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Sample records for butyric alcohols

  1. Butyric acid esterification kinetics over Amberlyst solid acid catalysts: the effect of alcohol carbon chain length.

    PubMed

    Pappu, Venkata K S; Kanyi, Victor; Santhanakrishnan, Arati; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2013-02-01

    The liquid phase esterification of butyric acid with a series of linear and branched alcohols is examined. Four strong cation exchange resins, Amberlyst™ 15, Amberlyst™ 36, Amberlyst™ BD 20, and Amberlyst™ 70, were used along with para-toluenesulfonic acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The effect of increasing alcohol carbon chain length and branching on esterification rate at 60°C is presented. For all catalysts, the decrease in turnover frequency (TOF) with increasing carbon chain length of the alcohol is described in terms of steric hindrance, alcohol polarity, and hydroxyl group concentration. The kinetics of butyric acid esterification with 2-ethylhexanol using Amberlyst™ 70 catalyst is described with an activity-based, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model that includes autocatalysis by butyric acid.

  2. DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL, POLY(METHYL METHACRYLATE), POLYVINYL BUTYRAL RESIN AND POLYIMIDE AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R

    2008-01-01

    Performance of materials and their compatibility determine the size of the electrical insulation in power equipment. For this reason dielectric properties of electrical insulation materials are needed for low temperature power applications. In this work we report the dielectric properties of four polymers: polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polyvinyl butyral resin (PVB), and polyimide (PI--Kapton\\textregistered). The dielectric measurements are performed with an electrical impedance analyzer in the frequency domain. The impedances are recorded in a cryocooler in the temperature range from 45K to 350K. The dielectric breakdown characteristics of the polymers are measured in a liquid nitrogen bath at atmospheric pressure. It is observed that PI and \\pmma\\ dissolved in toluene have the lowest dielectric losses for temperatures lower than $100\\ \\kelvin$. \\Blx\\ and PI have the smallest spread in their breakdown strength data.

  3. Cellulose acetate butyrate-pH/thermosensitive polymer microcapsules containing aminated poly(vinyl alcohol) microspheres for oral administration of DNA.

    PubMed

    Fundueanu, Gheorghe; Constantin, Marieta; Bortolotti, Fabrizio; Cortesi, Rita; Ascenzi, Paolo; Menegatti, Enea

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this work is to safely transport bioadhesive microspheres loaded with DNA to intestine and to test their bioadhesive properties. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) microspheres were prepared by dispersion reticulation with glutaraldehyde and further aminated. These microspheres were firstly loaded with plasmid DNA by electrostatic interactions and then entrapped in cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microcapsules for gastric protection. The entrapped PVA microspheres do not have enough force by swelling to produce the rupture of CAB shell, therefore the resistance of microcapsules was weakened by incorporating different amount of the pH/thermosensitive polymer (SP) based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) (NIPAAm-co-MM-co-MA). This polymer is insoluble in gastric juice at pH 1.2 and 37 degrees C, but quickly solubilized in intestinal fluids (pH 6.8 and pH 7.4). Therefore, DNA loaded PVA microspheres were not expelled in acidic media but were almost entirely discharged in small intestine or colon. The integrity of DNA after entrapment was tested by agarose gel electrophoresis indicating that no DNA degradation occurs during encapsulation. The percentage of adhered microspheres on the mucus surface of everted intestinal tissue was 65+/-18% for aminated PVA microspheres without DNA and almost 50+/-15% for those loaded with DNA. Non-aminated PVA microspheres display the lowest adhesive properties (33+/-12%). In conclusion DNA loaded microspheres were progressively discharged in intestine. The integrity of DNA was not modified after entrapment and release, as proved by agarose gel electrophoresis. Both loaded and un-loaded aminated microspheres display good bioadhesive properties.

  4. Fragrance material review on phenethyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of phenethyl butyrate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Phenethyl butyrate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for phenethyl butyrate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fragrance material review on benzyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of benzyl butyrate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Benzyl butyrate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for benzyl butyrate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, skin sensitization, toxicokinetics, and repeated dose data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of the interaction between two food aroma components, alpha-pinene and ethyl butyrate, and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH) packaging films as a function of environmental humidity.

    PubMed

    López-Carballo, Gracia; Cava, David; Lagarón, Jose M; Catalá, Ramón; Gavara, Rafael

    2005-09-07

    The ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOHs) are well-known high oxygen barrier materials that are being used successfully in the design of packaging structures for oxygen-sensitive food or pharmaceutical products. Recently, there has been increasing interest in using EVOH materials to provide a high barrier to organic compounds as a means to reduce food aroma scalping. However, the barrier function of this family of materials diminishes significantly in humid environments, and it is supposed that so does the organic vapor barrier. In this work, a new sorption-based method to characterize the interaction between food aroma and polymer films for packaging as a function of relative humidity is presented and is used to determine the barrier to ethyl butyrate and alpha-pinene of EVOH at 23 degrees C. The results show that although EVOH is an excellent barrier to food aroma when dry, a property that even improves at low relative humidity (RH), the solubility and diffusivity of the compounds tested increase dramatically with humidity at medium to high water activities. However, even in the worst case (100% RH), EVOH outperforms low-density polyethylene (LDPE) as a barrier to organic vapors at least 500,000-fold.

  7. Butyrate Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Boosalis, Michael S.; Perrine, Susan P.; Sangerman, José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In addition to being a part of the metabolic fatty acid fuel cycle, butyrate is also capable of inducing growth arrest in a variety of normal cell types and senescence-like phenotypes in gynecological cancer cells, inhibiting DNA synthesis and cell growth in colonic tumor cell lines, suppressing hTERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity in human prostate cancer cells, and inducing stem cell differentiation and apoptosis by DNA fragmentation. It regulates gene expression by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs), enhances memory recovery and formation in mice, stimulates neurogenesis in the ischemic brain, promotes osteoblast formation, selectively blocks cell replication in transformed cells (compared to healthy cells), and can prevent and treat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mouse models of obesity, as well as stimulate fetal hemoglobin expression in individuals with hematologic diseases such as the thalassemias and sickle-cell disease, in addition to a multitude of other biochemical effects in vivo. However, efforts to exploit the potential of butyrate in the clinical treatment of cancer and other medical disorders are thwarted by its poor pharmacological properties (short half-life and first-pass hepatic clearance) and the multigram doses needed to achieve therapeutic concentrations in vivo. Herein, we review some of the methods used to overcome these difficulties with an emphasis on HDAC inhibition. PMID:23514803

  8. Colonic butyrate- algesic or analgesic?

    PubMed

    Kannampalli, P; Shaker, R; Sengupta, J N

    2011-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common health issue that is characterized by abdominal pain, abnormal bowel movements, and altered visceral perception. The complexity and variability in symptoms pose serious challenges in treating IBS. Current therapy for IBS is primarily focused on reducing the abdominal pain, thereby improving the quality of life to a significant extent. Although the use of fiber rich diet is widely recommended in treating IBS, some studies have questioned its use. Intra-colonic butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, is primarily produced by the fermentation of dietary fibers in the colon. In the existing literature there are conflicting reports about the function of butyrate. In rats it is known to induce visceral hypersensitivity without altered pathology, whereas in humans it has been reported to reduce visceral pain. Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for this contrasting effect of butyrate is important before recommending fiber rich diet to IBS patients.

