in the VTB's integrating operations. process models, systems and environment models, and cost models as a comprehensive disciplined enterprise analysis environment. Significant emphasis is being placed on adapting root cause from existing Shuttle operations to exploration. Technical challenges include cost model validation, integration of parametric models with discrete event process and systems simulations. and large-scale simulation integration. The enterprise architecture is required for coherent integration of systems models. It will also require a plan for evolution over the life of the program. The proposed technology will produce

  11. Business intelligence modeling in launch operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Davis, Rodney D.

    2005-05-01

    The future of business intelligence in space exploration will focus on the intelligent system-of-systems real-time enterprise. In present business intelligence, a number of technologies that are most relevant to space exploration are experiencing the greatest change. Emerging patterns of set of processes rather than organizational units leading to end-to-end automation is becoming a major objective of enterprise information technology. The cost element is a leading factor of future exploration systems. This technology project is to advance an integrated Planning and Management Simulation Model for evaluation of risks, costs, and reliability of launch systems from Earth to Orbit for Space Exploration. The approach builds on research done in the NASA ARC/KSC developed Virtual Test Bed (VTB) to integrate architectural, operations process, and mission simulations for the purpose of evaluating enterprise level strategies to reduce cost, improve systems operability, and reduce mission risks. The objectives are to understand the interdependency of architecture and process on recurring launch cost of operations, provide management a tool for assessing systems safety and dependability versus cost, and leverage lessons learned and empirical models from Shuttle and International Space Station to validate models applied to Exploration. The systems-of-systems concept is built to balance the conflicting objectives of safety, reliability, and process strategy in order to achieve long term sustainability. A planning and analysis test bed is needed for evaluation of enterprise level options and strategies for transit and launch systems as well as surface and orbital systems. This environment can also support agency simulation based acquisition process objectives. The technology development approach is based on the collaborative effort set forth in the VTB's integrating operations, process models, systems and environment models, and cost models as a comprehensive disciplined

  12. Business model for sensor-based fall recognition systems.

    PubMed

    Fachinger, Uwe; Schöpke, Birte

    2014-01-01

    AAL systems require, in addition to sophisticated and reliable technology, adequate business models for their launch and sustainable establishment. This paper presents the basic features of alternative business models for a sensor-based fall recognition system which was developed within the context of the "Lower Saxony Research Network Design of Environments for Ageing" (GAL). The models were developed parallel to the R&D process with successive adaptation and concretization. An overview of the basic features (i.e. nine partial models) of the business model is given and the mutual exclusive alternatives for each partial model are presented. The partial models are interconnected and the combinations of compatible alternatives lead to consistent alternative business models. However, in the current state, only initial concepts of alternative business models can be deduced. The next step will be to gather additional information to work out more detailed models.

  13. Crowd Sourcing for Challenging Technical Problems and Business Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    imaging, microbial detection and even the use of pharmaceuticals for radiation protection. The internal challenges through NASA@Work drew over 6000 participants across all NASA centers. Challenges conducted by each NASA center elicited ideas and solutions from several other NASA centers and demonstrated rapid and efficient participation from employees at multiple centers to contribute to problem solving. Finally, on January 19, 2011, the SLSD conducted a workshop on open collaboration and innovation strategies and best practices through the newly established NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC). Initial projects will be described leading to a new business model for SLSD.

  14. Multifaceted Modelling of Complex Business Enterprises

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We formalise and present a new generic multifaceted complex system approach for modelling complex business enterprises. Our method has a strong focus on integrating the various data types available in an enterprise which represent the diverse perspectives of various stakeholders. We explain the challenges faced and define a novel approach to converting diverse data types into usable Bayesian probability forms. The data types that can be integrated include historic data, survey data, and management planning data, expert knowledge and incomplete data. The structural complexities of the complex system modelling process, based on various decision contexts, are also explained along with a solution. This new application of complex system models as a management tool for decision making is demonstrated using a railway transport case study. The case study demonstrates how the new approach can be utilised to develop a customised decision support model for a specific enterprise. Various decision scenarios are also provided to illustrate the versatility of the decision model at different phases of enterprise operations such as planning and control. PMID:26247591

  15. National Institutes of Health phase I, Small Business Innovation Research applications: fiscal year 1983 results.

    PubMed

    Vener, K J

    1985-08-01

    A review of the 356 disapproved Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) proposals submitted to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for fiscal year 1983 funding was undertaken to identify the most common shortcomings of those disapproved applications. The shortcomings were divided into four general classes by using the scheme developed by other authors when describing the reasons for the disapproval of regular NIH research applications. Comparison of the reasons for disapproval of SBIR applications with regular applications suggests comparable difficulties in the areas of the problem and the approach. There is some indication, however, that the SBIR proposals may have been weaker in the category of the principal investigator (PI). In general, it is the responsibility of the PI to demonstrate that the work is timely and can be performed with available technology and expertise, and that the guidelines for the NIH SBIR program have been satisfied. PMID:4018273

  16. The NIAID Radiation Countermeasures Program Business Model

    PubMed Central

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Maidment, Bert W.

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Radiation/Nuclear Medical Countermeasures Development Program has developed an integrated approach to providing the resources and expertise required for the research, discovery, and development of radiation/nuclear medical countermeasures (MCMs). These resources and services lower the opportunity costs and reduce the barriers to entry for companies interested in working in this area and accelerate translational progress by providing goal-oriented stewardship of promising projects. In many ways, the radiation countermeasures program functions as a “virtual pharmaceutical firm,” coordinating the early and mid-stage development of a wide array of radiation/nuclear MCMs. This commentary describes the radiation countermeasures program and discusses a novel business model that has facilitated product development partnerships between the federal government and academic investigators and biopharmaceutical companies. PMID:21142762

  17. Maximum entropy model for business cycle synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Azaele, Sandro; Wang, Yougui

    2014-11-01

    The global economy is a complex dynamical system, whose cyclical fluctuations can mainly be characterized by simultaneous recessions or expansions of major economies. Thus, the researches on the synchronization phenomenon are key to understanding and controlling the dynamics of the global economy. Based on a pairwise maximum entropy model, we analyze the business cycle synchronization of the G7 economic system. We obtain a pairwise-interaction network, which exhibits certain clustering structure and accounts for 45% of the entire structure of the interactions within the G7 system. We also find that the pairwise interactions become increasingly inadequate in capturing the synchronization as the size of economic system grows. Thus, higher-order interactions must be taken into account when investigating behaviors of large economic systems.

  18. The NIAID Radiation Countermeasures Program business model.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Maidment, Bert W; Hatchett, Richard J

    2010-12-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Radiation/Nuclear Medical Countermeasures Development Program has developed an integrated approach to providing the resources and expertise required for the research, discovery, and development of radiation/nuclear medical countermeasures (MCMs). These resources and services lower the opportunity costs and reduce the barriers to entry for companies interested in working in this area and accelerate translational progress by providing goal-oriented stewardship of promising projects. In many ways, the radiation countermeasures program functions as a "virtual pharmaceutical firm," coordinating the early and mid-stage development of a wide array of radiation/nuclear MCMs. This commentary describes the radiation countermeasures program and discusses a novel business model that has facilitated product development partnerships between the federal government and academic investigators and biopharmaceutical companies.

  19. University Business Models and Online Practices: A Third Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Higher Education is in a state of change, and the existing business models do not meet the needs of stakeholders. This article contrasts the current dominant business models of universities, comparing the traditional non-profit against the for-profit online model, examining the structural features and online teaching practices that underlie each.…

  20. Proof of Economic Viability of Blended Learning Business Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druhmann, Carsten; Hohenberg, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The discussion on economically sustainable business models with respect to information technology is lacking in many aspects of proven approaches. In the following contribution the economic viability is valued based on a procedural model for design and evaluation of e-learning business models in the form of a case study. As a case study object a…

  1. Selections from the ABC 2015 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington: Pitching Fish and Innovative Oral and Written Business Communication Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, D. Joel, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This article, the first of a two-part series, presents teaching 10 innovations from the 2015 Association for Business Communication's 80th annual conference. The creative new assignments offered here include building listening skills by journaling, oral interpretation, positive message framing, storytelling, delivering bad news, persuasive…

  2. Exploring the Relationship between the Use of Evaluation in Business Process Re-engineering and Organisational Learning and Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakola, Maria

    2000-01-01

    Evaluations of the reengineering of business processes in three companies examined the relationship with organizational learning and innovation. Understanding and mapping existing processes helped identify weaknesses; skills required to make processes operational were clarified; implementation of the reengineering was facilitated by knowledge of…

  3. The Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center: A business incubator concept adapted to federal laboratory technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wittig, T.; Greenfield, J.

    1996-10-01

    In recent years, the US defense industrial base spawned the aerospace industry, among other successes, and served as the nation`s technology seed bed. However, as the defense industrial base shrinks and public and private resources become scarcer, the merging of the commercial and defense communities becomes necessary to maintain national technological competencies. Cooperative efforts such as technology transfer provide an attractive, cost-effective, well-leveraged alternative to independently funded research and development (R and D). The sharing of knowledge, resources, and innovation among defense contractors and other public sector firms, academia, and other organizations has become exceedingly attractive. Recent legislation involving technology transfer provides for the sharing of federal laboratory resources with the private sector. The Army Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, a designer of weapons systems, is one of the nation`s major laboratories with this requirement. To achieve its important technology transfer mission, ARDEC reviewed its capabilities, resources, intellectual property, and products with commercial potential. The purpose of the review was to develop a viable plan for effecting a technology transfer cultural change within the ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal and with the private sector. This report highlights the issues identified, discussed, and resolved prior to the transformation of a temporarily vacant federal building on the Picatinny installation into a business incubator. ARDEC`s discussions and rationale for the decisions and actions that led to the implementation of the Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center are discussed.

  4. Adding Innovation Diffusion Theory to the Technology Acceptance Model: Supporting Employees' Intentions to Use E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Hsu, Chia-Ning

    2011-01-01

    This study intends to investigate factors affecting business employees' behavioral intentions to use the e-learning system. Combining the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) with the technology acceptance model (TAM), the present study proposes an extended technology acceptance model. The proposed model was tested with data collected from 552…

  5. Empowering nurses through an innovative scheduling model.

    PubMed

    Maxson-Cooper, Pamela A

    2011-03-01

    In 1980, Froedtert Hospital opened its doors using an innovative registered nurse scheduling model. The hospital has grown to 500 beds, with over 1,600 registered nurses, and continues to use the 7/70 staffing pattern as a core scheduling model. Registered nurses work a straight seven, 10-hour days, and then have 1 week off, or 26 weeks off a year. For professional registered nurses in acute care, the schedule is predictable and consistent for years. This scheduling pattern has resulted in excellent registered nurse satisfaction, increased retention, and consistency in care delivery teams since 1980.

  6. 45 CFR 2532.30 - Other innovative and model programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other innovative and model programs. 2532.30 Section 2532.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE INNOVATIVE AND SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS § 2532.30 Other innovative and model programs. (a) The Corporation may...

  7. A Structural Equation Model for Predicting Business Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomykalski, James J.; Dion, Paul; Brock, James L.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors developed a structural equation model that accounted for 79% of the variability of a student's final grade point average by using a sample size of 147 students. The model is based on student grades in 4 foundational business courses: introduction to business, macroeconomics, statistics, and using databases. Educators and…

  8. Business Model for the e-University. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This report describes a British study designed to produce a business model for an e-university, a concept that did not previously exist. Part 1, "Aims and Objectives," describes the background of the effort, the challenge to the United Kingdom, goals, and objectives. Part 2, "The Business Model," describes: the basic concept; markets, courses, and…

  9. The Clinical Learning Dyad Model: An Innovation in Midwifery Education.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susanna R; Thomas, Celeste R; Gerard, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    There is a national shortage of women's health and primary care providers in the United States, including certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives. This shortage is directly related to how many students can be trained within the existing system. The current model of midwifery clinical training is based on apprenticeship, with one-on-one interaction between a student and preceptor. Thus, the number of newly trained midwifery providers is limited by the number of available and willing preceptors. The clinical learning dyad model (CLDM), which pairs 2 beginning midwifery students with one preceptor in a busy practice, addresses this problem. In addition, this model brings in a senior midwife student as a near-peer mentor when the students are first oriented into outpatient clinical practice. The model began as a pilot project to improve the quality of training and increase available student spots in clinical education. This article discusses the origins of the model, the specifics of its design, and the results of a midterm and one-year postintervention survey. Students and preceptors involved in this model identified several advantages to the program, including increased student accountability, enhanced socialization into the profession, improved learning, and reduced teaching burden on preceptors. An additional benefit of the CLDM is that students form a learning community and collaborate with preceptors to care for women in busy clinical settings. Challenges of the model will also be discussed. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the CLDM. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health.

  10. Employer-driven consumerism: integrating health into the business model.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Checkley, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Consumer-driven health care is a misnomer. Notwithstanding the enormous role the individual consumer has to play in reshaping the U.S. health care delivery system, this article will focus on the employer as the key driver of change and innovation in the consumerism revolution. American Standard provides a case study of how one major employer has evaluated health care in the context of its business and aggressively integrated consumerism and health into the core of its business. Other companies will appropriately execute consumerism strategies in a fashion consistent with their own needs, culture, resources and populations. However, the principles supporting those strategies will be very much consistent.

  11. Innovation Process Design: A Change Management and Innovation Dimension Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peisl, Thomas; Reger, Veronika; Schmied, Juergen

    The authors propose an innovative approach to the management of innovation integrating business, process, and maturity dimensions. Core element of the concept is the adaptation of ISO/IEC 15504 to the innovation process including 14 innovation drivers. Two managerial models are applied to conceptualize and visualize the respective innovation strategies, the Balanced Scorecard and a Barriers in Change Processes Model. An illustrative case study shows a practical implementation process.

  12. A theory-based logic model for innovation policy and evaluation.

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Gretchen B.

    2010-04-01

    Current policy and program rationale, objectives, and evaluation use a fragmented picture of the innovation process. This presents a challenge since in the United States officials in both the executive and legislative branches of government see innovation, whether that be new products or processes or business models, as the solution to many of the problems the country faces. The logic model is a popular tool for developing and describing the rationale for a policy or program and its context. This article sets out to describe generic logic models of both the R&D process and the diffusion process, building on existing theory-based frameworks. Then a combined, theory-based logic model for the innovation process is presented. Examples of the elements of the logic, each a possible leverage point or intervention, are provided, along with a discussion of how this comprehensive but simple model might be useful for both evaluation and policy development.

  13. A new model for graduate education and innovation in medical technology.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Youseph; Acharya, Soumyadipta

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new model of graduate education in bioengineering innovation and design- a year long Master's degree program that educates engineers in the process of healthcare technology innovation for both advanced and low-resource global markets. Students are trained in an iterative "Spiral Innovation" approach that ensures early, staged, and repeated examination of all key elements of a successful medical device. This includes clinical immersion based problem identification and assessment (at Johns Hopkins Medicine and abroad), team based concept and business model development, and project planning based on iterative technical and business plan de-risking. The experiential, project based learning process is closely supported by several core courses in business, design, and engineering. Students in the program work on two team based projects, one focused on addressing healthcare needs in advanced markets and a second focused on low-resource settings. The program recently completed its fourth year of existence, and has graduated 61 students, who have continued on to industry or startups (one half), additional graduate education, or medical school (one third), or our own Global Health Innovation Fellowships. Over the 4 years, the program has sponsored 10 global health teams and 14 domestic/advanced market medtech teams, and launched 5 startups, of which 4 are still active. Projects have attracted over US$2.5M in follow-on awards and grants, that are supporting the continued development of over a dozen projects.

  14. A new model for graduate education and innovation in medical technology.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Youseph; Acharya, Soumyadipta

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new model of graduate education in bioengineering innovation and design- a year long Master's degree program that educates engineers in the process of healthcare technology innovation for both advanced and low-resource global markets. Students are trained in an iterative "Spiral Innovation" approach that ensures early, staged, and repeated examination of all key elements of a successful medical device. This includes clinical immersion based problem identification and assessment (at Johns Hopkins Medicine and abroad), team based concept and business model development, and project planning based on iterative technical and business plan de-risking. The experiential, project based learning process is closely supported by several core courses in business, design, and engineering. Students in the program work on two team based projects, one focused on addressing healthcare needs in advanced markets and a second focused on low-resource settings. The program recently completed its fourth year of existence, and has graduated 61 students, who have continued on to industry or startups (one half), additional graduate education, or medical school (one third), or our own Global Health Innovation Fellowships. Over the 4 years, the program has sponsored 10 global health teams and 14 domestic/advanced market medtech teams, and launched 5 startups, of which 4 are still active. Projects have attracted over US$2.5M in follow-on awards and grants, that are supporting the continued development of over a dozen projects. PMID:23943068

  15. A Meta-modeling Framework to Support Accountability in Business Process Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Joe; de Vaney, Christopher; Wang, Yan

    Accountability is becoming a central theme in business today in the midst of global financial crisis as the corporate scandals and fallouts dominate the front pages of the press. Businesses are demanding more accountability measures built-in at the business process modeling level. Currently the business process modeling standards and methods mainly focus on the sequential flow aspect of business process and leave the business aspect of accountability largely untouched. In this paper, we extend the OMG’s business modeling specifications to define a business accountability meta-model. The meta-model is complementary to the OMG’s Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) vision, laying out the foundation for future model generation and transformation for creating accountable business process solutions.

  16. Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Gwo, Jin-Ping; Siegel, Malcolm D; Li, Ming-Hsu; Fang, Yilin; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Yabusaki, Steve B

    2013-05-01

    There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g., Ni, Cr, Co). The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport

  17. Modeling interdependencies between business and communication processes in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brigl, Birgit; Wendt, Thomas; Winter, Alfred

    2003-01-01

    The optimization and redesign of business processes in hospitals is an important challenge for the hospital information management who has to design and implement a suitable HIS architecture. Nevertheless, there are no tools available specializing in modeling information-driven business processes and the consequences on the communication between information processing, tools. Therefore, we will present an approach which facilitates the representation and analysis of business processes and resulting communication processes between application components and their interdependencies. This approach aims not only to visualize those processes, but to also to evaluate if there are weaknesses concerning the information processing infrastructure which hinder the smooth implementation of the business processes.

  18. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  19. The New Community College Business and Finance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myran, Gunder

    2013-01-01

    The term "community college business and finance model" is unlikely to evoke a positive response from educators who resist labeling students as "customers," do not want to call the college's offerings "products," and don't like to hear the college referred to as a "business." Faculty and staff tend…

  20. An Open Source Business Model for Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Greater investment is required in developing new drugs and vaccines against malaria in order to eradicate malaria. These precious funds must be carefully managed to achieve the greatest impact. We evaluate existing efforts to discover and develop new drugs and vaccines for malaria to determine how best malaria R&D can benefit from an enhanced open source approach and how such a business model may operate. We assess research articles, patents, clinical trials and conducted a smaller survey among malaria researchers. Our results demonstrate that the public and philanthropic sectors are financing and performing the majority of malaria drug/vaccine discovery and development, but are then restricting access through patents, ‘closed’ publications and hidden away physical specimens. This makes little sense since it is also the public and philanthropic sector that purchases the drugs and vaccines. We recommend that a more “open source” approach is taken by making the entire value chain more efficient through greater transparency which may lead to more extensive collaborations. This can, for example, be achieved by empowering an existing organization like the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) to act as a clearing house for malaria-related data. The malaria researchers that we surveyed indicated that they would utilize such registry data to increase collaboration. Finally, we question the utility of publicly or philanthropically funded patents for malaria medicines, where little to no profits are available. Malaria R&D benefits from a publicly and philanthropically funded architecture, which starts with academic research institutions, product development partnerships, commercialization assistance through UNITAID and finally procurement through mechanisms like The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the U.S.’ President’s Malaria Initiative. We believe that a fresh look should be taken at the cost/benefit of patents particularly related to new

  1. An open source business model for malaria.

    PubMed

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Greater investment is required in developing new drugs and vaccines against malaria in order to eradicate malaria. These precious funds must be carefully managed to achieve the greatest impact. We evaluate existing efforts to discover and develop new drugs and vaccines for malaria to determine how best malaria R&D can benefit from an enhanced open source approach and how such a business model may operate. We assess research articles, patents, clinical trials and conducted a smaller survey among malaria researchers. Our results demonstrate that the public and philanthropic sectors are financing and performing the majority of malaria drug/vaccine discovery and development, but are then restricting access through patents, 'closed' publications and hidden away physical specimens. This makes little sense since it is also the public and philanthropic sector that purchases the drugs and vaccines. We recommend that a more "open source" approach is taken by making the entire value chain more efficient through greater transparency which may lead to more extensive collaborations. This can, for example, be achieved by empowering an existing organization like the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) to act as a clearing house for malaria-related data. The malaria researchers that we surveyed indicated that they would utilize such registry data to increase collaboration. Finally, we question the utility of publicly or philanthropically funded patents for malaria medicines, where little to no profits are available. Malaria R&D benefits from a publicly and philanthropically funded architecture, which starts with academic research institutions, product development partnerships, commercialization assistance through UNITAID and finally procurement through mechanisms like The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the U.S.' President's Malaria Initiative. We believe that a fresh look should be taken at the cost/benefit of patents particularly related to new malaria

  2. 25 CFR 162.402 - Is there a model business lease form?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Is there a model business lease form? 162.402 Section 162... Business Leases Business Leasing General Provisions § 162.402 Is there a model business lease form? There is no model business lease form because of the need for flexibility in negotiating and...

  3. 25 CFR 162.402 - Is there a model business lease form?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Is there a model business lease form? 162.402 Section 162... Business Leases Business Leasing General Provisions § 162.402 Is there a model business lease form? There is no model business lease form because of the need for flexibility in negotiating and...

  4. Linking satellite ICT application businesses with regional innovation centers and investors: The EC “INVESaT” project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiron, Florence; Kreisel, Joerg

    2009-09-01

    In the sector of information and communication technologies (ICT), whether in the USA, Japan, or Europe, innovative services are already in use, based on large-scale space-based infrastructure investments. Such systems are e.g. earth observation, telecommunication, and navigation, timing and positioning satellites. In combination with the advent of powerful handheld terminals and the demand for ubiquitous services, it is expected that info-mobility applications will reveal new sources of business in the years ahead, using in particular the Earth observation and future GALILEO systems to position any feature or user anywhere in the world within a few meter accuracy. Hence, satellite-based capabilities provide new and unique opportunities for economic stimulation and development. Many incubators and innovation centers in Europe have already grasped this growth potential. Yet, for many European players business growth appears below expectations compared to developments in the USA following the launch of GPS (Global Positioning System). Europe still has to overcome intrinsic barriers to seize these new business opportunities faster and with more visible economic impact by leveraging on SMEs and regional innovation centers to expand the commercial utilization of satellite capabilities and mobilization of appropriate financial resources. The paper elaborates on the INVESat project (funded by the EuropeInnova—European Commission), which aims at bridging the gap between Innovative enterprises and financial In VEstors in the emerging markets of SaTellite applications. The critical success factors required to stimulate and support more efficiently investments in this bread of innovative services will also be highlighted.

  5. Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Gour T.; Gwo, Jin Ping; Siegel, Malcolm D.; Li, Ming-Hsu; Fang, Yilin; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2013-05-01

    There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g.,Ni, Cr, Co).The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models

  6. Application of simulation models for the optimization of business processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jašek, Roman; Sedláček, Michal; Chramcov, Bronislav; Dvořák, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the applications of modeling and simulation tools in the optimization of business processes, especially in solving an optimization of signal flow in security company. As a modeling tool was selected Simul8 software that is used to process modeling based on discrete event simulation and which enables the creation of a visual model of production and distribution processes.

  7. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Science Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  8. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into NASA Programs Associated With the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  9. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  10. Institutionalizing Innovation in an Organization: A Model and Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slawski, Carl

    A policy systems theoretical analysis of the problem of institutionalizing innovation in an organization is summarized in a flow diagram. The model is presented in terms of specific hypotheses, and then illustrated with a case of frustrated innovation, the 1968-69 crisis and strike at San Francisco State College. The model is set up (1) to help…

  11. A Legal Perspective on Business: Modeling the Impact of Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanavati, Sepideh; Siena, Alberto; Perini, Anna; Amyot, Daniel; Peyton, Liam; Susi, Angelo

    Modern goal-oriented requirements engineering frameworks use modeling as a means of better understanding a domain, leading to an overall improvement in the quality of the requirements. Regulations and laws impose additional context and constraints on software goals and can limit the satisfaction of stakeholder needs. Organizations and software developers need modeling tools that can properly address the potential deep impact legal issues can have on the effectiveness of business strategies. In this paper, we perform a preliminary study into the development of a modeling framework able to support the analysis of legal prescriptions alongside business strategies. We demonstrate, via an example drawn from a case study of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), how models of this law can be built with the GRL modeling language and how they can be evaluated as part of the business goal models.

  12. Racing to define pharmaceutical R&D external innovation models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangsu; Plump, Andrew; Ringel, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The pharmaceutical industry continues to face fundamental challenges because of issues with research and development (R&D) productivity and rising customer expectations. To lower R&D costs, move beyond me-too therapies, and create more transformative portfolios, pharmaceutical companies are actively capitalizing on external innovation through precompetitive collaboration with academia, cultivation of biotech start-ups, and proactive licensing and acquisitions. Here, we review the varying innovation strategies used by pharmaceutical companies, compare and contrast these models, and identify the trends in external innovation. We also discuss factors that influence these external innovation models and propose a preliminary set of metrics that could be used as leading indicators of success.

  13. Using a business practice model to control product line costs.

    PubMed

    Farr, Ronald J; Senn, Girard F; Whitten, Catherine M

    2006-08-01

    Faced with a downward turn in its total joint replacement product line, Avera McKennan Hospital was able to avert further decline and save dollar 500,000 annually by: Reviewing and analyzing the product line's past performance. Developing a business model to govern its new implant supply process. Obtaining physician buy-in. Ensuring vendor compliance with its new contracts. Developing a role as business partner with its orthopedic surgeons. PMID:16927502

  14. Use of a business case model for organizational change.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2011-01-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author discusses the concept of a business case and introduces a 3-phase business case model for organizational change. PMID:21799358

  15. Use of a business case model for organizational change.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2011-01-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author discusses the concept of a business case and introduces a 3-phase business case model for organizational change.

  16. The pediatric intensive care unit business model.

    PubMed

    Schleien, Charles L

    2013-06-01

    All pediatric intensivists need a primer on ICU finance. The author describes potential alternate revenue sources for the division. Differentiating units by size or academic affiliation, the author describes drivers of expense. Strategies to manage the bottom line including negotiations for hospital services are covered. Some of the current trends in physician productivity and its described metrics, with particular focus on clinical FTE management is detailed. Methods of using this data to enhance revenue are discussed. Some of the other current trends in the ICU business related to changes at the federal and state level as well as in the insurance sector, moving away from fee-for-service are covered.

  17. Minding the Business of Business: Tools and Models to Design and Measure Wealth Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardez, Mariano L.

    2009-01-01

    What is the business of business? How can planners and investors anticipate the true chances of failure and success of a business idea? This article describes a rationale for developing successful new business on the basis of a simple, sensible idea: the business of any business is to make its clients successful enough to continue purchasing and…

  18. Generic Business Model Types for Enterprise Mashup Intermediaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Volker; Stanoevska-Slabeva, Katarina

    The huge demand for situational and ad-hoc applications desired by the mass of business end users led to a new kind of Web applications, well-known as Enterprise Mashups. Users with no or limited programming skills are empowered to leverage in a collaborative manner existing Mashup components by combining and reusing company internal and external resources within minutes to new value added applications. Thereby, Enterprise Mashup environments interact as intermediaries to match the supply of providers and demand of consumers. By following the design science approach, we propose an interaction phase model artefact based on market transaction phases to structure required intermediary features. By means of five case studies, we demonstrate the application of the designed model and identify three generic business model types for Enterprise Mashups intermediaries (directory, broker, and marketplace). So far, intermediaries following a real marketplace business model don’t exist in context of Enterprise Mashups and require further research for this emerging paradigm.

  19. Business model design for a wearable biofeedback system.

    PubMed

    Hidefjäll, Patrik; Titkova, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Wearable sensor technologies used to track daily activities have become successful in the consumer market. In order for wearable sensor technology to offer added value in the more challenging areas of stress-rehab care and occupational health stress-related biofeedback parameters need to be monitored and more elaborate business models are needed. To identify probable success factors for a wearable biofeedback system (Affective Health) in the two mentioned market segments in a Swedish setting, we conducted literature studies and interviews with relevant representatives. Data were collected and used first to describe the two market segments and then to define likely feasible business model designs, according to the Business Model Canvas framework. Needs of stakeholders were identified as inputs to business model design. Value propositions, a key building block of a business model, were defined for each segment. The value proposition for occupational health was defined as "A tool that can both identify employees at risk of stress-related disorders and reinforce healthy sustainable behavior" and for healthcare as: "Providing therapists with objective data about the patient's emotional state and motivating patients to better engage in the treatment process".

