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Sample records for butyrate-producing colon bacteria

  1. Restricted distribution of the butyrate kinase pathway among butyrate-producing bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Duncan, Sylvia H; McCrae, Sheila I; Millar, Jacqueline; Jackson, Michelle S; Flint, Harry J

    2004-04-01

    The final steps in butyrate synthesis by anaerobic bacteria can occur via butyrate kinase and phosphotransbutyrylase or via butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase. Degenerate PCR and enzymatic assays were used to assess the presence of butyrate kinase among 38 anaerobic butyrate-producing bacterial isolates from human feces that represent three different clostridial clusters (IV, XIVa, and XVI). Only four strains were found to possess detectable butyrate kinase activity. These were also the only strains to give PCR products (verifiable by sequencing) with degenerate primer pairs designed within the butyrate kinase gene or between the linked butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes. Further analysis of the butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes of one isolate, L2-50, revealed similar organization to that described previously from different groups of clostridia, along with differences in flanking sequences and phylogenetic relationships. Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase activity was detected in all 38 strains examined, suggesting that it, rather than butyrate kinase, provides the dominant route for butyrate formation in the human colonic ecosystem that contains a constantly high concentration of acetate.

  2. Cell-associated alpha-amylases of butyrate-producing Firmicute bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Alan G; Scott, Karen P; Martin, Jenny C; Rincon, Marco T; Flint, Harry J

    2006-11-01

    Selected butyrate-producing bacteria from the human colon that are related to Roseburia spp. and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens showed a good ability to utilize a variety of starches for growth when compared with the Gram-negative amylolytic anaerobe Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. A major cell-associated amylase of high molecular mass (140-210 kDa) was detected in each strain by SDS-PAGE zymogram analysis, and genes corresponding to these enzymes were analysed for two representative strains. Amy13B from But. fibrisolvens 16/4 is a multi-domain enzyme of 144.6 kDa that includes a family 13 glycoside hydrolase domain, and duplicated family 26 carbohydrate-binding modules. Amy13A (182.4 kDa), from Roseburia inulinivorans A2-194, also includes a family 13 domain, which is preceded by two repeat units of approximately 116 aa rich in aromatic residues, an isoamylase N-terminal domain, a pullulanase-associated domain, and an additional unidentified domain. Both Amy13A and Amy13B have N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal cell-wall sorting signals, including a modified LPXTG motif similar to that involved in interactions with the cell surface in other Gram-positive bacteria, a hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and a basic C terminus. The overexpressed family 13 domains showed an absolute requirement for Mg2+ or Ca2+ for activity, and functioned as 1,4-alpha-glucanohydrolases (alpha-amylases; EC 3.2.1.1). These major starch-degrading enzymes thus appear to be anchored to the cell wall in this important group of human gut bacteria.

  3. Prebiotic stimulation of human colonic butyrate-producing bacteria and bifidobacteria, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Scott, Karen P; Martin, Jennifer C; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J

    2014-01-01

    Dietary macronutrients affect the composition of the gut microbiota, and prebiotics are used to improve and maintain a healthy gut. The impact of prebiotics on dominant gut bacteria other than bifidobacteria, however, is under-researched. Here, we report carbohydrate utilisation patterns for representative butyrate-producing anaerobes, belonging to the Gram-positive Firmicutes families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, by comparison with selected Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium species. Growth assessments using anaerobic Hungate tubes and a new rapid microtitre plate assay were generally in good agreement. The Bacteroides strains tested showed some growth on basal medium with no added carbohydrates, utilising peptides in the growth medium. The butyrate-producing strains exhibited different growth profiles on the substrates, which included starch, inulin, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), galactooligosaccharides (GOS) and xylooligosaccharides (XOS). Eleven were able to grow on short-chain FOS, but this number decreased as the chain length of the fructan substrates increased. Long-chain inulin was utilised by Roseburia inulinivorans, but by none of the Bifidobacterium species examined here. XOS was a more selective growth substrate than FOS, with only six of the 11 Firmicutes strains able to use XOS for growth. These results illustrate the selectivity of different prebiotics and help to explain why some are butyrogenic.

  4. Bifidobacteria and Butyrate-Producing Colon Bacteria: Importance and Strategies for Their Stimulation in the Human Gut.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Audrey; Selak, Marija; Lantin, David; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of evidence linking certain disorders of the human body to a disturbed gut microbiota, there is a growing interest for compounds that positively influence its composition and activity through diet. Besides the consumption of probiotics to stimulate favorable bacterial communities in the human gastrointestinal tract, prebiotics such as inulin-type fructans (ITF) and arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS) can be consumed to increase the number of bifidobacteria in the colon. Several functions have been attributed to bifidobacteria, encompassing degradation of non-digestible carbohydrates, protection against pathogens, production of vitamin B, antioxidants, and conjugated linoleic acids, and stimulation of the immune system. During life, the numbers of bifidobacteria decrease from up to 90% of the total colon microbiota in vaginally delivered breast-fed infants to <5% in the colon of adults and they decrease even more in that of elderly as well as in patients with certain disorders such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, allergies, and regressive autism. It has been suggested that the bifidogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of strain-specific yet complementary carbohydrate degradation mechanisms within cooperating bifidobacterial consortia. Except for a bifidogenic effect, ITF and AXOS also have shown to cause a butyrogenic effect in the human colon, i.e., an enhancement of colon butyrate production. Butyrate is an essential metabolite in the human colon, as it is the preferred energy source for the colon epithelial cells, contributes to the maintenance of the gut barrier functions, and has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the butyrogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of cross-feeding interactions between bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (clostridial cluster IV

  5. Bifidobacteria and Butyrate-Producing Colon Bacteria: Importance and Strategies for Their Stimulation in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Audrey; Selak, Marija; Lantin, David; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of evidence linking certain disorders of the human body to a disturbed gut microbiota, there is a growing interest for compounds that positively influence its composition and activity through diet. Besides the consumption of probiotics to stimulate favorable bacterial communities in the human gastrointestinal tract, prebiotics such as inulin-type fructans (ITF) and arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS) can be consumed to increase the number of bifidobacteria in the colon. Several functions have been attributed to bifidobacteria, encompassing degradation of non-digestible carbohydrates, protection against pathogens, production of vitamin B, antioxidants, and conjugated linoleic acids, and stimulation of the immune system. During life, the numbers of bifidobacteria decrease from up to 90% of the total colon microbiota in vaginally delivered breast-fed infants to <5% in the colon of adults and they decrease even more in that of elderly as well as in patients with certain disorders such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, allergies, and regressive autism. It has been suggested that the bifidogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of strain-specific yet complementary carbohydrate degradation mechanisms within cooperating bifidobacterial consortia. Except for a bifidogenic effect, ITF and AXOS also have shown to cause a butyrogenic effect in the human colon, i.e., an enhancement of colon butyrate production. Butyrate is an essential metabolite in the human colon, as it is the preferred energy source for the colon epithelial cells, contributes to the maintenance of the gut barrier functions, and has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the butyrogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of cross-feeding interactions between bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (clostridial cluster IV

  6. Diversity of human colonic butyrate-producing bacteria revealed by analysis of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Young, Pauline; Holtrop, Grietje; Flint, Harry J

    2010-02-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria play an important role in the human colon, supplying energy to the gut epithelium and regulating host cell responses. In order to explore the diversity and culturability of this functional group, we designed degenerate primers to amplify butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase sequences from faecal samples provided by 10 healthy volunteers. Eighty-eight per cent of amplified sequences showed >98% DNA sequence identity to CoA-transferases from cultured butyrate-producing bacteria, and these fell into 12 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The four most prevalent OTUs corresponded to Eubacterium rectale, Roseburia faecis, Eubacterium hallii and an unnamed cultured species SS2/1. The remaining 12% of sequences, however, belonged to 20 OTUs that are assumed to come from uncultured butyrate-producing strains. Samples taken after ingestion of inulin showed significant (P=0.019) increases in Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Because several of the dominant butyrate producers differ in their DNA % G+C content, analysis of thermal melt curves obtained for PCR amplicons of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene provides a convenient and rapid qualitative assessment of the major butyrate producing groups present in a given sample. This type of analysis therefore provides an excellent source of information on functionally important groups within the colonic microbial community.

  7. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon; Uyeno, Yutaka

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10.

  8. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10. PMID:26921420

  9. Cross-feeding between Bifidobacterium longum BB536 and acetate-converting, butyrate-producing colon bacteria during growth on oligofructose.

    PubMed

    Falony, Gwen; Vlachou, Angeliki; Verbrugghe, Kristof; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-12-01

    In vitro coculture fermentations of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 and two acetate-converting, butyrate-producing colon bacteria, Anaerostipes caccae DSM 14662 and Roseburia intestinalis DSM 14610, with oligofructose as the sole energy source, were performed to study interspecies interactions. Two clearly distinct types of cross-feeding were identified. A. caccae DSM 14662 was not able to degrade oligofructose but could grow on the fructose released by B. longum BB536 during oligofructose breakdown. R. intestinalis DSM 14610 could degrade oligofructose, but only after acetate was added to the medium. Detailed kinetic analyses of oligofructose breakdown by the last strain revealed simultaneous degradation of the different chain length fractions, in contrast with the preferential degradation of shorter fractions by B. longum BB536. In a coculture of both strains, initial oligofructose degradation and acetate production by B. longum BB536 took place, which in turn also allowed oligofructose breakdown by R. intestinalis DSM 14610. These and similar cross-feeding mechanisms could play a role in the colon ecosystem and contribute to the combined bifidogenic/butyrogenic effect observed after addition of inulin-type fructans to the diet.

  10. In vitro kinetics of prebiotic inulin-type fructan fermentation by butyrate-producing colon bacteria: implementation of online gas chromatography for quantitative analysis of carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas production.

    PubMed

    Falony, Gwen; Verschaeren, An; De Bruycker, Feije; De Preter, Vicky; Verbeke, Kristin; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2009-09-01

    Kinetic analyses of bacterial growth, carbohydrate consumption, and metabolite production of five butyrate-producing clostridial cluster XIVa colon bacteria grown on acetate plus fructose, oligofructose, inulin, or lactate were performed. A gas chromatography method was set up to assess H2 and CO2 production online and to ensure complete coverage of all metabolites produced. Method accuracy was confirmed through the calculation of electron and carbon recoveries. Fermentations with Anaerostipes caccae DSM 14662(T), Roseburia faecis DSM 16840(T), Roseburia hominis DSM 16839(T), and Roseburia intestinalis DSM 14610(T) revealed similar patterns of metabolite production with butyrate, CO2, and H2 as the main metabolites. R. faecis DSM 16840(T) and R. intestinalis DSM 14610(T) were able to degrade oligofructose, displaying a nonpreferential breakdown mechanism. Lactate consumption was only observed with A. caccae DSM 14662(T). Roseburia inulinivorans DSM 16841(T) was the only strain included in the present study that was able to grow on fructose, oligofructose, and inulin. The metabolites produced were lactate, butyrate, and CO2, without H2 production, indicating an energy metabolism distinct from that of other Roseburia species. Oligofructose degradation was nonpreferential. In a coculture of R. inulinivorans DSM 16841(T) with the highly competitive strain Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum LMG 11047 on inulin, hardly any production of butyrate and CO2 was detected, indicating a lack of competitiveness of the butyrate producer. Complete recovery of metabolites during fermentations of clostridial cluster XIVa butyrate-producing colon bacteria allowed stoichiometric balancing of the metabolic pathway for butyrate production, including H2 formation.

  11. Dietary fibres modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chunlong; Zhang, Lingli; He, Xiangyu; Smidt, Hauke; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-02-04

    Dietary fibres have been shown to affect early-life microbiota colonization in the large intestine of suckling piglets, however, much less is known as to whether they also modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of dietary fibres on the abundance, composition, and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in suckling piglets. Piglets were fed a control diet or creep feeds containing alfalfa, wheat bran, or pure cellulose, respectively, from postnatal day 7 to 22. Large intestinal digesta and mucosa samples were collected for quantitative analysis of bacterial group-specific 16S ribosomal RNA- and butyrate production-related genes, and digesta samples for quantification of short-chain fatty acids. The alfalfa diet increased (P < 0.05) Clostridium cluster XIVa abundance, copies of genes encoding proteins involved in butyrate production (butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase, butyrate kinase), and butyrate concentration compared to the wheat bran diet in the digesta of the proximal colon. In the distal colonic digesta, animals fed the alfalfa diet had the highest number of butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene copies (P < 0.05) and numerically the highest butyrate concentration, albeit not significant (P > 0.05), compared to other groups. In the distal colonic mucosa, the cellulose diet increased (P < 0.05) the abundance of Clostridium cluster XIVa and copies of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene compared to the alfalfa diet. These results indicated that dietary fibres modulate the abundance and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets, and that a moderate supplementation of alfalfa and cellulose may benefit early-life gut health through the delivery of butyrate to the mucosa.

  12. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nylund, L; Nermes, M; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S; de Vos, W M; Satokari, R

    2015-02-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory, and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were characterized. Further, the changes in intestinal microbiota composition related to the improvement of this disease 3 months later were assessed. The severity of eczema correlated inversely with microbiota diversity (r = -0.54, P = 0.002) and with the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (r = -0.52, P = 0.005). During the 3-month follow-up, microbiota diversity increased (P < 0.001) and scoring atopic dermatitis values decreased (P < 0.001) in all infants. This decrease coincided with the increase in bacteria related to butyrate-producing Coprococcus eutactus (r = -0.59, P = 0.02). In conclusion, the high diversity of microbiota and high abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria were associated with milder eczema, thus suggesting they have a role in alleviating symptoms of atopic eczema.

  13. Butyrate-producing Clostridium cluster XIVa species specifically colonize mucins in an in vitro gut model.

    PubMed

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Belzer, Clara; Goossens, Margot; Kleerebezem, Michiel; De Vos, Willem M; Thas, Olivier; De Weirdt, Rosemarie; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2013-05-01

    The human gut is colonized by a complex microbiota with multiple benefits. Although the surface-attached, mucosal microbiota has a unique composition and potential to influence human health, it remains difficult to study in vivo. Therefore, we performed an in-depth microbial characterization (human intestinal tract chip (HITChip)) of a recently developed dynamic in vitro gut model, which simulates both luminal and mucosal gut microbes (mucosal-simulator of human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME)). Inter-individual differences among human subjects were confirmed and microbial patterns unique for each individual were preserved in vitro. Furthermore, in correspondence with in vivo studies, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were enriched in the luminal content while Firmicutes rather colonized the mucin layer, with Clostridium cluster XIVa accounting for almost 60% of the mucin-adhered microbiota. Of the many acetate and/or lactate-converting butyrate producers within this cluster, Roseburia intestinalis and Eubacterium rectale most specifically colonized mucins. These 16S rRNA gene-based results were confirmed at a functional level as butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase gene sequences belonged to different species in the luminal as opposed to the mucin-adhered microbiota, with Roseburia species governing the mucosal butyrate production. Correspondingly, the simulated mucosal environment induced a shift from acetate towards butyrate. As not only inter-individual differences were preserved but also because compared with conventional models, washout of relevant mucin-adhered microbes was avoided, simulating the mucosal gut microbiota represents a breakthrough in modeling and mechanistically studying the human intestinal microbiome in health and disease. Finally, as mucosal butyrate producers produce butyrate close to the epithelium, they may enhance butyrate bioavailability, which could be useful in treating diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Only fibres promoting a stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem decrease the rate of aberrant crypt foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P; Pierre, F; Patry, Y; Champ, M; Berreur, M; Pradal, G; Bornet, F; Meflah, K; Menanteau, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dietary fibres have been proposed as protective agents against colon cancer but results of both epidemiological and experimental studies are inconclusive.
AIMS—Hypothesising that protection against colon cancer may be restricted to butyrate producing fibres, we investigated the factors needed for long term stable butyrate production and its relation to susceptibility to colon cancer.
METHODS—A two part randomised blinded study in rats, mimicking a prospective study in humans, was performed using a low fibre control diet (CD) and three high fibre diets: starch free wheat bran (WB), type III resistant starch (RS), and short chain fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Using a randomised block design, 96 inbred rats were fed for two, 16, 30, or 44 days to determine the period of adaptation to the diets, fermentation profiles, and effects on the colon, including mucosal proliferation on day 44. Subsequently, 36 rats fed the same diets for 44 days were injected with azoxymethane and checked for aberrant crypt foci 30 days later.
RESULTS—After fermentation had stabilised (44 days), only RS and FOS produced large amounts of butyrate, with a trophic effect in the large intestine. No difference in mucosal proliferation between the diets was noted at this time. In the subsequent experiment one month later, fewer aberrant crypt foci were present in rats fed high butyrate producing diets (RS, p=0.022; FOS, p=0.043).
CONCLUSION—A stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem related to selected fibres appears to be less conducive to colon carcinogenesis.


Keywords: fibre; fermentation; butyrate; colon carcinogenesis; aberrant crypt foci; rat PMID:11115823

  15. Polysaccharide utilization loci and nutritional specialization in a dominant group of butyrate-producing human colonic Firmicutes

    PubMed Central

    O. Sheridan, Paul; Martin, Jennifer C.; Lawley, Trevor D.; Browne, Hilary P.; Harris, Hugh M. B.; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Duncan, Sylvia H.; O'Toole, Paul W.; J. Flint, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes are the predominant bacterial phyla colonizing the healthy human large intestine. Whilst both ferment dietary fibre, genes responsible for this important activity have been analysed only in the Bacteroidetes, with very little known about the Firmicutes. This work investigates the carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) in a group of Firmicutes, Roseburia spp. and Eubacterium rectale, which play an important role in producing butyrate from dietary carbohydrates and in health maintenance. Genome sequences of 11 strains representing E. rectale and four Roseburia spp. were analysed for carbohydrate-active genes. Following assembly into a pan-genome, core, variable and unique genes were identified. The 1840 CAZyme genes identified in the pan-genome were assigned to 538 orthologous groups, of which only 26 were present in all strains, indicating considerable inter-strain variability. This analysis was used to categorize the 11 strains into four carbohydrate utilization ecotypes (CUEs), which were shown to correspond to utilization of different carbohydrates for growth. Many glycoside hydrolase genes were found linked to genes encoding oligosaccharide transporters and regulatory elements in the genomes of Roseburia spp. and E. rectale, forming distinct polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs). Whilst PULs are also a common feature in Bacteroidetes, key differences were noted in these Firmicutes, including the absence of close homologues of Bacteroides polysaccharide utilization genes, hence we refer to Gram-positive PULs (gpPULs). Most CAZyme genes in the Roseburia/E. rectale group are organized into gpPULs. Variation in gpPULs can explain the high degree of nutritional specialization at the species level within this group. PMID:28348841

  16. Exercise and Prebiotics Produce Stress Resistance: Converging Impacts on Stress-Protective and Butyrate-Producing Gut Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mika, A; Rumian, N; Loughridge, A B; Fleshner, M

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbial ecosystem can mediate the negative health impacts of stress on the host. Stressor-induced disruptions in microbial ecology (dysbiosis) can lead to maladaptive health effects, while certain probiotic organisms and their metabolites can protect against these negative impacts. Prebiotic diets and exercise are feasible and cost-effective strategies that can increase stress-protective bacteria and produce resistance against the detrimental behavioral and neurobiological impacts of stress. The goal of this review is to describe research demonstrating that both prebiotic diets and exercise produce adaptations in gut ecology and the brain that arm the organism against inescapable stress-induced learned helplessness. The results of this research support the novel hypothesis that some of the stress-protective effects of prebiotics and exercise are due to increases in stress-protective gut microbial species and their metabolites. In addition, new evidence also suggests that prebiotic diet or exercise interventions are most effective if given early in life (juvenile-adolescence) when both the gut microbial ecosystem and the brain are plastic. Based on our new understanding of the mechanistic convergence of these interventions, it is feasible to propose that in adults, both interventions delivered in combination may elevate their efficacy to promote a stress-resistant phenotype. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary calcium phosphate content and oat β-glucan influence gastrointestinal microbiota, butyrate-producing bacteria and butyrate fermentation in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Zijlstra, Ruurd T; Mosenthin, Rainer; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of oat β-glucan in combination with low- and high-dietary calcium phosphate (CaP) content on gastrointestinal bacterial microbiota, prevalence of butyrate-production pathway genes and fermentation end-products in 32 weaned pigs allocated to four diets: a cornstarch-casein-based diet with low [65% of the calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) requirement] and high CaP content (125% and 115% of the Ca and P requirement, respectively); and low and high CaP diets supplemented with 8.95% of oat β-glucan concentrate. Pigs were slaughtered after 14 days, and digesta were collected for quantitative PCR analysis, and quantification of short-chain fatty acids and lactate. The high CaP content reduced gastric lactate and streptococci and propionate in the large intestine. Oat β-glucan distinctly raised gastric bacterial numbers, and colonic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. Although not reflected by gene copies of butyrate-production pathway genes, oat β-glucan also increased gastric, caecal and colonic butyrate concentrations, which may be favourable for intestinal development in weaned pigs. Thus, a high CaP content negatively affected the intestinal abundance of certain fermentation end-products, whereas oat β-glucan generally enhanced bacterial numbers and activity. The results emphasize the importance of the stomach for bacterial metabolism of oat β-glucan in weaned pigs. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum, a butyrate producer with probiotic potential, is intrinsically tolerant to stomach and small intestine conditions.

    PubMed

    Geirnaert, Annelies; Steyaert, Alix; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Debruyne, Bo; Arends, Jan B A; Van Immerseel, Filip; Boon, Nico; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Butyrate has several beneficial properties that are essential to maintain gastrointestinal health. Therefore butyrate-producing bacteria are seen as the next generation of probiotics. The butyrate-producing bacterium Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (a clostridial cluster IV strain) is such a promising probiotic candidate for people suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. To exert its beneficial properties, it is crucial that B. pullicaecorum survives the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract to arrive in the colon in a viable and metabolically active state. Before developing a stable formulation of B. pullicaecorum for oral administration, it is important to know its intrinsic acid and bile tolerance. We monitored the survival during and short chain fatty acid production after incubation in conditions simulating the stomach and small intestine using in vitro batch experiments. In case of acid conditions (pH 2 and pH 3), B. pullicaecorum was viable and active but not cultivable. Cultivability was restored during subsequent small intestine conditions. Importantly, bile and pancreatic juice had no lethal effect. Milk, as a suspension medium, only had a protective effect on the cultivability during the first hour at pH 2. B. pullicaecorum was still metabolically active after upper gastrointestinal conditions and produced short chain fatty acids, but a shift from butyrate to acetate production was observed. Although the butyrate-producing anaerobe B. pullicaecorum showed good intrinsic acid and bile tolerance in terms of viability and metabolic activity, colonization efficiency and butyrate production under colon conditions is needed to further evaluate its probiotic potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lactate- and acetate-based cross-feeding interactions between selected strains of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and colon bacteria in the presence of inulin-type fructans.

    PubMed

    Moens, Frédéric; Verce, Marko; De Vuyst, Luc

    2017-01-16

    Cross-feeding interactions were studied between selected strains of lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria that consume lactate but are not able to degrade inulin-type fructans (ITF) in a medium for colon bacteria (supplemented with ITF as energy source and acetate when necessary). Degradation of oligofructose by Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 and inulin by Lactobacillus paracasei 8700:2 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 resulted in the release of free fructose into the medium and the production of mainly lactate (lactobacilli) and acetate (B. longum LMG 11047). During bicultures of Lb. acidophilus IBB 801 and Anaerostipes caccae DSM 14662(T) on oligofructose, the latter strain converted lactate (produced by the former strain from oligofructose) into butyrate and gases, but only in the presence of acetate. During bicultures of Lb. paracasei 8700:2 and A. caccae DSM 14662(T) or Eubacterium hallii DSM 17630 on inulin, the butyrate-producing strains consumed low concentrations of lactate and acetate generated by inulin degradation by the Lactobacillus strain. As more acetate was produced during tricultures of Lb. paracasei 8700:2 and B. longum LMG 11047, which degraded inulin simultaneously, and A. caccae DSM 14662(T) or E. hallii DSM 17630, a complete conversion of lactate into butyrate and gases by these butyrate-producing strains occurred. Therefore, butyrate production by lactate-consuming, butyrate-producing colon bacterial strains incapable of ITF degradation, resulted from cross-feeding of monosaccharides and lactate by an ITF-degrading Lactobacillus strain and acetate produced by a Bifidobacterium strain.

  20. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n=38), Aves (n=8) and Reptilia (n=8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large ‘unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild. PMID:25343515

  1. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-03-17

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n = 38), Aves (n = 8) and Reptilia (n = 8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild.

  2. Induction of peroxisomes by butyrate-producing probiotics.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huachun; Endo, Kosuke; Li, Jiawei; Kito, Naoko; Iwai, Naoharu

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11a (Pex11a) deficiency is associated with a reduction in peroxisome abundance and impaired fatty acid metabolism in hepatocytes, and results in steatosis. In the present study, we investigated whether butyrate induces Pex11a expression and peroxisome proliferation, and studied its effect on lipid metabolism. C57BL/6 mice fed standard chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) were treated with tributyrin, 4-phelybutyrate acid (4-PBA), or the butyrate-producing probiotics (Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588 [CBM]) plus inulin (dietary fiber), and the body weight, white adipose tissue, serum triglycerides, mRNA expression, and peroxisome abundance were evaluated. Tributyrin or 4-PBA treatment significantly decreased body weight and increased hepatic mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and Pex11a. In addition, 4-PBA treatment increased peroxisome abundance and the expression of genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation (acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and hydroxysteroid [17-beta] dehydrogenase 4). CBM and inulin administration reduced adipose tissue mass and serum triglycerides, induced Pex11a, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1, and hydroxysteroid (17-beta) dehydrogenase 4 genes, and increased peroxisome abundance in mice fed standard chow or an HFD. In conclusion, elevation of butyrate availability (directly through administration of butyrate or indirectly via administration of butyrate-producing probiotics plus fiber) induces PPARα and Pex11a and the genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation, increases peroxisome abundance, and improves lipid metabolism. These results may provide a new therapeutic strategy against hyperlipidemia and obesity.

  3. Comparative genomics and physiology of the butyrate-producing bacterium Intestinimonas butyriciproducens.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thi Phuong Nam; Shetty, Sudarshan Anand; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Ritari, Jarmo; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Douillard, François P; Paulin, Lars; Piironen, Vieno; Clavel, Thomas; Plugge, Caroline M; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-12-01

    Intestinimonas is a newly described bacterial genus with representative strains present in the intestinal tract of human and other animals. Despite unique metabolic features including the production of butyrate from both sugars and amino acids, there is to date no data on their diversity, ecology, and physiology. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach, Intestinimomas was found to include at least three species that colonize primarily the human and mouse intestine. We focused on the most common and cultivable species of the genus, Intestinimonas butyriciproducens, and performed detailed genomic and physiological comparison of strains SRB521(T) and AF211, isolated from the mouse and human gut respectively. The complete 3.3-Mb genomic sequences of both strains were highly similar with 98.8% average nucleotide identity, testifying to their assignment to one single species. However, thorough analysis revealed significant genomic rearrangements, variations in phage-derived sequences, and the presence of new CRISPR sequences in both strains. Moreover, strain AF211 appeared to be more efficient than strain SRB521(T) in the conversion of the sugars arabinose and galactose. In conclusion, this study provides genomic and physiological insight into Intestinimonas butyriciproducens, a prevalent butyrate-producing species, differentiating strains that originate from the mouse and human gut. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology Reports published by Society for Applied Microbiology and JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Accelerated dysbiosis of gut microbiota during aggravation of DSS-induced colitis by a butyrate-producing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianpeng; Wu, Yanqiu; Wang, Jing; Wu, Guojun; Long, Wenmin; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yufeng; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Chenhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria (BPB) are potential probiotic candidates for inflammatory bowel diseases as they are often depleted in the diseased gut microbiota. However, here we found that augmentation of a human-derived butyrate-producing strain, Anaerostipes hadrus BPB5, significantly aggravated colitis in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-treated mice while exerted no detrimental effect in healthy mice. We explored how the interaction between BPB5 and gut microbiota may contribute to this differential impact on the hosts. Butyrate production and severity of colitis were assessed in both healthy and DSS-treated mice, and gut microbiota structural changes were analysed using high-throughput sequencing. BPB5-inoculated healthy mice showed no signs of colitis, but increased butyrate content in the gut. In DSS-treated mice, BPB5 augmentation did not increase butyrate content, but induced significantly more severe disease activity index and much higher mortality. BPB5 didn’t induce significant changes of gut microbiota in healthy hosts, but expedited the structural shifts 3 days earlier toward the disease phase in BPB5-augmented than DSS-treated animals. The differential response of gut microbiota in healthy and DSS-treated mice to the same potentially beneficial bacterium with drastically different health consequences suggest that animals with dysbiotic gut microbiota should also be employed for the safety assessment of probiotic candidates. PMID:27264309

  5. Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163274.html Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says High- ... link appears to be a type of intestinal bacteria, the Boston research team said. Specifically, they looked ...

  6. Detection of cellulolytic bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Kopecný, J; Hajer, J; Mrázek, J

    2004-01-01

    The main representatives of bacteria in the human colon were investigated by specific PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Prevalent in both cases were species of Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Bacteroides, Faecalibacterium and Eubacterium. Simultaneously, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from the human feces. The largest proportion was represented by ruminococcus-like isolates. Their presence was confirmed both by PCR and DGGE methods; the latter one was able to give more comprehensive data about the composition of bacterial population in the human colon chyme.

  7. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation) Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study

    PubMed Central

    Šket, Robert; Treichel, Nicole; Debevec, Tadej; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor; Schloter, Michael; Vital, Marius; Chandler, Jenna; Tiedje, James M.; Murovec, Boštjan; Prevoršek, Zala; Stres, Blaž

    2017-01-01

    developed symptoms of low magnitude obesity-related syndromes was primarily driven by the onset of inactivity (lack of exercise in NBR) that were exacerbated by systemic hypoxia (HBR) and significantly alleviated by exercise, despite hypoxia (HAmb). Butyrate producing community in colon exhibited apparent resilience toward short-term modifications in host exercise or hypoxia. Progressive constipation (decreased intestinal motility) and increased local inflammation marker suggest that changes in microbial colonization and metabolism were taking place at the location of small intestine. PMID:28522975

  8. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation) Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study.

    PubMed

    Šket, Robert; Treichel, Nicole; Debevec, Tadej; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor; Schloter, Michael; Vital, Marius; Chandler, Jenna; Tiedje, James M; Murovec, Boštjan; Prevoršek, Zala; Stres, Blaž

    2017-01-01

    developed symptoms of low magnitude obesity-related syndromes was primarily driven by the onset of inactivity (lack of exercise in NBR) that were exacerbated by systemic hypoxia (HBR) and significantly alleviated by exercise, despite hypoxia (HAmb). Butyrate producing community in colon exhibited apparent resilience toward short-term modifications in host exercise or hypoxia. Progressive constipation (decreased intestinal motility) and increased local inflammation marker suggest that changes in microbial colonization and metabolism were taking place at the location of small intestine.

  9. Colonization of the oral cavity by probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ravn, I; Dige, I; Meyer, R L; Nyvad, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if three probiotic bacteria present in the milk product Cultura Dofilus® naturell could be detected in saliva and on oral mucosal surfaces, and if they colonized dental surfaces in situ in 8 caries-inactive individuals after 8 daily exposures to the milk product for up to 3 days. Bacteria were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. While probiotic bacteria were present sporadically in the oral cavity on mucosal surfaces and in saliva after 3 days of frequent use of the probiotic milk, they were not detected on dental surfaces. Probiotic bacteria may thus contribute to general oral health, but their potential role in biofilm-induced dental diseases remains unclear.

  10. Kineothrix alysoides, gen. nov., sp. nov., a saccharolytic butyrate-producer within the family Lachnospiraceae.

    PubMed

    Haas, Kelly Nicole; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2017-02-01

    An anaerobic, saccharolytic, spore-forming, butyrate-producing bacterium, strain KNHs209T, was isolated from a switchgrass microcosm seeded with forest soil. Cells were highly motile rods, often forming long filamentous chains which were easily observed moving under the microscope. Its closest phylogenetic relative was Eisenbergiella tayi (16S rRNA gene sequence identity 94.2 %), although it was easily distinguishable based on its morphology and physiology. Whole-genome sequencing enabled development of a minimal medium, and also suggested that the organism is capable of fixing nitrogen. Its wide variety of growth substrates was mirrored by a high number of encoded chemotaxis receptors (45, the highest in the family Lachnospiraceae). Strain KNHs209T utilized a wide variety of carbohydrates, but not cellulose or xylan. Fermentation products included formate, acetate and butyrate; sulfur compounds and nitrate were not reduced. Strain KNHs209T grew optimally at 35-40 °C and pH 7. The genomic DNA G+C content was 42.74 mol%; the major membrane fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. Based on phenotypic, genomic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses, this organism represents a novel genus and species within the family Lachnospiraceae for which the name Kineothrix alysoides, gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KNHs209T (=ATCC TSD-26T=DSM 100556T).

  11. Regulation of surface architecture by symbiotic bacteria mediates host colonization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui Hua; Lee, S Melanie; Vanlare, Jordan M; Kasper, Dennis L; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2008-03-11

    Microbes occupy countless ecological niches in nature. Sometimes these environments may be on or within another organism, as is the case in both microbial infections and symbiosis of mammals. Unlike pathogens that establish opportunistic infections, hundreds of human commensal bacterial species establish a lifelong cohabitation with their hosts. Although many virulence factors of infectious bacteria have been described, the molecular mechanisms used during beneficial host-symbiont colonization remain almost entirely unknown. The novel identification of multiple surface polysaccharides in the important human symbiont Bacteroides fragilis raised the critical question of how these molecules contribute to commensalism. To understand the function of the bacterial capsule during symbiotic colonization of mammals, we generated B. fragilis strains deleted in the global regulator of polysaccharide expression and isolated mutants with defects in capsule expression. Surprisingly, attempts to completely eliminate capsule production are not tolerated by the microorganism, which displays growth deficits and subsequent reversion to express capsular polysaccharides. We identify an alternative pathway by which B. fragilis is able to reestablish capsule production and modulate expression of surface structures. Most importantly, mutants expressing single, defined surface polysaccharides are defective for intestinal colonization compared with bacteria expressing a complete polysaccharide repertoire. Restoring the expression of multiple capsular polysaccharides rescues the inability of mutants to compete for commensalism. These findings suggest a model whereby display of multiple capsular polysaccharides provides essential functions for bacterial colonization during host-symbiont mutualism.

  12. Virulence of Bacteria Colonizing Vascular Bundles in Ischemic Lower Limbs.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Podbielska, Adrianna; Galkowska, Hanna; Golas, Marlena; Piskorska, Katarzyn; Stelmach, Ewa; Swoboda, Ewa; Zaleska, Marzamma; Durlik, Marek

    2016-02-01

    We documented previously the presence of bacterial flora in vascular bundles, lymphatics, and lymph nodes of ischemic lower limbs amputated because of multifocal atheromatic changes that made them unsuitable for reconstructive surgery and discussed their potential role in tissue destruction. The question arose why bacterial strains inhabiting lower limb skin and considered to be saprophytes become pathogenic once they colonize deep tissues. Bacterial pathogenicity is evoked by activation of multiple virulence factors encoded by groups of genes. We identified virulence genes in bacteria cultured from deep tissue of ischemic legs of 50 patients using a polymerase chain reaction technique. The staphylococcal virulence genes fnbA (fibronectin-binding protein A), cna (collagen adhesin precursor), and ica (intercellular adhesion) were present in bacteria isolated from both arteries and, to a lesser extent, skin. The IS256 gene, whose product is responsible for biofilm formation, was more frequent in bacteria retrieved from the arteries than skin bacteria. Among the virulence genes of Staphylococcus epidermidis encoding autolysin atlE, icaAB (intercellular adhesion), and biofilm insert IS256, only the latter was detected in arterial specimens. Bacteria cultured from the lymphatics did not reveal expression of eta and IS256 in arteries. The Enterococcus faecalis asa 373 (aggregation substance) and cylA (cytolysin activator) frequency was greater in arteries than in skin bacteria, as were the E. faecium cyl A genes. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence genes were present in bacteria cultured from both the skin and arteries. Staphylococci colonizing arterial bundles and transported to tissues via ischemic limb lymphatics expressed virulence genes at greater frequency than did those dwelling on the skin surface. Moreover, enterococci and Pseudomonas isolated from arterial bundles expressed many virulence genes. These findings may add to the understanding of the mechanism of

  13. [Colonization properties of opportunistic bacteria isolated from children with pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Kholodok, G N; Alekseeva, I N; Strel'nikova, N V; Kozlov, V K

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of phenotypes and pathogenicity factors of 476 opportunistic bacteria isolated from respiratory samples of 973 children with community-acquired pneumonia and 36 children without respiratory infection symptoms. Quantitative method of tracheal aspirate and nasopharyngeal swab seeding into certified nutrient media was used, identification was carried out according to standard techniques. Adhesive, "anti-interferon", anti-lysozyme and inherent bactericidal activity of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were established to ensure in combination with known aggression factors their colonization advantage compared with other pneumopathogens. Adhesion indexes of Gram-negative bacteria lower than 2.5 are shown as markers of invasive strains. Anti-lysozyme activity level lower than 2.14 microg/ml and lack of "anti-interferon" activity characterize non-invasive opportunistic bacteria strains. The detected phenotypic features of opportunistic bacteria may be used in clinical practice for evaluatio of etiologic importance of microorganisms isolated from tracheal aspirate in pneumonia patients.

  14. Density-dependent adaptive resistance allows swimming bacteria to colonize an antibiotic gradient.

    PubMed

    Hol, Felix J H; Hubert, Bert; Dekker, Cees; Keymer, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    During antibiotic treatment, antibiotic concentration gradients develop. Little is know regarding the effects of antibiotic gradients on populations of nonresistant bacteria. Using a microfluidic device, we show that high-density motile Escherichia coli populations composed of nonresistant bacteria can, unexpectedly, colonize environments where a lethal concentration of the antibiotic kanamycin is present. Colonizing bacteria establish an adaptively resistant population, which remains viable for over 24 h while exposed to the antibiotic. Quantitative analysis of multiple colonization events shows that collectively swimming bacteria need to exceed a critical population density in order to successfully colonize the antibiotic landscape. After colonization, bacteria are not dormant but show both growth and swimming motility under antibiotic stress. Our results highlight the importance of motility and population density in facilitating adaptive resistance, and indicate that adaptive resistance may be a first step to the emergence of genetically encoded resistance in landscapes of antibiotic gradients.

  15. Density-dependent adaptive resistance allows swimming bacteria to colonize an antibiotic gradient

    PubMed Central

    Hol, Felix J H; Hubert, Bert; Dekker, Cees; Keymer, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    During antibiotic treatment, antibiotic concentration gradients develop. Little is know regarding the effects of antibiotic gradients on populations of nonresistant bacteria. Using a microfluidic device, we show that high-density motile Escherichia coli populations composed of nonresistant bacteria can, unexpectedly, colonize environments where a lethal concentration of the antibiotic kanamycin is present. Colonizing bacteria establish an adaptively resistant population, which remains viable for over 24 h while exposed to the antibiotic. Quantitative analysis of multiple colonization events shows that collectively swimming bacteria need to exceed a critical population density in order to successfully colonize the antibiotic landscape. After colonization, bacteria are not dormant but show both growth and swimming motility under antibiotic stress. Our results highlight the importance of motility and population density in facilitating adaptive resistance, and indicate that adaptive resistance may be a first step to the emergence of genetically encoded resistance in landscapes of antibiotic gradients. PMID:26140531

  16. Iron effects on colonization behavior, motility, and enzymatic activity of marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kam W; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2007-08-01

    Iron availability in the ocean has been shown to affect the growth and production of phytoplankton and free-living bacteria. A large fraction of marine bacteria are specialized in colonizing and living on particles and aggregates, but the effects of iron limitation on these bacteria are not fully known. We conducted laboratory experiments to study the effects of iron availability on particle colonization behavior, motility, and enzymatic activities of 4 strains of marine bacteria. Iron depletion reduced the bacterial particle colonization rate by 1.7%-43.1%, which could be attributed to reduced swimming speeds in 2 of the 4 strains. Protease activity was not affected by iron availability. However, attached bacteria did show higher protease activities than their free counterparts. Our results suggest that iron limitation in the ocean could in some cases reduce bacteria-particle interactions by reducing bacterial motility and colonization rate.

  17. Co-Colonization with Multiple Different Species of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Graham M.; O’Fallon, Erin; D’Agata, Erika M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The characteristics of co-colonization with multiple different species of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDRGN) have not been fully elucidated. Quantifying the prevalence of co-colonization and those patients at higher risk of co-colonization may have important implications for strategies aimed at limiting the spread of MDRGN. Methods To determine the prevalence of MDRGN colonization, rectal swabs were obtained from 212 residents residing in a 600-bed long-term care facility. Co-colonization was defined as colonization with ≥ 2 different MDRGN species. Co-colonized residents were compared to residents colonized with a single MDRGN species to identify factors associated with an increased risk for co-colonization. Molecular typing was performed to determine the contribution of cross-transmission to the co-colonized state. Results A total of 53 (25%) residents were colonized with ≥ 1 MDRGN. Among these, 11 (21%) were colonized with ≥ 2 different species of MDRGN. A global deterioration score of ≥ 5 representing advanced dementia and an increased requirement for assistance from healthcare workers, was significantly associated with co-colonization (P = 0.05). Clonally-related MDRGN strains were identified among 7 (64%) co-colonized residents. Conclusions The prevalence of co-colonization with ≥ 2 different MDRGN is substantial. Cross-transmission of MDRGN is a major contributor to the co-colonized state. PMID:21492962

  18. Colonization by aerobic bacteria in karst: Laboratory and in situ experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personne, J.-C.; Poty, F.; Mahler, B.J.; Drogue, C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the potential for bacterial colonization of different substrates in karst aquifers and the nature of the colonizing bacteria. Laboratory batch experiments were performed using limestone and PVC as substrates, a natural bacterial isolate and a known laboratory strain (Escherichia coli [E. coli]) as inocula, and karst ground water and a synthetic formula as growth media. In parallel, fragments of limestone and granite were submerged in boreholes penetrating two karst aquifers for more than one year; the boreholes are periodically contaminated by enteric bacteria from waste water. Once a month, rock samples were removed and the colonizing bacteria quantified and identified. The batch experiments demonstrated that the natural isolate and E. coli both readily colonized limestone surfaces using karst ground water as the growth medium. In contrast, bacterial colonization of both the limestone and granite substrates, when submerged in the karst, was less intense. More than 300 bacterial strains were isolated over the period sampled, but no temporal pattern in colonization was seen as far as strain, and colonization by E. coli was notably absent, although strains of Salmonella and Citrobacter were each observed once. Samples suspended in boreholes penetrating highly fractured zones were less densely colonized than those in the borehole penetrating a less fractured zone. The results suggest that contamination of karst aquifers by enteric bacteria is unlikely to be persistent. We hypothesize that this may be a result of the high flow velocities found in karst conduits, and of predation of colonizing bacteria by autochthonous zooplankton.

  19. Salivary Mucins Protect Surfaces from Colonization by Cariogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Erica Shapiro

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the body's natural defenses function to protect the oral cavity from the myriad of bacteria that colonize its surfaces is an ongoing topic of research that can lead to breakthroughs in treatment and prevention. One key defense mechanism on all moist epithelial linings, such as the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and lungs, is a layer of thick, well-hydrated mucus. The main gel-forming components of mucus are mucins, large glycoproteins that play a key role in host defense. This study focuses on elucidating the connection between MUC5B salivary mucins and dental caries, one of the most common oral diseases. Dental caries is predominantly caused by Streptococcus mutans attachment and biofilm formation on the tooth surface. Once S. mutans attaches to the tooth, it produces organic acids as metabolic by-products that dissolve tooth enamel, leading to cavity formation. We utilize CFU counts and fluorescence microscopy to quantitatively show that S. mutans attachment and biofilm formation are most robust in the presence of sucrose and that aqueous solutions of purified human MUC5B protect surfaces by acting as an antibiofouling agent in the presence of sucrose. In addition, we find that MUC5B does not alter S. mutans growth and decreases surface attachment and biofilm formation by maintaining S. mutans in the planktonic form. These insights point to the importance of salivary mucins in oral health and lead to a better understanding of how MUC5B could play a role in cavity prevention or diagnosis. PMID:25344244

  20. Diet, microbiota, and microbial metabolites in colon cancer risk in rural Africans and African Americans1234

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Junhai; Carbonero, Franck; Zoetendal, Erwin G; DeLany, James P; Wang, Mei; Newton, Keith; Gaskins, H Rex

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies have suggested that most cases of sporadic colon cancer can be attributed to diet. The recognition that colonic microbiota have a major influence on colonic health suggests that they might mediate colonic carcinogenesis. Objective: To examine the hypothesis that the influence of diet on colon cancer risk is mediated by the microbiota through their metabolites, we measured differences in colonic microbes and their metabolites in African Americans with a high risk and in rural native Africans with a low risk of colon cancer. Design: Fresh fecal samples were collected from 12 healthy African Americans aged 50–65 y and from 12 age- and sex-matched native Africans. Microbiomes were analyzed with 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing together with quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the major fermentative, butyrate-producing, and bile acid–deconjugating bacteria. Fecal short-chain fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography and bile acids by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results: Microbial composition was fundamentally different, with a predominance of Prevotella in native Africans (enterotype 2) and of Bacteroides in African Americans (enterotype 1). Total bacteria and major butyrate-producing groups were significantly more abundant in fecal samples from native Africans. Microbial genes encoding for secondary bile acid production were more abundant in African Americans, whereas those encoding for methanogenesis and hydrogen sulfide production were higher in native Africans. Fecal secondary bile acid concentrations were higher in African Americans, whereas short-chain fatty acids were higher in native Africans. Conclusion: Our results support the hypothesis that colon cancer risk is influenced by the balance between microbial production of health-promoting metabolites such as butyrate and potentially carcinogenic metabolites such as secondary bile acids. PMID:23719549

  1. Diet, microbiota, and microbial metabolites in colon cancer risk in rural Africans and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Ou, Junhai; Carbonero, Franck; Zoetendal, Erwin G; DeLany, James P; Wang, Mei; Newton, Keith; Gaskins, H Rex; O'Keefe, Stephen J D

    2013-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies have suggested that most cases of sporadic colon cancer can be attributed to diet. The recognition that colonic microbiota have a major influence on colonic health suggests that they might mediate colonic carcinogenesis. To examine the hypothesis that the influence of diet on colon cancer risk is mediated by the microbiota through their metabolites, we measured differences in colonic microbes and their metabolites in African Americans with a high risk and in rural native Africans with a low risk of colon cancer. Fresh fecal samples were collected from 12 healthy African Americans aged 50-65 y and from 12 age- and sex-matched native Africans. Microbiomes were analyzed with 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing together with quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the major fermentative, butyrate-producing, and bile acid-deconjugating bacteria. Fecal short-chain fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography and bile acids by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Microbial composition was fundamentally different, with a predominance of Prevotella in native Africans (enterotype 2) and of Bacteroides in African Americans (enterotype 1). Total bacteria and major butyrate-producing groups were significantly more abundant in fecal samples from native Africans. Microbial genes encoding for secondary bile acid production were more abundant in African Americans, whereas those encoding for methanogenesis and hydrogen sulfide production were higher in native Africans. Fecal secondary bile acid concentrations were higher in African Americans, whereas short-chain fatty acids were higher in native Africans. Our results support the hypothesis that colon cancer risk is influenced by the balance between microbial production of health-promoting metabolites such as butyrate and potentially carcinogenic metabolites such as secondary bile acids.

  2. Relationship between Rapid, Firm Adhesion and Long-Term Colonization of Roots by Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    James, Douglas W.; Suslow, Trevor V.; Steinback, Katherine E.

    1985-01-01

    For rhizobacteria to exert physiological effects on plant growth, the bacteria must first effectively colonize the root surface. To examine the relationship between long-term colonization of root systems and adherence to roots in the short term, a binding assay was developed. Adherence was determined by incubating roots of intact radish seedlings with bacteria, washing and homogenizing the roots, and dilution plating the resulting homogenate. Irreversible binding of bacteria was rapid, reaching half-maximum by 5 min. All of the rhizosphere bacteria tested showed similar, concentration-dependent binding (ranging from 104 to 108 CFU/ml), as well as long-term colonization of radish roots under sterile conditions. Escherichia coli, which is not a root colonizer, showed about 10-fold less binding, but still demonstrated concentration-dependent binding and rapid kinetics of adherence at high concentrations (106 to 108 CFU/ml). The bacteria tested were very different with respect to source or habitat and plant response, yet they showed similar concentration-dependent binding. There was no correlation between the relative hydrophobicities of the cell surfaces of strains and the adherence of the strains to roots. Binding of Pseudomonas fluorescens E6-22 was promoted by divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) at concentrations of 5 to 10 mM, whereas monovalent cations (Na+ and K+) had little effect; electrostatic phenomena may partially explain adherence in the short term, an important prelude to long-term colonization of root surfaces. PMID:16346859

  3. Activation of HIF-1α and LL-37 by commensal bacteria inhibits Candida albicans colonization

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A.; Neubauer, Megan M.; Kim, Jiwoong; Kim, Minsoo; Zhan, Xiaowei; Simms-Waldrip, Tiffany R.; Xie, Yang; Hooper, Lora V.; Koh, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans colonization is required for invasive disease1-3. Unlike humans, adult mice with mature intact gut microbiota are resistant to C. albicans gastrointestinal (GI) colonization2,4. But the factors that promote C. albicans colonization resistance are unknown. Here we demonstrate that commensal anaerobic bacteria – specifically Clostridial Firmicutes (Clusters IV and XIVa) and Bacteroidetes – are critical for maintaining C. albicans colonization resistance in mice. Using Bacteroides thetaiotamicron as a model organism, we find that HIF-1α, a transcription factor important for activating innate immune effectors, and the antimicrobial peptide LL37-CRAMP are key determinants of C. albicans colonization resistance. While antibiotic treatment enables C. albicans colonization, pharmacologic activation of colonic Hif1a induces CRAMP expression and results in a significant reduction of C. albicans GI colonization and a 50% decrease in mortality from invasive disease. In the setting of antibiotics, Hif1a and Cramp are required for B. thetaiotamicron-induced protection against CA colonization of the gut. Thus, C. albicans GI colonization modulation by activation of gut mucosal immune effectors may represent a novel therapeutic approach for preventing invasive fungal disease in humans. PMID:26053625

  4. Activation of HIF-1α and LL-37 by commensal bacteria inhibits Candida albicans colonization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A; Neubauer, Megan M; Kim, Jiwoong; Kim, Min Soo; Zhan, Xiaowei; Simms-Waldrip, Tiffany R; Xie, Yang; Hooper, Lora V; Koh, Andrew Y

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans colonization is required for invasive disease. Unlike humans, adult mice with mature intact gut microbiota are resistant to C. albicans gastrointestinal (GI) colonization, but the factors that promote C. albicans colonization resistance are unknown. Here we demonstrate that commensal anaerobic bacteria-specifically clostridial Firmicutes (clusters IV and XIVa) and Bacteroidetes-are critical for maintaining C. albicans colonization resistance in mice. Using Bacteroides thetaiotamicron as a model organism, we find that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a transcription factor important for activating innate immune effectors, and the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 (CRAMP in mice) are key determinants of C. albicans colonization resistance. Although antibiotic treatment enables C. albicans colonization, pharmacologic activation of colonic Hif1a induces CRAMP expression and results in a significant reduction of C. albicans GI colonization and a 50% decrease in mortality from invasive disease. In the setting of antibiotics, Hif1a and Camp (which encodes CRAMP) are required for B. thetaiotamicron-induced protection against C. albicans colonization of the gut. Thus, modulating C. albicans GI colonization by activation of gut mucosal immune effectors may represent a novel therapeutic approach for preventing invasive fungal disease in humans.

  5. Vancomycin-sensitive bacteria trigger development of colitis-associated colon cancer by attracting neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuriko; Ito, Sachiko; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease confers an increased risk of developing colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). During the active colitis or developing tumor stage, commensal bacteria show dynamic translocation. However, whether alteration of the bacterial composition in the gut causes CAC is still unclear. To clarify the effect of commensal bacteria on CAC development, we employed an azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced murine CAC model treated with or without antibiotics. In addition, we analyzed the effects of antibiotics on infiltration of myeloid cells, colonic inflammatory responses, and colorectal cancer formation. We found that vancomycin treatment dramatically suppressed tumor development. In addition, AOM/DSS treatment greatly induced the infiltration of Gr-1high/CD11bhigh neutrophils to the colon, which led to the production of tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Vancomycin treatment suppressed the infiltration of neutrophils induced by AOM/DSS. Moreover, vancomycin treatment greatly reduced the colon injury and DNA damage caused by AOM/DSS-induced NO radicals. Our results indicate that vancomycin-sensitive bacteria induced colon inflammation and DNA damage by attracting neutrophils into damaged colon tissue, thus promoting tumor formation. PMID:27050089

  6. Vancomycin-sensitive bacteria trigger development of colitis-associated colon cancer by attracting neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuriko; Ito, Sachiko; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2016-04-06

    Inflammatory bowel disease confers an increased risk of developing colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). During the active colitis or developing tumor stage, commensal bacteria show dynamic translocation. However, whether alteration of the bacterial composition in the gut causes CAC is still unclear. To clarify the effect of commensal bacteria on CAC development, we employed an azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced murine CAC model treated with or without antibiotics. In addition, we analyzed the effects of antibiotics on infiltration of myeloid cells, colonic inflammatory responses, and colorectal cancer formation. We found that vancomycin treatment dramatically suppressed tumor development. In addition, AOM/DSS treatment greatly induced the infiltration of Gr-1(high)/CD11b(high) neutrophils to the colon, which led to the production of tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Vancomycin treatment suppressed the infiltration of neutrophils induced by AOM/DSS. Moreover, vancomycin treatment greatly reduced the colon injury and DNA damage caused by AOM/DSS-induced NO radicals. Our results indicate that vancomycin-sensitive bacteria induced colon inflammation and DNA damage by attracting neutrophils into damaged colon tissue, thus promoting tumor formation.

  7. Gut Commensal Bacteria and Regional Wnt Gene Expression in the Proximal Versus Distal Colon

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Koch, Stefan; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Denning, Patricia; Jobin, Christian; Nusrat, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Regional expression of Wingless/Int (Wnt) genes plays a central role in regulating intestinal development and homeostasis. However, our knowledge of such regional Wnt proteins in the colon remains limited. To understand further the effect of Wnt signaling components in controlling intestinal epithelial homeostasis, we investigated whether the physiological heterogeneity of the proximal and distal colon can be explained by differential Wnt signaling. With the use of a Wnt signaling-specific PCR array, expression of 84 Wnt-mediated signal transduction genes was analyzed, and a differential signature of Wnt-related genes in the proximal versus distal murine colon was identified. Several Wnt agonists (Wnt5a, Wnt8b, and Wnt11), the Wnt receptor frizzled family receptor 3, and the Wnt inhibitory factor 1 were differentially expressed along the colon length. These Wnt signatures were associated with differential epithelial cell proliferation and migration in the proximal versus distal colon. Furthermore, reduced Wnt/β-catenin activity and decreased Wnt5a and Wnt11 expression were observed in mice lacking commensal bacteria, an effect that was reversed by conventionalization of germ-free mice. Interestingly, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 knockout mice showed decreased Wnt5a levels, indicating a role for Toll-like receptor signaling in regulating Wnt5a expression. Our results suggest that the morphological and physiological heterogeneity within the colon is in part facilitated by the differential expression of Wnt signaling components and influenced by colonization with bacteria. PMID:24418259

  8. Gut commensal bacteria and regional Wnt gene expression in the proximal versus distal colon.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Koch, Stefan; Hilgarth, Roland S; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Denning, Patricia; Jobin, Christian; Nusrat, Asma

    2014-03-01

    Regional expression of Wingless/Int (Wnt) genes plays a central role in regulating intestinal development and homeostasis. However, our knowledge of such regional Wnt proteins in the colon remains limited. To understand further the effect of Wnt signaling components in controlling intestinal epithelial homeostasis, we investigated whether the physiological heterogeneity of the proximal and distal colon can be explained by differential Wnt signaling. With the use of a Wnt signaling-specific PCR array, expression of 84 Wnt-mediated signal transduction genes was analyzed, and a differential signature of Wnt-related genes in the proximal versus distal murine colon was identified. Several Wnt agonists (Wnt5a, Wnt8b, and Wnt11), the Wnt receptor frizzled family receptor 3, and the Wnt inhibitory factor 1 were differentially expressed along the colon length. These Wnt signatures were associated with differential epithelial cell proliferation and migration in the proximal versus distal colon. Furthermore, reduced Wnt/β-catenin activity and decreased Wnt5a and Wnt11 expression were observed in mice lacking commensal bacteria, an effect that was reversed by conventionalization of germ-free mice. Interestingly, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 knockout mice showed decreased Wnt5a levels, indicating a role for Toll-like receptor signaling in regulating Wnt5a expression. Our results suggest that the morphological and physiological heterogeneity within the colon is in part facilitated by the differential expression of Wnt signaling components and influenced by colonization with bacteria.

  9. In vitro degradation and fermentation of three dietary fiber sources by human colonic bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend in part on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of the type of supplemented fiber on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a non-adapted human bacterial...

  10. Endophytic bacteria of Mammillaria fraileana, an endemic rock-colonizing cactus of the southern Sonoran Desert.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Blanca R; Bashan, Yoav; Bacilio, Macario

    2011-07-01

    The small cactus Mammillaria fraileana is a pioneer rock-colonizing plant harboring endophytic bacteria with the potential for nitrogen fixation and rock weathering (phosphate solubilization and rock degradation). In seeds, only a combination of culture-independent methods, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and fluorescence vital staining, detected significant amounts of non-culturable, but living, endophytic bacteria distributed underneath the membrane covering the embryo, in the undifferentiated tissue of the embryo, and in the vascular tissue. Large populations of culturable endophytic bacteria were detected in stems and roots of wild plants colonizing rocks in the southern Sonoran Desert, but not in seeds. Among 14 endophytic bacterial isolates found in roots, four isolates were identified by full sequencing of their 16S rRNA gene. In vitro tests indicated that Azotobacter vinelandii M2Per is a potent nitrogen fixer. Solubilization of inorganic phosphate was exhibited by Pseudomonas putida M5TSA, Enterobacter sakazakii M2PFe, and Bacillus megaterium M1PCa, while A. vinelandii M2Per, P. putida M5TSA, and B. megaterium M1PCa weathered rock by reducing the size of rock particles, probably by changing the pH of the liquid media. Cultivated seedlings of M. fraileana, derived from disinfected seeds and inoculated with endophytic bacteria, showed re-colonization 105 days after inoculation. Their densities decreased from the root toward the stem and apical zones. Functional traits in planta of culturable and non-culturable endophytic bacteria in seeds remain unknown.

  11. Methanogens outcompete sulphate reducing bacteria for H2 in the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Strocchi, A; Furne, J; Ellis, C; Levitt, M D

    1994-01-01

    Methanogens and sulphate reducing bacteria compete for H2 in the human colon, and, as a result, faeces usually contain high concentrations of just one of these two organisms. There is controversy over which of these organisms wins the competition for H2, although theoretical data suggest that sulphate reducing bacteria should predominate. To elucidate this question experiments were undertaken in which sulphate enriched homogenates of human sulphate reducing faeces and methane producing faeces were incubated separately or mixed together. Co-incubation of sulphate reducing faeces with methanogenic faeces resulted in a sixfold reduction in the activity of the sulphate reducing bacteria (measured as sulphide production), whereas methane production was not inhibited by co-incubation with sulphate reducing bacteria. Methanogenic faeces also consumed H2 more rapidly and reduced the H2 tension of the homogenate to a lower value than did sulphate reducing faecal samples. In these experiments, methanogens seem to outcompete sulphate reducing bacteria for H2. PMID:7926913

  12. Internalization property of intestinal bacteria in colon cancer and HIV/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Wachsmannova, Lenka; Ciernikova, Sona; Majek, Juraj; Mego, Michal; Stevurkova, Viola; Zajac, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria from the intestinal tract of Slovak and American HIV/AIDS patients and Slovak colon cancer patients were tested for the capacity to be internalized by cells of the HL-60 cell line as well as by normal human lymphocytes. They were anticipated to possess a specific characteristic, i.e. a vigorous ability to be internalized by HL-60 cells and human lymphocytes. This assumption was confirmed by gentamicin protection assay. Internalization of bacteria from HIV/AIDS patients frequently resulted in partial (patients SKM1, SKM22) or complete lysis (patients SKK1-1, SKM12) of HL-60 cells. In comparison with intramucosal bacteria isolated from patients with colorectal cancer (TSG, 883, 660, 838, 536, MZRa), their capacity to internalize HL-60 cells was found to be 15-20 times higher (USP15/7, USP1/4, USP3/3, SK725/5). Partial lysis (patients USP15/7, USP3/3 and SKM22) and complete lysis (patients USP1/4, SKK1-1/1, SKM1/6, SKM12/5) were detected also after internalization of bacteria by normal human lymphocytes. Compared to the amount of intracellular bacteria isolated from patients with HIV/AIDS, the ability of bacteria from patients with colorectal cancer to internalize normal human lymphocytes was significantly lower (10-15 times), yet still higher than that of bacteria isolated from healthy people. Our results present the ability of bacteria of colon cancer patients and HIV/AIDS patients to internalize HL-60 cells and normal human lymphocytes. The findings underline the potentially important function of bacteria in the induction of colorectal cancer and immunodeficiency. The particularly high detection ability of bacteria from HIV/AIDS patients to internalize normal human cells emphasizes their potentially important role in the process of AIDS.

  13. Bacteria from diverse habitats colonize and compete in the mouse gut.

    PubMed

    Seedorf, Henning; Griffin, Nicholas W; Ridaura, Vanessa K; Reyes, Alejandro; Cheng, Jiye; Rey, Federico E; Smith, Michelle I; Simon, Gabriel M; Scheffrahn, Rudolf H; Woebken, Dagmar; Spormann, Alfred M; Van Treuren, William; Ursell, Luke K; Pirrung, Megan; Robbins-Pianka, Adam; Cantarel, Brandi L; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2014-10-09

    To study how microbes establish themselves in a mammalian gut environment, we colonized germ-free mice with microbial communities from human, zebrafish, and termite guts, human skin and tongue, soil, and estuarine microbial mats. Bacteria from these foreign environments colonized and persisted in the mouse gut; their capacity to metabolize dietary and host carbohydrates and bile acids correlated with colonization success. Cohousing mice harboring these xenomicrobiota or a mouse cecal microbiota, along with germ-free "bystanders," revealed the success of particular bacterial taxa in invading guts with established communities and empty gut habitats. Unanticipated patterns of ecological succession were observed; for example, a soil-derived bacterium dominated even in the presence of bacteria from other gut communities (zebrafish and termite), and human-derived bacteria colonized germ-free bystander mice before mouse-derived organisms. This approach can be generalized to address a variety of mechanistic questions about succession, including succession in the context of microbiota-directed therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characteristics of alcohol dehydrogenases of certain aerobic bacteria representing human colonic flora.