  9. Metabolic flexibility of a butyrate pathway mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Minyeong; Croux, Christian; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe

    2017-01-31

    Clostridium acetobutylicum possesses two homologous buk genes, buk (or buk1) and buk2, which encode butyrate kinases involved in the last step of butyrate formation. To investigate the contribution of buk in detail, an in-frame deletion mutant was constructed. However, in all the Δbuk mutants obtained, partial deletions of the upstream ptb gene were observed, and low phosphotransbutyrylase and butyrate kinase activities were measured. This demonstrates that i) buk (CA_C3075) is the key butyrate kinase-encoding gene and that buk2 (CA_C1660) that is poorly transcribed only plays a minor role; and ii) strongly suggests that a Δbuk mutant is not viable if the ptb gene is not also inactivated, probably due to the accumulation of butyryl-phosphate, which might be toxic for the cell. One of the ΔbukΔptb mutants was subjected to quantitative transcriptomic (mRNA molecules/cell) and fluxomic analyses in acidogenic, solventogenic and alcohologenic chemostat cultures. In addition to the low butyrate production, drastic changes in metabolic fluxes were also observed for the mutant: i) under acidogenic conditions, the primary metabolite was butanol and a new metabolite, 2-hydroxy-valerate, was produced ii) under solventogenesis, 58% increased butanol production was obtained compared to the control strain under the same conditions, and a very high yield of butanol formation (0.3gg(-1)) was reached; and iii) under alcohologenesis, the major product was lactate. Furthermore, at the transcriptional level, adhE2, which encodes an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase and is known to be a gene specifically expressed in alcohologenesis, was surprisingly highly expressed in all metabolic states in the mutant. The results presented here not only support the key roles of buk and ptb in butyrate formation but also highlight the metabolic flexibility of C. acetobutylicum in response to genetic alteration of its primary metabolism.

  10. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  11. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... that's how many accidents occur. continue What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  12. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Alcohol KidsHealth > For Kids > Alcohol Print A A A What's in this article? ... What Is Alcoholism? Say No en español El alcohol Getting the Right Message "Hey, who wants a ...

  13. Butyrate as preferred substrate for polyhydroxybutyrate production.

    PubMed

    Marang, Leonie; Jiang, Yang; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kleerebezem, Robbert

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the suitability of butyrate as substrate for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by microbial enrichment cultures was assessed. Two sequencing batch reactors were operated under feast-famine conditions: one fed with butyrate, and another with mixed acetate and butyrate. The obtained results were compared to previous results with acetate as sole substrate. In all three reactors Plasticicumulans acidivorans dominated the enrichment culture. The carbon uptake rate and PHA yield were significantly higher on butyrate than on acetate, resulting in a higher PHA production rate. When both substrates were available the bacteria strongly preferred the uptake of butyrate. Only after butyrate depletion acetate was taken up at a high rate. The molar substrate uptake rate remained the same, suggesting that substrate uptake is the rate-limiting step. The results show that for optimized waste-based PHA production the pre-fermentation process should be directed towards butyrate production.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of butyric acid derivative with xylitol.

    PubMed

    Desmet, G; Brazier, M; Cerutti, J; Chany, C; Arnould-Guerin, M L

    1991-01-01

    The short chain fatty acids, especially butyric acid salts have interesting biological properties. In some cases, transformed cells can recover a normal phenotype and in animal, butyrate salts increase antitumor resistance. Butyrate may be considered as possibly useful for antitumor therapy. But these products exhibit two essential disadvantages which restrict their clinical use in man: high concentrations required to achieve therapeutic effects and rapid excretion with short half life. In order to optimize the clinical use of butyrate, we studied a n-butyric acid ester obtained with xylitol selected for its physiological and metabolic inertia. Structure determination of tributyryl xylitol was carried out by mass and NMR spectrometry (MW = 344). The low toxicity and the antitumor effects of this ester, especially in association with Corynebacterium parvum and interferon, confirm its therapeutic interest. The slow excretion of this prodrug should make butyrate clinical use easier by preventing extensive systemic metabolism and metabolic side-effects due to cations of butyrate salts.

  15. Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P., Ed.

    This extensive annotated bibliography provides a compilation of documents retreived from a computerized search of the ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, and Med-Line databases on the topic of alcoholism. The materials address the following areas of concern: (1) attitudes toward alcohol users and abusers; (2) characteristics of alcoholics and…

  16. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents for Kids for Teens Search Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – ... this article? Getting the Facts What Is Alcohol? How Does It Affect the Body? Why Do Teens Drink? Why Shouldn't I ...

  17. The Future of Butyric Acid in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Dwidar, Mohammed; Park, Jae-Yeon; Mitchell, Robert J.; Sang, Byoung-In

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the different applications of butyric acid and its current and future production status are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on the biofuels industry. As such, this paper discusses different issues regarding butyric acid fermentations and provides suggestions for future improvements and their approaches. PMID:22593687

  18. Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... created when grains, fruits, or vegetables are fermented . Fermentation is a process that uses yeast or bacteria ... change the sugars in the food into alcohol. Fermentation is used to produce many necessary items — everything ...

  19. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  20. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  1. Restricted distribution of the butyrate kinase pathway among butyrate-producing bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Duncan, Sylvia H; McCrae, Sheila I; Millar, Jacqueline; Jackson, Michelle S; Flint, Harry J

    2004-04-01

    The final steps in butyrate synthesis by anaerobic bacteria can occur via butyrate kinase and phosphotransbutyrylase or via butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase. Degenerate PCR and enzymatic assays were used to assess the presence of butyrate kinase among 38 anaerobic butyrate-producing bacterial isolates from human feces that represent three different clostridial clusters (IV, XIVa, and XVI). Only four strains were found to possess detectable butyrate kinase activity. These were also the only strains to give PCR products (verifiable by sequencing) with degenerate primer pairs designed within the butyrate kinase gene or between the linked butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes. Further analysis of the butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes of one isolate, L2-50, revealed similar organization to that described previously from different groups of clostridia, along with differences in flanking sequences and phylogenetic relationships. Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase activity was detected in all 38 strains examined, suggesting that it, rather than butyrate kinase, provides the dominant route for butyrate formation in the human colonic ecosystem that contains a constantly high concentration of acetate.