  20. A fractal comparison of real and Austrian business cycle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Robert F.

    2010-06-01

    Rescaled range and power spectral density analysis are applied to examine a diverse set of macromonetary data for fractal character and stochastic dependence. Fractal statistics are used to evaluate two competing models of the business cycle, Austrian business cycle theory and real business cycle theory. Strong evidence is found for antipersistent stochastic dependence in transactions money (M1) and components of the monetary aggregates most directly concerned with transactions, which suggests an activist monetary policy. Savings assets exhibit persistent long memory, as do those monetary aggregates which include savings assets, such as savings money (M2), M2 minus small time deposits, and money of zero maturity (MZM). Virtually all measures of economic activity display antipersistence, and this finding is invariant to whether the measures are adjusted for inflation, including real gross domestic product, real consumption expenditures, real fixed private investment, and labor productivity. This strongly disconfirms real business cycle theory.

  1. Application and project portfolio valuation using enterprise architecture and business requirements modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartel, Dick; Steen, Maarten W. A.; Lankhorst, Marc M.

    2012-05-01

    This article describes an architecture-based approach to IT valuation. This approach offers organisations an instrument to valuate their application and project portfolios and to make well-balanced decisions about IT investments. The value of a software application is assessed in terms of its contribution to a selection of business goals. Based on such assessments, the value of different applications can be compared, and requirements for innovation, development, maintenance and phasing out can be identified. IT projects are proposed to realise the requirements. The value of each project is assessed in terms of the value it adds to one or more applications. This value can be obtained by relating the 'as-is' application portfolio to the 'to-be' portfolio that is being proposed by the project portfolio. In this way, projects can be ranked according to their added value, given a certain selection of business goals. The approach uses ArchiMate to model the relationship between software applications, business processes, services and products. In addition, two language extensions are used to model the relationship of these elements to business goals and requirements and to projects and project portfolios. The approach is illustrated using the portfolio method of Bedell and has been implemented in BiZZdesign Architect.

  2. Five Frames to Promote Innovative Business Education: Lessons Learned from the Art and Science of Improv

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, L. Roger; Kumta, Shekhar M.; Werner, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    Business education and workplace learning are addressed via five episodes or conversations between two business educators, one of whom is experienced and also an improvisational artist. Vaill (1989) compared managing to a performing art. Vendelø (2009) connected organizational learning to improvisation. In these constructed conversations, the…

  3. Online Business Simulations: A Sustainable or Disruptive Innovation in Management Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Jason Scott

    2012-01-01

    The focal goal of this research was to extend the empirical effort on business simulations as a form of experiential learning by providing the first empirical analysis of business acumen and knowledge application skills. Disruptions in technology are providing more opportunities to improve the simulation gaming learning experience and a number of…

  4. Business-School Accrediting Group Revises Standards in Effort to Improve Teaching and Foster Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evangelauf, Jean

    1991-01-01

    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business has endorsed new accrediting standards to be phased in over two years. Revisions combine mandatory requirements for all business schools and flexible standards based on self-defined mission, reflecting the view that quality and diversity are compatible and desirable. (MSE)

  5. Innovative Business Cases for Energy Storage In a Restructured Electricity Marketplace, A Study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    IANNUCCI, JOE; EYER, JIM; BUTLER, PAUL C.

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the second phase of a project entitled ''Innovative Business Cases for Energy Storage in a Restructured Electricity Marketplace''. During part one of the effort, nine ''Stretch Scenarios'' were identified. They represented innovative and potentially significant uses of electric energy storage. Based on their potential to significantly impact the overall energy marketplace, the five most compelling scenarios were identified. From these scenarios, five specific ''Storage Market Opportunities'' (SMOs) were chosen for an in-depth evaluation in this phase. The authors conclude that some combination of the Power Cost Volatility and the T&D Benefits SMOs would be the most compelling for further investigation. Specifically, a combination of benefits (energy, capacity, power quality and reliability enhancement) achievable using energy storage systems for high value T&D applications, in regions with high power cost volatility, makes storage very competitive for about 24 GW and 120 GWh during the years of 2001 and 2010.

  6. Business Model Evaluation for an Advanced Multimedia Service Portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciella, Paolo; Zoric, Josip; Gaivoronski, Alexei A.

    In this paper we analyze quantitatively a business model for the collaborative provision of an advanced mobile data service portfolio composed of three multimedia services: Video on Demand, Internet Protocol Television and User Generated Content. We provide a description of the provision system considering the relation occurring between tecnical aspects and business aspects for each agent providing the basic multimedia service. Such a techno-business analysis is then projected into a mathematical model dealing with the problem of the definition of incentives between the different agents involved in a collaborative service provision. Through the implementation of this model we aim at shaping the behaviour of each of the contributing agents modifying the level of profitability that the Service Portfolio yields to each of them.

  7. Catalysts for Change: The Role of Small Business Funders in the Creation and Dissemination of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shic, Frederick; Smith, Daniel; Horsburgh, Brian; Hollander, Eric; Rehg, James M.; Goodwin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    A gap exists between the expanding space of technological innovations to aid those affected by autism spectrum disorders, and the actual impact of those technologies on daily lives. This gap can be addressed through a very practical path of commercialization. However, the path from a technological innovation to a commercially viable product is…

  8. Business and Organizational Models of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist Groups.

    PubMed

    Garite, Thomas J; Levine, Lisa; Olson, Rob

    2015-09-01

    The growth of obstetric and gynecologic (OB/GYN) hospitalists throughout the United States has led to different organizational approaches, depending on the perception of what an OB/GYN hospitalist is. There are advantages of OB/GYN hospitalist practices; however, practitioners who do this as just 1 piece of their practice are not fulfilling the promise of what this new specialty can deliver. Because those with office practices have their own business models, this article is devoted to the organizational and business models of OB/GYN hospitalists for physicians whose practice is devoted to inpatient obstetrics with or without emergency room and/or inpatient gynecology coverage.

  9. The Study on Business Growth Process Management Entropy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Duan

    Enterprise's growth is a dynamic process. The factors of enterprise development are changing all the time. For this reason, it is difficult to study management entropy growth-oriented enterprises from static view. Its characteristic is the business enterprise growth stage, and puts forward a kind of measuring and calculating model based on enterprise management entropy for business scale, the enterprise ability and development speed. According to entropy measured by the model, enterprise can adopt revolution measure in the moment of truth. It can make the enterprise avoid crisis and take the road of sustainable development.

  10. Towards Using Reo for Compliance-Aware Business Process Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab, Farhad; Kokash, Natallia; Meng, Sun

    Business process modeling and implementation of process supporting infrastructures are two challenging tasks that are not fully aligned. On the one hand, languages such as Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) exist to capture business processes at the level of domain analysis. On the other hand, programming paradigms and technologies such as Service-Oriented Computing (SOC) and web services have emerged to simplify the development of distributed web systems that underly business processes. BPMN is the most recognized language for specifying process workflows at the early design steps. However, it is rather declarative and may lead to the executable models which are incomplete or semantically erroneous. Therefore, an approach for expressing and analyzing BPMN models in a formal setting is required. In this paper we describe how BPMN diagrams can be represented by means of a semantically precise channel-based coordination language called Reo which admits formal analysis using model checking and bisimulation techniques. Moreover, since additional requirements may come from various regulatory/legislative documents, we discuss the opportunities offered by Reo and its mathematical abstractions for expressing process-related constraints such as Quality of Service (QoS) or time-aware conditions on process states.

  11. Innovative Developmental Education Programs: A Texas Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Eric A.; Capraro, Mary Margaret; Capraro, Robert M.; Chaudhuri, Nandita; Dyer, James; Marchbanks, Miner P., III

    2014-01-01

    This article provides insights from a 2-year, cross-site evaluation of state funded developmental education sites and serves as a focus article for response by those sites. Receiving grants from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), nine sites (5 community colleges and 4 universities) implemented innovative developmental education…

  12. University Start-ups: A Better Business Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Many universities look to start-up companies as a way to attract faculty, supporting research and students as traditional federal sources become harder to come by. University affiliated start-up companies can apply for a broader suite of grants, as well as market their services to a broad customer base. Often university administrators see this as a potential panacea, but national statistics show this is not the case. Rarely do universities profit significantly from their start-ups. With a success rates of around 20%, most start-ups end up costing the university money as well as faculty-time. For the faculty, assuming they want to continue in academia, a start-up is often unattractive because it commonly leads out of academia. Running a successful business as well as maintaining a strong teaching and research load is almost impossible to do at the same time. Most business models and business professionals work outside of academia, and the models taught in business schools do not merge well in a university environment. To mitigate this a new business model is proposed where university start-ups are aligned with the academic and research missions of the university. A university start-up must work within the university, directly support research and students, and the work done maintaining the business be recognized as part of the faculty member's university obligations. This requires a complex conflict of interest management plan and for the companies to be non-profit in order to not jeopardize the university's status. This approach may not work well for all universities, but would be ideal for many to conserve resources and ensure a harmonious relationship with their start-ups and faculty.

  13. Computer-Based Simulation Models for Community College Business Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, James

    Instructors at Lower Columbia College in Longview, Washington use computer-based simulation models in lower level business administration courses. Prior to use, teachers must select and obtain a simulation, discuss it with campus computer personnel, set an operations schedule, obtain the necessary supplementary material, and test run the program.…

  14. Exploring Higher Education Business Models ("If Such a Thing Exists")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harney, John O.

    2013-01-01

    The global economic recession has caused students, parents, and policymakers to reevaluate personal and societal investments in higher education--and has prompted the realization that traditional higher ed "business models" may be unsustainable. Predicting a shakeout, most presidents expressed confidence for their own school's ability to…

  15. Faculty Unions, Business Models, and the Academy's Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Gary

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses questions about the future of faculty unions, business models, and the academy by providing some current and historical context regarding the causes of and conflicts about faculty unions. He also reviews trends in college and university management over the past three decades, using California, Ohio, and…

  16. Rethinking the Business Model: Responsibilities of Governing Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusteeship, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities are thinking strategically about their business models. Reductions in state and federal appropriations, endowment volatility, fundraising uncertainties, and limits on tuition increases are creating persistent shortfalls in operating budgets. This all comes when institutions are being called upon to enroll and graduate…

  17. Voices of innovation: building a model for curriculum transformation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Janet M; Resnick, Jerelyn; Boni, Mary Sharon; Bradley, Patricia; Grady, Janet L; Ruland, Judith P; Stuever, Nancy L

    2013-05-07

    Innovation in nursing education curriculum is critically needed to meet the demands of nursing leadership and practice while facing the complexities of today's health care environment. International nursing organizations, the Institute of Medicine, and; our health care practice partners have called for curriculum reform to ensure the quality and safety of patient care. While innovation is occurring in schools of nursing, little is being researched or disseminated. The purposes of this qualitative study were to (a) describe what innovative curricula were being implemented, (b) identify challenges faced by the faculty, and (c) explore how the curricula were evaluated. Interviews were conducted with 15 exemplar schools from a variety of nursing programs throughout the United States. Exemplar innovative curricula were identified, and a model for approaching innovation was developed based on the findings related to conceptualizing, designing, delivering, evaluating, and supporting the curriculum. The results suggest implications for nursing education, research, and practice.

  18. Lean business model and implementation of a geriatric fracture center.

    PubMed

    Kates, Stephen L

    2014-05-01

    Geriatric hip fracture is a common event associated with high costs of care and often with suboptimal outcomes for the patients. Ideally, a new care model to manage geriatric hip fractures would address both quality and safety of patient care as well as the need for reduced costs of care. The geriatric fracture center model of care is one such model reported to improve both outcomes and quality of care. It is a lean business model applied to medicine. This article describes basic lean business concepts applied to geriatric fracture care and information needed to successfully implement a geriatric fracture center. It is written to assist physicians and surgeons in their efforts to implement an improved care model for their patients. PMID:24721360

  19. No Child Left Behind: Factory Models and Business Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Andrew P.

    2006-01-01

    Because No Child Left Behind (NCLB) is not based on educational research or research-based theory, it offers no new innovations nor does anything to improve the fundamental quality of education. NCLB is built on a rigid, outdated factory model in which students step onto a thirteen-year conveyor belt in kindergarten and progress slowly forward,…

  20. Models for open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Alexander; Germann, Paul-Georg; Trill, Henning; Gassmann, Oliver

    2013-12-01

    The nature of the pharmaceutical industry is such that the main driver for its growth is innovation. In view of the vast challenges that the industry has been facing for several years and, in particular, how to manage stagnating research and development (R&D) productivity, pharmaceutical companies have opened their R&D organizations to external innovation. Here, we identify and characterize four new types of open innovator, which we call 'knowledge creator', 'knowledge integrator', 'knowledge translator' and 'knowledge leverager', and which describe current open R&D models. PMID:23892183

  1. Models for open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Alexander; Germann, Paul-Georg; Trill, Henning; Gassmann, Oliver

    2013-12-01

    The nature of the pharmaceutical industry is such that the main driver for its growth is innovation. In view of the vast challenges that the industry has been facing for several years and, in particular, how to manage stagnating research and development (R&D) productivity, pharmaceutical companies have opened their R&D organizations to external innovation. Here, we identify and characterize four new types of open innovator, which we call 'knowledge creator', 'knowledge integrator', 'knowledge translator' and 'knowledge leverager', and which describe current open R&D models.

  2. Racing to define pharmaceutical R&D external innovation models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangsu; Plump, Andrew; Ringel, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The pharmaceutical industry continues to face fundamental challenges because of issues with research and development (R&D) productivity and rising customer expectations. To lower R&D costs, move beyond me-too therapies, and create more transformative portfolios, pharmaceutical companies are actively capitalizing on external innovation through precompetitive collaboration with academia, cultivation of biotech start-ups, and proactive licensing and acquisitions. Here, we review the varying innovation strategies used by pharmaceutical companies, compare and contrast these models, and identify the trends in external innovation. We also discuss factors that influence these external innovation models and propose a preliminary set of metrics that could be used as leading indicators of success. PMID:25448753

  3. Excellence in Business Education (A "FRUCE" Model for Higher Education Commission-Recognized Business Schools in Pakistan)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolachi, Nadir Ali; Mohammad, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The paper develops a new model of the essential factors required to be a top business school in the world for the benefit of schools recognized by the Higher Education Commission (HEC) in Pakistan. Globally, top business schools are those that excel in research, attract strong faculty, and successfully foster student development. The present…

  4. The Arizona Telemedicine Program business model.

    PubMed

    Barker, Gail P; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; McNeely, Richard A; Holcomb, Michael J; Lopez, Ana Maria; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2005-01-01

    The Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) was established in 1996 when state funding was provided to implement eight telemedicine sites. Since then the ATP has expanded to connect 55 health-care organizations through a membership programme formalized through legal contracts. The ATP's membership model is based on an application service provider (ASP) concept, whereby organizations can share services at lower cost; that is, the ATP acts as a broker for services. The membership fee schedule is flexible, allowing clients to purchase only those services desired. An annual membership fee is paid by every user, based on the services requested. The membership programme income has provided a steady revenue stream for the ATP. The membership-derived revenue represented 30% of the ATP's 2.6 million dollars total income during fiscal year 2003/04. PMID:16356313

  5. Innovative Teaching: An Empirical Study of Computer-Aided Instruction in Quantitative Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonul, Fusun F.; Solano, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate business undergraduate mathematics-based courses in a blended environment of online assignments and exams and offline lectures, and report the impact on academic performance of factors such as classroom attendance, web-based course supplements, and homework. We present results from both ordinary least squares and fixed effects,…

  6. Improving the Business Communication Skills of Postgraduate Internal Audit Students: A South African Teaching Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, Kato; Slippers, Jana

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the introduction of a business communication course in the curriculum of postgraduate internal audit students at a higher education institution in South Africa. Internal auditors should have excellent verbal and written communication skills in performing value-adding assurance and consulting services to their engagement…

  7. A queueing theory based model for business continuity in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Miniati, R; Cecconi, G; Dori, F; Frosini, F; Iadanza, E; Biffi Gentili, G; Niccolini, F; Gusinu, R

    2013-01-01

    Clinical activities can be seen as results of precise and defined events' succession where every single phase is characterized by a waiting time which includes working duration and possible delay. Technology makes part of this process. For a proper business continuity management, planning the minimum number of devices according to the working load only is not enough. A risk analysis on the whole process should be carried out in order to define which interventions and extra purchase have to be made. Markov models and reliability engineering approaches can be used for evaluating the possible interventions and to protect the whole system from technology failures. The following paper reports a case study on the application of the proposed integrated model, including risk analysis approach and queuing theory model, for defining the proper number of device which are essential to guarantee medical activity and comply the business continuity management requirements in hospitals. PMID:24109839

  8. A queueing theory based model for business continuity in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Miniati, R; Cecconi, G; Dori, F; Frosini, F; Iadanza, E; Biffi Gentili, G; Niccolini, F; Gusinu, R

    2013-01-01

    Clinical activities can be seen as results of precise and defined events' succession where every single phase is characterized by a waiting time which includes working duration and possible delay. Technology makes part of this process. For a proper business continuity management, planning the minimum number of devices according to the working load only is not enough. A risk analysis on the whole process should be carried out in order to define which interventions and extra purchase have to be made. Markov models and reliability engineering approaches can be used for evaluating the possible interventions and to protect the whole system from technology failures. The following paper reports a case study on the application of the proposed integrated model, including risk analysis approach and queuing theory model, for defining the proper number of device which are essential to guarantee medical activity and comply the business continuity management requirements in hospitals.

  9. Innovators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  10. Kelley Direct (KD) Toolkit: Toward the Development of Innovative Pedagogical Tools for Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magjuka, Richard J.; Liu, Xiaojing; Lee, Seung-Hee

    2006-01-01

    KD Toolkit shows a representative synthesis of the best practices learned by world-renowned instructors in a top ranked online MBA program in the United States. This article will share and discuss the pedagogical implications of this learning technology and the leadership and innovative effort of the program that afforded the development of KD…

  11. A Study of Innovative Entrepreneurial Talents of Business and Management: Knowledge, Ability and Quality Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yurong; Wang, Wenhua

    2011-01-01

    It has been an urgent mission for universities and institutes to instruct the students with enterprise knowledge and cultivate high quality entrepreneurial talents with innovation. The paper discusses the knowledge, ability and quality structure of talents of economics and administration with a purpose to achieve the goal of innovative…

  12. Integrating Teacher- and Peer-Assessments of Group Coursework Assignments in Business Education: Some Innovative Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyia, Okey Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to an earlier one that examines "the efficacy of two innovative peer-assessment templates ("PET" and "PACT") introduced to enable students provide evidence of their fairness in evaluating peer contributions to group project work" (Onyia, O. P. and Allen, S., 2012). In the present paper, three…

  13. Multidisciplinary Case Study on Higher Education: An Innovative Experience in the Business Management Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez-Cañas, Ricardo; del Pozo-Rubio, Raúl; Mondéjar-Jiménez, José; Ruiz-Palomino, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is constantly changing and looking for innovative educational solutions in order to increase the level of the student's knowledge and skills. As an important part of this set of educational policies, a new process is emerging for the ideation, planning and implementation of multidisciplinary case studies for students with the aim…

  14. Resolving Issues in Innovative Graduate Degree Programs: The Metropolitan State University Doctor of Business Administration Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delmont, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Applied Master's Degree and doctoral programs have been criticized widely for their lack of relevance, rigor and quality. New graduate degree programs have responded to these criticisms by implementing innovative academic policies, program curriculum, and student services. A case study of the Metropolitan State University Doctor of Business…

  15. Use of a business excellence model to improve conservation programs.

    PubMed

    Black, Simon; Groombridge, Jim

    2010-12-01

    The current shortfall in effectiveness within conservation biology is illustrated by increasing interest in "evidence-based conservation," whose proponents have identified the need to benchmark conservation initiatives against actions that lead to proven positive effects. The effectiveness of conservation policies, approaches, and evaluation is under increasing scrutiny, and in these areas models of excellence used in business could prove valuable. Typically, conservation programs require years of effort and involve rigorous long-term implementation processes. Successful balance of long-term efforts alongside the achievement of short-term goals is often compromised by management or budgetary constraints, a situation also common in commercial businesses. "Business excellence" is an approach many companies have used over the past 20 years to ensure continued success. Various business excellence evaluations have been promoted that include concepts that could be adapted and applied in conservation programs. We describe a conservation excellence model that shows how scientific processes and results can be aligned with financial and organizational measures of success. We applied the model to two well-documented species conservation programs. In the first, the Po'ouli program, several aspects of improvement were identified, such as more authority for decision making in the field and better integration of habitat management and population recovery processes. The second example, the black-footed ferret program, could have benefited from leadership effort to reduce bureaucracy and to encourage use of best-practice species recovery approaches. The conservation excellence model enables greater clarity in goal setting, more-effective identification of job roles within programs, better links between technical approaches and measures of biological success, and more-effective use of resources. The model could improve evaluation of a conservation program's effectiveness and may be

  16. Use of a business excellence model to improve conservation programs.

    PubMed

    Black, Simon; Groombridge, Jim

    2010-12-01

    The current shortfall in effectiveness within conservation biology is illustrated by increasing interest in "evidence-based conservation," whose proponents have identified the need to benchmark conservation initiatives against actions that lead to proven positive effects. The effectiveness of conservation policies, approaches, and evaluation is under increasing scrutiny, and in these areas models of excellence used in business could prove valuable. Typically, conservation programs require years of effort and involve rigorous long-term implementation processes. Successful balance of long-term efforts alongside the achievement of short-term goals is often compromised by management or budgetary constraints, a situation also common in commercial businesses. "Business excellence" is an approach many companies have used over the past 20 years to ensure continued success. Various business excellence evaluations have been promoted that include concepts that could be adapted and applied in conservation programs. We describe a conservation excellence model that shows how scientific processes and results can be aligned with financial and organizational measures of success. We applied the model to two well-documented species conservation programs. In the first, the Po'ouli program, several aspects of improvement were identified, such as more authority for decision making in the field and better integration of habitat management and population recovery processes. The second example, the black-footed ferret program, could have benefited from leadership effort to reduce bureaucracy and to encourage use of best-practice species recovery approaches. The conservation excellence model enables greater clarity in goal setting, more-effective identification of job roles within programs, better links between technical approaches and measures of biological success, and more-effective use of resources. The model could improve evaluation of a conservation program's effectiveness and may be

  17. The Impact of the Enterprise Resources Planning Systems on the Innovative Capabilities of the Organization: A Secondary Analysis of the Sectoral E-Business Watch Longitudinal Study 2002-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erturk, Alper

    2012-01-01

    Companies constantly adapt to new business environments in order to be successful and stay relevant. Innovation is a vital source for a company to be competitive in the business environment. Innovations enable companies to develop and utilize new strategies, tools, and tactics as well as new products and services. Enterprise resource planning…

  18. From invention to innovation: Commercialization of new technology by independent and small business inventors

    SciTech Connect

    1989-05-15

    This handbook emerged from the commitment of Energy-Related Inventions Program personnel to supporting the commercialization efforts of independent and small business inventors with new technologies. As you read this document, you will face questions that may seem far removed from technological concerns--questions about the market, your competition, your business structure, and about legal and regulatory requirements. These may seem peripheral to your present and future work. But, make no mistake, you must carefully and honestly consider and answer these if you expect to penetrate the market in sustained way and profit from your work. Over four hundred of your peers--some by success, others by failure--have shown us the lessons incorporated in this volume. By using it, and by commenting on it, you benefit from their collective experience, and make invaluable additions to it. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. 97. View of International Business Machine (IBM) digital computer model ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. View of International Business Machine (IBM) digital computer model 7090 magnetic core installation, international telephone and telegraph (ITT) Artic Services Inc., Official photograph BMEWS site II, Clear, AK, by unknown photographer, 17 September 1965, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-6604. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. Clinical laboratory as an economic model for business performance analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buljanović, Vikica; Patajac, Hrvoje; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a clinical laboratory as an economic model that may be used to improve business performance of laboratories by removing weaknesses, minimizing threats, and using external opportunities and internal strengths. Methods Impact of possible threats to and weaknesses of the Clinical Laboratory at Našice General County Hospital business performance and use of strengths and opportunities to improve operating profit were simulated using models created on the basis of SWOT analysis results. The operating profit as a measure of profitability of the clinical laboratory was defined as total revenue minus total expenses and presented using a profit and loss account. Changes in the input parameters in the profit and loss account for 2008 were determined using opportunities and potential threats, and economic sensitivity analysis was made by using changes in the key parameters. The profit and loss account and economic sensitivity analysis were tools for quantifying the impact of changes in the revenues and expenses on the business operations of clinical laboratory. Results Results of simulation models showed that operational profit of €470 723 in 2008 could be reduced to only €21 542 if all possible threats became a reality and current weaknesses remained the same. Also, operational gain could be increased to €535 804 if laboratory strengths and opportunities were utilized. If both the opportunities and threats became a reality, the operational profit would decrease by €384 465. Conclusion The operational profit of the clinical laboratory could be significantly reduced if all threats became a reality and the current weaknesses remained the same. The operational profit could be increased by utilizing strengths and opportunities as much as possible. This type of modeling may be used to monitor business operations of any clinical laboratory and improve its financial situation by

  1. 47 CFR 76.1904 - Encoding rules for defined business models.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Encoding rules for defined business models. 76... defined business models. (a) Commercial audiovisual content delivered as unencrypted broadcast television... the Commission pursuant to a petition with respect to a defined business model other than...

  2. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminov, Ildar; Tarasova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Tatyana; Avazov, Artur

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt) and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  3. 47 CFR 76.1904 - Encoding rules for defined business models.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Encoding rules for defined business models. 76... defined business models. (a) Commercial audiovisual content delivered as unencrypted broadcast television... the Commission pursuant to a petition with respect to a defined business model other than...

  4. E-Commerce Infusion into Business Education--Encompassing the Realities of an Emerging Business Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.; Oladunjoye, Ganiyu Titi

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 287 business faculty found that few were infusing electronic commerce topics into existing curricula despite its growing use in business. Responses were similar regardless of faculty gender, region, and program size or level. (SK)

  5. Modeling the prediction of business intelligence system effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Weng, Sung-Shun; Yang, Ming-Hsien; Koo, Tian-Lih; Hsiao, Pei-I

    2016-01-01

    Although business intelligence (BI) technologies are continually evolving, the capability to apply BI technologies has become an indispensable resource for enterprises running in today's complex, uncertain and dynamic business environment. This study performed pioneering work by constructing models and rules for the prediction of business intelligence system effectiveness (BISE) in relation to the implementation of BI solutions. For enterprises, effectively managing critical attributes that determine BISE to develop prediction models with a set of rules for self-evaluation of the effectiveness of BI solutions is necessary to improve BI implementation and ensure its success. The main study findings identified the critical prediction indicators of BISE that are important to forecasting BI performance and highlighted five classification and prediction rules of BISE derived from decision tree structures, as well as a refined regression prediction model with four critical prediction indicators constructed by logistic regression analysis that can enable enterprises to improve BISE while effectively managing BI solution implementation and catering to academics to whom theory is important. PMID:27376005

  6. Modeling the prediction of business intelligence system effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Weng, Sung-Shun; Yang, Ming-Hsien; Koo, Tian-Lih; Hsiao, Pei-I

    2016-01-01

    Although business intelligence (BI) technologies are continually evolving, the capability to apply BI technologies has become an indispensable resource for enterprises running in today's complex, uncertain and dynamic business environment. This study performed pioneering work by constructing models and rules for the prediction of business intelligence system effectiveness (BISE) in relation to the implementation of BI solutions. For enterprises, effectively managing critical attributes that determine BISE to develop prediction models with a set of rules for self-evaluation of the effectiveness of BI solutions is necessary to improve BI implementation and ensure its success. The main study findings identified the critical prediction indicators of BISE that are important to forecasting BI performance and highlighted five classification and prediction rules of BISE derived from decision tree structures, as well as a refined regression prediction model with four critical prediction indicators constructed by logistic regression analysis that can enable enterprises to improve BISE while effectively managing BI solution implementation and catering to academics to whom theory is important.

  7. A Dynamic Simulation Model of Organizational Culture and Business Strategy Effects on Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivellas, Panagiotis; Reklitis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos

    2007-12-01

    In the past two decades, organizational culture literature has gained tremendous interest for both academic and practitioners. This is based not only on the suggestion that culture is related to performance, but also on the view that it is subject of direct managerial control and manipulation to the desired direction. In the present paper, we adopt Competing Values Framework (CVF) to operationalise organizational culture and Porter's typology to conceptualize business strategy (cost leadership, innovative and marketing differentiation, and focus). Although simulation of social events is a quite difficult task, since there are so many considerations (not all well understood) involved, in the present study we developed a dynamic model to simulate the organizational culture and strategy effects on financial performance. Data obtained from a six-year survey in the banking sector of a European developing economy was used for the proposed dynamic model development.