    PubMed

    Nosova, T; Jousimies-Somer, H; Kaihovaara, P; Jokelainen, K; Heine, R; Salaspuro, M

    1997-05-01

    We have recently proposed the existence of a bacteriocolonic pathway for ethanol oxidation [i.e., ethanol is oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) of intestinal bacteria resulting in high intracolonic levels of reactive and toxic acetaldehyde]. The aim of this in vitro study was to characterize further ADH activity of some aerobic bacteria, representing the normal human colonic flora. These bacteria were earlier shown to possess high cytosolic ADH activities (Escherichia coli IH 133369, Klebsiella pneumoniae IH 35385, Klebsiella oxytoca IH 35339, Pseudomonas aeruginosa IH 35342, and Hafnia alvei IH 53227). ADHs of the tested bacteria strongly preferred NAD as a cofactor. Marked ADH activities were found in all bacteria, even at low ethanol concentrations (1.5 mM) that may occur in the colon due to bacterial fermentation. The Km for ethanol varied from 29.9 mM for K. pneumoniae to 0.06 mM for Hafnia alvei. The inhibition of ADH by 4-methylpyrazole was found to be of the competitive type in 4 of 5 bacteria, and Ki varied from 18.26 +/- 3.3 mM for Escherichia coli to 0.47 +/- 0.13 mM for K. pneumoniae. At pH 7.4, ADH activity was significantly lower than at pH 9.6 in four bacterial strains. ADH of K. oxytoca, however, showed almost equal activities at neutral pH and at 9.6. In conclusion, NAD-linked alcohol dehydrogenases of aerobic colonic bacteria possess low apparent Km's for ethanol. Accordingly, they may oxidize moderate amounts of ethanol ingested during social drinking with nearly maximal velocity. This may result in the marked production of intracolonic acetaldehyde. Kinetic characteristics of the bacterial enzymes may enable some of them to produce acetaldehyde even from endogenous ethanol formed by other bacteria via alcoholic fermentation. The microbial ADHs were inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole by the same competitive inhibition as hepatic ADH, however, with nearly 1000 times lower susceptibility. Individual variations in human colonic flora may thus

  15. Different cytokine response of primary colonic epithelial cells to commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jing-Gang; Cruickshank, Sheena-Margaret; Singh, Joy-Carmelina-Indira; Farrar, Mark; Lodge, James-Peter-Alan; Felsburg, Peter-John; Carding, Simon-Richard

    2005-06-14

    To determine if primary murine colonic epithelial cells (CEC) respond to commensal bacteria and discriminate between different types of bacteria. A novel CEC: bacteria co-culture system was used to compare the ability of the colonic commensal bacteria, Bacteroides ovatus, E. coli (SLF) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) to modulate production of different cytokines (n = 15) by primary CEC. Antibody staining and flow cytometry were used to investigate Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression by CEC directly ex vivo and TLR responsiveness was determined by examining the ability of TLR ligands to influence CEC cytokine production. Primary CEC constitutively expressed functional TLR2 and TLR4. Cultured in complete medium alone, CEC secreted IL-6, MCP-1 and IP-10 the levels of which were significantly increased upon addition of the TLR ligands peptidoglycan (PGN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to the commensal bacteria induced or up-regulated different patterns of cytokine production and secretion. E. coli induced production of MIP-1alpha/beta and betadefensin3 whereas B. ovatus and L. rhamnosus exclusively induced MCP-1 and MIP-2alpha expression, respectively. TNFalpha, RANTES and MEC were induced or up-regulated in response to some but not all of the bacteria whereas ENA78 and IP-10 were up-regulated in response to all bacteria. Evidence of bacterial interference and suppression of cytokine production was obtained from mixed bacterial: CEC co-cultures. Probiotic LGG suppressed E. coli- and B. ovatus-induced cytokine mRNA accumulation and protein secretion. These observations demonstrate the ability of primary CEC to respond to and discriminate between different strains of commensal bacteria and identify a mechanism by which probiotic bacteria (LGG) may exert anti-inflammatory effects in vivo.

  16. Different cytokine response of primary colonic epithelial cells to commensal bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jing-Gang; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret; Singh, Joy Carmelina Indira; Farrar, Mark; Lodge, James Peter Alan; Felsburg, Peter John; Carding, Simon Richard

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine if primary murine colonic epithelial cells (CEC) respond to commensal bacteria and discriminate between different types of bacteria. METHODS: A novel CEC: bacteria co-culture system was used to compare the ability of the colonic commensal bacteria, Bacteroides ovatus, E. coli (SLF) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) to modulate production of different cytokines (n = 15) by primary CEC. Antibody staining and flow cytometry were used to investigate Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression by CEC directly ex vivo and TLR responsiveness was determined by examining the ability of TLR ligands to influence CEC cytokine production. RESULTS: Primary CEC constitutively expressed functional TLR2 and TLR4. Cultured in complete medium alone, CEC secreted IL-6, MCP-1 and IP-10 the levels of which were significantly increased upon addition of the TLR ligands peptidoglycan (PGN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to the commensal bacteria induced or up-regulated different patterns of cytokine production and secretion. E. coli induced production of MIP-1α/β and β defensin3 whereas B. ovatus and L. rhamnosus exclusively induced MCP-1 and MIP-2α expression, respectively. TNFα, RANTES and MEC were induced or up-regulated in response to some but not all of the bacteria whereas ENA78 and IP-10 were up-regulated in response to all bacteria. Evidence of bacterial interference and suppression of cytokine production was obtained from mixed bacterial: CEC co-cultures. Probiotic LGG suppressed E. coli- and B. ovatus-induced cytokine mRNA accumulation and protein secretion. CONCLUSION: These observations demonstrate the ability of primary CEC to respond to and discriminate between different strains of commensal bacteria and identify a mechanism by which probiotic bacteria (LGG) may exert anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. PMID:15948242

  17. Inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in chicks by defined competitive exclusion bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeni, J L; Wong, A C

    1994-01-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans has been linked to consumption of chicken. Reducing Campylobacter jejuni colonization in chickens can potentially reduce Campylobacter infections in humans. In this study, the reduction of C. jejuni colonization in chicks by oral administration of defined competitive exclusion (CE) cultures, 2.5% dietary carbohydrates, or CE cultures and carbohydrates was examined. Prevention, elimination, or direct challenge of Campylobacter infection was simulated by administering treatments before, after, or at the same time as that of the Campylobacter inoculation. Additionally, the effect of maintaining high levels of protective bacteria was evaluated by administering CE cultures on days 1 and 4 (booster treatment). All treatments reduced C. jejuni colonization. Protection by aerobically grown CE cultures was not statistically different from that by anaerobically grown CE cultures. A combination of Citrobacter diversus 22, Klebsiella pneumoniae 23, and Escherichia coli 25 (CE 3) was the most effective CE treatment. Maintaining high numbers of CE isolates by administering CE boosters did not increase protection. The greatest reduction of Campylobacter colonization was observed in schemes to prevent or eliminate C. jejuni infection. C. jejuni was not detected in the ceca of birds receiving the prevention treatment, CE 3 with mannose, representing a 62% reduction in the colonization rate. The protection factor (PF), a value combining the colonization rate and the level of infection, for CE 3 with mannose was high (> 13.2). Fructo-oligosaccharides alone strongly prevented Campylobacter colonization. Only 8% of the chicks in this group were colonized, with a PF of > 14.3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8017915

  18. Molecular characterization of early colonizer bacteria from wastes in a steel plant.

    PubMed

    Freitas, D B; Lima-Bittencourt, C I; Reis, M P; Costa, P S; Assis, P S; Chartone-Souza, E; Nascimento, A M A

    2008-10-01

    Forty-nine bacteria isolated from four newly-produced waste samples of a steel industry, which had a high content of CaO, MgO, Cr and P2O5, were characterized molecularly and phenotypically by susceptibility testing against heavy metals. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolates belonged to nine genera, Pseudomonas, Micrococcus, Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Dietzia, Kocuria, Diaphorobacter, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus. Besides, some isolates could be affiliated to species: M. luteus, Ac. junii, Ac. schindleri, B. cereus, K. marina, D. nitroreducens and Staph. warneri. The bacteria that were characterized are taxonomically diverse, and Pseudomonas and Micrococcus predominated. Fingerprinting BOX-PCR revealed high genomic heterogeneity among the isolates. Among the heavy metal compounds Zn, Ni, Pb and Cu were least toxic to the bacterial isolates, whereas Ag inhibited all isolates at 0.001 mmol l(-1). Heterotrophic bacteria, affiliated with several phylogentic groups, were able to colonize different wastes of a steel industry. This study extends our knowledge of the early colonizers bacteria populating siderurgic environments. Some of these bacteria could have potential for recycling siderurgic waste for steel production.

  19. Bioluminescent monitoring of in vivo colonization and clearance dynamics by light-emitting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Siouxsie; Robertson, Brian D; Frankel, Gad; Kerton, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence is an excellent reporter system for analysing bacterial colonization and clearance dynamics in vivo. Many bacterial species have been rendered bioluminescent, allowing the sensitive detection of bacterial burden and metabolic activity in real-time and in situ in living animals. In this chapter we describe the protocols for characterizing in vivo infection models using bioluminescent bacteria: from real-time imaging in living animals by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to ex vivo BLI of harvested organs and tissues and, finally, to quantification of bacterial numbers in organ and tissue homogenates by luminometry and viable counts. While the lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens is ideally suited for use in such models, there may be times when alternative luciferases, such as those from the firefly (luc) or marine copepods (Gluc), may be more appropriate. Here we describe the protocols required to monitor colonization and clearance dynamics using bioluminescent bacteria that are lux-, luc-, or Gluc-positive.

  20. Temporal dynamics of the metabolically active rumen bacteria colonizing fresh perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Huws, Sharon A; Edwards, Joan E; Creevey, Christopher J; Rees Stevens, Pauline; Lin, Wanchang; Girdwood, Susan E; Pachebat, Justin A; Kingston-Smith, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated successional colonization of fresh perennial ryegrass (PRG) by the rumen microbiota over time. Fresh PRG was incubated in sacco in the rumens of three Holstein × Friesian cows over a period of 8 h, with samples recovered at various times. The diversity of attached bacteria was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA (cDNA). Results showed that plant epiphytic communities either decreased to low relative abundances or disappeared following rumen incubation, and that temporal colonization of the PRG by the rumen bacteria was biphasic with primary (1 and 2 h) and secondary (4-8 h) events evident with the transition period being with 2-4 h. A decrease in sequence reads pertaining to Succinivibrio spp. and increases in Pseudobutyrivibrio, Roseburia and Ruminococcus spp. (the latter all order Clostridiales) were evident during secondary colonization. Irrespective of temporal changes, the continually high abundances of Butyrivibrio, Fibrobacter, Olsenella and Prevotella suggest that they play a major role in the degradation of the plant. It is clear that a temporal understanding of the functional roles of these microbiota within the rumen is now required to unravel the role of these bacteria in the ruminal degradation of fresh PRG. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Rhizosphere Competitiveness of Trichloroethylene-Degrading, Poplar-Colonizing Recombinant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hojae; Chauhan, Sadhana; Ryoo, Doohyun; Bowers, Kally; Thomas, Stuart M.; Canada, Keith A.; Burken, Joel G.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2000-01-01

    Indigenous bacteria from poplar tree (Populus canadensis var. eugenei ‘Imperial Carolina’) and southern California shrub rhizospheres, as well as two tree-colonizing Rhizobium strains (ATCC 10320 and ATCC 35645), were engineered to express constitutively and stably toluene o-monooxygenase (TOM) from Burkholderia cepacia G4 by integrating the tom locus into the chromosome. The poplar and Rhizobium recombinant bacteria degraded trichloroethylene at a rate of 0.8 to 2.1 nmol/min/mg of protein and were competitive against the unengineered hosts in wheat and barley rhizospheres for 1 month (colonization occurred at a level of 1.0 × 105 to 23 × 105 CFU/cm of root). In addition, six of these recombinants colonized poplar roots stably and competitively with populations as large as 79% ± 12% of all rhizosphere bacteria after 28 days (0.2 × 105 to 31 × 105 CFU/cm of root). Furthermore, five of the most competitive poplar recombinants (e.g., Pb3-1 and Pb5-1, which were identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain PsK recombinants) retained the ability to express TOM for 29 days as 100% ± 0% of the recombinants detected in the poplar rhizosphere expressed TOM constitutively. PMID:11055909

  2. Heat-treated colostrum feeding promotes beneficial bacteria colonization in the small intestine of neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Malmuthuge, Nilusha; Chen, Yanhong; Liang, Guanxiang; Goonewardene, Laksiri A; Guan, Le Luo

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the effect of heat-treated colostrum feeding on the bacterial colonization in calf small intestine of neonatal calves within the first 12h of life. Newborn Holstein bull calves (n=32) were assigned to 3 treatment groups and fed with either fresh colostrum (FC, n=12) or heat-treated (60°C, 60 min) colostrum (HC, n=12) soon after birth, whereas the control (NC, n=8) group did not receive colostrum or water. Small intestinal tissues and contents were collected from proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum at 6 and 12h after birth, following euthanasia. Quantitative real time-PCR was used to explore the colonization of total bacteria, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Escherichia coli. The feeding of colostrum soon after birth increased the colonization of total bacteria in calf gut within the first 12h compared with NC. In contrast, the prevalence of Lactobacillus was lower in HC and FC compared to NC. Remarkable changes in the prevalence of small intestinal tissue-attached Bifidobacterium were observed with the feeding of HC, but not that in small intestinal contents. The prevalence of Bifidobacterium was 3.2 and 5.2 fold higher in HC than FC and NC, respectively, at 6h. Although the feeding of FC did not enhance the prevalence of tissue-attached Bifidobacterium at 6h compared with NC, it displayed a gradual increase over the time that was higher than NC, but similar to that of HC at 12h. Moreover, the colonization of E. coli was drastically reduced in HC calves compared with FC and NC. Thus, the present study suggests that the feeding of HC enhances the colonization of Bifidobacterium but lessens E. coli in the calf small intestine immediately postpartum compared with that of FC and NC. The increased colonization of beneficial bacteria along with the decreased colonization of potential pathogens in calf gut may also diminish the neonatal calf diarrhea when calves are fed heat-treated colostrum soon after birth.

  3. Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria – On the Efficiency of Local Decolonization Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Julia; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Müller, Martin; Kellert, Viktor; Wiemer, Dorothea Franziska; Hinz, Rebecca; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Frickmann, Hagen

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of a disinfectant-based decolonization strategy for multidrug-resistant bacteria like extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Gram-negative bacteria with or without additional fluoroquinolon and carbapenem resistance as well as vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was assessed. Between 2011 and 2015, 25 patients from Libya, Syria, and the Ukraine with war traumata were treated at the Bundeswehr hospital Hamburg. The patients were heavily colonized and infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria, altogether comprising 371 distinct combinations of pathogens and isolation sites. Local disinfection was assessed for effectiveness regarding successful decolonization of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Altogether, 170 cases of successful decolonization were observed, comprising 95 (55.8%) such events at sampling sites that were accessible to disinfecting procedures. The remaining 75 (44.2%) decolonization events had to be considered as spontaneous. In contrast, 95 out of 172 (55.2%) colonized isolation sites that were accessible to disinfection procedures were successfully decolonized. Patient compliance with the enforced hygiene procedures was associated with decolonization success. Systemic antibiotic therapy did not relevantly affect isolation time. Disinfecting washing moderately supports local decolonization of multidrug-resistant pathogens in comparison with spontaneous decolonization rates if the patients’ compliance with the applied hygiene procedures is ensured. PMID:28690877

  4. Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria - On the Efficiency of Local Decolonization Procedures.

    PubMed

    Münch, Julia; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Müller, Martin; Kellert, Viktor; Wiemer, Dorothea Franziska; Hinz, Rebecca; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Frickmann, Hagen

    2017-06-01

    The effectiveness of a disinfectant-based decolonization strategy for multidrug-resistant bacteria like extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Gram-negative bacteria with or without additional fluoroquinolon and carbapenem resistance as well as vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was assessed. Between 2011 and 2015, 25 patients from Libya, Syria, and the Ukraine with war traumata were treated at the Bundeswehr hospital Hamburg. The patients were heavily colonized and infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria, altogether comprising 371 distinct combinations of pathogens and isolation sites. Local disinfection was assessed for effectiveness regarding successful decolonization of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Altogether, 170 cases of successful decolonization were observed, comprising 95 (55.8%) such events at sampling sites that were accessible to disinfecting procedures. The remaining 75 (44.2%) decolonization events had to be considered as spontaneous. In contrast, 95 out of 172 (55.2%) colonized isolation sites that were accessible to disinfection procedures were successfully decolonized. Patient compliance with the enforced hygiene procedures was associated with decolonization success. Systemic antibiotic therapy did not relevantly affect isolation time. Disinfecting washing moderately supports local decolonization of multidrug-resistant pathogens in comparison with spontaneous decolonization rates if the patients' compliance with the applied hygiene procedures is ensured.

  5. Previously unrecognized stages of species-specific colonization in the mutualism between Xenorhabdus bacteria and Steinernema nematodes.

    PubMed

    Chaston, John M; Murfin, Kristen E; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2013-09-01

    The specificity of a horizontally transmitted microbial symbiosis is often defined by molecular communication between host and microbe during initial engagement, which can occur in discrete stages. In the symbiosis between Steinernema nematodes and Xenorhabdus bacteria, previous investigations focused on bacterial colonization of the intestinal lumen (receptacle) of the nematode infective juvenile (IJ), as this was the only known persistent, intimate and species-specific contact between the two. Here we show that bacteria colonize the anterior intestinal cells of other nematode developmental stages in a species-specific manner. Also, we describe three processes that only occur in juveniles that are destined to become IJs. First, a few bacterial cells colonize the nematode pharyngeal-intestinal valve (PIV) anterior to the intestinal epithelium. Second, the nematode intestine constricts while bacteria initially remain in the PIV. Third, anterior intestinal constriction relaxes and colonizing bacteria occupy the receptacle. At each stage, colonization requires X. nematophila symbiosis region 1 (SR1) genes and is species-specific: X. szentirmaii, which naturally lacks SR1, does not colonize unless SR1 is ectopically expressed. These findings reveal new aspects of Xenorhabdus bacteria interactions with and transmission by theirSteinernema nematode hosts, and demonstrate that bacterial SR1 genes aid in colonizing nematode epithelial surfaces.

  6. Previously unrecognized stages of species-specific colonization in the mutualism between Xenorhabdus bacteria and Steinernema nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Chaston, John M.; Murfin, Kristen E.; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A.; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The specificity of a horizontally transmitted microbial symbiosis is often defined by molecular communication between host and microbe during initial engagement, which can occur in discrete stages. In the symbiosis between Steinernema nematodes and Xenorhabdus bacteria, previous investigations focused on bacterial colonization of the intestinal lumen (receptacle) of the nematode infective juvenile (IJ), as this was the only known persistent, intimate, and species-specific contact between the two. Here we show that bacteria colonize the anterior intestinal cells of other nematode developmental stages in a species-specific manner. Also, we describe three processes that only occur in juveniles that are destined to become IJs. First, a few bacterial cells colonize the nematode pharyngeal-intestinal valve (PIV) anterior to the intestinal epithelium. Second, the nematode intestine constricts while bacteria initially remain in the PIV. Third, anterior intestinal constriction relaxes and colonizing bacteria occupy the receptacle. At each stage, colonization requires X. nematophila symbiosis region 1 (SR1) genes and is species-specific: X. szentirmaii, which naturally lacks SR1, does not colonize unless SR1 is ectopically expressed. These findings reveal new aspects of Xenorhabdus bacteria interactions with and transmission by their Steinernema nematode hosts, and demonstrate that bacterial SR1 genes aid in colonizing nematode epithelial surfaces. PMID:23480552

  7. HIV-induced immunosuppression is associated with colonization of the proximal gut by environmental bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liying; Poles, Michael A.; Fisch, Gene S; Ma, Yingfei; Nossa, Carlos; Phelan, Joan A; Pei, Zhiheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of HIV infection on colonization resistance in the proximal gut. Design It was a case-control study. Methods We contrasted microbiota composition between 8 HIV-1-infected patients and 8 HIV-negative controls to characterize community alteration and detect exogenous bacteria in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum as well as the mouth using a universal 16S rRNA gene survey and correlated the findings with HIV serostatus and peripheral blood T-cell counts. Results HIV infection was associated with an enrichment of Proteobacteria (p=0.020) and depletion of Firmicutes (p=0.005) in the proximal gut. In particular, environmental species Burkholderia fungorum and Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi colonized the duodenum of HIV patients who had abnormal blood CD4+ T-cell counts but were absent in HIV-negative controls or HIV patients whose CD4 counts were normal. The two species coexisted and exhibited a decreasing trend proximally towards the stomach and esophagus and were virtually absent in the mouth. B. fungorum always outnumbered B. pachyrhizi in a ratio of approximately 15 to 1 regardless of the body sites (p<0.0001, r2=0.965). Their abundance was inversely correlated with CD4 counts (p=0.004) but not viral load. Overgrowth of potential opportunistic pathogens e.g. Prevotella, Fusobacterium, and Ralstonia and depletion of beneficial bacteria, e.g. Lactobacillus were also observed in HIV patients. Conclusions The colonization of the duodenum by environmental bacteria reflects loss of colonization resistance in HIV infection. Their correlation with CD4 counts suggests that compromised immunity could be responsible for the observed invasion by exogenous microbes. PMID:26731752

  8. Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts are protected from attack by potentially harmful enteric microorganisms, viruses, and parasites by the polarized fully differentiated epithelial cells that make up the epithelium, providing a physical and functional barrier. Enterovirulent bacteria interact with the epithelial polarized cells lining the intestinal barrier, and some invade the cells. A better understanding of the cross talk between enterovirulent bacteria and the polarized intestinal cells has resulted in the identification of essential enterovirulent bacterial structures and virulence gene products playing pivotal roles in pathogenesis. Cultured animal cell lines and cultured human nonintestinal, undifferentiated epithelial cells have been extensively used for understanding the mechanisms by which some human enterovirulent bacteria induce intestinal disorders. Human colon carcinoma cell lines which are able to express in culture the functional and structural characteristics of mature enterocytes and goblet cells have been established, mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal epithelial barrier. Moreover, Caco-2-derived M-like cells have been established, mimicking the bacterial capture property of M cells of Peyer's patches. This review intends to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of human enterovirulent bacteria observed in infected cultured human colon carcinoma enterocyte-like HT-29 subpopulations, enterocyte-like Caco-2 and clone cells, the colonic T84 cell line, HT-29 mucus-secreting cell subpopulations, and Caco-2-derived M-like cells, including cell association, cell entry, intracellular lifestyle, structural lesions at the brush border, functional lesions in enterocytes and goblet cells, functional and structural lesions at the junctional domain, and host cellular defense responses. PMID:24006470

  9. Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Diogo Filho, Augusto; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; de Araújo, Lúcio Borges; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45 h (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under these study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum models demonstrate that root colonization is an intrinsic trait of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Quist, J Cristian; O'Sullivan, Louise A; Desert, Annaëlle; Fivian-Hughes, Amanda S; Millet, Coralie; Jones, T Hefin; Weightman, Andrew J; Rogers, Hilary J; Berry, Colin; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-02-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria possess biotechnologically useful properties that contrast with their opportunistic pathogenicity. The rhizosphere fitness of Bcc bacteria is central to their biocontrol and bioremediation activities. However, it is not known whether this differs between species or between environmental and clinical strains. We investigated the ability of 26 Bcc strains representing nine different species to colonize the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum (pea). Viable counts, scanning electron microscopy and bioluminescence imaging were used to assess root colonization, with Bcc bacteria achieving mean (±sem) levels of 2.49±0.23×10(6) and 5.16±1.87×10(6) c.f.u. per centimetre of root on the A. thaliana and P. sativum models, respectively. The A. thaliana rhizocompetence model was able to reveal loss of colonization phenotypes in Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 transposon mutants that had only previously been observed in competition experiments on the P. sativum model. Different Bcc species colonized each plant model at different rates, and no statistical difference in root colonization was observed between isolates of clinical or environmental origin. Loss of the virulence-associated third chromosomal replicon (>1 Mb DNA) did not alter Bcc root colonization on A. thaliana. In summary, Bcc bacteria possess intrinsic root colonization abilities irrespective of their species or source. As Bcc rhizocompetence does not require their third chromosomal replicon, the possibility of using synthetic biology approaches to engineer virulence-attenuated biotechnological strains is tractable.

  11. The Role of Colonic Bacteria in the Metabolism of the Natural Isoflavone Daidzin to Equol

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones are found in leguminous plants, especially soybeans. They have a structural similarity to natural estrogens, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors and elicit biological activities similar to natural estrogens. They have been suggested to be beneficial for the prevention and therapy of hormone-dependent diseases. After soy products are consumed, the bacteria of the intestinal microflora metabolize isoflavones to metabolites with altered absorption, bioavailability, and estrogenic characteristics. Variations in the effect of soy products have been correlated with the isoflavone metabolites found in plasma and urine samples of the individuals consuming soy products. The beneficial effects of the soy isoflavone daidzin, the glycoside of daidzein, have been reported in individuals producing equol, a reduction product of daidzein produced by specific colonic bacteria in individuals called equol producers. These individuals comprise 30% and 60% of populations consuming Western and soy-rich Asian diets, respectively. Since the higher percentage of equol producers in populations consuming soy-rich diets is correlated with a lower incidence of hormone-dependent diseases, considerable efforts have been made to detect the specific colonic bacteria involved in the metabolism of daidzein to the more estrogenic compound, equol, which should facilitate the investigation of the metabolic activities related to this compound. PMID:25594250

  12. The role of colonic bacteria in the metabolism of the natural isoflavone daidzin to equol.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Fatemeh

    2015-01-14

    Isoflavones are found in leguminous plants, especially soybeans. They have a structural similarity to natural estrogens, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors and elicit biological activities similar to natural estrogens. They have been suggested to be beneficial for the prevention and therapy of hormone-dependent diseases. After soy products are consumed, the bacteria of the intestinal microflora metabolize isoflavones to metabolites with altered absorption, bioavailability, and estrogenic characteristics. Variations in the effect of soy products have been correlated with the isoflavone metabolites found in plasma and urine samples of the individuals consuming soy products. The beneficial effects of the soy isoflavone daidzin, the glycoside of daidzein, have been reported in individuals producing equol, a reduction product of daidzein produced by specific colonic bacteria in individuals called equol producers. These individuals comprise 30% and 60% of populations consuming Western and soy-rich Asian diets, respectively. Since the higher percentage of equol producers in populations consuming soy-rich diets is correlated with a lower incidence of hormone-dependent diseases, considerable efforts have been made to detect the specific colonic bacteria involved in the metabolism of daidzein to the more estrogenic compound, equol, which should facilitate the investigation of the metabolic activities related to this compound.

  13. Colonization of Bacteria on the Surfaces of Cold-Sprayed Copper Coatings Alters Their Electrochemical Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Xinkun; Abdoli, Leila; Liu, Yi; Xia, Peng; Yang, Guanjun; Li, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Copper coatings were fabricated on stainless steel plates by cold spraying. Attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp. on their surfaces in artificial seawater were characterized, and their effects on anticorrosion performances of the coatings were examined. Attached bacteria were observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical behaviors including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with/without bacterial attachment were evaluated using commercial electrochemical analysis station Modulab. Results show that Bacillus sp. opt to settle on low-lying spots of the coating surfaces in early stage, followed by recruitment and attachment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secreted through metabolism of Bacillus sp. The bacteria survive with the protection of EPS. An attachment model is proposed to illustrate the bacterial behaviors on the surfaces of the coatings. Electrochemical data show that current density under Bacillus sp. environment decreases compared to that without the bacteria. Charge-transfer resistance increases markedly in bacteria-containing seawater, suggesting that corrosion resistance increases and corrosion rate decreases. The influencing mechanism of bacteria settlement on corrosion resistance of the cold-sprayed copper coatings was discussed and elucidated.

  14. Colonization of Bacteria on the Surfaces of Cold-Sprayed Copper Coatings Alters Their Electrochemical Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Xinkun; Abdoli, Leila; Liu, Yi; Xia, Peng; Yang, Guanjun; Li, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Copper coatings were fabricated on stainless steel plates by cold spraying. Attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp. on their surfaces in artificial seawater were characterized, and their effects on anticorrosion performances of the coatings were examined. Attached bacteria were observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical behaviors including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with/without bacterial attachment were evaluated using commercial electrochemical analysis station Modulab. Results show that Bacillus sp. opt to settle on low-lying spots of the coating surfaces in early stage, followed by recruitment and attachment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secreted through metabolism of Bacillus sp. The bacteria survive with the protection of EPS. An attachment model is proposed to illustrate the bacterial behaviors on the surfaces of the coatings. Electrochemical data show that current density under Bacillus sp. environment decreases compared to that without the bacteria. Charge-transfer resistance increases markedly in bacteria-containing seawater, suggesting that corrosion resistance increases and corrosion rate decreases. The influencing mechanism of bacteria settlement on corrosion resistance of the cold-sprayed copper coatings was discussed and elucidated.

  15. Colonization and beneficial effects on annual ryegrass by mixed inoculation with plant growth promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Nádia L; Dourado, Ana Catarina; Pais, Isabel; Semedo, José; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Borges, Nuno; Carvalho, Gilda; Barreto Crespo, Maria Teresa; Fareleira, Paula

    2017-05-01

    Multi-strain inoculants have increased potential to accomplish a diversity of plant needs, mainly attributed to its multi-functionality. This work evaluated the ability of a mixture of three bacteria to colonize and induce a beneficial response on the pasture crop annual ryegrass. Pseudomonas G1Dc10 and Paenibacillus G3Ac9 were previously isolated from annual ryegrass and were selected for their ability to perform multiple functions related to plant growth promotion. Sphingomonas azotifigens DSMZ 18530(T) was included due to nitrogen fixing ability. The effects of the bacterial mixture were assessed in gnotobiotic plant inoculation assays and compared with single and dual inoculation treatments. Triple inoculation with 3×10(8) bacteria significantly increased plant dry weight and leaf pigments, indicating improved photosynthetic performance. Plant lipid biosynthesis was enhanced by 65%, mainly due to the rise of linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid with high dietary value. Electrolyte leakage, an indicator of plant membrane stability under stress, was decreased pointing to a beneficial effect by inoculation. Plants physiological condition was more favoured by triple inoculation than by single, although benefits on biomass were only evident relative to non-inoculated plants. The colonization behaviour and coexistence in plant tissues were assessed using FISH and GFP-labelling, combined with confocal microscopy and a cultivation-based approach for quantification. The three strains occupied the same sites, localizing preferentially along root hairs and in stem epidermis. Endophytic colonization was observed as bacteria entered root and stem inner tissues. This study reveals the potential of this mixture of strains for biofertilization, contributing to improve crop productivity and nutritional value.

  16. Bacteria penetrate the normally impenetrable inner colon mucus layer in both murine colitis models and patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin E V; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica; Jabbar, Karolina S; Xia, Lijun; Xu, Hua; Ghishan, Fayez K; Carvalho, Frederic A; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Sjövall, Henrik; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2014-02-01

    The inner mucus layer in mouse colon normally separates bacteria from the epithelium. Do humans have a similar inner mucus layer and are defects in this mucus layer a common denominator for spontaneous colitis in mice models and ulcerative colitis (UC)? The colon mucus layer from mice deficient in Muc2 mucin, Core 1 O-glycans, Tlr5, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Slc9a3 (Nhe3) together with that from dextran sodium sulfate-treated mice was immunostained for Muc2, and bacterial localisation in the mucus was analysed. All murine colitis models revealed bacteria in contact with the epithelium. Additional analysis of the less inflamed IL-10(-/-) mice revealed a thicker mucus layer than wild-type, but the properties were different, as the inner mucus layer could be penetrated both by bacteria in vivo and by fluorescent beads the size of bacteria ex vivo. Clear separation between bacteria or fluorescent beads and the epithelium mediated by the inner mucus layer was also evident in normal human sigmoid colon biopsy samples. In contrast, mucus on colon biopsy specimens from patients with UC with acute inflammation was highly penetrable. Most patients with UC in remission had an impenetrable mucus layer similar to that of controls. Normal human sigmoid colon has an inner mucus layer that is impenetrable to bacteria. The colon mucus in animal models that spontaneously develop colitis and in patients with active UC allows bacteria to penetrate and reach the epithelium. Thus colon mucus properties can be modulated, and this suggests a novel model of UC pathophysiology.

  17. Bacteria penetrate the normally impenetrable inner colon mucus layer in both murine colitis models and patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Malin E V; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica; Jabbar, Karolina S; Xia, Lijun; Xu, Hua; Ghishan, Fayez K; Carvalho, Frederic A; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Sjövall, Henrik; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2014-01-01

    Objective The inner mucus layer in mouse colon normally separates bacteria from the epithelium. Do humans have a similar inner mucus layer and are defects in this mucus layer a common denominator for spontaneous colitis in mice models and ulcerative colitis (UC)? Methods and results The colon mucus layer from mice deficient in Muc2 mucin, Core 1 O-glycans, Tlr5, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Slc9a3 (Nhe3) together with that from dextran sodium sulfate-treated mice was immunostained for Muc2, and bacterial localisation in the mucus was analysed. All murine colitis models revealed bacteria in contact with the epithelium. Additional analysis of the less inflamed IL-10−/− mice revealed a thicker mucus layer than wild-type, but the properties were different, as the inner mucus layer could be penetrated both by bacteria in vivo and by fluorescent beads the size of bacteria ex vivo. Clear separation between bacteria or fluorescent beads and the epithelium mediated by the inner mucus layer was also evident in normal human sigmoid colon biopsy samples. In contrast, mucus on colon biopsy specimens from patients with UC with acute inflammation was highly penetrable. Most patients with UC in remission had an impenetrable mucus layer similar to that of controls. Conclusions Normal human sigmoid colon has an inner mucus layer that is impenetrable to bacteria. The colon mucus in animal models that spontaneously develop colitis and in patients with active UC allows bacteria to penetrate and reach the epithelium. Thus colon mucus properties can be modulated, and this suggests a novel model of UC pathophysiology. PMID:23426893

  18. Evaluation of the intestinal colonization by microencapsulated probiotic bacteria in comparison with the same uncoated strains.

    PubMed

    Del Piano, Mario; Carmagnola, Stefania; Andorno, Silvano; Pagliarulo, Michela; Tari, Roberto; Mogna, Luca; Strozzi, Gian Paolo; Sforza, Filomena; Capurso, Lucio

    2010-09-01

    Beneficial findings concerning probiotics are increasing day by day. However, one of the most important parameter which affects the probiotic activity of a microorganism is its survival during the gastroduodenal transit. Some microencapsulation techniques could be applied to bacterial cells to improve this parameter. A comparison between the intestinal colonization by microencapsulated bacteria and the same not microencapsulated strains has been conducted in a double blind, randomized, cross-over study. The study (April to July 2005) involved 44 healthy volunteers. In particular, participants were divided into 2 groups: group A (21 participants) received a mix of probiotic strains Lactobacillus plantarum LP01 (LMG P-21021) and Bifidobacterium breve BR03 (DSM 16604) in an uncoated form, group B (23 participants) was given the same strains microencapsulated with a gastroresistant material. The not microencapsulated strains were administered at 5 x 10(9) colony forming units/strain/d for 21 days, whereas the microencapsulated bacteria were given at 1 x 10(9) colony forming units/strain/d for 21 days. At the end of the first period of treatment with probiotics a 3 weeks washout phase has been included in the study protocol. At the end of the washout period the groups were crossed: in detail, group A had the microencapsulated and group B the uncoated bacteria. The administered amounts of each strain were the same as the first treatment. The quantitative evaluation of intestinal colonization by strains microencapsulated or not microencapsulated was made by fecal samples examination at the beginning of the clinical trial, after 10 and 21 days of each treatment period. In particular, fecal heterofermentative Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria have been counted. A statistically significant increase in the fecal amounts of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria was recorded in both groups at the end of each treatment compared with d0 or d42 (P<0.0001 and P<0.0001 at d21, P<0.0001 and

  19. H2 and acetate transfers during xylan fermentation between a butyrate-producing xylanolytic species and hydrogenotrophic microorganisms from the human gut.

    PubMed

    Chassard, Christophe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate in vitro interrelationships during xylan fermentation between an H2 and butyrate-producing xylanolytic species recently isolated in our laboratory from human faeces and identified as Roseburia intestinalis and the H2-utilizing acetogen Ruminococcus hydrogenotrophicus or the methanogen Methanobrevibacter smithii. H2 transfer between M. smithii or Ru. hydrogenotrophicus and the xylanolytic species was evidenced, confirming the great potential of these H2-consuming microorganisms to reutilize fermentative H2 during fibre fermentation in the gut. In addition, acetate transfer was demonstrated between the xylanolytic Roseburia sp. and the acetogenic species, both metabolites transfers leading to butyric fermentation of oat xylan without production of H2.

  20. Kinetics and Strain Specificity of Rhizosphere and Endophytic Colonization by Enteric Bacteria on Seedlings of Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuemei; Iniguez, A. Leonardo; Ahmer, Brian M. M.; Triplett, Eric W.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of human-pathogenic, enteric bacteria on the surface and in the interior of raw produce is a significant health concern. Several aspects of the biology of the interaction between these bacteria and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seedlings are addressed here. A collection of enteric bacteria associated with alfalfa sprout contaminations, along with Escherichia coli K-12, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium strain ATCC 14028, and an endophyte of maize, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, were labeled with green fluorescent protein, and their abilities to colonize the rhizosphere and the interior of the plant were compared. These strains differed widely in their endophytic colonization abilities, with K. pneumoniae 342 and E. coli K-12 being the best and worst colonizers, respectively. The abilities of the pathogens were between those of K. pneumoniae 342 and E. coli K-12. All Salmonella bacteria colonized the interiors of the seedlings in high numbers with an inoculum of 102 CFU, although infection characteristics were different for each strain. For most strains, a strong correlation between endophytic colonization and rhizosphere colonization was observed. These results show significant strain specificity for plant entry by these strains. Significant colonization of lateral root cracks was observed, suggesting that this may be the site of entry into the plant for these bacteria. At low inoculum levels, a symbiosis mutant of Medicago truncatula, dmi1, was colonized in higher numbers on the rhizosphere and in the interior by a Salmonella endophyte than was the wild-type host. Endophytic entry of M. truncatula appears to occur by a mechanism independent of the symbiotic infections by Sinorhizobium meliloti or mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:12620870

  1. Dairy bacteria remove in vitro dietary lectins with toxic effects on colonic cells.

    PubMed

    Zárate, G; Chaia, A Perez

    2009-03-01

    To assess in vitro the ability of some dairy bacteria to bind concanavalin A (Con A), peanut agglutinin (PNA) and jacalin (AIL), preventing their toxicity on mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Con A and AIL reduced significantly IEC viability in vitro, as determined by Trypan Blue dye exclusion or by propidium iodide/fluorescein diacetate/Hoescht staining. Different strains of dairy bacteria were able to remove lectins from the media. Two strains were subjected to treatments used to remove S-layer, cell wall proteins, polysaccharides and lectin-like adhesins. They were then assayed for the ability to bind dietary lectins and reduce toxicity against IEC and to adhere to IEC after interaction with lectins. Con A and AIL were removed by Propionibacterium acidipropionici and Propionibacterium freudenreichii by binding with specific sugar moieties on the bacterial surface. Removal of lectins by bacteria impaired IEC protection. Adhesion of P. acidipropionici to IEC was reduced but not abolished after binding Con A or AIL. Removal of Con A or AIL by dairy propionibacteria was effective to avoid the toxic effect against colonic cells in vitro. Consumption of foods containing these bacteria would be a tool to protect the intestinal epithelia.

  2. In Vitro Degradation and Fermentation of Three Dietary Fiber Sources by Human Colonic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Weimer, Paul J.; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Savik, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend partially on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of supplemental fiber type on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a non-adapted human bacterial population from three normal subjects, extent of in vitro fermentation was greater for gum arabic (GA) than for psyllium (PSY), which was greater than that for carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). In a separate experiment, in vitro incubation with feces from 52 subjects with fecal incontinence, before and after random assignment to and consumption of one of three fiber (GA, PSY, or CMC) supplements or a placebo for 20-21d, indicated that prior consumption of a specific fiber source did not increase its degradation by fecal bacteria. Results suggest that the colonic microbial community enriched on a particular fiber substrate can rapidly adapt to the presentation of a new fiber substrate. Clinical implications of the findings are that intake of a fiber source by humans is not expected to result in bacterial adaptation that would require continually larger and eventually intolerable amounts of fiber to achieve therapeutic benefits. PMID:23556460

  3. In vitro degradation and fermentation of three dietary fiber sources by human colonic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Donna Z; Weimer, Paul J; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Savik, Kay

    2013-05-15

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend partially on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of supplemental fiber type on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a nonadapted human bacterial population from three normal subjects, the extent of in vitro fermentation was greater for gum arabic (GA) than for psyllium (PSY), which was greater than that for carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). In a separate experiment, in vitro incubation with feces from 52 subjects with fecal incontinence, before and after random assignment to and consumption of one of three fiber (GA, PSY, or CMC) supplements or a placebo for 20-21 days, indicated that prior consumption of a specific fiber source did not increase its degradation by fecal bacteria. Results suggest that the colonic microbial community enriched on a particular fiber substrate can rapidly adapt to the presentation of a new fiber substrate. Clinical implications of the findings are that intake of a fiber source by humans is not expected to result in bacterial adaptation that would require continually larger and eventually intolerable amounts of fiber to achieve therapeutic benefits.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Endophytic Colonizing Bacteria from Agronomic Crops and Prairie Plants†

    PubMed Central

    Zinniel, Denise K.; Lambrecht, Pat; Harris, N. Beth; Feng, Zhengyu; Kuczmarski, Daniel; Higley, Phyllis; Ishimaru, Carol A.; Arunakumari, Alahari; Barletta, Raúl G.; Vidaver, Anne K.

    2002-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria reside within plant hosts without causing disease symptoms. In this study, 853 endophytic strains were isolated from aerial tissues of four agronomic crop species and 27 prairie plant species. We determined several phenotypic properties and found approximately equal numbers of gram-negative and gram-positive isolates. In a greenhouse study, 28 of 86 prairie plant endophytes were found to colonize their original hosts at 42 days postinoculation at levels of 3.5 to 7.7 log10 CFU/g (fresh weight). More comprehensive colonization studies were conducted with 373 corn and sorghum endophytes. In growth room studies, none of the isolates displayed pathogenicity, and 69 of the strains were recovered from corn or sorghum seedlings at levels of 8.3 log10 CFU/plant or higher. Host range greenhouse studies demonstrated that 26 of 29 endophytes were recoverable from at least one host other than corn and sorghum at levels of up to 5.8 log10 CFU/g (fresh weight). Long-range dent corn greenhouse studies and field trials with 17 wild-type strains and 14 antibiotic-resistant mutants demonstrated bacterial persistence at significant average colonization levels ranging between 3.4 and 6.1 log10 CFU/g (fresh weight) up to 78 days postinoculation. Three prairie and three agronomic endophytes exhibiting the most promising levels of colonization and an ability to persist were identified as Cellulomonas, Clavibacter, Curtobacterium, and Microbacterium isolates by 16S rRNA gene sequence, fatty acid, and carbon source utilization analyses. This study defines for the first time the endophytic nature of Microbacterium testaceum. These microorganisms may be useful for biocontrol and other applications. PMID:11976089

  5. Technical note: fatty acids and purine profile of cecum and colon bacteria as indicators of equine microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Santos, A S; Jerónimo, E; Ferreira, L M; Rodrigues, M A M; Bessa, R J B

    2013-04-01

    The potential use of odd- and branched-chain fatty acids (OBCFA) and purine bases (PB) as microbial markers in the equine hindgut was studied. For this purpose, feed particles adherent bacteria [solid associated bacteria (SAB)] and planktonic bacteria [liquid associated bacteria (PAB)] were isolated from total cecum and colon contents of 8 healthy, crossbred horses (9 ± 3 yr). Horses were fasted for 12 to 15 h before slaughter, and the cecum and colon were identified and clamped in their extremities to avoid mixing of digesta contents. The total cecum or colon contents was collected into thermal containers previously filled with CO2, immediately transported to the laboratory, and subjected to separation of solid and liquid phases to obtain bacterial PAB and SAB pellets from each horse. Overall differences observed were mainly between site of bacterial collection (cecum vs. colon) rather than between type of bacterial population (PAB vs. SAB). Cecal bacteria fraction had greater (P < 0.05) OM, PB, and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA):odd-chain fatty acids (OFA) ratio but less (P < 0.05) BCFA, OFA, BCFA:PB ratio, and adenine:guanine ratio than colon bacterial biomass. Results indicated that the composition of cecal and colon bacteria is very different from that of similar ecosystems (e.g., rumen). These differences can be a reflection of different growth stages or nutrition of particular populations as well as different bacterial metabolic activities. Results presented herein provide evidence that PB and fatty acids can be used as microbial markers in equine studies.

  6. Competition between n-alkane-assimilating yeasts and bacteria during colonization of sandy soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, C; Goebel, I; Wagner, S; Vomberg, A; Klinner, U

    2000-07-01

    An n-alkane-assimilating strain of Candida tropicalis was selected in sandy soil inoculated with microorganisms from contaminated sites. Competition experiments with n-alkane utilizers from different strain collections confirmed that yeasts overgrow bacteria in sandy soil. Acidification of the soil is one of the colonization factors useful for the yeasts. It can be counteracted by addition of bentonite, a clay mineral with high ion exchange capacity, but not, however, by kaolin. Strains of different yeast species showed different levels of competitiveness. Strains of Arxula adeninivorans, Candida maltosa, and Yarrowia lipolytica overgrew strains of C. tropicalis, C. shehatae or Pichia stipitis. Two strains of C. maltosa and Y. lipolytica coexisted during several serial transfers under microcosm conditions.

  7. Colonizing the embryonic zebrafish gut with anaerobic bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Toh, Michael C; Goodyear, Mara; Daigneault, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Van Raay, Terence J

    2013-06-01

    The zebrafish has become increasingly popular for microbiological research. It has been used as an infection model for a variety of pathogens, and is also emerging as a tool for studying interactions between a host and its resident microbial communities. The mouse microbiota has been transplanted into the zebrafish gut, but to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to introduce a bacterial community derived from the human gut. We explored two methods for colonizing the developing gut of 5-day-old germ-free zebrafish larvae with a defined anaerobic microbial community derived from a single human fecal sample. Both environmental exposure (static immersion) and direct microinjection into the gut resulted in the establishment of two species-Lactobacillus paracasei and Eubacterium limosum-from a community of 30 strains consisting of 22 anaerobic species. Of particular interest is E. limosum, which, as a strict anaerobe, represents a group of bacteria which until now have not been shown to colonize the developing zebrafish gut. Our success here indicates that further investigation of zebrafish as a tool for studying human gut microbial communities is warranted.

  8. Biofilm formation, communication and interactions of leaching bacteria during colonization of pyrite and sulfur surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bellenberg, Sören; Díaz, Mauricio; Noël, Nanni; Sand, Wolfgang; Poetsch, Ansgar; Guiliani, Nicolas; Vera, Mario

    2014-11-01

    Bioleaching of metal sulfides is an interfacial process where biofilm formation is considered to be important in the initial steps of this process. Among the factors regulating biofilm formation, molecular cell-to-cell communication such as quorum sensing is involved. A functional LuxIR-type I quorum sensing system is present in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, cell-to-cell communication among different species of acidophilic mineral-oxidizing bacteria has not been studied in detail. These aspects were the scope of this study with emphasis on the effects exerted by the external addition of mixtures of synthetic N-acyl-homoserine-lactones on pure and binary cultures. Results revealed that some mixtures had inhibitory effects on pyrite leaching. Some of them correlated with changes in biofilm formation patterns on pyrite coupons. We also provide evidence that A. thiooxidans and Acidiferrobacter spp. produce N-acyl-homoserine-lactones. In addition, the observation that A. thiooxidans cells attached more readily to pyrite pre-colonized by living iron-oxidizing acidophiles than to heat-inactivated or biofilm-free pyrite grains suggests that other interactions also occur. Our experiments show that pre-cultivation conditions influence A. ferrooxidans attachment to pre-colonized pyrite surfaces. The understanding of cell-to-cell communication may consequently be used to develop attempts to influence biomining/bioremediation processes.

  9. Commensal Bacteria-Dependent Indole Production Enhances Epithelial Barrier Function in the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yosuke; Kinoshita, Makoto; Harada, Kazuo; Mizutani, Masafumi; Masahata, Kazunori; Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Microbiota have been shown to have a great influence on functions of intestinal epithelial cells (ECs). The role of indole as a quorum-sensing (QS) molecule mediating intercellular signals in bacteria has been well appreciated. However, it remains unknown whether indole has beneficial effects on maintaining intestinal barriers in vivo. In this study, we analyzed the effect of indole on ECs using a germ free (GF) mouse model. GF mice showed decreased expression of junctional complex molecules in colonic ECs. The feces of specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice contained a high amount of indole; however the amount was significantly decreased in the feces of GF mice by 27-fold. Oral administration of indole-containing capsules resulted in increased expression of both tight junction (TJ)- and adherens junction (AJ)-associated molecules in colonic ECs in GF mice. In accordance with the increased expression of these junctional complex molecules, GF mice given indole-containing capsules showed higher resistance to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. A similar protective effect of indole on DSS-induced epithelial damage was also observed in mice bred in SPF conditions. These findings highlight the beneficial role of indole in establishing an epithelial barrier in vivo. PMID:24278294

  10. Reclassification of Eubacterium desmolans as Butyricicoccus desmolans comb. nov., and description of Butyricicoccus faecihominis sp. nov., a butyrate-producing bacterium from human faeces.

    PubMed

    Takada, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Koichi; Makino, Hiroshi; Kushiro, Akira

    2016-10-01

    A Gram-positive-staining, coccoid-shaped, non-motile, asporogenous, obligately anaerobic and butyrate-producing bacterium was recovered from a healthy human's faeces. The organism was isolated by the enrichment culture technique using yeast extract-casein hydrolysate-fatty acids broth supplemented with 0.5 % mucin. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that the novel strain should be classified as a member of the Eubacterium desmolans-related cluster in the family Ruminococcaceae. Furthermore, this analysis demonstrated that the type strains of Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (95.6 %) and Eubacterium desmolans (94.7 %) were the closest phylogenetic neighbours to strain YIT 12789T. However, DNA‒DNA reassociation values with these closest strains were less than 20 %. On the basis of the phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic features, the novel coccoid-shaped bacterium should be designated as a representative of a novel species of the genus Butyricicoccus, for which the name Butyricicoccus faecihominis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIT 12789T (=JCM 31056T=DSM 100989T). It is also proposed that Eubacterium desmolans be reclassified in the genus Butyricicoccus as Butyricicoccus desmolans comb. nov.

  11. Bacteria used for the production of yogurt inactivate carcinogens and prevent DNA damage in the colon of rats.

    PubMed

    Wollowski, I; Ji, S T; Bakalinsky, A T; Neudecker, C; Pool-Zobel, B L

    1999-01-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria prevent carcinogen-induced preneoplastic lesions and tumors in rat colon. Because the mechanisms responsible for these protective effects are unknown, two strains of lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus 191R and Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus CH3, that are used to produce yogurt, were investigated in vitro and in vivo to elucidate their potential to deactivate carcinogens. Using the "Comet assay" to detect genetic damage, we found that L. bulgaricus 191R applied orally to rats could prevent 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine-induced DNA breaks in the colon in vivo, whereas St. thermophilus CH3 were not effective. However, in vitro, both strains prevented DNA damage induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in isolated primary rat colon cells. Extracts prepared from milk fermented with St. thermophilus CH3 were as efficient in deactivating MNNG as was L-cysteine. Isolated metabolites arising from bacteria during fermentation in the colon or in milk [L(+) lactate, D(-) lactate, palmitic acid and isopalmitic acid] were not effective. We postulate that thiol-containing breakdown products of proteins, via catalysis by bacterial proteases, could be one mechanism by which MNNG or other carcinogens are deactivated in the gut lumen resulting in reduced damage to colonic mucosal cells.

  12. [Colonization characteristics of endophytic bacteria NJ13 in Panax ginseng and its biocontrol efficiency against Alternaria leaf spot of ginseng].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Qing; Li, Tong; Li, Xin-Lian; Jiang, Yun; Tian, Lei; Xu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    To reveal the colonization characteristics in host of endophytic biocontrol bacteria NJ13 isolated from Panax ginseng, this study obtained the marked strain NJ13-R which was double antibiotic resistant to rifampicin and streptomycin through enhancing the method of inducing antibiotic. The colonization characteristics in ginseng and its biocontrol efficiency against Alternaria spot of ginseng in the field were studied. The results showed that the strain could colonize in root, stem and leaf of ginseng and the colonization amount was positive correlated with inoculation concentration. Meanwhile, the strain could infect and then transfer in different tissues of ginseng The colonization amount of strain in roots and leaves of ginseng increased first and then decreased. However, the tendency of colonization amount of strain in stems was ascend at first and then descend slowly, and was more than that in roots and leaves along with time, which had a preference to specific tissue of its host. In field experiment, the endophytic bacteria NJ13 was proved to be effective in controlling Alternaria leaf spot of ginseng. The biocontrol efficiency of fermentation broth at the concentration of 0.76 x 10(8) cfu x mL(-1) reached 75.62%, which was close to the controlling level (73.06%) of 0.67 mg x L(-1) 50% cyprodinil WG.

  13. Nasal colonization by four potential respiratory bacteria in healthy children attending kindergarten or elementary school in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Bae, Songmee; Yu, Jae-Yon; Lee, Kwangjun; Lee, Sunhwa; Park, Bohyun; Kang, Yeonho

    2012-05-01

    A longitudinal analysis was carried out of the colonization by four potential respiratory pathogens - Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Staphylococcus aureus - in 165 healthy children (aged 3-7 years) attending three kindergartens and 417 healthy children (aged 7-10 years) attending an elementary school in Seoul, Korea, by four consecutive examinations over 1 year. The prevalence of nasal carriers of one or more of four bacteria was found to be higher in younger children (≤7 years) (mean 68.6%) than that in older children (mean 46.8%). The mean rates of nasal carriage of Strep. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and Staph. aureus were 16.8, 18.9, 20.2 and 18.2%, respectively. Colonization by Strep. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis was higher in pre-school children (28.6, 32.4 and 35.0%, respectively) than in school children (12.2, 13.6 and 14.3%, respectively). Carriage trends differed with age, with Strep. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis colonization decreasing with age but Staph. aureus colonization increasing. Positive associations of co-occurrence between Strep. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were evident, with a significant negative association evident between Staph. aureus and the other three bacteria. A better understanding of the colonization and interaction of potential respiratory pathogens may be important for predicting changes in bacterial ecology and for designing control strategies that target bacterial colonization in upper respiratory tract infections.

  14. Potential sources of bacteria colonizing the cryoconite of an Alpine glacier

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, Andrea; Navarra, Federico; Tagliaferri, Ilario; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Minora, Umberto; Azzoni, Roberto Sergio; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the potential contribution of ice-marginal environments to the microbial communities of cryoconite holes, small depressions filled with meltwater that form on the surface of Forni Glacier (Italian Alps). Cryoconite holes are considered the most biologically active environments on glaciers. Bacteria can colonize these environments by short-range transport from ice-marginal environments or by long-range transport from distant areas. We used high throughput DNA sequencing to identify Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) present in cryoconite holes and three ice-marginal environments, the moraines, the glacier forefield, and a large (> 3 m high) ice-cored dirt cone occurring on the glacier surface. Bacterial communities of cryoconite holes were different from those of ice-marginal environments and hosted fewer OTUs. However, a network analysis revealed that the cryoconite holes shared more OTUs with the moraines and the dirt cone than with the glacier forefield. Ice-marginal environments may therefore act as sources of bacteria for cryoconite holes, but differences in environmental conditions limit the number of bacterial strains that may survive in them. At the same time, cryoconite holes host a few OTUs that were not found in any ice-marginal environment we sampled, thus suggesting that some bacterial populations are positively selected by the specific environmental conditions of the cryoconite holes. PMID:28358872

  15. Salmonella colonization activates the plant immune system and benefits from association with plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanhong; Altier, Craig; Martin, Gregory B

    2013-09-01

    Despite increasing incidences of human salmonellosis caused by consumption of contaminated vegetables, relatively little is known about how the plant immune system responds to and may inhibit Salmonella colonization. Here we show that Salmonella Typhimurium activates the plant immune system primarily due to its recognition of the flg22 region in Salmonella flagellin. Several previously identified plant genes that play a role in immunity were found to affect the host response to Salmonella. The Salmonella flg22 (Seflg22) peptide induced the immune response in leaves which effectively restricted the growth of Salmonella as well as the plant pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Induction of immune responses by Seflg22 was dependent on the plant FLS2 receptor. Salmonella multiplied poorly on plant tissues similar to other bacteria which are non-pathogenic to plants. However, Salmonella populations increased significantly when co-inoculated with P. syringae pv. tomato but not when co-inoculated with a type III secretion system mutant of this pathogen. Our results suggest that Salmonella benefits from the immune-suppressing effects of plant pathogenic bacteria, and this growth enhancement may increase the risk of salmonellosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Potential sources of bacteria colonizing the cryoconite of an Alpine glacier.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Andrea; Navarra, Federico; Tagliaferri, Ilario; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Minora, Umberto; Azzoni, Roberto Sergio; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio; Ambrosini, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the potential contribution of ice-marginal environments to the microbial communities of cryoconite holes, small depressions filled with meltwater that form on the surface of Forni Glacier (Italian Alps). Cryoconite holes are considered the most biologically active environments on glaciers. Bacteria can colonize these environments by short-range transport from ice-marginal environments or by long-range transport from distant areas. We used high throughput DNA sequencing to identify Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) present in cryoconite holes and three ice-marginal environments, the moraines, the glacier forefield, and a large (> 3 m high) ice-cored dirt cone occurring on the glacier surface. Bacterial communities of cryoconite holes were different from those of ice-marginal environments and hosted fewer OTUs. However, a network analysis revealed that the cryoconite holes shared more OTUs with the moraines and the dirt cone than with the glacier forefield. Ice-marginal environments may therefore act as sources of bacteria for cryoconite holes, but differences in environmental conditions limit the number of bacterial strains that may survive in them. At the same time, cryoconite holes host a few OTUs that were not found in any ice-marginal environment we sampled, thus suggesting that some bacterial populations are positively selected by the specific environmental conditions of the cryoconite holes.

  17. Effects of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and sexual intercourse on vaginal colonization with the probiotic Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05.

    PubMed

    Ngugi, Benjamin M; Hemmerling, Anke; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Kikuvi, Gideon; Gikunju, Joseph; Shiboski, Stephen; Fredricks, David N; Cohen, Craig R

    2011-11-01

    Several fastidious bacteria have been associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), but their role in lactobacilli recolonization failure is unknown. We studied the effect of 7 BV-associated bacterial species and 2 Lactobacillus species on vaginal colonization with Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05 (LACTIN-V). Twenty-four women with BV were given a 5-day course of metronidazole vaginal gel and then randomized 3:1 to receive either LACTIN-V or placebo applied vaginally once daily for 5 initial consecutive days, followed by a weekly application over 2 weeks. Vaginal swabs for L. crispatus CTV-05 culture and 9 bacterium-specific 16S rRNA gene quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were analyzed on several study visits for the 18 women receiving LACTIN-V. Vaginal colonization with CTV-05 was achieved in 61% of the participants receiving LACTIN-V at either day 10 or day 28 visit and 44% at day 28. Participants not colonized with CTV-05 had generally higher median concentrations of BV-associated bacteria compared to those who colonized. Between enrollment and day 28, the median concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis minimally reduced from 10 to 10 16S rRNA gene copies per swab in women who colonized with CTV-05 but increased from 10 to 10 in those who failed to colonize (P = 0.19). Similarly, the median concentration of Atopobium spp. reduced from 10 16S rRNA gene copies per swab to below limit of detection in women who colonized with CTV-05, but increased from 10 to 10 in those who failed to colonize (P = 0.04). The presence of endogenous L. crispatus at enrollment was found to be significantly associated with a reduced odds of colonization with CTV-05 on day 28 (P = 0.003), and vaginal intercourse during the study significantly impaired successful CTV-05 colonization (P = 0.018). Vaginal concentration of certain BV-associated bacteria, vaginal intercourse during treatment, and the presence of endogenous L. crispatus at enrollment predict colonization with probiotic

  18. Effects of BV-Associated Bacteria and Sexual Intercourse on Vaginal Colonization with the Probiotic Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05

    PubMed Central

    Ngugi, Benjamin M.; Hemmerling, Anke; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Kikuvi, Gideon; Gikunju, Joseph; Shiboski, Stephen; Fredricks, David N.; Cohen, Craig R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Several fastidious bacteria have been associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), but their role in lactobacilli recolonization failure is unknown. We studied the effect of seven BV-associated bacterial species and two Lactobacillus species on vaginal colonization with L. crispatus CTV-05 (LACTIN-V). Methods Twenty four women with BV were given a 5-day course of metronidazole vaginal gel and then randomized 3:1 to receive either LACTIN-V or placebo applied vaginally once daily for 5 initial consecutive days, followed by a weekly application over 2 weeks. Vaginal swabs for L. crispatus CTV-05 culture and 9-bacterium specific 16S rRNA gene quantitative PCR assays were analyzed on several study visits for the 18 women receiving LACTIN-V. Results Vaginal colonization with CTV-05 was achieved in 61% of the participants receiving LACTIN-V at either the day 10 or the 28 visit and 44% at day 28. Participants not colonized with CTV-05 had generally higher median concentrations of BV-associated bacteria compared to those who colonized. Between enrollment and day 28, the median concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis minimally reduced from 104.5 to 104.3 16S rRNA gene copies per swab in women who colonized with CTV-05 but increased from 105.7 to 107.3 in those who failed to colonize (p=0.19). Similarly, the median concentration of Atopobium spp. reduced from 102.7 16S rRNA gene copies per swab to below limit of detection in women who colonized with CTV-05 but increased from 102.7 to 106.6 in those who failed to colonize (p=0.04). The presence of endogenous L. crispatus at enrollment was found to be significantly associated with a reduced odds of colonization with CTV-05 on day 28 (p=0.003) and vaginal intercourse during the study significantly impaired successful CTV-05 colonization (p=0.018). Conclusion Vaginal concentration of certain BV-associated bacteria, vaginal intercourse during treatment and presence of endogenous L. crispatus at enrollment predict

  19. Adopting Bacteria in Order to Adapt to Water—How Reed Beetles Colonized the Wetlands (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Donaciinae)

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, Birgit; Kölsch, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reviews the biology of reed beetles (Donaciinae), presents experimental data on the role of specific symbiotic bacteria, and describes a molecular method for the detection of those bacteria. Reed beetles are herbivores living on wetland plants, each species being mono- or oligo-phagous. They lay their eggs on the host plant and the larvae live underwater in the sediment attached to its roots. The larvae pupate there in a water-tight cocoon, which they build using a secretion that is produced by symbiotic bacteria. The bacteria are located in four blind sacs at the foregut of the larvae; in (female) adults they colonize two out of the six Malpighian tubules. Tetracycline treatment of larvae reduced their pupation rate, although the bacteria could not be fully eliminated. When the small amount of bacterial mass attached to eggs was experimentally removed before hatching, symbiont free larvae resulted, showing the external transmission of the bacteria to the offspring. Specific primers were designed to detect the bacteria, and to confirm their absence in manipulated larvae. The pupation underwater enabled the reed beetles to permanently colonize the wetlands and to diversify in this habitat underexploited by herbivorous insects (adaptive radiation). PMID:26467833

  20. Adopting Bacteria in Order to Adapt to Water-How Reed Beetles Colonized the Wetlands (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Donaciinae).

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Birgit; Kölsch, Gregor

    2011-12-09

    The present paper reviews the biology of reed beetles (Donaciinae), presents experimental data on the role of specific symbiotic bacteria, and describes a molecular method for the detection of those bacteria. Reed beetles are herbivores living on wetland plants, each species being mono- or oligo-phagous. They lay their eggs on the host plant and the larvae live underwater in the sediment attached to its roots. The larvae pupate there in a water-tight cocoon, which they build using a secretion that is produced by symbiotic bacteria. The bacteria are located in four blind sacs at the foregut of the larvae; in (female) adults they colonize two out of the six Malpighian tubules. Tetracycline treatment of larvae reduced their pupation rate, although the bacteria could not be fully eliminated. When the small amount of bacterial mass attached to eggs was experimentally removed before hatching, symbiont free larvae resulted, showing the external transmission of the bacteria to the offspring. Specific primers were designed to detect the bacteria, and to confirm their absence in manipulated larvae. The pupation underwater enabled the reed beetles to permanently colonize the wetlands and to diversify in this habitat underexploited by herbivorous insects (adaptive radiation).