  2. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for butyric acid production with high butyric acid selectivity.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Im, Jung Ae; Choi, So Young; Lee, Jung Im; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-05-01

    A typical characteristic of the butyric acid-producing Clostridium is coproduction of both butyric and acetic acids. Increasing the butyric acid selectivity important for economical butyric acid production has been rather difficult in clostridia due to their complex metabolic pathways. In this work, Clostridium acetobutylicum was metabolically engineered for highly selective butyric acid production. For this purpose, the second butyrate kinase of C. acetobutylicum encoded by the bukII gene instead of butyrate kinase I encoded by the buk gene was employed. Furthermore, metabolic pathways were engineered to further enhance the NADH-driving force. Batch fermentation of the metabolically engineered C. acetobutylicum strain HCBEKW (pta(-), buk(-), ctfB(-) and adhE1(-)) at pH 6.0 resulted in the production of 32.5g/L of butyric acid with a butyric-to-acetic acid ratio (BA/AA ratio) of 31.3g/g from 83.3g/L of glucose. By further knocking out the hydA gene (encoding hydrogenase) in the HCBEKW strain, the butyric acid titer was not further improved in batch fermentation. However, the BA/AA ratio (28.5g/g) obtained with the HYCBEKW strain (pta(-), buk(-), ctfB(-), adhE1(-) and hydA(-)) was 1.6 times higher than that (18.2g/g) obtained with the HCBEKW strain at pH 5.0, while no improvement was observed at pH 6.0. These results suggested that the buk gene knockout was essential to get a high butyric acid selectivity to acetic acid in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fragrance material review on 1,1-dimethyl-2-phenylethyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 1,1-dimethyl-2-phenylethyl butyrate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 1,1-Dimethyl-2-phenylethyl butyrate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 1,1-dimethyl-2-phenylethyl butyrate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for enhanced production of butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Woo, Hee Moon; Im, Jung Ae; Kim, In Ho; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-11-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum has been considered as an attractive platform host for biorefinery due to its metabolic diversity. Considering its capability to overproduce butanol through butyrate, it was thought that butyric acid can also be efficiently produced by this bacterium through metabolic engineering. The pta-ctfB-deficient C. acetobutylicum CEKW, in which genes encoding phosphotransacetylase and CoA-transferase were knocked out, was assessed for its potential as a butyric acid producer in fermentations with four controlled pH values at 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, and 6.4. Butyric acid could be best produced by fermentation of the CEKW at pH 6.0, resulting in the highest titer of 26.6 g/l, which is 6.4 times higher than that obtained with the wild type. However, due to the remaining solventogenic ability of the CEKW, 3.6 g/l solvents were also produced. Thus, the CEKW was further engineered by knocking out the adhE1-encoding aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase to prevent solvent production. Batch fermentation of the resulting C. acetobutylicum HCEKW at pH 6.0 showed increased butyric acid production to 30.8 g/l with a ratio of butyric-to-acetic acid (BA/AA) of 6.6 g/g and a productivity of 0.72 g/l/h from 86.9 g/l glucose, while negligible solvent (0.8 g/l ethanol only) was produced. The butyric acid titer, BA/AA ratio, and productivity obtained in this study were the highest values reported for C. acetobutylicum, and the BA/AA ratio and productivity were also comparable to those of native butyric acid producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum. These results suggested that the simultaneous deletion of the pta-ctfB-adhE1 in C. acetobutylicum resulted in metabolic switch from biphasic to acidogenic fermentation, which enhanced butyric acid production.

  5. Influence of emulsifying agents on the properties of cellulose acetate butyrate and ethylcellulose microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Kristmundsdóttir, T; Ingvarsdóttir, K

    1994-01-01

    Microcapsules of ibuprofen were prepared according to the solvent evaporation method, using two coating polymers, cellulose acetate butyrate and ethylcellulose. The influence of two emulsifying agents, polysorbat 80 and polyvinyl alcohol, on the properties of the microcapsules was investigated. The results show that type and concentration of emulsifying agent influences size distribution, drug loading and amount of free drug on the surface of the microcapsules.

  6. Extractive fermentation for butyric acid production from glucose by Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zetang; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2003-04-05

    A novel extractive fermentation for butyric acid production from glucose, using immobilized cells of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a fibrous bed bioreactor, was developed by using 10% (v/v) Alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol as the extractant contained in a hollow-fiber membrane extractor for selective removal of butyric acid from the fermentation broth. The extractant was simultaneously regenerated by stripping with NaOH in a second membrane extractor. The fermentation pH was self-regulated by a balance between acid production and removal by extraction, and was kept at approximately pH 5.5 throughout the study. Compared with conventional fermentation, extractive fermentation resulted in a much higher product concentration (>300 g/L) and product purity (91%). It also resulted in higher reactor productivity (7.37 g/L. h) and butyric acid yield (0.45 g/g). Without on-line extraction to remove the acid products, at the optimal pH of 6.0, the final butyric acid concentration was only approximately 43.4 g/L, butyric acid yield was 0.423 g/g, and reactor productivity was 6.77 g/L. h. These values were much lower at pH 5.5: 20.4 g/L, 0.38 g/g, and 5.11 g/L. h, respectively. The improved performance for extractive fermentation can be attributed to the reduced product inhibition by selective removal of butyric acid from the fermentation broth. The solvent was found to be toxic to free cells in suspension, but not harmful to cells immobilized in the fibrous bed. The process was stable and provided consistent long-term performance for the entire 2-week period of study.

  7. Enzymology of butyrate formation by Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L; Jenesel, S E

    1979-04-01

    Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens is a major butyrate-forming species in the bovine and ovine rumen. The enzymology of butyrate formation from pyruvate was investigated in cell-free extracts of B. fibrisolvens D1. Pyruvate owas oxidized to acetylcoenzyme A (CoA) in the presence of CoA.SH and benzyl viologen or flavin nucleotides. The bacterium uses thiolase, beta-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, crotonase, and crotonyl-CoA reductase to form butyryl-CoA from acetyl-CoA. Reduction of acetoacetyl-CoA to beta-hydroxybutyryl-CoA was faster with NADH than with NADPH. Crotonyl-CoA was reduced to butyryl-CoA by NADH, but not by NADPH, only in the presence of flavin nucleotides. Reduction of flavin nucleotides by NADH was much slower than the flavin-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA. This indicates that flavoproteins rather than free flavin participated in the reduction of crotonyl-CoA. Butyryl-CoA was converted to butyrate by phosphate butyryl transferase and butyrate kinase.

  8. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  9. Searching for Synbiotics to increase Colonic Butyrate Concentration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyrate is produced by microbial fermentation of plant fiber in the gut and a preferred substrate for gut epithelial cells. In ruminants, butyrate contributes to 70% of energy metabolism. In monogastric species, butyrate also plays an important role in energy metabolism in the hindgut. Moreover, bu...