  8. An Investigative Study into Perspectives and Experiences of Incubates at the Chandaria Business Innovation and Incubation Centre at the Kenyatta University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munyanyiwa, Takaruza; Mutsau, Morgen; Rudhumbu, Norman; Svotwa, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The study presents results from an investigative study undertaken at the Kenyatta University (KU) Chandaria Business Innovation and Incubation Centre. A total of 10 incubates representing 10 projects were engaged in face to face interviews. The incubates were appreciative of the value that incubation centre such as the one at KU contributed to…

  9. An Innovative Program in the Science of Health Care Delivery: Workforce Diversity in the Business of Health.

    PubMed

    Essary, Alison C; Wade, Nathaniel L

    2016-01-01

    According to the most recent statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics, disparities in enrollment in undergraduate and graduate education are significant and not improving commensurate with the national population. Similarly, only 12% of graduating medical students and 13% of graduating physician assistant students are from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. Established in 2012 to promote health care transformation at the organization and system levels, the School for the Science of Health Care Delivery is aligned with the university and college missions to create innovative, interdisciplinary curricula that meet the needs of our diverse patient and community populations. Three-year enrollment trends in the program exceed most national benchmarks, particularly among students who identify as Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native. The Science of Health Care Delivery program provides students a seamless learning experience that prepares them to be solutions-oriented leaders proficient in the business of health care, change management, innovation, and data-driven decision making. Defined as the study and design of systems, processes, leadership and management used to optimize health care delivery and health for all, the Science of Health Care Delivery will prepare the next generation of creative, diverse, pioneering leaders in health care.

  10. An Innovative Program in the Science of Health Care Delivery: Workforce Diversity in the Business of Health.

    PubMed

    Essary, Alison C; Wade, Nathaniel L

    2016-01-01

    According to the most recent statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics, disparities in enrollment in undergraduate and graduate education are significant and not improving commensurate with the national population. Similarly, only 12% of graduating medical students and 13% of graduating physician assistant students are from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. Established in 2012 to promote health care transformation at the organization and system levels, the School for the Science of Health Care Delivery is aligned with the university and college missions to create innovative, interdisciplinary curricula that meet the needs of our diverse patient and community populations. Three-year enrollment trends in the program exceed most national benchmarks, particularly among students who identify as Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native. The Science of Health Care Delivery program provides students a seamless learning experience that prepares them to be solutions-oriented leaders proficient in the business of health care, change management, innovation, and data-driven decision making. Defined as the study and design of systems, processes, leadership and management used to optimize health care delivery and health for all, the Science of Health Care Delivery will prepare the next generation of creative, diverse, pioneering leaders in health care. PMID:27262477

  11. An Innovative Marketing Model: Promoting Technical Programs by Conducting One-Day Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosian, Anahid

    This document examines an innovative marketing strategy developed by South Texas Community College (STCC) to promote its technical programs. In 2000, STCC organized the "Business Conference Institute" to develop 1-day conferences with the Division of Business, Math & Sciences (DBMS). The creation of this Institute linked the College with the local…

  12. A Multimethodology Contractor Assessment Model for Facilitating Green Innovation: The View of Energy and Environmental Protection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The trends of the green supply chain are attributed to pressures from the environment and from customers. Green innovation is a practice for creating competitive advantage in sustainable development. To keep up with the changing business environment, the construction industry needs an appropriate assessment tool to examine the intrinsic and extrinsic effects regarding corporate competitive advantage. From the viewpoint of energy and environmental protection, this study combines four scientific methodologies to develop an assessment model for the green innovation of contractors. System dynamics can be used to estimate the future trends for the overall industrial structure and is useful in predicting competitive advantage in the industry. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and utility theory focus on the customer's attitude toward risk and are useful for comprehending changes in objective requirements in the environment. Fuzzy logic can simplify complicated intrinsic and extrinsic factors and express them with a number or ratio that is easy to understand. The proposed assessment model can be used as a reference to guide the government in examining the public constructions that qualified green contractors participate in. Additionally, the assessment model serves an indicator of relative competitiveness that can help the general contractor and subcontractor to evaluate themselves and further green innovations. PMID:24311979

  13. A multimethodology contractor assessment model for facilitating green innovation: the view of energy and environmental protection.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Sung-Lin; Yan, Min-Ren

    2013-01-01

    The trends of the green supply chain are attributed to pressures from the environment and from customers. Green innovation is a practice for creating competitive advantage in sustainable development. To keep up with the changing business environment, the construction industry needs an appropriate assessment tool to examine the intrinsic and extrinsic effects regarding corporate competitive advantage. From the viewpoint of energy and environmental protection, this study combines four scientific methodologies to develop an assessment model for the green innovation of contractors. System dynamics can be used to estimate the future trends for the overall industrial structure and is useful in predicting competitive advantage in the industry. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and utility theory focus on the customer's attitude toward risk and are useful for comprehending changes in objective requirements in the environment. Fuzzy logic can simplify complicated intrinsic and extrinsic factors and express them with a number or ratio that is easy to understand. The proposed assessment model can be used as a reference to guide the government in examining the public constructions that qualified green contractors participate in. Additionally, the assessment model serves an indicator of relative competitiveness that can help the general contractor and subcontractor to evaluate themselves and further green innovations.

  14. A multimethodology contractor assessment model for facilitating green innovation: the view of energy and environmental protection.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Sung-Lin; Yan, Min-Ren

    2013-01-01

    The trends of the green supply chain are attributed to pressures from the environment and from customers. Green innovation is a practice for creating competitive advantage in sustainable development. To keep up with the changing business environment, the construction industry needs an appropriate assessment tool to examine the intrinsic and extrinsic effects regarding corporate competitive advantage. From the viewpoint of energy and environmental protection, this study combines four scientific methodologies to develop an assessment model for the green innovation of contractors. System dynamics can be used to estimate the future trends for the overall industrial structure and is useful in predicting competitive advantage in the industry. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and utility theory focus on the customer's attitude toward risk and are useful for comprehending changes in objective requirements in the environment. Fuzzy logic can simplify complicated intrinsic and extrinsic factors and express them with a number or ratio that is easy to understand. The proposed assessment model can be used as a reference to guide the government in examining the public constructions that qualified green contractors participate in. Additionally, the assessment model serves an indicator of relative competitiveness that can help the general contractor and subcontractor to evaluate themselves and further green innovations. PMID:24311979

  15. Innovation in pediatric surgery: the surgical innovation continuum and the ETHICAL model.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer A T

    2014-04-01

    Innovations are indispensable to the practice and advancement of pediatric surgery. Children represent a special type of vulnerable population and must be protected since they do not have legal capacity to consent, and their parent's judgment may be compromised in circumstances when the child is very ill or no adequate therapy exists. In an effort to protect patients, legislators could pass and enforce laws that prohibit or curtail surgical innovations and thus stifle noble advancement of the practice. The goals of this paper are, 1) To clearly define the characteristics of surgical innovation types so interventions may be classified into 1 of 3 distinct categories along a continuum: Practice Variation, Transition Zone, and Experimental Research, and 2) To propose a practical systematic method to guide surgeon decision-making when approaching interventions that fall into the "Transition Zone" category on the Surgical Intervention Continuum. The ETHICAL model allows those that know the intricacies and nuances of pediatric surgery best, the pediatric surgeons and professional pediatric surgical societies, to participate in self-regulation of innovation in a manner that safeguards patients without stifling creativity or unduly hampering surgical progress. PMID:24726128

  16. AAL service development loom--from the idea to a marketable business model.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Johannes; Auinger, Klemens

    2015-01-01

    The Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) market is still in an early stage of development. Previous approaches of comprehensive AAL services are mostly supply-side driven and focused on hardware and software. Usually this type of AAL solutions does not lead to a sustainable success on the market. Research and development increasingly focuses on demand and customer requirements in addition to the social and legal framework. The question is: How can a systematic performance measurement strategy along a service development process support the market-ready design of a concrete business model for AAL service? Within the EU funded research project DALIA (Assistant for Daily Life Activities at Home) an iterative service development process uses an adapted Osterwalder business model canvas. The application of a performance measurement index (PMI) to support the process has been developed and tested. Development of an iterative service development model using a supporting PMI. The PMI framework is developed throughout the engineering of a virtual assistant (AVATAR) as a modular interface to connect informal carers with necessary and useful services. Future research should seek to ensure that the PMI enables meaningful transparency regarding targeting (e.g. innovative AAL service), design (e.g. functional hybrid AAL service) and implementation (e.g. marketable AAL support services). To this end, a further reference to further testing practices is required. The aim must be to develop a weighted PMI in the context of further research, which supports both the service engineering and the subsequent service management process. PMID:26063267

  17. AAL service development loom--from the idea to a marketable business model.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Johannes; Auinger, Klemens

    2015-01-01

    The Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) market is still in an early stage of development. Previous approaches of comprehensive AAL services are mostly supply-side driven and focused on hardware and software. Usually this type of AAL solutions does not lead to a sustainable success on the market. Research and development increasingly focuses on demand and customer requirements in addition to the social and legal framework. The question is: How can a systematic performance measurement strategy along a service development process support the market-ready design of a concrete business model for AAL service? Within the EU funded research project DALIA (Assistant for Daily Life Activities at Home) an iterative service development process uses an adapted Osterwalder business model canvas. The application of a performance measurement index (PMI) to support the process has been developed and tested. Development of an iterative service development model using a supporting PMI. The PMI framework is developed throughout the engineering of a virtual assistant (AVATAR) as a modular interface to connect informal carers with necessary and useful services. Future research should seek to ensure that the PMI enables meaningful transparency regarding targeting (e.g. innovative AAL service), design (e.g. functional hybrid AAL service) and implementation (e.g. marketable AAL support services). To this end, a further reference to further testing practices is required. The aim must be to develop a weighted PMI in the context of further research, which supports both the service engineering and the subsequent service management process.

  18. An Innovative Seminar Course in Business Etiquette for Pharmacy Graduate Students

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To develop and implement a seminar course for graduate students in the social and administrative pharmaceutical sciences to enhance knowledge and confidence with respect their abilities to demonstrate appropriate business etiquette. Design. A 1-credit graduate seminar course was designed based on learner-centered constructivist theory and application of Fink’s Taxonomy for Significant Learning. Assessment. Eleven students participated in the spring 2011 seminar course presentations and activities. Students completed pre- and post-assessment instruments, which included knowledge and attitudinal questions. Formative and summative assessments showed gains in student knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence based on observation and student-reported outcomes. Conclusion. Graduate student reaction to the course was overwhelmingly positive. The etiquette course has potential application in doctor of pharmacy education, other graduate disciplines, undergraduate education, and continuing professional development. PMID:23193341

  19. Innovating Education with an Educational Modeling Language: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloep, Peter B.; van Bruggen, Jan; Tattersall, Colin; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob; Brouns, Francis; van Rosmalen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The intent of this study was to investigate how to maximize the chances of success of an educational innovation--specifically one based on the implementation of the educational modeling language called EML. This language is both technically and organizationally demanding. Two different implementation cases were investigated, one situated in an…

  20. The RiverFish Approach to Business Process Modeling: Linking Business Steps to Control-Flow Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuliane, Devanir; Oikawa, Marcio K.; Malkowski, Simon; Alcazar, José Perez; Ferreira, João Eduardo

    Despite the recent advances in the area of Business Process Management (BPM), today’s business processes have largely been implemented without clearly defined conceptual modeling. This results in growing difficulties for identification, maintenance, and reuse of rules, processes, and control-flow patterns. To mitigate these problems in future implementations, we propose a new approach to business process modeling using conceptual schemas, which represent hierarchies of concepts for rules and processes shared among collaborating information systems. This methodology bridges the gap between conceptual model description and identification of actual control-flow patterns for workflow implementation. We identify modeling guidelines that are characterized by clear phase separation, step-by-step execution, and process building through diagrams and tables. The separation of business process modeling in seven mutually exclusive phases clearly delimits information technology from business expertise. The sequential execution of these phases leads to the step-by-step creation of complex control-flow graphs. The process model is refined through intuitive table and diagram generation in each phase. Not only does the rigorous application of our modeling framework minimize the impact of rule and process changes, but it also facilitates the identification and maintenance of control-flow patterns in BPM-based information system architectures.

  1. Getting governance right for a sustainable regionalised business model.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Caroline O; Black, Linda E; Rowe, Mark; Pearce, Rod

    2011-06-01

    The 1998 Ministerial Review of General Practice Training identified several areas for improvement that led to major changes in the provision of general practice training, including the establishment of General Practice Education and Training (GPET) and the regionalisation of training. The regionalised training business model has been in place for nearly 10 years, and several key organisations have been involved in its evolution, including the Australian Government, speciality colleges, GPET and regionalised training providers. Both the college-focused and regionalised-focused models have had some successes. These include recognition and support of general practice as a vocational specialty, increased numbers of junior doctors undertaking placements in general practice, and increased numbers of registrars training in rural areas. This period has also seen changes in the governance and decision-making processes with creation of a new framework that is inclusive of all the key players in the new regionalised training system. The future holds challenges for the regionalised training business model as the general practice education and training landscape becomes more complex. The framework in the current model will provide a base to help meet these challenges and allow for further sustainable expansion. PMID:21644862

  2. Modeling Innovations Advance Wind Energy Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In 1981, Glenn Research Center scientist Dr. Larry Viterna developed a model that predicted certain elements of wind turbine performance with far greater accuracy than previous methods. The model was met with derision from others in the wind energy industry, but years later, Viterna discovered it had become the most widely used method of its kind, enabling significant wind energy technologies-like the fixed pitch turbines produced by manufacturers like Aerostar Inc. of Westport, Massachusetts-that are providing sustainable, climate friendly energy sources today.

  3. A new, but old business model for family physicians: cash.

    PubMed

    Weber, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The following study is an exploratory investigation into the opportunity identification, opportunity analysis, and strategic implications of implementing a cash-only family physician practice. The current market dynamics (i.e., increasing insurance premiums, decreasing benefits, more regulations and paperwork, and cuts in federal and state programs) suggest that there is sufficient motivation for these practitioners to change their current business model. In-depth interviews were conducted with office managers and physicians of family physician practices. The results highlighted a variety of issues, including barriers to change, strategy issues, and opportunities/benefits. The implications include theory applications, strategic marketing applications, and managerial decision-making. PMID:23924222

  4. A new, but old business model for family physicians: cash.

    PubMed

    Weber, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The following study is an exploratory investigation into the opportunity identification, opportunity analysis, and strategic implications of implementing a cash-only family physician practice. The current market dynamics (i.e., increasing insurance premiums, decreasing benefits, more regulations and paperwork, and cuts in federal and state programs) suggest that there is sufficient motivation for these practitioners to change their current business model. In-depth interviews were conducted with office managers and physicians of family physician practices. The results highlighted a variety of issues, including barriers to change, strategy issues, and opportunities/benefits. The implications include theory applications, strategic marketing applications, and managerial decision-making.

  5. Using Hybrid Modeling to Develop Innovative Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Brenda; Avans, Diana

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a hybrid activities model that physical educators can use with students in grades four and above to create virtually a limitless array of novel games. A brief introduction to the basic theory is followed by descriptions of some hybrid games. Hybrid games are typically the result of merging two traditional sports or other…

  6. Model Offices: Flexible Options, Local Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perspective: Essays and Reviews of Issues in Employment Security and Employment and Training Programs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This volume of an annual journal contains 17 articles that focus on model local offices of the employment security (ES) and training systems. The articles are arranged in three parts. Part I, on developing new initiatives, contains the following five articles: "A Public Employment Service for the 1990s" (Elizabeth Dole); "The Revitalization of the…

  7. Palliative Care Doula: an innovative model.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Judy C

    2014-01-01

    Walking the journey of serious illness is very difficult and stressful for patients and families. A universal principle of palliative care is caring for the patient/ family unit. This article introduces a model for the Palliative Care Doula for experienced and advanced practice palliative care nurses to support patients and families during the traumatic and vulnerable period of end-of-life care.

  8. Entrepreneurial Skills for Small Business. Exemplar Curriculum Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of Employment, Education and Training, Canberra.

    This model curriculum provides materials and information for a 200-hour course to provide training in entrepreneurial skills and small business management. It is designed to help students identify opportunities and have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills to develop innovative small business ideas into successfully managed small businesses. The…

  9. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Projects at NASA Glenn Research Center for 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    This document is intended to enable the more effective transition of NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) SBIR technologies funded by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program as well as its companion, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Primarily, it is intended to help NASA program and project managers find useful technologies that have undergone extensive research and development (RRD), through Phase II of the SBIR program; however, it can also assist non-NASA agencies and commercial companies in this process. aviation safety, unmanned aircraft, ground and flight test technique, low emissions, quiet performance, rotorcraft

  10. The innovations with the medical applications of white LEDs and the breakthrough for new business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Motohiro; Kawakami, Youichi; Tsuji, Kiyotsugu

    2006-02-01

    The distance between the LED and the surface of the target organ is about 4-5 cm, and we think this will become the "ultimate super-localized LED lighting". In an experiment with swine, we placed a LED module at the tip of the retractor. When compared to endoscopic lighting, this method illuminated the entire thoracic cavity more brightly. Since the light is emitted from the cylinder-shaped camera component, the light is unidirectional, and the shadows from the surgical instruments are moved to the side of the incision. Retractor LED lights provided enough light in the thoracic cavity. we believe that "medical white LEDs" can contribute in clinical settings as a light source for performing safe operations with bright surgical fields in the near future. Also, we use our LEDs for new real business. In the summer of 2004, LED lighting was world first used in the 1200 year-old Gion Festival for the first time in history as "a lighting device that does not destroy cultural assets by light heat". And the next is "Lighting at the "Diva status at diva gate" and the "Thousand Armed Avalokiteshwara in innermost sanctuary in the main hall" at Kiyomizudera in Kyoto". It was a great success, and we were invited back in the spring of 2005 and for future applications. We think this is the first real application of LEDs as an outdoor lighting device. The number of people who visit Kiyomizudera is 4000,000 annually, and LEDs were adopted to illuminate the diva gate.

  11. Innovative modelling techniques in computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardizzone, Edoardo; Chella, Antonio

    The paper is concerned with two of main research activities currently carried on at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence lab of DIE. The first part deals with hybrid artificial vision models, intended to provide object recognition and classification capabilities to an autonomous intelligen system. In this framework, a system recovering 3-D shape information from grey-level images of a scene, building a geometric representation of the scene in terms of superquadrics at the geometric level, and reasoning about the scene at the symbolic level is described. In the second part, attention is focused on automatic indexing of image databases. JACOB, a prototypal system allowing for the automatic extraction from images of salient features like colour and texture, and for content-based browsing and querying in image and video databases is briefly described.

  12. Fuels and Space Propellants for Reusable Launch Vehicles: A Small Business Innovation Research Topic and Its Commercial Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1997-01-01

    Under its Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program (and with NASA Headquarters support), the NASA Lewis Research Center has initiated a topic entitled "Fuels and Space Propellants for Reusable Launch Vehicles." The aim of this project would be to assist in demonstrating and then commercializing new rocket propellants that are safer and more environmentally sound and that make space operations easier. Soon it will be possible to commercialize many new propellants and their related component technologies because of the large investments being made throughout the Government in rocket propellants and the technologies for using them. This article discusses the commercial vision for these fuels and propellants, the potential for these propellants to reduce space access costs, the options for commercial development, and the benefits to nonaerospace industries. This SBIR topic is designed to foster the development of propellants that provide improved safety, less environmental impact, higher density, higher I(sub sp), and simpler vehicle operations. In the development of aeronautics and space technology, there have been limits to vehicle performance imposed by traditionally used propellants and fuels. Increases in performance are possible with either increased propellant specific impulse, increased density, or both. Flight system safety will also be increased by the use of denser, more viscous propellants and fuels.

  13. Innovation and design approaches within prospective ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Liem, André; Brangier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this conceptual article the topic of "Prospective Ergonomics" will be discussed within the context of innovation, design thinking and design processes & methods. Design thinking is essentially a human-centred innovation process that emphasises observation, collaboration, interpretation, visualisation of ideas, rapid concept prototyping and concurrent business analysis, which ultimately influences innovation and business strategy. The objective of this project is to develop a roadmap for innovation, involving consumers, designers and business people in an integrative process, which can be applied to product, service and business design. A theoretical structure comprising of Innovation perspectives (1), Worldviews supported by rationalist-historicist and empirical-idealistic dimensions (2) and Models of "design" reasoning (3) precedes the development and classification of existing methods as well as the introduction of new ones.

  14. Innovation and design approaches within prospective ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Liem, André; Brangier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this conceptual article the topic of "Prospective Ergonomics" will be discussed within the context of innovation, design thinking and design processes & methods. Design thinking is essentially a human-centred innovation process that emphasises observation, collaboration, interpretation, visualisation of ideas, rapid concept prototyping and concurrent business analysis, which ultimately influences innovation and business strategy. The objective of this project is to develop a roadmap for innovation, involving consumers, designers and business people in an integrative process, which can be applied to product, service and business design. A theoretical structure comprising of Innovation perspectives (1), Worldviews supported by rationalist-historicist and empirical-idealistic dimensions (2) and Models of "design" reasoning (3) precedes the development and classification of existing methods as well as the introduction of new ones. PMID:22317532

  15. Deployment of e-health services - a business model engineering strategy.

    PubMed

    Kijl, Björn; Nieuwenhuis, Lambert J M; Huis in 't Veld, Rianne M H A; Hermens, Hermie J; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M R

    2010-01-01

    We designed a business model for deploying a myofeedback-based teletreatment service. An iterative and combined qualitative and quantitative action design approach was used for developing the business model and the related value network. Insights from surveys, desk research, expert interviews, workshops and quantitative modelling were combined to produce the first business model and then to refine it in three design cycles. The business model engineering strategy provided important insights which led to an improved, more viable and feasible business model and related value network design. Based on this experience, we conclude that the process of early stage business model engineering reduces risk and produces substantial savings in costs and resources related to service deployment.

  16. Consistency Across Standards or Standards in a New Business Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Dane M.

    2010-01-01

    Presentation topics include: standards in a changing business model, the new National Space Policy is driving change, a new paradigm for human spaceflight, consistency across standards, the purpose of standards, danger of over-prescriptive standards, a balance is needed (between prescriptive and general standards), enabling versus inhibiting, characteristics of success-oriented standards, characteristics of success-oriented standards, and conclusions. Additional slides include NASA Procedural Requirements 8705.2B identifies human rating standards and requirements, draft health and medical standards for human rating, what's been done, government oversight models, examples of consistency from anthropometry, examples of inconsistency from air quality and appendices of government and non-governmental human factors standards.

  17. Aeroelastic Calculations Using CFD for a Typical Business Jet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Michael D.

    1996-01-01

    Two time-accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes were used to compute several flutter points for a typical business jet model. The model consisted of a rigid fuselage with a flexible semispan wing and was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center where experimental flutter data were obtained from M(sub infinity) = 0.628 to M(sub infinity) = 0.888. The computational results were computed using CFD codes based on the inviscid TSD equation (CAP-TSD) and the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations (CFL3D-AE). Comparisons are made between analytical results and with experiment where appropriate. The results presented here show that the Navier-Stokes method is required near the transonic dip due to the strong viscous effects while the TSD and Euler methods used here provide good results at the lower Mach numbers.

  18. A Model Business and Industrial Development Program for Community Colleges. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    Designed to help community and junior colleges in Texas establish their own approach to economic development services, this report reviews innovative programs providing assistance to business and industry in many parts of the United States. After chapter I discusses the changing role of community and junior colleges in economic development…

  19. From Innovation to Diversification: A Simple Competitive Model.

    PubMed

    Saracco, Fabio; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Few attempts have been proposed in order to describe the statistical features and historical evolution of the export bipartite matrix countries/products. An important standpoint is the introduction of a products network, namely a hierarchical forest of products that models the formation and the evolution of commodities. In the present article, we propose a simple dynamical model where countries compete with each other to acquire the ability to produce and export new products. Countries will have two possibilities to expand their export: innovating, i.e. introducing new goods, namely new nodes in the product networks, or copying the productive process of others, i.e. occupying a node already present in the same network. In this way, the topology of the products network and the country-product matrix evolve simultaneously, driven by the countries push toward innovation.

  20. From Innovation to Diversification: A Simple Competitive Model.

    PubMed

    Saracco, Fabio; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Few attempts have been proposed in order to describe the statistical features and historical evolution of the export bipartite matrix countries/products. An important standpoint is the introduction of a products network, namely a hierarchical forest of products that models the formation and the evolution of commodities. In the present article, we propose a simple dynamical model where countries compete with each other to acquire the ability to produce and export new products. Countries will have two possibilities to expand their export: innovating, i.e. introducing new goods, namely new nodes in the product networks, or copying the productive process of others, i.e. occupying a node already present in the same network. In this way, the topology of the products network and the country-product matrix evolve simultaneously, driven by the countries push toward innovation. PMID:26544685

  1. From Innovation to Diversification: A Simple Competitive Model

    PubMed Central

    Saracco, Fabio; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Few attempts have been proposed in order to describe the statistical features and historical evolution of the export bipartite matrix countries/products. An important standpoint is the introduction of a products network, namely a hierarchical forest of products that models the formation and the evolution of commodities. In the present article, we propose a simple dynamical model where countries compete with each other to acquire the ability to produce and export new products. Countries will have two possibilities to expand their export: innovating, i.e. introducing new goods, namely new nodes in the product networks, or copying the productive process of others, i.e. occupying a node already present in the same network. In this way, the topology of the products network and the country-product matrix evolve simultaneously, driven by the countries push toward innovation. PMID:26544685

  2. Innovative model of interprofessional geriatric consultation: specialized seniors clinics.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Laura; Chow, Helen; Metcalfe, Sarah; Friesen, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    As the Canadian population ages, healthcare systems have become increasingly interested in exploring new ways to deliver services to frail older adults, and in particular older adults with dementia. The Specialized Seniors Clinics (SSCs) are an innovative integrated network of six outpatient clinics in BC's Fraser Health Authority that utilize interprofessional teams to provide comprehensive geriatric assessments and care planning for frail older adults. The SSCs provided approximately 19,000 appointments in the past fiscal year, and clients and primary care physicians are highly satisfied with the model. This article describes the SSC model and provides reflection on the model development, implementation and standardization processes. PMID:25591611

  3. Jet Noise Modeling for Supersonic Business Jet Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the development of an improved predictive model for coannular jet noise, including noise suppression modifications applicable to small supersonic-cruise aircraft such as the Supersonic Business Jet (SBJ), for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). For such aircraft a wide range of propulsion and integration options are under consideration. Thus there is a need for very versatile design tools, including a noise prediction model. The approach used is similar to that used with great success by the Modern Technologies Corporation (MTC) in developing a noise prediction model for two-dimensional mixer ejector (2DME) nozzles under the High Speed Research Program and in developing a more recent model for coannular nozzles over a wide range of conditions. If highly suppressed configurations are ultimately required, the 2DME model is expected to provide reasonable prediction for these smaller scales, although this has not been demonstrated. It is considered likely that more modest suppression approaches, such as dual stream nozzles featuring chevron or chute suppressors, perhaps in conjunction with inverted velocity profiles (IVP), will be sufficient for the SBJ.

  4. Animal models for arthritis: innovative tools for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kollias, George; Papadaki, Piyi; Apparailly, Florence; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J; Holmdahl, Rikard; Baumans, Vera; Desaintes, Christian; Di Santo, James; Distler, Jörg; Garside, Paul; Hegen, Martin; Huizinga, Tom W J; Jüngel, Astrid; Klareskog, Lars; McInnes, Iain; Ragoussis, Ioannis; Schett, Georg; Hart, Bert 't; Tak, Paul P; Toes, Rene; van den Berg, Wim; Wurst, Wolfgang; Gay, Steffen

    2011-08-01

    The development of novel treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) requires the interplay between clinical observations and studies in animal models. Given the complex molecular pathogenesis and highly heterogeneous clinical picture of RA, there is an urgent need to dissect its multifactorial nature and to propose new strategies for preventive, early and curative treatments. Research on animal models has generated new knowledge on RA pathophysiology and aetiology and has provided highly successful paradigms for innovative drug development. Recent focus has shifted towards the discovery of novel biomarkers, with emphasis on presymptomatic and emerging stages of human RA, and towards addressing the pathophysiological mechanisms and subsequent efficacy of interventions that underlie different disease variants. Shifts in the current paradigms underlying RA pathogenesis have also led to increased demand for new (including humanised) animal models. There is therefore an urgent need to integrate the knowledge on human and animal models with the ultimate goal of creating a comprehensive 'pathogenesis map' that will guide alignment of existing and new animal models to the subset of disease they mimic. This requires full and standardised characterisation of all models at the genotypic, phenotypic and biomarker level, exploiting recent technological developments in 'omics' profiling and computational biology as well as state of the art bioimaging. Efficient integration and dissemination of information and resources as well as outreach to the public will be necessary to manage the plethora of data accumulated and to increase community awareness and support for innovative animal model research in rheumatology.