  1. Interaction between plants and bacteria: glucosinolates and phyllospheric colonization of cruciferous vegetables by Enterobacter radicincitans DSM 16656.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Monika; Krumbein, Angelika; Ruppel, Silke

    2009-01-01

    For determining interactive plant-bacterial effects between glucosinolates and phyllospheric colonization by a plant growth-promoting strain, Enterobacter radicincitans DSM 16656, in cruciferous vegetables, the extent of bacterial colonization was assessed in 5 cruciferous vegetables (Brassica juncea, Brassica campestris, Brassica oleracea var. capitata, Brassica rapa var. alboglabra, Nasturtium officinale) using a species-specific TaqMan probe and quantitative real-time PCR. Colonization ability of inoculated E. radicincitans in the phyllosphere of these species varied from inability to colonize B. rapa up to a very good colonization rate of B. campestris. In addition to morphological factors and other plant compounds, the colonization rate was affected by different individual aromatic and aliphatic glucosinolates and their concentration, revealing that both plant pathogens and plant growth-promoting bacteria were affected by glucosinolates in their colonization behavior. In contrast, after E. radicincitans inoculation neither the total nor the individual glucosinolate concentrations in the phyllosphere of the 5 cruciferous species were affected, indicating that the nonpathogenic E. radicincitans might cause only poor cell damage by metabolizing plant cell components and does not induce a plant defense response and thus subsequently an increased glucosinolate concentration in the phyllosphere. Moreover, E. radicincitans induced no stimulation of indole glucosinolate biosynthesis by additional bacterial auxin supply.

  2. Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria colonization of healthy US military personnel in the US and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The US military has seen steady increases in multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria (GNB) infections in casualties from Iraq and Afghanistan. This study evaluates the prevalence of MDR GNB colonization in US military personnel. Methods GNB colonization surveillance of healthy, asymptomatic military personnel (101 in the US and 100 in Afghanistan) was performed by swabbing 7 anatomical sites. US-based personnel had received no antibiotics within 30 days of specimen collection, and Afghanistan-based personnel were receiving doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis at time of specimen collection. Isolates underwent genotypic and phenotypic characterization. Results The only colonizing MDR GNB recovered in both populations was Escherichia coli (p=0.01), which was seen in 2% of US-based personnel (all perirectal) and 11% of Afghanistan-based personnel (10 perirectal, 1 foot+groin). Individuals with higher off-base exposures in Afghanistan did not show a difference in overall GNB colonization or MDR E. coli colonization, compared with those with limited off-base exposures. Conclusion Healthy US- and Afghanistan-based military personnel have community onset-MDR E. coli colonization, with Afghanistan-based personnel showing a 5.5-fold higher prevalence. The association of doxycycline prophylaxis or other exposures with antimicrobial resistance and increased rates of MDR E. coli colonization needs further evaluation. PMID:23384348

  3. Antibiotic treatment with ampicillin accelerates the healing of colonic damage impaired by aspirin and coxib in the experimental colitis. Importance of intestinal bacteria, colonic microcirculation and proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zwolinska-Wcislo, M; Krzysiek-Maczka, G; Ptak-Belowska, A; Karczewska, E; Pajdo, R; Sliwowski, Z; Urbanczyk, K; Drozdowicz, D; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W; Brzozowski, T

    2011-06-01

    -α levels, as well as an overexpression of mRNA for IL-1β and TNF-α, COX-2, VEGF and iNOS in the colonic tissue. ASA and coxib also resulted also in a significant increase of E. coli counts in the stool at day 3 and day 10 day of the observation compared with the intact rats. Moreover, E. coli translocation from the colon to the blood and extraintestinal organs such as liver and spleen in the group of rats treated without or with ASA and coxib. E. coli was the most common bacteria isolated from these organs. Treatment with ampicillin significantly attenuated the ASA- or celecoxib-induced increase in plasma levels of IL-1β and TNF-α and suppressed the mucosal mRNA expression for IL-1β and TNF-β, COX-2, iNOS and VEGF in the colonic mucosa. Ampicillin administration caused a significant fall in the number of E. coli in the faeces at day 3 and day 10 of observation in ASA- and coxib-treated rats with colitis. Antibiotic therapy markedly reduced bacterial translocation to the colonic tissue and the extraintestinal organs such as the liver and spleen. We conclude that administration of ASA and to lesser extent of celecoxib, delays the healing of experimental colitis and enhances the alterations in colonic blood flow, proinflammatory markers such as IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2, iNOS and VEGF and increased intestinal mucosal permeability resulting in the intestinal bacterial translocation to the blood, spleen and liver. Antibiotic treatment with ampicillin is effective in the diminishing of the severity of colonic damage, counteracts both the NSAID-induced fall in colonic microcirculation and bacterial E.coli translocation to the extraintestinal organs.

  4. Capturing One of the Human Gut Microbiome’s Most Wanted: Reconstructing the Genome of a Novel Butyrate-Producing, Clostridial Scavenger from Metagenomic Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Jeraldo, Patricio; Hernandez, Alvaro; Nielsen, Henrik B.; Chen, Xianfeng; White, Bryan A.; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Nelson, Heidi; Alhquist, David; Boardman, Lisa; Chia, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The role of the microbiome in health and disease is attracting great attention, yet we still know little about some of the most prevalent microorganisms inside our bodies. Several years ago, Human Microbiome Project (HMP) researchers generated a list of “most wanted” taxa: bacteria both prevalent among healthy volunteers and distantly related to any sequenced organisms. Unfortunately, the challenge of assembling high-quality genomes from a tangle of metagenomic reads has slowed progress in learning about these uncultured bacteria. Here, we describe how recent advances in sequencing and analysis allowed us to assemble “most wanted” genomes from metagenomic data collected from four stool samples. Using a combination of both de novo and guided assembly methods, we assembled and binned over 100 genomes from an initial data set of over 1,300 Gbp. One of these genome bins, which met HMP’s criteria for a “most wanted” taxa, contained three essentially complete genomes belonging to a previously uncultivated species. This species is most closely related to Eubacterium desmolans and the clostridial cluster IV/Clostridium leptum subgroup species Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (71–76% average nucleotide identity). Gene function analysis indicates that the species is an obligate anaerobe, forms spores, and produces the anti-inflammatory short-chain fatty acids acetate and butyrate. It also appears to take up metabolically costly molecules such as cobalamin, methionine, and branch-chained amino acids from the environment, and to lack virulence genes. Thus, the evidence is consistent with a secondary degrader that occupies a host-dependent, nutrient-scavenging niche within the gut; its ability to produce butyrate, which is thought to play an anti-inflammatory role, makes it intriguing for the study of diseases such as colon cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. In conclusion, we have assembled essentially complete genomes from stool metagenomic data, yielding

  5. Risk factors for infection development after transrectal prostate biopsy and the role of resistant bacteria in colonic flora.

    PubMed

    Eruz, Emine Dilek; Yalci, Aysun; Ozden, Eriz; Aslaner, Halide; Ogucu-Durgun, Suna; Koseoglu-Taymur, Deniz Derya; Memikoglu, Kemal Osman; Erdem, Hakan; Kurt, Halil

    2017-02-28

    In this study, we aimed to identify risk factors for the development of infectious complications after prostate biopsy and to investigate the role of intestinal colonization of bacteria that are resistant to prophylactic antibiotics. A total of 168 patients who had undergone transrectal prostate biopsy (TRPB) under ciprofloxacin and gentamycin prophylaxis were included in the study. Stool cultures and subsequent antibiotic susceptibility testing were performed in all patients before the start of antibiotic prophylaxis. Of the 168 patients, 17 (10.1%) developed urinary tract infection (UTI), while 6 (3.57%) developed sepsis within seven days after biopsy. Ciprofloxacin-resistant bacterial colonization was detected in 81 (48.2%) of the patients. None of the patients with ciprofloxacin-sensitive bacteria in intestinal flora developed a UTI. The colonization of intestinal ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria increased UTI risk significantly after TRPB (p < 0.0001). Urolithiasis history, presence of permanent urinary catheterization, hospitalization history for more than 48 hours in the last year, and recent antibiotic usage significantly increased UTI risk after TRPB. Development of an infection was more frequent in patients with resistant bacterial colonization. We hope to guide more comprehensive studies designed to find a standard prophylactic regimen for TRPB that can be used all over the world.

  6. Butyrate-producing probiotics reduce nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression in rats: new insight into the probiotics for the gut-liver axis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hitoshi; Niioka, Maki; Kobayashi, Noriko; Tanaka, Mamoru; Watanabe, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes simple steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The gut-derived endotoxin plays an essential role in the pathophysiological development and progression of NAFLD. By using rat models of choline-deficient/L-amino acid-defined (CDAA)-diet-induced NAFLD, we examined whether MIYAIRI 588--a butyrate-producing probiotic--prevents the progression of pathophysiological changes from steatosis to hepatocarcinogenesis. In vivo experiments showed that treatment with MIYAIRI 588 reduced CDAA-diet-induced hepatic lipid deposition and significantly improved the triglyceride content, insulin resistance, serum endotoxin levels, and hepatic inflammatory indexes. We also found that MIYAIRI 588 substantially increased the activation of hepatic adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and AKT and the expression of lipogenesis- or lipolysis-related proteins. MIYAIRI 588 also improved CDAA-diet-induced delocalization and substantially decreased the expression of the tight-junction proteins intestinal zonula occluden-1 and occludin in CDAA-diet-fed rats. Further, the MIYAIRI 588-treated rats also showed remarkable induction of nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its targeted antioxidative enzymes, which suppressed hepatic oxidative stress. In vitro studies revealed that treatment with sodium butyrate (NaB) also activated AMPK and AKT and enhanced Nrf2 expression by precluding ubiquitination, thereby increasing the half-life of the Nrf2 protein. Pharmacological studies and siRNA knockdown experiments showed that NaB-mediated AMPK activation induced the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Sirtuin 1, leading to the increased assembly of mammalian TOR complex 2 and phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473 and subsequent induction of Nrf2 expression and activation. These favorable changes caused an obvious decrease in hepatic fibrous deposition, GST

  7. Nasopharyngeal colonization by potentially pathogenic bacteria found in healthy semi-captive wild-born chimpanzees in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mugisha, Lawrence; Köndgen, Sophie; Kaddu-Mulindwa, Deogratias; Gaffikin, Lynne; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2014-02-01

    Information on the chimpanzee nasopharygeal colonization in captive sanctuaries and in the wild is rare. This study was undertaken to establish the nasopharygeal colonization and potential bacterial pathogens in sanctuary chimpanzees as a basis for improving chimpanzee and employee health. Nasopharygeal colonization of 39 healthy chimpanzees were analyzed by microbiological cultivation method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We report four major phyla dominated by Proteobacteria (50%), Fermicutes (35.7%), Bacteriodes (7.1%), and Cynobacteria (7.1%) in healthy semi-captive chimpanzees. Further classification based on 7-base oligomers revealed the following genera: Streptococcus, Veillonella, Neisseria, Prevotella, Kingella and unclassified Cynobacteria, Actinobacillus, Bacteriodes and Pasteurellaceae. On microbiological cultivation we were able to identify and characterize some of the bacteria to species level as Klebsiella pneumonie and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being dominant bacteria with 54.7% and 50% colonization, respectively. Of these, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Klebsiella, and Haemophillus have representatives known to potentially cause severe respiratory disease. Our data present important information on chimpanzee nasopharygeal colonization as a guide to understanding disease processes and pharmaceutical therapies required for improving the health of chimpanzees. The results from this study will guide the processes to improve procedures for routine management of sanctuary chimpanzees and use it as a basis for evaluation of future reintroduction possibilities. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Colonization of Mucin by Human Intestinal Bacteria and Establishment of Biofilm Communities in a Two-Stage Continuous Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Woodmansey, Emma J.; Macfarlane, George T.

    2005-01-01

    The human large intestine is covered with a protective mucus coating, which is heavily colonized by complex bacterial populations that are distinct from those in the gut lumen. Little is known of the composition and metabolic activities of these biofilms, although they are likely to play an important role in mucus breakdown. The aims of this study were to determine how intestinal bacteria colonize mucus and to study physiologic and enzymatic factors involved in the destruction of this glycoprotein. Colonization of mucin gels by fecal bacteria was studied in vitro, using a two-stage continuous culture system, simulating conditions of nutrient availability and limitation characteristic of the proximal (vessel 1) and distal (vessel 2) colon. The establishment of bacterial communities in mucin gels was investigated by selective culture methods, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy, in association with fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes. Gel samples were also taken for analysis of mucin-degrading enzymes and measurements of residual mucin sugars. Mucin gels were rapidly colonized by heterogeneous bacterial populations, especially members of the Bacteroides fragilis group, enterobacteria, and clostridia. Intestinal bacterial populations growing on mucin surfaces were shown to be phylogenetically and metabolically distinct from their planktonic counterparts. PMID:16269790

  9. Antibiotic usage and risk of colonization and infection with antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a hospital population-based study.

    PubMed

    Tacconelli, Evelina; De Angelis, Giulia; Cataldo, Maria Adriana; Mantengoli, Elisabetta; Spanu, Teresa; Pan, Angelo; Corti, Giampaolo; Radice, Anna; Stolzuoli, Lucia; Antinori, Spinello; Paradisi, Franco; Carosi, Giampiero; Bernabei, Roberto; Antonelli, Massimo; Fadda, Giovanni; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Cauda, Roberto

    2009-10-01

    Accurate assessment of risk factors for nosocomial acquisition of colonization by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) is often confounded by scarce data on antibiotic use. A 12-month, nested, multicenter cohort study was conducted. Target ARB were methicillin (meticillin)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CR-PA). Nares and rectal swabs were obtained before and after starting antibiotics. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was done to define genetic relatedness of the strains. Primary outcomes were (i) the mean time, in days, for acquisition of target ARB colonization in patients previously not colonized; (ii) the rate of acquisition per 1,000 antibiotic-days according to different classes of antibiotics; (iii) the rate of infection caused by the same bacteria as those previously isolated in screening samples; and (iv) the risk factors for ARB acquisition. In total, 6,245 swabs from 864 inpatients were processed. The rate of acquisition was 3%, 2%, and 1% for MRSA, VRE, and CR-PA, respectively. The rate of acquisition of ARB per 1,000 antibiotic-days was 14 for carbapenems, 9 for glycopeptides, and 6 for broad-spectrum cephalosporins and quinolones. The highest rates of acquisition were observed for carbapenems in dialyzed and diabetic patients. Four risk factors were independently associated with acquisition of target ARB: use of carbapenems, age of >70 years, hospitalization for >16 days, and human immunodeficiency virus infection. During the 30-day follow-up, 4 among 42 patients newly colonized by ARB (9%) suffered from an infection due to the same bacteria as those isolated in a previous screening sample. Colonizing and infecting strains from single patients were genotypically identical. Identifying ARB colonization early during antibiotic therapy could target a high-risk hospitalized population that may benefit from intervention to decrease the risk of subsequent

  10. Like Will to Like: Abundances of Closely Related Species Can Predict Susceptibility to Intestinal Colonization by Pathogenic and Commensal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Freedrich, Susanne; Weber, Thomas C.; Kirundi, Jorum; Suar, Mrutyunjay; McCoy, Kathy D.; von Mering, Christian; Macpherson, Andrew J.; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem is formed by a complex, yet highly characteristic microbial community. The parameters defining whether this community permits invasion of a new bacterial species are unclear. In particular, inhibition of enteropathogen infection by the gut microbiota ( = colonization resistance) is poorly understood. To analyze the mechanisms of microbiota-mediated protection from Salmonella enterica induced enterocolitis, we used a mouse infection model and large scale high-throughput pyrosequencing. In contrast to conventional mice (CON), mice with a gut microbiota of low complexity (LCM) were highly susceptible to S. enterica induced colonization and enterocolitis. Colonization resistance was partially restored in LCM-animals by co-housing with conventional mice for 21 days (LCMcon21). 16S rRNA sequence analysis comparing LCM, LCMcon21 and CON gut microbiota revealed that gut microbiota complexity increased upon conventionalization and correlated with increased resistance to S. enterica infection. Comparative microbiota analysis of mice with varying degrees of colonization resistance allowed us to identify intestinal ecosystem characteristics associated with susceptibility to S. enterica infection. Moreover, this system enabled us to gain further insights into the general principles of gut ecosystem invasion by non-pathogenic, commensal bacteria. Mice harboring high commensal E. coli densities were more susceptible to S. enterica induced gut inflammation. Similarly, mice with high titers of Lactobacilli were more efficiently colonized by a commensal Lactobacillus reuteri RR strain after oral inoculation. Upon examination of 16S rRNA sequence data from 9 CON mice we found that closely related phylotypes generally display significantly correlated abundances (co-occurrence), more so than distantly related phylotypes. Thus, in essence, the presence of closely related species can increase the chance of invasion of newly incoming species into the gut

  11. Like will to like: abundances of closely related species can predict susceptibility to intestinal colonization by pathogenic and commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stecher, Bärbel; Chaffron, Samuel; Käppeli, Rina; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Freedrich, Susanne; Weber, Thomas C; Kirundi, Jorum; Suar, Mrutyunjay; McCoy, Kathy D; von Mering, Christian; Macpherson, Andrew J; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem is formed by a complex, yet highly characteristic microbial community. The parameters defining whether this community permits invasion of a new bacterial species are unclear. In particular, inhibition of enteropathogen infection by the gut microbiota ( = colonization resistance) is poorly understood. To analyze the mechanisms of microbiota-mediated protection from Salmonella enterica induced enterocolitis, we used a mouse infection model and large scale high-throughput pyrosequencing. In contrast to conventional mice (CON), mice with a gut microbiota of low complexity (LCM) were highly susceptible to S. enterica induced colonization and enterocolitis. Colonization resistance was partially restored in LCM-animals by co-housing with conventional mice for 21 days (LCM(con21)). 16S rRNA sequence analysis comparing LCM, LCM(con21) and CON gut microbiota revealed that gut microbiota complexity increased upon conventionalization and correlated with increased resistance to S. enterica infection. Comparative microbiota analysis of mice with varying degrees of colonization resistance allowed us to identify intestinal ecosystem characteristics associated with susceptibility to S. enterica infection. Moreover, this system enabled us to gain further insights into the general principles of gut ecosystem invasion by non-pathogenic, commensal bacteria. Mice harboring high commensal E. coli densities were more susceptible to S. enterica induced gut inflammation. Similarly, mice with high titers of Lactobacilli were more efficiently colonized by a commensal Lactobacillus reuteri(RR) strain after oral inoculation. Upon examination of 16S rRNA sequence data from 9 CON mice we found that closely related phylotypes generally display significantly correlated abundances (co-occurrence), more so than distantly related phylotypes. Thus, in essence, the presence of closely related species can increase the chance of invasion of newly incoming species into the gut

  12. Proteinaceous determinants of surface colonization in bacteria: bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from a protein secretion perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chagnot, Caroline; Zorgani, Mohamed A.; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of biotic or abiotic surfaces results from two quite distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Broadly speaking, a biofilm is defined as the sessile development of microbial cells. Biofilm formation arises following bacterial adhesion but not all single bacterial cells adhering reversibly or irreversibly engage inexorably into a sessile mode of growth. Among molecular determinants promoting bacterial colonization, surface proteins are the most functionally diverse active components. To be present on the bacterial cell surface, though, a protein must be secreted in the first place. Considering the close association of secreted proteins with their cognate secretion systems, the secretome (which refers both to the secretion systems and their protein substrates) is a key concept to apprehend the protein secretion and related physiological functions. The protein secretion systems are here considered in light of the differences in the cell-envelope architecture between diderm-LPS (archetypal Gram-negative), monoderm (archetypal Gram-positive) and diderm-mycolate (archetypal acid-fast) bacteria. Besides, their cognate secreted proteins engaged in the bacterial colonization process are regarded from single protein to supramolecular protein structure as well as the non-classical protein secretion. This state-of-the-art on the complement of the secretome (the secretion systems and their cognate effectors) involved in the surface colonization process in diderm-LPS and monoderm bacteria paves the way for future research directions in the field. PMID:24133488

  13. Outcome of Transplantation Using Organs From Donors Infected or Colonized With Carbapenem-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mularoni, A; Bertani, A; Vizzini, G; Gona, F; Campanella, M; Spada, M; Gruttadauria, S; Vitulo, P; Conaldi, P; Luca, A; Gridelli, B; Grossi, P

    2015-10-01

    Donor-derived infections due to multidrug-resistant bacteria are a growing problem in solid organ transplantation, and optimal management options are not clear. In a 2-year period, 30/214 (14%) recipients received an organ from 18/170 (10.5%) deceased donors with infection or colonization caused by a carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria that was unknown at the time of transplantation. Among them, 14/30 recipients (47%) received a transplant from a donor with bacteremia or with infection/colonization of the transplanted organ and were considered at high risk of donor-derived infection transmission. The remaining 16/30 (53%) recipients received an organ from a nonbacteremic donor with colonization of a nontransplanted organ and were considered at low risk of infection transmission. Proven transmission occurred in 4 of the 14 high-risk recipients because donor infection was either not recognized, underestimated, or not communicated. These recipients received late, short or inappropriate posttransplant antibiotic therapy. Transmission did not occur in high-risk recipients who received appropriate and prompt antibiotic therapy for at least 7 days. The safe use of organs from donors with multidrug-resistant bacteria requires intra- and inter-institutional communication to allow appropriate management and prompt treatment of recipients in order to avoid transmission of infection.

  14. Inguinal skin colonization with multidrug-resistant bacteria among residents of elderly care facilities: frequency, persistence, molecular analysis and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Ruscher, Claudia; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Layer, Franziska; Schaumann, Reiner; Levin, Katja; Mielke, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Frequency, persistence and molecular characteristics of multidrug resistant bacteria colonizing inhabitants of long term care facilities are topics of current concern. We performed a point-prevalence survey of 402 residents in 7 elderly care facilities in Berlin, Germany. Inguinal swabs were analyzed for the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria. Three and six months following the initial investigation, all colonized residents were sampled again and the occurrence of intercurrent infections, hospital admissions and use of antimicrobials were registered. Genetic relatedness of the bacteria was investigated using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), spa-typing and SmaI/XbaI-macrorestriction analysis. 33 (8.2%) residents were skin-colonized with multidrug-resistant bacteria. MRSA were found in 19 (4.7%) and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in 16 residents (3.98%). Independent risk factors for colonization with multidrug-resistant bacteria were a high level of care and the presence of chronic wounds. A large proportion of the observed bacteria persisted up to six months and showed a high degree of inter-individual diversity. Outcome analysis revealed that infections tend to occur slightly more often in residents colonized by multiresistant pathogens. We assume that a perceptible population of residents in nursing homes is at risk for individual colonization with multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as healthcare associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Dominant and diet-responsive groups of bacteria within the human colonic microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alan W; Ince, Jennifer; Duncan, Sylvia H; Webster, Lucy M; Holtrop, Grietje; Ze, Xiaolei; Brown, David; Stares, Mark D; Scott, Paul; Bergerat, Aurore; Louis, Petra; McIntosh, Freda; Johnstone, Alexandra M; Lobley, Gerald E; Parkhill, Julian; Flint, Harry J

    2011-01-01

    The populations of dominant species within the human colonic microbiota can potentially be modified by dietary intake with consequences for health. Here we examined the influence of precisely controlled diets in 14 overweight men. Volunteers were provided successively with a control diet, diets high in resistant starch (RS) or non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs) and a reduced carbohydrate weight loss (WL) diet, over 10 weeks. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences in stool samples of six volunteers detected 320 phylotypes (defined at >98% identity) of which 26, including 19 cultured species, each accounted for >1% of sequences. Although samples clustered more strongly by individual than by diet, time courses obtained by targeted qPCR revealed that ‘blooms' in specific bacterial groups occurred rapidly after a dietary change. These were rapidly reversed by the subsequent diet. Relatives of Ruminococcus bromii (R-ruminococci) increased in most volunteers on the RS diet, accounting for a mean of 17% of total bacteria compared with 3.8% on the NSP diet, whereas the uncultured Oscillibacter group increased on the RS and WL diets. Relatives of Eubacterium rectale increased on RS (to mean 10.1%) but decreased, along with Collinsella aerofaciens, on WL. Inter-individual variation was marked, however, with >60% of RS remaining unfermented in two volunteers on the RS diet, compared to <4% in the other 12 volunteers; these two individuals also showed low numbers of R-ruminococci (<1%). Dietary non-digestible carbohydrate can produce marked changes in the gut microbiota, but these depend on the initial composition of an individual's gut microbiota. PMID:20686513

  16. Biofouling of ultrafiltration membrane by dairy fluids: Characterization of pioneer colonizer bacteria using a DNA metabarcoding approach.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Julien; Lessard, Marie-Hélène; Doyen, Alain; Labrie, Steve; Pouliot, Yves

    2017-02-01

    Biofouling of filtration membranes is a major quality and performance issue for the dairy industry. Because biofilms that survive cleaning cycles become resistant over time, prevention strategies limiting the adhesion of bacteria to membranes should be prioritized for sustainable control of biofouling. However, this cannot be achieved because the pioneer bacteria colonizing these membranes are still unknown. Consequently, the objective of this study was to characterize pioneer bacteria on the filtration membrane surface and to measure the effect of filtration operational parameters on their diversity. Thus, milk and cheese whey were filtered for 5 h in concentration mode at 10 and 40°C using a laboratory-scale crossflow filtration system equipped with flat-sheet ultrafiltration membranes. Pioneer colonizer bacteria found on membranes after a chlorinated alkaline cleaning cycle were identified using a metabarcoding approach targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Our results suggested that prevention strategies targeting biofouling should consider the nature of the filtered fluid and the feed temperature (36.15 and 5.09% of the variances observed on membranes, respectively), as well as the microbial environment of the dairy processing plant. In the future, it is hypothesized that cleaning prevention strategies will be specific to each dairy processor and their operational parameters. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacteriocins reduce Campylobacter jejuni colonization while bacteria producing bacteriocins are ineffective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Broiler chickens are widely considered an important source for human exposure to Campylobacter jejuni because of the high numbers found colonizing the chicken gut and the consequent contamination of processed carcasses. We hoped to intervene in gut colonization by C. jejuni using a defined probioti...

  18. The potential of lactic acid bacteria to colonize biotic and abiotic surfaces and the investigation of their interactions and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arena, Mattia Pia; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Fiocco, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a heterogeneous group of Gram-positive bacteria that comprise several species which have evolved in close association with humans (food and lifestyle). While their use to ferment food dates back to very ancient times, in the last decades, LAB have attracted much attention for their documented beneficial properties and for potential biomedical applications. Some LAB are commensal that colonize, stably or transiently, host mucosal surfaces, inlcuding the gut, where they may contribute to host health. In this review, we present and discuss the main factors enabling LAB adaptation to such lifestyle, including the gene reprogramming accompanying gut colonization, the specific bacterial components involved in adhesion and interaction with host, and how the gut niche has shaped the genome of intestine-adapted species. Moreover, the capacity of LAB to colonize abiotic surfaces by forming structured communities, i.e., biofilms, is briefly discussed, taking into account the main bacterial and environmental factors involved, particularly in relation to food-related environments. The vast spread of LAB surface-associated communities and the ability to control their occurrence hold great potentials for human health and food safety biotechnologies.

  19. Xylo-Oligosaccharides and Inulin Affect Genotoxicity and Bacterial Populations Differently in a Human Colonic Simulator Challenged with Soy Protein

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Claus T.; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine R.; Conlon, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic simulator consisting of a proximal vessel (PV) (pH 5.5) and a distal vessel (DV) (pH 6.8) inoculated with human faeces and media containing soy protein. Genotoxicity of the liquid phase and microbial population changes in the vessels were measured. Soy protein (3%) was fermented with 1% low amylose cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate-producing bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly increased in the PV and DV by inulin but significantly decreased by XOS in both vessels. Other bacteria examined were also significantly impacted by the carbohydrate treatments or by the vessel (i.e., pH). There was a significant overall inverse correlation between levels of damage induced by the ferments and levels of sulphate-reducing bacteria, Bacteroides fragilis, and acetate. In conclusion, dietary XOS can potentially modulate the genotoxicity of the colonic environment and specific bacterial groups and short chain fatty acids may mediate this. PMID:24064573

  20. [Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of the epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia].

    PubMed

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Filho, Augusto Diogo; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; Araújo, Lúcio Borges de; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45hours (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under this study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented dairy milks on antiproliferation of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Thirabunyanon, Mongkol; Boonprasom, Pongphun; Niamsup, Piyanuch

    2009-04-01

    Fifty-four strains of lactic acid bacteria obtained from fermented dairy milks were investigated for possible use as probiotics and for colon cancer biological products. Five of these strains inhibited growth of eight food-borne pathogens including Helicobacter pylori, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium. Three of these strains survived at pH 2.5 and in 0.3% bile salts. Additionally they produced no haemolysis, were resistant to kanamycin and adhered to Caco-2 cells. 16S rRNA gene sequences of probiotic strains indicated that RM11 and RM28 were Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacillus fermentum, respectively. Both the cultured medium and live whole cells from probiotic strains were tested for antiproliferation of colon cancer cells through MTT and Trypan Blue exclusion assays. The probiotic strains of E. faecium RM11 and L. fermentum RM28 also triggered antiproliferation of colon cancer cells at the rates of 21-29%, and 22-29%, respectively. This suggested that both strains could be used as potential probiotics in functional food or for colon cancer biological products.

  2. Lactic acid bacteria colonization and clinical outcome after probiotic supplementation in conventionally treated bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ehrström, Sophia; Daroczy, Katalin; Rylander, Eva; Samuelsson, Carolina; Johannesson, Ulrika; Anzén, Bo; Påhlson, Carl

    2010-09-01

    This randomized double-blind placebo controlled study assessed the vaginal colonization of lactic acid bacteria and clinical outcome. Vaginal capsules containing L gasseri LN40, Lactobacillus fermentum LN99, L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LN113 and P. acidilactici LN23, or placebos were administered for five days to 95 women after conventional treatment of bacterial vaginosis and/or vulvovaginal candidiasis. Vulvovaginal examinations and vaginal samplings were performed before and after administration, after the first and second menstruation, and after six months. Presence of LN strains was assessed using RAPD analysis. LN strains were present 2-3 days after administration in 89% of the women receiving LN strains (placebo: 0%, p < 0.0001). After one menstruation 53% were colonized by at least one LN strain. Nine percent were still colonized six months after administration. Ninety-three percent of the women receiving LN strains were cured 2-3 days after administration (placebo: 83%), and 78% after one menstruation (placebo: 71%) (ns). The intervention group experienced less malodorous discharge 2-3 days after administration (p = 0.03) and after the second menstruation (p = 0.04), compared with placebo. In summary, five days of vaginal administration of LN strains after conventional treatment of bacterial vaginosis and/or vulvovaginal candidiasis lead to vaginal colonization, somewhat fewer recurrences and less malodorous discharge. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Abnormal vaginal colonization by gram-negative bacteria is significantly higher in pregnancy conceived through infertility treatment compared to natural pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Y; Sung, Ji-Hee; Chang, Kylie Hae-Jin; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2017-03-01

    To compare abnormal vaginal colonization between natural pregnancy and pregnancy by infertility treatment in high-risk parturient women and to examine the association between abnormal vaginal colonization and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). The clinical characteristics, vaginal culture result, and delivery outcome of patients who admitted to our high-risk unit between 2005 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed and compared. We investigated the prevalence of EONS according to maternal vaginal colonization and examined the concordance between maternal vaginal bacteria and etiologic microorganism causing EONS. Among 1096 pregnancies, the rate of vaginal colonization by gram-negative bacteria, especially Escherichia coli was significantly higher in pregnancies by infertility treatment after adjustment of confounding variables (E. coli, OR [95% CI]: 2.47 [1.33-4.57], p = 0.004). The rate of EONS was significantly higher in neonates with maternal abnormal vaginal bacteria colonization (OR [95% CI]: 3.38 [1.44-7.93], p = 0.005) after adjusting for confounding variables. Notably, among microorganisms isolated from maternal vagina, E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus were consistent with the results from neonatal blood culture in EONS. Our data implicate a possible association between gram-negative bacteria colonization and infertility treatment and suggest that maternal vaginal colonization may be associated with EONS of neonates in high-risk pregnancy.

  4. Evidence for natural transfer of a tetracycline resistance gene between bacteria from the human colon and bacteria from the bovine rumen.

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, N B; Wang, G R; Salyers, A A

    1992-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated conjugal transfer of a specially constructed shuttle vector, pRDB5, from the human colonic anaerobe Bacteroides uniformis to the ruminal anaerobe Prevotella (Bacteroides) ruminicola B(1)4. We have now shown that naturally occurring gene transfer elements in Bacteroides species and Prevotella ruminicola can also be transferred between these two genera. A self-transmissible chromosomal element originally found in a clinical isolate of Bacteroides fragilis (Tcr Emr 12256) was transferred from B. uniformis 0061 to P. ruminicola B(1)4 and from P. ruminicola B(1)4 back to B. uniformis or to another human colonic species, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. Similarly, a conjugative plasmid (pRRI4) originally found in P. ruminicola 223 was transferred from P. ruminicola B(1)4 to B. uniformis or B. thetaiotaomicron. pRRI4 could be transferred from the colonic Bacteroides species only if the donor strain contained the Tcr Emr 12256 element in its chromosome. These results show that transfer of naturally occurring elements can be demonstrated under laboratory conditions. Evidence that such transfers may actually have occurred in nature came from our finding that the tetracycline resistance (Tcr) gene on the P. ruminicola plasmid pRRI4 hybridized on high-stringency Southern blots with the Tcr gene found on the Bacteroides Tcr elements. The presence of the same gene in such distantly related genera of bacteria is most likely to have occurred as a result of horizontal transfer. Images PMID:1599250

  5. Bacteria flying under the radar: linking a bacterial infection to colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Frizelle, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a link between Helicobacter pylori infection and an increased risk of gastric cancer has raised an awareness of a possible link between colonic microbiota and colorectal cancer. Pertubation of the colonic epithelium by toxin-producing strains of Bacteroides fragilis may increase the risk of premalignant transdifferentiation. However, like H. pylori, B. fragilis exhibit an ability to modulate the normal host response to infection. We speculate this may be an underappreciated risk factor in the genesis of colon carcinogenesis in individuals colonised with toxin-producing strains of B. fragilis.

  6. Colonization and Succession within the Human Gut Microbiome by Archaea, Bacteria, and Microeukaryotes during the First Year of Life

    PubMed Central

    Wampach, Linda; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Hogan, Angela; Muller, Emilie E. L.; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Laczny, Cedric C.; Hugerth, Luisa W.; Bindl, Lutz; Bottu, Jean; Andersson, Anders F.; de Beaufort, Carine; Wilmes, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Perturbations to the colonization process of the human gastrointestinal tract have been suggested to result in adverse health effects later in life. Although much research has been performed on bacterial colonization and succession, much less is known about the other two domains of life, archaea, and eukaryotes. Here we describe colonization and succession by bacteria, archaea and microeukaryotes during the first year of life (samples collected around days 1, 3, 5, 28, 150, and 365) within the gastrointestinal tract of infants delivered either vaginally or by cesarean section and using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR as well as 16S and 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Sequences from organisms belonging to all three domains of life were detectable in all of the collected meconium samples. The microeukaryotic community composition fluctuated strongly over time and early diversification was delayed in infants receiving formula milk. Cesarean section-delivered (CSD) infants experienced a delay in colonization and succession, which was observed for all three domains of life. Shifts in prokaryotic succession in CSD infants compared to vaginally delivered (VD) infants were apparent as early as days 3 and 5, which were characterized by increased relative abundances of the genera Streptococcus and Staphylococcus, and a decrease in relative abundance for the genera Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides. Generally, a depletion in Bacteroidetes was detected as early as day 5 postpartum in CSD infants, causing a significantly increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio between days 5 and 150 when compared to VD infants. Although the delivery mode appeared to have the strongest influence on differences between the infants, other factors such as a younger gestational age or maternal antibiotics intake likely contributed to the observed patterns as well. Our findings complement previous observations of a delay in colonization and succession of CSD infants, which affects not

  7. Colonization and Succession within the Human Gut Microbiome by Archaea, Bacteria, and Microeukaryotes during the First Year of Life.

    PubMed

    Wampach, Linda; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Hogan, Angela; Muller, Emilie E L; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Laczny, Cedric C; Hugerth, Luisa W; Bindl, Lutz; Bottu, Jean; Andersson, Anders F; de Beaufort, Carine; Wilmes, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Perturbations to the colonization process of the human gastrointestinal tract have been suggested to result in adverse health effects later in life. Although much research has been performed on bacterial colonization and succession, much less is known about the other two domains of life, archaea, and eukaryotes. Here we describe colonization and succession by bacteria, archaea and microeukaryotes during the first year of life (samples collected around days 1, 3, 5, 28, 150, and 365) within the gastrointestinal tract of infants delivered either vaginally or by cesarean section and using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR as well as 16S and 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Sequences from organisms belonging to all three domains of life were detectable in all of the collected meconium samples. The microeukaryotic community composition fluctuated strongly over time and early diversification was delayed in infants receiving formula milk. Cesarean section-delivered (CSD) infants experienced a delay in colonization and succession, which was observed for all three domains of life. Shifts in prokaryotic succession in CSD infants compared to vaginally delivered (VD) infants were apparent as early as days 3 and 5, which were characterized by increased relative abundances of the genera Streptococcus and Staphylococcus, and a decrease in relative abundance for the genera Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides. Generally, a depletion in Bacteroidetes was detected as early as day 5 postpartum in CSD infants, causing a significantly increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio between days 5 and 150 when compared to VD infants. Although the delivery mode appeared to have the strongest influence on differences between the infants, other factors such as a younger gestational age or maternal antibiotics intake likely contributed to the observed patterns as well. Our findings complement previous observations of a delay in colonization and succession of CSD infants, which affects not

  8. Host gene expression in the colon of gnotobiotic interleukin-2-deficient mice colonized with commensal colitogenic or noncolitogenic bacterial strains: common patterns and bacteria strain specific signatures.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Erwin; Bechtold, Oliver; Zahir, Naima; Frick, Julia-Stefanie; Reimann, Jörg; Jilge, Burghart; Autenrieth, Ingo B

    2006-09-01

    Specific pathogen-free (SPF), but not germfree (GF), interleukin (IL)-2-deficient (IL-2-/-) mice develop inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) at 10 to 15 weeks of age. Gnotobiotic IL-2-/- mice monocolonized with E. coli mpk develop IBD at 25 to 33 weeks of age but not B. vulgatus mpk, E. coli Nissle 1917, or mice cocolonized with both E. coli mpk and B. vulgatus. To determine genes regulated by these commensal bacteria, host gene expression in the colon of 8-week-old IL-2-/- mice was compared by using microarrays and semiquantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Colonization with E. coli mpk/B. vulgatus or SPF microbiota altered the gene expression profile more profoundly than monocolonization with either B. vulgatus, E. coli mpk or E. coli Nissle indicating that the complexity of the gene expression pattern is influenced by the diversity of the microbiota. A small but distinct group of genes could be defined which might be associated with colitis development. Thus, 8 week old E. coli mpk IL-2-/- mice rone to colitis compared to E. coli Nissle, B. vulgatus and E. coli mpk/B. vulgatus IL-2-/- mice displayed a lower expression of the anti-inflammatory RegIII family genes such as RegIII[gamma] and pancreatitis associated protein (PAP) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-[gamma] regulated genes such as adipsin and adiponectin. The increased expression of these genes in B. vulgatus colonized mice might be associated with prevention of E. coli mpk triggered colitis in E. coli mpkM/B. vulgatus IL-2-/- mice.

  9. Live cell imaging reveals extensive intracellular cytoplasmic colonization of banana by normally non-cultivable endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pious; Sekhar, Aparna Chandra

    2014-01-01

    It is generally believed that endophytic microorganisms are intercellular inhabitants present in either cultivable or non-cultivable form primarily as root colonizers. The objective of this study was to determine whether the actively mobile micro-particles observed in the intracellular matrix of fresh tissue sections of banana included endophytic bacteria. Tissue sections (50-100 µm) from apical leaf sheaths of surface-disinfected suckers (cv. Grand Naine) displayed 'Brownian motion'-reminiscent abundant motile micro-particles under bright-field and phase-contrast (×1000), which appeared similar in size and motility to the pure cultures of endophytes previously isolated from banana. Observations on callus, embryonic cells and protoplasts with intact cell wall/plasma membrane confirmed their cytoplasmic nature. The motility of these entities reduced or ceased upon tissue fixation or staining with safranin/crystal violet (0.5 % w/v), but continued uninterrupted following treatment with actin-disrupting drugs, ruling out the possibility of micro-organelles like peroxisomes. Staining with 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) confirmed them to be live bacteria with similar observations after dilute safranin (0.005 %) treatment. Tissue staining with SYTO-9 coupled with epi-fluorescence or confocal laser scanning microscopy showed bacterial colonization along the peri-space between cell wall and plasma membrane initially. SYTO-9 counterstaining on TTC- or safranin-treated tissue and those subjected to enzymatic permeabilization revealed the cytoplasmic bacteria. These included organisms moving freely in the cytoplasm and those adhering to the nuclear envelope or vacuoles and the intravacuolar colonizers. The observations appeared ubiquitous to different genomes and genotypes of banana. Plating the tissue homogenate on nutrient media seldom yielded colony growth. This study, supported largely by live cell video-imaging, demonstrates enormous intracellular

  10. Insights into Vibrio cholerae Intestinal Colonization from Monitoring Fluorescently Labeled Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Alvarez, David; Ringgaard, Simon; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is a motile non-invasive pathogen that colonizes the small intestine (SI). Most of our knowledge of the processes required for V. cholerae intestinal colonization is derived from enumeration of wt and mutant V. cholerae recovered from orogastrically infected infant mice. There is limited knowledge of the distribution of V. cholerae within the SI, particularly its localization along the villous axis, or of the bacterial and host factors that account for this distribution. Here, using confocal and intravital two-photon microscopy to monitor the localization of fluorescently tagged V. cholerae strains, we uncovered unexpected and previously unrecognized features of V. cholerae intestinal colonization. Direct visualization of the pathogen within the intestine revealed that the majority of V. cholerae microcolonies attached to the intestinal epithelium arise from single cells, and that there are notable regiospecific aspects to V. cholerae localization and factors required for colonization. In the proximal SI, V. cholerae reside exclusively within the developing intestinal crypts, but they are not restricted to the crypts in the more distal SI. Unexpectedly, V. cholerae motility proved to be a regiospecific colonization factor that is critical for colonization of the proximal, but not the distal, SI. Furthermore, neither motility nor chemotaxis were required for proper V. cholerae distribution along the villous axis or in crypts, suggesting that yet undefined processes enable the pathogen to find its niches outside the intestinal lumen. Finally, our observations suggest that host mucins are a key factor limiting V. cholerae intestinal colonization, particularly in the proximal SI where there appears to be a more abundant mucus layer. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the potent capacity of direct pathogen visualization during infection to deepen our understanding of host pathogen interactions. PMID:25275396

  11. Insights into Vibrio cholerae intestinal colonization from monitoring fluorescently labeled bacteria.

    PubMed

    Millet, Yves A; Alvarez, David; Ringgaard, Simon; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2014-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is a motile non-invasive pathogen that colonizes the small intestine (SI). Most of our knowledge of the processes required for V. cholerae intestinal colonization is derived from enumeration of wt and mutant V. cholerae recovered from orogastrically infected infant mice. There is limited knowledge of the distribution of V. cholerae within the SI, particularly its localization along the villous axis, or of the bacterial and host factors that account for this distribution. Here, using confocal and intravital two-photon microscopy to monitor the localization of fluorescently tagged V. cholerae strains, we uncovered unexpected and previously unrecognized features of V. cholerae intestinal colonization. Direct visualization of the pathogen within the intestine revealed that the majority of V. cholerae microcolonies attached to the intestinal epithelium arise from single cells, and that there are notable regiospecific aspects to V. cholerae localization and factors required for colonization. In the proximal SI, V. cholerae reside exclusively within the developing intestinal crypts, but they are not restricted to the crypts in the more distal SI. Unexpectedly, V. cholerae motility proved to be a regiospecific colonization factor that is critical for colonization of the proximal, but not the distal, SI. Furthermore, neither motility nor chemotaxis were required for proper V. cholerae distribution along the villous axis or in crypts, suggesting that yet undefined processes enable the pathogen to find its niches outside the intestinal lumen. Finally, our observations suggest that host mucins are a key factor limiting V. cholerae intestinal colonization, particularly in the proximal SI where there appears to be a more abundant mucus layer. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the potent capacity of direct pathogen visualization during infection to deepen our understanding of host pathogen interactions.

  12. Gram-positive bacteria are held at a distance in the colon mucus by the lectin-like protein ZG16

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Joakim H.; Katona, Gergely; Schütte, André; Ermund, Anna; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2016-01-01

    The distal colon functions as a bioreactor and harbors an enormous amount of bacteria in a mutualistic relationship with the host. The microbiota have to be kept at a safe distance to prevent inflammation, something that is achieved by a dense inner mucus layer that lines the epithelial cells. The large polymeric nets made up by the heavily O-glycosylated MUC2 mucin forms this physical barrier. Proteomic analyses of mucus have identified the lectin-like protein ZG16 (zymogen granulae protein 16) as an abundant mucus component. To elucidate the function of ZG16, we generated recombinant ZG16 and studied Zg16−/− mice. ZG16 bound to and aggregated Gram-positive bacteria via binding to the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. Zg16−/− mice have a distal colon mucus layer with normal thickness, but with bacteria closer to the epithelium. Using distal colon explants mounted in a horizontal perfusion chamber we demonstrated that treatment of bacteria with recombinant ZG16 hindered bacterial penetration into the mucus. The inner colon mucus of Zg16−/− animals had a higher load of Gram-positive bacteria and showed bacteria with higher motility in the mucus close to the host epithelium compared with cohoused littermate Zg16+/+. The more penetrable Zg16−/− mucus allowed Gram-positive bacteria to translocate to systemic tissues. Viable bacteria were found in spleen and were associated with increased abdominal fat pad mass in Zg16−/− animals. The function of ZG16 reveals a mechanism for keeping bacteria further away from the host colon epithelium. PMID:27849619

  13. Function and phylogeny of bacterial butyryl-CoA:acetate transferases and their diversity in the proximal colon of swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studying the host-associated butyrate-producing bacterial community is important because butyrate is essential for colonic homeostasis and gut health. Previous research has identified the butyryl-coA:acetate transferase (2.3.8.3) as a the main gene for butyrate production in intestinal ecosystems; h...

  14. Diversity and antifungal activity of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria colonizing sugarcane in Egypt

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The price of nitrogen continues to increase and is a major input in sugarcane production. Sugarcane grown in Egypt was screened for the presence of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen-free medium LGI-P was used to isolate bacteria from cane stalks. Among the 52 isolates subjected to acetylene redu...

  15. Cefotaxime-Resistant Bacteria Colonizing Older People Admitted to an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Robert A.; Donskey, Curtis J.; Blumer, Jeffery L.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Hoyenm, Claudia K.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Whalen, Christopher C.; Salata, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine the frequency of fecal colonization by cefotaxime-resistant gram-negative bacilli in older patients living in the community and in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) admitted to an acute care hospital. DESIGN Case-control, point prevalence study. SETTING Hospital. PARTICIPANTS One hundred forty-three patients aged 65 and older. MEASUREMENTS Rectal swab cultures, antibiotic drug sensitivity, beta lactamase isolation, and clonal identity. RESULTS Of the 190 surveillance cultures obtained from 143 patients, 26 cefotaxime-resistant gram-negative isolates from 22 patients were recovered. The prevalence rate of cefotaxime-resistant isolates on admission was 13.3% (19/143). A logistic regression model using cefotaxime colonization as the dependent variable found that multiple comorbidities, admission to a surgical service, and having a diagnosis of infection on presentation and a transfusion history were factors associated with the presence of colonization. These four clinical items accurately classified 74% of patients colonized. Antibiotic use and nursing home residence were not associated with the presence of colonization by cefotaxime-resistant organisms. Twelve of the cefotaxime-resistant isolates (46%) were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 14 (54%) were other gram-negative bacilli. In six of the 14 isolates that were not P. aeruginosa (36%), it was possible to demonstrate the presence of an AmpC β-lactamase related to the CMY-2 β-lactamase, a plasmid-borne cephalosporinase. CONCLUSION These data raise awareness that there are community- and LTCF-dwelling older patients colonized with gram-negative enteric bacilli resistant to third-generation cephalosporins on admission to the hospital. The “reservoir of resistant bacteria” in older people is no longer confined to LTCFs. PMID:12657072

  16. Acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting the rhizoplane and deep cortex cells of the sea grass Halodule wrightii.

    PubMed

    Küsel, K; Pinkart, H C; Drake, H L; Devereux, R

    1999-11-01

    Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizospheres that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria and clostridia were enriched in sediments colonized by the sea grasses Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum compared to an adjacent unvegetated sediment. Most-probable-number analyses found that in contrast to butyrate-producing clostridia, acetogens and acetate-utilizing sulfate reducers were enriched by an order of magnitude in rhizosphere sediments. Although sea grass roots are oxygenated in the daytime, colorimetric root incubation studies demonstrated that acetogenic O-demethylation and sulfidogenic iron precipitation activities were tightly associated with washed, sediment-free H. wrightii roots. This suggests that the associated anaerobes are able to tolerate exposure to oxygen. To localize and quantify the anaerobic microbial colonization, root thin sections were hybridized with newly developed (33)P-labeled probes that targeted (i) low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, (ii) cluster I species of clostridia, (iii) species of Acetobacterium, and (iv) species of Desulfovibrio. Microautoradiography revealed intercellular colonization of the roots by Acetobacterium and Desulfovibrio species. Acetogenic bacteria occurred mostly in the rhizoplane and outermost cortex cell layers, and high numbers of sulfate reducers were detected on all epidermal cells and inward, colonizing some 60% of the deepest cortex cells. Approximately 30% of epidermal cells were colonized by bacteria that hybridized with an archaeal probe, strongly suggesting the presence of methanogens. Obligate anaerobes within the roots might contribute to the vitality of sea grasses and other aquatic plants and to the biogeochemistry of the surrounding sediment.

  17. Acetogenic and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Inhabiting the Rhizoplane and Deep Cortex Cells of the Sea Grass Halodule wrightii†

    PubMed Central

    Küsel, Kirsten; Pinkart, Holly C.; Drake, Harold L.; Devereux, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizospheres that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria and clostridia were enriched in sediments colonized by the sea grasses Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum compared to an adjacent unvegetated sediment. Most-probable-number analyses found that in contrast to butyrate-producing clostridia, acetogens and acetate-utilizing sulfate reducers were enriched by an order of magnitude in rhizosphere sediments. Although sea grass roots are oxygenated in the daytime, colorimetric root incubation studies demonstrated that acetogenic O-demethylation and sulfidogenic iron precipitation activities were tightly associated with washed, sediment-free H. wrightii roots. This suggests that the associated anaerobes are able to tolerate exposure to oxygen. To localize and quantify the anaerobic microbial colonization, root thin sections were hybridized with newly developed 33P-labeled probes that targeted (i) low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, (ii) cluster I species of clostridia, (iii) species of Acetobacterium, and (iv) species of Desulfovibrio. Microautoradiography revealed intercellular colonization of the roots by Acetobacterium and Desulfovibrio species. Acetogenic bacteria occurred mostly in the rhizoplane and outermost cortex cell layers, and high numbers of sulfate reducers were detected on all epidermal cells and inward, colonizing some 60% of the deepest cortex cells. Approximately 30% of epidermal cells were colonized by bacteria that hybridized with an archaeal probe, strongly suggesting the presence of methanogens. Obligate anaerobes within the roots might contribute to the vitality of sea grasses and other aquatic plants and to the biogeochemistry of the surrounding sediment. PMID:10543830

  18. Bacteriocins control chicken colonization while probiotic bacteria are ineffective at reducing Campylobacter jejuni

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Broilers chickens are widely considered an important source for human exposure to Campylobacter jejuni. We sought to intervene in C. jejuni colonization by using a probiotic approach. Isolates from chicken intestine were screened for C. jejuni inhibition. These isolates were live-fed to treat chi...

  19. Colonization of Libyan civil war casualties with multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Koole, K; Ellerbroek, P M; Lagendijk, R; Leenen, L P H; Ekkelenkamp, M B

    2013-07-01

    In November 2011 51 Libyan war casualties were admitted to the Major Incident Hospital in Utrecht and from there were transferred to 26 other Dutch hospitals. Cultures and clinical data were collected to establish the prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in this patient group and to identify the associated risk factors. The prevalence of MDR bacteria was 59% (30/51 patients); extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing enterobacteriaceae were most common (26/51 patients: 51%). The major risk factor for carriage of MDR bacteria was the presence of open wounds at admission to the Major Incident Hospital.

  20. Muc2 Protects against Lethal Infectious Colitis by Disassociating Pathogenic and Commensal Bacteria from the Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Kirk S. B.; Kissoon-Singh, Vanessa; Gibson, Deanna L.; Ma, Caixia; Montero, Marinieve; Sham, Ho Pan; Ryz, Natasha; Huang, Tina; Velcich, Anna; Finlay, B. Brett; Chadee, Kris; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of attaching and effacing (A/E) Escherichia coli infections, the mechanisms by which the host defends against these microbes are unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the role of goblet cell-derived Muc2, the major intestinal secretory mucin and primary component of the mucus layer, in host protection against A/E pathogens. To assess the role of Muc2 during A/E bacterial infections, we inoculated Muc2 deficient (Muc2−/−) mice with Citrobacter rodentium, a murine A/E pathogen related to diarrheagenic A/E E. coli. Unlike wildtype (WT) mice, infected Muc2−/− mice exhibited rapid weight loss and suffered up to 90% mortality. Stool plating demonstrated 10–100 fold greater C. rodentium burdens in Muc2−/− vs. WT mice, most of which were found to be loosely adherent to the colonic mucosa. Histology of Muc2−/− mice revealed ulceration in the colon amid focal bacterial microcolonies. Metabolic labeling of secreted mucins in the large intestine demonstrated that mucin secretion was markedly increased in WT mice during infection compared to uninfected controls, suggesting that the host uses increased mucin release to flush pathogens from the mucosal surface. Muc2 also impacted host-commensal interactions during infection, as FISH analysis revealed C. rodentium microcolonies contained numerous commensal microbes, which was not observed in WT mice. Orally administered FITC-Dextran and FISH staining showed significantly worsened intestinal barrier disruption in Muc2−/− vs. WT mice, with overt pathogen and commensal translocation into the Muc2−/− colonic mucosa. Interestingly, commensal depletion enhanced C. rodentium colonization of Muc2−/− mice, although colonic pathology was not significantly altered. In conclusion, Muc2 production is critical for host protection during A/E bacterial infections, by limiting overall pathogen and commensal numbers associated with the colonic

  1. Kinetics of Colonization of Adult Queensland Fruit Flies (Bactrocera tryoni) by Dinitrogen-Fixing Alimentary Tract Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Murphy, K M; Teakle, D S; Macrae, I C

    1994-07-01

    The average total population of bacteria remained constant in the alimentary tracts of adult laboratory-raised Queensland fruit flies (Bactrocera tryoni) although the insects had ingested large numbers of live bacteria as part of their diet. The mean number of bacteria (about 13 million) present in the gut of the insects from 12 to 55 days after emergence was not significantly modified when, at 5 days after emergence, the flies were fed antibiotic-resistant bacteria belonging to two species commonly isolated from the gut of field-collected B. tryoni. Flies were fed one marked dinitrogen-fixing strain each of either Klebsiella oxytoca or Enterobacter cloacae, and the gastrointestinal tracts of fed flies were shown to be colonized within 7 days by antibiotic-resistant isolates of K. oxytoca but not E. cloacae. The composition of the microbial population also appeared to be stable in that the distribution and frequency of bacterial taxa among individual flies exhibited similar patterns whether or not the flies had been bacteria fed. Isolates of either E. cloacae or K. oxytoca, constituting 70% of the total numbers, were usually dominant, with oxidative species including pseudomonads forming the balance of the population. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria could be spread from one cage of flies to the adjacent surfaces of a second cage within a few days and had reached a control group several meters distant by 3 weeks. Restriction of marked bacteria to the population of one in five flies sampled from the control group over the next 30 days suggested that the bacterial population in the gut of the insect was susceptible to alteration in the first week after emergence but that thereafter it entered a steady state and was less likely to be perturbed by the introduction of newly encountered strains. All populations sampled, including controls, included at least one isolate of the dinitrogen-fixing family Enterobacteriaceae; many were distinct from the marked strains fed to the

  2. Endotracheal tube: friend or foe? Bacteria, the endotracheal tube, and the impact of colonization and infection.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Kathleen; Holzman, Ian R

    2012-12-01

    The microbiology of the endotracheal tube culture plays a role in diagnosing a variety of diseases in the newborn intensive care unit, including subglottic stenosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Bacterial production of a biofilm that coats the endotracheal tube acts as a reservoir for infection, prevents eradication, and may play a role in the development of subglottic stenosis. The diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia is limited by the CDC definition as well as currently available diagnostic methods. Biomarkers could aid in differentiating colonization from infection, but are not available to most clinicians. The etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia is often polymicrobial. Failure to differentiate colonization from infection results in unnecessary prescription of antibiotics, which could contribute to antimicrobial resistance. Measures to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia have been described, primarily in the adult population.

  3. Natural variation in populations of persistently colonizing bacteria affect human host cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Aras, Rahul A; Lee, Yongchan; Kim, Sung-Kook; Israel, Dawn; Peek, Richard M; Blaser, Martin J

    2003-08-15

    The highly diverse bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which persistently colonizes the human stomach, provides models to study the role of genome plasticity in host adaptation. Within H. pylori populations from 2 colonized individuals, intragenomic recombination between cagA DNA repeat sequences leads to deletion or duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the CagA protein, which is injected by a type IV secretion system into host cells. Experimental coculture of gastric epithelial cells with the strains containing these naturally occurring CagA phosphorylation site variants induced markedly divergent host cell morphologic responses. Mutants were constructed in which a phosphorylation site was either added or deleted in the expressed CagA protein; coculture studies confirmed that the naturally occurring differences in CagA phosphorylation are responsible for the observed phenotypic variation. These findings indicate that within an individual host, intragenomic recombination between H. pylori repetitive DNA produces strain variants differing in their signals to host cells.

  4. Metabolism and Metal Binding by Surface-Colonizing Bacteria: Results of Microgradient Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kepkay, P. E.; Schwinghamer, P.; Willar, T.; Bowen, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Short-term (65-h) bacterial colonization of 0.2-μm (pore size) filters submerged in water from Lake Charlotte, Nova Scotia, was characterized by a well-defined succession of cell types, in which small cocci gave way to larger, rod-shaped cells. This succession agrees with the concept of attachment as a strategy for survival, in which inactive cocci can attach to a surface and grow into larger, rod-shaped cells by using endogenous nutrients and the nutrients accumulated at the solid-liquid interface. Analyses of oxygen and CO2 microgradients above colonized surfaces indicated that a peak of respiration accompanied the succession of rods from cocci. CO2 fixation then became apparent as the rods began to bind manganese and iron to their surfaces. This means that survival by attachment may not be just the province of heterotrophs. It could also be a strategy adopted by metal-oxidizing chemoautotrophs. Long-term (34-day) colonization of similar filters indicated that, while a succession of attached cell types may indeed be a natural occurrence, other factors (such as the selective grazing of larger cells) tend to obscure the development of this succession. Images PMID:16346966

  5. Oral and endotracheal tubes colonization by periodontal bacteria: a case-control ICU study.

    PubMed

    Porto, A N; Cortelli, S C; Borges, A H; Matos, F Z; Aquino, D R; Miranda, T B; Oliveira Costa, F; Aranha, A F; Cortelli, J R

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal infection is a possible risk factor for respiratory disorders; however, no studies have assessed the colonization of periodontal pathogens in endotracheal tubes (ET). This case-control study analyzed whether periodontal pathogens are able to colonize ET of dentate and edentulous patients in intensive care units (ICU) and whether oral and ET periodontal pathogen profiles have any correlation between these patients. We selected 18 dentate and 18 edentulous patients from 78 eligible ICU patients. Oral clinical examination including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index , and plaque index was performed by a single examiner, followed by oral and ET sampling and processing by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (total bacterial load, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia). Data were statistically analyzed by Mann-Whitney U, two-way analysis of variance (p < 0.05). Among dentate, there was no correlation between clinical parameters and ET bacterial levels. Both dentate and edentulous patients showed similar ET bacterial levels. Dentate patients showed no correlation between oral and ET bacterial levels, while edentulous patients showed positive correlations between oral and ET levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and T. forsythia. Periodontal pathogens can colonize ET and the oral cavity of ICU patients. Periodontal pathogen profiles tend to be similar between dentate and edentulous ICU patients. In ICU patients, oral cavity represents a source of ET contamination. Although accompanied by higher oral bacterial levels, teeth do not seem to influence ET bacterial profiles.

  6. Endophytes of grapevine flowers, berries, and seeds: identification of cultivable bacteria, comparison with other plant parts, and visualization of niches of colonization.

    PubMed

    Compant, Stéphane; Mitter, Birgit; Colli-Mull, Juan Gualberto; Gangl, Helmut; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-07-01

    Endophytic bacteria can colonize various plants and organs. However, endophytes colonizing plant reproductive organs have been rarely analyzed. In this study, endophytes colonizing flowers as well as berries and seeds of grapevine plants grown under natural conditions were investigated by cultivation as well as by fluorescence in situ hybridization. For comparison, bacteria were additionally isolated from other plant parts and the rhizosphere and characterized. Flowers, fruits, and seeds hosted various endophytic bacteria. Some taxa were specifically isolated from plant reproductive organs, whereas others were also detected in the rhizosphere, endorhiza or grape inflo/infructescence stalk at the flowering or berry harvest stage. Microscopic analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization of resin-embedded samples confirmed the presence of the isolated taxa in plant reproductive organs and enabled us to localize them within the plant. Gammaproteobacteria (including Pseudomonas spp.) and Firmicutes (including Bacillus spp.) were visualized inside the epidermis and xylem of ovary and/or inside flower ovules. Firmicutes, mainly Bacillus spp. were additionally visualized inside berries, in the intercellular spaces of pulp cells and/or xylem of pulp, but also along some cell walls inside parts of seeds. Analysis of cultivable bacteria as well as microscopic results indicated that certain endophytic bacteria can colonize flowers, berries, or seeds. Our results also indicated that some specific taxa may not only derive from the root environment but also from other sources such as the anthosphere.