  10. Effect of butyrate and Lactobacillus GG on a butyrate receptor and transporter during Campylobacter jejuni exposure.

    PubMed

    Cresci, Gail A M; Mayor, Paul C; Thompson, Stuart A

    2017-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni frequently infects humans causing many gastrointestinal symptoms, fever, fatigue and several long-term debilitating diseases. Current treatment for campylobacteriosis includes rehydration and in some cases, antibiotic therapy. Probiotics are used to treat several gastrointestinal diseases. Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid known to promote intestinal health. Interaction of butyrate with its respective receptor (HCAR2) and transporter (SLC5A8), both expressed in the intestine, is associated with water and electrolyte absorption as well as providing defense against colon cancer and inflammation. Alterations in gut microbiota influence the presence of HCAR2 and SLC5A8 in the intestine. We hypothesized that adherence and/or invasion of C. jejuni and alterations in HCAR2 and SLC5A8 expression would be minimized with butyrate or Lactobacillus GG (LGG) pretreatment of Caco-2 cells. We found that both C. jejuni adhesion but not invasion was reduced with butyrate pretreatment. While LGG pretreatment did not prevent C. jejuni adhesion, it did result in reduced invasion which was associated with altered cell supernate pH. Both butyrate and LGG protected HCAR2 and SLC5A8 protein expression following C. jejuni infection. These results suggest that the first stages of C. jejuni infection of Caco-2 cells may be minimized by LGG and butyrate pretreatment. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  12. Potential beneficial effects of butyrate in intestinal and extraintestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Canani, Roberto Berni; Costanzo, Margherita Di; Leone, Ludovica; Pedata, Monica; Meli, Rosaria; Calignano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The multiple beneficial effects on human health of the short-chain fatty acid butyrate, synthesized from non-absorbed carbohydrate by colonic microbiota, are well documented. At the intestinal level, butyrate plays a regulatory role on the transepithelial fluid transport, ameliorates mucosal inflammation and oxidative status, reinforces the epithelial defense barrier, and modulates visceral sensitivity and intestinal motility. In addition, a growing number of studies have stressed the role of butyrate in the prevention and inhibition of colorectal cancer. At the extraintestinal level, butyrate exerts potentially useful effects on many conditions, including hemoglobinopathies, genetic metabolic diseases, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, and ischemic stroke. The mechanisms of action of butyrate are different; many of these are related to its potent regulatory effects on gene expression. These data suggest a wide spectrum of positive effects exerted by butyrate, with a high potential for a therapeutic use in human medicine. PMID:21472114

  13. Lipase in biphasic alginate beads as a biocatalyst for esterification of butyric acid and butanol in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Ng, Choong Hey; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Esterification of organic acids and alcohols in aqueous media is very inefficient due to thermodynamic constraints. However, fermentation processes used to produce organic acids and alcohols are often conducted in aqueous media. To produce esters in aqueous media, biphasic alginate beads with immobilized lipase are developed for in situ esterification of butanol and butyric acid. The biphasic beads contain a solid matrix of calcium alginate and hexadecane together with 5 mg/mL of lipase as the biocatalyst. Hexadecane in the biphasic beads serves as an organic phase to facilitate the esterification reaction. Under optimized conditions, the beads are able to catalyze the production of 0.16 mmol of butyl butyrate from 0.5 mmol of butyric acid and 1.5 mmol of butanol. In contrast, when monophasic beads (without hexadecane) are used, only trace amount of butyl butyrate is produced. One main application of biphasic beads is in simultaneous fermentation and esterification (SFE) because the organic phase inside the beads is very stable and does not leach out into the culture medium. SFE is successfully conducted with an esterification yield of 6.32% using biphasic beads containing iso-octane even though the solvent is proven toxic to the butanol-producing Clostridium spp.

  14. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. PMID:25336453

  15. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  16. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that ... alcohol to feel the same effect With alcohol abuse, you are not physically dependent, but you still ...

  17. The combined use of ultrasound and molecular sieves improves the synthesis of ethyl butyrate catalyzed by immobilized Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase.

    PubMed

    Paludo, Natalia; Alves, Joana S; Altmann, Cintia; Ayub, Marco A Z; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Rodrigues, Rafael C

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the combined use of ultrasound energy and molecular sieves was investigated for the synthesis of ethyl butyrate, ester with mango and banana notes, catalyzed by the immobilized lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL-IM). Initially, the best concentrations of biocatalysts (35%) and butyric acid (0.7M) were tested using ultrasound as an alternative to mechanical agitation. The amount of acid in the reaction could be increased by 2-fold when compared to previous works where mechanical agitation was used. In the next step, substrate molar ratio and reaction temperature were optimized and the best conditions were at their lowest levels: 1:1 (acid:alcohol), and 30°C, reaching 61% of conversion in 6h. Molecular sieves (3Å) were added to optimized reaction medium in order to remove the formed water and improve the maximum yield. The reaction yield increased 1.5 times, reaching 90% of conversion in 6h, when 60mg of molecular sieves per mmol of butyric acid was used. Finally, the reuse of Lipozyme TL-IM for the ultrasound-assisted synthesis of ethyl butyrate was verified for 10 batches, without any appreciable loss of activity, whereas in systems using mechanical agitation, the biocatalyst was completely inactivated after 5 batches. These results suggest that the combined use of ultrasound and molecular sieves greatly improve esterification reactions by stabilizing the enzyme and increasing yields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial electrosynthesis of butyrate from carbon dioxide: Production and extraction.

    PubMed

    Batlle-Vilanova, Pau; Ganigué, Ramon; Ramió-Pujol, Sara; Bañeras, Lluís; Jiménez, Gerard; Hidalgo, Manuela; Balaguer, M Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Puig, Sebastià

    2017-10-01

    To date acetate is the main product of microbial electrosynthesis (MES) from carbon dioxide (CO2). In this work a tubular bioelectrochemical system was used to carry out MES and enhance butyrate production over the other organic products. Batch tests were performed at a fixed cathode potential of -0.8V vs SHE. The reproducibility of the results according to previous experiments was validated in a preliminary test. According to the literature butyrate production could take place by chain elongation reactions at low pH and high hydrogen partial pressure (pH2). During the experiment, CO2 supply was limited to build up pH2 and trigger the production of compounds with a higher degree of reduction. In test 1 butyrate became the predominant end-product, with a concentration of 59.7mMC versus 20.3mMC of acetate, but limitation on CO2 supply resulted in low product titers. CO2 limitation was relaxed in test 2 to increase the bioelectrochemical activity but increase pH2 and promote the production of butyrate, what resulted in the production of 87.5mMC of butyrate and 34.7mMC of acetate. The consumption of ethanol, and the presence of other products in the biocathode (i.e. caproate) suggested that butyrate production took place through chain elongation reactions, likely driven by Megasphaera sueciensis (>39% relative abundance). Extraction and concentration of butyrate was performed by liquid membrane extraction. A concentration phase with 252.4mMC of butyrate was obtained, increasing also butyrate/acetate ratio to 16.4. The results are promising for further research on expanding the product portfolio of MES. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomass conversion to mixed alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, M.T.; Loescher, M.; Ross, M.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses the MixAlco Process which converts a wide variety of biomass materials (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, agricultural residues) to mixed alcohols. First, the biomass is treated with lime to enhance its digestibility. Then, a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms converts the lime-treated biomass to volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. To maintain fermentor pH, a neutralizing agent (e.g. calcium carbonate or lime) is added, so the fermentation actually produces VFA salts such as calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The VFA salts are recovered and thermally converted to ketones (e.g. acetone, methylethyl ketone, diethyl ketone) which are subsequently hydrogenated to mixed alcohols (e.g. isopropanol, isobutanol, isopentanol). Processing costs are estimated at $0.72/gallon of mixed alcohols making it potentially attractive for transportation fuels.