  5. Business models for academic medical center cyclotron operations.

    PubMed

    LeGarde, Caroline; Bledsoe, Martin L; Wahl, Richard L

    2005-06-01

    A cyclotron facility may provide a significant strategic advantage for an academic medical center that desires to build a strong research program in nuclear medicine. Such a facility may provide an advantage in obtaining support from the National Institutes of Health. A nuclear medicine research program often requires the production of short-lived radioisotopes for clinical patients. Combining the research program with a commercial production and distribution program can increase the synergies and efficiencies of an organization. This article describes various business models that combine research, clinical, and commercial operations to align an academic medical center's cyclotron program operation to its goals and resources. By coordinating these three functions, an academic medical center may be able to support extensive research capabilities that would otherwise be unattainable.

  6. Case Study of Apple, Inc. for Business Law Students: How Apple's Business Model Controls Digital Content through Legal and Technological Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reder, Margo E. K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a six-week long exercise that incorporates a dynamic learning approach into an e-commerce or Internet technology business law elective course; the exercise pursues an entrepreneurial approach to the use of an appropriate business model by emphasizing the interaction between technology, business, and law. This active learning…

  7. HIMSS Venture+ Forum and HX360 Provide Industry View of Health Technology Innovation, Startup and Investment Activity; Advancing the New Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Burde, Howard A; Scarfo, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Presented by HIMSS, the Venture+ Forum program and pitch competition provides a 360-degree view on health technology investing and today's top innovative companies. It features exciting 3-minute pitch presentations from emerging and growth-stage companies, investor panels and a networking reception. Recent Venture+ Forum winners include TowerView Health, Prima-Temp, ActuaiMeds and M3 Clinician. As an industry catalyst for health IT innovation and business-building resource for growing companies and emerging technology solutions, HIMSS has co-developed with A VIA, a new initiative that addresses how emerging technologies, health system business model changes and investment will transform the delivery of care. HX360 engages senior healthcare leaders, innovation teams, investors and entrepreneurs around the vision of transforming healthcare delivery by leveraging technology, process and structure.

  8. HIMSS Venture+ Forum and HX360 Provide Industry View of Health Technology Innovation, Startup and Investment Activity; Advancing the New Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Burde, Howard A; Scarfo, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Presented by HIMSS, the Venture+ Forum program and pitch competition provides a 360-degree view on health technology investing and today's top innovative companies. It features exciting 3-minute pitch presentations from emerging and growth-stage companies, investor panels and a networking reception. Recent Venture+ Forum winners include TowerView Health, Prima-Temp, ActuaiMeds and M3 Clinician. As an industry catalyst for health IT innovation and business-building resource for growing companies and emerging technology solutions, HIMSS has co-developed with A VIA, a new initiative that addresses how emerging technologies, health system business model changes and investment will transform the delivery of care. HX360 engages senior healthcare leaders, innovation teams, investors and entrepreneurs around the vision of transforming healthcare delivery by leveraging technology, process and structure. PMID:26571634

  9. Self-monitoring surveillance system for prestressing tendons. Phase I small business innovation research

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, H.

    1995-12-01

    Assured safety and operational reliability of post-tensioned concrete components of nuclear power plants are of great significance to the public, electric utilities, and regulatory agencies. Prestressing tendons provide principal reinforcement for containment and other structures. In this phase of the research effort, the feasibility of developing a passive surveillance system for identification of ruptures in tendon wires was evaluated and verified. The concept offers high potential for greatly increasing effectiveness of presently-utilized periodic tendon condition surveillance programs. A one-tenth scale ring model of the Palo Verde nuclear containment structure was built inside the Structural Laboratory. Dynamic scaling (similitude) relationships were used to relate measured sensor responses recorded during controlled wire breakages to the expected prototype containment tendon response. Strong and recognizable signatures were detected by the accelerometers used. It was concluded that the unbonded prestressing tendons provide an excellent path for transmission of stress waves resulting from wire breaks. Accelerometers placed directly on the bearing plates at the ends of tendons recorded high-intensity waveforms. Accelerometers placed elsewhere on concrete surfaces of the containment model revealed substantial attenuation and reduced intensities of captured waveforms. Locations of wire breaks could be determined accurately through measurement of differences in arrival times of the signal at the sensors. Pattern recognition systems to be utilized in conjunction with the proposed concept will provide a basis for an integrated and automated tool for identification of wire breaks.

  10. An Empirical Study on the Distinctive Teaching Mode and Practice of International Business Innovation Class in GDUFS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dongman, Cai; Wenzhong, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Accommodating to the development of globalization, China witnesses a mounting demand for international business talents who are proficient in both foreign languages and business knowledge and adept at international cooperation and competition in business context. In order to meet this need, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, taking advantage…

  11. The Junior Faculty Laboratory: an innovative model of peer mentoring.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kimberly S; Hastings, S Nicole; Purser, Jama L; Whitson, Heather E

    2011-12-01

    Mentoring in academic medicine has been shown to contribute to the success of junior faculty, resulting in increased productivity, career satisfaction, and opportunities for networking. Although traditional dyadic mentoring, involving one senior faculty member and one junior protégé, is the dominant model for mentoring in the academic environment, there is increasing recognition that the sharing of knowledge, skills, and experiences among peers may also contribute to the career development of junior faculty. The authors describe the structure, activities, and outcomes of the Junior Faculty Laboratory (JFL), a self-organized, flexible, and dynamic peer-mentoring model within the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. As an innovative mentoring model, JFL is entirely peer driven, and its activities are determined by the real-time needs of members. In contrast to some other peer-mentoring models, JFL lacks senior faculty input or a structured curriculum, members are multidisciplinary, meeting times are project driven rather than preset, and participation in collaborative projects is optional based on the interests and needs of group members. Additionally, JFL was not formed as a substitute for, but as a complement to, the dyadic mentoring relationships enjoyed by its members. The model, now in its fifth year, has demonstrated success and sustainability. The authors present the JFL as an innovative, mentoring model that can be reproduced by other junior faculty seeking to foster collegial relationships with peers while simultaneously enhancing their career development. PMID:22030756

  12. Nurses Improving the Care of Healthsystem Elders: creating a sustainable business model to improve care of hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Capezuti, Elizabeth A; Bricoli, Barbara; Briccoli, Barbara; Boltz, Marie P

    2013-08-01

    The Nurses Improving the Care of Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) program helps its more than 450 member sites to build the leadership capabilities to enact system-level change that targets the unique needs of older adults and embeds evidence-based geriatrics knowledge into practice. NICHE received expansion funding to establish a sustainable business model for operations while positioning the program to continue as a leader in innovative senior care programs. The expansion program focused on developing an internal business infrastructure, expanding NICHE-specific resources, creating a Web platform, increasing the number of participating NICHE hospitals, enhancing and expanding the NICHE benchmarking service, supporting research that generates evidence-based practices, fostering interorganizational collaboration, developing sufficient diversified revenue sources, and increasing the penetration and level of activity of current NICHE sites. These activities (improved services, Web-based tools, better benchmarking) added value and made it feasible to charge hospitals an annual fee for access and participation. NICHE does not stipulate how institutions should modify geriatric care; rather, NICHE principles and tools are meant to be adapted to each site's unique institutional culture. This article describes the historical context, the rationale, and the business plan that has resulted in successful organizational outcomes, including financial sustainability of the business operations of NICHE.

  13. Nurses Improving the Care of Healthsystem Elders: creating a sustainable business model to improve care of hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Capezuti, Elizabeth A; Bricoli, Barbara; Briccoli, Barbara; Boltz, Marie P

    2013-08-01

    The Nurses Improving the Care of Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) program helps its more than 450 member sites to build the leadership capabilities to enact system-level change that targets the unique needs of older adults and embeds evidence-based geriatrics knowledge into practice. NICHE received expansion funding to establish a sustainable business model for operations while positioning the program to continue as a leader in innovative senior care programs. The expansion program focused on developing an internal business infrastructure, expanding NICHE-specific resources, creating a Web platform, increasing the number of participating NICHE hospitals, enhancing and expanding the NICHE benchmarking service, supporting research that generates evidence-based practices, fostering interorganizational collaboration, developing sufficient diversified revenue sources, and increasing the penetration and level of activity of current NICHE sites. These activities (improved services, Web-based tools, better benchmarking) added value and made it feasible to charge hospitals an annual fee for access and participation. NICHE does not stipulate how institutions should modify geriatric care; rather, NICHE principles and tools are meant to be adapted to each site's unique institutional culture. This article describes the historical context, the rationale, and the business plan that has resulted in successful organizational outcomes, including financial sustainability of the business operations of NICHE. PMID:23772850

  14. Care Models of eHealth Services: A Case Study on the Design of a Business Model for an Online Precare Service

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background With a growing population of health care clients in the future, the organization of high-quality and cost-effective service providing becomes an increasing challenge. New online eHealth services are proposed as innovative options for the future. Yet, a major barrier to these services appears to be the lack of new business model designs. Although design efforts generally result in visual models, no such artifacts have been found in the literature on business model design. This paper investigates business model design in eHealth service practices from a design perspective. It adopts a research by design approach and seeks to unravel what characteristics of business models determine an online service and what are important value exchanges between health professionals and clients. Objective The objective of the study was to analyze the construction of care models in-depth, framing the essential elements of a business model, and design a new care model that structures these elements for the particular context of an online pre-care service in practice. Methods This research employs a qualitative method of an in-depth case study in which different perspectives on constructing a care model are investigated. Data are collected by using the visual business modeling toolkit, designed to cocreate and visualize the business model. The cocreated models are transcribed and analyzed per actor perspective, transactions, and value attributes. Results We revealed eight new actors in the business model for providing the service. Essential actors are: the intermediary network coordinator connecting companies, the service dedicated information technology specialists, and the service dedicated health specialist. In the transactions for every service providing we found a certain type of contract, such as a license contract and service contracts for precare services and software products. In addition to the efficiency, quality, and convenience, important value attributes

  15. Radioprotectors and Radiomitigators for Improving Radiation Therapy: The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Gateway for Accelerating Clinical Translation.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Pataje G S; Narayanan, Deepa; Hallett, Kory; Bernhard, Eric J; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Evans, Gregory; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Weingarten, Michael; Coleman, C Norman

    2015-09-01

    Although radiation therapy is an important cancer treatment modality, patients may experience adverse effects. The use of a radiation-effect modulator may help improve the outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients undergoing radiation therapy either by enhancing tumor cell killing or by protecting normal tissues. Historically, the successful translation of radiation-effect modulators to the clinic has been hindered due to the lack of focused collaboration between academia, pharmaceutical companies and the clinic, along with limited availability of support for such ventures. The U.S. Government has been developing medical countermeasures against accidental and intentional radiation exposures to mitigate the risk and/or severity of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and the delayed effects of acute radiation exposures (DEARE), and there is now a drug development pipeline established. Some of these medical countermeasures could potentially be repurposed for improving the outcome of radiation therapy and HRQOL of cancer patients. With the objective of developing radiation-effect modulators to improve radiotherapy, the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Development Center at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), supported by the Radiation Research Program (RRP), provided funding to companies from 2011 to 2014 through the SBIR contracts mechanism. Although radiation-effect modulators collectively refer to radioprotectors, radiomitigators and radiosensitizers, the focus of this article is on radioprotection and mitigation of radiation injury. This specific SBIR contract opportunity strengthened existing partnerships and facilitated new collaborations between academia and industry. In this commentary, we assess the impact of this funding opportunity, outline the review process, highlight the organ/site-specific disease needs in the clinic for the development of radiation-effect modulators, provide a general understanding of a framework for gathering

  16. Radioprotectors and Radiomitigators for Improving Radiation Therapy: The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Gateway for Accelerating Clinical Translation.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Pataje G S; Narayanan, Deepa; Hallett, Kory; Bernhard, Eric J; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Evans, Gregory; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Weingarten, Michael; Coleman, C Norman

    2015-09-01

    Although radiation therapy is an important cancer treatment modality, patients may experience adverse effects. The use of a radiation-effect modulator may help improve the outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients undergoing radiation therapy either by enhancing tumor cell killing or by protecting normal tissues. Historically, the successful translation of radiation-effect modulators to the clinic has been hindered due to the lack of focused collaboration between academia, pharmaceutical companies and the clinic, along with limited availability of support for such ventures. The U.S. Government has been developing medical countermeasures against accidental and intentional radiation exposures to mitigate the risk and/or severity of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and the delayed effects of acute radiation exposures (DEARE), and there is now a drug development pipeline established. Some of these medical countermeasures could potentially be repurposed for improving the outcome of radiation therapy and HRQOL of cancer patients. With the objective of developing radiation-effect modulators to improve radiotherapy, the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Development Center at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), supported by the Radiation Research Program (RRP), provided funding to companies from 2011 to 2014 through the SBIR contracts mechanism. Although radiation-effect modulators collectively refer to radioprotectors, radiomitigators and radiosensitizers, the focus of this article is on radioprotection and mitigation of radiation injury. This specific SBIR contract opportunity strengthened existing partnerships and facilitated new collaborations between academia and industry. In this commentary, we assess the impact of this funding opportunity, outline the review process, highlight the organ/site-specific disease needs in the clinic for the development of radiation-effect modulators, provide a general understanding of a framework for gathering

  17. Radioprotectors and Radiomitigators for Improving Radiation Therapy: The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Gateway for Accelerating Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Pataje G. S.; Narayanan, Deepa; Hallett, Kory; Bernhard, Eric J.; Ahmed, Mansoor M.; Evans, Gregory; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Weingarten, Michael; Coleman, C. Norman

    2015-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is an important cancer treatment modality, patients may experience adverse effects. The use of a radiation-effect modulator may help improve the outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients undergoing radiation therapy either by enhancing tumor cell killing or by protecting normal tissues. Historically, the successful translation of radiation-effect modulators to the clinic has been hindered due to the lack of focused collaboration between academia, pharmaceutical companies and the clinic, along with limited availability of support for such ventures. The U.S. Government has been developing medical countermeasures against accidental and intentional radiation exposures to mitigate the risk and/or severity of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and the delayed effects of acute radiation exposures (DEARE), and there is now a drug development pipeline established. Some of these medical countermeasures could potentially be repurposed for improving the outcome of radiation therapy and HRQOL of cancer patients. With the objective of developing radiation-effect modulators to improve radiotherapy, the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Development Center at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), supported by the Radiation Research Program (RRP), provided funding to companies from 2011 to 2014 through the SBIR contracts mechanism. Although radiation-effect modulators collectively refer to radioprotectors, radiomitigators and radiosensitizers, the focus of this article is on radioprotection and mitigation of radiation injury. This specific SBIR contract opportunity strengthened existing partnerships and facilitated new collaborations between academia and industry. In this commentary, we assess the impact of this funding opportunity, outline the review process, highlight the organ/site-specific disease needs in the clinic for the development of radiation-effect modulators, provide a general understanding of a framework for gathering

  18. Developing a Model for an Innovative Culinary Competency Curriculum and Examining Its Effects on Students' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Meng-Lei I-Chen Monica; Horng, Jeou-Shyan; Teng, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The present study designs and develops an innovative culinary competency curriculum (ICCC) model comprising seven sections: innovative culture, aesthetics, techniques, service, product, management, and creativity. The model is formulated based on culinary concept, creativity, innovation, and competency theory. The four elements of curriculum…

  19. The business of emergency medicine: a model for success.

    PubMed

    Proctor, John; Hall, Peter; Carr, Janet

    2004-02-01

    Today's EPOs and their physicians face an array of daunting challenges. Falling reimbursement, rising malpractice costs. ED and hospital crowding,and demands for improving ED efficiency and patient satisfaction all contribute to the challenging and sometimes threatening environment of EM practice. The EP involved in a busy and often hectic ED shift may feel unduly and unnecessarily distracted when required to continuously acknowledge and address the business aspect of the practice. Nevertheless,regardless of the size and structure, fiscal viability ultimately determines the EPO's ability to continue to offer access to care. This article contends that a comprehensive business strategy drives superior financial performance and supports the organization's mission. The business strategy must identify financial and non-financial determinants of the EPO's success and provide a mechanism for understanding how the organization's resources are converted to value for customers. The section offers a framework for developing this strategy, for identifying possible gaps or deficiencies, and for measuring and monitoring progress in achieving strategic objectives and ultimately, the EPO's mission. The importance of the mission and the dynamic EM environment require that the strategy development process be more than an annual exercise for the leadership of the organization. Though key leaders in any size EPO--set the course for the organization, the entire organization must be aware and understand the strategy before they commit themselves and adopt actions and behaviors that promote it. The model presented here provides a graphic display that lends itself well to consistent communication of a comprehensive strategy in a concise way throughout the organization.Furthermore, the balance of the model, across four perspectives, recognizes the value of balanced organizational objectives and lends itself well to the creation of a measurement system that supports cause and effect

  20. Drosophila Sex Combs as a Model of Evolutionary Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Artyom

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of animal and plant forms is shaped by nested evolutionary innovations. Understanding the genetic and molecular changes responsible for these innovations is therefore one of the key goals of evolutionary biology. From the genetic point of view, the origin of novel traits implies the origin of new regulatory pathways to control their development. To understand how these new pathways are assembled in the course of evolution, we need model systems that combine relatively recent innovations with a powerful set of genetic and molecular tools. One such model is provided by the Drosophila sex comb – a male-specific morphological structure that evolved in a relatively small lineage related to the model species D. melanogaster. Our extensive knowledge of sex comb development in D. melanogaster provides the basis for investigating the genetic changes responsible for sex comb origin and diversification. At the same time, sex combs can change on microevolutionary timescales and differ spectacularly among closely related species, providing opportunities for direct genetic analysis and for integrating developmental and population-genetic approaches. Sex comb evolution is associated with the origin of novel interactions between HOX and sex determination genes. Activity of the sex determination pathway was brought under the control of the HOX code to become segment-specific, while HOX gene expression became sexually dimorphic. At the same time, both HOX and sex determination genes were integrated into the intrasegmental spatial patterning network, and acquired new joint downstream targets. Phylogenetic analysis shows that similar sex comb morphologies evolved independently in different lineages. Convergent evolution at the phenotypic level reflects convergent changes in the expression of HOX and sex determination genes, involving both independent gains and losses of regulatory interactions. However, the downstream cell differentiation programs have diverged between

  1. International Education/International Business: A Model for Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rookstool, Judy

    In order to strengthen cooperation among institutions of higher education and businesses with global connections in Silicon Valley, a project was undertaken by San Jose City College to compile a list of the internationally oriented business-related courses available at local institutions and identify existing gaps in the curricula. Information…

  2. Good Conversations: An Enhanced Model to Teach Business Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Grace S.

    2011-01-01

    Business practices are a constant matter of discussion by ethical theorists concerned with the conflicts between profitability and justice (Cherry, Lee, & Chien, 2003). Business decisions are complex and hence likely to be compromised by low-quality or questionable strategies (Carpenter & Sanders, 2008). The line between misbehavior and legal…

  3. Business/Education Partnerships in South Carolina. Model Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Div. of Public Accountability.

    This document contains reports from school districts in South Carolina on the status of their successful partnerships between schools and businesses. They are examples of what is happening in South Carolina today and what could happen between other businesses and schools as new alliances are formed. These accounts describe new ideas for…

  4. The Business Model of E-Learning in UK Higher Education: Optimization through Outsourcing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, David Charles

    2004-01-01

    E-learning is not just an application of technology to teaching, but a new business model for higher education. By approaching e-learning as a business model, educational policymakers can begin to appreciate the scope of the integrated technology and services required to run a successful online degree programme or a blended programme that includes…

  5. A Simple Model to Teach Business Cycle Macroeconomics for Emerging Market and Developing Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The canonical neoclassical model is insufficient to understand business cycle fluctuations in emerging market and developing economies. The author reformulates the model proposed by Aguiar and Gopinath (2007) in a simple setting that can be used to teach business cycle macroeconomics for emerging market and developing economies at the…

  6. Practical Teaching & Learning Model: A Modern Dimension for Business Management Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolachi, Nadir Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to evaluate and investigate the most suitable model required for teaching business Management curriculum. The paper will report a new dimension of Business Management Teaching. For this purpose, a Practical teaching & Learning Model has been prepared and will be discussed through qualitative research…

  7. 47 CFR 76.1906 - Encoding rules for undefined business models.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Encoding rules for undefined business models. 76.1906 Section 76.1906 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Encoding Rules § 76.1906 Encoding rules for undefined business models. (a) Upon...

  8. Hofstede's Model of National Culture: A Social Science Contribution to International Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, George C.; Cutler, Bob D.

    1996-01-01

    A search of scholarly business journals identified 54 articles in business-related disciplines since 1980 using Geerte Hofstede's model of national culture as a research technique. Of those, 22 analyses were at the level of country, 12 at the organizational level, 20 at the individual level. The model's successful use to conduct both empirical and…

  9. Conceptualization of an R&D Based Learning-to-Innovate Model for Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Oiki Sylvia

    The purpose of this research was to conceptualize an R & D based learning-to-innovate (LTI) model. The problem to be addressed was the lack of a theoretical L TI model, which would inform science pedagogy. The absorptive capacity (ACAP) lens was adopted to untangle the R & D LTI phenomenon into four learning processes: problem-solving via knowledge acquisition, incremental improvement via knowledge participation, scientific discovery via knowledge creation, and product design via knowledge productivity. The four knowledge factors were the latent factors and each factor had seven manifest elements as measured variables. The key objectives of the non experimental quantitative survey were to measure the relative importance of the identified elements and to explore the underlining structure of the variables. A questionnaire had been prepared, and was administered to more than 155 R & D professionals from four sectors - business, academic, government, and nonprofit. The results showed that every identified element was important to the R & D professionals, in terms of improving the related type of innovation. The most important elements were highlighted to serve as building blocks for elaboration. In search for patterns of the data matrix, exploratory factor analysis (EF A) was performed. Principal component analysis was the first phase of EF A to extract factors; while maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was used to estimate the model. EF A yielded the finding of two aspects in each kind of knowledge. Logical names were assigned to represent the nature of the subsets: problem and knowledge under knowledge acquisition, planning and participation under knowledge participation, exploration and discovery under knowledge creation, and construction and invention under knowledge productivity. These two constructs, within each kind of knowledge, added structure to the vague R & D based LTI model. The research questions and hypotheses testing were addressed using correlation

  10. Small Business Innovations (Exoskeletons)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Dexterous Hand Master (DHM), a 1989 winner of an R&D 100 Award, is an exoskeleton device for measuring the joints of the human hand with extreme precision. It was originally developed for NASA by Arthur D. Little, and is sold commercially by EXOS, Inc. The DHM is worn on the hand and connected to a computer that records hand motions. The resulting data is transmitted as control signals to robots and other computers, enabling robotic hands to emulate human hand actions. Two additional spinoff products were also inspired by the DHM.

  11. Implementation of the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) in the modelling of anatomic pathology processes

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Marcial García; Rolón, Elvira; Calahorra, Luis; García, Felix Óscar; Sánchez, Rosario Paloma; Ruiz, Francisco; Ballester, Nieves; Armenteros, María; Rodríguez, Teresa; Espartero, Rafael Martín

    2008-01-01

    Background Process orientation is one of the essential elements of quality management systems, including those in use in healthcare. Business processes in hospitals are very complex and variable. BPMN (Business Process Modelling Notation) is a user-oriented language specifically designed for the modelling of business (organizational) processes. Previous experiences of the use of this notation in the processes modelling within the Pathology in Spain or another country are not known. We present our experience in the elaboration of the conceptual models of Pathology processes, as part of a global programmed surgical patient process, using BPMN. Methods With the objective of analyzing the use of BPMN notation in real cases, a multidisciplinary work group was created, including software engineers from the Dep. of Technologies and Information Systems from the University of Castilla-La Mancha and health professionals and administrative staff from the Hospital General de Ciudad Real. The work in collaboration was carried out in six phases: informative meetings, intensive training, process selection, definition of the work method, process describing by hospital experts, and process modelling. Results The modelling of the processes of Anatomic Pathology is presented using BPMN. The presented subprocesses are those corresponding to the surgical pathology examination of the samples coming from operating theatre, including the planning and realization of frozen studies. Conclusion The modelling of Anatomic Pathology subprocesses has allowed the creation of an understandable graphical model, where management and improvements are more easily implemented by health professionals. PMID:18673511

  12. Innovation Squared: Comparison of Models by Tony Wagner and Steven Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, Tony Wagner's model of innovation differs from Steven Johnson's. One explores the following: how might we develop a nation of innovators? The other offers seven patterns that mark environments for innovation. Drawing from triangulated data, both authors create regularities (not laws) that have new paradigm, scientific credibility.…

  13. Innovation in Doctoral Degrees Designed for Adult Learners: A Hybrid Model in Personal Financial Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grable, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Innovation in doctoral degree program development and delivery provides an effective counterpoint to the expert-apprentice model established in the Middle Ages. The author outlines the importance of innovation in reaching adult learners and describes an innovative hybrid PhD program designed to allow aspiring doctoral adult-age students to pursue…

  14. Alabama: A Successful Home-Based Business Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centrallo, Carol B.

    1999-01-01

    The Alabama Cooperative Extension Service transformed a traditional textile/clothing program into a home-based business program. It was delivered by multiple methods including meetings, printed materials, audiovisual resources, and, in the second phase, videoconferencing. (SK)

  15. Follow the Leaders? An Analysis of Convergence and Innovation of Faculty Recruiting Practices in US Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, David; Deephouse, David L.; O'Reilly, Norm; Massie, Tyler; Hillenbrand, Carola

    2016-01-01

    The debate associated with the qualifications of business school faculty has raged since the 1959 release of the Gordon-Howell and Pierson reports, which encouraged business schools in the USA to enhance their legitimacy by increasing their faculties' doctoral qualifications and scholarly rigor. Today, the legitimacy of specific faculty…

  16. A Culture Model as Mediator and Repository Source for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadisadr, Mohammad; Siadat, Seyed Ali; Azizollah, Arbabisarjou; Ebrahim, Ebrahimitabas

    2012-01-01

    As innovation has become one of the most important competitive advantages, academic practitioner's interest in the matter has increased. But, still the question "why lots of organizations fail in their path of article to be innovative" is remained unanswered. In this, among many factors influencing innovation capacity of an organization;…

  17. Smartphone Apps on the Mobile Web: An Exploratory Case Study of Business Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Caroline Morgan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore the business strategies of a firm seeking to develop and profitably market a mobile smartphone application to understand how small, digital entrepreneurships may build sustainable business models given substantial market barriers. Through a detailed examination of one firm's process to try to…

  18. Promises from Afar: A Model of International Student Psychological Contract in Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordia, Sarbari; Bordia, Prashant; Restubog, Simon Lloyd D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their significant presence in western business schools, the needs and experiences of international students have not been adequately reflected in the business education literature. We draw upon psychological contract theory--used to understand employer-employee relationships--to develop a novel theoretical model on the international…

  19. Active Learning through Modeling: Introduction to Software Development in the Business Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roussev, Boris; Rousseva, Yvonna

    2004-01-01

    Modern software practices call for the active involvement of business people in the software process. Therefore, programming has become an indispensable part of the information systems component of the core curriculum at business schools. In this paper, we present a model-based approach to teaching introduction to programming to general business…

  20. Nutrigenomics-based personalised nutritional advice: in search of a business model?

    PubMed

    Ronteltap, Amber; van Trijp, Hans; Berezowska, Aleksandra; Goossens, Jo

    2013-03-01

    Nutritional advice has mainly focused on population-level recommendations. Recent developments in nutrition, communication, and marketing sciences have enabled potential deviations from this dominant business model in the direction of personalisation of nutrition advice. Such personalisation efforts can take on many forms, but these have in common that they can only be effective if they are supported by a viable business model. The present paper takes an inventory of approaches to personalised nutrition currently available in the market place as its starting point to arrive at an identification of their underlying business models. This analysis is presented as a unifying framework against which the potential of nutrigenomics-based personalised advice can be assessed. It has uncovered nine archetypical approaches to personalised nutrition advice in terms of their dominant underlying business models. Differentiating features among such business models are the type of information that is used as a basis for personalisation, the definition of the target group, the communication channels that are being adopted, and the partnerships that are built as a part of the business model. Future research should explore the consumer responses to the diversity of "archetypical" business models for personalised nutrition advice as a source of market information on which the delivery of nutrigenomics-based personalised nutrition advice may further build.

  1. Nutrigenomics-based personalised nutritional advice: in search of a business model?

    PubMed

    Ronteltap, Amber; van Trijp, Hans; Berezowska, Aleksandra; Goossens, Jo

    2013-03-01

    Nutritional advice has mainly focused on population-level recommendations. Recent developments in nutrition, communication, and marketing sciences have enabled potential deviations from this dominant business model in the direction of personalisation of nutrition advice. Such personalisation efforts can take on many forms, but these have in common that they can only be effective if they are supported by a viable business model. The present paper takes an inventory of approaches to personalised nutrition currently available in the market place as its starting point to arrive at an identification of their underlying business models. This analysis is presented as a unifying framework against which the potential of nutrigenomics-based personalised advice can be assessed. It has uncovered nine archetypical approaches to personalised nutrition advice in terms of their dominant underlying business models. Differentiating features among such business models are the type of information that is used as a basis for personalisation, the definition of the target group, the communication channels that are being adopted, and the partnerships that are built as a part of the business model. Future research should explore the consumer responses to the diversity of "archetypical" business models for personalised nutrition advice as a source of market information on which the delivery of nutrigenomics-based personalised nutrition advice may further build. PMID:22903899

  2. Innovation information seeking and innovation adoption: Facilities and plant managers' energy outlook comparing linear to nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Joseph J.