  7. Insight into alteration of gut microbiota in Clostridium difficile infection and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Dong, Danfeng; Jiang, Cen; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xuefeng; Peng, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the common pathogen of nosocomial diarrhea, meanwhile, asymptomatic colonization with C. difficile in part of the population has also drawn public attention. Although gut microbiota is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI), whether there is any alteration of gut microbial composition in asymptomatic C. difficile carriers hasn't been clearly described. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in gut microbiome among CDI patients, asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and healthy individuals. We performed fecal microbiota analysis on the samples of eight CDI patients, eight asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and nine healthy subjects using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers showed reduced microbial richness and diversity compared with healthy subjects, accompanied with a paucity of phylum Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes as well as an overabundance of Proteobacteria. Some normally commensal bacteria, especially butyrate producers, were significantly depleted in CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers. Furthermore, the differences observed in microbial community structure between CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers suggested that the gut microbiota may be a potential factor of disease state for CDI. Our study demonstrates the characterization and diversity of gut microbiota in CDI and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, which will provide new ideas for surveillance of the disease state and development of microbiota-targeted agents for CDI prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Variability of cutaneous and nasal population levels between patients colonized and infected by multidrug-resistant bacteria in two Brazilian intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Nicoli, Jacques R; Oliveira, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare cutaneous and nasal population levels between patients colonized and infected by multidrug-resistant organisms in two intensive care units. Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed in adult intensive care units of two hospitals in Belo Horizonte, Brazil (April 2012 to February 2013). Clinical and demographic data were first collected by reviewing patients’ charts. Then, samples collected with nasal, groin, and perineum swabs were cultivated in selective media for 48 h at 37°C. After isolation, determination of antimicrobial susceptibility and biochemical identification were performed. Results: A total of 53 cases of colonization were observed by the following bacteria in decreasing frequencies: imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (50.9%), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (43.4%), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase–producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (37.7%), imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32.1%), oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (7.5%), and imipenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (5.7%). Among these colonization cases, 26 (49.0%) were followed by infection with bacteria phenotypically similar to those of the colonization. A relation between high population levels of colonization by most of the multidrug-resistant organisms at anatomical sites and a subsequent infection was observed. After colonization/infection, bacterial population levels decreased progressively and spontaneously until disappearance by day 45 in all the anatomical sites and for all the multidrug-resistant organisms. Conclusion: There was a correlation between high population levels of colonization by multidrug-resistant organisms at anatomical sites and a subsequent infection. Reduction in multidrug-resistant organism populations after colonization at anatomical sites could be a preventive measure to reduce evolution to infection as well as transmission of these bacteria between patients in intensive care unit. PMID:26770762

  9. Carbon utilization profiles of bacteria colonizing the headbox water of two paper machines in a Canadian mill.

    PubMed

    Kashama, Johnny; Prince, Véronique; Simao-Beaunoir, Anne-Marie; Beaulieu, Carole

    2009-03-01

    Forty-one bacterial strains isolated from the headbox water of two machines in a Canadian paper mill were associated with the genera Asticcacaulis, Acidovorax, Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Hydrogenophaga, Pseudomonas, Pseudoxanthomonas, Staphylococcus, Stenotrophomonas based on the sequence of their 16S rRNA genes. The metabolic profile of these strains were determined using Biolog EcoPlate, and the bacteria were divided into four metabolic groups. Metabolic profiles of the bacterial communities colonizing the headbox water of two paper machines was also determined weekly over a 1 year period. The only compound that was not reduced by the bacterial community was 2-hydroxybenzoic acid. Utilization frequency of the other carbon sources in the Biolog EcoPlate ranged from 3 to 100%. The metabolic profiles of the bacterial community did not vary considerably between the two paper machines. However, the metabolic profile varied among the sampling dates.

  10. Diversity of endophytic bacteria from Eucalyptus species seeds and colonization of seedlings by Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Anderson; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Lacava, Paulo Teixeira; Oda, Shinitiro; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2008-10-01

    The diversity and beneficial characteristics of endophytic microorganisms have been studied in several host plants. However, information regarding naturally occurring seed-associated endophytes and vertical transmission among different life-history stages of hosts is limited. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from seeds and seedlings of 10 Eucalyptus species and two hybrids. The results showed that endophytic bacteria, such as Bacillus, Enterococcus, Paenibacillus and Methylobacterium, are vertically transferred from seeds to seedlings. In addition, the endophytic bacterium Pantoea agglomerans was tagged with the gfp gene, inoculated into seeds and further reisolated from seedlings. These results suggested a novel approach to change the profile of the plants, where the bacterium is a delivery vehicle for desired traits. This is the first report of an endophytic bacterial community residing in Eucalyptus seeds and the transmission of these bacteria from seeds to seedlings. The bacterial species reported in this work have been described as providing benefits to host plants. Therefore, we suggest that endophytic bacteria can be transmitted vertically from seeds to seedlings, assuring the support of the bacterial community in the host plant.

  11. Taxon interactions control the distributions of cryoconite bacteria colonizing a High Arctic ice cap.

    PubMed

    Gokul, Jarishma K; Hodson, Andrew J; Saetnan, Eli R; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D L; Westall, Philippa J; Detheridge, Andrew P; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Bussell, Jennifer; Mur, Luis A J; Edwards, Arwyn

    2016-08-01

    Microbial colonization of glacial ice surfaces incurs feedbacks which affect the melting rate of the ice surface. Ecosystems formed as microbe-mineral aggregates termed cryoconite locally reduce ice surface albedo and represent foci of biodiversity and biogeochemical cycling. Consequently, greater understanding the ecological processes in the formation of functional cryoconite ecosystems upon glacier surfaces is sought. Here, we present the first bacterial biogeography of an ice cap, evaluating the respective roles of dispersal, environmental and biotic filtration occurring at local scales in the assembly of cryoconite microbiota. 16S rRNA gene amplicon semiconductor sequencing of cryoconite colonizing a Svalbard ice cap coupled with digital elevation modelling of physical parameters reveals the bacterial community is dominated by a ubiquitous core of generalist taxa, with evidence for a moderate pairwise distance-decay relationship. While geographic position and melt season duration are prominent among environmental predictors of community structure, the core population of taxa appears highly influential in structuring the bacterial community. Taxon co-occurrence network analysis reveals a highly modular community structured by positive interactions with bottleneck taxa, predominantly Actinobacteria affiliated to isolates from soil humus. In contrast, the filamentous cyanobacterial taxon (assigned to Leptolyngbya/Phormidesmis pristleyi) which dominates the community and binds together granular cryoconite are poorly connected to other taxa. While our study targeted one ice cap, the prominent role of generalist core taxa with close environmental relatives across the global cryosphere indicate discrete roles for cosmopolitan Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria as respective keystone taxa and ecosystem engineers of cryoconite ecosystems colonizing ice caps. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The role of pigmentation, ultraviolet radiation tolerance, and leaf colonization strategies in the epiphytic survival of phyllosphere bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J L; Carroll, T L; Sundin, G W

    2005-01-01

    Phenotypic mechanisms that enhance bacterial UVR survival typically include pigmentation and DNA repair mechanisms which provide protection from UVA and UVB wavelengths, respectively. In this study, we examined the contribution of pigmentation to field survival in Clavibacter michiganensis and evaluated differences in population dynamics and leaf colonization strategies. Two C. michiganensis pigment-deficient mutants were significantly reduced in UVA radiation survival in vitro; one of these mutants also exhibited reduced field populations on peanut when compared to the wild-type strain over the course of replicate 25-day experiments. The UVR-tolerant C. michiganensis strains G7.1 and G11.1 maintained larger epiphytic field populations on peanut compared to the UVR-sensitive C. michiganensis T5.1. Epiphytic field populations of C. michiganensis utilized the strategy of solar UVR avoidance during leaf colonization resulting in increased strain survival on leaves after UVC irradiation. These results further demonstrate the importance of UVR tolerance in the ability of bacterial strains to maintain population size in the phyllosphere. However, an examination of several bacterial species from the peanut phyllosphere and a collection of environmental Pseudomonas spp. revealed that sensitivity to UVA and UVC radiation was correlated in some but not all of these bacteria. These results underscore a need to further understand the biological effects of different solar wavelength groups on microbial ecology.

  13. Interaction of rumen bacteria as assumed by colonization patterns on untreated and alkali-treated rice straw.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Yabuki, Hiroyoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2014-05-01

    Colonization patterns of representative rumen bacteria were compared between untreated rice straw (UTS) and sodium hydroxide-treated rice straw (SHTS). UTS and SHTS were incubated in the rumen of sheep for 10 min, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 96 h using the nylon bag method. The population sizes of 13 representative bacterial species or groups were quantified by real-time PCR. The total bacterial population size (abundance) was similar in both UTS and SHTS. Fibrobacter succinogenes showed a higher population size compared to other fibrolytic species and was detected at a higher level in SHTS (3.7%) than in UTS (2.6%). Ruminococcus albus and Ruminococcus flavefaciens were also detected at higher levels in SHTS (0.15% and 0.29%) than in UTS (0.03% and 0.18%). Population sizes of non-fibrolytic species, such as Selenomonas ruminantium, Anaerovibrio lipolytica and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens were higher in UTS than in SHTS. Coefficient of determination (r(2) ) on population changes between bacterial species or groups were higher in UTS than in SHTS, suggesting the necessity of stronger bacterial interactions for UTS digestion. Therefore, not only colonization of fibrolytic species, but also synergistic interactions between different bacterial species may be key to the ruminal digestion of rice straw. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey Jr, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-01-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l−1 HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l−1) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l−1) (PRE) (n=19–21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7–8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection. PMID:24522264

  15. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-08-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l(-1) HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l(-1)) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l(-1)) (PRE) (n=19-21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7-8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection.

  16. Impact of Gut Colonization by Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria on the Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Retrospective, Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Bilinski, Jaroslaw; Robak, Katarzyna; Peric, Zinaida; Marchel, Halina; Karakulska-Prystupiuk, Ewa; Halaburda, Kazimierz; Rusicka, Patrycja; Swoboda-Kopec, Ewa; Wroblewska, Marta; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Basak, Grzegorz W

    2016-06-01

    Gut colonization by antibiotic-resistant bacteria may underlie hard-to-treat systemic infections. There is also accumulating evidence on the immunomodulatory function of gut microbiota after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) and its impact on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We investigated the epidemiology and clinical impact of gut colonization after alloSCT and retrospectively analyzed data on 107 alloSCTs performed at a single transplant center. Pretransplant microbiology screening identified colonization in 31% of cases. Colonization had a negative impact on overall survival after alloSCT in univariate (34% versus 74% at 24 months, P < .001) and multivariate (hazard ratio, 3.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.71 to 7.28; P < .001) analyses. Nonrelapse mortality was significantly higher in colonized than in noncolonized patients (42% versus 11% at 24 months, P = .001). Colonized patients more frequently experienced bacteremia (48% versus 24%, P = .01), and more deaths were attributable to infectious causes in the colonized group (42% versus 11% of patients and 67% versus 29% of deaths, P < .05). We observed a significantly higher incidence of grades II to IV acute GVHD in colonized than in noncolonized patients (42% versus 23%, P < .05), especially involving the gastrointestinal system (33% versus 13.5%, P = .07). In summary, we determined that gut colonization by antibiotic-resistant bacteria decreases the overall survival of patients undergoing alloSCT by increasing nonrelapse mortality and the incidences of systemic infection and acute GVHD. Copyright © 2016 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lactate-utilizing bacteria, isolated from human feces, that produce butyrate as a major fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2004-10-01

    The microbial community of the human colon contains many bacteria that produce lactic acid, but lactate is normally detected only at low concentrations (<5 mM) in feces from healthy individuals. It is not clear, however, which bacteria are mainly responsible for lactate utilization in the human colon. Here, bacteria able to utilize lactate and produce butyrate were identified among isolates obtained from 10(-8) dilutions of fecal samples from five different subjects. Out of nine such strains identified, four were found to be related to Eubacterium hallii and two to Anaerostipes caccae, while the remaining three represent a new species within clostridial cluster XIVa based on their 16S rRNA sequences. Significant ability to utilize lactate was not detected in the butyrate-producing species Roseburia intestinalis, Eubacterium rectale, or Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Whereas E. hallii and A. caccae strains used both D- and L-lactate, the remaining strains used only the d form. Addition of glucose to batch cultures prevented lactate utilization until the glucose became exhausted. However, when two E. hallii strains and one A. caccae strain were grown in separate cocultures with a starch-utilizing Bifidobacterium adolescentis isolate, with starch as the carbohydrate energy source, the L-lactate produced by B. adolescentis became undetectable and butyrate was formed. Such cross-feeding may help to explain the reported butyrogenic effect of certain dietary substrates, including resistant starch. The abundance of E. hallii in particular in the colonic ecosystem suggests that these bacteria play important roles in preventing lactate accumulation.

  18. Development of Human Breast Milk Microbiota-Associated Mice as a Method to Identify Breast Milk Bacteria Capable of Colonizing Gut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxin; Lu, Huifang; Feng, Zhou; Cao, Jie; Fang, Chao; Xu, Xianming; Zhao, Liping; Shen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Human breast milk is recognized as one of multiple important sources of commensal bacteria for infant gut. Previous studies searched for the bacterial strains shared between breast milk and infant feces by isolating bacteria and performing strain-level bacterial genotyping, but only limited number of milk bacteria were identified to colonize infant gut, including bacteria from Bifidobacterium, Staphylococcus, Lactobacillus, and Escherichia/Shigella. Here, to identify the breast milk bacteria capable of colonizing gut without the interference of bacteria of origins other than the milk or the necessity to analyze infant feces, normal chow-fed germ-free mice were orally inoculated with the breast milk collected from a mother 2 days after vaginal delivery. According to 16S rRNA gene-based denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and Illumina sequencing, bacteria at >1% abundance in the milk inoculum were only Streptococcus (56.0%) and Staphylococcus (37.4%), but in the feces of recipient mice were Streptococcus (80.3 ± 2.3%), Corynebacterium (10.0 ± 2.6 %), Staphylococcus (7.6 ± 1.6%), and Propionibacterium (2.1 ± 0.5%) that were previously shown as dominant bacterial genera in the meconium of C-section-delivered human babies; the abundance of anaerobic gut-associated bacteria, Faecalibacterium, Prevotella, Roseburia, Ruminococcus, and Bacteroides, was 0.01–1% in the milk inoculum and 0.003–0.01% in mouse feces; the abundance of Bifidobacterium spp. was below the detection limit of Illumina sequencing in the milk but at 0.003–0.01% in mouse feces. The human breast milk microbiota-associated mouse model may be used to identify additional breast milk bacteria that potentially colonize infant gut. PMID:28744259

  19. Successful treatment of an MTBE-impacted aquifer using a bioreactor self-colonized by native aquifer bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Kristin A.; Nickelsen, Michael G.; Boyle, Susan L.; Baker, Jeffrey M.; Tornatore, Paul M.; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Scow, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    A field-scale fixed bed bioreactor was used to successfully treat an MTBE-contaminated aquifer in North Hollywood, CA without requiring inoculation with introduced bacteria. Native bacteria from the MTBE-impacted aquifer rapidly colonized the bioreactor, entering the bioreactor in the contaminated groundwater pumped from the site, and biodegraded MTBE with greater than 99 % removal efficiency. DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified MTBE-degrading bacteria Methylibium petroleiphilum in the bioreactor. Quantitative PCR showed M. petroleiphilum enriched by three orders of magnitude in the bioreactor above densities pre-existing in the groundwater. Because treatment was carried out by indigenous rather than introduced organisms, regulatory approval was obtained for implementation of a full-scale bioreactor to continue treatment of the aquifer. In addition, after confirmation of MTBE removal in the bioreactor to below maximum contaminant limit levels (MCL; MTBE = 5 μg L−1), treated water was approved for reinjection back into the aquifer rather than requiring discharge to a water treatment system. This is the first treatment system in California to be approved for reinjection of biologically treated effluent into a drinking water aquifer. This study demonstrated the potential for using native microbial communities already present in the aquifer as an inoculum for ex-situ bioreactors, circumventing the need to establish non-native, non-acclimated and potentially costly inoculants. Understanding and harnessing the metabolic potential of native organisms circumvents some of the issues associated with introducing non-native organisms into drinking water aquifers, and can provide a low-cost and efficient remediation technology that can streamline future bioremediation approval processes. PMID:23613160

  20. Successful treatment of an MTBE-impacted aquifer using a bioreactor self-colonized by native aquifer bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Kristin A; Schmidt, Radomir; Nickelsen, Michael G; Boyle, Susan L; Baker, Jeffrey M; Tornatore, Paul M; Hristova, Krassimira R; Scow, Kate M

    2014-02-01

    A field-scale fixed bed bioreactor was used to successfully treat an MTBE-contaminated aquifer in North Hollywood, CA without requiring inoculation with introduced bacteria. Native bacteria from the MTBE-impacted aquifer rapidly colonized the bioreactor, entering the bioreactor in the contaminated groundwater pumped from the site, and biodegraded MTBE with greater than 99 % removal efficiency. DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified MTBE-degrading bacteria Methylibium petroleiphilum in the bioreactor. Quantitative PCR showed M. petroleiphilum enriched by three orders of magnitude in the bioreactor above densities pre-existing in the groundwater. Because treatment was carried out by indigenous rather than introduced organisms, regulatory approval was obtained for implementation of a full-scale bioreactor to continue treatment of the aquifer. In addition, after confirmation of MTBE removal in the bioreactor to below maximum contaminant limit levels (MCL; MTBE = 5 μg L(-1)), treated water was approved for reinjection back into the aquifer rather than requiring discharge to a water treatment system. This is the first treatment system in California to be approved for reinjection of biologically treated effluent into a drinking water aquifer. This study demonstrated the potential for using native microbial communities already present in the aquifer as an inoculum for ex-situ bioreactors, circumventing the need to establish non-native, non-acclimated and potentially costly inoculants. Understanding and harnessing the metabolic potential of native organisms circumvents some of the issues associated with introducing non-native organisms into drinking water aquifers, and can provide a low-cost and efficient remediation technology that can streamline future bioremediation approval processes.

  1. Effects of alternative dietary substrates on competition between human colonic bacteria in an anaerobic fermentor system.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Scott, Karen P; Ramsay, Alan G; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Welling, Gjalt W; Stewart, Colin S; Flint, Harry J

    2003-02-01

    Duplicate anaerobic fermentor systems were used to examine changes in a community of human fecal bacteria supplied with different carbohydrate energy sources. A panel of group-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization probes targeting 16S rRNA sequences revealed that the fermentors supported growth of a greater proportion of Bacteroides and a lower proportion of gram-positive anaerobes related to Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Ruminococcus flavefaciens-Ruminococcus bromii, Eubacterium rectale-Clostridium coccoides, and Eubacterium cylindroides than the proportions in the starting fecal inoculum. Nevertheless, certain substrates, such as dahlia inulin, caused a pronounced increase in the number of bacteria related to R. flavefaciens-R. bromii and E. cylindroides. The ability of three strictly anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria to compete with the complete human fecal flora was tested in the same experiment by using selective plating to enumerate the introduced strains. The Roseburia-related strain A2-183(F) was able to grow on all substrates despite the fact that it was unable to utilize complex carbohydrates in pure culture, and it was assumed that this organism survived by cross-feeding. In contrast, Roseburia intestinalis L1-82(R) and Eubacterium sp. strain A2-194(R) survived less well despite the fact that they were able to utilize polysaccharides in pure culture, except that A2-194(R) was stimulated 100-fold by inulin. These results suggest that many low-G+C-content gram-positive obligate anaerobes may be selected against during in vitro incubation, although several groups were stimulated by inulin. Thus, considerable caution is necessary when workers attempt to predict the in vivo effects of probiotics and prebiotics from their effects in vitro.

  2. Colonization of probiotic bacteria and its impact on ornamental fish Puntius conchonius.

    PubMed

    Divya, K R; Isamma, A; Ramasubramanian, V; Sureshkumar, S; Arunjith, T S

    2012-05-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the establishment and effect of probiotic bacteria such as Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus mesentericus, and Bifidobacterium infantis in the gut of freshwater ornamental fish Puntius conchonius. Postlarvae of 60 days old Puntius conchonius divided in four experimental groups each with three replicates. T1, T2 and T3 groups were fed with Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus mesentericus and Bifidobacterium infantis enriched copepod Thermocyclops decipiens respectively. T0 was the control group (without probiotic treated T. decipiens). The experiment was conducted for 45 days. The initial gut analysis of fish showed significant level of pathogenic bacteria in the gut of fish (p < 0.05). Total plate count of initial gut analysis of fish larvae were enumerated as 1.2 x 10(4)CFU ml(-1). The bacteriological study indicated thatfinal gut microflora of post-larvae have decreased level of pathogens. Total plate count of T1, T2 T3 and T0 were reported to be as 1.0 8 x 10(4), 1.06 x 10(4), 1.27 x 10(4) and 2.1 x 10(5) CFU ml(-1), respectively. Three experimental groups (T1, T2 and T3) were significantly different from control group (T0) (p < 0.05). At the end of the experiment, establishment of probiotics were examined. One week after probiotics administration, gut analysis of fish larvae showed, poor spore formation of Bacillus coagulans (2.3 x 10(3) CFU mL(-1)), when compared to B. mesentericus (3.2 +/- 0.03 x10(3) CFU ml(-1)) and Bifidobacterium infantis(3.1 x 10(3) CFU ml(-1)). The results from the study suggest that the probiotic bacteria significantly established in gut of P. conchonius and significant effects on the pathogenic gut inhabitants of the fish.

  3. Moderate halophilic bacteria colonizing the phylloplane of halophytes of the subfamily Salicornioideae (Amaranthaceae).

    PubMed

    Mora-Ruiz, Merit del Rocío; Font-Verdera, Francisca; Díaz-Gil, Carlos; Urdiain, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Valdecantos, Gustavo; González, Bernardo; Orfila, Alejandro; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2015-09-01

    Halophytes accumulate large amounts of salt in their tissues, and thus are susceptible to colonization by halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms that might be relevant for the growth and development of the plant. Here, the study of 814 cultured strains and 14,189 sequences obtained by 454 pyrosequencing were combined in order to evaluate the presence, abundance and diversity of halophilic, endophytic and epiphytic microorganisms in the phytosphere of leaves of members of the subfamily Salicornioideae from five locations in Spain and Chile. Cultures were screened by the tandem approach of MALDI-TOF/MS and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition, differential centrifugation was used to enrich endophytes for further DNA isolation, 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing. Culturable and non-culturable data showed strong agreement with a predominance of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. The most abundant isolates corresponded to close relatives of the species Chromohalobacter canadensis and Salinicola halophilus that comprised nearly 60% of all isolates and were present in all plants. Up to 66% of the diversity retrieved by pyrosequencing could be brought into pure cultures and the community structures were highly dependent on the compartment where the microorganisms thrived (plant surface or internal tissues). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. [The high fermentative capacity of colonic bacteria in the origin of flatulence and its sensibility to bismuth subsalicylate].

    PubMed

    León-Barúa, Raúl; Alvarez De Roig, Maritza; Roig-Arosemena, Javier; Berendson-Seminario, Roberto; Torres-Zevallos, Hernando

    2007-01-01

    Using a previously described technique, "in vitro" determinations were carried out for faecal fermentation (FF): basal faecal fermentation (BFF), i.e, only with faeces, with faeces and lactulose (LFF) and with faeces, lactulose and bismuth subsalicylate (BiLFF) in 34 patients with flatulence. The media+d.s. of the difference between the LFFand BFF levels (LFF-BFF) in patients with flatulence was significant and markedly higher than the respective media +d.s. in 30 normal control patients previously studied (9.1+4.7 vs. 3.9+3.2 ml gas/24 hrs; p<0.000001 respectively). And, although FF was reduced by adding bismuth salicylate in only 24% (70.6%) of the patients with flatulence but not in the remaining 10 (29.4%), in total the media+d.s. of the differences between the levels BiLFF and BFF (BiLFFBFF) was significantly lower that the media+d.s. of the differences between the LFF and BFF levels (LFF-BFF) (6.0+4.2 vs 9.1+4.7 ml gas/24 hrs; p<0.01 respectively). These results confirm that: 1) The fermentative capacity of the colonic bacteriae is most likely to be abnormally intense in peoples with flatulence and 2) Bismuth subsalicylate can be useful in the control of excessive colonic fermentation and flatulence; they raise, furthermore, the interesting possibility that we may have found the way to predict when the use of bismuth subsalicylate could be effective in the treatment of a patient with flatulence.

  5. Infection processes of xylem-colonizing pathogenic bacteria: possible explanations for the scarcity of qualitative disease resistance genes against them in crops.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chungyun; Han, Sang Wook; Song, Yu-Rim; Kim, Bo-Young; Lee, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Je-Min; Yeam, Inhwa; Heu, Sunggi; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2015-07-01

    Disease resistance against xylem-colonizing pathogenic bacteria in crops. Plant pathogenic bacteria cause destructive diseases in many commercially important crops. Among these bacteria, eight pathogens, Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. campestris pv. campestris, Erwinia amylovora, Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, and Xylella fastidiosa, infect their host plants through different infection sites and paths and eventually colonize the xylem tissues of their host plants, resulting in wilting symptoms by blocking water flow or necrosis of xylem tissues. Noticeably, only a relatively small number of resistant cultivars in major crops against these vascular bacterial pathogens except X. oryzae pv. oryzae have been found or generated so far, although these pathogens threaten productivity of major crops. In this review, we summarize the lifestyles of major xylem-colonizing bacterial pathogens and then discuss the progress of current research on disease resistance controlled by qualitative disease resistance genes or quantitative trait loci against them. Finally, we propose infection processes of xylem-colonizing bacterial pathogens as one of possible reasons for why so few qualitative disease resistance genes against these pathogens have been developed or identified so far in crops.

  6. Polarized currents inhibit in vitro growth of bacteria colonizing cutaneous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rosana Caetano; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; de Sousa, Natanael Teixeira Alves; Santos, Marcos Ferracioli; Martinez, Roberto; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli are among the microorganisms that often lead to infection in pressure ulcers. Polarized current has emerged as a possible intervention to limit bacterial proliferation. We analyzed the effect of fixed diphasic - Bernard (FD-B) and high voltage monophasic pulsed (HVMP) currents on bacteria S. aureus ATCC 25923 (Gram +), P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 (Gram -), and E. coli ATCC 25922 (Gram -). After the bacterial strains were activated the bacteria were suspended in physiological solution (0.9%) and the concentration adjusted to 1.5 × 10(3) CFU/mL. The cultures were stimulated with FD-B current at (3, 6, and 9 mA, 100 Hz, 15 and 30 minutes) and HVMP (32, 64, and 95 V, 100 Hz, 30 and 60 min) while monitoring the pH and temperature. After the stimulation, the suspensions were plated and incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. Then the counts were made of colony forming units (CFU). Data were submitted to normality Shapiro-Wilk test followed by nonparametric ANOVA test and post hoc Tukey test with p < 0.05. There was a decrease in the CFU for the two currents, but the most effective reduction was in FD-B. The temperature remained constant and the pH measured alkaline at the negative pole and acid at the positive pole during stimulation. The application of FD-B and HVMP currents promoted inhibition of bacterial proliferation when stimulated in vitro, acting as an adjuvant resource in the healing process. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  7. Impact of preoperative screening for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria on the incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, John J; Hicks, Jennifer L; Wallace, Stephanie E; Seftel, Allen D

    2017-01-01

    With the universal adoption of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to prostate biopsy, the current risk of post-biopsy infection (including sepsis) is <2%. Preoperative prophylactic antibiotic regimens can vary, and although fluoroquinolones have emerged as the standard of care, there is no universally agreed upon preoperative antibiotic regimen. Recently, an increase in the proportion of postoperative infections caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (as well as other Enterobacteriaceae) has led to the exploration of simple, practical, and cost-effective methods to minimize this postoperative infection risk. We performed a prospective, nonrandomized, controlled study of preoperative rectal cultures to screen for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria using ciprofloxacin-supplemented MacConkey agar culture media. To evaluate the feasibility and practicality of this test, one provider used the results of rectal swab cultures collected during the preoperative outpatient evaluation to adjust each patient’s preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis when fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria were detected, whereas two other providers continued usual preoperative care and empiric antimicrobial prophylaxis. Rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria was detected in 19/152 (12.5%) of patients. In our intention-to-treat analysis (N=268), the rate of post-biopsy sepsis was 3.6% lower in the group that was screened for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria prior to transrectal prostate biopsy. The observed risk reduction in the rectal screening group trended toward, but did not achieve, statistical significance. We suggest that preoperative screening for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria may be a useful step toward mitigating post-prostate biopsy sepsis. PMID:28280717

  8. The Colonic Microbiome and Epithelial Transcriptome Are Altered in Rats Fed a High-Protein Diet Compared with a Normal-Protein Diet.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chunlong; Yang, Yuxiang; Luo, Zhen; Guan, Leluo; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-03-01

    A high-protein diet (HPD) can produce hazardous compounds and reduce butyrate-producing bacteria in feces, which may be detrimental to gut health. However, information on whether HPD affects intestinal function is limited. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of an HPD on the microbiota, microbial metabolites, and epithelial transcriptome in the colons of rats. Adult male Wistar rats were fed either a normal-protein diet (20% protein, 56% carbohydrate) or an HPD (45% protein, 30% carbohydrate) for 6 wk (n = 10 rats per group, individually fed). After 6 wk, the colonic microbiome, microbial metabolites, and epithelial transcriptome were determined. Compared with the normal-protein diet, the HPD adversely altered the colonic microbiota by increasing (P < 0.05) Escherichia/Shigella, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and sulfate-reducing bacteria by 54.9-fold, 31.3-fold, 5.36-fold, and 2.59-fold, respectively. However, the HPD reduced Ruminococcus (8.04-fold), Akkermansia (not detected in HPD group), and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (3.5-fold) (P < 0.05), which are generally regarded as beneficial bacteria in the colon. Concomitant increases in cadaverine (4.88-fold), spermine (31.2-fold), and sulfide (4.8-fold) (P < 0.05) and a decrease in butyrate (2.16-fold) (P < 0.05) in the HPD rats indicated an evident shift toward the production of unhealthy microbial metabolites. In the colon epithelium of the HPD rats, transcriptome analysis identified an upregulation of genes (P < 0.05) involved in disease pathogenesis; these genes are involved in chemotaxis, the tumor necrosis factor signal process, and apoptosis. The HPD was also associated with a downregulation of many genes (P < 0.05) involved in immunoprotection, such as genes involved in innate immunity, O-linked glycosylation of mucin, and oxidative phosphorylation, suggesting there may be an increased disease risk in these rats. The abundance of Escherichia/Shigella, Enterococcus, and Streptococcus was

  9. Distribution and Diversity of Bacteria and Fungi Colonization in Stone Monuments Analyzed by High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Bingjian; He, Zhang; Yang, Xiaoru

    2016-01-01

    The historical and cultural heritage of Qingxing palace and Lingyin and Kaihua temple, located in Hangzhou of China, include a large number of exquisite Buddhist statues and ancient stone sculptures which date back to the Northern Song (960–1219 A.D.) and Qing dynasties (1636–1912 A.D.) and are considered to be some of the best examples of ancient stone sculpting techniques. They were added to the World Heritage List in 2011 because of their unique craftsmanship and importance to the study of ancient Chinese Buddhist culture. However, biodeterioration of the surface of the ancient Buddhist statues and white marble pillars not only severely impairs their aesthetic value but also alters their material structure and thermo-hygric properties. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was utilized to identify the microbial communities colonizing the stone monuments. The diversity and distribution of the microbial communities in six samples collected from three different environmental conditions with signs of deterioration were analyzed by means of bioinformatics software and diversity indices. In addition, the impact of environmental factors, including temperature, light intensity, air humidity, and the concentration of NO2 and SO2, on the microbial communities’ diversity and distribution was evaluated. The results indicate that the presence of predominantly phototrophic microorganisms was correlated with light and humidity, while nitrifying bacteria and Thiobacillus were associated with NO2 and SO2 from air pollution. PMID:27658256

  10. Distribution and Diversity of Bacteria and Fungi Colonization in Stone Monuments Analyzed by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Bingjian; He, Zhang; Yang, Xiaoru

    The historical and cultural heritage of Qingxing palace and Lingyin and Kaihua temple, located in Hangzhou of China, include a large number of exquisite Buddhist statues and ancient stone sculptures which date back to the Northern Song (960-1219 A.D.) and Qing dynasties (1636-1912 A.D.) and are considered to be some of the best examples of ancient stone sculpting techniques. They were added to the World Heritage List in 2011 because of their unique craftsmanship and importance to the study of ancient Chinese Buddhist culture. However, biodeterioration of the surface of the ancient Buddhist statues and white marble pillars not only severely impairs their aesthetic value but also alters their material structure and thermo-hygric properties. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was utilized to identify the microbial communities colonizing the stone monuments. The diversity and distribution of the microbial communities in six samples collected from three different environmental conditions with signs of deterioration were analyzed by means of bioinformatics software and diversity indices. In addition, the impact of environmental factors, including temperature, light intensity, air humidity, and the concentration of NO2 and SO2, on the microbial communities' diversity and distribution was evaluated. The results indicate that the presence of predominantly phototrophic microorganisms was correlated with light and humidity, while nitrifying bacteria and Thiobacillus were associated with NO2 and SO2 from air pollution.

  11. A prospective observational study of the prevalence and risk factors for colonization by antibiotic resistant bacteria in patients at admission to hospital in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistant organisms pose an increasing threat to the successful treatment of common infections. Understanding colonization patterns of these bacteria is important for effective antibiotic treatment and infection control guidelines. Methods A prospective observational study was performed to determine the prevalence of colonization with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) among patients admitted via the emergency department to a public tertiary hospital in Singapore. Anterior nares, groin, axillary and rectal swabs were collected at admission and cultured using standard bacteriological techniques. Clinical data including healthcare contact within the past 12 months and recent antibiotic use was collected and analyzed using a logistic regression model. Results 1006 patients were screened. 124 (12.4%) were colonized by ESBL-E, 18 (1.8%) by MRSA while no VRE was detected. Antibiotic use within the past month was the only significant predictor for ESBL-E colonization in the regression model, with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 2.58 (1.04 to 6.42). In participants recently prescribed antibiotics and hospitalized in the previous 3 months, 29.4% were colonized by ESBL-E. This represented 20.2% of the total ESBL-E burden, and ESBL-E was also detected in 6.3% of participants with no healthcare contact. Hospitalization and outpatient hospital visits predicted MRSA colonization in the univariate analysis. Neither was statistically significant in the logistic regression model, with AORs for MRSA colonization following hospitalization in the past 3 and 12 months of 3.81 [95% CI 0.84-17.28] and 3.48 [0.64-18.92] respectively. Conclusion A high prevalence of colonization with ESBL-E was evident among patients at admission, even in the absence of recent antibiotic use or contact with healthcare. PMID:24889720

  12. Review on colonization of residents and staff in Italian long-term care facilities by multidrug-resistant bacteria compared with other European countries.

    PubMed

    Aschbacher, Richard; Pagani, Elisabetta; Confalonieri, Massimo; Farina, Claudio; Fazii, Paolo; Luzzaro, Francesco; Montanera, Pier Giorgio; Piazza, Aurora; Pagani, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Rates of colonization and infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are increasing worldwide, in both acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Italy has one of the highest prevalence of MDR bacteria in European countries, especially with regard to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) or carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Review of studies on colonization by MDR bacteria from Italian LTCFs, risk factors for colonization and molecular characteristics of surveillance and clinical isolates, compared with other European countries. High variability of MDR colonization has been reported within and especially between European countries. Only a few surveillance studies have been performed in Italian LTCFs; these show MRSA colonization prevalence of 7.8-38.7 % for residents and 5.2-7.0 % for staff members, ESBL prevalence of 49.0-64.0 % for residents and 5.2-14.5 % for staff and prevalence of CPE of 1.0-6.3 % for residents and 0.0-1.5 % for staff. In Italian LTCFs, as well as in other European countries, the most prevalent ESBLs from surveillance or clinical Escherichia coli isolates were found to be CTX-M-type enzymes, particularly CTX-M-15, expressed by the pandemic ST131 clonal group; this lineage also expresses carbapenemase genes of the blaVIM and blaKPC types. Various risk factors for colonization of residents by MDR bacteria were identified. The limited data from Italian LTCFs confirms these settings as important reservoirs for MDR organisms, allowing important considerations regarding the infection risk by these organisms. Nevertheless, more extended and countrywide screening studies for MDR colonization in Italian LTCFs are required. To promote further studies of various microbiological aspects related to LTCFs, the Association of Italian Clinical Microbiologists (Associazione Microbiologi Clinici Italiani; AMCLI) in 2016 has set up a new Working Group for the

  13. Vertical mother-neonate transfer of maternal gut bacteria via breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Jost, Ted; Lacroix, Christophe; Braegger, Christian P; Rochat, Florence; Chassard, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Breast milk has recently been recognized as source of commensal and potential probiotic bacteria. The present study investigated whether viable strains of gut-associated obligate anaerobes are shared between the maternal and neonatal gut ecosystem via breastfeeding. Maternal faeces, breast milk and corresponding neonatal faeces collected from seven mothers-neonate pairs at three neonatal sampling points were analyzed by culture-independent (pyrosequencing) and culture-dependent methods (16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, random amplified polymorphic DNA and repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction. Pyrosequencing allowed identifying gut-associated obligate anaerobic genera, like Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Parabacteroides and members of the Clostridia (Blautia, Clostridium, Collinsella and Veillonella) shared between maternal faeces, breast milk and neonatal faeces. Using culture, a viable strain of Bifidobacterium breve was shown to be shared between all three ecosystems within one mother-neonate pair. Furthermore, pyrosequencing revealed that several butyrate-producing members of the Clostridia (Coprococcus, Faecalibacterium, Roseburia and Subdoligranulum) were shared between maternal faeces and breast milk. This study shows that (viable) obligate gut-associated anaerobes may be vertically transferred from mother to neonate via breastfeeding. Thus, our data support the recently suggested hypothesis of a novel way of mother-neonate communication, in which maternal gut bacteria reach breast milk via an entero-mammary pathway to influence neonatal gut colonization and maturation of the immune system. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Patients With Blood Disorders Inhibits Gut Colonization With Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria: Results of a Prospective, Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Bilinski, Jaroslaw; Grzesiowski, Pawel; Sorensen, Nikolaj; Madry, Krzysztof; Muszynski, Jacek; Robak, Katarzyna; Wroblewska, Marta; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Dulny, Grazyna; Dwilewicz-Trojaczek, Jadwiga; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Basak, Grzegorz W

    2017-08-01

    Patients with blood disorders colonized with antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) are prone to systemic infections that are difficult to treat. Reintroduction of commensal bacteria in a murine model of enterococcal colonization of the gut can lead to eradication of enterococci. We hypothesized that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) could be used to eradicate ARB in humans. Participants colonized with ARB were treated with intraduodenal FMT according to a prospective protocol (NCT02461199). The primary endpoint was complete ARB decolonization at 1 month after FMT. Secondary endpoints included safety assessment and partial ARB decolonization. Microbiome sequencing was performed to investigate the influence of microbial composition of the transplanted material on the outcome of FMT. Twenty-five FMTs were performed in 20 participants (including 40% who had neutropenia) who were colonized by a median of 2 (range, 1-4) strains of ARB. The primary endpoint was reached in 15/25 (60%) of the FMTs and more frequently in cases in which there was no periprocedural use of antibiotics (79% vs 36%, P < .05). Among participants, 15/20 (75%) experienced complete ARB decolonization. There were no severe adverse events, and partial ARB decolonization was observed in 20/25 (80%) of the FMTs. The microbiota composition analysis revealed higher abundance of Barnesiella spp., Bacteroides, and Butyricimonas and greater bacterial richness in the fecal material, resulting in eradication of Klebsiella pneumoniae compared with nonresponders. FMT in patients with blood disorders is safe and promotes eradication of ARB from the gastrointestinal tract. NCT02461199.

  15. A role of hydrogen peroxide producing commensal bacteria present in colon of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease in perpetuation of the inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Strus, M; Gosiewski, T; Fyderek, K; Wedrychowicz, A; Kowalska-Duplaga, K; Kochan, P; Adamski, P; Heczko, P B

    2009-12-01

    Bacteria in the gut play a central role in the initiation and progress of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study was prepared to elucidate the role in the inflammatory process of the bacterial species which are able to produce hydrogen peroxide, present in samples taken from colon lesions in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease. Fifty eight adolescents were enrolled into the study from January 2004 to October 2006 in Cracow, Poland. Biopsies and stool samples were collected. Bacteriological examinations and measurements of hydrogen peroxide production by enterococci, streptococci and lactobacilli were performed. For the first time it has been shown here that HP producing bacteria may contribute to increased amounts of hydrogen peroxide in the inflamed mucosa of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Moreover, we have been able to demonstrate an increase of total populations of aerobic bacteria but not anaerobes in the studied samples of mucosa of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease which is an indirect evidence of higher oxygen tension present in inflamed tissues in IBD. We have also been able to demonstrate the direct relationship between presence of blood in stools of IBD adolescents and increased populations of Enterobacteriaceae but not streptococci in samples of colon mucosa. It is, therefore, possible that different products of Enterobacteriaceae and especially their lipopolysaccharides may also contribute to perpetuation of the chronic colon inflammation.

  16. Iron encrustations on filamentous algae colonized by Gallionella-related bacteria in a metal-polluted freshwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J. F.; Neu, T. R.; Lu, S.; Händel, M.; Totsche, K. U.; Küsel, K.

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous macroscopic algae were observed in slightly acidic to circumneutral (pH 5.9-6.5), metal-rich stream water that leaked out from a former uranium mining district (Ronneburg, Germany). These algae differed in color and morphology and were encrusted with Fe-deposits. To elucidate their potential interaction with Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), we collected algal samples at three time points during summer 2013 and studied the algae-bacteria-mineral compositions via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and a 16S and 18S rRNA gene-based bacterial and algae community analysis. Surprisingly, sequencing analysis of 18S rRNA gene regions of green and brown algae revealed high homologies with the freshwater algae Tribonema (99.9-100 %). CLSM imaging indicated a loss of active chloroplasts in the algae cells, which may be responsible for the change in color in

  17. In vitro utilization of amylopectin and high-amylose maize (Amylomaize) starch granules by human colonic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Conway, P L; Brown, I L; Evans, A J

    1999-11-01

    It has been well established that a certain amount of ingested starch can escape digestion in the human small intestine and consequently enters the large intestine, where it may serve as a carbon source for bacterial fermentation. Thirty-eight types of human colonic bacteria were screened for their capacity to utilize soluble starch, gelatinized amylopectin maize starch, and high-amylose maize starch granules by measuring the clear zones on starch agar plates. The six cultures which produced clear zones on amylopectin maize starch- containing plates were selected for further studies for utilization of amylopectin maize starch and high-amylose maize starch granules A (amylose; Sigma) and B (Culture Pro 958N). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to detect bacterial starch-degrading enzymes. It was demonstrated that Bifidobacterium spp., Bacteroides spp., Fusobacterium spp., and strains of Eubacterium, Clostridium, Streptococcus, and Propionibacterium could hydrolyze the gelatinized amylopectin maize starch, while only Bifidobacterium spp. and Clostridium butyricum could efficiently utilize high-amylose maize starch granules. In fact, C. butyricum and Bifidobacterium spp. had higher specific growth rates in the autoclaved medium containing high-amylose maize starch granules and hydrolyzed 80 and 40% of the amylose, respectively. Starch-degrading enzymes were cell bound on Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides cells and were extracellular for C. butyricum. Active staining for starch-degrading enzymes on SDS-PAGE gels showed that the Bifidobacterium cells produced several starch-degrading enzymes with high relative molecular (M(r)) weights (>160,000), medium-sized relative molecular weights (>66,000), and low relative molecular weights (<66,000). It was concluded that Bifidobacterium spp. and C. butyricum degraded and utilized granules of amylomaize starch.

  18. Mucosa-associated bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract are uniformly distributed along the colon and differ from the community recovered from feces.

    PubMed

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; von Wright, Atte; Vilpponen-Salmela, Terttu; Ben-Amor, Kaouther; Akkermans, Antoon D L; de Vos, Willem M

    2002-07-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbors a complex community of bacterial cells in the mucosa, lumen, and feces. Since most attention has been focused on bacteria present in feces, knowledge about the mucosa-associated bacterial communities in different parts of the colon is limited. In this study, the bacterial communities in feces and biopsy samples from the ascending, transverse, and descending colons of 10 individuals were analyzed by using a 16S rRNA approach. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that 10(5) to 10(6) bacteria were present in the biopsy samples. To visualize the diversity of the predominant and the Lactobacillus group community, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was performed. DGGE analysis and similarity index comparisons demonstrated that the predominant mucosa-associated bacterial community was host specific and uniformly distributed along the colon but significantly different from the fecal community (P < 0.01). The Lactobacillus group-specific profiles were less complex than the profiles reflecting the predominant community. For 6 of the 10 individuals the community of Lactobacillus-like bacteria in the biopsy samples was similar to that in the feces. Amplicons having 99% sequence similarity to the 16S ribosomal DNA of Lactobacillus gasseri were detected in the biopsy samples of nine individuals. No significant differences were observed between healthy and diseased individuals. The observed host-specific DGGE profiles of the mucosa-associated bacterial community in the colon support the hypothesis that host-related factors are involved in the determination of the GI tract microbial community.

  19. Colonic inflammation accompanies an increase of β-catenin signaling and Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae bacteria in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Ishaq, Suzanne L; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Wright, André-Denis G

    2016-09-01

    Consumption of an obesigenic/high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with a high colon cancer risk and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that long-term high-fat (HF) feeding accelerates inflammatory process and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed HFD (45% energy) or a low-fat (LF) diet (10% energy) for 36 weeks. At the end of the study, body weights in the HF group were 35% greater than those in the LF group. These changes were associated with dramatic increases in body fat composition, inflammatory cell infiltration, inducible nitric oxide synthase protein concentration and cell proliferation marker (Ki67) in ileum and colon. Similarly, β-catenin expression was increased in colon (but not ileum). Consistent with gut inflammation phenotype, we also found that plasma leptin, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α concentrations were also elevated in mice fed the HFD, indicative of chronic inflammation. Fecal DNA was extracted and the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the microbial 16S rRNA gene was amplified using primers suitable for 454 pyrosequencing. Compared to the LF group, the HF group had high proportions of bacteria from the family Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae, which is known to be involved in the development of metabolic disorders, diabetes and colon cancer. Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that long-term HF consumption not only increases inflammatory status but also accompanies an increase of colonic β-catenin signaling and Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae bacteria in the hind gut of C57BL/6 mice. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Microscopic elucidation of abundant endophytic bacteria colonizing the cell wall–plasma membrane peri-space in the shoot-tip tissue of banana

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Pious; Reddy, Krishna M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at generating microscopic evidence of intra-tissue colonization in banana in support of the previous findings on widespread association of endophytic bacteria with the shoot tips of field-grown plants and micropropagated cultures, and to understand the extent of tissue colonization. Leaf-sheath tissue sections (∼50–100 µm) from aseptically gathered shoot tips of cv. Grand Naine were treated with Live/Dead bacterial viability kit components SYTO 9 (S9) and propidium iodide (PI) followed by epifluorescence or confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The S9, which targets live bacteria, showed abundant green-fluorescing particles along the host cell periphery in CLSM, apparently in between the plasma membrane and the cell wall. These included non-motile and occasional actively motile single bacterial cells seen in different x–y planes and z-stacks over several cell layers, with the fluorescence signal similar to that of pure cultures of banana endophytes. Propidium iodide, which stains dead bacteria, did not detect any, but post-ethanol treatment, both PI and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole detected abundant bacteria. Propidium iodide showed clear nuclear staining, as did S9 to some extent, and the fluorophores appeared to detect bacteria at the exclusion of DNA-containing plant organelles as gathered from bright-field and phase-contrast microscopy. The S9–PI staining did not work satisfactorily with formalin- or paraformaldehyde-fixed tissue. The extensive bacterial colonization in fresh tissue was further confirmed with the suckers of different cultivars, and was supported by transmission electron microscopy. This study thus provides clear microscopic evidence of the extensive endophytic bacterial inhabitation in the confined cell wall–plasma membrane peri-space in shoot tissue of banana with the organisms sharing an integral association with the host. The abundant tissue colonization suggests a possible involvement of endophytes in

  1. Differential induction of apoptosis in human colonic carcinoma cells (Caco-2) by Atopobium, and commensal, probiotic and enteropathogenic bacteria: mediation by the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Altonsy, Mohammed O; Andrews, Simon C; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2010-02-28

    The induction of apoptosis in mammalian cells by bacteria is well reported. This process may assist infection by pathogens whereas for non-pathogens apoptosis induction within carcinoma cells protects against colon cancer. Here, apoptosis induction by a major new gut bacterium, Atopobium minutum, was compared with induction by commensal (Escherichia coli K-12 strains), probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium latis) and pathogenic (E. coli: EPEC and VTEC) gut bacteria within the colon cancer cell line, Caco-2. The results show a major apoptotic effect for the pathogens, mild effects for the probiotic strains and A. minutum, but no effect for commensal E. coli. The mild apoptotic effects observed are consistent with the beneficial roles of probotics in protection against colon cancer and suggest, for the first time, that A. minutum possesses similar advantageous, anti-cancerous activity. Although bacterial infection increased Caco-2 membrane FAS levels, caspase-8 was not activated indicating that apoptosis is FAS independent. Instead, in all cases, apoptosis was induced through the mitochondrial pathway as indicated by BAX translocation, cytochrome c release, and caspase-9 and -3 cleavage. This suggests that an intracellular stimulus initiates the observed apoptosis responses.

  2. Phylogenetic distribution of genes encoding β-glucuronidase activity in human colonic bacteria and the impact of diet on faecal glycosidase activities.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Freda M; Maison, Nathalie; Holtrop, Grietje; Young, Pauline; Stevens, Valerie J; Ince, Jennifer; Johnstone, Alexandra M; Lobley, Gerald E; Flint, Harry J; Louis, Petra

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial β-glucuronidase in the human colon plays an important role in cleaving liver conjugates of dietary compounds and xenobiotics, while other glycosidase activities are involved in the conversion of dietary plant glycosides. Here we detected an increase in β-glucuronidase activity in faecal samples from obese volunteers following a high-protein moderate carbohydrate weight-loss diet, compared with a weight maintenance diet, but little or no changes were observed when the type of fermentable carbohydrate was varied. Other faecal glycosidase activities showed little or no change over a fivefold range of dietary NSP intake, although α-glucosidase increased on a resistant starch-enriched diet. Two distinct groups of gene, gus and BG, have been reported to encode β-glucuronidase activity among human colonic bacteria. Degenerate primers were designed against these genes. Overall, Firmicutes were found to account for 96% of amplified gus sequences, with three operational taxonomic units particularly abundant, whereas 59% of amplified BG sequences belonged to Bacteroidetes and 41% to Firmicutes. A similar distribution of operational taxonomic units was found in a published metagenome dataset involving a larger number of volunteers. Seven cultured isolates of human colonic bacteria that carried only the BG gene gave relatively low β-glucuronidase activity that was not induced by 4-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucuronide. By comparison, in three of five isolates that possessed only the gus gene, β-glucuronidase activity was induced. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Yerba mate enhances probiotic bacteria growth in vitro but as a feed additive does not reduce Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Francisco; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Pendleton, Sean; Andino, Ana; Zhang, Nan; Yard, Carrie; Crilly, Nate; Harte, Federico; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is a tea known to have beneficial effects on human health and antimicrobial activity against some foodborne pathogens. Thus, the application of yerba mate as a feed additive for broiler chickens to reduce Salmonella colonization was evaluated. The first in vitro evaluation was conducted by suspending Salmonella Enteritidis and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in yerba mate extract. The in vivo evaluations were conducted using preventative and horizontal transmission experiments. In all experiments, day-of-hatch chicks were treated with one of the following 1) no treatment (control); 2) ground yerba mate in feed; 3) probiotic treatment (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Pediococcus; 9:1 administered once on day of hatch by gavage); or 4) both yerba mate and probiotic treatments. At d 3, all chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis (preventative experiment) or 5 of 20 chicks (horizontal transmission experiment). At d 10, all birds were euthanized, weighed, and cecal contents enumerated for Salmonella. For the in vitro evaluation, antimicrobial activity was observed against Salmonella and the same treatment enhanced growth of LAB. For in vivo evaluations, none of the yerba mate treatments significantly reduced Salmonella Enteritidis colonization, whereas the probiotic treatment significantly reduced Salmonella colonization in the horizontal transmission experiment. Yerba mate decreased chicken BW and decreased the performance of the probiotic treatment when used in combination. In conclusion, yerba mate had antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens and enhanced the growth of LAB in vitro, but in vivo yerba mate did not decrease Salmonella Enteritidis colonization.

  4. Duration of Colonization With Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Bacteria at Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals in Chicago, Illinois

    PubMed Central

    Haverkate, Manon R.; Weiner, Shayna; Lolans, Karen; Moore, Nicholas M.; Weinstein, Robert A.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Hayden, Mary K.; Bootsma, Martin C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. High prevalence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae has been reported in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs), in part because of frequent readmissions of colonized patients. Knowledge of the duration of colonization with KPC is essential to identify patients at risk of KPC colonization upon readmission and to make predictions on the effects of transmission control measures. Methods. We analyzed data on surveillance isolates that were collected at 4 LTACHs in the Chicago region during a period of bundled interventions, to simultaneously estimate the duration of colonization during an LTACH admission and between LTACH (re)admissions. A maximum-likelihood method was used, taking interval-censoring into account. Results. Eighty-three percent of patients remained colonized for at least 4 weeks, which was the median duration of LTACH stay. Between LTACH admissions, the median duration of colonization was 270 days (95% confidence interval, 91–∞). Conclusions. Only 17% of LTACH patients lost colonization with KPC within 4 weeks. Approximately half of the KPC-positive patients were still carriers when readmitted after 9 months. Infection control practices should take prolonged carriage into account to limit transmission of KPCs in LTACHs. PMID:27747253

  5. Is surveillance for colonization of carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria important in adult bone marrow transplantation units?

    PubMed

    Demiraslan, Hayati; Cevahir, Fatma; Berk, Elife; Metan, Gokhan; Cetin, Mustafa; Alp, Emine

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacilli (CRGNB) colonization and to analyze the risk factors associated with CRGNB colonization. This prospective study was conducted in adult patients hospitalized in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units over a period of 8 months. Rectal swab samples were obtained from each participant every Monday, and patients CRGNB positive on admission were excluded. Of 185 participants, the median age was 47 years, and 59.5% were men. CRGNB colonization was detected in 21 (11.4%) patients. The most commonly isolated CRGNB were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Multivariate analysis revealed that busulfan use (11.9 times), fludarabine use (6.4 times), transfer from another hospital (7.8 times), transfer between units (9.3 times), and central venous catheterization (5.1 times) were risk factors for CRGNB colonization. During the study period, febrile neutropenia (FN) developed in 9 (56.2%) of the 21 colonized patients, and 1 patient died. Screening of patients for CRGNB colonization may have a role in preventing the spread of CRGNB. However, the empirical antimicrobial treatment for FN in patients with CRGNB colonization did not change, and their mortality rates were similar. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Colonization of residents and staff of an Italian long-term care facility and an adjacent acute care hospital geriatric unit by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    March, Albert; Aschbacher, Richard; Sleghel, Ferisa; Soelva, Gertrud; Kaczor, Malgorzata; Migliavacca, Roberta; Piazza, Aurora; Mattioni Marchetti, Vittoria; Pagani, Laura; Scalzo, Katia; Pasquetto, Valentina; Pagani, Elisabetta

    2017-10-10

    In 2016, we undertook a point prevalence screening study for Enterobacteriaceae with extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), high-level AmpC cephalosporinases and carbapenemases, and also methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in a long-term care facility (LTCF) and the associated acute care hospital geriatric unit in Bolzano, Northern Italy. Urine samples and rectal, inguinal, oropharyngeal and nasal swabs were plated on selective agars. Demographic data were collected. ESBL and carbapenemase genes were sought by PCR. We found the following colonization percentages with multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in 2016 in LTCF residents: all MDR organisms, 66.1%; ESBL producers, 53.0%; carbapenemase-producers, 1.7%; MRSA, 14.8%; VRE, 0.8%. Colonization by all MDR bacteria was 19.4% for LTCF staff and 26.0% for geriatric unit patients. PCR showed that 85% of Escherichia coli isolates from LTCF residents, all E. coli isolates from LTCF staff, 62.5% and 100% of Klebsiella pneumoniae from LTCF residents and geriatric unit patients, respectively, had a blaCTX-M-type gene. All carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae harboured a blaVIM-type gene. To conclude, the ongoing widespread diffusion of MDR bacteria in the LTCF suggests that efforts should be strengthened on MDR screening, implementation of infection control strategies and antibiotic stewardship programs targeting the unique aspects of LTCFs.

  7. Anaerostipes hadrus comb. nov., a dominant species within the human colonic microbiota; reclassification of Eubacterium hadrum Moore et al. 1976.

    PubMed

    Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Daigneault, Michelle; White, Aaron; Panaccione, Remo; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; O'Neal, Lindsey; Lawson, Paul A

    2012-10-01

    Recent molecular analyses suggest that bacteria related to strains SS2/1 and SSC/2, previously reported to be distantly related to Anaerostipes caccae NCIMB 13811(T), represent one of the ten most abundant phylotypes detected in adult human faecal samples. These two strains were isolated as d-lactate-utilizing bacteria from faecal samples of a healthy individual. We show here that they share >99.9% similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequence with a new butyrate-producing isolate recovered from a colonic biopsy of a Crohn's disease patient, and also with the sequence reported recently for Eubacterium hadrum ATCC 29173(T). Biochemical profiling using API Rapid ID 32A and API ZYM test systems confirmed a close phenotypic similarity to E. hadrum ATCC 29173(T), but also indicated that the description of this species should be expanded to include the ability to produce butyrate from d-lactate and acetate. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed an affinity between E. hadrum and members of the genus Anaerostipes (92.3-94.2% sequence similarity) belonging to the family Lachnospiraceae (formerly Clostridium cluster XIVa). Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic evidence it is proposed that E. hadrum be transferred to the genus Anaerostipes with the name Anaerostipes hadrus comb. nov. The type strain of A. hadrus comb. nov. is =ATCC 29173(T) (=DSM 3319(T) = VP 82-52(T)).

  8. The source of fermentable carbohydrates influences the in vitro protein synthesis by colonic bacteria isolated from pigs.

    PubMed

    Bindelle, J; Buldgen, A; Wavreille, J; Agneessens, R; Destain, J P; Wathelet, B; Leterme, P

    2007-09-01

    Two in vitro experiments were carried out to quantify the incorporation of nitrogen (N) by pig colonic bacteria during the fermentation of dietary fibre, including non-starch polysaccharides and resistant starch. In the first experiment, five purified carbohydrates were used: starch (S), cellulose (C), inulin (I), pectin (P) and xylan (X). In the second experiment, three pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysed ingredients were investigated: potato, sugar-beet pulp and wheat bran. The substrates were incubated in an inoculum, prepared from fresh faeces of sows and a buffer solution providing 15N-labelled NH4Cl. Gas production was monitored. Bacterial N incorporation (BNI) was estimated by measuring the incorporation of 15N in the solid residue at half-time to asymptotic gas production (T/2). The remaining substrate was analysed for sugar content. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were determined in the liquid phase. In the first experiment, the fermentation kinetics differed between the substrates. P, S and I showed higher rates of degradation (P < 0.001), while X and C showed a longer lag time and T/2. The sugar disappearance reached 0.91, 0.90, 0.81, 0.56 and 0.46, respectively, for P, I, S, C and X. Among them, S and I fixed more N per gram substrate (P < 0.05) than C, X and P (22.9 and 23.2 mg fixed N per gram fermented substrate v. 11.3, 12.3 and 9.8, respectively). Production of SCFA was the highest for the substrates with low N fixation: 562 and 565 mg/g fermented substrate for X and C v. 290 to 451 for P, I and S (P < 0.01). In the second experiment, potato and sugar-beet pulp fermented more rapidly than wheat bran (P < 0.001). Substrate disappearance at T/2 varied from 0.17 to 0.50. BNI were 18.3, 17.0 and 10.2 fixed N per gram fermented substrate, for sugar-beet pulp, potato and wheat bran, respectively, but were not statistically different. SCFA productions were the highest with wheat bran (913 mg/g fermented substrate) followed by sugar-beet pulp (641) and potato (556

  9. A mixed formulation of lactic acid bacteria inhibits trinitrobenzene-sulfonic-acid-induced inflammatory changes of the colon tissue in mice.

    PubMed

    Cha, Yun Suk; Seo, Jae-Gu; Chung, Myung-Jun; Cho, Chung Won; Youn, Hyun Joo

    2014-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are probiotics that provide numerous beneficial effects on the host body, especially on the intestine. Combining several strains of LAB, we prepared a formulation containing four different LAB and studied its anti-inflammatory activity both in vitro and in vivo. The formulation significantly reduced NO production from RAW 264.7 cells treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, indicating that the formulation might include antiinflammatory activity. The formulation also suppressed inflammatory change induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in mice, where oral or rectal administration of the formulation protected the colon tissue from the damage by TNBS. Expressions of the IL-6 and FasL genes appeared to be down-regulated by the formulation in TNBS-treated colon tissues, suggesting that the suppression of those genes may be involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of the formulation.

  10. High-level dietary fibre up-regulates colonic fermentation and relative abundance of saccharolytic bacteria within the human faecal microbiota in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing; Zhao, Lu; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2012-09-01

    Health authorities around the world advise citizens to increase their intake of foods rich in dietary fibre because of its inverse association with chronic disease. However, a few studies have measured the impact of increasing mixed dietary fibres directly on the composition of the human gut microbiota. We studied the impact of high-level mixed dietary fibre intake on the human faecal microbiota using an in vitro three-stage colonic model. The colonic model was maintained on three levels of fibre, a basal level of dietary fibre, typical of a Western-style diet, a threefold increased level and back to normal level. Bacterial profiles and short chain fatty acids concentrations were measured. High-level dietary fibre treatment significantly stimulated the growth of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus-Enterococcus group, and Ruminococcus group (p < 0.05) and significantly increased clostridial cluster XIVa and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in vessel 1 mimicking the proximal colon (p < 0.05). Total short chain fatty acids concentrations increased significantly upon increased fibre fermentation, with acetate and butyrate increasing significantly in vessel 1 only (p < 0.05). Bacterial species richness changed upon increased fibre supplementation. The microbial community and fermentation output returned to initial levels once supplementation with high fibre ceased. This study shows that high-level mixed dietary fibre intake can up-regulate both colonic fermentation and the relative abundance of saccharolytic bacteria within the human colonic microbiota. Considering the important role of short chain fatty acids in regulating human energy metabolism, this study has implications for the health-promoting potential of foods rich in dietary fibres.

  11. Structure of the gut microbiome following colonization with human feces determines colonic tumor burden.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Nielson T; Zackular, Joseph P; Chen, Grace Y; Schloss, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    extent of these changes was also correlated with tumor incidence. Our results suggest that the initial structure of the microbiome determines susceptibility to colonic tumorigenesis. There appear to be opposing roles for certain Gram-negative (Bacteroidales and Verrucomicrobia) and Gram-positive (Clostridiales) bacteria in tumor susceptibility. Thus, the impact of community structure is potentially mediated by the balance between protective, butyrate-producing populations and inflammatory, mucin-degrading populations.

  12. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii influence the production of mucus glycans and the development of goblet cells in the colonic epithelium of a gnotobiotic model rodent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The intestinal mucus layer plays a key role in the maintenance of host-microbiota homeostasis. To document the crosstalk between the host and microbiota, we used gnotobiotic models to study the influence of two major commensal bacteria, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, on this intestinal mucus layer. B. thetaiotaomicron is known to use polysaccharides from mucus, but its effect on goblet cells has not been addressed so far. F. prausnitzii is of particular physiological importance because it can be considered as a sensor and a marker of human health. We determined whether B. thetaiotaomicron affected goblet cell differentiation, mucin synthesis and glycosylation in the colonic epithelium. We then investigated how F. prausnitzii influenced the colonic epithelial responses to B. thetaiotaomicron. Results B. thetaiotaomicron, an acetate producer, increased goblet cell differentiation, expression of mucus-related genes and the ratio of sialylated to sulfated mucins in mono-associated rats. B. thetaiotaomicron, therefore, stimulates the secretory lineage, favoring mucus production. When B. thetaiotaomicron was associated with F. prausnitzii, an acetate consumer and a butyrate producer, the effects on goblet cells and mucin glycosylation were diminished. F. prausnitzii, by attenuating the effects of B. thetaiotaomicron on mucus, may help the epithelium to maintain appropriate proportions of different cell types of the secretory lineage. Using a mucus-producing cell line, we showed that acetate up-regulated KLF4, a transcription factor involved in goblet cell differentiation. Conclusions B. thetaiotaomicron and F. prausnitzii, which are metabolically complementary, modulate, in vivo, the intestinal mucus barrier by modifying goblet cells and mucin glycosylation. Our study reveals the importance of the balance between two main commensal bacteria in maintaining colonic epithelial homeostasis via their respective effects on mucus. PMID

  13. Persistence of nasal colonization with human pathogenic bacteria and associated antimicrobial resistance in the German general population

    PubMed Central

    Köck, R.; Werner, P.; Friedrich, A.W.; Fegeler, C.; Becker, K.; Bindewald, O.; Bui, T.T.; Eckhoff, C.; Epping, R.; Kähmann, L.; Meurer, M.; Steger, J.; von Auenmüller, L.