  20. Impact of butyric acid on butanol formation by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Regestein, Lars; Doerr, Eric Will; Staaden, Antje; Rehmann, Lars

    2015-11-01

    The butanol yield of the classic fermentative acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) process has been enhanced in the past decades through the development of better strains and advanced process design. Nevertheless, by-product formation and the incomplete conversion of intermediates still decrease the butanol yield. This study demonstrates the potential of increasing the butanol yield from glycerol though the addition of small amounts of butyric acid. The impact of butyric acid was investigated in a 7L stirred tank reactor. The results of this study show the positive impact of butyric acid on butanol yield under pH controlled conditions and the metabolic stages were monitored via online measurement of carbon dioxide formation, pH value and redox potential. Butyric acid could significantly increase the butanol yield at low pH values if sufficient quantities of primary carbon source (glycerol) were present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Butyrate-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    butyrate-induced apoptosis was independent of cell cycle phase. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES prostate cancer, histone deacetylase inhibitors, bone...of cells plated) HDI histone deacetylase inhibitor SBHA suberoylbishydroxamate PKC protein kinase C activator SDS-PAGE SDS polyacrylamide gel...cancer cell lines 1. Summary of goals and findings Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI) such as butyrate and suberoylbishydroxamate (SBHA) have

  2. Colonic mucin synthesis is increased by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Finnie, I A; Dwarakanath, A D; Taylor, B A; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sodium butyrate and sodium bromo-octanoate (an inhibitor of beta oxidation) on colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) synthesis have been assessed using tissue from colonic resection samples. Epithelial biopsy specimens were incubated for 16 hours in RPMI 1640 with glutamine, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and N-acetyl-[3H]-glucosamine ([3H]-Glc NAc), and differing concentrations of sodium butyrate. Incorporation of [3H] Glc NAc into mucin by normal epithelium at least 10 cm distant from colonic cancer was increased in the presence of sodium butyrate in a dose dependent manner, with maximum effect (476%) at a concentration of 0.1 mM (number of specimens = 24 from six patients, p < 0.001). The increase in response to butyrate was not seen when specimens were incubated in the presence of the beta oxidation inhibitor sodium bromo-octanoate 0.05 M. The striking increase in mucin synthesis that results when butyrate is added to standard nutrient medium suggests that this may be an important mechanism affecting the rate of mucin synthesis in vivo and may also explain the therapeutic effect of butyrate in colitis.

  3. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-04-20

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Woodard, TL; Lovley, DR

    2014-08-26

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H-2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. IMPORTANCE The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  5. Converting carbon dioxide to butyrate with an engineered strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P; Woodard, Trevor L; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-10-21

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. Importance: The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  6. Butyrate and propionate: important components of toxic dental plaque extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, R E; Buckner, B A

    1981-01-01

    Extracts of in vitro-cultured human dental plaque contain factors toxic to mammalian cells. Previous studies demonstrated that those toxic factors most readily released from cultured plaque had very low molecular weights and were heat stable. Studies reported here demonstrate that metabolic end products including short-chain fatty acids were present in fractions containing the low-molecular-weight, heat-stable factors. The salts of two of these acids, butyrate and propionate, inhibited proliferation of both mouse L929 cells and human gingival fibroblasts. Furthermore, when tested at concentrations present in plaque extracts, the inhibitory effects of butyrate and propionate accounted for essentially all the inhibitory potential of the extracts. These findings, taken together with those of other groups, suggest that butyrate and propionate, end products of dental plaque metabolism, may have an etiological role in periodontal disease. PMID:7251132

  7. Pyruvate sparing by butyrate and propionate in proliferating colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Butler, R N; Stafford, I; Triantafillos, E; O'Dee, C D; Jarrett, I G; Fettman, M J; Roberts-Thomson, I C

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of fasting and fasting followed by refeeding on the relative activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in isolated rat colonocytes were estimated by the rate of production of 14CO2 from [1-14C]pyruvate and [3-14C]pyruvate, respectively. 2. Decarboxylation of pyruvate by the PDH complex exceeded that by the TCA cycle in both fasted and fasted/refed colonocytes, was higher in distal than in proximal colon, and was stimulated by refeeding following a fast. 3. Oxidation of pyruvate by both the PDH complex and the TCA cycle was inhibited by butyrate. 4. Propionate alone had no effect, but synergized with butyrate to further reduce pyruvate decarboxylation by the TCA cycle. 5. Preferential utilization of butyrate by proliferating colonic epithelial cells is postulated to maximize the energy yield and spare pyruvate and its precursors for alternative synthetic roles necessary for active cell division.

  8. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells.

  9. Oxadiazoles Have Butyrate-Specific Conditional Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Early, Julie V.; Casey, Allen; Martinez-Grau, Maria Angeles; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Vieth, Michal; Ollinger, Juliane; Bailey, Mai Ann; Alling, Torey; Files, Megan; Ovechkina, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global pathogen of huge importance which can adapt to several host niche environments in which carbon source availability is likely to vary. We developed and ran a phenotypic screen using butyrate as the sole carbon source to be more reflective of the host lung environment. We screened a library of ∼87,000 small compounds and identified compounds which demonstrated good antitubercular activity against M. tuberculosis grown with butyrate but not with glucose as the carbon source. Among the hits, we identified an oxadiazole series (six compounds) which had specific activity against M. tuberculosis but which lacked cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. PMID:27044545

  10. Transcriptome characterization by deep-RNA-sequencing underlies the mechanisms of butyrate-induced epigenomic regulation in bovine cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate), especially butyrate, alter cell differentiation, proliferation, motility, and in particular, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition activity. Butyrate is a great inducer of ...

  11. Alternate splicing regulated by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a signaling molecule and a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HADCs), butyrate exerts its impacts on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. In this study, we examined the effect of...

  12. 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid (MCPB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( MCPB ) ; CASRN 94 - 81 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Hea

  13. Development of a specific radioimmunoassay for cortisol 17-butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.N.; Lee, Y.F.; Bu'Lock, D.E.; August, P.; Anderson, D.C.