    One focal point of concern, policy and a new research will involve identifying individual and organizational facilitative and obstructive factors within the context of energy innovation diffusion in the U.S. This interdisciplinary intersection of people, technology and change is one of serious consequence and has broad implications that span national security, energy infrastructure, the economy, organizational change, education and the environment. This study investigates facilities and plant managers' energy innovation information seeking and energy adoption evolution. The participants are managers who consume more electrical energy than all other groups in the world and are among the top users of natural gas and oil in the United States. The research calls upon the Theory of Planned Behavior, the Diffusion of Innovations and nonlinear dynamics in a study of adoption patterns for 13 energy-related innovations. Cusp catastrophe models and power laws were compared to linear multiple regression to examine and characterize data. Findings reveal that innovation adoption and information seeking differences are slight between private and public sector facilities and plant managers and that the group as a whole may resist change. Of the 13 innovations, some exhibit very strong cusp catastrophe distributions while support for multiple linear regression and the power law were found.

  3. Can We Recognize an Innovation? Perspective from an Evolving Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sanjay; Krishna, Sandeep

    "Innovations" are central to the evolution of societies and the evolution of life. But what constitutes an innovation? We can often agree after the event, when its consequences and impact over a long term are known, whether something was an innovation, and whether it was a "big" innovation or a "minor" one. But can we recognize an innovation "on the fly" as it appears? Successful entrepreneurs often can. Is it possible to formalize that intuition? We discuss this question in the setting of a mathematical model of evolving networks. The model exhibits self-organization , growth, stasis, and collapse of a complex system with many interacting components, reminiscent of real-world phenomena. A notion of "innovation" is formulated in terms of graph-theoretic constructs and other dynamical variables of the model. A new node in the graph gives rise to an innovation, provided it links up "appropriately" with existing nodes; in this view innovation necessarily depends upon the existing context. We show that innovations, as defined by us, play a major role in the birth, growth, and destruction of organizational structures. Furthermore, innovations can be categorized in terms of their graph-theoretic structure as they appear. Different structural classes of innovation have potentially different qualitative consequences for the future evolution of the system, some minor and some major. Possible general lessons from this specific model are briefly discussed.

  4. Business Inspiration: Small Business Leadership in Recovery?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, David; Price, Liz; Bosworth, Gary; Parkinson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Business Inspiration was a short, action-centred leadership and innovation development programme designed for owners and managers of smaller firms to address business survival and repositioning needs arising from the UK's economic downturn. The article examines the design and delivery of Business Inspiration and the impact of the programme on…

  5. Upgrading the Chinese Economy by Overhauling Special Economic Zones: Innovation Model Shopping or the Emergence of a Chinese Innovation Model?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhardt, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Technology and Education, the main body for the central government's innovation policy, highlights the strengthening of the scientific--technological base and the upgrading of domestic innovative competences, and places the industrial focus on seven new strategic…

  6. Business and Management Education in Transitioning and Developing Countries: A Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, John R., Ed.; Alon, Ilan, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Business education is a critical ingredient in establishing a viable middle class of managers in transitioning and developing economies. Compiled in association with the Center for International Business Education and Research, this comprehensive examination of business and management education, pedagogical models, and curricula innovations in…

  7. The assisted prediction modelling frame with hybridisation and ensemble for business risk forecasting and an implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Hong, Lu-Yao; Zhou, Qing; Yu, Hai-Jie

    2015-08-01

    The business failure of numerous companies results in financial crises. The high social costs associated with such crises have made people to search for effective tools for business risk prediction, among which, support vector machine is very effective. Several modelling means, including single-technique modelling, hybrid modelling, and ensemble modelling, have been suggested in forecasting business risk with support vector machine. However, existing literature seldom focuses on the general modelling frame for business risk prediction, and seldom investigates performance differences among different modelling means. We reviewed researches on forecasting business risk with support vector machine, proposed the general assisted prediction modelling frame with hybridisation and ensemble (APMF-WHAE), and finally, investigated the use of principal components analysis, support vector machine, random sampling, and group decision, under the general frame in forecasting business risk. Under the APMF-WHAE frame with support vector machine as the base predictive model, four specific predictive models were produced, namely, pure support vector machine, a hybrid support vector machine involved with principal components analysis, a support vector machine ensemble involved with random sampling and group decision, and an ensemble of hybrid support vector machine using group decision to integrate various hybrid support vector machines on variables produced from principle components analysis and samples from random sampling. The experimental results indicate that hybrid support vector machine and ensemble of hybrid support vector machines were able to produce dominating performance than pure support vector machine and support vector machine ensemble.

  8. A Conceptual framework of Strategy, Structure and Innovative Behaviour for the Development of a Dynamic Simulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Trivellas, Panagiotis; Reklitis, Panagiotis

    2007-12-01

    According to many researchers of organizational theory, a great number of problems encountered by the manufacturing firms are due to their failure to foster innovative behaviour by aligning business strategy and structure. From this point of view, the fit between strategy and structure is essential in order to facilitate firms' innovative behaviour. In the present paper, we adopt Porter's typology to operationalise business strategy (cost leadership, innovative and marketing differentiation, and focus). Organizational structure is built on four dimensions (centralization, formalization, complexity and employees' initiatives to implement new ideas). Innovativeness is measured as product innovation, process and technological innovation. This study provides the necessary theoretical framework for the development of a dynamic simulation method, although the simulation of social events is a quite difficult task, considering that there are so many alternatives (not all well understood).

  9. Innovation, Innovation, Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Innovation, Universities and Skills. The new title of the department offers much food for thought. The title is indeed an intriguing and important one. Bringing the idea of innovation right to the fore is, to use an overworked term, challenging. Pinning down what innovation means is not at all easy. There are three different lines of argument. The…

  10. Modeling a Mobile Health Management Business Model for Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Li; Chang, Polun

    2016-01-01

    In these decades, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. Information technology (IT) tools have been used widely to empower the patients with chronic disease (e.g., diabetes and hypertension). It is also a potential application to advance the CKD care. In this project, we analyzed the requirements of a mobile health management system for healthcare workers, patients and their families to design a health management business model for CKD patients. PMID:27332476

  11. Modeling a Mobile Health Management Business Model for Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Li; Chang, Polun

    2016-01-01

    In these decades, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. Information technology (IT) tools have been used widely to empower the patients with chronic disease (e.g., diabetes and hypertension). It is also a potential application to advance the CKD care. In this project, we analyzed the requirements of a mobile health management system for healthcare workers, patients and their families to design a health management business model for CKD patients.

  12. Group therapy for refugees and torture survivors: treatment model innovations.

    PubMed

    Kira, Ibrahim A; Ahmed, Asha; Wasim, Fatima; Mahmoud, Vanessa; Colrain, Joanna; Rai, Dhan

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses varieties of group therapies with refugees and torture survivors and the logic behind enhancing traditional group therapies to fit the unique experiences of refugees and torture survivors. It discusses some lessons learned from practice and from empirical research and some recommended adaptations. Finally, it discusses the Center for Torture and Trauma Survivors' therapy group model for torture survivors and describes two of its variants: The Bashal group for African and Somali women and the Bhutanese multi-family therapy group. Group therapies, in this model, extend to community healing. One of the essential and innovative features of the model is that it focuses not only on treating individual psychopathology but also extends to community healing by promoting the development of social clubs and organizations that promote the values and culture of the graduates of the therapy group and the continuation of social support. New graduates from the group join the club and become part of the social advocacy process and of group and community support and healing. This model adds an ecological dimension to the traditional group therapy.

  13. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Zero Net-Energy Homes Production Builder Business Case: California/Florida Production Builders

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Grupe Homes of Sacramento’s work with Building America to design California’s first production-scale community of solar homes. The homes outsold neighboring developments two to one.

  14. Preparation for International Business: A Cultural Immersion Model in French.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Martin, Gerry

    A Salisbury State University (Maryland) program integrating intensive French language and business administration instruction is described. In its pilot, the program had 11 students, all but 1 drawn from French language classes; one was a native speaker. The French portion was taught in the morning by two French professors, and the business…

  15. Wisconsin's Model Academic Standards for Business. Bulletin No. 9004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This document contains standards for the academic content of the Wisconsin K-12 curriculum in the area of business. Developed by task forces of educators, parents, board of education members, and employers and employees, the standards cover content, performance, and proficiency areas. They are cross-referenced to the state standards for English…

  16. Modeling Business Processes of the Social Insurance Fund in Information System Runa WFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataev, M. Yu; Bulysheva, L. A.; Xu, Li D.; Loseva, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    Introduction - Business processes are gradually becoming a tool that allows you at a new level to put employees or to make more efficient document management system. In these directions the main work, and presents the largest possible number of publications. However, business processes are still poorly implemented in public institutions, where it is very difficult to formalize the main existing processes. Us attempts to build a system of business processes for such state agencies as the Russian social insurance Fund (SIF), where virtually all of the processes, when different inputs have the same output: public service. The parameters of the state services (as a rule, time limits) are set by state laws and regulations. The article provides a brief overview of the FSS, the formulation of requirements to business processes, the justification of the choice of software for modeling business processes and create models of work in the system Runa WFE and optimization models one of the main business processes of the FSS. The result of the work of Runa WFE is an optimized model of the business process of FSS.

  17. Applying the Concepts of Innovation Strategies to Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yirong; Kotsis, Sandra V.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plastic surgery has a well-known history of innovative procedures and products. However, with the rise in competition, such as aesthetic procedures being performed by other medical specialties, there is a need for continued innovation in plastic surgery to create novel treatments to advance this specialty. Although many articles introduce innovative technologies and procedures, there is a paucity of publications to highlight the application of principles of innovation in plastic surgery. Methods: We review the literature regarding business strategies for innovation. Results: We evaluate concepts of innovation, process of innovation (idea generation, idea evaluation, idea conversion, idea diffusion and adoption), ethical issues, and the application to plastic surgery. Conclusions: Adopting a business model of innovation is helpful to promote a new paradigm of progress to propel plastic surgery to new avenues of creativity. PMID:23897344

  18. Using Solar Business Models to Expand the Distributed Wind Market (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, S.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation to attendees at Wind Powering America's All-States Summit in Chicago describes business models that were responsible for rapid growth in the solar industry and that may be applicable to the distributed wind industry as well.

  19. Why Business Modeling is Crucial in the Development of eHealth Technologies

    PubMed Central

    van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia EWC; Nijland, Nicol; Ossebaard, Hans C; Hendrix, Ron MG; Seydel, Erwin R

    2011-01-01

    The impact and uptake of information and communication technologies that support health care are rather low. Current frameworks for eHealth development suffer from a lack of fitting infrastructures, inability to find funding, complications with scalability, and uncertainties regarding effectiveness and sustainability. These issues can be addressed by defining a better implementation strategy early in the development of eHealth technologies. A business model, and thus business modeling, help to determine such an implementation strategy by involving all important stakeholders in a value-driven dialogue on what the technology should accomplish. This idea also seems promising to eHealth, as it can contribute to the whole development of eHealth technology. We therefore suggest that business modeling can be used as an effective approach to supporting holistic development of eHealth technologies. The contribution of business modeling is elaborated in this paper through a literature review that covers the latest business model research, concepts from the latest eHealth and persuasive technology research, evaluation and insights from our prior eHealth research, as well as the review conducted in the first paper of this series. Business modeling focuses on generating a collaborative effort of value cocreation in which all stakeholders reflect on the value needs of the others. The resulting business model acts as the basis for implementation. The development of eHealth technology should focus more on the context by emphasizing what this technology should contribute in practice to the needs of all involved stakeholders. Incorporating the idea of business modeling helps to cocreate and formulate a set of critical success factors that will influence the sustainability and effectiveness of eHealth technology. PMID:22204896

  20. Why business modeling is crucial in the development of eHealth technologies.

    PubMed

    van Limburg, Maarten; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C; Nijland, Nicol; Ossebaard, Hans C; Hendrix, Ron M G; Seydel, Erwin R

    2011-01-01

    The impact and uptake of information and communication technologies that support health care are rather low. Current frameworks for eHealth development suffer from a lack of fitting infrastructures, inability to find funding, complications with scalability, and uncertainties regarding effectiveness and sustainability. These issues can be addressed by defining a better implementation strategy early in the development of eHealth technologies. A business model, and thus business modeling, help to determine such an implementation strategy by involving all important stakeholders in a value-driven dialogue on what the technology should accomplish. This idea also seems promising to eHealth, as it can contribute to the whole development of eHealth technology. We therefore suggest that business modeling can be used as an effective approach to supporting holistic development of eHealth technologies. The contribution of business modeling is elaborated in this paper through a literature review that covers the latest business model research, concepts from the latest eHealth and persuasive technology research, evaluation and insights from our prior eHealth research, as well as the review conducted in the first paper of this series. Business modeling focuses on generating a collaborative effort of value cocreation in which all stakeholders reflect on the value needs of the others. The resulting business model acts as the basis for implementation. The development of eHealth technology should focus more on the context by emphasizing what this technology should contribute in practice to the needs of all involved stakeholders. Incorporating the idea of business modeling helps to cocreate and formulate a set of critical success factors that will influence the sustainability and effectiveness of eHealth technology. PMID:22204896

  1. Why business modeling is crucial in the development of eHealth technologies.

    PubMed

    van Limburg, Maarten; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C; Nijland, Nicol; Ossebaard, Hans C; Hendrix, Ron M G; Seydel, Erwin R

    2011-12-28

    The impact and uptake of information and communication technologies that support health care are rather low. Current frameworks for eHealth development suffer from a lack of fitting infrastructures, inability to find funding, complications with scalability, and uncertainties regarding effectiveness and sustainability. These issues can be addressed by defining a better implementation strategy early in the development of eHealth technologies. A business model, and thus business modeling, help to determine such an implementation strategy by involving all important stakeholders in a value-driven dialogue on what the technology should accomplish. This idea also seems promising to eHealth, as it can contribute to the whole development of eHealth technology. We therefore suggest that business modeling can be used as an effective approach to supporting holistic development of eHealth technologies. The contribution of business modeling is elaborated in this paper through a literature review that covers the latest business model research, concepts from the latest eHealth and persuasive technology research, evaluation and insights from our prior eHealth research, as well as the review conducted in the first paper of this series. Business modeling focuses on generating a collaborative effort of value cocreation in which all stakeholders reflect on the value needs of the others. The resulting business model acts as the basis for implementation. The development of eHealth technology should focus more on the context by emphasizing what this technology should contribute in practice to the needs of all involved stakeholders. Incorporating the idea of business modeling helps to cocreate and formulate a set of critical success factors that will influence the sustainability and effectiveness of eHealth technology.

  2. A new breed of innovative ground water modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, R.J.; Doss, S.K.; Ziagos, J.; McKereghan, P.; Vogele, T.; Nelson, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    Sparse data is a critical obstacle in every ground water remediation project. Lack of data necessitates non-unique interpolations that can distort modeled distributions of contaminants and essential physical properties (e.g., permeability, porosity). These properties largely determine the rates and paths that contaminants may take in migrating from sources to receptor locations. We apply both forward and inverse model estimates to resolve this problem because coupled modeling provides the only way to obtain constitutive property distributions that simultaneously simulate the flow and transport behavior observed in borehole measurements. Innovations in multidimensional modeling are a key to achieving more effective subsurface characterizations, remedial designs, risk assessments, and compliance monitoring in efforts to accelerate cleanup and reduce costs in national environmental remediations. Fundamentally new modeling concepts and novel software have emerged recently from two decades of research on self-adaptive solvers of partial differential equations (PDEs). We have tested a revolutionary software product, PDEase, applying it to coupled forward and inverse flow problems. In the Superfund cleanup effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) Livermore Site, the new modeling paradigm of PDEase enables ground water professionals to simply provide the flow equations, site geometry, sources, sinks, constitutive parameters, and boundary conditions. Its symbolic processors then construct the actual numerical solution code and solve it automatically. Powerful grid refinements that conform adaptively to evolving flow features are executed dynamically with iterative finite-element solutions that minimize numerical errors to user-specified limits. Numerical solution accuracy can be tested easily with the diagnostic information and interactive graphical displays that appear as the solutions are generated.

  3. Study on Innovation of Teacher Training Model in Basic Education from the Perspective of "Blended Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bu, Huabai; Bu, Shizhen

    2012-01-01

    Gradual integration of synergetic technology, P2P technology and online learning community furnishes a new research field for innovation of teacher training model in a knowledge economy era. This article proposes the innovative model of "whole of three lines" in teacher training in basic education from the perspective of "blended…

  4. Teaching Quality Management Model for the Training of Innovation Ability and the Multilevel Decomposition Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Xingjiang; Yao, Chen; Zheng, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the training of undergraduate students' innovation ability. On top of the theoretical framework of the Quality Function Deployment (QFD), we propose a teaching quality management model. Based on this model, we establish a multilevel decomposition indicator system, which integrates innovation ability characterized by four…

  5. A Systems Dynamics Model of Implementation of an Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, Alan K.; And Others

    The research presented in this report investigated the critical factors that affected the decision to abandon or replace a curricular innovation in one elementary school. The specific innovation examined in this research is called developing mathematical processes, which emphasizes process and induction rather than computational skills. Although…

  6. Innovation from a Computational Social Science Perspective: Analyses and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casstevens, Randy M.

    2013-01-01

    Innovation processes are critical for preserving and improving our standard of living. While innovation has been studied by many disciplines, the focus has been on qualitative measures that are specific to a single technological domain. I adopt a quantitative approach to investigate underlying regularities that generalize across multiple domains.…

  7. Building an innovation factory.

    PubMed

    Hargadon, A; Sutton, R I

    2000-01-01

    New ideas are the precious currency of the new economy, but generating them doesn't have to be a mysterious process. The image of the lone genius inventing from scratch is a romantic fiction. Businesses that constantly innovate have systematized the production and testing of new ideas, and the system can be replicated by practically any organization. The best innovators use old ideas as the raw materials for new ideas, a strategy the authors call knowledge brokering. The system for sustaining innovation is the knowledge brokering cycle, and the authors discuss its four parts. The first is capturing good ideas from a wide variety of sources. The second is keeping those ideas alive by playing with them, discussing them, and using them. Imagining new uses for old ideas is the third part--some knowledge brokers encourage cross-pollination by creating physical layouts that allow, or even force, people to interact with one another. The fourth is turning promising concepts into real services, products, processes, or business models. Companies can use all or part of the cycle. Large companies in particular desperately need to move ideas from one place to another. Some will want to build full-fledged consulting groups dedicated to internal knowledge brokering. Others can hire people who have faced problems similar to the companies' current problems. The most important lesson is that business leaders must change how they think about innovation, and they must change how their company cultures reflect that thinking.

  8. Using Innovative Tools to Teach Computer Application to Business Students--A Hawthorne Effect or Successful Implementation Here to Stay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Zeenath Reza

    2014-01-01

    A year after the primary study that tested the impact of introducing blended learning and guided discovery to help teach computer application to business students, this paper looks into the continued success of using guided discovery and blended learning with learning management system in and out of classrooms to enhance student learning.…

  9. The Impact of Organizational Learning on Innovativeness in Spanish Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo González Del Campo, Jesús David Sánchez; Škerlavaj, Miha

    Innovativeness is a key factor regarding the survival and progress of a company in modern business environments. The question is how to facilitate innovativeness in organizations. This article studies the impact of the organizational learning process on innovativeness. We understand innovativeness as a combination of (1) innovative culture and (2) technological and process innovation. Organizational learning is a consecutive process of (1) information acquisition, (2) information distribution, (3) information interpretation, and (4) behavioral and cognitive changes. New knowledge obtained through organizational learning improves innovativeness. As a methodological framework, we use the partial least square (PLS) approach to structural equation modeling on data from 107 Spanish companies. The results show that organizational learning has a strong positive direct impact on process, product, and service innovations. In addition, the impact of organizational learning on innovation is also indirect, via innovative culture.

  10. Business intelligence tools for radiology: creating a prototype model using open-source tools.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Hanson, Richard; Kelly, Pauline; Khorasani, Ramin

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiology departments could benefit from the ability to integrate and visualize data (e.g. information reflecting complex workflow states) from all of their imaging and information management systems in one composite presentation view. Leveraging data warehousing tools developed in the business world may be one way to achieve this capability. In total, the concept of managing the information available in this data repository is known as Business Intelligence or BI. This paper describes the concepts used in Business Intelligence, their importance to modern Radiology, and the steps used in the creation of a prototype model of a data warehouse for BI using open-source tools.

  11. Structural Models that Manage IT Portfolio Affecting Business Value of Enterprise Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamogawa, Takaaki

    This paper examines the structural relationships between Information Technology (IT) governance and Enterprise Architecture (EA), with the objective of enhancing business value in the enterprise society. Structural models consisting of four related hypotheses reveal the relationship between IT governance and EA in the improvement of business values. We statistically examined the hypotheses by analyzing validated questionnaire items from respondents within firms listed on the Japanese stock exchange who were qualified to answer them. We concluded that firms which have organizational ability controlled by IT governance are more likely to deliver business value based on IT portfolio management.

  12. An Innovative Model of Management Education for the Poor: The South African Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Dennis P.

    2008-01-01

    Community and Individual Development Association (CIDA) City Campus is a private business college that provides bachelor's degrees to economically disadvantaged students in South Africa. CIDA's model of management education is in stark contrast to conventional business schools, which are not accessible to or adapted to students from extreme…

  13. Enhancing Users' Participation in Business Process Modeling through Ontology-Based Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macris, A.; Malamateniou, F.; Vassilacopoulos, G.

    Successful business process design requires active participation of users who are familiar with organizational activities and business process modelling concepts. Hence, there is a need to provide users with reusable, flexible, agile and adaptable training material in order to enable them instil their knowledge and expertise in business process design and automation activities. Knowledge reusability is of paramount importance in designing training material on process modelling since it enables users participate actively in process design/redesign activities stimulated by the changing business environment. This paper presents a prototype approach for the design and use of training material that provides significant advantages to both the designer (knowledge - content reusability and semantic web enabling) and the user (semantic search, knowledge navigation and knowledge dissemination). The approach is based on externalizing domain knowledge in the form of ontology-based knowledge networks (i.e. training scenarios serving specific training needs) so that it is made reusable.

  14. A Rule-Based Modeling for the Description of Flexible and Self-healing Business Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhebouze, Mohamed; Amghar, Youssef; Benharkat, Aïcha-Nabila; Maamar, Zakaria

    In this paper we discuss the importance of ensuring that business processes are label robust and agile at the same time robust and agile. To this end, we consider reviewing the way business processes are managed. For instance we consider offering a flexible way to model processes so that changes in regulations are handled through some self-healing mechanisms. These changes may raise exceptions at run-time if not properly reflected on these processes. To this end we propose a new rule based model that adopts the ECA rules and is built upon formal tools. The business logic of a process can be summarized with a set of rules that implement an organization’s policies. Each business rule is formalized using our ECAPE formalism (Event-Condition-Action-Post condition- post Event). This formalism allows translating a process into a graph of rules that is analyzed in terms of reliably and flexibility.

  15. Hanging with the Right Crowd: Crowdsourcing as a New Business Practice for Innovation, Productivity, Knowledge Capture, and Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Lisa B.

    2013-01-01

    In today's connected world, the reach of the Internet and collaborative social media tools have opened up new opportunities for individuals, regardless of their location, to share their knowledge, expertise, and creativity with others. These tools have also opened up opportunities for organizations to connect with new sources of innovation to…

  16. Mission leverage education: NSU/NASA innovative undergraduate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhury, S. Raj; Shaw, Paula R. D.

    2005-01-01

    The BEST Lab (Center for Excellence in Science Education), the Center for Materials Research (CMR), and the Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, and Computer Science (CS) Departments at Norfolk State University (NSU) joined forces to implement MiLEN(2) IUM - an innovative approach tu integrate current and emerging research into the undergraduate curricula and train students on NASA-related fields. An Earth Observing System (EOS) mission was simulated where students are educated and trained in many aspects of Remote Sensing: detector physics and spectroscopy; signal processing; data conditioning, analysis, visualization; and atmospheric science. This model and its continued impact is expected to significantly enhance the quality of the Mathematics, Science, Engineering and Technology (MSET or SMET) educational experience and to inspire students from historically underrepresented groups to pursue careers in NASA-related fields. MiLEN(2) IUM will be applicable to other higher education institutions that are willing to make the commitment to this endeavor in terms of faculty interest and space.

  17. Declarative Business Process Modelling and the Generation of ERP Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz-Møller, Nicholas Poul; Hølmer, Christian; Hansen, Michael R.

    We present an approach to the construction of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems, which is based on the Resources, Events and Agents (REA) ontology. This framework deals with processes involving exchange and flow of resources in a declarative, graphically-based manner describing what the major entities are rather than how they engage in computations. We show how to develop a domain-specific language on the basis of REA, and a tool which automatically can generate running web-applications. A main contribution is a proof-of-concept showing that business-domain experts can generate their own applications without worrying about implementation details.

  18. Discovering the Business Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Daved; Meisiek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, numerous business schools have begun experimenting with studio-based inquiry, often drawing inspiration from professional studios used within art and design schools and from business and governmental studios used for problem-solving and innovation. Business school studios vary considerably in form, ranging from temporary…

  19. Analysis of stochastic effects in Kaldor-type business cycle discrete model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev; Sysolyatina, Anna

    2016-07-01

    We study nonlinear stochastic phenomena in the discrete Kaldor model of business cycles. A numerical parametric analysis of stochastically forced attractors (equilibria, closed invariant curves, discrete cycles) of this model is performed using the stochastic sensitivity functions technique. A spatial arrangement of random states in stochastic attractors is modeled by confidence domains. The phenomenon of noise-induced transitions "chaos-order" is discussed.

  20. A literature review on business process modelling: new frontiers of reusability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldin, Laden; de Cesare, Sergio

    2011-08-01

    Business process modelling (BPM) has become fundamental for modern enterprises due to the increasing rate of organisational change. As a consequence, business processes need to be continuously (re-)designed as well as subsequently aligned with the corresponding enterprise information systems. One major problem associated with the design of business processes is reusability. Reuse of business process models has the potential of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of BPM. This article critically surveys the existing literature on the problem of BPM reusability and more specifically on that State-of-the-Art research that can provide or suggest the 'elements' required for the development of a methodology aimed at discovering reusable conceptual artefacts in the form of patterns. The article initially clarifies the definitions of business process and business process model; then, it sets out to explore the previous research conducted in areas that have an impact on reusability in BPM. The article concludes by distilling directions for future research towards the development of apatterns-based approach to BPM; an approach that brings together the contributions made by the research community in the areas of process mining and discovery, declarative approaches and ontologies.

  1. New Learning Models: The Evolution of Online Learning into Innovative K-12 Blended Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The author traces the growth of K-12 online learning in the United States from its modest genesis in the mid-1990s with 50,000 students to the more than 4 million enrollments today, the fastest scaling ever of any innovation in K-12 education. The evolution from one-size-fits-all online courses to innovative, blended instructional models that are…

  2. Understanding the health care business model: the financial analysts' point of view.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Nielsen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on how financial analysts understand the strategy of a health care company and which elements, from such a strategy perspective, they perceive as constituting the cornerstone of a health care company's business model. The empirical part of this study is based on semi-structured interviews with analysts following a large health care company listed on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange. The authors analyse how the financial analysts view strategy and value creation within the framework of a business model. Further, the authors analyze whether the characteristics emerging from a comprehensive literature review are reflected in the financial analysts' perceptions of which information is decision-relevant and important to communicate to the financial markets. Among the conclusions of the study is the importance of distinguishing between the health care companies' business model and the model by which the payment of revenues are allocated between end users and reimbursing organizations.

  3. A methodology proposal for collaborative business process elaboration using a model-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wenxin; Bénaben, Frédérick; Pingaud, Hervé

    2015-05-01

    Business process management (BPM) principles are commonly used to improve processes within an organisation. But they can equally be applied to supporting the design of an Information System (IS). In a collaborative situation involving several partners, this type of BPM approach may be useful to support the design of a Mediation Information System (MIS), which would ensure interoperability between the partners' ISs (which are assumed to be service oriented). To achieve this objective, the first main task is to build a collaborative business process cartography. The aim of this article is to present a method for bringing together collaborative information and elaborating collaborative business processes from the information gathered (by using a collaborative situation framework, an organisational model, an informational model, a functional model and a metamodel and by using model transformation rules).