    2015-01-01

    The nares represent an important bacterial reservoir for endogenous infections. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of nasal colonization by different important pathogens, the associated antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1878 nonhospitalized volunteers recruited from the general population in Germany. Participants provided nasal swabs at three time points (each separated by 4–6 months). Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and important nonfermenters were cultured and subjected to susceptibility testing. Factors potentially influencing bacterial colonization patterns were assessed. The overall prevalence of S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenters was 41.0, 33.4 and 3.7%, respectively. Thirteen participants (0.7%) were colonized with methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Enterobacteriaceae were mostly (>99%) susceptible against ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (100%). Extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing isolates were not detected among Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Several lifestyle- and health-related factors (e.g. household size, travel, livestock density of the residential area or occupational livestock contact, atopic dermatitis, antidepressant or anti-infective drugs) were associated with colonization by different microorganisms. This study unexpectedly demonstrated high nasal colonization rates with Enterobacteriaceae in the German general population, but rates of antibiotic resistance were low. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage was rare but highly associated with occupational livestock contact. PMID:26862431

  14. A new zebrafish model of oro-intestinal pathogen colonization reveals a key role for adhesion in protection by probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rendueles, Olaya; Ferrières, Lionel; Frétaud, Maxence; Bégaud, Evelyne; Herbomel, Philippe; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial contribution of commensal bacteria to host health and homeostasis led to the concept that exogenous non-pathogenic bacteria called probiotics could be used to limit disease caused by pathogens. However, despite recent progress using gnotobiotic mammal and invertebrate models, mechanisms underlying protection afforded by commensal and probiotic bacteria against pathogens remain poorly understood. Here we developed a zebrafish model of controlled co-infection in which germ-free zebrafish raised on axenic living protozoa enabled the study of interactions between host and commensal and pathogenic bacteria. We screened enteric fish pathogens and identified Edwardsiella ictaluri as a virulent strain inducing a strong inflammatory response and rapid mortality in zebrafish larvae infected by the natural oro-intestinal route. Using mortality induced by infection as a phenotypic read-out, we pre-colonized zebrafish larvae with 37 potential probiotic bacterial strains and screened for survival upon E. ictaluri infection. We identified 3 robustly protective strains, including Vibrio parahaemolyticus and 2 Escherichia coli strains. We showed that the observed protective effect of E. coli was not correlated with a reduced host inflammatory response, nor with the release of biocidal molecules by protective bacteria, but rather with the presence of specific adhesion factors such as F pili that promote the emergence of probiotic bacteria in zebrafish larvae. Our study therefore provides new insights into the molecular events underlying the probiotic effect and constitutes a potentially high-throughput in vivo approach to the study of the molecular basis of pathogen exclusion in a relevant model of vertebrate oro-intestinal infection.

  15. Distribution of beta-glucosidase and beta-glucuronidase activity and of beta-glucuronidase gene gus in human colonic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dabek, Marta; McCrae, Sheila I; Stevens, Valerie J; Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra

    2008-12-01

    beta-Glycosidase activities present in the human colonic microbiota act on glycosidic plant secondary compounds and xenobiotics entering the colon, with potential health implications for the human host. Information on beta-glycosidases is currently limited to relatively few species of bacteria from the human colonic ecosystem. We therefore screened 40 different bacterial strains that are representative of dominant bacterial groups from human faeces for beta-glucosidase and beta-glucuronidase activity. More than half of the low G+C% Gram-positive firmicutes harboured beta-glucosidase activity, while beta-glucuronidase activity was only found in some firmicutes within clostridial clusters XIVa and IV. Most of the Bifidobacterium spp. and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron carried beta-glucosidase activity. A beta-glucuronidase gene belonging to family 2 glycosyl hydrolases was detected in 10 of the 40 isolates based on degenerate PCR. These included all nine isolates that gave positive assays for beta-glucuronidase activity, suggesting that the degenerate PCR could provide a useful assay for the capacity to produce beta-glucuronidase in the gut community. beta-Glucuronidase activity was induced by growth on d-glucuronic acid, or by addition of 4-nitrophenol-glucuronide, in Roseburia hominis A2-183, while beta-glucosidase activity was induced by 4-nitrophenol-glucopyranoside. Inducibility varied between strains.

  16. Nitrogen fixation by phyllosphere bacteria associated with higher plants and their colonizing epiphytes of a tropical lowland rainforest of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Fürnkranz, Michael; Wanek, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas; Abell, Guy; Rasche, Frank; Sessitsch, Angela

    2008-05-01

    Leaf surfaces (phyllospheres) have been shown to provide appropriate conditions for colonization by microorganisms including diazotrophic bacteria that are able to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N(2)). In this study, we determined leaf-associated N(2) fixation of a range of rainforest plants in Costa Rica, under different environmental conditions, by tracing biomass N incorporation from (15)N(2). N(2)-fixing bacterial communities of the plant species Carludovica drudei, Grias cauliflora and Costus laevis were investigated in more detail by analysis of the nifH gene and leaf-associated bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis. N(2) fixation rates varied among plant species, their growth sites (different microclimatic conditions) and light exposure. Leaf-associated diazotrophic bacterial communities detected on C. drudei and C. laevis were mainly composed of cyanobacteria (Nostoc spp.), whereas on the leaves of G. cauliflora gamma-proteobacteria were dominant in addition to cyanobacteria. The complexity of diazotrophic communities on leaves was not correlated with N(2) fixation activity. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis suggested the presence of complex microbial communities in association with leaves, however, cyanobacteria showed only low abundance. Our findings suggest that cyanobacteria as well as gamma-proteobacteria associated with leaf-colonizing epiphytes may provide significant nitrogen input into this rainforest ecosystem.

  17. Comparison of the kinetics of intestinal colonization by associating 5 probiotic bacteria assumed either in a microencapsulated or in a traditional, uncoated form.

    PubMed

    Piano, Mario D; Carmagnola, Stefania; Ballarè, Marco; Balzarini, Marco; Montino, Franco; Pagliarulo, Michela; Anderloni, Andrea; Orsello, Marco; Tari, Roberto; Sforza, Filomena; Mogna, Luca; Mogna, Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    Beneficial findings concerning probiotics are increasing day by day. However, one of the most important parameters able to significantly affect the probiotic value of a microorganism is its survival during the transit through the stomach and the duodenum. Some techniques may be applied that aim to improve this parameter, but microencapsulation of bacterial cells remains one of the most important. A recent study assessed the kinetics of intestinal colonization by a mixture of 2 probiotic strains, given either in a microencapsulated or in a traditional, uncoated form. A comparison between the intestinal colonization by associating 5 microencapsulated bacteria and the same uncoated strains was performed by a double-blind, randomized, cross-over study. The study (December 2007 to January 2009) involved 53 healthy volunteers. In particular, subjects were divided into 2 groups: group A (27 subjects) was given a mix of probiotic strains Probiotical S.p.A. (Novara, Italy), Lactobacillus acidophilus LA02 (DSM 21717), Lactobacillus rhamnosus LR04 (DSM 16605), L. rhamnosus GG, or LGG (ATCC 53103), L. rhamnosus LR06 (DSM 21981), and Bifidobacterium lactis BS01 (LMG P-21384) in an uncoated form, whereas group B (26 subjects) received the same strains microencapsulated with a gastroprotected material. The uncoated strains were administered at 5×10⁹ cfu/strain/d (a total of 25×10⁹ cfu/d) for 21 days, whereas the microencapsulated bacteria were given at 1×10⁹ cfu/strain/d (a total of 5×10⁹ cfu/d) for 21 days. At the end of the first period of supplementation with probiotics, a 3-week wash-out phase was included in the study setting. At the end of the wash-out period, the groups crossed over their treatment regimen; that is, group A was administered the microencapsulated bacteria and group B the uncoated bacteria. The administered quantities of each strain were the same as the first treatment. A quantitative evaluation of intestinal colonization by probiotics, either

  18. Numerical ecology validates a biogeographical distribution and gender-based effect on mucosa-associated bacteria along the human colon

    PubMed Central

    de Cárcer, Daniel Aguirre; Cuív, Páraic Ó; Wang, Tingting; Kang, Seungha; Worthley, Daniel; Whitehall, Vicki; Gordon, Iain; McSweeney, Chris; Leggett, Barbara; Morrison, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We applied constrained ordination numerical ecology methods to data produced with a human intestinal tract-specific phylogenetic microarray (the Aus-HIT Chip) to examine the microbial diversity associated with matched biopsy tissue samples taken from the caecum, transverse colon, sigmoid colon and rectum of 10 healthy patients. Consistent with previous studies, the profiles revealed a marked intersubject variability; however, the numerical ecology methods of analysis allowed the subtraction of the subject effect from the data and revealed, for the first time, evidence of a longitudinal gradient for specific microbes along the colorectum. In particular, probes targeting Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp. produced strongest signals with caecal and transverse colon samples, with a gradual decline through to the rectum. Conversely, the analyses suggest that several members of the Enterobacteriaceae increase in relative abundance towards the rectum. These collective differences were substantiated by the multivariate analysis of quantitative PCR data. We were also able to identify differences in the microarray profiles, especially for the streptococci and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, on the basis of gender. The results derived by these multivariate analyses are biologically intuitive and suggest that the biogeography of the colonic mucosa can be monitored for changes through cross-sectional and/or inception cohort studies. PMID:21124491

  19. pH and peptide supply can radically alter bacterial populations and short-chain fatty acid ratios within microbial communities from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alan W; Duncan, Sylvia H; McWilliam Leitch, E Carol; Child, Matthew W; Flint, Harry J

    2005-07-01

    The effects of changes in the gut environment upon the human colonic microbiota are poorly understood. The response of human fecal microbial communities from two donors to alterations in pH (5.5 or 6.5) and peptides (0.6 or 0.1%) was studied here in anaerobic continuous cultures supplied with a mixed carbohydrate source. Final butyrate concentrations were markedly higher at pH 5.5 (0.6% peptide mean, 24.9 mM; 0.1% peptide mean, 13.8 mM) than at pH 6.5 (0.6% peptide mean, 5.3 mM; 0.1% peptide mean, 7.6 mM). At pH 5.5 and 0.6% peptide input, a high butyrate production coincided with decreasing acetate concentrations. The highest propionate concentrations (mean, 20.6 mM) occurred at pH 6.5 and 0.6% peptide input. In parallel, major bacterial groups were monitored by using fluorescence in situ hybridization with a panel of specific 16S rRNA probes. Bacteroides levels increased from ca. 20 to 75% of total eubacteria after a shift from pH 5.5 to 6.5, at 0.6% peptide, coinciding with high propionate formation. Conversely, populations of the butyrate-producing Roseburia group were highest (11 to 19%) at pH 5.5 but fell at pH 6.5, a finding that correlates with butyrate formation. When tested in batch culture, three Bacteroides species grew well at pH 6.7 but poorly at pH 5.5, which is consistent with the behavior observed for the mixed community. Two Roseburia isolates grew equally well at pH 6.7 and 5.5. These findings suggest that a lowering of pH resulting from substrate fermentation in the colon may boost butyrate production and populations of butyrate-producing bacteria, while at the same time curtailing the growth of Bacteroides spp.

  20. CD4CD8αα Lymphocytes, A Novel Human Regulatory T Cell Subset Induced by Colonic Bacteria and Deficient in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Bossard, Céline; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Jarry, Anne; Meurette, Guillaume; Quévrain, Elodie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Preisser, Laurence; Asehnoune, Karim; Labarrière, Nathalie; Altare, Frédéric; Sokol, Harry; Jotereau, Francine

    2014-01-01

    How the microbiota affects health and disease is a crucial question. In mice, gut Clostridium bacteria are potent inducers of colonic interleukin (IL)-10-producing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Treg), which play key roles in the prevention of colitis and in systemic immunity. In humans, although gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with immune disorders, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In contrast with mice, the contribution of Foxp3 Treg in colitis prevention has been questioned, suggesting that other compensatory regulatory cells or mechanisms may exist. Here we addressed the regulatory role of the CD4CD8 T cells whose presence had been reported in the intestinal mucosa and blood. Using colonic lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy individuals, and those with colon cancer and irritable bowel disease (IBD), we demonstrated that CD4CD8αα (DP8α) T lymphocytes expressed most of the regulatory markers and functions of Foxp3 Treg and secreted IL-10. Strikingly, DP8α LPL and PBL exhibited a highly skewed repertoire toward the recognition of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major Clostridium species of the human gut microbiota, which is decreased in patients with IBD. Furthermore, the frequencies of DP8α PBL and colonic LPL were lower in patients with IBD than in healthy donors and in the healthy mucosa of patients with colon cancer, respectively. Moreover, PBL and LPL from most patients with active IBD failed to respond to F. prausnitzii in contrast to PBL and LPL from patients in remission and/or healthy donors. These data (i) uncover a Clostridium-specific IL-10-secreting Treg subset present in the human colonic LP and blood, (ii) identify F. prausnitzii as a major inducer of these Treg, (iii) argue that these cells contribute to the control or prevention of colitis, opening new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IBD, and (iv) provide new tools to address the systemic impact of both these Treg and the

  1. CD4CD8αα lymphocytes, a novel human regulatory T cell subset induced by colonic bacteria and deficient in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Bossard, Céline; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Jarry, Anne; Meurette, Guillaume; Quévrain, Elodie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Preisser, Laurence; Asehnoune, Karim; Labarrière, Nathalie; Altare, Frédéric; Sokol, Harry; Jotereau, Francine

    2014-04-01

    How the microbiota affects health and disease is a crucial question. In mice, gut Clostridium bacteria are potent inducers of colonic interleukin (IL)-10-producing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Treg), which play key roles in the prevention of colitis and in systemic immunity. In humans, although gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with immune disorders, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In contrast with mice, the contribution of Foxp3 Treg in colitis prevention has been questioned, suggesting that other compensatory regulatory cells or mechanisms may exist. Here we addressed the regulatory role of the CD4CD8 T cells whose presence had been reported in the intestinal mucosa and blood. Using colonic lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy individuals, and those with colon cancer and irritable bowel disease (IBD), we demonstrated that CD4CD8αα (DP8α) T lymphocytes expressed most of the regulatory markers and functions of Foxp3 Treg and secreted IL-10. Strikingly, DP8α LPL and PBL exhibited a highly skewed repertoire toward the recognition of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major Clostridium species of the human gut microbiota, which is decreased in patients with IBD. Furthermore, the frequencies of DP8α PBL and colonic LPL were lower in patients with IBD than in healthy donors and in the healthy mucosa of patients with colon cancer, respectively. Moreover, PBL and LPL from most patients with active IBD failed to respond to F. prausnitzii in contrast to PBL and LPL from patients in remission and/or healthy donors. These data (i) uncover a Clostridium-specific IL-10-secreting Treg subset present in the human colonic LP and blood, (ii) identify F. prausnitzii as a major inducer of these Treg, (iii) argue that these cells contribute to the control or prevention of colitis, opening new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IBD, and (iv) provide new tools to address the systemic impact of both these Treg and the

  2. Long-Term Colonization of the Cystic Fibrosis Lung by Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria: Epidemiology, Clonal Variation, and Genome-Wide Expression Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Carla P.; dos Santos, Sandra C.; Madeira, Andreia; Mira, Nuno P.; Moreira, Ana S.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Long-term respiratory infections with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients generally lead to a more rapid decline in lung function and, in some cases, to a fatal necrotizing pneumonia known as the “cepacia syndrome.” Bcc bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment and are recognized as serious opportunistic pathogens that are virtually impossible to eradicate from the CF lung, posing a serious clinical threat. The epidemiological survey of Bcc bacteria involved in respiratory infections at the major Portuguese CF Treatment Center at Santa Maria Hospital, in Lisbon, has been carried out by our research group for the past 16 years, covering over 500 clinical isolates where B. cepacia and B. cenocepacia are the predominant species, with B. stabilis, B. contaminans, B. dolosa, and B. multivorans also represented. The systematic and longitudinal study of this CF population during such an extended period of time represents a unique case–study, comprehending 41 Bcc-infected patients (29 pediatric and 12 adult) of whom around 70% have been persistently colonized between 7 months and 9 years. During chronic infection, the CF airways represent an evolving ecosystem, with multiple phenotypic variants emerging from the clonal population and becoming established in the patients’ airways as the result of genetic adaptation. Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms involved is crucial for an improved therapeutic outcome of chronic infections in CF. This review focuses on our contribution to the understanding of these adaptive mechanisms based on extensive phenotypic, genotypic, and genome-wide expression approaches of selected Bcc clonal variants obtained during long-term colonization of the CF airways. PMID:22919578

  3. Colonization of frog Rana temporaria L. urinary bladder by Gram-negative bacteria leads to decreased effect of arginine-vasotocin on water reabsorption from the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Fock, Ekaterina; Lavrova, Elena; Parnova, Rimma

    2013-11-01

    In frogs and toads the urinary bladder is very important for the maintenance of water balance due to its ability to store water which can be reabsorbed under the action of arginine-vasotocin (AVT). The usage of isolated bladders as a model for studying the osmotic water permeability (OWP) regulation has a disadvantage which relates to high variability of AVT effect among individuals, some showing insensitivity to the hormone. We hypothesized that the response of the bladder to AVT could depend on the colonization of the mucosal epithelium by Gram-negative bacteria. To test this, paired hemibladders of the frog Rana temporaria were used for measurement of OWP and for analysis of Gram-negative bacteria in the bladder tissue or isolated epithelial cells. Among the 206 frogs studied, 41% were infected by different Enterobacteriaceae, with prevalence of Hafnia alvei and Escherichia coli. In infected bladders the basal level of OWP was unchanged, whereas OWP stimulated by AVT was reduced (non-infected: 2.53 ± 0.13, n = 59, infected: 1.21 ± 0.17 µL min(-1)  cm(-2), n = 38, for the 15 min of AVT action, P < 0.001). In the sample, 100% of hemibladders that responded to AVT very weakly (OWP <0.5 µL min(-1)  cm(-2)) had a bacterial infection. Overnight treatment of hemibladders with mucosal lipopolysaccharide E. coli decreased OWP induced by AVT, forskolin, or IBMX lowering basal and stimulated level of cAMP. The data obtained indicate that the frog bladder epithelium could be colonized by Gram-negative bacteria, probably of cloacal origin, leading to reduction of sensitivity to AVT and to impairment of the urinary bladder to provide osmoregulation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A Small Number of Low-abundance Bacteria Dominate Plant Species-specific Responses during Rhizosphere Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Wayne; Hör, Jens; Egert, Markus; van Kleunen, Mark; Pester, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Plant growth can be affected by soil bacteria. In turn, plants are known to influence soil bacteria through rhizodeposits and changes in abiotic conditions. We aimed to quantify the phylotype richness and relative abundance of rhizosphere bacteria that are actually influenced in a plant species-specific manner and to determine the role of the disproportionately large diversity of low-abundance bacteria belonging to the rare biosphere (<0.1 relative abundance) in this process. In addition, we aimed to determine whether plant phylogeny has an influence on the plant species-specific rhizosphere bacterial community. For this purpose, 19 herbaceous plant species from five different plant orders were grown in a common soil substrate. Bacterial communities in the initial soil substrate and the established rhizosphere soils were compared by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Only a small number of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 97% sequence identity) responded either positively (ca. 1%) or negatively (ca. 1%) to a specific plant species. On average, 91% of plant-specific positive response OTUs comprised bacteria belonging to the rare biosphere, highlighting that low-abundance populations are metabolically active in the rhizosphere. In addition, low-abundance OTUs were in terms of their summed relative abundance major drivers of the bacterial phyla composition across the rhizosphere of all tested plant species. However, no effect of plant phylogeny could be observed on the established rhizosphere bacterial communities, neither when considering differences in the overall established rhizosphere communities nor when considering plant species-specific responders only. Our study provides a quantitative assessment of the effect of plants on their rhizosphere bacteria across multiple plant orders. Plant species-specific effects on soil bacterial communities involved only 18–111 bacterial OTUs out of several 1000s; this minority may potentially impact plant growth

  5. A Small Number of Low-abundance Bacteria Dominate Plant Species-specific Responses during Rhizosphere Colonization.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Wayne; Hör, Jens; Egert, Markus; van Kleunen, Mark; Pester, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Plant growth can be affected by soil bacteria. In turn, plants are known to influence soil bacteria through rhizodeposits and changes in abiotic conditions. We aimed to quantify the phylotype richness and relative abundance of rhizosphere bacteria that are actually influenced in a plant species-specific manner and to determine the role of the disproportionately large diversity of low-abundance bacteria belonging to the rare biosphere (<0.1 relative abundance) in this process. In addition, we aimed to determine whether plant phylogeny has an influence on the plant species-specific rhizosphere bacterial community. For this purpose, 19 herbaceous plant species from five different plant orders were grown in a common soil substrate. Bacterial communities in the initial soil substrate and the established rhizosphere soils were compared by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Only a small number of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 97% sequence identity) responded either positively (ca. 1%) or negatively (ca. 1%) to a specific plant species. On average, 91% of plant-specific positive response OTUs comprised bacteria belonging to the rare biosphere, highlighting that low-abundance populations are metabolically active in the rhizosphere. In addition, low-abundance OTUs were in terms of their summed relative abundance major drivers of the bacterial phyla composition across the rhizosphere of all tested plant species. However, no effect of plant phylogeny could be observed on the established rhizosphere bacterial communities, neither when considering differences in the overall established rhizosphere communities nor when considering plant species-specific responders only. Our study provides a quantitative assessment of the effect of plants on their rhizosphere bacteria across multiple plant orders. Plant species-specific effects on soil bacterial communities involved only 18-111 bacterial OTUs out of several 1000s; this minority may potentially impact plant growth in

  6. Major Anaerobic Bacteria Responsible for the Production of Carcinogenic Acetaldehyde from Ethanol in the Colon and Rectum.

    PubMed

    Tsuruya, Atsuki; Kuwahara, Akika; Saito, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Haruhiko; Tenma, Natsuki; Inai, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiji; Tsutsumi, Eri; Suwa, Yoshihide; Totsuka, Yukari; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Akira; Shimoyama, Takefumi; Nakayama, Toru

    2016-07-01

    The importance of ethanol oxidation by intestinal aerobes and facultative anaerobes under aerobic conditions in the pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer has been proposed. However, the role of obligate anaerobes therein remains to be established, and it is still unclear which bacterial species, if any, are most important in the production and/or elimination of carcinogenic acetaldehyde under such conditions. This study was undertaken to address these issues. More than 500 bacterial strains were isolated from the faeces of Japanese alcoholics and phylogenetically characterized, and their aerobic ethanol metabolism was studied in vitro to examine their ability to accumulate acetaldehyde beyond the minimum mutagenic concentration (MMC, 50 µM). Bacterial strains that were considered to potentially accumulate acetaldehyde beyond the MMC under aerobic conditions in the colon and rectum were identified and referred to as 'potential acetaldehyde accumulators' (PAAs). Ruminococcus, an obligate anaerobe, was identified as a genus that includes a large number of PAAs. Other obligate anaerobes were also found to include PAAs. The accumulation of acetaldehyde by PAAs colonizing the colorectal mucosal surface could be described, at least in part, as the response of PAAs to oxidative stress. Ethanol oxidation by intestinal obligate anaerobes under aerobic conditions in the colon and rectum could also play an important role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer. © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  7. Colonization of residents and staff of a long-term-care facility and adjacent acute-care hospital geriatric unit by multiresistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    March, A; Aschbacher, R; Dhanji, H; Livermore, D M; Böttcher, A; Sleghel, F; Maggi, S; Noale, M; Larcher, C; Woodford, N

    2010-07-01

    Long-term-care facilities (LTCFs) are reservoirs of resistant bacteria. We undertook a point-prevalence survey and risk factor analysis for specific resistance types among residents and staff of a Bolzano LTCF and among geriatric unit patients in the associated acute-care hospital. Urine samples and rectal, inguinal, oropharyngeal and nasal swabs were plated on chromogenic agar; isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; resistance genes and links to insertion sequences were sought by PCR; plasmids were analysed by PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism and incompatibility grouping. Demographic data were collected. Of the LTCF residents, 74.8% were colonized with ≥1 resistant organism, 64% with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers, 38.7% with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 6.3% with metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) producers, and 2.7% with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Corresponding rates for LTCF staff were 27.5%, 14.5%, 14.5%, 1.5% and 0%, respectively. Colonization frequencies for geriatric unit patients were lower than for those in the LTCF. Both clonal spread and plasmid transfer were implicated in the dissemination of MBL producers that harboured IncN plasmids bearing bla(VIM-1), qnrS, and bla(SHV-12). Most (44/45) ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates had bla(CTX-M) genes of group 1; a few had bla(CTX-M) genes of group 9 or bla(SHV-5); those with bla(CTX-M-15) or bla(SHV-5) were clonal. Risk factors for colonization of LTCF residents with resistant bacteria included age ≥86 years, antibiotic treatment in the previous 3 months, indwelling devices, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, physical disability, and the particular LTCF unit; those for geriatric unit patients were age and dementia. In conclusion, ESBL-producing and MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and MRSA were prevalent among the LTCF residents and staff, but less so in the hospital geriatric unit. Education of LTCF employees and better

  8. Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria Colonization of Healthy US Military Personnel in the US and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-05

    1) 0 4 (5) 2 (2) 8 (9) Alcaligenes species 0 1 (1) 0 0 1 (1) 2 (2) 1 (1) 5 (5) Citrobacter species 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 (11) 11 (11) Enterobacter...Klebsiella oxytoca 0 1 (1) 0 1 (1) 0 0 2 (3) 2 (5) Klebsiella pneumoniae 0 1 (1) 1 (1) 2 (2) 0 1 (1) 8 (8) 12 (13) Proteus species 0 0 1 (1) 0 0 1...bacteria or clones of bacteria. ***Other isolates include: Acinetobacter species (2), Acinetobacter haemolyticus (2), Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia

  9. Differential colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria and Lactobacillus murinus do not drive divergent development of diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Isaac T.W.; Giles, Daniel A.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Walters, Stephanie; Hembree, Jazzminn; Raver, Christine; Rewerts, Cheryl L.; Downey, Jordan; Flick, Leah M.; Stankiewicz, Traci E.; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Balfour Sartor, R.; Divanovic, Senad; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Karp, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota have been proposed to modify the development and maintenance of obesity and its sequelae. Definition of underlying mechanisms has lagged, although the ability of commensal gut microbes to drive pathways involved in inflammation and metabolism has generated compelling, testable hypotheses. We studied C57BL/6 mice from two vendors that differ in their obesogenic response and in their colonization by specific members of the gut microbiota having well-described roles in regulating gut immune responses. We confirmed the presence of robust differences in weight gain in mice from these different vendors during high fat diet stress. However, neither specific, highly divergent members of the gut microbiota (Lactobacillus murinus, segmented filamentous bacteria) nor the horizontally transmissible gut microbiota were found to be responsible. Constitutive differences in locomotor activity were observed, however. These data underscore the importance of selecting appropriate controls in this widely used model of human obesity. PMID:24049732

  10. Symbiosome-like intracellular colonization of cereals and other crop plants by nitrogen-fixing bacteria for reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Cocking, Edward C; Stone, Philip J; Davey, Michael R

    2005-12-01

    It has been forecast that the challenge of meeting increased food demand and protecting environmental quality will be won or lost in maize, rice and wheat cropping systems, and that the problem of environmental nitrogen enrichment is most likely to be solved by substituting synthetic nitrogen fertilizers by the creation of cereal crops that are able to fix nitrogen symbiotically as legumes do. In legumes, rhizobia present intracellularly in membrane-bound vesicular compartments in the cytoplasm of nodule cells fix nitrogen endosymbiotically. Within these symbiosomes, membrane-bound vesicular compartments, rhizobia are supplied with energy derived from plant photosynthates and in return supply the plant with biologically fixed nitrogen, usually as ammonia. This minimizes or eliminates the need for inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. Recently we have demonstrated, using novel inoculation conditions with very low numbers of bacteria, that cells of root meristems of maize, rice, wheat and other major non-legume crops, such as oilseed rape and tomato, can be intracellularly colonized by the non-rhizobial, non-nodulating, nitrogen fixing bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus that naturally occurs in sugarcane. G. diazotrophicus expressing nitrogen fixing (nifH) genes is present in symbiosome-like compartments in the cytoplasm of cells of the root meristems of the target cereals and non-legume crop species, somewhat similar to the intracellular symbiosome colonization of legume nodule cells by rhizobia. To obtain an indication of the likelihood of adequate growth and yield, of maize for example, with reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers, we are currently determining the extent to which nitrogen fixation, as assessed using various methods, is correlated with the extent of systemic intracellular colonization by G. diazotrophicus, with minimal or zero inputs.

  11. Symbiosome-like intracellular colonization of cereals and other crop plants by nitrogen-fixing bacteria for reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Cocking, Edward C; Stone, Philip J; Davey, Michael R

    2005-09-01

    It has been forecast that the challenge of meeting increased food demand and protecting environmental quality will be won or lost in maize, rice and wheat cropping systems, and that the problem of environmental nitrogen enrichment is most likely to be solved by substituting synthetic nitrogen fertilizers by the creation of cereal crops that are able to fix nitrogen symbiotically as legumes do. In legumes, rhizobia present intracellularly in membrane-bound vesicular compartments in the cytoplasm of nodule cells fix nitrogen endosymbiotically. Within these symbiosomes, membrane-bound vesicular compartments, rhizobia are supplied with energy derived from plant photosynthates and in return supply the plant with biologically fixed nitrogen, usually as ammonia. This minimizes or eliminates the need for inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. Recently we have demonstrated, using novel inoculation conditions with very low numbers of bacteria, that cells of root meristems of maize, rice, wheat and other major non-legume crops, such as oilseed rape and tomato, can be intracellularly colonized by the non-rhizobial, non-nodulating, nitrogen fixing bacterium,Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus that naturally occurs in sugarcane.G. diazotrophicus expressing nitrogen fixing (nifH) genes is present in symbiosome-like compartments in the cytoplasm of cells of the root meristems of the target cereals and non-legume crop species, somewhat similar to the intracellular symbiosome colonization of legume nodule cells by rhizobia. To obtain an indication of the likelihood of adequate growth and yield, of maize for example, with reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers, we are currently determining the extent to which nitrogen fixation, as assessed using various methods, is correlated with the extent of systemic intracellular colonization byG. diazotrophicus, with minimal or zero inputs.

  12. Iron Oxidizing and Reducing Bacteria as Contributors to Basaltic Glass Colonization and Subsequent Weathering in Active Hydrothermal Vent Systems on Loihi and Vailulu'u Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, B.; Templeton, A.; Haucke, L.; Staudigel, H.; Tebo, B. M.

    2005-12-01

    The extreme oligotrophic nature of the oceanic crust was once believed to be an inhospitable environment to support microbial life. However, numerous studies in the past two decades have revealed diverse chemolithotrophic microbial communities inhabiting the deep biosphere within the oceanic crust. Vailulu'u Seamount in American Samoa and Loihi Seamount in Hawai'i provide access to the deep biosphere environments through the study of the interaction of hydrothermal vent water, basaltic substrates and microbial communities. Both seamounts have been found to exhibit similar iron-encrusted microbial mats surrounding both high and low temperature hydrothermal vent orifices. We are targeting iron as the main electron donor/acceptor in these environments due to the relative abundance and availability in basalts. Through the use of the HURL Pisces submersibles, we exposed amended basaltic glasses of several different compositions to a host of different environments on both seamounts in order to study the colonization and biofilm characteristics of the microbial communities. A large culturing effort reveals multiple iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria as members of the microbial community responsible for the colonization and subsequent dissolution and alteration of basaltic glass. We employ an annular reactor to expose the same suite of chemically altered basaltic glasses to a sample of iron microbial mats taken from Vailulu'u to provide a laboratory complement the environmental exposure experiments. Here cell counts reveal a 90% enhanced colonization and growth on the basalt glass versus the surrounding epoxy and borosilicate glass. The ability of microbes to leach nutrients (such as iron) out of the host substrate has far reaching astrobiological implications for nutrient sources available to sustain life in a Mars or Europa biosphere.

  13. Live yeasts enhance fibre degradation in the cow rumen through an increase in plant substrate colonization by fibrolytic bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Chaucheyras-Durand, F; Ameilbonne, A; Bichat, A; Mosoni, P; Ossa, F; Forano, E

    2016-03-01

    To monitor the effect of a live yeast additive on feedstuff colonization by targeted fibrolytic micro-organisms and fibre degradation in the cow rumen. Abundance of adhering fibrolytic bacteria and fungi on feedstuffs incubated in sacco in the cow rumen was quantified by qPCR and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) degradation was measured. Saccharomyces cerevisiae I-1077 (SC) increased the abundance of fibre-associated Fibrobacter succinogenes on wheat bran (WB) and that of Ruminococcus flavefaciens on alfalfa hay (AH) and wheat silage (WS). The greatest effect was observed on the abundance of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens on AH and soya hulls (SH) (P < 0·001). Fungal biomass increased on AH, SH, WS and WB in the presence of SC. NDF degradation of AH and SH was improved (P < 0·05) with SC supplementation. Live yeasts enhanced microbial colonization of fibrous materials, the degree of enhancement depended on their nature and composition. As an effect on rumen pH was not likely to be solely involved, the underlying mechanisms could involve nutrient supply or oxygen scavenging by the live yeast cells. Distribution of this microbial additive could be an interesting tool to increase fibre digestion in the rumen and thereby improve cow feed efficiency. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. In vitro anti-biofilm activity of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt. against oral primary colonizer bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Kim, Kyu-Hoi; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2008-03-01

    In early dental plaque formation, oral primary colonizers such as Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis and Actinomyces viscosus are initially attached to the pellicle-coated tooth surface to form a biofilm. The study aimed to determine the efficacy of macelignan, isolated from nutmeg (Myristica fragrans Houtt.), in removing each single oral primary biofilm in vitro on a polystyrene 96-well microtiter plate. Four biofilm growth phases (4, 12, 20 and 24 h) were evaluated in this study after treatment with macelignan at various concentrations (0.2, 2 and 10 microg/mL) and exposure times (5, 10 and 30 min). Anti-biofilm activity of macelignan was measured as the percentage of the remaining biofilm absorbance after macelignan treatment in comparison with the untreated control. At 24 h of biofilm growth, S. mutans, A. viscosus and S. sanguis biofilms were reduced by up to 30%, 30% and 38%, respectively, after treatment with 10 microg/mL macelignan for 5 min. Increasing the treatment time to 30 min resulted in a reduction of more than 50% of each of the single primary biofilms. The results indicate that macelignan is a potent natural anti-biofilm agent against oral primary colonizers.

  15. Effects of adsorbed and templated nanosilver in mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles on inhibition of bacteria colonization of dentin.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Wu, Daming; Tay, Franklin R; Ma, Tengjiao; Wu, Yujie; Fan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles (MCSNs) are advanced biomaterials for controlled drug delivery and mineralization induction. Nanosilver-incorporated MCSNs (Ag-MCSNs) were prepared in the present study using both the adsorption and template methods. Both versions of Ag-MCSNs showed characteristic morphology of mesoporous materials and exhibited sustained release of ions over time. In antibacterial testing against planktonic Enterococcus faecalis, Ag-MCSNs showed significantly better antibacterial effects when compared with MCSNs (P<0.05). The Ag-MCSNs aggregated on the dentin surface of root canal walls and infiltrated into dentinal tubules after ultrasound activation, significantly inhibiting the adherence and colonization of E. faecalis on dentin (P<0.05). Despite this, Ag-MCSNs with templated nanosilver showed much lower cytotoxicity than Ag-MCSNs with adsorbed nanosilver (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicated that nanosilver could be incorporated into MCSNs using the template method. The templated nanosilver could release silver ions and inhibit the growth and colonization of E. faecalis both in the planktonic form and as biofilms on dentin surfaces as absorbed nanosilver. Templated Ag-MCSNs may be developed into a new intracanal disinfectant for root canal disinfection due to their antibacterial ability and low cytotoxicity, and as controlled release devices for other bioactive molecules to produce multifunctional biomaterials.

  16. Potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria of human origin induce antiproliferation of colon cancer cells via synergic actions in adhesion to cancer cells and short-chain fatty acid bioproduction.

    PubMed

    Thirabunyanon, Mongkol; Hongwittayakorn, Penrat

    2013-01-01

    The activities and modes of probiotic action of lactic acid bacteria isolated from infant feces were investigated for alternative application in the prevention and biotherapy of colon cancer. From a total of 81 isolates of Gram-positive rod and cocci bacteria obtained from healthy infants, only 15 isolates had the probiotic criteria which included growth inhibition against eight food-borne pathogens, no blood hemolysis, and tolerance to gastrointestinal tract properties such as pH 2.5 and 0.3 % bile salt. Four probiotic bacteria showed antiproliferation of colon cancer cells with the use of MTT and Trypan blue exclusion assay at the rates of 17-35 %. Through comparison of probiotic 16S rRNA sequences, they were identified as Pediococcus pentosaceus FP3, Lactobacillus salivarius FP25, L. salivarius FP35, and Enterococcus faecium FP51. Finding the mechanism of proliferative inhibition of colon cancer cells in this study indicated synergic induction by probiotic bacteria directly adhered to these cancer cells and triggered the bioproduction of short-chain fatty acids, mainly butyric and propionic acids. This study suggested that the use of these probiotics may be suitable as an alternative bioprophylactic and biotherapeutic strategy for colon cancer.

  17. Mucin degradation in the human colon: production of sialidase, sialate O-acetylesterase, N-acetylneuraminate lyase, arylesterase, and glycosulfatase activities by strains of fecal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Corfield, A P; Wagner, S A; Clamp, J R; Kriaris, M S; Hoskins, L C

    1992-01-01

    Oligosaccharide side chains of human colonic mucins contain O-acetylated sialic acids and glycosulfate esters. Although these substituents are considered to protect the chains against degradation by bacterial glycosidases, sialate O-acetylesterase, N-acetylneuraminate lyase, and glycosulfatase activities have been found in fecal extracts. To better define the source of these activities, we measured extracellular and cell-bound sialidase, sialate O-acetylesterase, N-acetylneuraminate lyase, arylesterase, and glycosulfatase activities produced by 23 isolates of human fecal bacteria grown anaerobically in a hog gastric mucin culture medium; these represented dominant populations of fecal anaerobes, facultative anaerobes, and the subset of mucin oligosaccharide-degrading bacteria. Every strain produced sialidase and high levels of arylesterase, and all but five facultative anaerobes produced sialate O-acetylesterase. Sialic acids containing 2 mol or more of O-acetyl ester per mol of sialic acid were cleaved from mucin glycoproteins more slowly by sialidases of mucin oligosaccharide-degrading stains than were sialic acids containing 1 or 0 mol, and only N-acetyl- and mono-O-acetylated sialic acids were recovered from enzyme digests of a mucin containing di-O-acetylated sialic acids. No detectable N-acetylneuraminate lyase activity was produced by any strain, but low activity was induced by increasing the glycoprotein-bound sialic acid concentration in the culture medium of six Escherichia coli strains. Using lactitol-6-sulfate as a substrate, we found weak glycosulfatase activity in the partially purified, concentrated enzyme mixture in the culture supernatants of four mucin oligosaccharide-degrading strains but in none of the unconcentrated culture fractions. We conclude that the presence of two or more O-acetyl groups on sialic acids inhibits enteric bacterial sialidases but that production of sialate O-acetylesterases by several populations of enteric bacteria

  18. Interaction between H2-producing and non-H2-producing cellulolytic bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Chassard, Christophe; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick

    2005-01-15

    The cellulose-degrading species recently isolated from the human colon showed diverse ability to degrade and ferment cellulose. In the present study, the nature of the inter-relation existing between one H(2)-producing cellulolytic isolate (Ruminococcus sp. nov.) and one non-H(2)-producing cellulose-degrading species (Bacteroides sp. nov.) was investigated in vitro. Coculture experiments revealed synergism in cellulose degradation between these two cellulolytic species. An increase in total bacterial population was measured in the coculture, Bacteroides sp. being the predominant organism. As a result, a large decrease in H(2) production from cellulose fermentation was observed. Predominance of Bacteroides sp. might thus contribute to limit gas produced from fibre fermentation in the gut.

  19. Humus bacteria of Norway spruce stands: plant growth promoting properties and birch, red fescue and alder colonizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Elo; Maunuksela; Salkinoja-Salonen; Smolander; Haahtela

    2000-02-01

    We studied the potential of the humus layer of the Norway spruce stands to supply beneficial rhizobacteria to birch (Betula pendula), alder (Alnus incana) and fescue grass (Festuca rubra), representatives of pioneer vegetation after clear-cutting of the coniferous forest. Axenically grown seedlings of these species were inoculated with the acid spruce humus, pH 3.7-5.3. Actinorhizal propagules, capable of nodulating alder, were present in high density (10(3) g(-1)) in humus of long-term limed plots, whereas plots with nitrogen fertilization contained almost none (bacteria. In addition, nitrogen-fixing R. fascians was found in the humus. The rhizoflora and humus contained high proportions of bacteria antagonistic towards plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia sp., Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium culmorum. The antagonistic isolates also commonly produced siderophores and/or cell wall degrading enzymes.

  20. Inhibition of colonization of the chicken alimentary tract with Salmonella typhimurium gram-negative facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, P. A.; Tucker, J. F.; Simpson, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Oral administration of strains of food poisoning salmonellas to day-old chickens produced a profound inhibition in the subsequent colonization of the caeca by a strain of Salmonella typhimurium given one day later. Closely related genera were unable to produce a similar inhibition. The inhibition was not the result of bacteriophages produced by the first strain. Neither was it the result of an immunological response by the host induced by the first strain. In additional experiments in day-old chickens, inhibition of an Escherichia coli Nalr strain and of a Citrobacter sp. Nalr strain was produced by the antibiotic-sensitive forms of the homologous strains while strains from other genera did not produce any inhibition. When an avirulent mutant of S. typhimurium was used for pre-treatment a statistically significant reduction in the excretion of the super-infecting S. typhimurium Nalr strain over several weeks was produced. A genus specific inhibition was reproduced in vitro by mixed culture experiments. Live cultures were necessary for in vitro inhibition. Killed cells or a culture supernatant produced no inhibition. PMID:2954839

  1. Evaluation of a selected lactic acid bacteria-based probiotic on Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization and intestinal permeability in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Prado-Rebolledo, Omar F; Delgado-Machuca, Jaime de Jesus; Macedo-Barragan, Rafael J; Garcia-Márquez, Luis J; Morales-Barrera, Jesus E; Latorre, Juan D; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Tellez, Guillermo

    2017-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of a lactic acid bacteria-based probiotic (FloraMax-B11(®)) against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis intestinal colonization and intestinal permeability in broiler chickens. Experiment 1 consisted of two independent trials. In each trial, day-old broiler chicks were assigned to one of two groups: control + S. Enteritidis or probiotic + S. Enteritidis. At 72 h post-S. Enteritidis challenge, haematology and caecal content were evaluated for S. Enteritidis colonization. In Experiment 2, day-old broiler chicks were assigned to one of four groups: negative control; probiotic; control + S. Enteritidis; or probiotic + S. Enteritidis. At 72 h post-S. Enteritidis challenge, chickens in all groups were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). In both trials of Experiment 1, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in colony-forming units/gram of S. Enteritidis in caecal content and a reduction in the incidence of S. Enteritidis enriched caecal samples were observed in probiotic + S. Enteritidis chickens. In addition, significant heterophilia and lymphopaenia were observed in control + S. Enteritidis chickens. In Experiment 2, a decrease in numbers of S. Enteritidis in caeca were observed in probiotic + S. Enteritidis chickens when compared to control + S. Enteritidis. Also, an increase in serum FITC-d concentration was detected in control + S. Enteritidis. These results suggest that early infection with S. Enteritidis can increase intestinal permeability, but the adverse effects can be prevented by the administration of the probiotic tested.

  2. Colon Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... or family history of colon polyps or colon cancer. Colon polyps often don't cause symptoms. It's important ... removed safely and completely. The best prevention for colon cancer is regular screening for polyps. Colon polyps care ...

  3. Colonization by nitrogen-fixing Frankia bacteria causes short-term increases in herbivore susceptibility in red alder (Alnus rubra) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ballhorn, Daniel J; Elias, Jacob D; Balkan, M A; Fordyce, Rachel F; Kennedy, Peter G

    2017-06-01

    Carbon allocation demands from root-nodulating nitrogen-fixing bacteria (NFB) can modulate the host plant's chemical phenotype, with strong bottom-up effects on herbivores. In contrast to well-studied rhizobia, the effects of other important NFB on plant chemistry and herbivory are much less understood. Here, combining field surveys in the Oregon Coast Range, USA with laboratory experiments, we analyzed how N2-fixing Frankia bacteria influenced plant growth, chemistry, and herbivory on Alnus rubra (red alder) seedlings. In the field, we quantified Frankia nodulation, herbivore damage, and plant size. In the laboratory, we grew seedlings with Frankia (F+), Frankia-free but nitrogen-fertilized (N+), or both uncolonized and unfertilized (F-N-) and assessed growth and leaf chemistry. We further conducted choice trials with black slugs, Arion rufus, a natural red alder herbivore. In the field, Frankia nodulation was significantly positively correlated with herbivory and negatively with seedling height. In contrast, in the lab, F+ as well as N+ seedlings were significantly taller than the F-N- controls. Seedlings from both treatments also had significantly increased leaf protein concentration compared to controls, whereas carbon-based nutritive compounds (carbohydrates) as well as leaf palatability-decreasing condensed tannins, lignin, and fiber were decreased in F+ but not in N+ treatments. In the choice assays, slugs preferred leaf material from F+ seedlings, but the effects were only significant in young leaves. Our study indicates that colonization by Frankia causes short-term ecological costs in terms of susceptibility to herbivory. However, the ubiquity of this symbiosis in natural settings suggests that these costs are outweighed by benefits beyond the seedling stage.

  4. Over-expression of major colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, alone or together, on non-toxigenic E. coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Holmgren, Jan; Hellman, Maria; Nygren, Erik; Lebens, Michael; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2010-10-08

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrheal disease and deaths among children in developing countries and the major cause of traveller's diarrhea. Since surface protein colonization factors (CFs) of ETEC are important for pathogenicity and immune protection is mainly mediated by locally produced IgA antibodies in the gut, much effort has focused on the development of an oral CF-based vaccine. We have recently described the development of recombinant strains over-expressing CFA/I; the most prevalent CF among human clinical ETEC isolates. Here, non-toxigenic recombinant E. coli strains over-expressing Coli surface antigen 2 (CS2), CS4, CS5, and CS6, either alone, or each in combination with CFA/I were constructed by cloning the genes required for expression and assembly of each CF into expression vectors harboring a strong promoter. Immunological assays showed that recombinant strains expressing single CFs produced those in significantly larger amounts than did corresponding naturally high producing reference strains. Recombinant strains co-expressing CFA/I together with another CF also expressed significantly larger amounts of both CFs compared with the corresponding references strains. Further, when tested in mice, oral immunization with formalin-killed recombinant bacteria co-expressing one such double-expression CF pair, CFA/I+CS2, induced specific serum IgG+IgM and fecal IgA antibody responses against both CFs exceeding the responses induced by immunizations with natural reference strains expressing CFA/I and CS2, respectively. We conclude that the described type of recombinant bacteria over-expressing major CFs of ETEC, alone or in combination, may be useful as candidate strains for use in an oral whole-cell CF-ETEC vaccine.

  5. Remarkable recovery and colonization behaviour of methane oxidizing bacteria in soil after disturbance is controlled by methane source only.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Abell, Guy C J; Bodelier, Paul L E; Meima-Franke, Marion; Sessitsch, Angela; Bodrossy, Levente

    2014-08-01

    Little is understood about the relationship between microbial assemblage history, the composition and function of specific functional guilds and the ecosystem functions they provide. To learn more about this relationship we used methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) as model organisms and performed soil microcosm experiments comprised of identical soil substrates, hosting distinct overall microbial diversities(i.e., full, reduced and zero total microbial and MOB diversities). After inoculation with undisturbed soil, the recovery of MOB activity, MOB diversity and total bacterial diversity were followed over 3 months by methane oxidation potential measurements and analyses targeting pmoA and 16S rRNA genes. Measurement of methane oxidation potential demonstrated different recovery rates across the different treatments. Despite different starting microbial diversities, the recovery and succession of the MOB communities followed a similar pattern across the different treatment microcosms. In this study we found that edaphic parameters were the dominant factor shaping microbial communities over time and that the starting microbial community played only a minor role in shaping MOB microbial community.

  6. Identification of dominant bacteria in feces and colonic mucosa from healthy Spanish adults by culturing and by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Susana; Suárez, Adolfo; Mayo, Baltasar

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to examine by culturing the changes in the total and indicator populations of the feces of two individuals over 1 year and to identify the dominant microbial components of a single sample of feces from each donor. Populations and dominant bacteria from a sample of colonic mucosa from a further individual were also assessed. The culture results were then compared to those obtained with the same samples by 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing. High interindividual variation in representative microbial populations of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was revealed by both the culture and the culture-independent techniques. Species belonging to Clostridium clusters (XIVa, IV, and XVIII) predominated in both the fecal and the mucosal samples (except in the mucose cultured isolates), members of Clostridium coccoides cluster XIVa being the most numerous microorganisms. Species of gamma-proteobacteria (Escherichia coli and Shigella spp.), bifidobacteria, and actinobacteria appeared in lower numbers than those of clostridia. From the mucosal cultured sample, only facultative anaerobes and bifidobacteria were recovered, suggesting destruction of the anaerobe population during processing. In accordance with this, the microbial diversity revealed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis was greater than that revealed by culturing. Despite large interindividual differences, distinct human communities may have group-associated GIT microbiota characteristics, such as the low number of Bacteroides seen in the subjects in this study.

  7. Anti-proliferative effect of fungal taxol extracted from Cladosporium oxysporum against human pathogenic bacteria and human colon cancer cell line HCT 15.

    PubMed

    Gokul Raj, K; Manikandan, R; Arulvasu, C; Pandi, M

    2015-03-05

    Cladosporium oxysporum a new taxol producing endophytic fungus was identified and production of taxol were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), infrared (IR) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR ((13)C and (1)H)) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The taxol biosynthetic gene (dbat) was evaluated for new taxol producing fungus. Antibacterial activity against six different human pathogenic bacteria was done by agar well diffusion method. The anticancer efficacy of isolated fungal taxol were also evaluated in human colon cancer cell HCT 15 by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), cytotoxicity and nuclear morphology analysis. The isolated fungal taxol showed positive towards biosynthetic gene (dbat) and effective against both Gram positive as well as Gram negative. The fungal taxol suppress growth of cancer cell line HCT 15 with an IC50 value of 3.5μM concentration by 24h treatment. Thus, the result reveals that C. oxysporum could be a potential alternative source for production of taxol and have antibacterial as well as anticancer properties with possible clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-proliferative effect of fungal taxol extracted from Cladosporium oxysporum against human pathogenic bacteria and human colon cancer cell line HCT 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokul Raj, K.; Manikandan, R.; Arulvasu, C.; Pandi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Cladosporium oxysporum a new taxol producing endophytic fungus was identified and production of taxol were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), infrared (IR) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR (13C and 1H)) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The taxol biosynthetic gene (dbat) was evaluated for new taxol producing fungus. Antibacterial activity against six different human pathogenic bacteria was done by agar well diffusion method. The anticancer efficacy of isolated fungal taxol were also evaluated in human colon cancer cell HCT 15 by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), cytotoxicity and nuclear morphology analysis. The isolated fungal taxol showed positive towards biosynthetic gene (dbat) and effective against both Gram positive as well as Gram negative. The fungal taxol suppress growth of cancer cell line HCT 15 with an IC50 value of 3.5 μM concentration by 24 h treatment. Thus, the result reveals that C. oxysporum could be a potential alternative source for production of taxol and have antibacterial as well as anticancer properties with possible clinical applications.

  9. The physiology of colonic hydrotherapy.

    PubMed

    Seow-Choen, F

    2009-09-01

    Colonic hydrotherapy is widely used and many of its practitioners are medically qualified. Nonetheless, the basis of many of their practices requires physiological scrutiny. The claims of colonic hydrotherapy are examined against known physiological facts. Hydrotherapy is not entirely physiological. Colonic hydrotherapy may increase the dissemination and absorption of toxins and bacteria into the body.

  10. Identification of Rothia Bacteria as Gluten-Degrading Natural Colonizers of the Upper Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Zamakhchari, Maram; Wei, Guoxian; Dewhirst, Floyd; Lee, Jaeseop; Schuppan, Detlef; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Gluten proteins, prominent constituents of barley, wheat and rye, cause celiac disease in genetically predisposed subjects. Gluten is notoriously difficult to digest by mammalian proteolytic enzymes and the protease-resistant domains contain multiple immunogenic epitopes. The aim of this study was to identify novel sources of gluten-digesting microbial enzymes from the upper gastro-intestinal tract with the potential to neutralize gluten epitopes. Methodology/Principal Findings Oral microorganisms with gluten-degrading capacity were obtained by a selective plating strategy using gluten agar. Microbial speciations were carried out by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Enzyme activities were assessed using gliadin-derived enzymatic substrates, gliadins in solution, gliadin zymography, and 33-mer α-gliadin and 26-mer γ-gliadin immunogenic peptides. Fragments of the gliadin peptides were separated by RP-HPLC and structurally characterized by mass spectrometry. Strains with high activity towards gluten were typed as Rothia mucilaginosa and Rothia aeria. Gliadins (250 µg/ml) added to Rothia cell suspensions (OD620 1.2) were degraded by 50% after ∼30 min of incubation. Importantly, the 33-mer and 26-mer immunogenic peptides were also cleaved, primarily C-terminal to Xaa-Pro-Gln (XPQ) and Xaa-Pro-Tyr (XPY). The major gliadin-degrading enzymes produced by the Rothia strains were ∼70–75 kDa in size, and the enzyme expressed by Rothia aeria was active over a wide pH range (pH 3–10). Conclusion/Significance While the human digestive enzyme system lacks the capacity to cleave immunogenic gluten, such activities are naturally present in the oral microbial enzyme repertoire. The identified bacteria may be exploited for physiologic degradation of harmful gluten peptides. PMID:21957450

  11. Hydrothermally generated aromatic compounds are consumed by bacteria colonizing in Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Jiangke; Lee, On On; Dash, Swagatika; Lau, Stanley C K; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Wong, Tim Y H; Danchin, Antoine; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Hydrothermal ecosystems have a wide distribution on Earth and many can be found in the basin of the Red Sea. Production of aromatic compounds occurs in a temperature window of ∼60–150 °C by utilizing organic debris. In the past 50 years, the temperature of the Atlantis II Deep brine pool in the Red Sea has increased from 56 to 68 °C, whereas the temperature at the nearby Discovery Deep brine pool has remained relatively stable at about 44 °C. In this report, we confirmed the presence of aromatic compounds in the Atlantis II brine pool as expected. The presence of the aromatic compounds might have disturbed the microbes in the Atlantis II. To show shifted microbial communities and their metabolisms, we sequenced the metagenomes of the microbes from both brine pools. Classification based on metareads and the 16S rRNA gene sequences from clones showed a strong divergence of dominant bacterial species between the pools. Bacteria capable of aromatic degradation were present in the Atlantis II brine pool. A comparison of the metabolic pathways showed that several aromatic degradation pathways were significantly enriched in the Atlantis II brine pool, suggesting the presence of aromatic compounds. Pathways utilizing metabolites derived from aromatic degradation were also significantly affected. In the Discovery brine pool, the most abundant genes from the microbes were related to sugar metabolism pathways and DNA synthesis and repair, suggesting a different strategy for the utilization of carbon and energy sources between the Discovery brine pool and the Atlantis II brine pool. PMID:21525946

  12. Hydrothermally generated aromatic compounds are consumed by bacteria colonizing in Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Jiangke; Lee, On On; Dash, Swagatika; Lau, Stanley C K; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Wong, Tim Y H; Danchin, Antoine; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2011-10-01

    Hydrothermal ecosystems have a wide distribution on Earth and many can be found in the basin of the Red Sea. Production of aromatic compounds occurs in a temperature window of ∼60-150 °C by utilizing organic debris. In the past 50 years, the temperature of the Atlantis II Deep brine pool in the Red Sea has increased from 56 to 68 °C, whereas the temperature at the nearby Discovery Deep brine pool has remained relatively stable at about 44 °C. In this report, we confirmed the presence of aromatic compounds in the Atlantis II brine pool as expected. The presence of the aromatic compounds might have disturbed the microbes in the Atlantis II. To show shifted microbial communities and their metabolisms, we sequenced the metagenomes of the microbes from both brine pools. Classification based on metareads and the 16S rRNA gene sequences from clones showed a strong divergence of dominant bacterial species between the pools. Bacteria capable of aromatic degradation were present in the Atlantis II brine pool. A comparison of the metabolic pathways showed that several aromatic degradation pathways were significantly enriched in the Atlantis II brine pool, suggesting the presence of aromatic compounds. Pathways utilizing metabolites derived from aromatic degradation were also significantly affected. In the Discovery brine pool, the most abundant genes from the microbes were related to sugar metabolism pathways and DNA synthesis and repair, suggesting a different strategy for the utilization of carbon and energy sources between the Discovery brine pool and the Atlantis II brine pool.

  13. Colonic Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colonic polyps grow in the large intestine, or colon. Most polyps are not dangerous. However, some polyps ... member with polyps Have a family history of colon cancer Most colon polyps do not cause symptoms. ...

  14. Formation of propionate and butyrate by the human colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2017-01-01

    The human gut microbiota ferments dietary non-digestible carbohydrates into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). These microbial products are utilized by the host and propionate and butyrate in particular exert a range of health-promoting functions. Here an overview of the metabolic pathways utilized by gut microbes to produce these two SCFA from dietary carbohydrates and from amino acids resulting from protein breakdown is provided. This overview emphasizes the important role played by cross-feeding of intermediary metabolites (in particular lactate, succinate and 1,2-propanediol) between different gut bacteria. The ecophysiology, including growth requirements and responses to environmental factors, of major propionate and butyrate producing bacteria are discussed in relation to dietary modulation of these metabolites. A detailed understanding of SCFA metabolism by the gut microbiota is necessary to underpin effective strategies to optimize SCFA supply to the host.

  15. Heat-killed probiotic bacteria differentially regulate colonic epithelial cell production of human β-defensin-2: dependence on inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Habil, N; Abate, W; Beal, J; Foey, A D

    2014-12-01

    The inducible antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial products is essential to antipathogen responses of gut epithelial cells. Commensal and probiotic bacteria can augment such mucosal defences. Probiotic use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, however, may have adverse effects, boosting inflammatory responses. The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of selected probiotic strains on hBD-2 production by epithelial cells induced by pathologically relevant pro-inflammatory cytokines and the role of cytokine modulators in controlling hBD-2. Caco-2 colonic intestinal epithelial cells were pre-incubated with heat-killed probiotics, i.e. Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) or Lactobacillus fermentum strain MS15 (LF), followed by stimulation of hBD-2 by interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the absence or presence of exogenous IL-10 or anti-IL-10 neutralising antibody. Cytokines and hBD-2 mRNA and protein were analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LcS augmented IL-1β-induced hBD-2, whereas LF enhanced TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. LF enhanced TNF-α-induced TNF-α and suppressed IL-10, whereas augmented IL-1β-induced IL-10. LcS upregulated IL-1β-induced TNF-α mRNA and suppressed IL-10. Endogenous IL-10 differentially regulated hBD-2; neutralisation of IL-10 augmented TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. Exogenous IL-10, however, suppressed both TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced hBD-2; LcS partially rescued suppression in TNF-α- and IL-1β-stimulation, whereas LF further suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. It can be concluded that probiotic strains differentially regulate hBD-2 mRNA expression and protein secretion, modulation being dictated by inflammatory stimulus and resulting cytokine environment.

  16. Colonization of plant substrates at hydrothermal vents and cold seeps in the northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean and occurrence of symbiont-related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Kamil M.; Deschamps, Philippe; Cunha, Marina R.; Gaudron, Sylvie M.; Duperron, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Reducing conditions with elevated sulfide and methane concentrations in ecosystems such as hydrothermal vents, cold seeps or organic falls, are suitable for chemosynthetic primary production. Understanding processes driving bacterial diversity, colonization and dispersal is of prime importance for deep-sea microbial ecology. This study provides a detailed characterization of bacterial assemblages colonizing plant-derived substrates using a standardized approach over a geographic area spanning the North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean. Wood and alfalfa substrates in colonization devices were deployed for different periods at 8 deep-sea chemosynthesis-based sites in four distinct geographic areas. Pyrosequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA-encoding gene was used to describe bacterial communities. Colonization occurred within the first 14 days. The diversity was higher in samples deployed for more than 289 days. After 289 days, no relation was observed between community richness and deployment duration, suggesting that diversity may have reached saturation sometime in between. Communities in long-term deployments were different, and their composition was mainly influenced by the geographical location where devices were deployed. Numerous sequences related to horizontally-transmitted chemosynthetic symbionts of metazoans were identified. Their potential status as free-living forms of these symbionts was evaluated based on sequence similarity with demonstrated symbionts. Results suggest that some free-living forms of metazoan symbionts or their close relatives, such as Epsilonproteobacteria associated with the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata, are efficient colonizers of plant substrates at vents and seeps. PMID:25774156

  17. Colonization of plant substrates at hydrothermal vents and cold seeps in the northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean and occurrence of symbiont-related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Kamil M; Deschamps, Philippe; Cunha, Marina R; Gaudron, Sylvie M; Duperron, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Reducing conditions with elevated sulfide and methane concentrations in ecosystems such as hydrothermal vents, cold seeps or organic falls, are suitable for chemosynthetic primary production. Understanding processes driving bacterial diversity, colonization and dispersal is of prime importance for deep-sea microbial ecology. This study provides a detailed characterization of bacterial assemblages colonizing plant-derived substrates using a standardized approach over a geographic area spanning the North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean. Wood and alfalfa substrates in colonization devices were deployed for different periods at 8 deep-sea chemosynthesis-based sites in four distinct geographic areas. Pyrosequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA-encoding gene was used to describe bacterial communities. Colonization occurred within the first 14 days. The diversity was higher in samples deployed for more than 289 days. After 289 days, no relation was observed between community richness and deployment duration, suggesting that diversity may have reached saturation sometime in between. Communities in long-term deployments were different, and their composition was mainly influenced by the geographical location where devices were deployed. Numerous sequences related to horizontally-transmitted chemosynthetic symbionts of metazoans were identified. Their potential status as free-living forms of these symbionts was evaluated based on sequence similarity with demonstrated symbionts. Results suggest that some free-living forms of metazoan symbionts or their close relatives, such as Epsilonproteobacteria associated with the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata, are efficient colonizers of plant substrates at vents and seeps.

  18. Molecular diversity, cultivation, and improved detection by fluorescent in situ hybridization of a dominant group of human gut bacteria related to Roseburia spp. or Eubacterium rectale.

    PubMed

    Aminov, Rustam I; Walker, Alan W; Duncan, Sylvia H; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Welling, Gjalt W; Flint, Harry J

    2006-09-01

    Phylogenetic analysis was used to compare 16S rRNA sequences from 19 cultured human gut strains of Roseburia and Eubacterium rectale with 356 related sequences derived from clone libraries. The cultured strains were found to represent five of the six phylotypes identified. A new oligonucleotide probe, Rrec584, and the previous group probe Rint623, when used in conjunction with a new helper oligonucleotide, each recognized an average of 7% of bacteria detected by the eubacterial probe Eub338 in feces from 10 healthy volunteers. Most of the diversity within this important group of butyrate-producing gut bacteria can apparently be retrieved through cultivation.