    1983-07-01

    We describe the development and validation of an assay for cortisol 17-butyrate in blood in which there is no significant cross reaction with endogenous corticosteroids at levels encountered normally in man. Preliminary data on blood levels of the drug in absorption studies are presented.

  14. Induction of peroxisomes by butyrate-producing probiotics.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huachun; Endo, Kosuke; Li, Jiawei; Kito, Naoko; Iwai, Naoharu

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11a (Pex11a) deficiency is associated with a reduction in peroxisome abundance and impaired fatty acid metabolism in hepatocytes, and results in steatosis. In the present study, we investigated whether butyrate induces Pex11a expression and peroxisome proliferation, and studied its effect on lipid metabolism. C57BL/6 mice fed standard chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) were treated with tributyrin, 4-phelybutyrate acid (4-PBA), or the butyrate-producing probiotics (Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588 [CBM]) plus inulin (dietary fiber), and the body weight, white adipose tissue, serum triglycerides, mRNA expression, and peroxisome abundance were evaluated. Tributyrin or 4-PBA treatment significantly decreased body weight and increased hepatic mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and Pex11a. In addition, 4-PBA treatment increased peroxisome abundance and the expression of genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation (acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and hydroxysteroid [17-beta] dehydrogenase 4). CBM and inulin administration reduced adipose tissue mass and serum triglycerides, induced Pex11a, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1, and hydroxysteroid (17-beta) dehydrogenase 4 genes, and increased peroxisome abundance in mice fed standard chow or an HFD. In conclusion, elevation of butyrate availability (directly through administration of butyrate or indirectly via administration of butyrate-producing probiotics plus fiber) induces PPARα and Pex11a and the genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation, increases peroxisome abundance, and improves lipid metabolism. These results may provide a new therapeutic strategy against hyperlipidemia and obesity.

  15. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  16. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling based on increased expression of urea transporter (UT-B) in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concent...

  17. Effects of oral butyrate application on insulin signaling in various tissues of chickens.

    PubMed

    Mátis, G; Kulcsár, A; Turowski, V; Fébel, H; Neogrády, Zs; Huber, K

    2015-01-01

    The influence of butyrate on insulin signaling in chickens was studied because butyrate is produced during microbial fermentation in the large intestine of birds, and butyrate is widely used as a feed additive in animal production. Ross 308 broiler chickens received a daily intraingluvial bolus of sodium butyrate (0.25 g/kg body weight) on days 20-24 of life (n = 10). Plasma butyrate concentration increased after receiving oral butyrate treatment (P < 0.001). Oral butyrate application was associated with decreased protein expression of insulin receptor β subunit (IRβ) in liver (P = 0.008) and both abdominal (P = 0.003) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (P < 0.001), but with elevated IRβ expression in muscle (P = 0.045), assessed by Western blotting. The quantity of hepatic phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase was reduced in the butyrate-treated group (P = 0.007); further, mammalian target of rapamycin was downregulated by butyrate in liver (P < 0.001) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (P = 0.038). Oral butyrate application provoked reduced systemic insulin sensitivity in chickens, indicated by elevated fasting blood glucose and subsequently, insulin level. However, responses of insulin signaling cascade to butyrate were tissue specific, suggesting that butyrate could act on glucose shifting among tissues by selectively increasing the glucose uptake of skeletal muscle via IRβ upregulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantification of transcriptome responses of the rumen epithelium to butyrate infusion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, produced by gut microorganisms play an important role in energy metabolism and physiology in ruminants as well as in human health. Butyrate is a preferred substrate in the rumen epithelium where approximately 90% of butyrate is metabolized. Additi...

  19. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, David E.; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2005-08-25

    Butanol replaced gasoline gallon for gallon in a 10,000 miles trip across the United States without the need to highly modify a ’92 Buick (your existing car today). Butanol can now be made for less than ethanol and yields more Btu’s from the same corn, making the plow to tire equation positive – more energy out than it takes to make it and Butanol is much safer. Butanol when substituted for gasoline gives better gas mileage and does not pollute as tested in 10 states. Butanol should now receive the same recognition as ethanol in U.S. legislation “ethanol/butanol”. There is abundant plant biomass present as low-value agricultural commodities or processing wastes requiring proper disposal to avoid pollution problems. One example is in the corn refinery industry, which processes more than 13% of the ~9.5 billion bushels (~240 million metric tons) of corn annually produced in the U.S. to produce high-fructose-corn-syrup, dextrose, starch, and fuel alcohol, and generates more than 10 million metric tons of corn byproducts that are currently of limited use and pose significant environmental problems. The abundant inexpensive renewable resources as feedstock for fermentation, and recent advances in the fields of biotechnology and bioprocessing have resulted in a renewed interest in the fermentation production of chemicals and fuels, including n-butanol. The historic acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum is one of the oldest known industrial fermentations. It was ranked second only to ethanol fermentation by yeast in its scale of production, and is one of the largest biotechnological processes ever known. However, since the 1950's industrial ABE fermentation has declined continuously, and almost all butanol is now produced via petrochemical routes (Chemical Marketing Reporter, 1993). Butanol is an important industrial solvent and is a better fuel for replacing gasoline – gallon for gallon than ethanol. Current butanol prices

  20. Isolation of butyrate-utilizing bacteria from thermophilic and mesophilic methane-producing ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of various ecosystems to convert butyrate to methane was studied in order to isolate the bacteria responsible for the conversion. When thermophilic digester sludge was enriched with butyrate, methane was produced without a lag period. Marine sediments enriched with butyrate required a 2-week incubation period before methanogenesis began. A thermophilic digester was studied in more detail and found by most-probable-number enumeration to have ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ butyrate-utilizing bactera/ml of sludge. A thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium was isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and a Methanosarcina sp. This bacterium was a gram-negative, slightly curved rod that occurred singly, was nonmotile, and did not appear to produce spores. The thermophilic digester was infused with butyrate at the rate of 10 ..mu..moles/ml of sludge per day. Biogas production increased by 150%, with the percentage of methane increasing from 58% to 68%. Acetate, propionate, and butyrate did not accumulate. Butyrate-utilizing enrichments from mesophilic ecosystems were used in obtaining cocultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria. These cocultures served as inocula for attempts to isolate pure cultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria by use of hydrogenase-containing membrane fragments of Escherichia coli. After a 3-week incubation period, colonies appeared only in inoculated tubes that contained membrane fragments and butyrate.