  4. Nurses' adoption of technology: application of Rogers' innovation-diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ting

    2004-11-01

    This qualitative study applied Everett Rogers' innovation-diffusion model to analyze nurses' perceptions toward using a computerized care plan system. Twelve nurses from three respiratory intensive care units in Taiwan voluntarily participated in a one-on-one, in-depth interview. Data were analyzed by constant comparative analysis. The content that emerged was compared with the model's five innovation characteristics (relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability, and observability), as perceived by new users. Results indicate that Rogers' model can accurately describe nurses' behavior during the process of adopting workplace innovations. Related issues that emerged deserve further attention to help nurses make the best use of technology.

  5. Analysis of flood modeling through innovative geomatic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazo, Santiago; Molina, José-Luis; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo

    2015-05-01

    A suitable assessment and management of the exposure level to natural flood risks necessarily requires an exhaustive knowledge of the terrain. This study, primarily aimed to evaluate flood risk, firstly assesses the suitability of an innovative technique, called Reduced Cost Aerial Precision Photogrammetry (RC-APP), based on a motorized technology ultra-light aircraft ULM (Ultra-Light Motor), together with the hybridization of reduced costs sensors, for the acquisition of geospatial information. Consequently, this research generates the RC-APP technique which is found to be a more accurate-precise, economical and less time consuming geomatic product. This technique is applied in river engineering for the geometric modeling and risk assessment to floods. Through the application of RC-APP, a high spatial resolution image (orthophoto of 2.5 cm), and a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of 0.10 m mesh size and high density points (about 100 points/m2), with altimetric accuracy of -0.02 ± 0.03 m have been obtained. These products have provided a detailed knowledge of the terrain, afterward used for the hydraulic simulation which has allowed a better definition of the inundated area, with important implications for flood risk assessment and management. In this sense, it should be noted that the achieved spatial resolution of DEM is 0.10 m which is especially interesting and useful in hydraulic simulations through 2D software. According to the results, the developed methodology and technology allows for a more accurate riverbed representation, compared with other traditional techniques such as Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), with a Root-Mean-Square Error (RMSE ± 0.50 m). This comparison has revealed that RC-APP has one lower magnitude order of error than the LiDAR method. Consequently, this technique arises as an efficient and appropriate tool, especially in areas with high exposure to risk of flooding. In hydraulic terms, the degree of detail achieved in the 3D model

  6. Innovative health service delivery models in low and middle income countries - what can we learn from the private sector?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The poor in low and middle income countries have limited access to health services due to limited purchasing power, residence in underserved areas, and inadequate health literacy. This produces significant gaps in health care delivery among a population that has a disproportionately large burden of disease. They frequently use the private health sector, due to perceived or actual gaps in public services. A subset of private health organizations, some called social enterprises, have developed novel approaches to increase the availability, affordability and quality of health care services to the poor through innovative health service delivery models. This study aims to characterize these models and identify areas of innovation that have led to effective provision of care for the poor. Methods An environmental scan of peer-reviewed and grey literature was conducted to select exemplars of innovation. A case series of organizations was then purposively sampled to maximize variation. These cases were examined using content analysis and constant comparison to characterize their strategies, focusing on business processes. Results After an initial sample of 46 studies, 10 case studies of exemplars were developed spanning different geography, disease areas and health service delivery models. These ten organizations had innovations in their marketing, financing, and operating strategies. These included approaches such a social marketing, cross-subsidy, high-volume, low cost models, and process reengineering. They tended to have a narrow clinical focus, which facilitates standardizing processes of care, and experimentation with novel delivery models. Despite being well-known, information on the social impact of these organizations was variable, with more data on availability and affordability and less on quality of care. Conclusions These private sector organizations demonstrate a range of innovations in health service delivery that have the potential to better

  7. Developing R&D Portfolio Business Validity Simulation Model and System

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The R&D has been recognized as critical method to take competitiveness by not only companies but also nations with its value creation such as patent value and new product. Therefore, R&D has been a decision maker's burden in that it is hard to decide how much money to invest, how long time one should spend, and what technology to develop which means it accompanies resources such as budget, time, and manpower. Although there are diverse researches about R&D evaluation, business factors are not concerned enough because almost all previous studies are technology oriented evaluation with one R&D technology based. In that, we early proposed R&D business aspect evaluation model which consists of nine business model components. In this research, we develop a simulation model and system evaluating a company or industry's R&D portfolio with business model point of view and clarify default and control parameters to facilitate evaluator's business validity work in each evaluation module by integrate to one screen. PMID:25893209

  8. Developing R&D portfolio business validity simulation model and system.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hyun Jin; Im, Kwang Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    The R&D has been recognized as critical method to take competitiveness by not only companies but also nations with its value creation such as patent value and new product. Therefore, R&D has been a decision maker's burden in that it is hard to decide how much money to invest, how long time one should spend, and what technology to develop which means it accompanies resources such as budget, time, and manpower. Although there are diverse researches about R&D evaluation, business factors are not concerned enough because almost all previous studies are technology oriented evaluation with one R&D technology based. In that, we early proposed R&D business aspect evaluation model which consists of nine business model components. In this research, we develop a simulation model and system evaluating a company or industry's R&D portfolio with business model point of view and clarify default and control parameters to facilitate evaluator's business validity work in each evaluation module by integrate to one screen. PMID:25893209

  9. The Design and Engineering of Mobile Data Services: Developing an Ontology Based on Business Model Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Debei, Mutaz M.; Fitzgerald, Guy

    This paper addresses the design and engineering problem related to mobile data services. The aim of the research is to inform and advise mobile service design and engineering by looking at this issue from a rigorous and holistic perspective. To this aim, this paper develops an ontology based on business model thinking. The developed ontology identifies four primary dimensions in designing business models of mobile data services: value proposition, value network, value architecture, and value finance. Within these dimensions, 15 key design concepts are identified along with their interrelationships and rules in the telecommunication service business model domain and unambiguous semantics are produced. The developed ontology is of value to academics and practitioners alike, particularly those interested in strategic-oriented IS/IT and business developments in telecommunications. Employing the developed ontology would systemize mobile service engineering functions and make them more manageable, effective, and creative. The research approach to building the mobile service business model ontology essentially follows the design science paradigm. Within this paradigm, we incorporate a number of different research methods, so the employed methodology might be better characterized as a pluralist approach.

  10. Developing R&D portfolio business validity simulation model and system.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hyun Jin; Im, Kwang Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    The R&D has been recognized as critical method to take competitiveness by not only companies but also nations with its value creation such as patent value and new product. Therefore, R&D has been a decision maker's burden in that it is hard to decide how much money to invest, how long time one should spend, and what technology to develop which means it accompanies resources such as budget, time, and manpower. Although there are diverse researches about R&D evaluation, business factors are not concerned enough because almost all previous studies are technology oriented evaluation with one R&D technology based. In that, we early proposed R&D business aspect evaluation model which consists of nine business model components. In this research, we develop a simulation model and system evaluating a company or industry's R&D portfolio with business model point of view and clarify default and control parameters to facilitate evaluator's business validity work in each evaluation module by integrate to one screen.

  11. Applying the Transtheoretical Model of Change to the Sequencing of Ethics Instruction in Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Catherine L.; Tyler, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Although there is widespread agreement on the importance of ethics instruction in business education, there is not agreement on the best approach or timing of instruction. This article uses J. O. Prochaska and DiClemente's transtheoretical model of change as the basis for a developmental model of student readiness for learning about ethics. By…

  12. A Conceptual Model of Management Learning in Micro Businesses: Implications for Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devins, David; Gold, Jeff; Johnson, Steve; Holden, Rick

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article proposes the development of a conceptual model to help understand the nature of management learning in the micro business context and to inform research and policy discourse. Design/Methodology/Approach: The model is developed on the basis of a literature search and review of academic and grey literature. Findings: The…

  13. Student Identification with Business Education Models: Measurement and Relationship to Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R. B.; Wheeler, Anthony R.

    2009-01-01

    Although management scholars have provided a variety of metaphors to describe the role of students in management courses, researchers have yet to explore students' identification with the models and how they are linked to educational outcomes. This article develops a measurement tool for students' identification with business education models and…

  14. Organizing intelligence: development of behavioral science and the research based model of business education.

    PubMed

    Bottom, William P

    2009-01-01

    Conventional history of the predominant, research-based model of business education (RBM) traces its origins to programs initiated by the Ford Foundation after World War II. This paper maps the elite network responsible for developing behavioral science and the Ford Foundation agenda. Archival records of the actions taken by central nodes in the network permit identification of the original vision statement for the model. Analysis also permits tracking progress toward realizing that vision over several decades. Behavioral science was married to business education from the earliest stages of development. The RBM was a fundamental promise made by advocates for social science funding. Appraisals of the model and recommendations for reform must address its full history, not the partial, distorted view that is the conventional account. Implications of this more complete history for business education and for behavioral theory are considered.

  15. The ultimate birth center: a collaborative model for innovation.

    PubMed

    Lyons, N; Reinke, C; Sutherland, K; Zelenkov, K

    1992-03-01

    Lest these descriptions sound too good to be true, Virginia Mason Birth Center is not utopia. It is a real place with real problems and struggles. Implementing and maintaining personalized, high-quality obstetric care to the childbearing woman and her family has not come easily. Innovations continue to be developed in response to patients' and providers' desire for birth services that are flexible, sensitive, and designed around families' preferences and needs. A common philosophy continues to guide a dedicated staff, administration, and provider group within a framework of collaboration, innovation, and quality to enable a wonderful professional practice to evolve.

  16. Granularity as a Cognitive Factor in the Effectiveness of Business Process Model Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschke, Oliver; Rake, Jannis; Levina, Olga

    Reusing design models is an attractive approach in business process modeling as modeling efficiency and quality of design outcomes may be significantly improved. However, reusing conceptual models is not a cost-free effort, but has to be carefully designed. While factors such as psychological anchoring and task-adequacy in reuse-based modeling tasks have been investigated, information granularity as a cognitive concept has not been at the center of empirical research yet. We hypothesize that business process granularity as a factor in design tasks under reuse has a significant impact on the effectiveness of resulting business process models. We test our hypothesis in a comparative study employing high and low granularities. The reusable processes provided were taken from widely accessible reference models for the telecommunication industry (enhanced Telecom Operations Map). First experimental results show that Recall in tasks involving coarser granularity is lower than in cases of finer granularity. These findings suggest that decision makers in business process management should be considerate with regard to the implementation of reuse mechanisms of different granularities. We realize that due to our small sample size results are not statistically significant, but this preliminary run shows that it is ready for running on a larger scale.

  17. Knowledge, Innovation and Internationalisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Technology Policy Council of Finland, Helsinki.

    Finland is challenged to make the most of globalization by reinforcing its positive aspects. The 1990s taught that success in creating innovations is a key factor for success of business and societies. A precondition, high-level technological and business know-how, requires systematic input into producing social innovations that prevent societal…

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research that is improving domestic hot water modeling capabilities to more effectively address one of the largest energy uses in residential buildings.

  19. High-intensity telemedicine-enhanced acute care for older adults: an innovative healthcare delivery model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish N; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Wood, Nancy; Wasserman, Erin B; Nelson, Dallas L; Dozier, Ann; McConnochie, Kenneth M

    2013-11-01

    Accessing timely acute medical care is a challenge for older adults. This article describes an innovative healthcare model that uses high-intensity telemedicine services to provide rapid acute care for older adults without requiring them to leave their senior living community (SLC) residences. This program, based in a primary care geriatrics practice that cares for SLC residents, is designed to offer acute care through telemedicine for complaints that are felt to need attention before the next available outpatient visit but not to require emergency department (ED) resources. This option gives residents access to care in their residence. Measures used to evaluate the program include successful completion of telemedicine visits, satisfaction of residents and caregivers with telemedicine care, and site of care that would have been recommended had telemedicine been unavailable. During the first 2 years of the program's operation, 281 of 301 requested telemedicine visits were completed successfully. Twelve residents were sent to an ED for care after the telemedicine visit. Ninety-four percent of residents reported being satisfied or very satisfied with telemedicine care. Had telemedicine not been available, residents would have been sent to an ED (48.1%) or urgent care center (27.0%) or been scheduled for an outpatient visit (24.4%). The project demonstrated that high-intensity telemedicine services for acute illnesses are feasible and acceptable and can provide definitive care without requiring ED or urgent care use. Continuation of the program will require evaluation demonstrating equal or better resident-level outcomes and the development of sustainable business models.

  20. Research in Modeling and Simulation for Airspace Systems Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, Mark G.; Kimmel, William M.; Welch, Sharon S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of some of the applied research and simulation methodologies at the NASA Langley Research Center that support aerospace systems innovation. Risk assessment methodologies, complex systems design and analysis methodologies, and aer ospace operations simulations are described. Potential areas for future research and collaboration using interactive and distributed simula tions are also proposed.

  1. Building Capacity for Innovation: The Vanguard for Learning Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Beverly

    When a school community is making a major investment in technology, the major challenge is to ensure that the technologies are used to support innovative practices that are responsive to the community's changing needs and opportunities for teaching and learning. How can implementation of technology be integrally embedded in and supportive of…

  2. Diffusion of Innovation: A Plea for Indigenous Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubdy, Rani

    2008-01-01

    Much of curriculum innovation in English language teaching in the context of former colonial countries has been derivative rather than generative, imitative rather than self-initiated or self-regulatory. This trend is in part the result of historical exigencies that made the importation of ELT approaches, methods, and techniques for classroom…

  3. A Replicable, Zero-Based Model for Marketing Curriculum Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borin, Norm; Metcalf, Lynn E.; Tietje, Brian C.

    2007-01-01

    As university curriculums inevitably change, their evolution typically occurs through a series of minor incremental adjustments to individual courses that cause the curriculum to lose strategic consistency and focus. This article demonstrates a zero-based approach to marketing curriculum innovation. The authors describe forces of change that led…

  4. Introduction to Financial Projection Models. Business Management Instructional Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomeroy, Robert W., III

    This guidebook and teacher's guide accompany a personal computer software program and introduce the key elements of financial projection modeling to project the financial statements of an industrial enterprise. The student will then build a model on an electronic spreadsheet. The guidebook teaches the purpose of a financial model and the steps…

  5. Business Simulation as an Active Learning Activity for Developing Soft Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levant, Yves; Coulmont, Michel; Sandu, Raluca

    2016-01-01

    Business simulations are innovative instruction models for active or cooperative learning. In this paper, we look at the social constructionist roots of these education models in light of the current efforts to enhance employability skills in undergraduate and graduate studies. More specifically, we analyse the role of business simulations in…

  6. Extending enterprise architecture modelling with business goals and requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelsman, Wilco; Quartel, Dick; Jonkers, Henk; van Sinderen, Marten

    2011-02-01

    The methods for enterprise architecture (EA), such as The Open Group Architecture Framework, acknowledge the importance of requirements modelling in the development of EAs. Modelling support is needed to specify, document, communicate and reason about goals and requirements. The current modelling techniques for EA focus on the products, services, processes and applications of an enterprise. In addition, techniques may be provided to describe structured requirements lists and use cases. Little support is available however for modelling the underlying motivation of EAs in terms of stakeholder concerns and the high-level goals that address these concerns. This article describes a language that supports the modelling of this motivation. The definition of the language is based on existing work on high-level goal and requirements modelling and is aligned with an existing standard for enterprise modelling: the ArchiMate language. Furthermore, the article illustrates how EA can benefit from analysis techniques from the requirements engineering domain.

  7. Electronic business model for small- and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises (SME): a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Karina; Chung, Walter W.

    2001-10-01

    This paper identifies three essential factors (information infrastructure, executive information system and a new manufacturing paradigm) that are used to support the development of a new business model for competitiveness. They facilitate changes in organization structure in support of business transformation. A SME can source a good manufacturing practice using a model of academic-university collaboration to gain competitive advantage in the e-business world. The collaboration facilitates the change agents to use information systems development as a vehicle to increase the capability of executives in using information and knowledge management to gain higher responsiveness and customer satisfaction. The case company is used to illustrate the application of a web-based executive information system to interface internal communications with external operation. It explains where a good manufacturing practice may be re-applied by other SMEs to acquire skills as a learning organization grows in an extended enterprise setting.

  8. Need to Knowledge (NtK) Model: an evidence-based framework for generating technological innovations with socio-economic impacts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional government policies suggest that upstream investment in scientific research is necessary and sufficient to generate technological innovations. The expected downstream beneficial socio-economic impacts are presumed to occur through non-government market mechanisms. However, there is little quantitative evidence for such a direct and formulaic relationship between public investment at the input end and marketplace benefits at the impact end. Instead, the literature demonstrates that the technological innovation process involves a complex interaction between multiple sectors, methods, and stakeholders. Discussion The authors theorize that accomplishing the full process of technological innovation in a deliberate and systematic manner requires an operational-level model encompassing three underlying methods, each designed to generate knowledge outputs in different states: scientific research generates conceptual discoveries; engineering development generates prototype inventions; and industrial production generates commercial innovations. Given the critical roles of engineering and business, the entire innovation process should continuously consider the practical requirements and constraints of the commercial marketplace. The Need to Knowledge (NtK) Model encompasses the activities required to successfully generate innovations, along with associated strategies for effectively communicating knowledge outputs in all three states to the various stakeholders involved. It is intentionally grounded in evidence drawn from academic analysis to facilitate objective and quantitative scrutiny, and industry best practices to enable practical application. Summary The Need to Knowledge (NtK) Model offers a practical, market-oriented approach that avoids the gaps, constraints and inefficiencies inherent in undirected activities and disconnected sectors. The NtK Model is a means to realizing increased returns on public investments in those science and technology

  9. Mathematical Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research funds from the Stennis Space Center, MathSoft, Inc., developed a system that can provide the building blocks for signal analysis and rapid prototyping. The product is the result of work to help NASA develop a complete understanding propulsion test data by using time frequency displays, automatic estimation and denoising, and data analysis plots for wavelet decomposition.

  10. Job demands, job resources and individual innovation at work: going beyond Karasek's model?

    PubMed

    Martín, Pilar; Salanova, Marisa; Peiró, José María

    2007-11-01

    The job demands-control model is one of the most recognized models in occupational stress research. It has, however, provided contradictory results, and the active learning hypothesis derived from this model has been under-researched in comparison with research on the stress hypothesis. The main aim of this study is to test the Job Demands Resources Model in the prediction of individual innovation at work as an active coping strategy. Results with hierarchical multiple regression analyses provide empirical support for this model. We found a positive relationship between job demands and individual innovation in situations characterized by high job resources. Finally, we discuss the limitations and practical implications of this study.

  11. Designing a Model of a Digital Ecosystem for Healthcare and Wellness Using the Business Model Canvas.

    PubMed

    León, María Cosio; Nieto-Hipólito, Juan Ivan; Garibaldi-Beltrán, Julián; Amaya-Parra, Guillermo; Luque-Morales, Priscy; Magaña-Espinoza, Pedro; Aguilar-Velazco, José

    2016-06-01

    Wellness is a term often used to talk about optimal health as "dynamic balance of physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and intellectual health." While healthcare is a term about care offered to patients for improving their health. We use both terms, as well as the Business Model Canvas (BMC) methodology, to design a digital ecosystem model for healthcare and wellness called DE4HW; the model considers economic, technological, and legal asymmetries, which are present on e-services beyond geographical regions. BMC methodology was embedded into the global project strategy called: IBOT (Initiate, Build, Operate and Transfer); it is a methodology to establish a functional, integrated national telemedicine network and virtual education network; of which we took its phases rationale. The results in this work illustrate the design of DE4HW model, into the first phase of IBOT, enriched with the BMC, which enables us to define actors, their interactions, rules and protocols, in order to build DE4HW, while IBOT strategy manages the project goal, up to the transfer phase, where an integral service platform of healthcare and wellness is turned over to stakeholders. PMID:27118010

  12. Designing a Model of a Digital Ecosystem for Healthcare and Wellness Using the Business Model Canvas.

    PubMed

    León, María Cosio; Nieto-Hipólito, Juan Ivan; Garibaldi-Beltrán, Julián; Amaya-Parra, Guillermo; Luque-Morales, Priscy; Magaña-Espinoza, Pedro; Aguilar-Velazco, José

    2016-06-01

    Wellness is a term often used to talk about optimal health as "dynamic balance of physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and intellectual health." While healthcare is a term about care offered to patients for improving their health. We use both terms, as well as the Business Model Canvas (BMC) methodology, to design a digital ecosystem model for healthcare and wellness called DE4HW; the model considers economic, technological, and legal asymmetries, which are present on e-services beyond geographical regions. BMC methodology was embedded into the global project strategy called: IBOT (Initiate, Build, Operate and Transfer); it is a methodology to establish a functional, integrated national telemedicine network and virtual education network; of which we took its phases rationale. The results in this work illustrate the design of DE4HW model, into the first phase of IBOT, enriched with the BMC, which enables us to define actors, their interactions, rules and protocols, in order to build DE4HW, while IBOT strategy manages the project goal, up to the transfer phase, where an integral service platform of healthcare and wellness is turned over to stakeholders.

  13. Neoliberalism in Historical Light: How Business Models Displaced Science Education Goals in Two Eras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Kathryn N.

    2016-01-01

    Although a growing body of work addresses the current role of neoliberalism in displacing democratic equality as a goal of public education, attempts to parse such impacts rarely draw from historical accounts. At least one tenet of neoliberalism--the application of business models to public institutions--was also pervasive at the turn of the 20th…

  14. A dynamic IS-LM business cycle model with two time delays in capital accumulation equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lujun; Li, Yaqiong

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze a augmented IS-LM business cycle model with the capital accumulation equation that two time delays are considered in investment processes according to Kalecki's idea. Applying stability switch criteria and Hopf bifurcation theory, we prove that time delays cause the equilibrium to lose or gain stability and Hopf bifurcation occurs.

  15. Loglinear Approximate Solutions to Real-Business-Cycle Models: Some Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Sau-Him Paul; Ng, Philip Hoi-Tak

    2007-01-01

    Following the analytical approach suggested in Campbell, the authors consider a baseline real-business-cycle (RBC) model with endogenous labor supply. They observe that the coefficients in the loglinear approximation of the dynamic equations characterizing the equilibrium are related to the fundamental parameters in a relatively simple manner.…

  16. 47 CFR 76.1904 - Encoding rules for defined business models.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... defined business models. (a) Commercial audiovisual content delivered as unencrypted broadcast television...) Commercial audiovisual content shall not be encoded so as to prevent or limit copying thereof except as... conditional access delivery transmissions; and (2) With respect to any commercial audiovisual...

  17. Digital Dividend Aware Business Models for the Creative Industries: Challenges and Opportunities in EU Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossiavelou, Vassiliki

    EU counties have a historically unique opportunity to enable their creative industries to promote the knowledge societies, applying new business models to their media content and networks markets, that are digital dividend (DD) aware. This new extra-media gatekeeping factor could shape new alliances and co operations among the member states and the global media markets, as well.

  18. Human Systems Engineering: A Learning Model Designed To Converge Education, Business, and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Karen L.

    The Human Systems Engineering (HSE) Model was created to facilitate collaboration among education, business, and industry. It emphasized the role of leaders who converge with others to accomplish their goals while paying attention to the key elements that create successful partnerships. The partnership of XXsys Technologies, Inc., University of…

  19. Business Process Elicitation, Modeling, and Reengineering: Teaching and Learning with Simulated Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeyaraj, Anand

    2010-01-01

    The design of enterprise information systems requires students to master technical skills for elicitation, modeling, and reengineering business processes as well as soft skills for information gathering and communication. These tacit skills and behaviors cannot be effectively taught students but rather experienced and learned by students. This…

  20. Phenomenological Study of Business Models Used to Scale Online Enrollment at Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dana E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore factors for selecting a business model for scaling online enrollment by institutions of higher education. The goal was to explore the lived experiences of academic industry experts involved in the selection process. The research question for this study was: What were the lived…

  1. Developing a Choice of Major Model for the Smeal College of Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colangelo, Augustus B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to develop a dynamic model and survey instruments to study the presence, strength, and susceptibility to change of the factors that influence the "choice of major" decision in an undergraduate population of business school students, and to determine if the factors are the same for male and female…

  2. Population health improvement: a community health business model that engages partners in all sectors.

    PubMed

    Kindig, David A; Isham, George

    2014-01-01

    Because population health improvement requires action on multiple determinants--including medical care, health behaviors, and the social and physical environments--no single entity can be held accountable for achieving improved outcomes. Medical organizations, government, schools, businesses, and community organizations all need to make substantial changes in how they approach health and how they allocate resources. To this end, we suggest the development of multisectoral community health business partnership models. Such collaborative efforts are needed by sectors and actors not accustomed to working together. Healthcare executives can play important leadership roles in fostering or supporting such partnerships in local and national arenas where they have influence. In this article, we develop the following components of this argument: defining a community health business model; defining population health and the Triple Aim concept; reaching beyond core mission to help create the model; discussing the shift for care delivery beyond healthcare organizations to other community sectors; examining who should lead in developing the community business model; discussing where the resources for a community business model might come from; identifying that better evidence is needed to inform where to make cost-effective investments; and proposing some next steps. The approach we have outlined is a departure from much current policy and management practice. But new models are needed as a road map to drive action--not just thinking--to address the enormous challenge of improving population health. While we applaud continuing calls to improve health and reduce disparities, progress will require more robust incentives, strategies, and action than have been in practice to date. Our hope is that ideas presented here will help to catalyze a collective, multisectoral response to this critical social and economic challenge.

  3. Construction of a business model to assure financial sustainability of biobanks.

    PubMed

    Warth, Rainer; Perren, Aurel

    2014-12-01

    Biobank-suisse (BBS) is a collaborative network of biobanks in Switzerland. Since 2005, the network has worked with biobank managers towards a Swiss biobanking platform that harmonizes structures and procedures. The work with biobank managers has shown that long-term, sustainable financing is difficult to obtain. In this report, three typical biobank business models are identified and their characteristics analyzed. Five forces analysis was used to understand the competitive environment of biobanks. Data provided by OECD was used for financial estimations. The model was constructed using the business model canvas tool. The business models identified feature financing influenced by the economic situation and the research budgets in a given country. Overall, the competitive environment for biobanks is positive. The bargaining power with the buyer is negative since price setting and demand prediction is difficult. In Switzerland, the healthcare industry collects approximately 5600 U.S. dollars per person and year. If each Swiss citizen paid 0.1% (or 5 U.S. dollars) of this amount to Swiss biobanks, 45 million U.S. dollars could be collected. This compares to the approximately 10 million U.S. dollars made available for cohort studies, longitudinal studies, and pathology biobanks through science funding. With the same approach, Germany, the United States, Canada, France, and the United Kingdom could collect 361, 2634, 154, 264, and 221 million U.S. dollars, respectively. In Switzerland and in other countries, an annual fee less than 5 U.S. dollars per person is sufficient to provide biobanks with sustainable financing. This inspired us to construct a business model that not only includes the academic and industrial research sectors as customer segment, but also includes the population. The revenues would be collected as fees by the healthcare system. In Italy and Germany, a small share of healthcare spending is already used to finance selected clinical trials. The legal

  4. Population health improvement: a community health business model that engages partners in all sectors.

    PubMed

    Kindig, David A; Isham, George

    2014-01-01

    Because population health improvement requires action on multiple determinants--including medical care, health behaviors, and the social and physical environments--no single entity can be held accountable for achieving improved outcomes. Medical organizations, government, schools, businesses, and community organizations all need to make substantial changes in how they approach health and how they allocate resources. To this end, we suggest the development of multisectoral community health business partnership models. Such collaborative efforts are needed by sectors and actors not accustomed to working together. Healthcare executives can play important leadership roles in fostering or supporting such partnerships in local and national arenas where they have influence. In this article, we develop the following components of this argument: defining a community health business model; defining population health and the Triple Aim concept; reaching beyond core mission to help create the model; discussing the shift for care delivery beyond healthcare organizations to other community sectors; examining who should lead in developing the community business model; discussing where the resources for a community business model might come from; identifying that better evidence is needed to inform where to make cost-effective investments; and proposing some next steps. The approach we have outlined is a departure from much current policy and management practice. But new models are needed as a road map to drive action--not just thinking--to address the enormous challenge of improving population health. While we applaud continuing calls to improve health and reduce disparities, progress will require more robust incentives, strategies, and action than have been in practice to date. Our hope is that ideas presented here will help to catalyze a collective, multisectoral response to this critical social and economic challenge. PMID:25671991

  5. Construction of a business model to assure financial sustainability of biobanks.

    PubMed

    Warth, Rainer; Perren, Aurel

    2014-12-01

    Biobank-suisse (BBS) is a collaborative network of biobanks in Switzerland. Since 2005, the network has worked with biobank managers towards a Swiss biobanking platform that harmonizes structures and procedures. The work with biobank managers has shown that long-term, sustainable financing is difficult to obtain. In this report, three typical biobank business models are identified and their characteristics analyzed. Five forces analysis was used to understand the competitive environment of biobanks. Data provided by OECD was used for financial estimations. The model was constructed using the business model canvas tool. The business models identified feature financing influenced by the economic situation and the research budgets in a given country. Overall, the competitive environment for biobanks is positive. The bargaining power with the buyer is negative since price setting and demand prediction is difficult. In Switzerland, the healthcare industry collects approximately 5600 U.S. dollars per person and year. If each Swiss citizen paid 0.1% (or 5 U.S. dollars) of this amount to Swiss biobanks, 45 million U.S. dollars could be collected. This compares to the approximately 10 million U.S. dollars made available for cohort studies, longitudinal studies, and pathology biobanks through science funding. With the same approach, Germany, the United States, Canada, France, and the United Kingdom could collect 361, 2634, 154, 264, and 221 million U.S. dollars, respectively. In Switzerland and in other countries, an annual fee less than 5 U.S. dollars per person is sufficient to provide biobanks with sustainable financing. This inspired us to construct a business model that not only includes the academic and industrial research sectors as customer segment, but also includes the population. The revenues would be collected as fees by the healthcare system. In Italy and Germany, a small share of healthcare spending is already used to finance selected clinical trials. The legal

  6. Guideline validation in multiple trauma care through business process modeling.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Bilir, Hüseyin; Waydhas, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2003-07-01

    Clinical guidelines can improve the quality of care in multiple trauma. In our Department of Trauma Surgery a specific guideline is available paper-based as a set of flowcharts. This format is appropriate for the use by experienced physicians but insufficient for electronic support of learning, workflow and process optimization. A formal and logically consistent version represented with a standardized meta-model is necessary for automatic processing. In our project we transferred the paper-based into an electronic format and analyzed the structure with respect to formal errors. Several errors were detected in seven error categories. The errors were corrected to reach a formally and logically consistent process model. In a second step the clinical content of the guideline was revised interactively using a process-modeling tool. Our study reveals that guideline development should be assisted by process modeling tools, which check the content in comparison to a meta-model. The meta-model itself could support the domain experts in formulating their knowledge systematically. To assure sustainability of guideline development a representation independent of specific applications or specific provider is necessary. Then, clinical guidelines could be used for eLearning, process optimization and workflow management additionally. PMID:12909182

  7. An innovative model of supportive clinical teaching and learning for undergraduate nursing students: the cluster model.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Sharon; Drayton, Nicola; Brown, Ann-Marie

    2011-03-01

    Students look forward to their clinical practicum to learn within the context of reality nursing. As educators we need to actively develop models of clinical practicum whereby students are supported to engage and learn in the clinical learning environment. The aim of this paper is to describe an innovative model of supportive clinical teaching and learning for undergraduate nursing students as implemented in a large teaching hospital in New South Wales, Australia. The model of supportive clinical teaching and learning situates eight students at a time, across a shift, on one ward, with an experienced registered nurse from the ward specialty, who is employed as the clinical teacher to support nursing students during their one to two week block practicum. Results from written evaluation statements inform the discussion component of the paper for a model that has proved to be successful in this large healthcare facility.