  19. Efficacy of 4 Irrigation Protocols in Killing Bacteria Colonized in Dentinal Tubules Examined by a Novel Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Adham A.; Aksel, Hacer; Zhuang, Tingting; Mashtare, Terry; Babu, Jegdish P.; Huang, George T.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of 4 irrigation systems in eliminating bacteria in root canals, particularly in dentinal tubules. Methods Roots of human teeth were prepared to 25/04, autoclaved, and inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks. Canals were then disinfected by (1) standard needle irrigation, (2) sonically agitating with EndoActivator, (3) XP Endo finisher, or (4) erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser (PIPS) (15 roots/group). The bacterial reduction in the canal was determined by MTT assays. For measuring live versus dead bacteria in the dentinal tubules (4 teeth/group), teeth were split open and stained with LIVE/DEAD BackLight. Coronal, middle, and apical thirds of the canal dentin were scanned by using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to determine the ratio of dead/total bacteria in the dentinal tubules at various depths. Results All 4 irrigation protocols significantly eliminated bacteria in the canal, ranging from 89.6% to 98.2% reduction (P < .001). XP Endo had the greatest bacterial reduction compared with other 3 techniques (P < .05). CLSM analysis showed that XP Endo had the highest level of dead bacteria in the coronal, middle, and apical segments at 50-μm depth. On the other hand, PIPS had the greatest bacterial killing efficiency at the 150-μm depth in all 3 root segments. Conclusions XP Endo appears to be more efficient than other 3 techniques in disinfecting the main canal space and up to 50 μm deep into the dentinal tubules. PIPS appears to be most effective in killing the bacteria deep in the dentinal tubules. PMID:27130334

  20. Efficacy of 4 Irrigation Protocols in Killing Bacteria Colonized in Dentinal Tubules Examined by a Novel Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope Analysis.

    PubMed

    Azim, Adham A; Aksel, Hacer; Zhuang, Tingting; Mashtare, Terry; Babu, Jegdish P; Huang, George T-J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of 4 irrigation systems in eliminating bacteria in root canals, particularly in dentinal tubules. Roots of human teeth were prepared to 25/04, autoclaved, and inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks. Canals were then disinfected by (1) standard needle irrigation, (2) sonically agitating with EndoActivator, (3) XP Endo finisher, or (4) erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser (PIPS) (15 roots/group). The bacterial reduction in the canal was determined by MTT assays. For measuring live versus dead bacteria in the dentinal tubules (4 teeth/group), teeth were split open and stained with LIVE/DEAD BackLight. Coronal, middle, and apical thirds of the canal dentin were scanned by using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to determine the ratio of dead/total bacteria in the dentinal tubules at various depths. All 4 irrigation protocols significantly eliminated bacteria in the canal, ranging from 89.6% to 98.2% reduction (P < .001). XP Endo had the greatest bacterial reduction compared with other 3 techniques (P < .05). CLSM analysis showed that XP Endo had the highest level of dead bacteria in the coronal, middle, and apical segments at 50-μm depth. On the other hand, PIPS had the greatest bacterial killing efficiency at the 150-μm depth in all 3 root segments. XP Endo appears to be more efficient than other 3 techniques in disinfecting the main canal space and up to 50 μm deep into the dentinal tubules. PIPS appears to be most effective in killing the bacteria deep in the dentinal tubules. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, Amber; Fletcher, Sarah J; Pelletier, Dale A; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Jawdy, Sara; Weston, David; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; Bohn, Paul W.; Coutinho, Teresa; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.

    2016-04-18

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically-important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343.

  2. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Amber N.; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Jawdy, Sara S.; Weston, David J.; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; Bohn, Paul W.; Coutinho, Teresa A.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of IAA. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343. PMID:27148182

  3. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization

    DOE PAGES

    Bible, Amber; Fletcher, Sarah J; Pelletier, Dale A; ...

    2016-04-18

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically-important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. Tomore » better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343.« less

  4. [Efficiency of novel splash-proof ventilator circuit component on VAP and the colonization of multiple-drug resistant bacteria prevention in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation: a prospective randomized controlled intervention study with 318 patients].

    PubMed

    Xu, Songao; Yu, Huijie; Sun, Hui; Zhu, Xiangyun; Xu, Xiaoqin; Xu, Jun; Cao, Weizhong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency of closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) using novel splash-proof ventilator circuit component on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and the colonization of multiple-drug resistant bacteria (MDR) in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) prevention. A prospective single-blinded randomized parallel controlled intervention study was conducted. 330 severe patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the First Hospital of Jiaxing from January 2014 to May 2016 were enrolled, and they were divided into open tracheal suction group, closed tracheal suction group, and splash-proof suction group on average by random number table. The patients in the three groups used conventional ventilator circuit component, conventional CTSS, and CTSS with a novel splash-proof ventilator circuit component for MV and sputum suction, respectively. The incidence of VAP, airway bacterial colonization rate, MDR and fungi colonization rate, duration of MV, length of ICU and hospitalization stay, and financial expenditure during hospitalization, as well as the in-hospital prognosis were recorded. After excluding patients who did not meet the inclusion criteria, incomplete data, backed out and so on, 318 patients were enrolled in the analysis finally. Compared with the open tracheal suction group, the total incidence of VAP was decreased in the closed tracheal suction group and splash-proof suction group [20.95% (22/105), 21.90% (23/105) vs. 29.63% (32/108)], but no statistical difference was found (both P > 0.05), and the incidence of VAP infections/1 000 MV days showed the same change tendency (cases: 14.56, 17.35 vs. 23.07). The rate of airway bacterial colonization and the rate of MDR colonization in the open tracheal suction group and splash-proof suction group were remarkably lower than those of closed tracheal suction group [32.41% (35/108), 28.57% (30/105) vs. 46.67% (49/105), 20.37% (22/108), 15.24% (16/105) vs. 39.05% (41/105)] with

  5. Antifouling activities against colonizer marine bacteria of extracts from marine invertebrates collected in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and on the Brazilian coast (Santa Catarina).

    PubMed

    Mora-Cristancho, Jennyfer A; Arévalo-Ferro, Catalina; Ramos, Freddy A; Tello, Edisson; Duque, Carmenza; Lhullier, Cintia; Falkenberg, Miriam; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo

    2011-01-01

    The growth inhibition of 12 native marine bacteria isolated from Aplysina sponge surfaces, the shell of a bivalve, and Phytagel immersed for 48 h in sea water were used as indicator of the antifouling activity of the extracts of 39 marine organisms (octocorals, sponges, algae, and zoanthid) collected in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and on the Brazilian coast (Santa Catarina). Gram-negative bacteria represented 75% of the isolates; identified strains belonged to Oceanobacillus iheyensis, Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio harveyi, and Bacillus megaterium species and seven strains were classified at genus level by the 16S rRNA sequencing method. The extracts of the octocorals Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae, four Eunicea octocorals, and the sponges Topsentia ophiraphidites, Agelas citrina, Neopetrosia carbonaria, Monanchora arbuscula, Cliona tenuis, Iotrochota imminuta, and Ptilocaulis walpersii were the most active, thus suggesting those species as antifoulant producers. This is the first study of natural antifoulants from marine organisms collected on the Colombian and Brazilian coasts.

  6. Effects of plant- and animal-based high-fat diets on lipid storage and distribution in environmental bacteria-colonized gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hsun; Chiu, Chien-Chao; Hung, Shao-Wen; Liu, Ju-Yun; Wang, Yu-Chih; Lv, Qiang; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Huang, Yi-Wen; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2017-11-18

    Different edible oils such as lard and soybean oil have been reported to interact with the gut microbiota, affecting host lipid metabolism. However, whether bacteria derived from the environment influence host lipid metabolism remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the roles of environmental bacteria in host lipid storage and distribution with various edible oils. Gnotobiotic C57BL/6JNarl mice were inoculated with Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus and Paenibacillus azoreducens and then fed either a normal diet (LabDiet 5010, control group) or a diet containing 60% lard (L-group) or soybean oil (S-group) for 18 months. Interestingly, the S-group accumulated massive amounts of white adipose tissue compared to the L- and control groups, while the L-group displayed more hepatic steatosis and fatty droplets than the other groups. The expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in the livers of the L-group were markedly elevated compared to the S-group. FAS and PPARγ protein levels were also markedly elevated. However, there were no differences in the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α between the groups. Our results suggest that environmental bacteria may affect host hepatic inflammation and lipid distribution in the presence of high-fat diets, with different effects depending on the fat type consumed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Seagrass (Zostera marina) Colonization Promotes the Accumulation of Diazotrophic Bacteria and Alters the Relative Abundances of Specific Bacterial Lineages Involved in Benthic Carbon and Sulfur Cycling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feifei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qianqian; Liu, Fanghua; Zhang, Jianping; Gong, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Seagrass colonization changes the chemistry and biogeochemical cycles mediated by microbes in coastal sediments. In this study, we molecularly characterized the diazotrophic assemblages and entire bacterial community in surface sediments of a Zostera marina-colonized coastal lagoon in northern China. Higher nitrogenase gene (nifH) copy numbers were detected in the sediments from the vegetated region than in the sediments from the unvegetated region nearby. The nifH phylotypes detected were mostly affiliated with the Geobacteraceae, Desulfobulbus, Desulfocapsa, and Pseudomonas. Redundancy analysis based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the distribution of nifH genotypes was mostly shaped by the ratio of total organic carbon to total organic nitrogen, the concentration of cadmium in the sediments, and the pH of the overlying water. High-throughput sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of bacterial 16S rRNA genes also indicated the presence of Geobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae phylotypes in these samples. A comparison of these results with those of previous studies suggests the prevalence and predominance of iron(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae and sulfate-reducing Desulfobulbaceae diazotrophs in coastal sedimentary environments. Although the entire bacterial community structure was not significantly different between these two niches, Desulfococcus (Deltaproteobacteria) and Anaerolineae (Chloroflexi) presented with much higher proportions in the vegetated sediments, and Flavobacteriaceae (Bacteroidetes) occurred more frequently in the bare sediments. These data suggest that the high bioavailability of organic matter (indicated by relatively lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratios) and the less-reducing anaerobic condition in vegetated sediments may favor Desulfococcus and Anaerolineae lineages, which are potentially important populations in benthic carbon and sulfur cycling in the highly productive seagrass ecosystem.

  8. Seagrass (Zostera marina) Colonization Promotes the Accumulation of Diazotrophic Bacteria and Alters the Relative Abundances of Specific Bacterial Lineages Involved in Benthic Carbon and Sulfur Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feifei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qianqian; Liu, Fanghua

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass colonization changes the chemistry and biogeochemical cycles mediated by microbes in coastal sediments. In this study, we molecularly characterized the diazotrophic assemblages and entire bacterial community in surface sediments of a Zostera marina-colonized coastal lagoon in northern China. Higher nitrogenase gene (nifH) copy numbers were detected in the sediments from the vegetated region than in the sediments from the unvegetated region nearby. The nifH phylotypes detected were mostly affiliated with the Geobacteraceae, Desulfobulbus, Desulfocapsa, and Pseudomonas. Redundancy analysis based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the distribution of nifH genotypes was mostly shaped by the ratio of total organic carbon to total organic nitrogen, the concentration of cadmium in the sediments, and the pH of the overlying water. High-throughput sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of bacterial 16S rRNA genes also indicated the presence of Geobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae phylotypes in these samples. A comparison of these results with those of previous studies suggests the prevalence and predominance of iron(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae and sulfate-reducing Desulfobulbaceae diazotrophs in coastal sedimentary environments. Although the entire bacterial community structure was not significantly different between these two niches, Desulfococcus (Deltaproteobacteria) and Anaerolineae (Chloroflexi) presented with much higher proportions in the vegetated sediments, and Flavobacteriaceae (Bacteroidetes) occurred more frequently in the bare sediments. These data suggest that the high bioavailability of organic matter (indicated by relatively lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratios) and the less-reducing anaerobic condition in vegetated sediments may favor Desulfococcus and Anaerolineae lineages, which are potentially important populations in benthic carbon and sulfur cycling in the highly productive seagrass ecosystem. PMID:26209674

  9. Physical stress and bacterial colonization

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial surface colonizers are subject to a variety of physical stresses. During the colonization of human epithelia such as on the skin or the intestinal mucosa, bacteria mainly have to withstand the mechanical stress of being removed by fluid flow, scraping, or epithelial turnover. To that end, they express a series of molecules to establish firm attachment to the epithelial surface, such as fibrillar protrusions (pili) and surface-anchored proteins that bind to human matrix proteins. In addition, some bacteria – in particular gut and urinary tract pathogens – use internalization by epithelial cells and other methods such as directed inhibition of epithelial turnover to ascertain continued association with the epithelial layer. Furthermore, many bacteria produce multi-layered agglomerations called biofilms with a sticky extracellular matrix, providing additional protection from removal. This review will give an overview over the mechanisms human bacterial colonizers have to withstand physical stresses with a focus on bacterial adhesion. PMID:25212723

  10. Risk Factors for Colonization With Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Among Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit After Returning From Abroad.

    PubMed

    Angue, Marion; Allou, Nicolas; Belmonte, Olivier; Lefort, Yannick; Lugagne, Nathalie; Vandroux, David; Montravers, Philippe; Allyn, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Few national recommendations exist on management of patients returning from abroad and all focus on hospitalized patients. Our purpose was to compare, in an intensive care unit (ICU), the admission prevalence and acquisition of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria carriage in patients with ("Abroad") or without ("Local") a recent stay abroad, and then identify the risk factors in "Abroad" patients. In this retrospective study, we reviewed charts of all the patients hospitalized in the ICU unit from January 2011 through July 2013 with hygiene samplings performed. We identified all patients who had stayed abroad ("Abroad") within 6 months prior to ICU admission. Of 1,842 ICU patients, 129 (7%) "Abroad" patients were reported. In the "Abroad" group, the rate of MDR strain carriage was higher at admission (33% vs 6.7%, p < 0.001) and also more often diagnosed during the ICU stay (acquisition rate: 17% vs 5.2%, p < 0.001) than in "Local" patients. Risk factors associated with MDR bacteria carriage at admission in "Abroad" patients were diabetes mellitus [odds ratio (OR) 5.1 (1.7-14.8), p = 0.003] and "hospitalization abroad with antibiotic treatment" [OR 10.7 (4.2-27.3), p < 0.001]. Hospitalization abroad without antibiotic treatment was not identified as a risk factor. The main factor associated with MDR bacteria carriage after a stay abroad seems to be a hospitalization abroad only in case of antibiotic treatment abroad. Screening and isolation of "Abroad" patients should be recommended, even in case of a first negative screening. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  11. Relationship between the adhesive properties of bacteria and their transport and colonization in the subsurface environment. Final report for period September 15, 1996 - September 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Madilyn Fletcher

    2000-04-06

    This research has focused on the attachment of bacteria to solid surfaces and the significance of their adhesion properties in their transport through porous media. Our work has focused on strains of Pseudomonas and a related species Burkholderia cepacia. Most of our experimental strains were isolated from subsurface environments at USDOE experimental field sites. The first portion of this project was conducted at the University of Maryland during 1994-1996, during which two graduates and one graduate student were supported by the award. The project was then continued under contract number DE-FG02-96ER62302 at the University of South Carolina, where one postdoctoral associate has been supported by the award.

  12. Bacteria Colonizing the Ocular Surface in Eyes With Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis: Analysis of Biofilm-Forming Capability and Vancomycin Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Jassim, Sarmad H; Sivaraman, Kavitha R; Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Jaboori, Assraa H J; Federle, Michael J; de la Cruz, Jose; Cortina, Maria S

    2015-07-01

    To analyze the bacterial microbiota colonizing the ocular surface of patients with Boston type 1 keratoprostheses (K-Pros) for antibacterial resistance patterns and capacity to form biofilms. Twenty-seven eyes with a Boston type 1 K-Pro and 16 fellow control eyes from 26 patients were enrolled. The surface of the K-Pro optic and/or the inferior conjunctival fornix was swabbed and plated separately on culture media. Positive cultures were processed to assess for biofilm-forming capability. Microtiter plate adherence assay and polymerase chain reaction for ica and atlE genes were used. An in vitro assay of vancomycin tolerance was performed on isolated strains and compared to standard controls with and without biofilm-forming capability. Eighty-five percent of K-Pro eyes and 69% of control eyes had positive cultures (P = 0.20). All Gram-positive strains exhibited susceptibility to vancomycin by standard testing. Biofilm-forming bacterial isolates were detected in 57.7% of K-Pro eyes and 53.3% of control eyes. A vancomycin tolerance assay showed that the antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS) within biofilms was significant in only three of five biofilm-forming strains (P < 0.05). In all strains, bacterial cells in planktonic form were more susceptible to vancomycin than in biofilm form (P < 0.001). Coagulase-negative staphylococcus can be isolated from K-Pro surfaces despite the use of vancomycin prophylaxis. In this study, the majority of isolated strains had biofilm-forming capability. In vitro vancomycin tolerance assays suggest that biofilm formation decreases susceptibility to vancomycin. This may contribute to higher rates of infectious complications observed in these patients.

  13. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  14. Constraints in the colonization of natural and engineered subterranean igneous rock aquifers by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria inferred by culture analysis.

    PubMed

    Chi Fru, E

    2008-08-01

    The aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are suggested to be important for the removal of oxygen from subterranean aquifers that become oxygenated by natural and engineering processes. This is primarily because MOB are ubiquitous in the environment and in addition reduce oxygen efficiently. The biogeochemical factors that will control the success of the aerobic MOB in these kinds of underground aquifers remain unknown. In this study, viable and cultivable MOB occurring at natural and engineered deep granitic aquifers targeted for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the Fennoscandian Shield (approximately 3-1000 m) were enumerated. The numbers were correlated with in situ salinity, methane concentrations, conductivity, pH, and depth. A mixed population habiting freshwater aquifers (approximately 3-20 m), a potential source for the inoculation of MOB into the deeper aquifers was tested for tolerance to NaCl, temperature, pH, and an ability to produce cysts and exospores. Extrapolations show that due to changing in situ parameters (salinity, conductivity, and pH), the numbers of MOB in the aquifers dropped quickly with depth. A positive correlation between the most probable numbers of MOB and methane concentrations was observed. Furthermore, the tolerance-based tests of cultured strains indicated that the MOB in the shallow aquifers thrived best in mesophilic and neutrophilic conditions as opposed to the hyperthermophilic and alkaliphilic conditions expected to develop in an engineered subterranean SNF repository. Overall, the survival of the MOB both quantitatively and physiologically in the granitic aquifers was under the strong influence of biogeochemical factors that are strongly depth-dependent.

  15. Mechanisms and rates of bacterial colonization of sinking aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Ploug, Helle; Tang, Kam

    2002-08-01

    Quantifying the rate at which bacteria colonize aggregates is a key to understanding microbial turnover of aggregates. We used encounter models based on random walk and advection-diffusion considerations to predict colonization rates from the bacteria's motility patterns (swimming speed, tumbling frequency, and turn angles) and the hydrodynamic environment (stationary versus sinking aggregates). We then experimentally tested the models with 10 strains of bacteria isolated from marine particles: two strains were nonmotile; the rest were swimming at 20 to 60 microm s(-1) with different tumbling frequency (0 to 2 s(-1)). The rates at which these bacteria colonized artificial aggregates (stationary and sinking) largely agreed with model predictions. We report several findings. (i) Motile bacteria rapidly colonize aggregates, whereas nonmotile bacteria do not. (ii) Flow enhances colonization rates. (iii) Tumbling strains colonize aggregates enriched with organic substrates faster than unenriched aggregates, while a nontumbling strain did not. (iv) Once on the aggregates, the bacteria may detach and typical residence time is about 3 h. Thus, there is a rapid exchange between attached and free bacteria. (v) With the motility patterns observed, freely swimming bacteria will encounter an aggregate in <1 day at typical upper-ocean aggregate concentrations. This is faster than even starving bacteria burn up their reserves, and bacteria may therefore rely solely on aggregates for food. (vi) The net result of colonization and detachment leads to a predicted equilibrium abundance of attached bacteria as a function of aggregate size, which is markedly different from field observations. This discrepancy suggests that inter- and intraspecific interactions among bacteria and between bacteria and their predators may be more important than colonization in governing the population dynamics of bacteria on natural aggregates.

  16. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... THERAPY Targeted treatment zeroes in on specific targets (molecules) in cancer cells. These targets play a role ... colon cancer. Some studies have reported that NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib) may help reduce the ...

  17. Colonic obstruction secondary to Actinomyces.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Moreno, Manuel Alfonso; Sánchez Pedrique, Isabel; Obregón Martínez, Estíbaliz

    2017-08-01

    Actinomycosis is an uncommon granulomatous infection by Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria of the genus Actinomyces. A. israelii is a major human pathogen. The most frequent locations for colonization are cervicofacial (50%), abdominal (20%) and thoracic (15-20%). The abdominal actinomycosis predisposing factors include recent surgery, trauma and neoplasias. Certain cases have been associated with the intrauterine contraception device (IUD).

  18. Polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V R; Kumria, R

    2001-08-14

    Natural polysaccharides are now extensively used for the development of solid dosage forms for delivery of drug to the colon. The rationale for the development of a polysaccharide based delivery system for colon is the presence of large amounts of polysaccharidases in the human colon as the colon is inhabited by a large number and variety of bacteria which secrete many enzymes e.g. beta-D-glucosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, amylase, pectinase, xylanase, beta-D-xylosidase, dextranase, etc. Various major approaches utilizing polysaccharides for colon-specific delivery are fermentable coating of the drug core, embedding of the drug in biodegradable matrix, formulation of drug-saccharide conjugate (prodrugs). A large number of polysaccharides have already been studied for their potential as colon-specific drug carrier systems, such as chitosan, pectin, chondroitin sulphate, cyclodextrin, dextrans, guar gum, inulin, amylose and locust bean gum. Recent efforts and approaches exploiting these polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery are discussed.

  19. Interaction of Dietary Fatty Acids with Tumour Necrosis Factor Family Cytokines during Colon Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Šafaříková, Barbora; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF-α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NFκB activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined. PMID:24876678

  20. Interaction of dietary fatty acids with tumour necrosis factor family cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Safaříková, Barbora; Skender, Belma; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF- α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NF κ B activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined.

  1. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  2. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  3. Extracellular pH regulation in microdomains of colonic crypts: effects of short-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Montrose, M H

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that transepithelial gradients of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs; the major anions in the colonic lumen) generate pH gradients across the colonic epithelium. Quantitative confocal microscopy was used to study extracellular pH in mouse distal colon with intact epithelial architecture, by superfusing tissue with carboxy SNARF-1 (a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye). Results demonstrate extracellular pH regulation in two separate microdomains surrounding colonic crypts: the crypt lumen and the subepithelial tissue adjacent to crypt colonocytes. Apical superfusion with (i) a poorly metabolized SCFA (isobutyrate), (ii) an avidly metabolized SCFA (n-butyrate), or (iii) a physiologic mixture of acetate/propionate/n-butyrate produced similar results: alkalinization of the crypt lumen and acidification of subepithelial tissue. Effects were (i) dependent on the presence and orientation of a transepithelial SCFA gradient, (ii) not observed with gluconate substitution, and (iii) required activation of sustained vectorial acid/base transport by SCFAs. Results suggest that the crypt lumen functions as a pH microdomain due to slow mixing with bulk superfusates and that crypts contribute significant buffering capacity to the lumen. In conclusion, physiologic SCFA gradients cause polarized extracellular pH regulation because epithelial architecture and vectorial transport synergize to establish regulated microenvironments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7724557

  4. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  5. [Pathogenic bacteria in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Bingen, E

    2003-09-01

    Since the CF gene identification in 1989 and despite the improvement of our knowledge in the physiopathology of the disease, bronchopulmonary infection determines the vital prognosis. Following Staphylococcus aureus infection, patients are colonized or colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, greatly involved in the pulmonary deterioration. Other bacteria may be involved Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Alcaligenes sp. Intensive antibiotic treatment of primocolonisation helps to prevent or delay chronic colonisation. Chronic colonization needs a rational long term antibiotic strategy to prevent the occurrence of multiresistant germs; antibiotic cures are performed every 3 or 4 months before pulmonary exacerbation symptoms.

  6. Films of bacteria at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Liana; Molaei, Mehdi; Niepa, Tagbo H R; Lee, Daeyeon; Leheny, Robert L; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2017-09-01

    Bacteria are often discussed as active colloids, self-propelled organisms whose collective motion can be studied in the context of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In such studies, the behavior of bacteria confined to interfaces or in the proximity of an interface plays an important role. For instance, many studies have probed collective behavior of bacteria in quasi two-dimensional systems such as soap films. Since fluid interfaces can adsorb surfactants and other materials, the stress and velocity boundary conditions at interfaces can alter bacteria motion; hydrodynamic studies of interfaces with differing boundary conditions are reviewed. Also, bacteria in bulk can become trapped at or near fluid interfaces, where they colonize and form structures comprising secretions like exopolysaccharides, surfactants, living and dead bacteria, thereby creating Films of Bacteria at Interfaces (FBI). The formation of FBI is discussed at air-water, oil-water, and water-water interfaces, with an emphasis on film mechanics, and with some allusion to genetic functions guiding bacteria to restructure fluid interfaces. At air-water interfaces, bacteria form pellicles or interfacial biofilms. Studies are reviewed that reveal that pellicle material properties differ for different strains of bacteria, and that pellicle physicochemistry can act as a feedback mechanism to regulate film formation. At oil-water interfaces, a range of FBI form, depending on bacteria strain. Some bacteria-laden interfaces age from an initial active film, with dynamics dominated by motile bacteria, through viscoelastic states, to form an elastic film. Others remain active with no evidence of elastic film formation even at significant interface ages. Finally, bacteria can adhere to and colonize ultra-low surface tension interfaces such as aqueous-aqueous systems common in food industries. Relevant literature is reviewed, and areas of interest for potential application are discussed, ranging from health

  7. Taste sensing in the colon.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2014-01-01

    The colonic lumen is continually exposed to many compounds, including beneficial and harmful compounds that are produced by colonic microflora. The intestinal epithelia form a barrier between the internal and luminal (external) environments. Chemical receptors that sense the luminal environment are thought to play important roles as sensors and as modulators of epithelial cell functions. The recent molecular identification of various membrane receptor proteins has revealed the sensory role of intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient sensing by these receptors in the small intestine is implicated in nutrient absorption and metabolism. However, little is known about the physiological roles of chemosensors in the large intestine. Since 1980s, researchers have examined the effects of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), the primary products of commensal bacteria, on gut motility, secretion, and incretin release, for example. In this decade, the SCFA receptor genes and their expression were identified in the mammalian colon. Furthermore, many other chemical receptors, including taste and olfactory receptors have been found in colonic epithelial cells. These findings indicate that the large intestinal epithelia express chemosensors that detect the luminal contents, particularly bacterial metabolites, and induce the host defense systems and the modulation of systemic metabolism via incretin release. In this review, we describe the local effects of chemical stimuli on the lumen associated with the expression pattern of sensory receptors. We propose that sensory receptors expressed in the colonic mucosa play important roles in luminal chemosensing to maintain homeostasis.

  8. Bacterial colonization or infection in chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Pandak, Nenad; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Sekelj, Alen; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja; Cabraja, Ivica; Miklaušić, Božana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of bacteria present in maxillary and ethmoid cavities in patients with chronic sinusitis and to correlate these findings with bacteria simultaneously present in their nasopharynx. The purpose of this correlation was to establish the role of bacteria found in chronically inflamed sinuses and to evaluate if the bacteria present colonized or infected sinus mucosa. Nasopharyngeal and sinus swabs of 65 patients that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery were cultivated and at the same time the presence of leukocytes were determined in each swab. The most frequently found bacteria in nasopharynx were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maxillary or ethmoidal sinus swabs yielded bacterial growth in 47 (72.31%) patients. The most frequently found bacteria in sinuses were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococci (pneumoniae, viridans and spp.). The insignificant number of leukocytes was present in each sinus and nasopharyngeal swab. Every published microbiology study of chronic sinusitis proved that sinus mucosa were colonized with bacteria and not infected, yet antibiotic therapy was discussed making no difference between infection and colonization. Chronic sinusitis should be considered a chronic inflammatory condition rather than bacterial infection, so routine antibiotic therapy should be avoided. Empiric antibiotic therapy should be prescribed only in cases when the acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis occurs and the antibiotics prescribed should aim the usual bacteria causing acute sinusitis. In case of therapy failure, antibiotics should be changed having in mind that under certain circumstances any bacteria colonizing sinus mucosa can cause acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis.

  9. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  10. Clostridium Butyricum CGMCC0313.1 Modulates Lipid Profile, Insulin Resistance and Colon Homeostasis in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Haixiao

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a cluster of metabolic disorders and systemic low-grade inflammation involving multiple organs. Recent findings have suggested that intestine is a key organ altered in response to high fat diet (HFD) feeding. Probiotics mainly lactobacillus strains have earlier been implicated in alleviating metabolic disorders. Here we aimed to examine the effects of a naturally occurring butyrate-producing probiotic clostridium butyricum CGMCC0313.1 (CB0313.1) in limiting the development of HFD-induced obesity. Mice treated with CB0313.1 exhibited reduced lipid accumulation in liver and serum, lower circulating insulin levels and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, CB0313.1 administration reversed the HFD-induced colonic inflammation as evidenced by reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level and increases the interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-22 levels in colon tissue. Additionally to colonic inflammation, CB0313.1 also reduced the colon permeability by upregulating the tight junction (TJ) proteins (claudin-1 and occludin) and contributed to a decreased circulating endotoxin level. In colon content, CB0313.1 administration restored the reduced production of butyrate and other short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) caused by HFD feeding. In adipose tissue, lower transcriptional levels of pro-inflammatory TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in adipose tissue were observed in CB0313.1-treated mice. Collectively, our data demonstrated that CB0313.1, targeting colon inflammation and permeability, ameliorated HFD-induced obesity, insulin resistance as well as adipose inflammation. PMID:27123997

  11. Ecology of Root Colonizing Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Maya; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Background Ecologically meaningful classification of bacterial populations is essential for understanding the structure and function of bacterial communities. As in soils, the ecological strategy of the majority of root-colonizing bacteria is mostly unknown. Among those are Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae), a major group of rhizosphere and root colonizing bacteria of many plant species. Methodology/Principal Findings The ecology of Massilia was explored in cucumber root and seed, and compared to that of Agrobacterium population, using culture-independent tools, including DNA-based pyrosequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Seed- and root-colonizing Massilia were primarily affiliated with other members of the genus described in soil and rhizosphere. Massilia colonized and proliferated on the seed coat, radicle, roots, and also on hyphae of phytopathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum infecting seeds. High variation in Massilia abundance was found in relation to plant developmental stage, along with sensitivity to plant growth medium modification (amendment with organic matter) and potential competitors. Massilia absolute abundance and relative abundance (dominance) were positively related, and peaked (up to 85%) at early stages of succession of the root microbiome. In comparison, variation in abundance of Agrobacterium was moderate and their dominance increased at later stages of succession. Conclusions In accordance with contemporary models for microbial ecology classification, copiotrophic and competition-sensitive root colonization by Massilia is suggested. These bacteria exploit, in a transient way, a window of opportunity within the succession of communities within this niche. PMID:22808103

  12. Commensal bacteria mediated defenses against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Michael C.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacterial communities residing within the intestinal lumen of mammals have evolved to flourish in this microenvironment. To preserve this niche, commensal bacteria act with the host to prevent colonization by invasive pathogens that induce inflammation and disrupt the intestinal niche commensal bacteria rely upon. Thus, it is mutually beneficial to the host and commensal bacteria to inhibit a pathogen's ability to establish an infection. Commensal bacteria express factors that support colonization, maximize nutrient uptake, and produce metabolites that confer a survival advantage over pathogens. Further, commensal bacteria stimulate the host's immune defenses and drive tonic expression of anti-microbial factors. In combination, these mechanisms preserve the niche for commensal bacteria and assist the host in preventing infection. PMID:24727150

  13. Biofilm formation by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonizing solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Crull, Katja; Rohde, Manfred; Westphal, Kathrin; Loessner, Holger; Wolf, Kathrin; Felipe-López, Alfonso; Hensel, Michael; Weiss, Siegfried

    2011-08-01

    Systemic administration of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to tumour bearing mice results in preferential colonization of the tumours and retardation of tumour growth. Although the bacteria are able to invade the tumour cells in vitro, in tumours they were never detected intracellularly. Ultrastructural analysis of Salmonella-colonized tumours revealed that the bacteria had formed biofilms. Interestingly, depletion of neutrophilic granulocytes drastically reduced biofilm formation. Obviously, bacteria form biofilms in response to the immune reactions of the host. Importantly, we tested Salmonella mutants that were no longer able to form biofilms by deleting central regulators of biofilm formation. Such bacteria could be observed intracellularly in immune cells of the host or in tumour cells. Thus, tumour colonizing S. typhimurium might form biofilms as protection against phagocytosis. Since other bacteria are behaving similarly, solid murine tumours might represent a unique model to study biofilm formation in vivo. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Bacterial Infections of the Colon.

    PubMed

    Hasan; Smith

    2000-06-01

    The colon is a common site of infection for a heterogeneous group of bacterial pathogens. The presentation of disease in the colon is generally in the form of distinct syndromes, and it is important for physicians to recognize the causative organisms, because specific treatment is highly effective. The flouroquinolones have emerged as the treatment of choice for most food-borne bacterial pathogens. Resistance to these agents is not a major issue at present except in Campylobacter. Clostridium difficile remains sensitive to both metronidazole and oral vancomycin. The majority of patients will respond to metronidazole, but oral vancomycin should be limited to severe cases of pseudomembranous colitis or treatment failures with metronidazole. Vancomycin is expensive and has the potential for the propagation of vancomycin resistance in other bacteria, notably enterococci. Patients appearing with proctitis should be screened for sexually transmitted diseases.

  15. Learning about Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top of page Is there a test for hereditary colon cancer? Gene testing can identify individuals who ... Top of page Current NHGRI Clinical Research on Hereditary Colon Cancer Currently, NHGRI is not conducting clinical ...

  16. Stages of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Anything ... colorectal cancer include the following: Having a family history of colon or rectal cancer in a first- ...

  17. Role of Fe-Oxidizing Bacteria in Metal Bio-Corrosion in the Marine Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 01/01/2008-31/03/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Fe-oxidizing bacteria in metal bio-corrosion in the marine...source, and that steel coupons incubated in natural seawater are rapidly colonized by these bacteria . This is the first demonstration these bacteria ...exist outside of marine hydrothermal vents. These bacteria are early colonizers of steel surfaces and through th&ir fomiatiori of a thick tiufilir

  18. Genome Sequence of the Butyrate-Producing Anaerobic Bacterium Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ravi; Rasinkangas, Pia; Satokari, Reetta; Pietilä, Taija E; Palva, Airi

    2015-04-02

    Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85, which was isolated from human feces, is a Gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium. The species may play an important role in gut health, as it was previously reported to produce butyric acid. Here, we present the genome assembly of PEL 85, a novel strain of A. hadrus.

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    DOE PAGES

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; ...

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceaemore » (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.« less

  20. Genome Sequence of the Butyrate-Producing Anaerobic Bacterium Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85

    PubMed Central

    Rasinkangas, Pia; Satokari, Reetta; Pietilä, Taija E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85, which was isolated from human feces, is a Gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium. The species may play an important role in gut health, as it was previously reported to produce butyric acid. Here, we present the genome assembly of PEL 85, a novel strain of A. hadrus. PMID:25838483

  1. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    PubMed Central

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A; Gilbert, Jack A; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. Our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut. PMID:26394008

  2. Intestinimonas butyriciproducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a butyrate-producing bacterium from the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Kläring, Karoline; Hanske, Laura; Bui, Nam; Charrier, Cédric; Blaut, Michael; Haller, Dirk; Plugge, Caroline M; Clavel, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    A Gram-positive, spore-forming, non-motile, strictly anaerobic rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from the caecal content of a TNF(deltaARE) mouse. The isolate, referred to as strain SRB-521-5-I(T), was originally cultured on a reduced agar medium containing yeast extract, rumen fluid and lactic acid as main energy and carbon sources. Phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the species most closely related to strain SRB-521-5-I(T) were Flavonifractor plautii and Pseudoflavonifractor capillosus (<95 % sequence similarity; 1436 bp). In contrast to F. plautii and P. capillosus, strain SRB-521-5-I(T) contained a substantial amount of C18 : 0 dimethylacetal. Additional major fatty acids were C14 : 0 methyl ester, C16 : 0 dimethylacetal and C18 : 0 aldehyde. Strain SRB-521-5-I(T) differed in its enzyme profile from F. plautii and P. capillosus by being positive for dextrin, maltotriose, turanose, dl-lactic acid and d-lactic acid methyl ester but negative for d-fructose. In reduced Wilkins-Chalgren-Anaerobe broth, strain SRB-521-5-I(T) produced approximately 8 mM butyrate and 4 mM acetate. In contrast to F. plautii, the strain did not metabolize flavonoids. It showed intermediate resistance towards the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, colistin and tetracycline. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, we propose the name Intestinimonas butyriciproducens gen. nov., sp. nov. to accommodate strain SRB-521-5-I(T) ( = DSM 26588(T) = CCUG 63529(T)) as the type strain.

  3. Age-related changes in select fecal bacteria in foals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult horses depend on the microbial community in the hindgut to produce VFAs that are utilized for energy. Microbial colonization in the gastrointestinal tract of foals is essential to develop a healthy symbiotic relationship and prevent proliferation of pathogenic bacteria. However, colonization i...

  4. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of colon tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junjie; Zepp, Jarod; Bulek, Katarzyna; Li, Xiaoxia

    2012-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the Toll-IL-1R (TL-IL-1) signaling by commensal bacteria contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and colitis-associated cancer. Recent studies have identified SIGIRR as a negative regulator of TL-IL-1 signaling. It dampens intestinal inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon. In this review, we will discuss the role of SIGIRR in different cell types and the mechanisms underlying its tumor suppressor function. PMID:22529873

  5. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junjie; Zepp, Jarod; Bulek, Katarzyna; Li, Xiaoxia

    2011-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the Toll-IL-1R (TL-IL-1) signaling by commensal bacteria contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and colitis-associated cancer. Recent studies have identified SIGIRR as a negative regulator of TL-IL-1 signaling. It dampens intestinal inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon. In this review, we will discuss the role of SIGIRR in different cell types and the mechanisms underlying its tumor suppressor function.

  6. Stability of peptide drugs in the colon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Yadav, Vipul; Smart, Alice L; Tajiri, Shinichiro; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-10-12

    This study was the first to investigate the colonic stability of 17 peptide molecules (insulin, calcitonin, glucagon, secretin, somatostatin, desmopressin, oxytocin, Arg-vasopressin, octreotide, ciclosporin, leuprolide, nafarelin, buserelin, histrelin, [D-Ser(4)]-gonadorelin, deslorelin, and goserelin) in a model of the large intestine using mixed human faecal bacteria. Of these, the larger peptides - insulin, calcitonin, somatostatin, glucagon and secretin - were metabolized rapidly, with complete degradation observed within 5 min. In contrast, a number of the smaller peptides - Arg-vasopressin, desmopressin, oxytocin, gonadorelin, goserelin, buserelin, leuprolide, nafarelin and deslorelin - degraded more slowly, while octreotide, histrelin and ciclosporin were seen to be more stable as compared to the other small peptides under the same conditions. Peptide degradation rate was directly correlated to peptide lipophilicity (logP); those peptides with a higher logP were more stable in the colonic model (R(2)=0.94). In the absence of human faecal bacteria, all peptides were stable. This study highlights the impact of the colonic environment - in particular, the gut microbiota - on the metabolism of peptide drugs, and identifies potential peptide candidates for drug delivery to the colon.

  7. Decreased colonization of fecal Clostridium coccoides/Eubacterium rectale species from ulcerative colitis patients in an in vitro dynamic gut model with mucin environment.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Joan; Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Laukens, Debby; Vigsnaes, Louise Kristine; De Vos, Martine; Boon, Nico; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2012-03-01

    The mucus layer in the colon, acting as a barrier to prevent invasion of pathogens, is thinner and discontinuous in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). A recent developed in vitro dynamic gut model, the M-SHIME, was used to compare long-term colonization of the mucin layer by the microbiota from six healthy volunteers (HV) and six UC patients and thus distinguish the mucin adhered from the luminal microbiota. Although under the same nutritional conditions, short-chain fatty acid production by the luminal communities from UC patients showed a tendency toward a lower butyrate production. A more in-depth community analysis of those microbial groups known to produce butyrate revealed that the diversity of the Clostridium coccoides/Eubacterium rectale and Clostridium leptum group, and counts of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were lower in the luminal fractions of the UC samples. Counts of Roseburia spp. were lower in the mucosal fractions of the UC samples. qPCR analysis for butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, responsible for butyrate production, displayed a lower abundance in both the luminal and mucosal fractions of the UC samples. The M-SHIME model revealed depletion in butyrate producing microbial communities not restricted to the luminal but also in the mucosal samples from UC patients compared to HV.

  8. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  9. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  10. A single-center evaluation of the risk for colonization or bacteremia with piperacillin-tazobactam- and cefepime-resistant bacteria in patients with acute leukemia receiving fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, A D; Heil, E L; Patel, N K; Duffy, A; Gilmore, S

    2016-04-01

    Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis is indicated to prevent neutropenic fever in patients with acute leukemia. However, fluoroquinolone use has been associated with development of multi-drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and extended spectrum β-lactamase producing gram-negative bacilli. Due to a presumed risk of multi-drug resistance associated with fluoroquinolone prophylaxis, patients admitted to our hospital with neutropenic fever receive empiric carbapenem therapy until cultures are negative for 72 h or identification of an organism. Our study seeks to identify the incidence of multi-drug-resistant organism colonization and bacteremia among patients who receive fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and to evaluate duration of empiric carbapenem therapy. A retrospective review of adult patients with acute leukemia receiving a fluoroquinolone as outpatient infection prophylaxis, admitted to our tertiary cancer center for treatment of neutropenic fever was completed. Surveillance and blood cultures were reviewed for antibiotic resistance. Duration of empiric carbapenem therapy was reviewed. One hundred patients and 177 admissions for neutropenic fever were included. Six patients harbored a piperacillin-tazobactam-resistant organism found during routine surveillance. Among these patients, two bacteremias were identified, one of which was a piperacillin-tazobactam-resistant organism. Five bacteremias were identified among 83 patients with negative surveillance cultures. Among the bloodstream infections, five organisms isolated were fluoroquinolone resistant. No cefepime-resistant organism was isolated on surveillance or bloodstream cultures. Adherence to the institution guideline of narrowing antibiotics after 72 h of negative cultures occurred in only 13% of neutropenic fever cases. The average duration of carbapenem therapy in 177 neutropenic fever episodes was 4.4 days. Our findings show that among our patient population, there is a low risk of bacteremia with a

  11. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  12. Sialic acid transport contributes to pneumococcal colonization.

    PubMed

    Marion, Carolyn; Burnaugh, Amanda M; Woodiga, Shireen A; King, Samantha J

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia and meningitis. Airway colonization is a necessary precursor to disease, but little is known about how the bacteria establish and maintain colonization. Carbohydrates are required as a carbon source for pneumococcal growth and, therefore, for colonization. Free carbohydrates are not readily available in the naso-oropharynx; however, N- and O-linked glycans are common in the airway. Sialic acid is the most common terminal modification on N- and O-linked glycans and is likely encountered frequently by S. pneumoniae in the airway. Here we demonstrate that sialic acid supports pneumococcal growth when provided as a sole carbon source. Growth on sialic acid requires import into the bacterium. Three genetic regions have been proposed to encode pneumococcal sialic acid transporters: one sodium solute symporter and two ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Data demonstrate that one of these, satABC, is required for transport of sialic acid. A satABC mutant displayed significantly reduced growth on both sialic acid and the human glycoprotein alpha-1. The importance of satABC for growth on human glycoprotein suggests that sialic acid transport may be important in vivo. Indeed, the satABC mutant was significantly reduced in colonization of the murine upper respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that S. pneumoniae is able to use sialic acid as a sole carbon source and that utilization of sialic acid is likely important during pneumococcal colonization.

  13. Colonic fermentation--more than meets the nose.

    PubMed

    Arasaradnam, R P; Pharaoh, M W; Williams, G J; Nwokolo, C U; Bardhan, K D; Kumar, S

    2009-11-01

    Fermentation of undigested foods in the colon by its resident bacteria affects not only colonic health (protection against inflammation and tumour formation) but also influences metabolic health. Studying fermentation directly is difficult for lack of access. We hypothesise that the anatomical structure of the colon is suited to act as a fermenting chamber with the gaseous molecules (VOCs) emitted having direct effects on the colonocytes as well as gut neural and metabolic effects. We refer to this complex system as the 'fermentome', and further hypothesise that alteration in the 'fermentome' through dietary modification will have a direct impact on colonic as well as metabolic health and disease. The VOCs emitted may play a role in bacterial chemical signalling within the colon but importantly could also function as a 'gas' biomarker. Measurement of such VOCs through non-invasive methods would have important application as a hypothesis-generating tool with subsequent clinical application.

  14. Mechanisms of Bacterial Colonization of the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Steven J.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chief among these are infections involving the lower airways. The opportunistic bacterial pathogens responsible for most cases of pneumonia can cause a range of local and invasive infections. However, bacterial colonization (or carriage) in the upper airway is the prerequisite of all these infections. Successful colonizers must attach to the epithelial lining, grow on the nutrient-limited mucosal surface, evade the host immune response, and transmit to a susceptible host. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying these conserved stages of carriage. We also examine how the demands of colonization influence progression to disease. A range of bacteria can colonize the upper airway; nevertheless, we focus on strategies shared by many respiratory tract opportunistic pathogens. Understanding colonization opens a window to the evolutionary pressures these pathogens face within their animal hosts and that have selected for attributes that contribute to virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:26488280

  15. Helicobacter pylori colonization critically depends on postprandial gastric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bücker, Roland; Azevedo-Vethacke, Marina; Groll, Claudia; Garten, Désirée; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Schreiber, Sören

    2012-01-01

    The risk of Helicobacter pylori infection is highest in childhood, but the colonization process of the stomach mucosa is poorly understood. We used anesthetized Mongolian gerbils to study the initial stages of H. pylori colonization. Prandial and postprandial gastric conditions characteristic of humans of different ages were simulated. The fraction of bacteria that reached the deep mucus layer varied strongly with the modelled postprandial conditions. Colonization success was weak with fast gastric reacidification typical of adults. The efficiency of deep mucus entry was also low with a slow pH decrease as seen in pH profiles simulating the situation in babies. Initial colonization was most efficient under conditions simulating the postprandial reacidification and pepsin activation profiles in young children. In conclusion, initial H. pylori colonization depends on age-related gastric physiology, providing evidence from an in vivo infection model that suggests an explanation why the bacterium is predominantly acquired in early childhood. PMID:23251780

  16. Identification of Population Bottlenecks and Colonization Factors during Assembly of Bacterial Communities within the Zebrafish Intestine.

    PubMed

    Stephens, W Zac; Wiles, Travis J; Martinez, Emily S; Jemielita, Matthew; Burns, Adam R; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Guillemin, Karen

    2015-10-27

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a powerful model for studying bacterial colonization of the vertebrate intestine, but the genes required by commensal bacteria to colonize the zebrafish gut have not yet been interrogated on a genome-wide level. Here we apply a high-throughput transposon mutagenesis screen to Aeromonas veronii Hm21 and Vibrio sp. strain ZWU0020 during their colonization of the zebrafish intestine alone and in competition with each other, as well as in different colonization orders. We use these transposon-tagged libraries to track bacterial population sizes in different colonization regimes and to identify gene functions required during these processes. We show that intraspecific, but not interspecific, competition with a previously established bacterial population greatly reduces the ability of these two bacterial species to colonize. Further, using a simple binomial sampling model, we show that under conditions of interspecific competition, genes required for colonization cannot be identified because of the population bottleneck experienced by the second colonizer. When bacteria colonize the intestine alone or at the same time as the other species, we find shared suites of functional requirements for colonization by the two species, including a prominent role for chemotaxis and motility, regardless of the presence of another species. Zebrafish larvae, which are amenable to large-scale gnotobiotic studies, comprehensive sampling of their intestinal microbiota, and live imaging, are an excellent model for investigations of vertebrate intestinal colonization dynamics. We sought to develop a mutagenesis and tagging system in order to understand bacterial population dynamics and functional requirements during colonization of the larval zebrafish intestine. We explored changes in bacterial colonization dynamics and functional requirements when bacteria colonize a bacterium-free intestine, one previously colonized by their own species, or one colonized

  17. Relatedness of amylase-producing, endospore-forming bacteria from the alimentary tract of commercially processed broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Competitive exclusion (CE) by bacteria from adult poultry reduces colonization of young chicks by Salmonella. CE might include the ability of these bacteria to breakdown complex carbohydrates to produce metabolites that inhibit Salmonella growth. Purpose: To isolate amylase producing, ...

  18. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bifidobacteria: Human Symbiotic Bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bifidobacterium ssp. constitute up to 90% of microbial gut flora in the infant colon, but considerably less in adults. Carbohydrate metabolism in these bacteria is highly unusual. Data from four Bifidobacterium genomes indicates genes missing from glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the TCA cycle, in...

  19. Microbes, Microbiota and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents a considerable disease burden worldwide. The human colon is also an anatomical location with the largest number of microbes. It is natural therefore to anticipate a role for microbes, particularly bacteria, in colorectal carcinogenesis. The increasing accessibility of microbial meta’omics is fueling a surge in our understanding of the role that microbes and the microbiota play in CRC. In this review, we will discuss recent insights into contributions of the microbiota to CRC and explore conceptual frameworks for evaluating the role of microbes in cancer causation. We also highlight new findings on candidate CRC-potentiating species and current knowledge gaps. Finally, we explore the roles of microbial metabolism as it relates to bile acids, xenobiotics, and diet in the etiology and therapeutics of CRC. PMID:24629338

  20. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer. PMID:20191069

  1. CT findings of colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  2. Bacterial colonization of laryngectomy stomas.

    PubMed

    Wild, D C; Mehta, D; Conboy, P J

    2004-09-01

    Infections with organisms resistant to conventional antibiotics are of increasing concern. This observational study investigates the bacterial colonization of the peristomal area of laryngectomy patients. Thirty-two consecutive patients who had previously undergone laryngectomy were recruited from the Head and Neck Clinic of a teaching hospital. Swabs were taken from the laryngectomy stoma site, the mouth and both nasal cavities. Microbiological culture and isolation were performed following standard procedures. Despite no clinical sign of infection, 27 patients were found to be carriers of one or more organism (84.4 per cent). Staphylococcus aureus was detected in the peristomal area of 15 patients (46.9 per cent). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated in seven (21.9 per cent) cases. In this series the authors found a high incidence of colonization with potentially pathogenic bacteria in laryngectomy stomas with no clinical signs of infection. In a significant number of patients, Gram positive organisms were identified that could potentially cause cellulitis or wound infections.

  3. Early stage colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-12-14

    Evidence has now accumulated that colonoscopy and removal of polyps, especially during screening and surveillance programs, is effective in overall risk reduction for colon cancer. After resection of malignant pedunculated colon polyps or early stage colon cancers, long-term repeated surveillance programs can also lead to detection and removal of asymptomatic high risk advanced adenomas and new early stage metachronous cancers. Early stage colon cancer can be defined as disease that appears to have been completely resected with no subsequent evidence of involvement of adjacent organs, lymph nodes or distant sites. This differs from the clinical setting of an apparent "curative" resection later pathologically upstaged following detection of malignant cells extending into adjacent organs, peritoneum, lymph nodes or other distant sites, including liver. This highly selected early stage colon cancer group remains at high risk for subsequent colon polyps and metachronous colon cancer. Precise staging is important, not only for assessing the need for adjuvant chemotherapy, but also for patient selection for continued surveillance. With advanced stages of colon cancer and a more guarded outlook, repeated surveillance should be limited. In future, novel imaging technologies (e.g., confocal endomicroscopy), coupled with increased pathological recognition of high risk markers for lymph node involvement (e.g., "tumor budding") should lead to improved staging and clinical care.

  4. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  5. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer - prevention; Colon cancer - screening ... We do not know what causes colon cancer, but we do know some of the things that may increase the risk of getting it, such as: Age. Your risk increases after ...

  6. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  7. Normalization of host intestinal mucus layers requires long-term microbial colonization

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Malin E V; Jakobsson, Hedvig E; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica; Schütte, André; Ermund, Anna; Rodríguez-Piñeiro, Ana M; Arike, Liisa; Wising, Catharina; Svensson, Frida; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal mucus layer provides a barrier limiting bacterial contact with the underlying epithelium. Mucus structure is shaped by intestinal location and the microbiota. To understand how commensals modulate gut mucus, we examined mucus properties under germ-free (GF) conditions and during microbial colonization. Although the colon mucus structure of GF mice was similar to conventionally raised (Convr) mice, the GF inner mucus layer was penetrable to bacteria-sized beads. During colonization, in which GF mice were gavaged with Convr microbiota, the small intestine mucus required five weeks to be normally detached and colonic inner mucus six weeks to become impenetrable. The composition of the small intestinal microbiota during colonization was similar to Convr donors until three weeks when Bacteroides increased, Firmicutes decreased, and segmented filamentous bacteria became undetectable. These findings highlight the dynamics of mucus layer development and indicate that studies of mature microbe-mucus interactions should be conducted weeks after colonization. PMID:26526499

  8. Colonic casts: unexpected complications of colonic ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Mantas, D; Damaskos, C; Bamias, G; Dimitroulis, D

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Extensive colonic ischaemia can result in passage of a colonic 'cast' (CC) through the rectum. Case Study We report a 69-year-old male who initially underwent surgery to remove a sessile polyp. On postoperative day (POD)15, he was febrile, suffering from diarrhoea, and was treated conservatively. On POD18, the patient returned to our hospital with a CC that presented after defaecation. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a CC extending from the descending colon to the anal orifice with presentation of air between the affected colonic wall and the CC. The patient was treated conservatively and discharged on POD20 without complications having passed the CC (≈80cm) completely and becoming afebrile. Conclusions In most cases, the cause of CC passage is surgery for colorectal cancer or repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A mild-to-severe presentation is dependent upon the bowel-wall layers affected by ischaemia and which therefore are included in the CC.

  9. Gnotobiotic Human Colon Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Frank D.; Folan, David M. A.; Winter, Des C.; Folan, Michael A.; Baird, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel emulsion with efficacy as an agent for eliminating biofilms was selected. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and effect of a formulation of ML:8 against commensal bacteria harvested from ex vivo human colonic tissues. Methods Mucosal sheets, obtained at the time of surgery, were exposed for 2 minutes to one of four solutions: Krebs-Hensleit (KH) solution, saline (NaCl; 0.9%), povidone iodine (1%), or ML:8 (2%); n = 4. Lumenal surfaces were swabbed for culture under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Following treatment, each sheet was mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage clamped. Tissues were challenged with carbachol. Permeability coefficient (Papp) was determined using mannitol fluxes. At the end of each experiment, tissues were examined histologically. Results Similar colony forming units grew in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in both control and NaCl treated tissues. Iodine reduced and ML:8 virtually abolished viable bacteria. Basal electrophysiological parameters were not different between treatments. Transepithelial electrical resistance values did not differ between groups. All tissues responded to carbachol, although this was attenuated in iodine treated tissue. Papp values were slightly elevated in all treated tissues but this did not reach significance. Histopathological assessment revealed no overt damage to tissues. Conclusion Brief exposure to ML:8 reduced culturable bacterial burden from human intestinal tissues harvested at the time of surgical resection. Such gnotobiotic tissues retain structural and functional integrity. This is a novel approach to reduce bacterial burden. PMID:27785304

  10. Beta-hemolysin promotes skin colonization by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yuki; Baba, Tadashi; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-03-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, Sa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage Sa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes.

  11. Beta-Hemolysin Promotes Skin Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Yuki; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, ϕSa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage ϕSa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes. PMID:23292775

  12. Ursodeoxycholic acid attenuates colonic epithelial secretory function

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Orlaith B; Mroz, Magdalena S; Ward, Joseph B J; Colliva, Carolina; Scharl, Michael; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gilmer, John F; Fallon, Padraic G; Hofmann, Alan F; Roda, Aldo; Murray, Frank E; Keely, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Dihydroxy bile acids, such as chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), are well known to promote colonic fluid and electrolyte secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea associated with bile acid malabsorption. However, CDCA is rapidly metabolised by colonic bacteria to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), the effects of which on epithelial transport are poorly characterised. Here, we investigated the role of UDCA in the regulation of colonic epithelial secretion. Cl− secretion was measured across voltage-clamped monolayers of T84 cells and muscle-stripped sections of mouse or human colon. Cell surface biotinylation was used to assess abundance/surface expression of transport proteins. Acute (15 min) treatment of T84 cells with bilateral UDCA attenuated Cl− secretory responses to the Ca2+ and cAMP-dependent secretagogues carbachol (CCh) and forskolin (FSK) to 14.0 ± 3.8 and 40.2 ± 7.4% of controls, respectively (n= 18, P < 0.001). Investigation of the molecular targets involved revealed that UDCA acts by inhibiting Na+/K+-ATPase activity and basolateral K+ channel currents, without altering their cell surface expression. In contrast, intraperitoneal administration of UDCA (25 mg kg−1) to mice enhanced agonist-induced colonic secretory responses, an effect we hypothesised to be due to bacterial metabolism of UDCA to lithocholic acid (LCA). Accordingly, LCA (50–200 μm) enhanced agonist-induced secretory responses in vitro and a metabolically stable UDCA analogue, 6α-methyl-UDCA, exerted anti-secretory actions in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, UDCA exerts direct anti-secretory actions on colonic epithelial cells and metabolically stable derivatives of the bile acid may offer a new approach for treating intestinal diseases associated with diarrhoea. PMID:23507881

  13. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic contributions to colonic hydrogen sulfide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, Kyle L; McCoy, Kathy D; Wallace, John L

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an important modulator of many aspects of digestive function, both in health and disease. Colonic tissue H(2)S synthesis increases markedly during injury and inflammation and appears to contribute to resolution. Some of the bacteria residing in the colon can also produce H(2)S. The extent to which bacterial H(2)S synthesis contributes to what is measured as colonic H(2)S synthesis is not clear. Using conventional and germ-free mice, we have delineated the eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic contributions to colonic H(2)S synthesis, both in healthy and colitic mice. Colonic tissue H(2)S production is entirely dependent on the presence of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (vitamin B(6)), while bacterial H(2)S synthesis appears to occur independent of this cofactor. As expected, approximately one-half of the H(2)S produced by feces is derived from eukaryotic cells. While colonic H(2)S synthesis is markedly increased when the tissue is inflamed, and, in proportion to the extent of inflammation, fecal H(2)S synthesis does not change and tissue granulocytes do not appear to be the source of the elevated H(2)S production. Rats fed a B vitamin-deficient diet for 6 wk exhibited significantly diminished colonic H(2)S synthesis, but fecal H(2)S synthesis was not different from that of rats on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that H(2)S production by colonic bacteria does not contribute significantly to what is measured as colonic tissue H(2)S production, using the acetate trapping assay system employed in this study.

  14. Bacterial colonization factors control specificity and stability of the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Melanie; Donaldson, Gregory P; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Boyajian, Silva; Ley, Klaus; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2013-09-19

    Mammals harbour a complex gut microbiome, comprising bacteria that confer immunological, metabolic and neurological benefits. Despite advances in sequence-based microbial profiling and myriad studies defining microbiome composition during health and disease, little is known about the molecular processes used by symbiotic bacteria to stably colonize the gastrointestinal tract. We sought to define how mammals assemble and maintain the Bacteroides, one of the most numerically prominent genera of the human microbiome. Here we find that, whereas the gut normally contains hundreds of bacterial species, germ-free mice mono-associated with a single Bacteroides species are resistant to colonization by the same, but not different, species. To identify bacterial mechanisms for species-specific saturable colonization, we devised an in vivo genetic screen and discovered a unique class of polysaccharide utilization loci that is conserved among intestinal Bacteroides. We named this genetic locus the commensal colonization factors (ccf). Deletion of the ccf genes in the model symbiont, Bacteroides fragilis, results in colonization defects in mice and reduced horizontal transmission. The ccf genes of B. fragilis are upregulated during gut colonization, preferentially at the colonic surface. When we visualize microbial biogeography within the colon, B. fragilis penetrates the colonic mucus and resides deep within crypt channels, whereas ccf mutants are defective in crypt association. Notably, the CCF system is required for B. fragilis colonization following microbiome disruption with Citrobacter rodentium infection or antibiotic treatment, suggesting that the niche within colonic crypts represents a reservoir for bacteria to maintain long-term colonization. These findings reveal that intestinal Bacteroides have evolved species-specific physical interactions with the host that mediate stable and resilient gut colonization, and the CCF system represents a novel molecular mechanism for

  15. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  16. Colonic Diseases - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Colonic Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/colonicdiseases.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  17. Colon cancer - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100157.htm Colon cancer - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  18. Streptococcus intermedius liver abscesses and colon cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J J; McKendrick, A I; Drelichman, V S

    2005-10-01

    Certain species of bacteria are known to be associated with colorectal cancer. We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with bacteraemia and liver abscesses due to Streptococcus intermedius. The isolation of this organism should prompt investigation for colorectal neoplasm, which may be present but asymptomatic, without metastases, and therefore at a curative stage.

  19. Carotenoids and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; Benson, J; Curtin, K; Ma, K N; Schaeffer, D; Potter, J D

    2000-02-01

    Carotenoids have numerous biological properties that may underpin a role for them as chemopreventive agents. However, except for beta-carotene, little is known about how dietary carotenoids are associated with common cancers, including colon cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between dietary alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin and the risk of colon cancer. Data were collected from 1993 case subjects with first primary incident adenocarcinoma of the colon and from 2410 population-based control subjects. Dietary data were collected from a detailed diet-history questionnaire and nutrient values for dietary carotenoids were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture-Nutrition Coordinating Center carotenoid database (1998 updated version). Lutein was inversely associated with colon cancer in both men and women [odds ratio (OR) for upper quintile of intake relative to lowest quintile of intake: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.04; P = 0.04 for linear trend]. The greatest inverse association was observed among subjects in whom colon cancer was diagnosed when they were young (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.92; P = 0.02 for linear trend) and among those with tumors located in the proximal segment of the colon (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91; P < 0.01 for linear trend). The associations with other carotenoids were unremarkable. The major dietary sources of lutein in subjects with colon cancer and in control subjects were spinach, broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes, oranges and orange juice, carrots, celery, and greens. These data suggest that incorporating these foods into the diet may help reduce the risk of developing colon cancer.

  20. Impact of succinate on growth of cultures of cecal bacteria from commercial broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beneficial bacteria in probiotics produce and utilize several organic acids that may play a role in the ability of these bacteria to inhibit colonization of poultry by enteropathogens. Since cecal contents of adult poultry contain many of these beneficial bacteria, 3 experiments were conducted to ex...

  1. Zebrafish as a natural host model for Vibrio cholerae colonization and transmission.

    PubMed

    Runft, Donna L; Mitchell, Kristie C; Abuaita, Basel H; Allen, Jonathan P; Bajer, Sarah; Ginsburg, Kevin; Neely, Melody N; Withey, Jeffrey H

    2014-03-01

    The human diarrheal disease cholera is caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae in the environment is associated with several varieties of aquatic life, including insect egg masses, shellfish, and vertebrate fish. Here we describe a novel animal model for V. cholerae, the zebrafish. Pandemic V. cholerae strains specifically colonize the zebrafish intestinal tract after exposure in water with no manipulation of the animal required. Colonization occurs in close contact with the intestinal epithelium and mimics colonization observed in mammals. Zebrafish that are colonized by V. cholerae transmit the bacteria to naive fish, which then become colonized. Striking differences in colonization between V. cholerae classical and El Tor biotypes were apparent. The zebrafish natural habitat in Asia heavily overlaps areas where cholera is endemic, suggesting that zebrafish and V. cholerae evolved in close contact with each other. Thus, the zebrafish provides a natural host model for the study of V. cholerae colonization, transmission, and environmental survival.