  1. Formation of propionate and butyrate by the human colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2017-01-01

    The human gut microbiota ferments dietary non-digestible carbohydrates into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). These microbial products are utilized by the host and propionate and butyrate in particular exert a range of health-promoting functions. Here an overview of the metabolic pathways utilized by gut microbes to produce these two SCFA from dietary carbohydrates and from amino acids resulting from protein breakdown is provided. This overview emphasizes the important role played by cross-feeding of intermediary metabolites (in particular lactate, succinate and 1,2-propanediol) between different gut bacteria. The ecophysiology, including growth requirements and responses to environmental factors, of major propionate and butyrate producing bacteria are discussed in relation to dietary modulation of these metabolites. A detailed understanding of SCFA metabolism by the gut microbiota is necessary to underpin effective strategies to optimize SCFA supply to the host.

  2. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or

  3. Butyrate influences intracellular levels of adenine and adenine derivatives in the fungus Penicillium restrictum.

    PubMed

    Zutz, Christoph; Chiang, Yi Ming; Faehnrich, Bettina; Bacher, Markus; Hellinger, Roland; Kluger, Bernhard; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Butyrate, a small fatty acid, has an important role in the colon of ruminants and mammalians including the inhibition of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation. There is also growing evidence that butyrate is influencing the histone structure in mammalian cells by inhibition of histone deacetylation. Butyrate shows furthermore an antimicrobial activity against fungi, yeast and bacteria, which is linked to its toxicity at a high concentration. In fungi there are indications that butyrate induces the production of secondary metabolites potentially via inhibition of histone deacetylases. However, information about the influence of butyrate on growth, primary metabolite production and metabolism, besides lipid catabolism, in fungi is scarce. We have identified the filamentous fungus Penicillium (P.) restrictum as a susceptible target for butyrate treatment in an antimicrobial activity screen. The antimicrobial activity was detected only in the mycelium of the butyrate treated culture. We investigated the effect of butyrate ranging from low (0.001mM) to high (30mM), potentially toxic, concentrations on biomass and antimicrobial activity. Butyrate at high concentrations (3 and 30mM) significantly reduced the fungal biomass. In contrast P. restrictum treated with 0.03mM of butyrate showed the highest antimicrobial activity. We isolated three antimicrobial active compounds, active against Staphylococcus aureus, from P. restrictum cellular extracts treated with butyrate: adenine, its derivate hypoxanthine and the nucleoside derivate adenosine. Production of all three compounds was increased at low butyrate concentrations. Furthermore we found that butyrate influences the intracellular level of the adenine nucleoside derivate cAMP, an important signalling molecule in fungi and various organisms. In conclusion butyrate treatment increases the intracellular levels of adenine and its respective derivatives.

  4. Cellulose acetate butyrate microparticles for controlled release of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, P; Boué, C; Chaumeil, J C

    1996-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate microparticles loaded in carbamazepine were prepared by a solvent evaporation technique. A decrease of the amount of organic solvent (from 80 to 40 ml of methylene chloride) increased the microparticle average diameter (73-111 and 207 microns) and decreased the carbamazepine release rate (T50% increased from 3.3 to 16.8 and 166.4 min). The microparticle area under the curve at 120 min was similar to that obtained with Tegretol LP 200 tablets.

  5. Sodium Butyrate Controls Cardiac Hypertrophy in Experimental Models of Rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhoomika M

    2017-04-07

    The aim of the present research was to study the effect of sodium butyrate (SB) on partial abdominal aorta constriction (PAAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and determine its mechanism of action. Healthy Wistar rats were exposed to PAAC for eight weeks. After eight weeks, we carried out hypertrophic and hemodynamic evaluation and measured oxidative stress parameters and mitochondrial DNA concentration. PAAC control animals exhibited cardiac hypertrophy, decreased hemodynamic functions and oxidative stress. Treatment with SB reduced hypertrophic indices, LV wall thickness, LV collagen levels, cardiomyocyte diameter, serum lipid levels and serum cardiac biomarkers. Treatment with SB also improved hemodynamic functions, prevented oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial DNA concentration. Improvement in hypertrophy due to HDAC inhibition was further confirmed by HDAC mRNA expression studies which revealed that SB decreases expression of prohypertrophic HDAC, i.e., HDAC2, without altering the expression of anti-hypertrophic HDAC5. Sodium butyrate produces beneficial effect on cardiac hypertrophy as is evident, specifically from reduction in hypertrophic parameters including collagen levels, improvement in mitochondrial DNA concentration and preservation of LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. This beneficial effect of sodium butyrate is mediated through downregulation of class I HDACs, specifically HDAC2 without any effect on class II HDAC, i.e., HDAC5. Thus, selective class I HDAC inhibition is required for controlling cardiac hypertrophy. Newer HDAC inhibitors which are class I inhibitor and class II promoter can be designed to obtain a 'pan' or 'dual' natural HDAC 'regulators.'

  6. Effect of the butyrate prodrug pivaloyloxymethyl butyrate (AN9) on a mouse model for spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jonathan D.; Butchbach, Matthew E. R.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an early-onset motor neuron disease that leads to loss of muscle function. Butyrate (BA)-based compounds markedly improve the survival and motor phenotype of SMA mice. In this study, we examine the protective effects of the BA prodrug pivaloyloxymethyl butyrate (AN9) on the survival of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. Oral administration of AN9 beginning at PND04 almost doubled the average lifespan of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. AN9 treatment also increased the growth rate of SMNΔ7 SMA mice when compared to vehicle-treated SMNΔ7 SMA mice. In conclusion, BA prodrugs like AN9 have ameliorative effects on SMNΔ7 SMA mice. PMID:27911337

  7. Increasing butanol/acetone ratio and solvent productivity in ABE fermentation by consecutively feeding butyrate to weaken metabolic strength of butyrate loop.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we attempted to increase butanol/acetone ratio and total solvent productivity in ABE fermentations with corn- and cassava-based media, by consecutively feeding a small amount of butyrate/acetate during solventogenic phase to weaken the metabolic strengths in butyrate/acetate closed-loops. Consecutively feeding a small amount of butyrate (a total of 3.0 g/L-broth) is most effective in improving performance of corn-based ABE fermentations, as it simultaneously increased average butanol/acetone ratio by 23 % (1.92-2.36) and total solvent productivity by 16 % (0.355-0.410 g/L/h) as compared with those of control. However, the butyrate feeding strategy could not improve butanol/acetone ratio and total solvent productivity in cassava-based ABE fermentations, where the metabolic strength of butyrate closed-loop had already been very low.