  8. Addressing economic development goals through innovative teaching of university statistics: a case study of statistical modelling in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oseloka Ezepue, Patrick; Ojo, Adegbola

    2012-12-01

    A challenging problem in some developing countries such as Nigeria is inadequate training of students in effective problem solving using the core concepts of their disciplines. Related to this is a disconnection between their learning and socio-economic development agenda of a country. These problems are more vivid in statistical education which is dominated by textbook examples and unbalanced assessment 'for' and 'of' learning within traditional curricula. The problems impede the achievement of socio-economic development objectives such as those stated in the Nigerian Vision 2020 blueprint and United Nations Millennium Development Goals. They also impoverish the ability of (statistics) graduates to creatively use their knowledge in relevant business and industry sectors, thereby exacerbating mass graduate unemployment in Nigeria and similar developing countries. This article uses a case study in statistical modelling to discuss the nature of innovations in statistics education vital to producing new kinds of graduates who can link their learning to national economic development goals, create wealth and alleviate poverty through (self) employment. Wider implications of the innovations for repositioning mathematical sciences education globally are explored in this article.

  9. Modelling health and output at business cycle horizons for the USA.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Paresh Kumar

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we employ a theoretical framework - a simple macro model augmented with health - that draws guidance from the Keynesian view of business cycles to examine the relative importance of permanent and transitory shocks in explaining variations in health expenditure and output at business cycle horizons for the USA. The variance decomposition analysis of shocks reveals that at business cycle horizons permanent shocks explain the bulk of the variations in output, while transitory shocks explain the bulk of the variations in health expenditures. We undertake a shock decomposition analysis for private health expenditures versus public health expenditures and interestingly find that while transitory shocks are more important for private sector expenditures, permanent shocks dominate public health expenditures.

  10. Extensibility in Model-Based Business Process Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Mario; Jiménez, Camilo; Villalobos, Jorge; Deridder, Dirk

    An organization’s ability to embrace change, greatly depends on systems that support their operation. Specifically, process engines might facilitate or hinder changes, depending on their flexibility, their extensibility and the changes required: current workflow engine characteristics create difficulties in organizations that need to incorporate some types of modifications. In this paper we present Cumbia, an extensible MDE platform to support the development of flexible and extensible process engines. In a Cumbia process, models represent participating concerns (control, resources, etc.), which are described with concern-specific languages. Cumbia models are executed in a coordinated way, using extensible engines specialized for each concern.

  11. Applying the Teacher Scholar Model in the School of Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John C.; McGowan, Carl B., Jr.; Moeller, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    The teacher-scholar model was proposed in Boyer (1990) and defines four dimensions of scholarship: 1) discovery, 2) integration, 3) application, and 4) teaching. In this paper, we describe the characteristics of scholarship, the theory of the scholarship of teaching, the excellent teacher, and undergraduate research and scholarship. We then show…

  12. Cross-Dimensional Modelling Patterns to Empower Pan-European Business to Government Services Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampathaki, Fenareti; Koussouris, Sotiris; Gionis, George; Charalabidis, Yannis; Askounis, Dimitris

    Pan-European policies envisioning a single European market and reduction of administrative burden call for effective, interoperable implementation and transformation of cross-border business-to-government services. Despite the existence of dedicated tools and methodologies that enable modelling and execution of cross-organizational business processes, a service-driven approach, that implies associating legal and business rules on the workflow, binding reusable documents with specific information exchanges among the stakeholders and extracting all-inclusive executable flows, remains to be adopted. In this context, the present paper outlines cross-dimensional patterns for modelling and transforming pan-European Business to Government Services interconnecting processes, data and rules under a common, cross-country prism. Such model-driven patterns foster interoperability on a conceptual and platform-independent basis. Discussion on the results is targeting best practices that can be drawn at research level and is pointing out the key difficulties that have to be tackled due to lack of enterprises' and public organizations' readiness in various countries.

  13. Service and business model for technology enabled and home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Sarela, Antti; Whittaker, Frank; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs are comprehensive life-style programs aimed at preventing recurrence of a cardiac event. However, the current programs have globally significantly low levels of uptake. Home-based model can be a viable alternative to hospital-based programs. We developed and analysed a service and business model for home based cardiac rehabilitation based on personal mentoring using mobile phones and web services. We analysed the different organizational and economical aspects of setting up and running the home based program and propose a potential business model for a sustainable and viable service. The model can be extended to management of other chronic conditions to enable transition from hospital and care centre based treatments to sustainable home-based care.

  14. The subtle business of model reduction for stochastic chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dan T; Cao, Yang; Sanft, Kevin R; Petzold, Linda R

    2009-02-14

    This paper addresses the problem of simplifying chemical reaction networks by adroitly reducing the number of reaction channels and chemical species. The analysis adopts a discrete-stochastic point of view and focuses on the model reaction set S(1)<=>S(2)-->S(3), whose simplicity allows all the mathematics to be done exactly. The advantages and disadvantages of replacing this reaction set with a single S(3)-producing reaction are analyzed quantitatively using novel criteria for measuring simulation accuracy and simulation efficiency. It is shown that in all cases in which such a model reduction can be accomplished accurately and with a significant gain in simulation efficiency, a procedure called the slow-scale stochastic simulation algorithm provides a robust and theoretically transparent way of implementing the reduction.

  15. Virtual enterprise model for the electronic components business in the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.J.; Long, K.S.; Sayre, J.A.; Hull, A.L.; Carey, D.A.; Sim, J.R.; Smith, M.G.

    1994-08-01

    The electronic components business within the Nuclear Weapons Complex spans organizational and Department of Energy contractor boundaries. An assessment of the current processes indicates a need for fundamentally changing the way electronic components are developed, procured, and manufactured. A model is provided based on a virtual enterprise that recognizes distinctive competencies within the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at the vendors. The model incorporates changes that reduce component delivery cycle time and improve cost effectiveness while delivering components of the appropriate quality.

  16. Model medication management process in Australian nursing homes using business process modeling.

    PubMed

    Qian, Siyu; Yu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    One of the reasons for end user avoidance or rejection to use health information systems is poor alignment of the system with healthcare workflow, likely causing by system designers' lack of thorough understanding about healthcare process. Therefore, understanding the healthcare workflow is the essential first step for the design of optimal technologies that will enable care staff to complete the intended tasks faster and better. The often use of multiple or "high risk" medicines by older people in nursing homes has the potential to increase medication error rate. To facilitate the design of information systems with most potential to improve patient safety, this study aims to understand medication management process in nursing homes using business process modeling method. The paper presents study design and preliminary findings from interviewing two registered nurses, who were team leaders in two nursing homes. Although there were subtle differences in medication management between the two homes, major medication management activities were similar. Further field observation will be conducted. Based on the data collected from observations, an as-is process model for medication management will be developed.

  17. Model medication management process in Australian nursing homes using business process modeling.

    PubMed

    Qian, Siyu; Yu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    One of the reasons for end user avoidance or rejection to use health information systems is poor alignment of the system with healthcare workflow, likely causing by system designers' lack of thorough understanding about healthcare process. Therefore, understanding the healthcare workflow is the essential first step for the design of optimal technologies that will enable care staff to complete the intended tasks faster and better. The often use of multiple or "high risk" medicines by older people in nursing homes has the potential to increase medication error rate. To facilitate the design of information systems with most potential to improve patient safety, this study aims to understand medication management process in nursing homes using business process modeling method. The paper presents study design and preliminary findings from interviewing two registered nurses, who were team leaders in two nursing homes. Although there were subtle differences in medication management between the two homes, major medication management activities were similar. Further field observation will be conducted. Based on the data collected from observations, an as-is process model for medication management will be developed. PMID:23920835

  18. Financial Comparisons across Different Business Models in the Canadian Airline Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flouris, Triant; Walker, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the accounting and stock price performance of two Canadian airlines, WestJet and Air Canada, over a five year period, taking into account the aftermath of the systemic shock to the airline industry produced by the September 11, 2001 (9-11), terrorist attacks and subsequent events such as the 2002 SARS outbreak, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the accompanying rise in jet fuel prices. Our study focuses on the viability of low-cost versus conventional-cost business models in Canada under the current business environment and the ability of airlines to withstand and effectively respond to catastrophic industry events. Furthermore, we link the effectiveness of the airlines responses to these events to specific elements of their respective business models. We test our hypothesis through a case study. We focus on WestJet as a typical low-cost airline and compare its accounting and stock performance to Air Canada, a legacy carrier and rival in several business sectors. We find WestJet to be much less affected by catastrophic industry events. By decomposing each airline s return volatility, we observe that WestJet s systematic and unsystematic risk increased only slightly during the industry's post-9-11 turmoil when compared to Air Canada. In addition, we find that both WestJet s accounting and stock performance have been highly superior to those of Air Canada. We argue that WestJet s business model provides the firm with significantly more financial and operational flexibility than its legacy rival, Air Canada. WestJet's lower operating costs, high consumer trust, product offering, corporate structure, workforce and work practices, as well as operational procedures are all factors that appear to contribute to its relative success.

  19. A Business Model for Diagnostic Startups-A Business Model for a New Generation Of Diagnostics Companies

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzman, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Venture capital has tended to shy away from diagnostics companies, whose products are not predicated on the blockbuster model of pharmaceuticals. But several new diagnostics companies are developing products that hold immense potential to improve healthcare delivery. Here’s why venture investors should take another look at the diagnostics area. PMID:23424311

  20. Complexity analysis of dual-channel game model with different managers' business objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Ma, Junhai

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers dual-channel game model with bounded rationality, using the theory of bifurcations of dynamical system. The business objectives of retailers are assumed to be different, which is closer to reality than previous studies. We study the local stable region of Nash equilibrium point and find that business objectives can expand the stable region and play an important role in price strategy. One interesting finding is that a fiercer competition tends to stabilize the Nash equilibrium. Simulation shows the complex behavior of two dimensional dynamic system, we find period doubling bifurcation and chaos phenomenon. We measure performances of the model in different period by using the index of average profit. The results show that unstable behavior in economic system is often an unfavorable outcome. So this paper discusses the application of adaptive adjustment mechanism when the model exhibits chaotic behavior and then allows the retailers to eliminate the negative effects.

  1. Determining business models for financial sustainability in regional health information organizations: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Roxana; Dunn, Kim

    2008-11-06

    While the promise and enthusiasm for regional health information organizations (RHIOs) are immense, a significant issue regarding this type of health information exchange, (HIE) remains unclear: financial sustainability. As of today, there is a clear lack of concrete business models implemented in RHIOs' projects. The purpose of this study is to conduct a literature review of the current state of RHIOs adaptation and implementation of business models for successful financial sustainability, as well as evaluate existing RHIOs financial situation to determine and recommend best models for economic uphold. This literature review will be the starting point for thorough analysis and understanding of the economic factors required for RHIOs to generate a return on investment (ROI) and become self-sustainable.

  2. Professional Competence of Prospective Teachers in Business and Economics Education: Evaluation of a Competence Model Using Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouley, Franziska; Wuttke, Eveline; Schnick-Vollmer, Kathleen; Schmitz, Bernhard; Berger, Stefanie; Fritsch, Sabine; Seifried, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Teacher competence is crucial for quality of teaching and learner achievement. Competency models and competence measurement are prevalent in domains such as the natural sciences and lacking in others. We conducted our research in the field of business and economics education by focusing on the accounting domain because it is key to a deep…

  3. Curriculum innovation in an accelerated BSN program: the ACE Model.

    PubMed

    Suplee, Patricia D; Glasgow, Mary Ellen

    2008-01-01

    As the demand for registered nurses continues to rise, so too has the creation of accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs for second-degree students. This article describes an 11-month Accelerated Career Entry (ACE) Nursing Program's innovative curriculum design, which has a heavy emphasis on technology, professional socialization, and the use of a standardized patient experience as a form of summative evaluation. In addition, challenges of this program are presented. Since 2002, the ACE Program has graduated over 500 students with an average first-time NCLEX pass rate of 95-100%. Although the number of graduates from accelerated programs does not solve the severe nursing shortage, the contributions of these intelligent, assertive, pioneering graduates are important for health care.

  4. Academic Achievements and Satisfaction of the Clicker-Aided Flipped Business English Writing Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhonggen, Yu; Guifang, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom has been achieving a great success in teaching innovation. This study, aiming to determine the effectiveness of the flipped model in business English writing course, combined the quantitative with the qualitative research methods. Participants were randomly selected from undergraduate students majoring in business English.…

  5. Modeling technology innovation: How science, engineering, and industry methods can combine to generate beneficial socioeconomic impacts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Government-sponsored science, technology, and innovation (STI) programs support the socioeconomic aspects of public policies, in addition to expanding the knowledge base. For example, beneficial healthcare services and devices are expected to result from investments in research and development (R&D) programs, which assume a causal link to commercial innovation. Such programs are increasingly held accountable for evidence of impact—that is, innovative goods and services resulting from R&D activity. However, the absence of comprehensive models and metrics skews evidence gathering toward bibliometrics about research outputs (published discoveries), with less focus on transfer metrics about development outputs (patented prototypes) and almost none on econometrics related to production outputs (commercial innovations). This disparity is particularly problematic for the expressed intent of such programs, as most measurable socioeconomic benefits result from the last category of outputs. Methods This paper proposes a conceptual framework integrating all three knowledge-generating methods into a logic model, useful for planning, obtaining, and measuring the intended beneficial impacts through the implementation of knowledge in practice. Additionally, the integration of the Context-Input-Process-Product (CIPP) model of evaluation proactively builds relevance into STI policies and programs while sustaining rigor. Results The resulting logic model framework explicitly traces the progress of knowledge from inputs, following it through the three knowledge-generating processes and their respective knowledge outputs (discovery, invention, innovation), as it generates the intended socio-beneficial impacts. It is a hybrid model for generating technology-based innovations, where best practices in new product development merge with a widely accepted knowledge-translation approach. Given the emphasis on evidence-based practice in the medical and health fields and

  6. Morphology of technological levels in an innovation propagation model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yup; Han, Bumhee; Yook, Soon-Hyung

    2010-10-01

    We study the dynamical properties of the propagation of innovation on a two-dimensional lattice, random network, scale-free network, and Cayley tree. In order to investigate the diversity of technological level, we study the scaling property of width, W(N,t), which represents the root mean square of the technological level of agents. Here, N is the total number of agents. From the numerical simulations, we find that the steady-state value of W(N,t), W(sat)(N), scales as W(sat)(N) ∼ N(-1/2) when the system is in a flat ordered phase for d ≥ 2. In the flat ordered phase, most of the agents have the same technological level. On the other hand, when the system is in a smooth disordered phase, the value of W(sat)(N) does not depend on N. These behaviors are completely different from those observed on a one-dimensional (1D) lattice. By considering the effect of the underlying topology on the propagation dynamics for d ≥ 2, we also provide a mean-field analysis for W(sat)(N), which agrees very well with the observed behaviors of W(sat)(N). This directly shows that the morphological properties in order-disorder transition on a 1D lattice is completely different from that on higher dimensions. It also provides an evidence that the upper critical dimension for the roughening transition of the propagation of innovation is d(u)=2. PMID:21230348

  7. Updating Business Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Report from the Curriculum Service Center, 1975

    1975-01-01

    To gather information on how the business education curriculum in secondary schools is being affected by changing trends, questionnaires were sent to State and local business education supervisors. Some aspects of instructional innovations are discussed based on the responses gained from the national survey, particularly the responses of 78 local…

  8. Conceptualization of an R&D Based Learning-to-Innovate Model for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Oiki Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to conceptualize an R & D based learning-to-innovate (LTI) model. The problem to be addressed was the lack of a theoretical L TI model, which would inform science pedagogy. The absorptive capacity (ACAP) lens was adopted to untangle the R & D LTI phenomenon into four learning processes: problem-solving via…

  9. Increasing Engineering Students' Awareness to Environment through Innovative Teaching of Mathematical Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klymchuk, Sergiy; Zverkova, Tatyana; Gruenwald, Norbert; Sauerbier, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the results of two studies on using an innovative pedagogical strategy in teaching mathematical modelling and applications to engineering students. Both studies are dealing with introducing non-traditional contexts for engineering students in teaching/learning of mathematical modelling and applications: environment and…

  10. Innovation Diffusion: A Deterministic Model of Space-Time Integration with Physical Analog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Kingsley E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Extends a fundamental temporal diffusion model to integrate space and time dimensions of innovation diffusion. Compares analogous developments in the physical sciences and argues that the proposed model may help link the concepts of catalysts in physical science diffusion processes to the role of change agents in social science systems. (Author/JG)

  11. The Baby TALK Model: An Innovative Approach to Identifying High-Risk Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalpando, Aimee Hilado; Leow, Christine; Hornstein, John

    2012-01-01

    This research report examines the Baby TALK model, an innovative early childhood intervention approach used to identify, recruit, and serve young children who are at-risk for developmental delays, mental health needs, and/or school failure, and their families. The report begins with a description of the model. This description is followed by an…

  12. Determining business models for financial sustainability in regional health information organizations (RHIOs): a review.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Roxana; Burciago, Daniel; Dunn, Kim

    2009-10-01

    Regional health information organizations (RHIOs) have the potential to alleviate today's health care problems by granting providers access to a supported body of clinical information for all patients in a given region. While the promise of and enthusiasm for RHIOs is immense, the issue of their financial sustainability remains unclear. It has been said that the business model supporting a regional or national health information network is as essential, if not more essential, than the technology that makes it feasible. Currently, there is a clear lack of concrete business models implemented in RHIOs' projects. This article reports the results of a literature review of the current status of the adaptation and implementation of business models by RHIOs for successful financial sustainability. Based on the review, this article also attempts to evaluate the existing financial situation of RHIOs to determine and recommend the best models of economic sustainability. Significant findings include RHIOs' present financial environment, planning, and self-sustainability methods. Future studies will be needed as RHIOs continue to grow and move toward the implementation phase of their development.

  13. Determining business models for financial sustainability in regional health information organizations (RHIOs): a review.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Roxana; Burciago, Daniel; Dunn, Kim

    2009-10-01

    Regional health information organizations (RHIOs) have the potential to alleviate today's health care problems by granting providers access to a supported body of clinical information for all patients in a given region. While the promise of and enthusiasm for RHIOs is immense, the issue of their financial sustainability remains unclear. It has been said that the business model supporting a regional or national health information network is as essential, if not more essential, than the technology that makes it feasible. Currently, there is a clear lack of concrete business models implemented in RHIOs' projects. This article reports the results of a literature review of the current status of the adaptation and implementation of business models by RHIOs for successful financial sustainability. Based on the review, this article also attempts to evaluate the existing financial situation of RHIOs to determine and recommend the best models of economic sustainability. Significant findings include RHIOs' present financial environment, planning, and self-sustainability methods. Future studies will be needed as RHIOs continue to grow and move toward the implementation phase of their development. PMID:19848569

  14. Cocreating business's new social compact.

    PubMed

    Brugmann, Jeb; Prahalad, C K

    2007-02-01

    Moving beyond decades of mutual distrust and animosity, corporations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are learning to cooperate with each other. Realizing that their interests are converging, the two sides are working together to create innovative business models that are helping to grow new markets and accelerate the eradication of poverty. The path to convergence has proceeded in three stages. In the initial be-responsible stage, companies and NGOs, realizing that they had to coexist, started to look for ways to influence each other through joint social responsibility projects. This experience paved the way for the get-into-business stage, in which NGOs and companies sought to serve the poor by setting up successful businesses. In the process, NGOs learned business discipline from the private sector, while corporations gained an appreciation for the local knowledge, low-cost business models, and community-based marketing techniques that the NGOs have mastered. Increased success on both sides has laid the foundation for the cocreate-business stage, in which companies and NGOs become key parts of each other's capacity to deliver value. When BP sought to market a duel-fuel portable stove in India, it set up one such cocreation system with three Indian NGOs. The system allowed BP to bring the innovative stove to a geographically dispersed market through myriad local distributors without incurring distribution costs so high that the product would become unaffordable. The company sold its stoves profitably, the NGOs gained access to a lucrative revenue stream that could fund other projects, and consumers got more than the ability to sit down to a hot meal-they got the opportunity to earn incomes as the local distributors and thus to gain economic and social influence.

  15. Energy-Efficiency Retrofits in Small-Scale Multifamily Rental Housing: A Business Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeChambeau, Brian

    The goal of this thesis to develop a real estate investment model that creates a financial incentive for property owners to perform energy efficiency retrofits in small multifamily rental housing in southern New England. The medium for this argument is a business plan that is backed by a review of the literature and input from industry experts. In addition to industry expertise, the research covers four main areas: the context of green building, efficient building technologies, precedent programs, and the Providence, RI real estate market for the business plan. The thesis concludes that the model proposed can improve the profitability of real estate investment in small multifamily rental properties, though the extent to which this is possible depends partially on utility-run incentive programs and the capital available to invest in retrofit measures.

  16. On Singularities and Black Holes in Combination-Driven Models of Technological Innovation Networks.

    PubMed

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R; Valverde, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that innovations occur mainly by combination: the more inventions accumulate, the higher the probability that new inventions are obtained from previous designs. Additionally, it has been conjectured that the combinatorial nature of innovations naturally leads to a singularity: at some finite time, the number of innovations should diverge. Although these ideas are certainly appealing, no general models have been yet developed to test the conditions under which combinatorial technology should become explosive. Here we present a generalised model of technological evolution that takes into account two major properties: the number of previous technologies needed to create a novel one and how rapidly technology ages. Two different models of combinatorial growth are considered, involving different forms of ageing. When long-range memory is used and thus old inventions are available for novel innovations, singularities can emerge under some conditions with two phases separated by a critical boundary. If the ageing has a characteristic time scale, it is shown that no singularities will be observed. Instead, a "black hole" of old innovations appears and expands in time, making the rate of invention creation slow down into a linear regime.

  17. On Singularities and Black Holes in Combination-Driven Models of Technological Innovation Networks.

    PubMed

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R; Valverde, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that innovations occur mainly by combination: the more inventions accumulate, the higher the probability that new inventions are obtained from previous designs. Additionally, it has been conjectured that the combinatorial nature of innovations naturally leads to a singularity: at some finite time, the number of innovations should diverge. Although these ideas are certainly appealing, no general models have been yet developed to test the conditions under which combinatorial technology should become explosive. Here we present a generalised model of technological evolution that takes into account two major properties: the number of previous technologies needed to create a novel one and how rapidly technology ages. Two different models of combinatorial growth are considered, involving different forms of ageing. When long-range memory is used and thus old inventions are available for novel innovations, singularities can emerge under some conditions with two phases separated by a critical boundary. If the ageing has a characteristic time scale, it is shown that no singularities will be observed. Instead, a "black hole" of old innovations appears and expands in time, making the rate of invention creation slow down into a linear regime. PMID:26821277

  18. On Singularities and Black Holes in Combination-Driven Models of Technological Innovation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R.; Valverde, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that innovations occur mainly by combination: the more inventions accumulate, the higher the probability that new inventions are obtained from previous designs. Additionally, it has been conjectured that the combinatorial nature of innovations naturally leads to a singularity: at some finite time, the number of innovations should diverge. Although these ideas are certainly appealing, no general models have been yet developed to test the conditions under which combinatorial technology should become explosive. Here we present a generalised model of technological evolution that takes into account two major properties: the number of previous technologies needed to create a novel one and how rapidly technology ages. Two different models of combinatorial growth are considered, involving different forms of ageing. When long-range memory is used and thus old inventions are available for novel innovations, singularities can emerge under some conditions with two phases separated by a critical boundary. If the ageing has a characteristic time scale, it is shown that no singularities will be observed. Instead, a “black hole” of old innovations appears and expands in time, making the rate of invention creation slow down into a linear regime. PMID:26821277

  19. Analysis of Types of Oscillations in Goodwin's Model of Business Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S. N.; Todorov, M. D.

    2010-11-01

    Types of solutions of the Goodwin business cycle model with the fixed investment time lag have been numerically studied. It is shown that the long-periodic Goodwin's oscillations are excited by the independent investment A in case A exceeds a threshold. If A falls below the threshold, then there are only sawtooth oscillations with a period equal to the investment time lag. Near the threshold, the time behavior of the income is irregular.

  20. Accelerated Innovation Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities: I. Engage NASA team (examples) a) Research and technology calls . provide suggestions to AES, HRP, OCT. b) Use NASA@Work to solicit other ideas; (possibly before R+D calls). II. Stimulate collaboration (examples) a) NHHPC. b) Wharton Mack Center for Technological Innovation (Feb 2013). c) International ] DLR ] :envihab (July 2013). d) Accelerated research models . NSF, Myelin Repair Foundation. III. Engage public Prizes (open platform: InnoCentive, yet2.com, NTL; Rice Business Plan, etc.) IV. Use same methods to engage STEM.