  2. [Incidence of cholelithiasis in patients with cancer of the colon and adenomatous polyp].

    PubMed

    Paniagua Estévez, M; González Calleja, I; González Lazo, N; Jimenéz Mesa, G; Hernández Miranda, W

    1992-01-01

    Recent international publications remark the association about carcinoma of the colon and cholelithiasis. These two entities with similar geographical distribution can be seen frequently in the modern western societies, being the cause as aetiological factors the low content in dietetics fiber. Different studies about the carcinoma of the colon and cholelithiasis pathogenesis had lead the possibility that the abnormal degradation of bile acids for the colonic bacterias, could be responsible of each one of these illness. The exposition of colonic mucosa to products of degradation of bile acids, specially secondary bile acids, may play a role in the etiopathogenic of colon carcinoma. It was analysed 135 patients with colon carcinoma or adenomatosis polyps, 42 with cholelithiasis or cholecystectomized for the same cause (31.1%), although in the control group, only 2(5%) had cholelithiasis. The female predominated the group of colon carcinoma and cholelithiasis, as well as cholecystectomized for that cause. The most frequent associated pathology was the diverticulosis.

  3. Zebrafish as a Natural Host Model for Vibrio cholerae Colonization and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Runft, Donna L.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Abuaita, Basel H.; Allen, Jonathan P.; Bajer, Sarah; Ginsburg, Kevin; Neely, Melody N.

    2014-01-01

    The human diarrheal disease cholera is caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae in the environment is associated with several varieties of aquatic life, including insect egg masses, shellfish, and vertebrate fish. Here we describe a novel animal model for V. cholerae, the zebrafish. Pandemic V. cholerae strains specifically colonize the zebrafish intestinal tract after exposure in water with no manipulation of the animal required. Colonization occurs in close contact with the intestinal epithelium and mimics colonization observed in mammals. Zebrafish that are colonized by V. cholerae transmit the bacteria to naive fish, which then become colonized. Striking differences in colonization between V. cholerae classical and El Tor biotypes were apparent. The zebrafish natural habitat in Asia heavily overlaps areas where cholera is endemic, suggesting that zebrafish and V. cholerae evolved in close contact with each other. Thus, the zebrafish provides a natural host model for the study of V. cholerae colonization, transmission, and environmental survival. PMID:24375135

  4. Colon Cryptogenesis: Asymmetric Budding

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Wee; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Smith, David W.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2013-01-01

    The process of crypt formation and the roles of Wnt and cell-cell adhesion signaling in cryptogenesis are not well described; but are important to the understanding of both normal and cancer colon crypt biology. A quantitative 3D-microscopy and image analysis technique is used to study the frequency, morphology and molecular topography associated with crypt formation. Measurements along the colon reveal the details of crypt formation and some key underlying biochemical signals regulating normal colon biology. Our measurements revealed an asymmetrical crypt budding process, contrary to the previously reported symmetrical fission of crypts. 3D immunofluorescence analyses reveals heterogeneity in the subcellular distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin in distinct crypt populations. This heterogeneity was also found in asymmetrical budding crypts. Singular crypt formation (i.e. no multiple new crypts forming from one parent crypt) were observed in crypts isolated from the normal colon mucosa, suggestive of a singular constraint mechanism to prevent aberrant crypt production. The technique presented improves our understanding of cryptogenesis and suggests that excess colon crypt formation occurs when Wnt signaling is perturbed (e.g. by truncation of adenomatous polyposis coli, APC protein) in most colon cancers. PMID:24205248

  5. [Colon cancer in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mathonnet, M; Fermeaux, V

    2003-09-01

    Colon cancers arise only rarely in the course of a pregnancy. Yet colon obstruction, perforation and metastatic spread seem to occur more frequently in this setting than with the average colon cancer. Perhaps this is due to the immunotolerance which accompanies pregnancy. No case of epidermoid (squamous cell) cancer of the colon has been previously described in a pregnant woman. This conjunction has a catastrophic prognosis: the diagnosis of colon tumor is delayed since symptoms are masked by the pregnancy, and epidermoid colon cancer is a particularly aggressive lesion. A major sub-diaphragmatic surgical procedure can be performed with reasonable safety to mother and fetus. Radiotherapy is contraindicated. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy can be administered although the risks to the fetus are not well known. During the first trimester, a therapeutic abortion can be proposed to optimise the treatment of the mother. During the second and third trimesters, treatment of the mother exposes the fetus to the risk of malformations or premature delivery; delay in maternal treatment in hopes of prolonging the pregnancy in order to obtain a viable neonate diminish the chances of maternal survival.

  6. Identification of Population Bottlenecks and Colonization Factors during Assembly of Bacterial Communities within the Zebrafish Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, Travis J.; Martinez, Emily S.; Jemielita, Matthew; Burns, Adam R.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a powerful model for studying bacterial colonization of the vertebrate intestine, but the genes required by commensal bacteria to colonize the zebrafish gut have not yet been interrogated on a genome-wide level. Here we apply a high-throughput transposon mutagenesis screen to Aeromonas veronii Hm21 and Vibrio sp. strain ZWU0020 during their colonization of the zebrafish intestine alone and in competition with each other, as well as in different colonization orders. We use these transposon-tagged libraries to track bacterial population sizes in different colonization regimes and to identify gene functions required during these processes. We show that intraspecific, but not interspecific, competition with a previously established bacterial population greatly reduces the ability of these two bacterial species to colonize. Further, using a simple binomial sampling model, we show that under conditions of interspecific competition, genes required for colonization cannot be identified because of the population bottleneck experienced by the second colonizer. When bacteria colonize the intestine alone or at the same time as the other species, we find shared suites of functional requirements for colonization by the two species, including a prominent role for chemotaxis and motility, regardless of the presence of another species. PMID:26507229

  7. Anaerobic facultative bacteria isolated from the gut of rabbits fed different diets.

    PubMed

    Canganella, F; Zirletta, G; Gualterio, L; Massa, S; Trovatelli, L D

    1992-11-01

    Anaerobic facultative bacteria colonizing the intestinal tract of conventional rabbits fed three different diets (standard pellet, hay and pellet/hay mixture) were enumerated in brain heart infusion agar. Colony counts recovered from homogenized samples of small intestine, caecum and rectum differed with reference to the diet given. Among anaerobic groups, identified from rabbit fed pellet/hay mixture, Enterococci (E. faecalis, E. avium, E. faecium and E. durans) represented the predominant flora. Enterobacters (E. cloacae and E. aerogenes) accounted for about 10 to 25% of the bacteria in the rectum and colon respectively, whereas Staphylococci (S. intermedius, S. epidermidis and S. lentus) represented 11% of the bacteria isolated from colon.

  8. Development and preclinical evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of an oral ETEC vaccine containing inactivated E. coli bacteria overexpressing colonization factors CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 combined with a hybrid LT/CT B subunit antigen, administered alone and together with dmLT adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, J; Bourgeois, L; Carlin, N; Clements, J; Gustafsson, B; Lundgren, A; Nygren, E; Tobias, J; Walker, R; Svennerholm, A-M

    2013-05-07

    A first-generation oral inactivated whole-cell enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine, comprising formalin-killed ETEC bacteria expressing different colonization factor (CF) antigens combined with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), when tested in phase III studies did not significantly reduce overall (generally mild) ETEC diarrhea in travelers or children although it reduced more severe ETEC diarrhea in travelers by almost 80%. We have now developed a novel more immunogenic ETEC vaccine based on recombinant non-toxigenic E. coli strains engineered to express increased amounts of CF antigens, including CS6 as well as an ETEC-based B subunit protein (LCTBA), and the optional combination with a nontoxic double-mutant heat-labile toxin (LT) molecule (dmLT) as an adjuvant. Two test vaccines were prepared under GMP: (1) A prototype E. coli CFA/I-only formalin-killed whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine, and (2) A "complete" inactivated multivalent ETEC-CF (CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 antigens) whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine. These vaccines, when given intragastrically alone or together with dmLT in mice, were well tolerated and induced strong intestinal-mucosal IgA antibody responses as well as serum IgG and IgA responses to each of the vaccine CF antigens as well as to LT B subunit (LTB). Both mucosal and serum responses were further enhanced (adjuvanted) when the vaccines were co-administered with dmLT. We conclude that the new multivalent oral ETEC vaccine, both alone and especially in combination with the dmLT adjuvant, shows great promise for further testing in humans.

  9. Isopycnic separation of Escherichia coli cultures possessing colonization factor antigen I.

    PubMed Central

    Giesa, F R; Zajac, I; Bartus, H F; Actor, P

    1982-01-01

    A culture of Escherichia coli possessing colonization factor antigen I was subjected to isopycnic separation on Percoll gradients. The results demonstrated successful division of the culture into two populations: (i) bacteria which cause mannose-resistant hemagglutination and (ii) bacteria which lack the ability to hemagglutinate in the presence of mannose. PMID:6286714

  10. Intestinal Microbiota Containing Barnesiella Species Cures Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Vanni; Caballero, Silvia; Djukovic, Ana; Toussaint, Nora C.; Equinda, Michele; Lipuma, Lauren; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Taur, Ying; Jenq, Robert R.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Xavier, Joao B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria causing infections in hospitalized patients are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Classical infection control practices are only partially effective at preventing spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria within hospitals. Because the density of intestinal colonization by the highly antibiotic-resistant bacterium vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) can exceed 109 organisms per gram of feces, even optimally implemented hygiene protocols often fail. Decreasing the density of intestinal colonization, therefore, represents an important approach to limit VRE transmission. We demonstrate that reintroduction of a diverse intestinal microbiota to densely VRE-colonized mice eliminates VRE from the intestinal tract. While oxygen-tolerant members of the microbiota are ineffective at eliminating VRE, administration of obligate anaerobic commensal bacteria to mice results in a billionfold reduction in the density of intestinal VRE colonization. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of intestinal bacterial populations isolated from mice that cleared VRE following microbiota reconstitution revealed that recolonization with a microbiota that contains Barnesiella correlates with VRE elimination. Characterization of the fecal microbiota of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation demonstrated that intestinal colonization with Barnesiella confers resistance to intestinal domination and bloodstream infection with VRE. Our studies indicate that obligate anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Barnesiella genus enable clearance of intestinal VRE colonization and may provide novel approaches to prevent the spread of highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:23319552

  11. The plant pathogen Rhodococcus fascians colonizes the exterior and interior of the aerial parts of plants.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, K; Ritsema, T; Nijsse, J; Holsters, M; Goethals, K; Jaziri, M

    2001-05-01

    Rhodococcus fascians is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that causes malformations on aerial plant parts, whereby leafy galls occur at axillary meristems. The colonization behavior on Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana plants was examined. Independent of the infection methods, R. fascians extensively colonized the plant surface where the bacteria were surrounded by a slime layer. R. fascians caused the collapse of epidermal cells and penetrated intercellularly into the plant tissues. The onset of symptom development preceded the extensive colonization of the interior. The meristematic regions induced by pathogenic strain D188 were surrounded by bacteria. The nonpathogenic strain, D188-5, colonized the exterior of the plant equally well, but the linear plasmid (pFiD188) seemed to be involved in the penetration efficiency and colonization of tobacco tissues.

  12. Inflammation and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Terzić, Janos; Grivennikov, Sergei; Karin, Eliad; Karin, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis is well-established and in the last decade has received a great deal of supporting evidence from genetic, pharmacological, and epidemiological data. Inflammatory bowel disease is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Inflammation is also likely to be involved with other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which inflammation promotes cancer development are still being uncovered and could differ between colitis-associated and other forms of colorectal cancer. Recent work has elucidated the role of distinct immune cells, cytokines, and other immune mediators in virtually all steps of colon tumorigenesis, including initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. These mechanisms, as well as new approaches to prevention and therapy, are discussed in this review.

  13. [Role of lactic acid bacteria in the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria among healthy persons].

    PubMed

    Zigangirova, N A; Tokarskaia, E A; Narodnitskiĭ, B S; Gintsburg, A L; Tugel'ian, V A

    2006-01-01

    The wide use of antibiotics in livestock raising has contributed to the selection and accumulation of representatives of commensal microflora, as well as pathogenic bacteria, colonizing livestock and poultry. For this reason the problem of the possible transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes along the chain from bacteria, autochthonous for agricultural animals, to bacteria used for the production of foodstuffs, which are incorporated into normal microflora and may thus participate in the exchange of these genes with bacteria, enteropathogenic for humans, is a highly important task of medical microbiology. The article deals with the review of experimental data, indicative the possibility of the appearance of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria due to the transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes via alimentary chains.

  14. INTRACELLULAR COLONIZATION OF SEAGRASS ROOTS BY ACETOGENIC AND SULFIDOGENIC BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of seagrasses to the stability and fertility of estuarine ecosystems is well established. Loss of seagrasses in recent years to disease and coastal development underscores the importance of understanding the microbial ecology of seagrasses, and the possible roles...

  15. INTRACELLULAR COLONIZATION OF SEAGRASS ROOTS BY ACETOGENIC AND SULFIDOGENIC BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of seagrasses to the stability and fertility of estuarine ecosystems is well established. Loss of seagrasses in recent years to disease and coastal development underscores the importance of understanding the microbial ecology of seagrasses, and the possible roles...

  16. Alterations of the Ileal and Colonic Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Chronic Enteropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cassmann, Eric; White, Robin; Atherly, Todd; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Khoda, Samir; Mosher, Curtis; Ackermann, Mark; Jergens, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of chronic enteropathies (CE) in dogs. While imbalances in duodenal and fecal microbial communities have been associated with mucosal inflammation, relatively little is known about alterations in mucosal bacteria seen with CE involving the ileum and colon. Aim To investigate the composition and spatial organization of mucosal microbiota in dogs with CE and controls. Methods Tissue sections from endoscopic biopsies of the ileum and colon from 19 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 6 dogs with granulomatous colitis (GC), 12 dogs with intestinal neoplasia, and 15 controls were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on a quantifiable basis. Results The ileal and colonic mucosa of healthy dogs and dogs with CE is predominantly colonized by bacteria localized to free and adherent mucus compartments. CE dogs harbored more (P < 0.05) mucosal bacteria belonging to the Clostridium-coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group, Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, and Escherichia coli versus controls. Within the CE group, IBD dogs had increased (P < 0.05) Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli bacteria attached onto surface epithelia or invading within the intestinal mucosa. Bacterial invasion with E. coli was observed in the ileal and colonic mucosa of dogs with GC (P < 0.05). Dogs with intestinal neoplasia had increased (P < 0.05) adherent (total bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli) and invasive (Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and Bacteroides) bacteria in biopsy specimens. Increased numbers of total bacteria adherent to the colonic mucosa were associated with clinical disease severity in IBD dogs (P < 0.05). Conclusion Pathogenic events in canine CE are associated with different populations of the ileal and colonic mucosal microbiota. PMID:26840462

  17. Colonization of Bacillus spp. on seeds and in plant rhizoplane.

    PubMed

    Ugoji, E O; Laing, M D; Hunter, C H

    2005-07-01

    Seed coating, dipping and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were employed to study bacterial and fungal colonization of the seeds and rhizoplane of maize (Zea mays L.) during the early stages of growth. Isolation of Bacillus spp. entailed screening soil bacteria with potential growth stimulation and plant pathogen suppressive abilities isolated from the rhizospheres and rhizoplanes of vegetable crops. The bacterial colonization of the spermosphere was 90%. When the coated seeds were fully germinated, bacteria moved to the emerging radicle. Virtually no bacteria occurred on the root tip both for the treated and untreated. However, colonization was 20% in the basal portion of the roots close to the seed-root junction. SEM observations showed that the bacterial cells were arranged linearly and laterally on the growing root axis. This phenomenon was more noticeable in the seedlings dipped in the bacterial culture on the 3rd day after germination. The results indicate that attachment to the seed coat and the rhizoplane by the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) is an important factor in the successful colonization of the rhizoplane. The significance of the work is to ascertain that the inoculated Bacillus spp. adhered to and established in the rhizoplane of maize. It can therefore be used as a PGPR and as a biocontrol agent.

  18. Differential Colonization Dynamics of Cucurbit Hosts by Erwinia tracheiphila.

    PubMed

    Vrisman, Cláudio M; Deblais, Loïc; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Miller, Sally A

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial wilt is one of the most destructive diseases of cucurbits in the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. Although the disease has been studied since 1900, host colonization dynamics remain unclear. Cucumis- and Cucurbita-derived strains exhibit host preference for the cucurbit genus from which they were isolated. We constructed a bioluminescent strain of Erwinia tracheiphila (TedCu10-BL#9) and colonization of different cucurbit hosts was monitored. At the second-true-leaf stage, Cucumis melo plants were inoculated with TedCu10-BL#9 via wounded leaves, stems, and roots. Daily monitoring of colonization showed bioluminescent bacteria in the inoculated leaf and petiole beginning 1 day postinoculation (DPI). The bacteria spread to roots via the stem by 2 DPI, reached the plant extremities 4 DPI, and the plant wilted 6 DPI. However, Cucurbita plants inoculated with TedCu10-BL#9 did not wilt, even at 35 DPI. Bioluminescent bacteria were detected 6 DPI in the main stem of squash and pumpkin plants, which harbored approximately 10(4) and 10(1) CFU/g, respectively, of TedCu10-BL#9 without symptoms. Although significantly less systemic plant colonization was observed in nonpreferred host Cucurbita plants compared with preferred hosts, the mechanism of tolerance of Cucurbita plants to E. tracheiphila strains from Cucumis remains unknown.

  19. Beneficial effects of lactic acid bacteria on human beings.

    PubMed

    Masood, Muhammad Irfan; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Shirazi, Jafir Hussain; Khan, Ikram Ullah

    2011-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are a diverse group of bacteria that produce lactic acid as their major fermented product. Most of them are normal flora of human being and animals and produce myriad beneficial effects for human beings include, alleviation of lactose intolerance, diarrhea, peptic ulcer, stimulation of immune system, antiallergic effects, antifungal actions, preservation of food, and prevention of colon cancer. This review highlights the potential species of Lactic acid bacteria responsible for producing these effects. It has been concluded that lactic acid bacteria are highly beneficial microorganisms for human beings and are present abundantly in dairy products so their use should be promoted for good human health.

  20. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  1. Effects of sample preparation on bacterial colonization of polymers.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Diana N; Stafford, Christopher M; Cheng, Yajun; Leigh, Stefan D; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Lin, Nancy J

    2010-02-16

    Characterization of materials developed for medical usage frequently includes studies in which the materials are inoculated with bacteria in order to assess bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Observed differences in bacterial growth are typically considered to be due to the material or the incubation conditions. To our knowledge, the method used to prepare the materials has generally not been considered with regard to its influence on bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to determine the effects that various preparation methods exert on bacterial colonization of polymer disks. Polymer disks of the same dimethacrylate composition were photopolymerized: (1) between untreated glass slides, (2) between polyester release film, (3) between glass slides treated with an alkyl silane, (4) between glass slides treated with a perfluorinated silane, or (5) with one free surface in an argon-purged chamber. Surface chemistry was quantified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, hydrophobicity was assessed by water contact angle, and topography was characterized using atomic force microscopy. The disks were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans for 4 h, fixed, and visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Differences among all groups were found with regard to surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, topography, and bacteria morphology, density, and coverage, indicating that the method of sample preparation strongly affects both the surface properties and the initial bacterial colonization. Polymerization on untreated slides was selected as the preferred method of preparation due to minimal material transfer to the polymer and consistent, reproducible bacterial colonization.

  2. Effects of sample preparation on bacterial colonization of polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Diana N.; Stafford, Christopher M.; Cheng, Yajun; Leigh, Stefan D.; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Lin, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of materials developed for medical usage frequently includes studies in which the materials are inoculated with bacteria in order to assess bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Observed differences in bacterial growth are typically considered to be due to the material or the incubation conditions. To our knowledge, the method used to prepare the materials has generally not been considered with regard to its influence on bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to determine the effects that various preparation methods exert on bacterial colonization of polymer disks. Polymer disks of the same dimethacrylate composition were photopolymerized: (1) between untreated glass slides, (2) between polyester release film, (3) between glass slides treated with an alkyl silane, (4) between glass slides treated with a perfluorinated silane, or (5) with one free surface in an argon-purged chamber. Surface chemistry was quantified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, hydrophobicity was assessed by water contact angle, and topography was characterized using atomic force microscopy. The disks were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans for 4 h, fixed, and visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Differences among all groups were found with regard to surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, topography, and bacteria morphology, density, and coverage, indicating that the method of sample preparation strongly affects both the surface properties and the initial bacterial colonization. Polymerization on untreated slides was selected as the preferred method of preparation due to minimal material transfer to the polymer and consistent, reproducible bacterial colonization. PMID:19839634

  3. A model for Vibrio cholerae colonization of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Anna Maria; Dirita, Victor; Kirschner, Denise

    2011-11-21

    Vibrio cholerae is a strict human pathogen that causes the disease cholera. It is an old-world pathogen that has re-emerged as a new threat since the early 1990s. V. cholerae colonizes the upper, small intestine where it produces a toxin that leads to watery diarrhea, characterizing the disease (Kahn et al., 1988). The dynamics of colonization by the bacteria of the intestines are largely unknown. Although a large initial infectious dose is required for infection, data suggests that only a smaller sub-population colonizes a portion of the small bowel leading to disease. There are many barriers to colonization in the intestines including peristalsis, fluid wash-out, viscosity of the mucus layer, and pH. We are interested in identifying the mechanisms that allow this sub-population of bacteria to survive and colonize the intestines when faced with these barriers. To elaborate the dynamics of V. cholerae infection, we have developed a mathematical model based on a convection-diffusion-reaction-swimming equation capturing bacterial dynamics coupled with Stokes equations governing fluid velocity where we developed a novel non-local boundary condition. Our results indicate that both host and bacterial factors contribute to bacterial density in the gut. Host factors include intestinal diffusion and convection rates while bacterial factors include adherence, motility and growth rates. This model can ultimately be used to test therapeutic strategies against V. cholerae.

  4. Determinants and Duration of Impact of Early Gut Bacterial Colonization.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Christine Ann

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies show low diversity of the gut microbiome in those with chronic diseases such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and allergy. Manipulation of the microbiota may promote health. However, the adult microbiota is stable and may be difficult to change. Understanding the fixed and modifiable factors, which determine colonization in early life, may provide strategies for acquisition of a health-promoting microbiome. Not enough is known about the long-term effects of established determinants of gut colonization, including delivery mode, perinatal antibiotics, and infant diet. It has been suggested that weaning onto solid diet containing non-digestible carbohydrates and cessation of breastfeeding are key stages in the colonization process. In addition, the microbiome of the placenta, amniotic fluid, and breast milk, alongside vaginal and fecal bacteria, may aid the transfer of maternal bacteria to the infant. However, methodological issues such as contamination during collection and/or analysis should be considered. Key Messages: The factors determining early colonization are becoming more evident. However, longitudinal studies of microbiome maturation into late childhood and adulthood are required. The nutrition and health status of the mother before, during, and after birth may be major factors in the early colonization of the infant. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Global discovery of colonization determinants in the squid symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, John F.; Gyllborg, Mattias C.; Cronin, David C.; Quillin, Sarah J.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Foxall, Randi; Whistler, Cheryl; Goodman, Andrew L.; Mandel, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Animal epithelial tissue becomes reproducibly colonized by specific environmental bacteria. The bacteria (microbiota) perform critical functions for the host’s tissue development, immune system development, and nutrition; yet the processes by which bacterial diversity in the environment is selected to assemble the correct communities in the host are unclear. To understand the molecular determinants of microbiota selection, we examined colonization of a simplified model in which the light organ of Euprymna scolopes squid is colonized exclusively by Vibrio fischeri bacteria. We applied high-throughput insertion sequencing to identify which bacterial genes are required during host colonization. A library of over 41,000 unique transposon insertions was analyzed before and after colonization of 1,500 squid hatchlings. Mutants that were reproducibly depleted following squid colonization represented 380 genes, including 37 that encode known colonization factors. Validation of select mutants in defined competitions against the wild-type strain identified nine mutants that exhibited a reproducible colonization defect. Some of the colonization factors identified included genes predicted to influence copper regulation and secretion. Other mutants exhibited defects in biofilm development, which is required for aggregation in host mucus and initiation of colonization. Biofilm formation in culture and in vivo was abolished in a strain lacking the cytoplasmic chaperone DnaJ, suggesting an important role for protein quality control during the elaboration of bacterial biofilm in the context of an intact host immune system. Overall these data suggest that cellular stress responses and biofilm regulation are critical processes underlying the reproducible colonization of animal hosts by specific microbial symbionts. PMID:25404340

  6. Global discovery of colonization determinants in the squid symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John F; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Cronin, David C; Quillin, Sarah J; Mallama, Celeste A; Foxall, Randi; Whistler, Cheryl; Goodman, Andrew L; Mandel, Mark J

    2014-12-02

    Animal epithelial tissue becomes reproducibly colonized by specific environmental bacteria. The bacteria (microbiota) perform critical functions for the host's tissue development, immune system development, and nutrition; yet the processes by which bacterial diversity in the environment is selected to assemble the correct communities in the host are unclear. To understand the molecular determinants of microbiota selection, we examined colonization of a simplified model in which the light organ of Euprymna scolopes squid is colonized exclusively by Vibrio fischeri bacteria. We applied high-throughput insertion sequencing to identify which bacterial genes are required during host colonization. A library of over 41,000 unique transposon insertions was analyzed before and after colonization of 1,500 squid hatchlings. Mutants that were reproducibly depleted following squid colonization represented 380 genes, including 37 that encode known colonization factors. Validation of select mutants in defined competitions against the wild-type strain identified nine mutants that exhibited a reproducible colonization defect. Some of the colonization factors identified included genes predicted to influence copper regulation and secretion. Other mutants exhibited defects in biofilm development, which is required for aggregation in host mucus and initiation of colonization. Biofilm formation in culture and in vivo was abolished in a strain lacking the cytoplasmic chaperone DnaJ, suggesting an important role for protein quality control during the elaboration of bacterial biofilm in the context of an intact host immune system. Overall these data suggest that cellular stress responses and biofilm regulation are critical processes underlying the reproducible colonization of animal hosts by specific microbial symbionts.

  7. What determines sclerobiont colonization on marine mollusk shells?

    PubMed Central

    José Macedo, Alexandre; Muxagata, Erik; Erthal, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Empty mollusk shells may act as colonization surfaces for sclerobionts depending on the physical, chemical, and biological attributes of the shells. However, the main factors that can affect the establishment of an organism on hard substrates and the colonization patterns on modern and time-averaged shells remain unclear. Using experimental and field approaches, we compared sclerobiont (i.e., bacteria and invertebrate) colonization patterns on the exposed shells (internal and external sides) of three bivalve species (Anadara brasiliana, Mactra isabelleana, and Amarilladesma mactroides) with different external shell textures. In addition, we evaluated the influence of the host characteristics (mode of life, body size, color alteration, external and internal ornamentation and mineralogy) of sclerobionts on dead mollusk shells (bivalve and gastropod) collected from the Southern Brazilian coast. Finally, we compared field observations with experiments to evaluate how the biological signs of the present-day invertebrate settlements are preserved in molluscan death assemblages (incipient fossil record) in a subtropical shallow coastal setting. The results enhance our understanding of sclerobiont colonization over modern and paleoecology perspectives. The data suggest that sclerobiont settlement is enhanced by (i) high(er) biofilm bacteria density, which is more attracted to surfaces with high ornamentation; (ii) heterogeneous internal and external shell surface; (iii) shallow infaunal or attached epifaunal life modes; (iv) colorful or post-mortem oxidized shell surfaces; (v) shell size (<50 mm2 or >1,351 mm2); and (vi) calcitic mineralogy. Although the biofilm bacteria density, shell size, and texture are considered the most important factors, the effects of other covarying attributes should also be considered. We observed a similar pattern of sclerobiont colonization frequency over modern and paleoecology perspectives, with an increase of invertebrates occurring on

  8. What determines sclerobiont colonization on marine mollusk shells?

    PubMed

    Ochi Agostini, Vanessa; Ritter, Matias do Nascimento; José Macedo, Alexandre; Muxagata, Erik; Erthal, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Empty mollusk shells may act as colonization surfaces for sclerobionts depending on the physical, chemical, and biological attributes of the shells. However, the main factors that can affect the establishment of an organism on hard substrates and the colonization patterns on modern and time-averaged shells remain unclear. Using experimental and field approaches, we compared sclerobiont (i.e., bacteria and invertebrate) colonization patterns on the exposed shells (internal and external sides) of three bivalve species (Anadara brasiliana, Mactra isabelleana, and Amarilladesma mactroides) with different external shell textures. In addition, we evaluated the influence of the host characteristics (mode of life, body size, color alteration, external and internal ornamentation and mineralogy) of sclerobionts on dead mollusk shells (bivalve and gastropod) collected from the Southern Brazilian coast. Finally, we compared field observations with experiments to evaluate how the biological signs of the present-day invertebrate settlements are preserved in molluscan death assemblages (incipient fossil record) in a subtropical shallow coastal setting. The results enhance our understanding of sclerobiont colonization over modern and paleoecology perspectives. The data suggest that sclerobiont settlement is enhanced by (i) high(er) biofilm bacteria density, which is more attracted to surfaces with high ornamentation; (ii) heterogeneous internal and external shell surface; (iii) shallow infaunal or attached epifaunal life modes; (iv) colorful or post-mortem oxidized shell surfaces; (v) shell size (<50 mm2 or >1,351 mm2); and (vi) calcitic mineralogy. Although the biofilm bacteria density, shell size, and texture are considered the most important factors, the effects of other covarying attributes should also be considered. We observed a similar pattern of sclerobiont colonization frequency over modern and paleoecology perspectives, with an increase of invertebrates occurring on

  9. Keep Colon Cancer At Bay

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164231.html Keep Colon Cancer at Bay Colonoscopy best way to detect disease ... 22, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Colon cancer can be treated and cured if it's diagnosed ...

  10. Chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-bacteria associations.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Birgit E; Hynes, Michael F; Alexandre, Gladys M

    2016-04-01

    Beneficial plant-microbe associations play critical roles in plant health. Bacterial chemotaxis provides a competitive advantage to motile flagellated bacteria in colonization of plant root surfaces, which is a prerequisite for the establishment of beneficial associations. Chemotaxis signaling enables motile soil bacteria to sense and respond to gradients of chemical compounds released by plant roots. This process allows bacteria to actively swim towards plant roots and is thus critical for competitive root surface colonization. The complete genome sequences of several plant-associated bacterial species indicate the presence of multiple chemotaxis systems and a large number of chemoreceptors. Further, most soil bacteria are motile and capable of chemotaxis, and chemotaxis-encoding genes are enriched in the bacteria found in the rhizosphere compared to the bulk soil. This review compares the architecture and diversity of chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-associated bacteria and discusses their relevance to the rhizosphere lifestyle. While it is unclear how controlling chemotaxis via multiple parallel chemotaxis systems provides a competitive advantage to certain bacterial species, the presence of a larger number of chemoreceptors is likely to contribute to the ability of motile bacteria to survive in the soil and to compete for root surface colonization.

  11. Colon diverticula - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100158.htm Colon diverticula - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 6 Go to slide 2 ...

  12. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Mohamed Ali, Elouer; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome. PMID:23785565

  13. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Ali, Elouer Mohamed; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome.

  14. Colonic Spirochetosis in a 60-Year-Old Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Taiwo; Peng, Jennifer L.; Choi, Euna; Tayarachakul, Sucharat; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2016-01-01

    Spirochetes, a genetically and morphologically distinct group of bacteria, are thin, spiral-shaped, and highly motile. They are known causes of several human diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever, and leptospirosis. We report a case of colonic spirochetosis in a healthy patient presenting for surveillance colonoscopy. The diagnosis of intestinal spirochetosis was made accidentally during the histological examination of colonic polyps, which were removed during colonoscopy. We also performed an extensive review on intestinal spirochetosis with a focus on clinical presentation and outcomes of reported cases from the past two decades. PMID:27570780

  15. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enema (ACE) Surgery Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ... Email Print What is antegrade colonic enema (ACE) surgery? Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ...

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yashuan; Marks, Laura R.; Pettigrew, Melinda M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over one million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease is not yet clear. Pneumococci in biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and this phenotype can be recapitulated when pneumococci are grown on respiratory epithelial cells under conditions found in the nasopharyngeal environment. Pneumococcal biofilms display lower levels of virulence in vivo and provide an optimal environment for increased genetic exchange both in vitro and in vivo, with increased natural transformation seen during co-colonization with multiple strains. Biofilms have also been detected on mucosal surfaces during pneumonia and middle ear infection, although the role of these biofilms in the disease process is debated. Recent studies have shown that changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by concomitant virus infection, changes in the microflora, inflammation, or other host assaults trigger active release of pneumococci from biofilms. These dispersed bacteria have distinct phenotypic properties and transcriptional profiles different from both biofilm and broth-grown, planktonic bacteria, resulting in a significantly increased virulence in vivo. In this review we discuss the properties of pneumococcal biofilms, the role of biofilm formation during pneumococcal colonization, including their propensity for increased ability to exchange genetic material, as well as mechanisms involved in transition from asymptomatic biofilm colonization to dissemination and disease of otherwise sterile sites. Greater understanding of pneumococcal biofilm

  17. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  18. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR.

    PubMed

    O'Brien Andersen, L; Karim, A B; Roager, H M; Vigsnæs, L K; Krogfelt, K A; Licht, T R; Stensvold, C R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis-positive (D+)/negative (D-), and split into four groups of 21 samples (B+ D+, B+ D-, B- D+, and B- D-). Quantitative PCR targeting the six bacterial taxa Bacteroides, Prevotella, the butyrate-producing clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, and the indigenous group of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), and this association was even more significant when comparing all parasite-positive samples with parasite-negative samples (P < 0.001). Additionally, our data revealed that a low abundance of Prevotella and a higher abundance of Clostridial cluster XIVa was associated with parasite-negative samples (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Our data support the theory that Blastocystis alone or combined with D. fragilis is associated with gut microbiota characterized by low relative abundances of Bacteroides and Clostridial cluster XIVa and high levels of Prevotella.

  19. Genome sequence of the leaf-colonizing Bacterium Bacillus sp. strain 5B6, isolated from a cherry tree.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Kwon; Chung, Joon-hui; Kim, Seon-Young; Jeong, Haeyoung; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Lee, Choong Hoon; Song, Ju Yeon; Yu, Dong Su; Ryu, Choong-Min; Kim, Jihyun F

    2012-07-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria colonize various habitats, including the phyllosphere. Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. strain 5B6, which was isolated from the leaf of a cherry tree. The 3.9-Mb genome uncovers its potential for understanding the nature of leaf colonization as well as antibiosis against plant pathogens.

  20. Bacillus subtilis Early Colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots Involves Multiple Chemotaxis Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Allard-Massicotte, Rosalie; Tessier, Laurence; Lécuyer, Frédéric; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Lucier, Jean-François; Garneau, Daniel; Caudwell, Larissa; Vlamakis, Hera; Bais, Harsh P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colonization of plant roots by Bacillus subtilis is mutually beneficial to plants and bacteria. Plants can secrete up to 30% of their fixed carbon via root exudates, thereby feeding the bacteria, and in return the associated B. subtilis bacteria provide the plant with many growth-promoting traits. Formation of a biofilm on the root by matrix-producing B. subtilis is a well-established requirement for long-term colonization. However, we observed that cells start forming a biofilm only several hours after motile cells first settle on the plant. We also found that intact chemotaxis machinery is required for early root colonization by B. subtilis and for plant protection. Arabidopsis thaliana root exudates attract B. subtilis in vitro, an activity mediated by the two characterized chemoreceptors, McpB and McpC, as well as by the orphan receptor TlpC. Nonetheless, bacteria lacking these chemoreceptors are still able to colonize the root, suggesting that other chemoreceptors might also play a role in this process. These observations suggest that A. thaliana actively recruits B. subtilis through root-secreted molecules, and our results stress the important roles of B. subtilis chemoreceptors for efficient colonization of plants in natural environments. These results demonstrate a remarkable strategy adapted by beneficial rhizobacteria to utilize carbon-rich root exudates, which may facilitate rhizobacterial colonization and a mutualistic association with the host. PMID:27899502

  1. The role of motility and chemotaxis in the bacterial colonization of protected surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tamar, Einat; Koler, Moriah; Vaknin, Ady

    2016-01-01

    Internal epithelial surfaces in humans are both oxygenated and physically protected by a few hundred microns thick hydrogel mucosal layer, conditions that might support bacterial aerotaxis. However, the potential role of aerotaxis in crossing such a thin hydrogel layer is not clear. Here, we used a new setup to study the potential role of motility and chemotaxis in the bacterial colonization of surfaces covered by a thin hydrogel layer and subjected to a vertical oxygen gradient. Using the bacterium Escherichia coli, we show that both non-motile and motile-but-non-chemotactic bacteria could barely reach the surface. However, an acquired mutation in the non-chemotactic bacteria that altered their inherent swimming behavior led to a critical enhancement of surface colonization. Most chemotactic strains accumulated within the bulk of the hydrogel layer, except for the MG1655 strain, which showed a unique tendency to accumulate directly at the oxygenated surface and thus exhibited distinctly enhanced colonization. Even after a long period of bacterial growth, non-motile bacteria could not colonize the hydrogel. Thus, switching motility, which can be spontaneously acquired or altered in vivo, is critical for the colonization of such protected surfaces, whereas aerotaxis capacity clearly expedites surface colonization, and can lead to diverse colonization patterns. PMID:26792493

  2. [Spectrum and susceptibility of preoperative conjunctival bacteria].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rubio, M E; Cuesta-Rodríguez, T; Urcelay-Segura, J L; Cortés-Valdés, C

    2013-12-01

    To describe the conjunctival bacterial spectrum of our patients undergoing intraocular surgery and their antibiotic sensitivity during the study period. A retrospective study of preoperative conjunctival culture of patients consecutively scheduled for intraocular surgery from 21 February 2011 to 1 April 2013. Specimens were directly seeded onto blood-agar and MacConkey-agar (aerobiosis incubation, 2 days), and on chocolate-agar (6% CO2 incubation, 7 days). The identified bacteria were divided into 3 groups according to their origin; the bacteria susceptibility tests were performed on those more pathogenic and on some of the less pathogenic when more than 5 colonies were isolated. The sensitivity of the exigent growing bacteria was obtained with disk diffusion technique, and for of the non-exigent bacteria by determining their minimum inhibitory concentration. The Epidat 3.1 program was used for statistical calculations. A total of 13,203 bacteria were identified in 6,051 cultures, with 88.7% being typical colonizers of conjunctiva (group 1), 8.8% typical of airways (group 2), and the remaining 2.5% of undetermined origin (group 3). 530 cultures (8.8%) were sterile. The sensitivity of group 1 was: 99% vancomycin, 95% rifampicin, 87% chloramphenicol, 76% tetracycline. Levels of co-trimoxazole, aminoglycosides, quinolones, β-lactams and macrolides decreased since 2007. The group 2 was very sensitive to chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanate. In group 3, to levofloxacin 93%, ciprofloxacin 89%, tobramycin 76%, but ceftazidime 53% and cefuroxime 29% decreased. None of the tested antibiotics could eradicate all possible conjunctival bacteria. Bacteria living permanently on the conjunctiva (group 1) have achieved higher resistance than the eventual colonizers. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Automatic segmentation of the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Christopher L.; Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.

    1999-05-01

    Virtual colonoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that enables detection of colorectal polyps and cancer. Normally, a patient's bowel is prepared with colonic lavage and gas insufflation prior to computed tomography (CT) scanning. An important step for 3D analysis of the image volume is segmentation of the colon. The high-contrast gas/tissue interface that exists in the colon lumen makes segmentation of the majority of the colon relatively easy; however, two factors inhibit automatic segmentation of the entire colon. First, the colon is not the only gas-filled organ in the data volume: lungs, small bowel, and stomach also meet this criteria. User-defined seed points placed in the colon lumen have previously been required to spatially isolate only the colon. Second, portions of the colon lumen may be obstructed by peristalsis, large masses, and/or residual feces. These complicating factors require increased user interaction during the segmentation process to isolate additional colon segments. To automate the segmentation of the colon, we have developed a method to locate seed points and segment the gas-filled lumen with no user supervision. We have also developed an automated approach to improve lumen segmentation by digitally removing residual contrast-enhanced fluid resulting from a new bowel preparation that liquefies and opacifies any residual feces.

  4. Isolation and identification of amylase-producing, endospore-forming bacteria from the alimentary tract of commercially processed broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cultures of crop and cecal contents of adult poultry contain beneficial bacteria that reduce colonization of young poultry by Salmonella. Since endospore-forming bacteria may play a role in competitive exclusion of Salmonella in poultry, 3 trials were conducted to isolate these bacteria fr...

  5. The gut microbiome modulates colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zackular, Joseph P; Baxter, Nielson T; Iverson, Kathryn D; Sadler, William D; Petrosino, Joseph F; Chen, Grace Y; Schloss, Patrick D

    2013-11-05

    Recent studies have shown that individuals with colorectal cancer have an altered gut microbiome compared to healthy controls. It remains unclear whether these differences are a response to tumorigenesis or actively drive tumorigenesis. To determine the role of the gut microbiome in the development of colorectal cancer, we characterized the gut microbiome in a murine model of inflammation-associated colorectal cancer that mirrors what is seen in humans. We followed the development of an abnormal microbial community structure associated with inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon. Tumor-bearing mice showed enrichment in operational taxonomic units (OTUs) affiliated with members of the Bacteroides, Odoribacter, and Akkermansia genera and decreases in OTUs affiliated with members of the Prevotellaceae and Porphyromonadaceae families. Conventionalization of germfree mice with microbiota from tumor-bearing mice significantly increased tumorigenesis in the colon compared to that for animals colonized with a healthy gut microbiome from untreated mice. Furthermore, at the end of the model, germfree mice colonized with microbiota from tumor-bearing mice harbored a higher relative abundance of populations associated with tumor formation in conventional animals. Manipulation of the gut microbiome with antibiotics resulted in a dramatic decrease in both the number and size of tumors. Our results demonstrate that changes in the gut microbiome associated with inflammation and tumorigenesis directly contribute to tumorigenesis and suggest that interventions affecting the composition of the microbiome may be a strategy to prevent the development of colon cancer. The trillions of bacteria that live in the gut, known collectively as the gut microbiome, are important for normal functioning of the intestine. There is now growing evidence that disruptive changes in the gut microbiome are strongly associated with the development colorectal cancer. However, how the gut microbiome

  6. Angiodysplasias of the colon.

    PubMed Central

    Pounder, D J; Rowland, R; Pieterse, A S; Freeman, R; Hunter, R

    1982-01-01

    We studied 14 large bowel resections from patients with a provisional clinical diagnosis of a bleeding vascular lesion of the colon. For the purpose of this study we developed a barium-gelatine vascular injection technique. Six of the 14 cases were proven to be angiodysplasias with an identifiable mucosal vascular ectasia. The pathological findings in these six cases are described. We conclude that angiodysplasia represent a significant cause of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the elderly. It is our opinion that only the mucosa vascular ectasia seen in these cases is histologically diagnostic and that sub-mucosal venous ectasia, while characteristic of angiodysplasia, is non-specific. the differential diagnostic features which will allow the histological distinction of angiodysplasia from other vascular lesions of the colon are discussed. Images PMID:6980903

  7. Identification of Commensal Escherichia coli Genes Involved in Biofilm Resistance to Pathogen Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Da Re, Sandra; Valle, Jaione; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Beloin, Christophe; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Faure, Philippe; Turlin, Evelyne; Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Renauld-Mongénie, Geneviève; Forestier, Christiane; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Protection provided by host bacterial microbiota against microbial pathogens is a well known but ill-understood property referred to as the barrier effect, or colonization resistance. Despite recent genome-wide analyses of host microbiota and increasing therapeutic interest, molecular analysis of colonization resistance is hampered by the complexity of direct in vivo experiments. Here we developed an in vitro-to-in vivo approach to identification of genes involved in resistance of commensal bacteria to exogenous pathogens. We analyzed genetic responses induced in commensal Escherichia coli upon entry of a diarrheagenic enteroaggregative E. coli or an unrelated Klebsiella pneumoniae pathogen into a biofilm community. We showed that pathogens trigger specific responses in commensal bacteria and we identified genes involved in limiting colonization of incoming pathogens within commensal biofilm. We tested the in vivo relevance of our findings by comparing the extent of intestinal colonization by enteroaggregative E. coli and K. pneumoniae pathogens in mice pre-colonized with E. coli wild type commensal strain, or mutants corresponding to identified colonization resistance genes. We demonstrated that the absence of yiaF and bssS (yceP) differentially alters pathogen colonization in the mouse gut. This study therefore identifies previously uncharacterized colonization resistance genes and provides new approaches to unravelling molecular aspects of commensal/pathogen competitive interactions. PMID:23667443

  8. Difficult colon polypectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vormbrock, Klaus; Mönkemüller, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the world. We now know that 90% of CRC develop from adenomatous polyps. Polypectomy of colon adenomas leads to a significant reduction in the incidence of CRC. At present most of the polyps are removed endoscopically. The vast majority of colorectal polyps identified at colonoscopy are small and do not pose a significant challenge for resection to an appropriately trained and skilled endoscopist. Advanced polypectomy techniques are intended for the removal of difficult colon polyps. We have defined a “difficult polyp” as any lesion that due to its size, shape or location represents a challenge for the colonoscopist to remove. Although many “difficult polyps” will be an easy target for the advanced endoscopist, polyps that are larger than 15 mm, have a large pedicle, are flat and extended, are difficult to see or are located in the cecum or any angulated portion of the colon should be always considered difficult. Although very successful, advanced resection techniques can potentially cause serious, even life-threatening complications. Moreover, post polypectomy complications are more common in the presence of difficult polyps. Therefore, any endoscopist attempting advanced polypectomy techniques should be adequately supervised by an expert or have an excellent training in interventional endoscopy. This review describes several useful tips and tricks to deal with difficult polyps. PMID:22816006

  9. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  10. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  11. Colonic intussusception in descending colon: An unusual presentation of colon lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Bagherzadeh Saba, Reza; Sadeghi, Amir; Rad, Neda; Safari, Mohammad Taghi; Barzegar, Farnoush

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas of the colon are relatively rare benign soft tissue tumors derived from mature adipocytes of mesenchymatic origin. During colonoscopy, surgery or autopsy they are generally discovered incidentally. Most cases are asymptomatic, with a small tumor size, and do not need any special treatment. However, in the cases with larger in size of tumor some symptoms such as anemia, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, bleeding, or intussusception may be presented. We reported a 47-year-old woman with colonic intussusception in the descending colon caused by colonic lipoma and diagnosed after surgical exploration for obstructive colonic mass. PMID:28224035

  12. Phylloepiphytic interaction between bacteria and different plant species in a tropical agricultural system.

    PubMed

    Baldotto, Lílian Estrela Borges; Olivares, Fábio Lopes

    2008-11-01

    Plant surfaces are a favourable niche for bacterial establishment, and hypothetically, plant species differ in their capacity to harbour epiphytic bacterial communities. This study was conducted to evaluate and describe the structural relationship of a bacterial community at the phyllosphere level with different plant species in a tropical ecosystem. Leaf blades of 47 plant species distributed in 27 botanical families were collected on a typical small Brazilian farm and prepared for observation under light and scanning electron microscopy. Naturally occurring bacteria were the most abundant settlers of the phylloplane, followed by fungal spore or hyphae. All plant species studied were colonized by phylloepiphytic bacteria, which were observed as solitary cells, microcolonies, and biofilms. However, independent of the family, the plant species differed in the pattern of phyllosphere colonization, as reflected in bacteria frequency and presence or absence of anatomical features that would favour the association. The phylloepiphytic bacteria were preferentially established on the following sites: epidermal cell wall junctions, glandular and nonglandular trichomes, veins, stomata, and epidermal cell wall surface. Profuse bacteria and fungi colonization was observed, at a level that was at least comparable with temperate regions. Interestingly, fungi seemed to alter the bacteria colonization pattern, most probably by microenvironmental modifications. The trichome type and density as well as the presence of epicuticular wax on the leaf blade surface seemed to be the most determinant anatomical features for the pattern of phyllosphere colonization. The presence of trichomes has a favourable, and epicuticular wax an unfavourable influence on the plant-bacteria interaction.

  13. Evaluating and managing open skin wounds: colonization versus infection.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Annette B

    2002-08-01

    Open skin wounds are colonized with bacteria, and optimal wound care is required to prevent progression to infection. Intact skin normally provides protection from external environmental assaults. Disruption of the skin or tissue creating an open skin wound can result in infection, dehydration, hypothermia, scarring, compromised immunity, and changes in body image. Biofilms and bacterial genomics are areas of intense scientific investigation in the face of the emerging threat of bacterial resistance. Optimal wound care to prevent progression from colonization to infection remains the foundation of good clinical practice. On the basis of wound conditions, cleansing, debridement, measures to increase oxygenation and perfusion, adequate nutrition, and appropriate use of topical agents and antibiotics, when indicated, are the keys to managing open skin wounds. This article provides a targeted review of normal skin flora, wound healing, prevention of skin infection, colonization versus infection, biofilms, genomics and infectious disease, and management of open skin wounds.

  14. Rhizoremediation of lindane by root-colonizing Sphingomonas.

    PubMed

    Böltner, Dietmar; Godoy, Patricia; Muñoz-Rojas, Jesús; Duque, Estrella; Moreno-Morillas, Silvia; Sánchez, Lourdes; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2008-01-01

    We used a two-step enrichment approach to isolate root-colonizing hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-degrading microorganisms. The first step consists of the use of classical liquid enrichment to isolate γ-HCH degraders. The γ-HCH-degrading microbes were attached in mass to corn seeds sown in soil with γ-HCH, and after plant development we rescued bacteria growing on root tips. Bacteria were then subjected to a second enrichment round in which growth on liquid medium with γ-HCH and inoculation of corn seeds were repeated. We then isolated bacteria on M9 minimal medium with γ-HCH from root tips. We were able to isolate four Sphingomonas strains, all of which degraded α-, β-, γ- and δ-HCH. Two of the strains were particularly good colonizers of corn roots, reaching high cell density in vegetated soil and partly removing γ-HCH. In contrast, these bacteria performed poorly in unplanted soils. This study supports the hypothesis that the removal of persistent toxic chemicals can be accelerated by combinations of plants and bacteria, a process generally known as rhizoremediation.

  15. Microbiota-mediated colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacteria inhabit mucosal and epidermal surfaces in mice and humans, and have effects on metabolic and immune pathways in their hosts. Recent studies indicate that the commensal microbiota can be manipulated to prevent and even to cure infections that are caused by pathogenic bacteria, particularly pathogens that are broadly resistant to antibiotics, such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium difficile. In this Review, we discuss how immune- mediated colonization resistance against antibiotic-resistant intestinal pathogens is influenced by the composition of the commensal microbiota. We also review recent advances characterizing the ability of different commensal bacterial families, genera and species to restore colonization resistance to intestinal pathogens in antibiotic-treated hosts. PMID:24096337

  16. Nitrogen acquisition in Agave tequilana from degradation of endophytic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Beltran-Garcia, Miguel J.; White, Jr., James F.; Prado, Fernanda M.; Prieto, Katia R.; Yamaguchi, Lydia F.; Torres, Monica S.; Kato, Massuo J.; Medeiros, Marisa H. G.; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Plants form symbiotic associations with endophytic bacteria within tissues of leaves, stems, and roots. It is unclear whether or how plants obtain nitrogen from these endophytic bacteria. Here we present evidence showing nitrogen flow from endophytic bacteria to plants in a process that appears to involve oxidative degradation of bacteria. In our experiments we employed Agave tequilana and its seed-transmitted endophyte Bacillus tequilensis to elucidate organic nitrogen transfer from 15N-labeled bacteria to plants. Bacillus tequilensis cells grown in a minimal medium with 15NH4Cl as the nitrogen source were watered onto plants growing in sand. We traced incorporation of 15N into tryptophan, deoxynucleosides and pheophytin derived from chlorophyll a. Probes for hydrogen peroxide show its presence during degradation of bacteria in plant tissues, supporting involvement of reactive oxygen in the degradation process. In another experiment to assess nitrogen absorbed as a result of endophytic colonization of plants we demonstrated that endophytic bacteria potentially transfer more nitrogen to plants and stimulate greater biomass in plants than heat-killed bacteria that do not colonize plants but instead degrade in the soil. Findings presented here support the hypothesis that some plants under nutrient limitation may degrade and obtain nitrogen from endophytic microbes. PMID:25374146

  17. Nitrogen acquisition in Agave tequilana from degradation of endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Garcia, Miguel J; White, James F; Prado, Fernanda M; Prieto, Katia R; Yamaguchi, Lydia F; Torres, Monica S; Kato, Massuo J; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-11-06

    Plants form symbiotic associations with endophytic bacteria within tissues of leaves, stems, and roots. It is unclear whether or how plants obtain nitrogen from these endophytic bacteria. Here we present evidence showing nitrogen flow from endophytic bacteria to plants in a process that appears to involve oxidative degradation of bacteria. In our experiments we employed Agave tequilana and its seed-transmitted endophyte Bacillus tequilensis to elucidate organic nitrogen transfer from (15)N-labeled bacteria to plants. Bacillus tequilensis cells grown in a minimal medium with (15)NH4Cl as the nitrogen source were watered onto plants growing in sand. We traced incorporation of (15)N into tryptophan, deoxynucleosides and pheophytin derived from chlorophyll a. Probes for hydrogen peroxide show its presence during degradation of bacteria in plant tissues, supporting involvement of reactive oxygen in the degradation process. In another experiment to assess nitrogen absorbed as a result of endophytic colonization of plants we demonstrated that endophytic bacteria potentially transfer more nitrogen to plants and stimulate greater biomass in plants than heat-killed bacteria that do not colonize plants but instead degrade in the soil. Findings presented here support the hypothesis that some plants under nutrient limitation may degrade and obtain nitrogen from endophytic microbes.

  18. High Life Expectancy of Bacteria on Lichens.

    PubMed

    Cernava, Tomislav; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Self-sustaining lichen symbioses potentially can become very old, sometimes even thousands of years in nature. In the joint structures, algal partners are sheltered between fungal structures that are externally colonized by bacterial communities. With this arrangement lichens survive long periods of drought, and lichen thalli can be revitalized even after decades of dry storage in a herbarium. To study the effects of long-term ex situ storage on viability of indigenous bacterial communities we comparatively studied herbarium-stored material of the lung lichen, Lobaria pulmonaria. We discovered that a significant fraction of the lichen-associated bacterial community survives herbarium storage of nearly 80 years, and living bacteria can still be found in even older material. As the bacteria reside in the upper surface layers of the lichen material, we argue that the extracellular polysaccharides of lichens contribute to superior life expectancy of bacteria. Deeper understanding of underlying mechanisms could provide novel possibilities for biotechnological applications.

  19. Spatial scales of interactions among bacteria and between bacteria and the leaf surface

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Daniel S.; Leveau, Johan H.J.; Meyer, Katrin M.; Wiegand, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Microbial life on plant leaves is characterized by a multitude of interactions between leaf colonizers and their environment. While the existence of many of these interactions has been confirmed, their spatial scale or reach often remained unknown. In this study, we applied spatial point pattern analysis to 244 distribution patterns of Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas syringae on bean leaves. The results showed that bacterial colonizers of leaves interact with their environment at different spatial scales. Interactions among bacteria were often confined to small spatial scales up to 5–20 μm, compared to interactions between bacteria and leaf surface structures such as trichomes which could be observed in excess of 100 μm. Spatial point-pattern analyses prove a comprehensive tool to determine the different spatial scales of bacterial interactions on plant leaves and will help microbiologists to better understand the interplay between these interactions. PMID:25764562

  20. Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization.

    PubMed

    Zipperer, Alexander; Konnerth, Martin C; Laux, Claudia; Berscheid, Anne; Janek, Daniela; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Burian, Marc; Schilling, Nadine A; Slavetinsky, Christoph; Marschal, Matthias; Willmann, Matthias; Kalbacher, Hubert; Schittek, Birgit; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Grond, Stephanie; Peschel, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard

    2016-07-28

    The vast majority of systemic bacterial infections are caused by facultative, often antibiotic-resistant, pathogens colonizing human body surfaces. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to invasive infection, but the mechanisms that permit or interfere with pathogen colonization are largely unknown. Whereas soil microbes are known to compete by production of antibiotics, such processes have rarely been reported for human microbiota. We show that nasal Staphylococcus lugdunensis strains produce lugdunin, a novel thiazolidine-containing cyclic peptide antibiotic that prohibits colonization by S. aureus, and a rare example of a non-ribosomally synthesized bioactive compound from human-associated bacteria. Lugdunin is bactericidal against major pathogens, effective in animal models, and not prone to causing development of resistance in S. aureus. Notably, human nasal colonization by S. lugdunensis was associated with a significantly reduced S. aureus carriage rate, suggesting that lugdunin or lugdunin-producing commensal bacteria could be valuable for preventing staphylococcal infections. Moreover, human microbiota should be considered as a source for new antibiotics.

  1. Regulatory Adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus during Nasal Colonization of Humans

    PubMed Central

    Burian, Marc; Wolz, Christiane; Goerke, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The nasopharynx is the main ecological niche of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Although colonization of the nares is asymptomatic, nasal carriage is a known risk factor for endogenous staphylococcal infection. We quantified S. aureus mRNA levels in nose swabs of persistent carriers to gain insight into the regulatory adaptation of the bacterium to the nasal environment. We could elucidate a general response of the pathogen to the surrounding milieu independent of the strain background or the human host. Colonizing bacteria preferentially express molecules necessary for tissue adherence or immune-evasion whereas toxins are down regulated. From the analysis of regulatory loci we found evidence for a predominate role of the essential two-component system WalKR of S. aureus. The results suggest that during persistent colonization the bacteria are metabolically active with a high cell surface turnover. The increased understanding of bacterial factors that maintain the colonization state can open new therapeutic options to control nasal carriage and subsequent infections. PMID:20386721

  2. Reduction of polymeric azo and nitro dyes by intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brown, J P

    1981-05-01

    The O(2)-sensitive reduction of high-molecular-weight aromatic azo and nitro dyes by intestinal bacteria appears to be mediated by low-molecular-weight electron carriers with E(o)' = -200 to -350 mV. This process may allow the design of polymeric azo prodrugs for specific release of certain aromatic amines in the colon.

  3. Conference on multicellular and interactive behavior of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This document provides abstracts for oral presentations at an American Society of Microbiology Conference on Multicellular and interactive behavior of bacteria. Sessions included: Cell to Cell interactions and exchange of genetic material; symbiotic interactions; multicellular aspects of pathogenesis; multicellular motility; developmental interactions; metabolic interactions; interactions in biofilms and surface colonization; pattern formation and colonial interactions.

  4. Structure, Function, and Assembly of Adhesive Organelles by Uropathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria assemble a wide range of adhesive proteins, termed adhesins, to mediate binding to receptors and colonization of surfaces. For pathogenic bacteria, adhesins are critical for early stages of infection, allowing the bacteria to initiate contact with host cells, colonize different tissues, and establish a foothold within the host. The adhesins expressed by a pathogen are also critical for bacterial-bacterial interactions and the formation of bacterial communities such as biofilms. The ability to adhere to host tissues is particularly important for bacteria that colonize sites such as the urinary tract, where the flow of urine functions to maintain sterility by washing away non-adherent pathogens. Adhesins vary from monomeric proteins that are directly anchored to the bacterial surface to polymeric, hairlike fibers that extend out from the cell surface. These latter fibers are termed pili or fimbriae, and were among the first identified virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Studies since then have identified a range of both pilus and non-pilus adhesins that contribute to bacterial colonization of the urinary tract, and have revealed molecular details of the structures, assembly pathways, and functions of these adhesive organelles. In this review, we describe the different types of adhesins expressed by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens, what is known about their structures, how they are assembled on the bacterial surface, and the functions of specific adhesins in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. PMID:26542038

  5. A novel autotransporter adhesin is required for efficient colonization during bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Matthew B; Lenz, Jonathan D; Miller, Virginia L

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins secreted by the type V secretion system (autotransporters) have been linked to virulence in gram-negative bacteria. Several putative conventional autotransporters are present in the Yersinia pestis genome, but only one, YapE, is conserved in the other pathogenic Yersinia species. Here, we introduce YapE and demonstrate that it is secreted via a type V mechanism. Inactivation of yapE in Y. pestis results in decreased efficiency in colonization of tissues during bubonic infection. Coinfection with wild-type bacteria only partially compensates for this defect. Analysis of the host immune response suggests that YapE is required for either efficient colonization at the inoculation site or dissemination to draining lymph nodes. YapE also demonstrates adhesive properties capable of mediating interactions with bacteria and eukaryotic cells. These findings support a role for YapE in modulating host-pathogen interactions that are important for colonization of the mammalian host.

  6. [Relation between natural bacterial colonization and adhesion to human buccal epithelium].

    PubMed

    Maianskiĭ, A N; Vorob'eva, O N; Malysheva, E F; Malyshev, Iu V

    1987-02-01

    As the results of the quantitative study of Streptococcus salivarius adhering to buccal epithelial cells, three levels of their natural colonization were established: low (less than 20 bacteria per epithelial cell), medium (20-50 bacteria), and high (more than 50 bacteria). The characteristics of natural colonization by S. salivarius inversely correlated with the resistance of epithelial cells to the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In the process of interaction with P. aeruginosa highly adhesive strain, S. salivarius, naturally colonizing the cells of the buccal epithelium, decreased in number 2-10 times up to complete desorption. These results may be regarded as the manifestation of one of the mechanisms regulating the microecological balance in the system of mucous membranes.

  7. Fungal infection of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Praneenararat, Surat

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its conclusions may be accessible for clinical application. PMID:25364269

  8. Advances in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    From May 29 to June 5, 2003, the American Society of Clinical Oncology held its 39th Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. The meeting was devoted to the presentation of advances in clinical sciences, diagnosis, prevention and management of malignant disorders, and brings together investigators, clinicians, policy makers and other professionals interested in the science and impact of cancer worldwide. This report will be presented in two parts, the first focusing of colon cancer, and the second on breast cancer will be published in the next issue of Drug News & Perspectives.

  9. Impact of lactate on growth of cultures of cecal bacteria from commercial broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultures of beneficial bacteria used in probiotics produce and utilize organic acids that may play a role in the ability of the cultures to inhibit colonization of poultry by enteropathogens. Cecal contents of adult poultry contain many of these beneficial bacteria, and earlier experiments showed th...

  10. Gut bacteria are rarely shared by co-hospitalized premature infants, regardless of necrotizing enterocolitis development.

    PubMed

    Raveh-Sadka, Tali; Thomas, Brian C; Singh, Andrea; Firek, Brian; Brooks, Brandon; Castelle, Cindy J; Sharon, Itai; Baker, Robyn; Good, Misty; Morowitz, Michael J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-03-03

    Premature infants are highly vulnerable to aberrant gastrointestinal tract colonization, a process that may lead to diseases like necrotizing enterocolitis. Thus, spread of potential pathogens among hospitalized infants is of great concern. Here, we reconstructed hundreds of high-quality genomes of microorganisms that colonized co-hospitalized premature infants, assessed their metabolic potential, and tracked them over time to evaluate bacterial strain dispersal among infants. We compared microbial communities in infants who did and did not develop necrotizing enterocolitis. Surprisingly, while potentially pathogenic bacteria of the same species colonized many infants, our genome-resolved analysis revealed that strains colonizing each baby were typically distinct. In particular, no strain was common to all infants who developed necrotizing enterocolitis. The paucity of shared gut colonizers suggests the existence of significant barriers to the spread of bacteria among infants. Importantly, we demonstrate that strain-resolved comprehensive community analysis can be accomplished on potentially medically relevant time scales.