  1. Business Modeling to Implement an eHealth Portal for Infection Control: A Reflection on Co-Creation With Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Wentzel, Jobke; Sanderman, Robbert; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette

    2015-01-01

    Background It is acknowledged that the success and uptake of eHealth improve with the involvement of users and stakeholders to make technology reflect their needs. Involving stakeholders in implementation research is thus a crucial element in developing eHealth technology. Business modeling is an approach to guide implementation research for eHealth. Stakeholders are involved in business modeling by identifying relevant stakeholders, conducting value co-creation dialogs, and co-creating a business model. Because implementation activities are often underestimated as a crucial step while developing eHealth, comprehensive and applicable approaches geared toward business modeling in eHealth are scarce. Objective This paper demonstrates the potential of several stakeholder-oriented analysis methods and their practical application was demonstrated using Infectionmanager as an example case. In this paper, we aim to demonstrate how business modeling, with the focus on stakeholder involvement, is used to co-create an eHealth implementation. Methods We divided business modeling in 4 main research steps. As part of stakeholder identification, we performed literature scans, expert recommendations, and snowball sampling (Step 1). For stakeholder analyzes, we performed “basic stakeholder analysis,” stakeholder salience, and ranking/analytic hierarchy process (Step 2). For value co-creation dialogs, we performed a process analysis and stakeholder interviews based on the business model canvas (Step 3). Finally, for business model generation, we combined all findings into the business model canvas (Step 4). Results Based on the applied methods, we synthesized a step-by-step guide for business modeling with stakeholder-oriented analysis methods that we consider suitable for implementing eHealth. Conclusions The step-by-step guide for business modeling with stakeholder involvement enables eHealth researchers to apply a systematic and multidisciplinary, co-creative approach for

  2. Interview: Professor Helle Neergaard, President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, on the Nature of Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industry and Higher Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    On August 13, 2014, Rita G. Klapper conducted a Skype interview with Helle Neergaard. Neergaard is not only President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, but also Docent at the Hanken School of Economics, and Professor at iCARE, Department of Business Administration, School of Business and Social Sciences, University…

  3. Impact of Post-Secondary Business Teacher Educators' Employment Characteristics and Innovation Factors on Their Adoption of Current Computer Technologies as a Pedagogical Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Betty F.; Gaytan, Jorge A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Business teacher educators prepare business teachers and workers to be successful in today's constantly changing technological environment. Therefore, business teacher educators must meet the challenge to be prepared technologically to educate their students for the workforce. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine…

  4. Patient navigation in oncology nursing: an innovative blended learning model.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Joanne; Brudnoy, Liat; Soong, Tracy; Graham, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Nurses are ideally suited to assume professional patient navigation roles in cancer care. Continuing education and staff development are essential for nurses to implement their roles to the fullest potential. This article describes an innovative patient navigation course that was developed to meet the educational needs of nurses who work with patients who have been diagnosed with cancer or are undergoing evaluation for cancer. Adult learning principles and interactive teaching strategies facilitated learning that was relevant and applicable to all nurses. Of the 200 participants, 77.5% completed questionnaires before and after the course. The questionnaire administered after the course showed a statistically significant increase in average total confidence scores on knowledge and skills in the seven domains examined (p < .00 to .03). This change reflected improvements in overall confidence in key principles and role functions of patient navigation. The course provided an opportunity for nurses to enhance their individual practice in patient navigation in the following areas: meeting patient needs for emotional and supportive care; providing information and education; and facilitating coordination and continuity of care.

  5. Binomial Markov-Switching Multifractal model with Skewed t innovations and applications to Chinese SSEC Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yufang; Zhang, Weiguo; Fu, Junhui

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the Binomial Markov-switching Multifractal (BMSM) model of asset returns with Skewed t innovations (BMSM-Skewed t for short), which considers the fat tails, skewness and multifractality in asset returns simultaneously. The parameters of BMSM-Skewed t model can be estimated by Maximum Likelihood (ML) methods, and volatility forecasting can be accomplished via Bayesian updating. In order to evaluate the performance of BMSM-Skewed t model, BMSM model with Normal innovations (BMSM-N), BMSM model with Student-t innovations (BMSM-t) and GARCH(1,1) models (GARCH-N, GARCH-t and GARCH-Skewed t) are chosen for comparison. Through empirical studies on Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index (SSEC), we find that for sample estimation, BMSM models outperform the GARCH(1,1) models through BIC and AIC rules, and BMSM-Skewed t performs the best among all the models due to its fat tails, skewness and multifractality. In addition, BMSM-Skewed t model dominates other models at most forecasting horizons for out-of-sample volatility forecasts in terms of MSE, MAE and SPA test.

  6. Modeling the leadership attributes of top management in green innovation implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, Noormaizatul Akmar; Ramli, Mohammad Fadzli

    2015-05-01

    The implementation of green innovation in the companies is the interest of the governments all over the world. This has been the main focus of the Copenhagen Protocol and Kyoto Protocol that require all governments to preserve the nature through green initiatives. This paper proposes a mathematical model on the leadership attributes of the top management in ensuring green innovation implementation in their companies' strategies to reduce operational cost. With green innovation implementation in the Government-Linked Companies (GLCs), we identify the leadership attributes are tied up to the leadership style of the top managers in the companies. Through this model we have proved that green type leadership always contributes better in cost saving, therefore it is a more efficient leadership attribute for the GLCs especially.

  7. Business Books: Best of 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cords, Sarah Statz

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, as business increasingly became the news, business publishing showed a growing awareness of the big picture, putting out fewer personality-driven titles. In this list, one will see that business histories embrace recent technological innovation as much as longevity. The best management/HR books look at the big picture through pushing…

  8. Flight Testing an Iced Business Jet for Flight Simulation Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Lee, Sam; Cooper, Jon

    2007-01-01

    A flight test of a business jet aircraft with various ice accretions was performed to obtain data to validate flight simulation models developed through wind tunnel tests. Three types of ice accretions were tested: pre-activation roughness, runback shapes that form downstream of the thermal wing ice protection system, and a wing ice protection system failure shape. The high fidelity flight simulation models of this business jet aircraft were validated using a software tool called "Overdrive." Through comparisons of flight-extracted aerodynamic forces and moments to simulation-predicted forces and moments, the simulation models were successfully validated. Only minor adjustments in the simulation database were required to obtain adequate match, signifying the process used to develop the simulation models was successful. The simulation models were implemented in the NASA Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD) to enable company pilots to evaluate flight characteristics of the simulation models. By and large, the pilots confirmed good similarities in the flight characteristics when compared to the real airplane. However, pilots noted pitch up tendencies at stall with the flaps extended that were not representative of the airplane and identified some differences in pilot forces. The elevator hinge moment model and implementation of the control forces on the ICEFTD were identified as a driver in the pitch ups and control force issues, and will be an area for future work.

  9. Innovative Model for Information Assurance Curriculum: A Teaching Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goel, Sanjay; Pon, Damira; Bloniarz, Peter; Bangert-Drowns, Robert; Berg, George; Delio, Vince; Iwan, Laura; Hurbanek, Thomas; Schuman, Sandoor P.; Gangolly, Jagdish; Baykal, Adnan; Hobbs, Jon

    2006-01-01

    A novel idea for information security education created by the New York State Center for Information Forensics and Assurance (CIFA) is presented. This new approach incorporates a teaching hospital model originally developed for medical training. In this model, information security problems from industry and government are solved and abstracted…

  10. The Concept of Innovation as Perceived by Public Sector Frontline Staff--Outline of a Tripartite Empirical Model of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegener, Charlotte; Tanggaard, Lene

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the innovation concept in two key welfare areas where the demands for innovation are substantial, namely vocational education and elder care. On the basis of ethnographic fieldwork and interviews on the collaboration between an educational institution and elder care services, the article develops a tripartite empirical…

  11. Using multi-class queuing network to solve performance models of e-business sites.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-ying; Chen, De-ren

    2004-01-01

    Due to e-business's variety of customers with different navigational patterns and demands, multi-class queuing network is a natural performance model for it. The open multi-class queuing network(QN) models are based on the assumption that no service center is saturated as a result of the combined loads of all the classes. Several formulas are used to calculate performance measures, including throughput, residence time, queue length, response time and the average number of requests. The solution technique of closed multi-class QN models is an approximate mean value analysis algorithm (MVA) based on three key equations, because the exact algorithm needs huge time and space requirement. As mixed multi-class QN models, include some open and some closed classes, the open classes should be eliminated to create a closed multi-class QN so that the closed model algorithm can be applied. Some corresponding examples are given to show how to apply the algorithms mentioned in this article. These examples indicate that multi-class QN is a reasonably accurate model of e-business and can be solved efficiently.

  12. Ranking of Business Process Simulation Software Tools with DEX/QQ Hierarchical Decision Model.

    PubMed

    Damij, Nadja; Boškoski, Pavle; Bohanec, Marko; Mileva Boshkoska, Biljana

    2016-01-01

    The omnipresent need for optimisation requires constant improvements of companies' business processes (BPs). Minimising the risk of inappropriate BP being implemented is usually performed by simulating the newly developed BP under various initial conditions and "what-if" scenarios. An effectual business process simulations software (BPSS) is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of an BP. Characterisation of an BPSS tool is a challenging task due to the complex selection criteria that includes quality of visual aspects, simulation capabilities, statistical facilities, quality reporting etc. Under such circumstances, making an optimal decision is challenging. Therefore, various decision support models are employed aiding the BPSS tool selection. The currently established decision support models are either proprietary or comprise only a limited subset of criteria, which affects their accuracy. Addressing this issue, this paper proposes a new hierarchical decision support model for ranking of BPSS based on their technical characteristics by employing DEX and qualitative to quantitative (QQ) methodology. Consequently, the decision expert feeds the required information in a systematic and user friendly manner. There are three significant contributions of the proposed approach. Firstly, the proposed hierarchical model is easily extendible for adding new criteria in the hierarchical structure. Secondly, a fully operational decision support system (DSS) tool that implements the proposed hierarchical model is presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed hierarchical model is assessed by comparing the resulting rankings of BPSS with respect to currently available results. PMID:26871694

  13. Ranking of Business Process Simulation Software Tools with DEX/QQ Hierarchical Decision Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The omnipresent need for optimisation requires constant improvements of companies’ business processes (BPs). Minimising the risk of inappropriate BP being implemented is usually performed by simulating the newly developed BP under various initial conditions and “what-if” scenarios. An effectual business process simulations software (BPSS) is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of an BP. Characterisation of an BPSS tool is a challenging task due to the complex selection criteria that includes quality of visual aspects, simulation capabilities, statistical facilities, quality reporting etc. Under such circumstances, making an optimal decision is challenging. Therefore, various decision support models are employed aiding the BPSS tool selection. The currently established decision support models are either proprietary or comprise only a limited subset of criteria, which affects their accuracy. Addressing this issue, this paper proposes a new hierarchical decision support model for ranking of BPSS based on their technical characteristics by employing DEX and qualitative to quantitative (QQ) methodology. Consequently, the decision expert feeds the required information in a systematic and user friendly manner. There are three significant contributions of the proposed approach. Firstly, the proposed hierarchical model is easily extendible for adding new criteria in the hierarchical structure. Secondly, a fully operational decision support system (DSS) tool that implements the proposed hierarchical model is presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed hierarchical model is assessed by comparing the resulting rankings of BPSS with respect to currently available results. PMID:26871694

  14. Ranking of Business Process Simulation Software Tools with DEX/QQ Hierarchical Decision Model.

    PubMed

    Damij, Nadja; Boškoski, Pavle; Bohanec, Marko; Mileva Boshkoska, Biljana

    2016-01-01

    The omnipresent need for optimisation requires constant improvements of companies' business processes (BPs). Minimising the risk of inappropriate BP being implemented is usually performed by simulating the newly developed BP under various initial conditions and "what-if" scenarios. An effectual business process simulations software (BPSS) is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of an BP. Characterisation of an BPSS tool is a challenging task due to the complex selection criteria that includes quality of visual aspects, simulation capabilities, statistical facilities, quality reporting etc. Under such circumstances, making an optimal decision is challenging. Therefore, various decision support models are employed aiding the BPSS tool selection. The currently established decision support models are either proprietary or comprise only a limited subset of criteria, which affects their accuracy. Addressing this issue, this paper proposes a new hierarchical decision support model for ranking of BPSS based on their technical characteristics by employing DEX and qualitative to quantitative (QQ) methodology. Consequently, the decision expert feeds the required information in a systematic and user friendly manner. There are three significant contributions of the proposed approach. Firstly, the proposed hierarchical model is easily extendible for adding new criteria in the hierarchical structure. Secondly, a fully operational decision support system (DSS) tool that implements the proposed hierarchical model is presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed hierarchical model is assessed by comparing the resulting rankings of BPSS with respect to currently available results.

  15. Innovation Diffusion Model in Higher Education: Case Study of E-Learning Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buc, Sanjana; Divjak, Blaženka

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion of innovation (DOI) is critical for any organization and especially nowadays for higher education institutions (HEIs) in the light of vast pressure of emerging educational technologies as well as of the demand of economy and society. DOI takes into account the initial and the implementation phase. The conceptual model of DOI in…

  16. Modeling Financial Innovation and Economic Growth: Why the Financial Sector Matters to the Real Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yuan K.

    2007-01-01

    The author devises a simple way of incorporating the financial sector into a growth model that is pedagogically useful. Financial innovation raises the efficiency of financial intermediation by increasing the variety of financial products and services, resulting in improved matching of the needs of individual savers with those of firms raising…

  17. The Innovation Team; A Model for Change in Inner City Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cernius, Vytas; Sherburne, Mary Lela

    Institutional behavior can be seen as a dynamic balance between driving and restraining forces operating oppositionally. To shift the balance toward change in the 24 inner-city schools of the Model School Division, this experiment in innovation trained 300 District of Columbia public school teachers in new curriculum materials and methodologies…

  18. Innovation in the Early College Model: Hartford Magnet Trinity College Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011 Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut entered a partnership with the Hartford Public Schools to launch an innovative early college model of public education. The new Hartford Middle Magnet Trinity College Academy (HMTCA) represents an expansion of the Hartford Middle Magnet School (HMMS) from a 6-8th grade school, into a 6-12th…

  19. The New Leadership Model of University Management for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sart, Gamze

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: Today's ever-changing educational environment has created a need for new leadership styles that encourage positive change and improvement. In Turkish universities, the most commonly used leadership models are the classic and/or traditional ones, which lead to stagnation in innovation and entrepreneurship. Only a limited number…

  20. Handling Disruptive Innovations in HE: Lessons from Two Contrasting Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Stephen; Olivier, Bill; Yuan, Li

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to show how Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) can recognise and best respond to a disruptive innovation. A disruptive innovation creates a new business model using a new process and usually a new technology to offer a product or service with new features and/or lower cost and initially addresses a group of people who are…

  1. Biomimetics - using nature as an inspiring model for innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, various aspects of the field of biomimetics will be reviewed, examples of inspiring biological models and practical applications will be described, and challenges and potential direction of the field will be discussed.

  2. Dual degree partnership in nursing: an innovative undergraduate educational model.

    PubMed

    Bastable, Susan B; Markowitz, Marianne

    2012-10-01

    We report the success of a unique articulation Dual Degree Partnership in Nursing (DDPN) model. The process used to establish and implement this approach is described. Unlike typical 2+2 agreements between associate degree (AD) and bachelor degree (BS) nursing education programs, the DDPN is designed with a 1+2+1 sequence. Intended to attract high school students, this model provides the opportunity to earn two degrees (AD and BS) while experiencing a 4-year campus living and learning environment. This configuration was accomplished without compromising the integrity of either of the established programs. After collecting data over the past 6 years, this model demonstrates popularity with the traditional-aged student, as well as success from an academic perspective. Statistics on retention, graduation, and NCLEX® pass rates indicate the feasibility and success of the model. Based on the findings, the potential for replication is promising for other colleges interested in a similar collaboration.

  3. An innovative education program: the peer competency validator model.

    PubMed

    Ringerman, Eileen; Flint, Lenora L; Hughes, DiAnn E

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a creative peer competency validation model leading to successful outcomes including a more proficient and motivated staff, the replacement of annual skill labs with ongoing competency validation, and significant cost savings. Trained staff assessed competencies of their coworkers directly in the practice setting. Registered nurses, licensed vocational nurses, and medical assistants recruited from patient care staff comprise the validator group. The model is applicable to any practice setting. PMID:16760770

  4. An innovative education program: the peer competency validator model.

    PubMed

    Ringerman, Eileen; Flint, Lenora L; Hughes, DiAnn E

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a creative peer competency validation model leading to successful outcomes including a more proficient and motivated staff, the replacement of annual skill labs with ongoing competency validation, and significant cost savings. Trained staff assessed competencies of their coworkers directly in the practice setting. Registered nurses, licensed vocational nurses, and medical assistants recruited from patient care staff comprise the validator group. The model is applicable to any practice setting.

  5. A Model of the Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations for the Case of the Individual Decision Maker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David Allan

    Information on the development and testing of a model of spatial diffusion and adoption of an agricultural innovation is presented. The data concern the practice of artificial insemination of cattle in southern Sweden. The model is intended to predict the time at which adoption occurred in terms of the time at which the innovation became available…

  6. Achieving the integrated and smart health and wellbeing paradigm: a call for policy research and action on governance and business models.

    PubMed

    Stroetmann, Karl A

    2013-04-01

    To assure sustainability of our health systems and improve quality, implementing integrated wellness, health and social care service models have been proposed. They will need the enabling power of Health ICT facilitated systems and applications. Such solutions support the efficient coordination of service provision across provider and jurisdictional boundaries, the sharing of data, information and knowledge, and the streamlining as well as individualisation of care. Achieving such change in health systems with limited resources requires refocusing the trend of medico-technical progress. Health ICT innovations must be scrutinised for their potential to indeed contribute not only to decreasing costs, but - at the same time - improving the quality of life and ability to cope with challenges like the increasing prevalence of certain chronic diseases or new expectations from healthy people and patients alike. This paper argues that decision-oriented governance models leading to focused policy interventions are needed at several levels: Governments should provide for comprehensive Health ICT infrastructures to enable provider market success. At the individual actor level, sustainable business models reflecting in their value propositions the expectations of their clients (patients and funders) need to be developed. Health policy should design intelligent reimbursement systems providing incentives to indeed optimise services. Smart health innovations should only be implemented where they help achieve the goal of increasing the productivity of health value chains and the quality of overall service delivery value systems. To assure allocational efficiency, regulatory impact analyses (RIA) can support evidence based policy making. PMID:22727880

  7. Achieving the integrated and smart health and wellbeing paradigm: a call for policy research and action on governance and business models.

    PubMed

    Stroetmann, Karl A

    2013-04-01

    To assure sustainability of our health systems and improve quality, implementing integrated wellness, health and social care service models have been proposed. They will need the enabling power of Health ICT facilitated systems and applications. Such solutions support the efficient coordination of service provision across provider and jurisdictional boundaries, the sharing of data, information and knowledge, and the streamlining as well as individualisation of care. Achieving such change in health systems with limited resources requires refocusing the trend of medico-technical progress. Health ICT innovations must be scrutinised for their potential to indeed contribute not only to decreasing costs, but - at the same time - improving the quality of life and ability to cope with challenges like the increasing prevalence of certain chronic diseases or new expectations from healthy people and patients alike. This paper argues that decision-oriented governance models leading to focused policy interventions are needed at several levels: Governments should provide for comprehensive Health ICT infrastructures to enable provider market success. At the individual actor level, sustainable business models reflecting in their value propositions the expectations of their clients (patients and funders) need to be developed. Health policy should design intelligent reimbursement systems providing incentives to indeed optimise services. Smart health innovations should only be implemented where they help achieve the goal of increasing the productivity of health value chains and the quality of overall service delivery value systems. To assure allocational efficiency, regulatory impact analyses (RIA) can support evidence based policy making.

  8. The risks of innovation in health care.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in health care creates risks that are unevenly distributed. An evolutionary analogy using species to represent business models helps categorize innovation experiments and their risks. This classification reveals two qualitative categories: early and late diversification experiments. Early diversification has prolific innovations with high risk because they encounter a "decimation" stage, during which most experiments disappear. Participants face high risk. The few decimation survivors can be sustaining or disruptive according to Christensen's criteria. Survivors enter late diversification, during which they again expand, but within a design range limited to variations of the previous surviving designs. Late diversifications carry lower risk. The exception is when disruptive survivors "diversify," which amplifies their disruption. Health care and radiology will experience both early and late diversifications, often simultaneously. Although oversimplifying Christensen's concepts, early diversifications are likely to deliver disruptive innovation, whereas late diversifications tend to produce sustaining innovations. Current health care consolidation is a manifestation of late diversification. Early diversifications will appear outside traditional care models and physical health care sites, as well as with new science such as molecular diagnostics. They warrant attention because decimation survivors will present both disruptive and sustaining opportunities to radiology. Radiology must participate in late diversification by incorporating sustaining innovations to its value chain. Given the likelihood of disruptive survivors, radiology should seriously consider disrupting itself rather than waiting for others to do so. Disruption entails significant modifications of its value chain, hence, its business model, for which lessons may become available from the pharmaceutical industry's current simultaneous experience with early and late diversifications.

  9. Breaking the Bank: Three Financing Models for Addressing the Drug Innovation Cost Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Kleinke, J.D.; McGee, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background The introduction of innovative specialty pharmaceuticals with high prices has renewed efforts by public and private healthcare payers to constrain their utilization, increase patient cost-sharing, and compel government intervention on pricing. These efforts, although rational for individual payers, have the potential to undermine the public health impact and overall economic value of these innovations for society. The emerging archetypal example is the outcry over the cost of sofosbuvir, a drug proved to cure hepatitis C infection at a cost of $84,000 per person for a course of treatment (or $1000 per tablet). This represents a radical medical breakthrough for public health, with great promise for the long-term costs associated with this disease, but with major short-term cost implications for the budgets of healthcare payers. Objectives To propose potential financing models to provide a workable and lasting solution that directly addresses the misalignment of incentives between healthcare payers confronted with the high upfront costs of innovative specialty drugs and the rest of the US healthcare system, and to articulate these in the context of the historic struggle over paying for innovation. Discussion We describe 3 innovative financing models to manage expensive specialty drugs that will significantly reduce the direct, immediate cost burden of these drugs to public and private healthcare payers. The 3 financing models include high-cost drug mortgages, high-cost drugs reinsurance, and high-cost drug patient rebates. These models have been proved successful in other areas and should be adopted into healthcare to mitigate the high-cost of specialty drugs. We discuss the distribution of this burden over time and across the healthcare system, and we match the financial burden of medical innovations to the healthcare stakeholders who capture their overall value. All 3 models work within or replicate the current healthcare marketplace mechanisms for

  10. Small Business Innovations (Automated Information)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Bruce G. Jackson & Associates Document Director is an automated tool that combines word processing and database management technologies to offer the flexibility and convenience of text processing with the linking capability of database management. Originally developed for NASA, it provides a means to collect and manage information associated with requirements development. The software system was used by NASA in the design of the Assured Crew Return Vehicle, as well as by other government and commercial organizations including the Southwest Research Institute.

  11. Clinical, information and business process modeling to promote development of safe and flexible software.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Deveny, Elizabeth; Morrison, Iain; Lewis, Bryn

    2006-09-01

    Using a factorial vignette survey and modeling methodology, we developed clinical and information models - incorporating evidence base, key concepts, relevant terms, decision-making and workflow needed to practice safely and effectively - to guide the development of an integrated rule-based knowledge module to support prescribing decisions in asthma. We identified workflows, decision-making factors, factor use, and clinician information requirements. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) and public domain software and knowledge engineering tools (e.g. Protégé) were used, with the Australian GP Data Model as the starting point for expressing information needs. A Web Services service-oriented architecture approach was adopted within which to express functional needs, and clinical processes and workflows were expressed in the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). This formal analysis and modeling methodology to define and capture the process and logic of prescribing best practice in a reference implementation is fundamental to tackling deficiencies in prescribing decision support software.

  12. Using a business model approach and marketing techniques for recruitment to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are generally regarded as the gold standard for evaluating health care interventions. The level of uncertainty around a trial's estimate of effect is, however, frequently linked to how successful the trial has been in recruiting and retaining participants. As recruitment is often slower or more difficult than expected, with many trials failing to reach their target sample size within the timescale and funding originally envisaged, the results are often less reliable than they could have been. The high number of trials that require an extension to the recruitment period in order to reach the required sample size potentially delays the introduction of more effective therapies into routine clinical practice. Moreover, it may result in less research being undertaken as resources are redirected to extending existing trials rather than funding additional studies. Poor recruitment to publicly-funded RCTs has been much debated but there remains remarkably little clear evidence as to why many trials fail to recruit well, which recruitment methods work, in which populations and settings and for what type of intervention. One proposed solution to improving recruitment and retention is to adopt methodology from the business world to inform and structure trial management techniques. We review what is known about interventions to improve recruitment to trials. We describe a proposed business approach to trials and discuss the implementation of using a business model, using insights gained from three case studies. PMID:21396088

  13. Using a business model approach and marketing techniques for recruitment to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Alison M; Treweek, Shaun; Shakur, Haleema; Free, Caroline; Knight, Rosemary; Speed, Chris; Campbell, Marion K

    2011-03-11

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are generally regarded as the gold standard for evaluating health care interventions. The level of uncertainty around a trial's estimate of effect is, however, frequently linked to how successful the trial has been in recruiting and retaining participants. As recruitment is often slower or more difficult than expected, with many trials failing to reach their target sample size within the timescale and funding originally envisaged, the results are often less reliable than they could have been. The high number of trials that require an extension to the recruitment period in order to reach the required sample size potentially delays the introduction of more effective therapies into routine clinical practice. Moreover, it may result in less research being undertaken as resources are redirected to extending existing trials rather than funding additional studies.Poor recruitment to publicly-funded RCTs has been much debated but there remains remarkably little clear evidence as to why many trials fail to recruit well, which recruitment methods work, in which populations and settings and for what type of intervention. One proposed solution to improving recruitment and retention is to adopt methodology from the business world to inform and structure trial management techniques.We review what is known about interventions to improve recruitment to trials. We describe a proposed business approach to trials and discuss the implementation of using a business model, using insights gained from three case studies.

  14. A process model of technology innovation in governmental agencies: Insights from NASA’s science directorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajnfarber, Zoe; Weigel, Annalisa L.

    2013-03-01

    This paper investigates the process through which new technical concepts are matured in the NASA innovation ecosystem. We propose an "epoch-shock" conceptualization as an alternative mental model to the traditional stage-gate view. The epoch-shock model is developed inductively, based on detailed empirical observations of the process, and validated, to the extent possible, through expert review. The paper concludes by illustrating how the new epoch-shock conceptualization could provide a useful basis for rethinking feasible interventions to improve innovation management in the space agency context. Where the more traditional stage-gate model leads to an emphasis on centralized flow control, the epoch-shock model acknowledges the decentralized, probabilistic nature of key interactions and highlights which aspects may be influenced.

  15. Models of Educational Innovation and Implications for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitgaard, Robert E.

    In this report, the author discusses the problem of educational change in terms of four basic elements: the objectives, the implementation process, the production possibilities, and the evaluation process. To illuminate both the logic of explanation and the specific needs for research, two competing explanatory models are developed: (1) the naive…

  16. An Innovative Model for Training Orientation and Mobility Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    A model was developed to prepare specialists in orientation and mobility (O&M) who work with people with visual impairments, with the specialists in turn training and supervising O&M assistants. The project developed curriculum guidelines, training methods, a national workshop, and regional seminars. (DB)

  17. Innovative modeling of Tuned Liquid Column Damper motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, A.; Lo Iacono, F.; Navarra, G.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper a new model for the liquid motion within a Tuned Liquid Column Damper (TLCD) device is developed, based on the mathematical tool of fractional calculus. Although the increasing use of these devices for structural vibration control, it is shown that existing model does not always lead to accurate prediction of the liquid motion. A better model is then needed for accurate simulation of the behavior of TLCD systems. As regards, it has been demonstrated how correctly including the first linear liquid sloshing mode, through the equivalent mechanical analogy well established in literature, produces numerical results that highly match the corresponding experimental ones. Since the apparent effect of sloshing is the deviation of the natural frequency from the theoretical one, the authors propose a fractional differential equation of motion. The latter choice is supported by the fact that the introduction a fractional derivative of order α alters simultaneously both the resonant frequency and the degree of damping of the system. It will be shown, through an extensive experimental analysis, how the proposed model accurately describes liquid surface displacements.

  18. ProcessGene-Connect: SOA Integration between Business Process Models and Enactment Transactions of Enterprise Software Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasser, Avi; Lincoln, Maya

    In recent years, both practitioners and applied researchers have become increasingly interested in methods for integrating business process models and enterprise software systems through the deployment of enabling middleware. Integrative BPM research has been mainly focusing on the conversion of workflow notations into enacted application procedures, and less effort has been invested in enhancing the connectivity between design level, non-workflow business process models and related enactment systems such as: ERP, SCM and CRM. This type of integration is useful at several stages of an IT system lifecycle, from design and implementation through change management, upgrades and rollout. The paper presents an integration method that utilizes SOA for connecting business process models with corresponding enterprise software systems. The method is then demonstrated through an Oracle E-Business Suite procurement process and its ERP transactions.

  19. Research on Computer Aided Innovation Model of Weapon Equipment Requirement Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Guo, Qisheng; Wang, Rui; Li, Liang

    Firstly, in order to overcome the shortcoming of using only AD or TRIZ solely, and solve the problems currently existed in weapon equipment requirement demonstration, the paper construct the method system of weapon equipment requirement demonstration combining QFD, AD, TRIZ, FA. Then, we construct a CAI model frame of weapon equipment requirement demonstration, which include requirement decomposed model, requirement mapping model and requirement plan optimization model. Finally, we construct the computer aided innovation model of weapon equipment requirement demonstration, and developed CAI software of equipment requirement demonstration.

  20. Malaria prevention in Zambia: a practical application of the diffusion of innovations model.

    PubMed

    Steury, Elinda Enright

    2013-04-01

    Transcultural nursing educators can be change agents for health issues in other cultures. Yet unfamiliar disease processes and the foreign environment provide challenges that must be overcome to achieve a lasting, effective, and positive change. Rogers's Diffusion of Innovations Model can be used to plan and implement community-focused interventions into the cultures of developing nations, specifically malaria prevention in Zambia. Transcultural nurse educators could use concepts from the model to effect change in other cultures or communities.