  11. Prospective, Descriptive Study of Critically Colonized Venous Leg Ulcers Managed With Silver Containing Absorbent Dressings and Compression

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic non-healing venous ulcers are by their very nature colonized with bacteria. The amount and make up will vary based on many variables. The transition from colonization to contamination, critical colonization, and infection complicates the treatment of these ulcers. Silver has been shown to be an effective antimicrobial agent with a diverse antimicrobial footprint, minimal allergic reactions, and has been employed for over twenty-five years with little resistance being encountered. Based on these factors, this study was initiated to evaluate the impact of silver containing absorbent dressings on critically colonized venous leg ulcers. PMID:26199888

  12. Prospective, Descriptive Study of Critically Colonized Venous Leg Ulcers Managed With Silver Containing Absorbent Dressings and Compression.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael F

    2013-08-01

    Chronic non-healing venous ulcers are by their very nature colonized with bacteria. The amount and make up will vary based on many variables. The transition from colonization to contamination, critical colonization, and infection complicates the treatment of these ulcers. Silver has been shown to be an effective antimicrobial agent with a diverse antimicrobial footprint, minimal allergic reactions, and has been employed for over twenty-five years with little resistance being encountered. Based on these factors, this study was initiated to evaluate the impact of silver containing absorbent dressings on critically colonized venous leg ulcers.

  13. Microbial pathways in colonic sulfur metabolism and links with health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Benefiel, Ann C.; Alizadeh-Ghamsari, Amir H.; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur is both crucial to life and a potential threat to health. While colonic sulfur metabolism mediated by eukaryotic cells is relatively well studied, much less is known about sulfur metabolism within gastrointestinal microbes. Sulfated compounds in the colon are either of inorganic (e.g., sulfates, sulfites) or organic (e.g., dietary amino acids and host mucins) origin. The most extensively studied of the microbes involved in colonic sulfur metabolism are the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are common colonic inhabitants. Many other microbial pathways are likely to shape colonic sulfur metabolism as well as the composition and availability of sulfated compounds, and these interactions need to be examined in more detail. Hydrogen sulfide is the sulfur derivative that has attracted the most attention in the context of colonic health, and the extent to which it is detrimental or beneficial remains in debate. Several lines of evidence point to SRB or exogenous hydrogen sulfide as potential players in the etiology of intestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and colorectal cancer in particular. Generation of hydrogen sulfide via pathways other than dissimilatory sulfate reduction may be as, or more, important than those involving the SRB. We suggest here that a novel axis of research is to assess the effects of hydrogen sulfide in shaping colonic microbiome structure. Clearly, in-depth characterization of the microbial pathways involved in colonic sulfur metabolism is necessary for a better understanding of its contribution to colonic disorders and development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23226130

  14. Nasal Bacterial Colonization in Pediatric Epistaxis: The Role of Topical Antibacterial Treatment.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Çetinkol, Yeliz; Korkmaz, Hakan; Batmaz, Timur

    2016-03-01

    Epistaxis is a common problem in childhood. It has been shown that children with recurrent epistaxis are more likely to have nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus. It has been suggested that low-grade inflammation, crusting and increased vascularity due to bacterial colonization contributes to the development of epistaxis in children. This study aimed to investigate the nasal colonization and treatment outcome in pediatric epistaxis patients. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Charts of the pediatric patients referred to our university hospital otolaryngology outpatient clinics for the evaluation of epistaxis were reviewed. The patients whose nasal cultures had been taken at the first clinical visit comprised the study group. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria grown. The presence of crusting and hypervascularity was not dependent on the type of bacterial growth and there was no relation between hypervascularity and crusting of the nasal mucosa. Thirty-six patients were evaluated for the outcome analysis. Resolution of bleeding was not dependent on nasal colonization; in patients with colonization, there was no difference between topical antibacterial and non-antibacterial treatments. Despite the high colonization rates, topical antibacterial treatment was not found superior to non-antibacterial treatment. Our study does not support the belief that bacterial colonization results in hypervascularity of the septal mucosa causing epistaxis since no relation was found between nasal colonization, hypervascularity and crusting. The role of bacterial colonization in pediatric epistaxis need to be further investigated and treatment protocols must be determined accordingly.

  15. Cinnamate of inulin as a vehicle for delivery of colonic drugs.

    PubMed

    López-Molina, Dorotea; Chazarra, Soledad; How, Chee Wun; Pruidze, Nikolov; Navarro-Perán, Enma; García-Cánovas, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio; Rojas-Melgarejo, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2015-02-01

    Colon diseases are difficult to treat because oral administrated drugs are absorbed at the stomach and intestine levels and they do not reach colon; in addition, intravenous administrated drugs are eliminated from the body before reaching colon. Inulin is a naturally occurring polysaccharide found in many plants. It consists of β 2-1 linked D-fructose molecules having a glucosyl unit at the reducing end. Various inulin and dextran hydrogels have been developed that serve as potential carrier for introduction of drugs into the colon. Because inulin is not absorbed in the stomach or in the small intestine, and inulin is degraded by colonic bacteria, drugs encapsulated in inulin-coated vesicles could be specifically liberated in the colon. Therefore, the use of inulin-coated vesicles could represent an advance for the treatment of colon diseases. Here, we study the use of a cinnamoylated derivative of chicory inulin as a vehicle for the controlled delivery of colonic drugs. The encapsulation of methotrexate in inulin vesicles and its release and activity was studied in colon cancer cells in cultures.

  16. Nasal Bacterial Colonization in Pediatric Epistaxis: The Role of Topical Antibacterial Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Çetinkol, Yeliz; Korkmaz, Hakan; Batmaz, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epistaxis is a common problem in childhood. It has been shown that children with recurrent epistaxis are more likely to have nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus. It has been suggested that low-grade inflammation, crusting and increased vascularity due to bacterial colonization contributes to the development of epistaxis in children. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the nasal colonization and treatment outcome in pediatric epistaxis patients. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Charts of the pediatric patients referred to our university hospital otolaryngology outpatient clinics for the evaluation of epistaxis were reviewed. The patients whose nasal cultures had been taken at the first clinical visit comprised the study group. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria grown. The presence of crusting and hypervascularity was not dependent on the type of bacterial growth and there was no relation between hypervascularity and crusting of the nasal mucosa. Thirty-six patients were evaluated for the outcome analysis. Resolution of bleeding was not dependent on nasal colonization; in patients with colonization, there was no difference between topical antibacterial and non-antibacterial treatments. Conclusion: Despite the high colonization rates, topical antibacterial treatment was not found superior to non-antibacterial treatment. Our study does not support the belief that bacterial colonization results in hypervascularity of the septal mucosa causing epistaxis since no relation was found between nasal colonization, hypervascularity and crusting. The role of bacterial colonization in pediatric epistaxis need to be further investigated and treatment protocols must be determined accordingly. PMID:27403392

  17. Bacterial Colonization of Disposable Soft Contact Lenses Is Greater during Corneal Infiltrative Events than during Asymptomatic Extended Lens Wear

    PubMed Central

    Sankaridurg, Padmaja R.; Sharma, Savitri; Willcox, Mark; Naduvilath, Thomas J.; Sweeney, Deborah F.; Holden, Brien A.; Rao, Gullapalli N.

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms, especially gram-negative bacteria, are considered to play a role in the etiology of certain corneal infiltrative events (CIEs) observed during soft contact lens wear. This study explored the possibility of microbial colonization of soft contact lenses as a risk factor leading to CIEs. In a clinical trial conducted from March 1993 to January 1996, 330 subjects wore disposable soft contact lenses on a 6-night extended-wear and disposal schedule. During this period, 4,321 lenses (118 during CIEs; 4,203 during asymptomatic lens wear) were recovered aseptically and analyzed for microbial colonization. A greater percentage of lenses were free from microbial colonization during asymptomatic wear than during CIEs (42 versus 23%; P < 0.0001). The incidence of gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria and fungi was greater during CIEs than during asymptomatic lens wear (P < 0.05). During asymptomatic lens wear, gram-positive bacteria were isolated most frequently and were usually normal external ocular microbiota. Of the gram-positive bacteria, the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae was greater during CIE than during asymptomatic wear (7.6 versus 0.6%; P < 0.0001). While gram-negative bacteria were seen in few cases during asymptomatic wear, their incidence during CIE in comparison to asymptomatic wear was substantial and significant (23.7 versus 3.8%; P < 0.0001). Also, the level of colonization was high. Of CIEs, events of microbial keratitis, contact lens acute red eye, and asymptomatic infiltrative keratitis were associated with lens colonization with gram-negative bacteria or S. pneumoniae. Colonization of soft contact lenses with pathogenic bacteria, especially gram-negative bacteria and S. pneumoniae, appears to be a significant risk factor leading to CIE. PMID:11101574

  18. Bacterial colonization of disposable soft contact lenses is greater during corneal infiltrative events than during asymptomatic extended lens wear.

    PubMed

    Sankaridurg, P R; Sharma, S; Willcox, M; Naduvilath, T J; Sweeney, D F; Holden, B A; Rao, G N

    2000-12-01

    Microorganisms, especially gram-negative bacteria, are considered to play a role in the etiology of certain corneal infiltrative events (CIEs) observed during soft contact lens wear. This study explored the possibility of microbial colonization of soft contact lenses as a risk factor leading to CIEs. In a clinical trial conducted from March 1993 to January 1996, 330 subjects wore disposable soft contact lenses on a 6-night extended-wear and disposal schedule. During this period, 4,321 lenses (118 during CIEs; 4,203 during asymptomatic lens wear) were recovered aseptically and analyzed for microbial colonization. A greater percentage of lenses were free from microbial colonization during asymptomatic wear than during CIEs (42 versus 23%; P < 0.0001). The incidence of gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria and fungi was greater during CIEs than during asymptomatic lens wear (P < 0.05). During asymptomatic lens wear, gram-positive bacteria were isolated most frequently and were usually normal external ocular microbiota. Of the gram-positive bacteria, the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae was greater during CIE than during asymptomatic wear (7.6 versus 0.6%; P < 0. 0001). While gram-negative bacteria were seen in few cases during asymptomatic wear, their incidence during CIE in comparison to asymptomatic wear was substantial and significant (23.7 versus 3.8%; P < 0.0001). Also, the level of colonization was high. Of CIEs, events of microbial keratitis, contact lens acute red eye, and asymptomatic infiltrative keratitis were associated with lens colonization with gram-negative bacteria or S. pneumoniae. Colonization of soft contact lenses with pathogenic bacteria, especially gram-negative bacteria and S. pneumoniae, appears to be a significant risk factor leading to CIE.

  19. Endophytic colonization of olive roots by the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2008-05-01

    Confocal microscopy combined with three-dimensional olive root tissue sectioning was used to provide evidence of the endophytic behaviour of Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, an effective biocontrol strain against Verticillium wilt of olive. Two derivatives of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), the enhanced green and the red fluorescent proteins, have been used to visualize simultaneously two differently fluorescently tagged populations of P. fluorescens PICF7 within olive root tissues at the single cell level. The time-course of colonization events of olive roots cv. Arbequina by strain PICF7 and the localization of tagged bacteria within olive root tissues are described. First, bacteria rapidly colonized root surfaces and were predominantly found in the differentiation zone. Thereafter, microscopy observations showed that PICF7-tagged populations eventually disappeared from the root surface, and increasingly colonized inner root tissues. Localized and limited endophytic colonization by the introduced bacteria was observed over time. Fluorescent-tagged bacteria were always visualized in the intercellular spaces of the cortex region, and no colonization of the root xylem vessels was detected at any time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time this approach has been used to demonstrate endophytism of a biocontrol Pseudomonas spp. strain in a woody host such as olive using a nongnotobiotic system.

  20. Efficacy of titanium dioxide photocatalyst for inhibition of bacterial colonization on percutaneous implants.

    PubMed

    Oka, Yoshinobu; Kim, Wook-Cheol; Yoshida, Takashi; Hirashima, Toshiko; Mouri, Hisashi; Urade, Hidenori; Itoh, Yoshihisa; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of titanium dioxide photocatalyst in inhibition of bacterial colonization on percutaneous implants. Titanium dioxide photocatalyst was prepared by direct oxidization of pure titanium substrate, and a comparative study with pure titanium was performed. The bactericidal ability of the photocatalyst was examined using methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) suspensions in a colony-forming assay according to the Japanese Industrial Standards committee standard. After exposing the MRSA suspension on sample plates to ultraviolet A (UVA) light, the number of surviving bacteria was estimated. Next, an animal model for inhibition of colonization was examined in vivo. Pins were inserted into the femurs of rabbits, were infected with 10(8) colony-forming units of MRSA suspension, and were illuminated with UVA light for 60 min daily; the number of colonizing bacteria was estimated after 7 days. The bactericidal ability of the photocatalyst was apparent after 60 min, when the bacteria had almost disappeared. The number of colonizing bacteria on photocatalytic pins was decreased significantly in vivo. The photocatalyst was effective even against resistant bacterial colonization. Clinically, the incidence of percutaneous implant infection such as pin tract infection in external fixation could be reduced using the titanium photocatalyst.

  1. Sialic Acid Transport Contributes to Pneumococcal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Carolyn; Burnaugh, Amanda M.; Woodiga, Shireen A.; King, Samantha J.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia and meningitis. Airway colonization is a necessary precursor to disease, but little is known about how the bacteria establish and maintain colonization. Carbohydrates are required as a carbon source for pneumococcal growth and, therefore, for colonization. Free carbohydrates are not readily available in the naso-oropharynx; however, N- and O-linked glycans are common in the airway. Sialic acid is the most common terminal modification on N- and O-linked glycans and is likely encountered frequently by S. pneumoniae in the airway. Here we demonstrate that sialic acid supports pneumococcal growth when provided as a sole carbon source. Growth on sialic acid requires import into the bacterium. Three genetic regions have been proposed to encode pneumococcal sialic acid transporters: one sodium solute symporter and two ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Data demonstrate that one of these, satABC, is required for transport of sialic acid. A satABC mutant displayed significantly reduced growth on both sialic acid and the human glycoprotein alpha-1. The importance of satABC for growth on human glycoprotein suggests that sialic acid transport may be important in vivo. Indeed, the satABC mutant was significantly reduced in colonization of the murine upper respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that S. pneumoniae is able to use sialic acid as a sole carbon source and that utilization of sialic acid is likely important during pneumococcal colonization. PMID:21189320

  2. Identification of Helicobacter pylori genes that contribute to stomach colonization.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David N; Shepherd, Benjamin; Kraemer, Petra; Hall, Michael K; Sycuro, Laura K; Pinto-Santini, Delia M; Salama, Nina R

    2007-02-01

    Chronic infection of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori leads to a variety of pathological sequelae, including peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, resulting in significant human morbidity and mortality. Several genes have been implicated in disease related to H. pylori infection, including the vacuolating cytotoxin and the cag pathogenicity island. Other factors important for the establishment and maintenance of infection include urease enzyme production, motility, iron uptake, and stress response. We utilized a C57BL/6 mouse infection model to query a collection of 2,400 transposon mutants in two different bacterial strain backgrounds for H. pylori genetic loci contributing to colonization of the stomach. Microarray-based tracking of transposon mutants allowed us to monitor the behavior of transposon insertions in 758 different gene loci. Of the loci measured, 223 (29%) had a predicted colonization defect. These included previously described H. pylori virulence genes, genes implicated in virulence in other pathogenic bacteria, and 81 hypothetical proteins. We have retested 10 previously uncharacterized candidate colonization gene loci by making independent null alleles and have confirmed their colonization phenotypes by using competition experiments and by determining the dose required for 50% infection. Of the genetic loci retested, 60% have strain-specific colonization defects, while 40% have phenotypes in both strain backgrounds for infection, highlighting the profound effect of H. pylori strain variation on the pathogenic potential of this organism.

  3. Clostridium difficile toxins facilitate bacterial colonization by modulating the fence and gate function of colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kasendra, Magdalena; Barrile, Riccardo; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Soriani, Marco

    2014-04-01

    The contribution of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B (TcdA and TcdB) to cellular intoxication has been studied extensively, but their impact on bacterial colonization remains unclear. By setting up 2- and 3-dimensional in vitro models of polarized gut epithelium, we investigated how C. difficile infection is affected by host cell polarity and whether TcdA and TcdB contribute to such events. Indeed, we observed that C. difficile adhesion and penetration of the mucosal barrier are substantially enhanced in poorly polarized or ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid-treated cells, indicating that bacteria bind preferentially to the basolateral (BL) cell surface. In this context, we demonstrated that sub-lethal concentrations of C. difficile TcdA are able to alter cell polarity by causing redistribution of plasma membrane components between distinct surface domains. Taken together, the data suggest that toxin-mediated modulation of host cell organization may account for the capacity of this opportunistic pathogen to gain access to BL receptors, leading to a successful colonization of the colonic mucosa.

  4. Pathways to Colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The steps required for space colonization are many to grow from our current 3-person International Space Station, now under construction, to an infrastructure that can support hundreds and eventually thousands of people in space. This paper will summarize the author's findings from numerous studies and workshops on related subjects and identify some of the critical next steps toward space colonization. Findings will be drawn from the author s previous work on space colony design, space infrastructure workshops, and various studies that addressed space policy. In conclusion, this paper will note that significant progress has been made on space facility construction through the International Space Station program, and that significant efforts are needed in the development of new reusable Earth to Orbit transportation systems. The next key steps will include reusable in space transportation systems supported by in space propellant depots, the continued development of inflatable habitat and space elevator technologies, and the resolution of policy issues that will establish a future vision for space development.

  5. Isolation of KPC 3-producing Enterobacter aerogenes in a patient colonized by MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Carolina; Villa, Laura; Capone, Alessandro; Fortini, Daniela; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Nisii, Carla; Bordi, Eugenio; Puro, Vincenzo; Antonini, Mario; Carattoli, Alessandra; Cataldo, Maria Adriana; Petrosillo, Nicola; Di Caro, Antonino

    2016-10-01

    We describe the interspecies transmission of the plasmid-mediated blaKPC-3 gene, which confers carbapenem resistance, between clinically relevant gram-negative bacteria in a single patient. A KPC-3 producing Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from a hospitalized patient previously colonized and then infected by a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST101 carrying the blaKPC-3 gene. The strains showed identical plasmids. Since intense horizontal exchanges among bacteria can occur in the gut, clinicians should be aware that patients colonized by carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae could become carriers of other carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

  6. Use of DNA probes in the study of silage colonization by Lactobacillus and Pediococcus strains.

    PubMed

    Cocconcelli, P S; Triban, E; Basso, M; Bottazzi, V

    1991-10-01

    A technique to monitor lactic acid bacteria inoculants in silage, based on specific DNA probes, was developed and used to evaluate the colonization properties of two strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and one strain of Pediococcus pentosaceus which were used as maize silage inoculants in farm conditions. The results indicated that these three strains were able to dominate the natural microflora of the silage, representing more than the 95% of the bacterial biomass of the maize silage. These studies indicate that the colony hybridization with specific DNA probes may be an effective method for monitoring bacteria and evaluating the colonization properties of inoculants in maize silage.

  7. Primary colonic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Quintín H; Heslin, Martin J; Dávila-Cervantes, Andrea; Alvarez-Tostado, Javier; de los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa; Shore, Gregg; Vickers, Selwyn M

    2008-03-01

    Surgical resection of primary colonic lymphoma can be an important therapeutic tool. We performed a nonrandomized retrospective descriptive study at the University hospital tertiary care center. From January 1990 to June 2002, a total of 15 patients with primary colonic lymphoma were identified from the tumor registry at University of Alabama at Birmingham and retrospectively reviewed under Institutional Review Board approved protocol. Demographic data, clinical features, treatment method (surgery and/or chemotherapy), recurrence rate, and survival were analyzed. The results are presented as mean +/- standard deviation or median and range. Differences in survival were evaluated by the log-rank test and the interval of disease-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Main outcome measures included surgical results, morbidity, mortality, and recurrence rate. Mean age was 51.5 years (standard deviation 16.4), 33 per cent were male and 67 per cent were female. Presenting symptoms were diarrhea (53.5%), lower gastrointestinal bleeding (13.3%), and nausea and vomiting (46.7%) secondary to low-grade obstruction. Concomitant colorectal disease was present in one patient with ulcerative colitis. Preoperative diagnosis of lymphoma was made in 13 patients (87%) with colonoscopy and biopsy. CT scan was performed in all patients; and none had radiographic evidence of systemic extension. Only one patient had a history of lymphoproliferative disease and exposure to radiation. The most common disease location was the cecum (60%), followed by the right colon (27%), and the sigmoid colon (13%). The mean lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) value was 214.9 u/L (range 129-309). Thirty-three per cent of the patients had an LDH value that was above the upper normal limit. LDH returned to normal after treatment in all patients. Operations performed consisted of right hemicolectomy (13), total proctocolectomy with ileal

  8. The transport of colonic contents in the irritable colon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, J A

    1970-08-01

    The mean distance of travel and hourly incidence of propulsive and retropulsive movements of colonic contents have been assessed by means of time-lapse cinefluorography and compared in 98 patients with the irritable colon syndrome and in 90 control subjects.Net propulsion in patients with the irritable colon syndrome was less than in the controls at rest, similar to the controls after feeding, and greater than in the controls after an injection of carbachol. In both clinical groups, food and carbachol increased the incidence of propulsive and retropulsive movements but did not alter the average distance over which they travelled.The figures suggest that at least two-thirds of all net propulsion of colonic contents in the irritable colon syndrome takes place under circumstances not reproduced in the present study.

  9. Carbohydrate Markers in Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneously mutated multiple oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes in colon epithelial cell and its progeny, may cause proliferation out of control and create benign colon neoplasm (colon polyp). If additional mutations involve genes responsible for cell adhesion and movement, aberrant epithelial cells may become malignant (colon cancer) and invade surrounding and remote tissues, creating secondary tumors called metastases. Incidence of colorectal cancer dramatically increases at 50–65 year of age. In Europe in 2006 colorectal cancer consisted 12.9% of all cancers and caused 207 400 deaths. To laboratory detection and monitoring of colon cancer are used tumor markers. Tumor markers are substances produced by the body in response to cancer, or by cancer tissue itself. Glycoconjugate markers for colon cancer include aberrant: mucins covering the surface of the colon epithelial cells, cadherins, selectins and Ig –like adhesion molecules mediating cell-cell adhesion, integrins and integral membrane proteoglycans responsible for adhesion of colon epithelial cells to extracellular matrix, glycoconjugate components of ECM, as well as lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and exoglycosidases. Detection of colon cancer at early non malignant stage is crucial in its prevention and eradication. As colon cancer is the effect of accumulation many somatic mutations in oncogens, supressors, mismatch repair genes and many genes responsible for posttranslational modifications of proteins, multidirectional approach should be applied for its detection. A glycobiological approach to diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer should be directed to detection changes in glycosylation accompanying every step of colon cancer progression, and correlation between changes in glycosylation and tumor progression. PMID:19126967

  10. Carbohydrate markers in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneously mutated multiple oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes in colon epithelial cell and its progeny, may cause proliferation out of control and create benign colon neoplasm (colon polyp). If additional mutations involve genes responsible for cell adhesion and movement, aberrant epithelial cells may become malignant (colon cancer) and invade surrounding and remote tissues, creating secondary tumors called metastases. Incidence of colorectal cancer dramatically increases at 50-65 year of age. In Europe in 2006 colorectal cancer consisted 12.9% of all cancers and caused 207,400 deaths. To laboratory detection and monitoring of colon cancer are used tumor markers. Tumor markers are substances produced by the body in response to cancer, or by cancer tissue itself. Glycoconjugate markers for colon cancer include aberrant: mucins covering the surface of the colon epithelial cells, cadherins, selectins and Ig-like adhesion molecules mediating cell-cell adhesion, integrins and integral membrane proteoglycans responsible for adhesion of colon epithelial cells to extracellular matrix, glycoconjugate components of ECM, as well as lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and exoglycosidases. Detection of colon cancer at early non malignant stage is crucial in its prevention and eradication. As colon cancer is the effect of accumulation many somatic mutations in oncogens, supressors, mismatch repair genes and many genes responsible for posttranslational modifications of proteins, multidirectional approach should be applied for its detection. A glycobiological approach to diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer should be directed to detection changes in glycosylation accompanying every step of colon cancer progression, and correlation between changes in glycosylation and tumor progression.

  11. Forever competent: deep-sea bivalves are colonized by their chemosynthetic symbionts throughout their lifetime.

    PubMed

    Wentrup, Cecilia; Wendeberg, Annelie; Schimak, Mario; Borowski, Christian; Dubilier, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    Symbiotic bivalves at hydrothermal vents and cold seeps host chemosynthetic bacteria intracellularly in gill cells. In bivalves, the gills grow continuously throughout their lifetime by forming new filaments. We examined how newly developed gill tissues are colonized in bivalves with horizontal and vertical symbiont transmission (Bathymodiolus mussels versus a vesicoymid clam) using fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy. Symbiont colonization was similar in mussels and clams and was independent of the transmission modes. Symbionts were absent in the growth zones of the gills, indicating that symbionts colonize newly formed gill filaments de novo after they are formed and that gill colonization is a continuous process throughout the host's lifetime. Symbiont abundance and distribution suggested that colonization is shaped by the developmental stage of host cells. Self-infection, in which new gill cells are colonized by symbionts from ontogenetically older gill tissues, may also play a role. In mussels, symbiont infection led to changes in gill cell structure similar to those described from other epithelial cells infected by intracellular pathogens, such as the loss of microvilli. A better understanding of the factors that affect symbiont colonization of bivalve gills could provide new insights into interactions between intracellular bacteria and epithelial tissues. © 2014 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenases of the rat colon: comparison with other tissues of the alimentary tract and the liver.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, T; Salaspuro, M

    1996-05-01

    Intracolonic bacteria have previously been shown to produce substantial amounts of acetaldehyde during ethanol oxidation, and it has been suggested that this acetaldehyde might be associated with alcohol-related colonic disorders, as well as other alcohol-induced organ injuries. The capacity of colonic mucosa to remove this bacterial acetaldehyde by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is, however, poorly known. We therefore measured ALDH activities and determined ALDH isoenzyme profiles from different subcellular fractions of rat colonic mucosa. For comparison, hepatic, gastric, and small intestinal samples were studied similarly. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were also measured from all of these tissues. Rat colonic mucosa was found to possess detectable amounts of ALDH activity with both micromolar and millimolar acetaldehyde concentrations and in all subcellular fractions. The ALDH activities of colonic mucosa were, however, generally low when compared with the liver and stomach, and they also tended to be lower than in small intestine. Mitochondrial low K(m) ALDH2 and cytosolic ALDH with low K(m) for acetaldehyde were expressed in the colonic mucosa, whereas some cytosolic high K(m) isoenzymes found in the small intestine and stomach were not detectable in colonic samples. Cytosolic ADH activity corresponded well to ALDH activity in different tissues: in colonic mucosa, it was approximately 6 times lower than in the liver and about one-half of gastric ADH activity. ALDH activity of the colonic mucosa should, thus, be sufficient for the removal of acetaldehyde produced by colonic mucosal ADH during ethanol oxidation. It may, however, be insufficient for the removal of the acetaldehyde produced by intracolonic bacteria. This may lead to the accumulation of acetaldehyde in the colon and colonic mucosa after ingestion of ethanol that might, at least after chronic heavy alcohol consumption, contribute to the development of alcohol-related colonic morbidity

  13. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    SciTech Connect

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.

  14. Fucose Sensing Regulates Bacterial Intestinal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Alline R.; Curtis, Meredith M.; Ritchie, Jennifer M.; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K.; Moreira, Cristiano G.; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota1. Successful colonization by pathogens depends on scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria, and precisely regulating expression of virulence genes2. The GI pathogen enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression3–4. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase (HK), and FusR the response regulator (RR). FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine5. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B.theta) produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen6. During growth in mucin, B.theta contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signaling cascade, modulating EHEC’s virulence gene expression. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism. PMID:23160491

  15. Colonization of second-trimester placenta parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Onderdonk, Andrew B; Hecht, Jonathan L; McElrath, Thomas F; Delaney, Mary L; Allred, Elizabeth N; Leviton, Alan

    2008-07-01

    The overtly healthy, nonpregnant uterus harbors bacteria, Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma. The extent of colonization remains elusive, as are relationships between isolated microorganisms, preterm labor and fetal inflammation. Biopsy specimens of chorion parenchyma from 1083 placentas delivered before the beginning of the 28th week of gestation were cultured, and the placentas were examined histologically. The frequencies of individual microorganisms and groups of microorganisms were evaluated in strata of processes leading to preterm delivery, routes of delivery, gestational age, and placenta morphology. Placentas delivered by cesarean section with preeclampsia had the lowest bacterial recovery rate (25%). Preterm labor had the highest rates, which decreased with increasing gestational age from 79% at 23 weeks to 43% at 27 weeks. The presence of microorganisms in placenta parenchyma was associated with the presence of neutrophils in the fetal stem vessels of the chorion or in the vessels of the umbilical cord. The high rate of colonization appears to coincide with phenomena associated with preterm delivery and gestational age. The presence of microorganisms within placenta parenchyma is biologically important.

  16. Fucose sensing regulates bacterial intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alline R; Curtis, Meredith M; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K; Moreira, Cristiano G; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-12-06

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota. Successful colonization by pathogens requires scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria and precisely regulating the expression of virulence genes. The gastrointestinal pathogen enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase and FusR the response regulator. FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen. During growth in mucin, B. thetaiotaomicron contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signalling cascade, modulating the virulence gene expression of EHEC. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism.

  17. Cystic lumphangioma of the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, F.P.; Francis, I.R.; Simms, S.M.

    1983-10-01

    Cystic lymphangioma is a rare benign lesion of the gastrointestinal tract, in which the colon is the least frequntly involved site. A case is reported displaying the characteristic radiographic features of an extramucosal intramural mass lesion in a patient with concurrent cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas, in whom the possibility of a metastatic lesion to the colon could not be excluded except by surgical resection.

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... colon. The colon is part of the body’s digestive system . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, ... pass waste material out of the body. The digestive system is made up of the esophagus , stomach , and ...

  19. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  20. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  1. Colon Cleansing: Is It Helpful or Harmful?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and possibly other substances, such as herbs or coffee, are flushed through the colon. This is done ... colon cleansing can sometimes be harmful. In fact, coffee enemas sometimes used in colon cleansing have been ...

  2. Schwannoma of the sigmoid colon

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Tuğrul; Aslaner, Arif; Yaz, Müjgan; Gündüz, Umut rıza

    2015-01-01

    Colonic schwannomas are very rare gastrointestinal tumours originating from Schwann cells, which form the neural sheath. Primary schwannomas of the lower gastrointestinal tract are very rare and usually benign in nature. However, if they are not surgically removed, malign degeneration can occur. We report a case of a 79-year-old woman who presented to our clinic with rectal bleeding and constipation. She underwent a lower gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. A mass subtotally obstructing the lumen of the sigmoid colon was seen and biopsies were taken. Histopathological examination indicated a suspicion of gastrointestinal tumour and the patient underwent sigmoid colon resection after preoperative evaluation by laboratory analysis, abdominal ultrasonography and CT. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on the fifth day for outpatient control. The histopathology report revealed schwannoma of the sigmoid colon. This was a case of schwannoma of the sigmoid colon that was successfully treated with total resection. PMID:25976197

  3. Lactic acid bacteria as probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ljungh, Asa; Wadström, Torkel

    2006-09-01

    A number of Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacterium sp, Saccharomyces boulardii, and some other microbes have been proposed as and are used as probiotic strains, i.e. live microorganisms as food supplement in order to benefit health. The health claims range from rather vague as regulation of bowel activity and increasing of well-being to more specific, such as exerting antagonistic effect on the gastroenteric pathogens Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and rotavirus, neutralising food mutagens produced in colon, shifting the immune response towards a Th2 response, and thereby alleviating allergic reactions, and lowering serum cholesterol (Tannock, 2002). Unfortunately, most publications are case reports, uncontrolled studies in humans, or reports of animal or in vitro studies. Whether or not the probiotic strains employed shall be of human origin is a matter of debate but this is not a matter of concern, as long as the strains can be shown to survive the transport in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to colonise the human large intestine. This includes survival in the stressful environment of the stomach - acidic pH and bile - with induction of new genes encoding a number of stress proteins. Since the availability of antioxidants decreases rostrally in the GI tract production of antioxidants by colonic bacteria provides a beneficial effect in scavenging free radicals. LAB strains commonly produce antimicrobial substance(s) with activity against the homologous strain, but LAB strains also often produce microbicidal substances with effect against gastric and intestinal pathogens and other microbes, or compete for cell surface and mucin binding sites. This could be the mechanism behind reports that some probiotic strains inhibit or decrease translocation of bacteria from the gut to the liver. A protective effect against cancer development can be ascribed to binding of mutagens by intestinal bacteria, reduction of the enzymes beta

  4. Against the tide: the role of bacterial adhesion in host colonization.

    PubMed

    Stones, Daniel Henry; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2016-12-15

    Evolving under the constant exposure to an abundance of diverse microbial life, the human body has developed many ways of defining the boundaries between self and non-self. Many physical and immunological barriers to microbial invasion exist, and yet bacteria have found a multitude of ways to overcome these, initiate interactions with and colonize the human host. Adhesion to host cells and tissues is a key feature allowing bacteria to persist in an environment under constant flux and to initiate transient or permanent symbioses with the host. This review discusses reasons why adhesion is such a seemingly indispensable requirement for bacteria-host interactions, and whether bacteria can bypass the need to adhere and still persist. It further outlines open questions about the role of adhesion in bacterial colonization and persistence within the host.

  5. Bacterial colonization and biofilm development on minimally processed vegetables.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, I; Harper, I S; Coventry, M J; Taylor, P W; Wan, J; Hickey, M W

    1998-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been observed and reported on food and food-processing surfaces and can contribute to increased risks for product quality and food safety. The colonization of fruit and vegetables by pectynolitic bacteria like Pseudonomas fluorescens attributable to conditions such as soft rot, can also manifest as biofilms. A developed biofilm structure can provide a protective environment for pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes reducing the effectiveness of sanitisers and other inhibitory agents. Understanding the colonization of bacteria on leaf surfaces is essential to the development of a better understanding of the leaf ecology of vegetable products. Studies of microbial colonization of leaf surfaces have been conducted using SEM and more recently using confocal microsocpy techniques. In the current study, a Leica TCS NT laser scanning confocal microscope was used to investigate biofilm formation using vital fluorescence staining on intact vegetable leaves. Reflection contrast and fluorescence three-dimensional imaging successfully delineated bacterial and biofilm morphology without disturbing the bacterial or leaf surface structure. The results demonstrate the presence and development of biofilm on the surface of lettuce. The biofilms appeared to originate on the cuticle in distinct micro-environments such as in the natural depression of the stomata, or in the intercellular junction. Bacteria also adhered to and developed biofilm colonies within an hour of contact and with clean stainless steel surfaces. Our study investigates the progression of biofilm formation from leaf colonization, and will assist in characterising the critical mechanisms of plant/host interaction and facilitate the development of improved preservation, sanitising and packaging strategies for minimally processed vegetable products.

  6. Multiple Acid Sensors Control Helicobacter pylori Colonization of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Julie Y; Goers Sweeney, Emily; Guillemin, Karen; Amieva, Manuel R

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori's ability to respond to environmental cues in the stomach is integral to its survival. By directly visualizing H. pylori swimming behavior when encountering a microscopic gradient consisting of the repellent acid and attractant urea, we found that H. pylori is able to simultaneously detect both signals, and its response depends on the magnitudes of the individual signals. By testing for the bacteria's response to a pure acid gradient, we discovered that the chemoreceptors TlpA and TlpD are each independent acid sensors. They enable H. pylori to respond to and escape from increases in hydrogen ion concentration near 100 nanomolar. TlpD also mediates attraction to basic pH, a response dampened by another chemoreceptor TlpB. H. pylori mutants lacking both TlpA and TlpD (ΔtlpAD) are unable to sense acid and are defective in establishing colonization in the murine stomach. However, blocking acid production in the stomach with omeprazole rescues ΔtlpAD's colonization defect. We used 3D confocal microscopy to determine how acid blockade affects the distribution of H. pylori in the stomach. We found that stomach acid controls not only the overall bacterial density, but also the microscopic distribution of bacteria that colonize the epithelium deep in the gastric glands. In omeprazole treated animals, bacterial abundance is increased in the antral glands, and gland colonization range is extended to the corpus. Our findings indicate that H. pylori has evolved at least two independent receptors capable of detecting acid gradients, allowing not only survival in the stomach, but also controlling the interaction of the bacteria with the epithelium.

  7. Patterns of microbial colonization in primary root canal infections.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Lopes, Hélio P

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the patterns of microbial infection of root canals in untreated teeth associated with chronic periradicular lesions by use of scanning electron microscopy. Fifteen extracted teeth with extensive carious lesions, radiolucent lesions of varying sizes, and attached periradicular lesions after extraction were selected for study. After fixation, lesions were removed and the teeth were split into 2 halves. The teeth were then dehydrated, sputter-coated with gold, and then examined for the patterns of microbial colonization of the root canal system by using a scanning electron microscope. All examined root canals were infected, and bacterial cells were seen in practically all areas of the root canal system. The pattern of colonization was not uniform between specimens and even within the same specimen. Most of the root canal walls of all specimens were heavily colonized by a root canal microbiota consisting of cocci and/or rods, often forming mixed communities. Spirilla were occasionally observed as single cells or as small clusters between other bacterial forms. Bacteria were often observed penetrating the dentinal tubules. Although a shallow penetration was the most common finding, bacterial cells could be observed reaching approximately 300 microm in some specimens. Yeastlike cells were observed in 1 specimen together with bacteria. The root canals of teeth associated with periradicular lesions were heavily infected by bacteria and occasionally by fungi. The pattern of colonization of the root canal microbiota often showed the characteristic of a climax community, which may require special considerations regarding its elimination and prevention of clinical problems. In addition, the observed propagation of the infection to the entire root canal system in teeth associated with periradicular lesions suggests that proper therapeutic measures may be necessary to eliminate the root canal infection completely.

  8. Competition-colonization dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ojosnegros, Samuel; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2010-01-01

    A single and purified clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus diversified in cell culture into two subpopulations that were genetically distinct. The subpopulation with higher virulence was a minority and was suppressed by the dominant but less virulent one. These two populations follow the competitioncolonization dynamics described in ecology. Virulent viruses can be regarded as colonizers because they killed the cells faster and they spread faster. The attenuated subpopulation resembles competitors because of its higher replication efficiency in coinfected cells. Our results suggest a new model for the evolution of virulence which is based on interactions between components of the quasispecies. Competition between viral mutants takes place at two levels, intracellular competition and competition for new cells. The two strategies are subjected to densitydependent selection. PMID:20798818

  9. Right Colonic Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although right colonic diverticultis (RCD) has been reported to be a rare disease in Western countries, RCD is a common diagnosis, with an incidence per 2.9-17 case of appendicitis, in Korea. Many Western studies have reported that it is difficult to differentiate the presenting symptoms of RCD from those of appendicitis before surgery because the signs and symptoms are similar. However, performing a computed tomography scan after the application of the diagnostic criteria for RCD has increased the preoperative RCD diagnostic rate. Treatment strategies have been difficult to define for this condition due to its low preoperative diagnosis rate. However, recent reports have shown that conservative medical treatment of uncomplicated RCD can be recommended and that such treatment is effective due to the benign and self-limited natural history of RCD. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the controversies surrounding RCD management. PMID:21152224

  10. Right colonic diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Kyu

    2010-08-01

    Although right colonic diverticultis (RCD) has been reported to be a rare disease in Western countries, RCD is a common diagnosis, with an incidence per 2.9-17 case of appendicitis, in Korea. Many Western studies have reported that it is difficult to differentiate the presenting symptoms of RCD from those of appendicitis before surgery because the signs and symptoms are similar. However, performing a computed tomography scan after the application of the diagnostic criteria for RCD has increased the preoperative RCD diagnostic rate. Treatment strategies have been difficult to define for this condition due to its low preoperative diagnosis rate. However, recent reports have shown that conservative medical treatment of uncomplicated RCD can be recommended and that such treatment is effective due to the benign and self-limited natural history of RCD. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the controversies surrounding RCD management.

  11. Colonic and rectal NET's.

    PubMed

    Mandair, Dalvinder; Caplin, Martyn E

    2012-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours of the Colon and Rectum are rare but are increasing in incidence as a result of greater investigation with endoscopy and improved histological reporting. Classification with the 2010 WHO TNM staging system as well as grading based on the Ki-67 index has led to improved prognostic assessment. The use of Endoanal Ultrasound has increased the sensitivity of detection of depth of invasion and lymphovascular involvement, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Standard polypectomy has largely been replaced by endoscopic mucosal resection of smaller polyps, although newer techniques such as band ligation or endoscopic submucosal dissection are likely to be associated with less residual disease. The management of advanced disease remains a challenge but new treatments such as Peptide Receptor Targeted therapy and molecular targeted treatments offer hope of improved progression free survival in non-resectable disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro anaerobic biofilms of human colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sproule-Willoughby, K M; Stanton, M Mark; Rioux, K P; McKay, D M; Buret, A G; Ceri, H

    2010-12-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complex community of microorganisms that grow as biofilms on the intestinal mucosa. These bacterial communities are not well characterized, although they are known to play an important role in human health. This study aimed to develop a model for culturing biofilms (surface-adherent communities) of intestinal microbiota. The model utilizes adherent mucosal bacteria recovered from colonic biopsies to create multi-species biofilms. Culture on selective media and confocal microscopy indicated the biofilms were composed of a diverse community of bacteria. Molecular analyses confirmed that several phyla were represented in the model, and demonstrated stability of the community over 96 h when cultured in the device. This model is novel in its use of a multi-species community of mucosal bacteria grown in a biofilm mode of growth. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute stress-induced colonic tissue HSP70 expression requires commensal bacterial components and intrinsic glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kaori; Zhang, Xiumin; Ono, Yusuke; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2009-01-01

    Induction of heat shock protein (HSPs) has a protective effect in cells under stress. Physical stressors, such as restraint, induce HSPs in colonic tissue in vivo, but the mechanism of HSP induction is not yet clear. Because commensal bacteria support basal expression of colon epithelial HSP70, we postulated that stress responses may enhance the interaction of commensal bacteria and the colonic tissue. Restraining C57BL/6 mice for 2h effectively induced HSP70 in colonic epithelia. Both blockade of stress-induced glucocorticoid by RU486 or elimination of commensal bacteria by antibiotics independently abrogated restraint-induced HSP70 augmentation. Oral administration of LPS to commensal-depleted mice restored restraint-induced HSP70 augmentation. Because TLR4 expression was absent from the epithelial surface, and was limited to lamina propria and muscularis externa, we examined how LPS reaches the lamina propria. Alexa-LPS administered in the colonic lumen was only detected in the lamina propria of the restrained mice. Expression of the tight junction component ZO-1 in the epithelia, which regulates the passage of luminal substances through the epithelia, was reduced after restraint, but reversed by RU486. In conclusion, HSP70 induction in colonic epithelial cells under restraint requires both stress-induced glucocorticoid and luminal commensal bacteria, and LPS plays a significant role. Glucocorticoid-dependent attenuation of epithelial tight junction integrity may facilitate the access of LPS into the lamina propria, where TLR4, known to be required for HSP70 induction, is abundantly expressed. Sophisticated regulation of colonic protection against stressors involving the general stress response and the luminal environment has been demonstrated.

  14. Biotimer assay: A reliable and rapid method for the evaluation of central venous catheter microbial colonization.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luigi; Cutone, Antimo; Coletti, Monica; Lepanto, Maria Stefania; Scotti, Mellani; Valenti, Piera; Raponi, Giammarco; Ghezzi, Maria Cristina; Berlutti, Francesca

    2017-09-29

    Adherent bacteria and biofilm frequently colonize central venous catheters (CVCs). CVC colonization is correlated to infections and particularly to bloodstream ones. The classical microbiological methods to determine of CVC colonization are not fully reliable and are time-consuming. BioTimer Assay (BTA) is a biological method already used to count bacteria adherent to abiotic surfaces and biofilm without sample manipulation. BTA employs specific reagents whose color changed according to bacterial metabolism. BTA is based on the principle that a metabolic reaction will be faster when more bacteria are present in the sample. Therefore, the time required for color changes of BTA reagents determines the number of bacteria present in the sample through a correlation line. Here, for the first time, we applied BTA and a specifically developed laboratory procedure to evaluate CVC colonization in comparison with the routine microbiological method (RMM). 125 CVCs removed from patients for suspected catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) or at hospital discharge were examined. BTA was reliable in assessing sterility and CVC colonization (100% agreement with RMM) and in recognizing the presence of fermenting or non-fermenting bacteria (97.1% agreement with RMM) shortening the analytical time by between 2- and 3-fold. Moreover, the reliability of BTA as early alert of CRBSI was evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values for BTA as an early alert of CRBSI were 100, 40.0, 88.8 and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, BTA and the related laboratory procedure should be incorporated into routine microbiological methods since it can be considered a reliable tool to evaluate CVC colonization in a very short time and a rapid alert for CRBSIs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacteria Inactivation During Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Sol Quintero, María; Mora, Ulises; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mues, Enrique; Castaño, Eduardo; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M.

    2006-09-01

    The influence of extracorporeal and intracorporeal lithotripsy on the viability of bacteria contained inside artificial kidney stones was investigated in vitro. Two different bacteria were exposed to the action of one extracorporeal shock wave generator and four intracorporeal lithotripters.

  16. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  17. Association of biofilm production with colonization among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seong Yeol; Baek, Won-Ki; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly causing healthcare-associated infections worldwide, particularly in intensive care units. Biofilm formation, a factor contributing to the virulence of A. baumannii, is associated with long-term persistence in hospital environments. The present study investigates the clinical impact of biofilm production on colonization and acquisition after patient admission. Methods Forty-nine A. baumannii isolates were obtained between August and November 2013 from Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea. All isolates were obtained from sputum samples of new patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. The microtiter plate assay was used to determine biofilm formation. Results Twenty-four A. baumannii isolates (48%) demonstrated enhanced biofilm formation capacity than that of the standard A. baumannii strain (ATCC 19606). All isolates were resistant to carbapenem, 38 isolates (77%) were collected from patients in an intensive care unit, and 47 isolates (95%) were from patients who had been exposed to antibiotics in the previous month. The median duration of colonization was longer for biofilm-producing isolates than that of the biofilm non-biofilm producing isolates (18 days vs. 12 days, p < 0.05). Simultaneous colonization with other bacteria was more common for biofilm-producing isolates than that for the non-biofilm producing isolates. The most prevalent co-colonizing bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Biofilm-producing isolates seem to colonize the respiratory tract for longer durations than the non-biofilm producing isolates. During colonization, biofilm producers promote co-colonization by other bacteria, particularly S. aureus. Additional research is required to determine possible links between biofilm formation and nosocomial infection. PMID:27653617

  18. [Colon cancer after colon interposition for oesophageal replacement].

    PubMed

    Sikorszki, László; Horváth, Ors Péter; Papp, András; Cseke, László; Pavlovics, Gábor

    2010-08-01

    The authors report the case of a colon adenocarcinoma developed on the neck at the anastomosis of the skin tube and colon 44 years following a corrosive oesophageal injury. This patient suffered a moderately severe oesophageal, stomach and laryngeal injuries due to drinking hydrochloric acid 44 years ago. He underwent serial laryngoplasties, then needed a tracheostomy, oesophagectomy, pyloroplasty and ileocolon transposition. An antethoracal oesophagus formation was performed with ileocolon and skin tube amendment. 44 years later an ulcerated adenocarcinoma developed in the transposed colon, which was resected and the ability to swallow was reinstated by the transplantation of an isolated jejunal segment using microvascular anastomosis.

  19. Do edible oils reduce bacterial colonization of enamel in situ?

    PubMed

    Hannig, Christian; Kirsch, Jasmin; Al-Ahmad, Ali; Kensche, Anna; Hannig, Matthias; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Edible oils are an empiric approach for the prevention of oral diseases. The present in situ study investigated the effect of edible oils on initial bacterial colonization of enamel surfaces. Initial biofilm formation was performed on enamel specimens mounted on maxillary splints and carried by eight subjects. After 1 min of pellicle formation, rinses with safflower oil, olive oil and linseed oil were performed for 10 min. Application of chlorhexidine for 1 min served as positive control. Afterwards, the slabs were carried for 8 h overnight. Samples carried for 8 h without any rinse served as negative controls. The amount of adherent bacteria was determined by DAPI staining (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and live-dead staining (BacLight). Additionally, determination of colony forming units was performed after desorption of the bacteria. TEM evaluation was carried out after application of the rinses. The number of adherent bacteria on control samples was 6.1 ± 8.1 × 10(5)/cm(2) after 8 h (DAPI). Fluorescence microscopic data from DAPI staining and live-dead staining as well as from the determination of CFU revealed no significant effects of rinsing with oils on the amount of adherent bacteria compared to the non-rinsed control samples. However, with chlorhexidine a significant reduction in the number of bacteria by more than 85 % was achieved (DAPI, chlorhexidine: 8.2 ± 17.1 × 10(4)/cm(2)). The ratio of viable to dead bacteria was almost equal (1:1) irrespective of the rinse adopted as recorded with BacLight. TEM indicated accumulation of oil micelles at the pellicle's surface and modification of its ultrastructure. Rinses with edible oils have no significant impact on the initial pattern and amount of bacterial colonization on enamel over 8 h. Rinses with edible oils cannot be recommended for efficient reduction of oral biofilm formation.

  20. Bacteria-bacteria interactions within the microbiota of the ancestral metazoan Hydra contribute to fungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Fraune, Sebastian; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Augustin, René; Franzenburg, Sören; Knop, Mirjam; Schröder, Katja; Willoweit-Ohl, Doris; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial surfaces of most animals are colonized by diverse microbial communities. Although it is generally agreed that commensal bacteria can serve beneficial functions, the processes involved are poorly understood. Here we report that in the basal metazoan Hydra, ectodermal epithelial cells are covered with a multilayered glycocalyx that provides a habitat for a distinctive microbial community. Removing this epithelial microbiota results in lethal infection by the filamentous fungus Fusarium sp. Restoring the complex microbiota in gnotobiotic polyps prevents pathogen infection. Although mono-associations with distinct members of the microbiota fail to provide full protection, additive and synergistic interactions of commensal bacteria are contributing to full fungal resistance. Our results highlight the importance of resident microbiota diversity as a protective factor against pathogen infections. Besides revealing insights into the in vivo function of commensal microbes in Hydra, our findings indicate that interactions among commensal bacteria are essential to inhibit pathogen infection.

  1. Pharmaceutical approaches to colon targeted drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, M K; Jain, S K

    2003-01-01

    Although oral delivery has become a widely accepted route of administration of therapeutic drugs, the gastrointestinal tract presents several formidable barriers to drug delivery. Colonic drug delivery has gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon but also for its potential for the delivery of proteins and therapeutic peptides. To achieve successful colonic delivery, a drug needs to be protected from absorption and /or the environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and then be abruptly released into the proximal colon, which is considered the optimum site for colon-targeted delivery of drugs. Colon targeting is naturally of value for the topical treatment of diseases of colon such as Chron's diseases, ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer and amebiasis. Peptides, proteins, oligonucleotides and vaccines pose potential candidature for colon targeted drug delivery. The various strategies for targeting orally administered drugs to the colon include covalent linkage of a drug with a carrier, coating with pH-sensitive polymers, formulation of timed released systems, exploitation of carriers that are degraded specifically by colonic bacteria, bioadhesive systems and osmotic controlled drug delivery systems. Various prodrugs (sulfasalazine, ipsalazine, balsalazine and olsalazine) have been developed that are aimed to deliver 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) for localized chemotherapy of inflammatory bowl disease (IBD). Microbially degradable polymers especially azo crosslinked polymers have been investigated for use in targeting of drugs to colon. Certain plant polysaccharides such as amylose, inulin, pectin and guar gum remains unaffected in the presence of gastrointestinal enzymes and pave the way for the formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. The concept of using pH as a rigger to release a drug in the colon is based on the pH conditions that vary continuously

  2. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  3. Vasohibin-1 suppresses colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Zhang, Qunyuan; Dou, Jie; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wenli; Sun, Yuping; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the clinical relevance of VASH1 in colon cancer and its regulations on cancer angiogenesis and cancer cell biological characteristics are still unknown. Here we showed that stromal VASH1 levels were negatively correlated with tumor size, advanced clinical stage and distant metastases in colon cancer patients. Overexpression of VASH1 in colon cancer cells induced apoptosis and senescence, inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. In addition, knockdown of VASH1 in cancer cells promoted cell growth, adhesion and migration in vitro, and enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. PMID:25797264

  4. Potential sources of bacteria that are isolated from contact lenses during wear.

    PubMed

    Willcox, M D; Power, K N; Stapleton, F; Leitch, C; Harmis, N; Sweeney, D F

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine the possible contamination sources of contact lenses during wear. Potential sources of the microbiota that colonized hydrogel contact lenses during wear were examined. The microorganisms that colonize contact lenses were grown, identified, and compared to those microorganisms that colonized the lower lid margins, upper bulbar conjunctiva, hands, and contact lens cases of contact lens wearers. In addition, the incidence of contamination of the domestic water supply in the Sydney area was obtained, and this was compared to the incidence of colonization of contact lenses by microorganisms in general and gram-negative bacteria in particular. There was a wide diversity of bacteria that were isolated from each site sampled. Coagulase-negative staphylococci and Propionibacterium spp. were the most common isolates from all ocular sites examined, and constituted the normal ocular microbiota. Other bacteria, including members of the families Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae, were isolated infrequently from all sites, but most frequently from contact lens cases. Statistical analysis revealed that there was a correlation between the isolation of bacteria from the contact lens and the lower lid margin (p < 0.001). Analysis of this correlation revealed that this was true for the normal microbiota. A correlation was also noted between the colonization of contact lenses by gram-negative bacteria and contamination of the domestic water supply. This study has demonstrated that the likely route for the normal ocular microbiota colonizing contact lenses is via the lid margins, whereas colonization by gram-negative bacteria, including potential agents of microbial keratitis, is likely to be from the domestic water supply.

  5. Bacterial colonization and gut development in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Cilieborg, Malene S; Boye, Mette; Sangild, Per T

    2012-03-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) develops in 5-10% of preterm infants in association with enteral feeding and bacterial colonization. It remains unclear how diet and bacteria interact to protect or provoke the immature gastrointestinal tract. Understanding the factors that control bacterial colonization may provide the clue to prevent NEC, and studies in infants must be combined with animal models to understand the mechanisms of the microbiota-epithelium interactions. Analyses of infant fecal samples show that the density and distribution of bacterial species are highly variable with no consistent effects of gestational age, delivery mode, diet or probiotic administration, while low bacterial diversity and bacterial overgrowth are commonly associated with NEC. A series of recent studies in preterm pigs show that the mucosa-associated microbiota is affected by delivery method, prematurity and NEC progression and that diet has limited effects. Overgrowth of specific groups (e.g. Clostridia) appears to be a consequence of NEC, rather than the cause of NEC. Administration of probiotics either decreases or increases NEC sensitivity in preterm pigs, while in preterm infants probiotics have generally decreased NEC incidence and overall mortality. The optimal nature and amount of probiotic bacteria are unknown and host defense factors appear more important for NEC sensitivity than the nature of the gut microbiota. Host defense is improved by feeding the optimal amount of enteral diets, such as mother's colostrum or milk, that help the immature intestinal immune system to respond appropriately to the highly variable bacterial colonization.

  6. Outcomes of colon resection in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Hwang, Grace; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2016-08-01

    Patients with advanced colorectal cancer have a high incidence of postoperative complications. We sought to identify outcomes of patients who underwent resection for colon cancer by cancer stage. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to evaluate all patients who underwent colon resection with a diagnosis of colon cancer from 2012 to 2014. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate patient outcomes by cancer stage. A total of 7,786 colon cancer patients who underwent colon resection were identified. Of these, 10.8% had metastasis at the time of operation. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly increased risks of perioperative morbidity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, P = .01) and mortality (AOR: 3.72, P = .01). Patients with metastatic disease were significantly younger (AOR: .99, P < .01) had a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score (AOR: 1.29, P < .2) and had a higher rate of emergent operation (AOR: 1.40, P < .01). Overall, 10.8% of patients undergoing colectomy for colon cancer have metastatic disease. Postoperative morbidity and mortality are significantly higher than in patients with localized disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Reduction of beta-glucuronidase and nitroreductase activity by yoghurt in a murine colon cancer model.

    PubMed

    de Moreno de LeBlanc, A; Perdigón, G

    2005-04-01

    Yoghurt feeding inhibits induced colon cancer in mice. Several studies showed the immunomodulatory effect of yoghurt which can explain this inhibition. It is possible that yoghurt bacteria can also affect gut flora enzymes related to colon carcinogenesis as reported for other probiotics in different animal tumours. The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of yoghurt starter bacteria and their cell-free fermentation products on the reduction of procarcinogen enzyme activities (beta-glucuronidase and nitroreductase). Mice injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and fed with yoghurt were used for this study. Mice given milk or yoghurt supernatant (cell free extract) were used to evaluate if the yoghurt antitumour effect is due to the starter bacteria or other components released during fermentation, that could inhibit these enzymes. We determined that yoghurt by itself maintained enzymes activities similar or lower than non-treatment control group, and the enzyme activity was also lower than milk or yoghurt supernatant groups. DMH increased the activity of the enzymes. Mice injected with DMH and fed cyclically with yoghurt presented lower enzymes activities than the tumour control group. Feeding yoghurt decreased procarcinogenic enzyme levels in the large intestine contents of mice bearing colon tumour. The results of this study provide another mechanism by which yoghurt starter bacteria interact with the large intestine of the mice and prevent colon cancer.

  8. Comparison of bacterial communities on limnic versus coastal marine particles reveals profound differences in colonization.

    PubMed

    Bižić-Ionescu, Mina; Zeder, Michael; Ionescu, Danny; Orlić, Sandi; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Amann, Rudolf

    2015-10-01

    Marine and limnic particles are hotspots of organic matter mineralization significantly affecting biogeochemical element cycling. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes were combined to investigate bacterial diversity and community composition on limnic and coastal marine particles > 5 and > 10 μm respectively. Limnic particles were more abundant (average: 1 × 10(7) l(-1)), smaller in size (average areas: 471 versus 2050 μm(2)) and more densely colonized (average densities: 7.3 versus 3.6 cells 100 μm(-2)) than marine ones. Limnic particle-associated (PA) bacteria harboured Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, and unlike previously suggested sizeable populations of Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Marine particles were colonized by Planctomycetes and Betaproteobacteria additionally to Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria. Large differences in individual particle colonization could be detected. High-throughput sequencing revealed a significant overlap of PA and free-living (FL) bacteria highlighting an underestimated connectivity between both fractions. PA bacteria were in 14/21 cases more diverse than FL bacteria, reflecting a high heterogeneity in the particle microenvironment. We propose that a ratio of Chao 1 indices of PA/FL < 1 indicates the presence of rather homogeneously colonized particles. The identification of different bacterial families enriched on either limnic or marine particles demonstrates that, despite the seemingly similar ecological niches, PA communities of both environments differ substantially. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Ruminococcus bromii is a keystone species for the degradation of resistant starch in the human colon

    PubMed Central

    Ze, Xiaolei; Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    The release of energy from particulate substrates such as dietary fiber and resistant starch (RS) in the human colon may depend on the presence of specialist primary degraders (or ‘keystone species') within the microbial community. We have explored the roles of four dominant amylolytic bacteria found in the human colon in the degradation and utilization of resistant starches. Eubacterium rectale and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron showed limited ability to utilize RS2- and RS3-resistant starches by comparison with Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Ruminococcus bromii. In co-culture, however, R. bromii proved unique in stimulating RS2 and RS3 utilization by the other three bacterial species, even in a medium that does not permit growth of R. bromii itself. Having previously demonstrated low RS3 fermentation in vivo in two individuals with undetectable populations of R. bromii-related bacteria, we show here that supplementation of mixed fecal bacteria from one of these volunteers with R. bromii, but not with the other three species, greatly enhanced the extent of RS3 fermentation in vitro. This argues strongly that R. bromii has a pivotal role in fermentation of RS3 in the human large intestine, and that variation in the occurrence of this species and its close relatives may be a primary cause of variable energy recovery from this important component of the diet. This work also indicates that R. bromii possesses an exceptional ability to colonize and degrade starch particles when compared with previously studied amylolytic bacteria from the human colon. PMID:22343308

  10. Bacterial Colonization of the Newborn Gut, Immune Development, and Prevention of Disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, W Allan

    2017-01-01

    We now know that the fetus does not reside in a sterile intrauterine environment but is exposed to commensal bacteria from the maternal gut which cross the placenta and infiltrate the amniotic fluid. This exposure to colonizing bacteria continues at birth and during the first year of life, and it has a profound influence on lifelong health. Why is this important? Cross talk with colonizing bacteria in the developing neonatal intestine helps in the initial adaptation of the infant to extrauterine life, particularly in acquiring immune homeostasis, and provides protection against disease expression (e.g., allergy, autoimmune disease, and obesity) later in life. Colonizing intestinal bacteria are critical to the development of host defense during the neonatal period. Disrupted colonization (dysbiosis) due to cesarean section delivery, perinatal antibiotics, or premature delivery may adversely affect the development of host defense mechanisms in the gut and predispose to inflammation leading to increased susceptibility to disease later in life. Clinical evidence suggests that babies born by cesarean section have higher incidence rates of allergy, type 1 diabetes, and obesity. Infants given repeated antibiotic regimens are more likely to have asthma as adolescents. This observation helps to explain the disease paradigm shift in children from developed countries.

  11. [Induction of a microbial colonization of the walls of copper pipes through which drinking water flows].

    PubMed

    Tuschewitzki, G J

    1990-05-01

    Bacterial colonization developed within one month on the surface of a copper pipe used for the transport of drinking water. No severe signs of corrosion could be detected within six weeks. Dividing cells and the formation of microcolonies indicated active metabolism and multiplication of the bacteria and not only a more or less passive adsorption on the copper from the bulk phase.

  12. Colonization of streptomycin-treated mice by Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, K; Ghazali, F M; Kirov, S M

    1996-03-01

    Streptomycin-treated adult mice were investigated as a possible model for studying the enteropathogenicity of Aeromonas species. C57BL mice pre-treated with streptomycin (5.0 g/L drinking water, 48 hours) received a single intragastric dose (10(10) bacteria /10.5 mL) of one of six well-characterized, toxin-producing, human diarrhoeal isolates of A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 3) or A. hydrophila (n = 3). Their faeces were examined for Aeromonas for 10 days post-challenge. All strains colonized the antibiotic-treated mice. Colonization did not occur in mice which did not receive streptomycin. Strains of A. hydrophila were recovered in greater numbers than strains of A. veronii biovar sobria, and colonized ( > or = 10(3) cfu/g of faeces) a greater proportion of mice at day 10. Strains of the latter species, however, were more adherent in cell line assays used as models of intestinal adhesion. A. hydrophila strains localized in the large intestine and appeared not to be cell associated. This study, therefore, points to species-related differences in intestinal colonization mechanisms. The streptomycin-treated adult mouse model may prove useful for further investigation of some of these mechanisms. Diarrhoeal symptoms were, however, not produced in this model.

  13. Initial intestinal colonization in the human infant and immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Walker, W Allan

    2013-01-01

    The paradigm of disease burden in the developed world has changed drastically in the last few decades from predominately infections to immune-mediated diseases (autoimmunity and allergy) because of alterations in the Western lifestyle (improved sanitation, immunizations, antibiotic usage and altered dietary intake). A diverse balanced microbiota is necessary for the development of an appropriate innate and adaptive immune response. There is strong evidence that disruption of the normal colonization process can lead to alterations in the important symbiotic relationship that is necessary for immune homeostasis. For example, infants born by cesarean section or receiving excessive perinatal antibiotics have inadequate initial colonization and aberrant mucosal immune function. As a result, later in childhood, they express an increased incidence in asthma and autoimmune diseases (e.g. celiac disease). An important component of initial colonization is the infant's diet. Breast milk contains a variety of nondigestible oligosaccharides which function as prebiotics preferentially stimulating proliferation of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, important health-promoting bacteria, and cause fermentation of the oligosaccharides into short-chain fatty acids. In the absence of breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, formula containing pre- and probiotics