  8. Strategies for production of butanol and butyl-butyrate through lipase-catalyzed esterification.

    PubMed

    Xin, Fengxue; Basu, Anindya; Yang, Kun-Lin; He, Jianzhong

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a fermentation process for production of butanol and butyl-butyrate by using Clostridium sp. strain BOH3 is developed. This strain is able to produce butyric acid and butanol when it ferments 60 g/L xylose. Meanwhile, it also excreted indigenous lipases (induced by olive oil) which naturally convert butyric acid and butanol into 1.2 g/L of butyl-butyrate. When Bio-OSR was used as both an inducer for lipase and extractant for butyl-butyrate, the butyl-butyrate concentration can reach 6.3 g/L. To further increase the yield, additional lipases and butyric acid are added to the fermentation system. Moreover, kerosene was used as an extractant to remove butyl-butyrate in situ. When all strategies are combined, 22.4 g/L butyl-butyrate can be produced in a fed-batch reactor spiked with 70 g/L xylose and 7.9 g/L butyric acid, which is 4.5-fold of that in a similar system (5 g/L) with hexadecane as the extractant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  10. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  11. Sodium butyrate attenuates high-fat diet-induced steatohepatitis in mice by improving gut microbiota and gastrointestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Da; Pan, Qin; Xin, Feng-Zhi; Zhang, Rui-Nan; He, Chong-Xin; Chen, Guang-Yu; Liu, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Wen; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2017-01-07

    To investigate whether gut microbiota metabolite sodium butyrate (NaB) is an effective substance for attenuating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the internal mechanisms. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups, normal control were fed standard chow and model group were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk, the intervention group were fed HFD for 16 wk and treated with NaB for 8 wk. Gut microbiota from each group were detected at baseline and at 16 wk, liver histology were evaluated and gastrointestinal barrier indicator such as zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1) were detected by immunohistochemistry and realtime-PCR, further serum or liver endotoxin were determined by ELISA and inflammation- or metabolism-associated genes were quantified by real-time PCR. NaB corrected the HFD-induced gut microbiota imbalance in mice, while it considerably elevated the abundances of the beneficial bacteria Christensenellaceae, Blautia and Lactobacillus. These bacteria can produce butyric acid in what seems like a virtuous circle. And butyrate restored HFD induced intestinal mucosa damage, increased the expression of ZO-1 in small intestine, further decreased the levels of gut endotoxin in serum and liver compared with HF group. Endotoxin-associated genes such as TLR4 and Myd88, pro-inflammation genes such as MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IFN-γ in liver or epididymal fat were obviously downregulated after NaB intervention. Liver inflammation and fat accumulation were ameliorated, the levels of TG and cholesterol in liver were decreased after NaB intervention, NAS score was significantly decreased, metabolic indices such as FBG and HOMA-IR and liver function indicators ALT and AST were improved compared with HF group. NaB may restore the dysbiosis of gut microbiota to attenuate steatohepatitis, which is suggested to be a potential gut microbiota modulator and therapeutic substance for NAFLD.

  12. Butyrate modulating effects on pro-inflammatory pathways in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elce, A; Amato, F; Zarrilli, F; Calignano, A; Troncone, R; Castaldo, G; Canani, R B

    2017-08-31

    Butyrate acts as energy source for intestinal epithelial cells and as key mediator of several immune processes, modulating gene expression mainly through histone deacetylation inhibition. Thanks to these effects, butyrate has been proposed for the treatment of many intestinal diseases. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of butyrate on the expression of a large series of target genes encoding proteins involved in pro-inflammatory pathways. We performed quantitative real-time-PCR analysis of the expression of 86 genes encoding proteins bearing to pro-inflammatory pathways, before and after butyrate exposure, in primary epithelial cells derived from human small intestine and colon. Butyrate significantly down-regulated the expression of genes involved in inflammatory response, among which nuclear factor kappa beta, interferon-gamma, Toll like 2 receptor and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. Further confirmations of these data, including studies at protein level, would support the use of butyrate as effective therapeutic strategy in intestinal inflammatory disorders.

  13. Effects of sodium bicarbonate on butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Satoko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Arai, Noriyuki; Ota, Noriko; Ito, Koichi

    2008-12-01

    Butyric acid is detected in periodontal pockets and is thought to be involved in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. We examined the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage. The human gingival carcinoma cell line Ca9-22 was cultured in medium that contained butyric acid with or without sodium bicarbonate. The viability of cells treated with sodium bicarbonate was significantly higher than that of cells treated with butyric acid alone. The effects of butyric acid on ICAM-1 expression were significantly improved by sodium bicarbonate. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, sodium bicarbonate was indicated to be a useful therapeutic agent to reduce the butyric acid-induced periodontal tissue damage.

  14. Supplementation of coated butyric acid in the feed reduces colonization and shedding of Salmonella in poultry.

    PubMed

    Van Immerseel, F; Boyen, F; Gantois, I; Timbermont, L; Bohez, L; Pasmans, F; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R

    2005-12-01

    Short-chain fatty acids have been widely used as feed additives to control Salmonella in poultry. Data on the use of butyric acid in poultry are lacking. In this study, powder form and coated butyric acid were compared in their ability to reduce Salmonella colonization of ceca and internal organs shortly after infection of young chickens with Salmonella enteritidis. In the first trial, 4 groups of 25 specific pathogen free layer chickens were given feed either supplemented with powder form butyric acid, coated butyric acid, a combination of powder form and coated butyric acid (all groups received a total of 0.63 g of butyric acid/kg) or nonsupplemented feed. The specific pathogen free layer chickens were orally infected with 10(6) cfu of S. enteritidis. Coated butyric acid significantly decreased cecal colonization 3 d post-infection compared with control chickens, and powder form butyric acid had no effect. To study long-term shedding and colonization of Salmonella in broilers given coated butyric acid as feed additive (0.63 g of active product butyric acid/kg), 10 Ross broiler chickens were infected at d 5 with 10(5) cfu of S. enteritidis and housed together with 40 noninfected broilers. A control group received nonsupplemented feed. The group of broilers receiving coated butyric acid had a significantly lower number of broilers shedding Salmonella bacteria, but cecal colonization at slaughter age was equal for both groups. In conclusion, butyric acid decreases cecal colonization shortly after infection, decreases fecal shedding, and as a consequence, decreases environmental contamination by S. enteritidis-infected broilers. However, complete elimination can probably only be achieved with a combined approach using both hygienic measures and different protection measures, as the broilers still carried S. enteritidis bacteria in the ceca at slaughter age, although at enrichment level.

  15. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Birren, B W; Taplitz, S J; Herschman, H R

    1987-01-01

    We examined in the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequences to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:3431545

  16. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  17. Alcohol Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Facts Listen Drinks like beer, malt liquor, wine, and hard liquor contain alcohol. Alcohol is the ... alcohol in it than beer, malt liquor, or wine. These drink sizes have about the same amount ...

  18. Alcohol Alert

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  19. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon Family Groups www.al-anon.org National Institute on Alcohol ...

  20. Antimicrobial activity of butyrate glycerides toward Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Namkung, H; Yu, H; Gong, J; Leeson, S

    2011-10-01

    The antimicrobial activities of n-butyric acid and its derivatives against Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens were studied. n-Butyric acid and its derivatives (monobutyrin and a mixture of mono-, di-, and tri-glycerides of butyric acid) were added at different concentrations (ranging from 250 to 7,000 mg/kg to a media inoculated with either Salmonella Typhimurium or C. perfringens. The antimicrobial activity of butyric acid against C. perfringens was measured at 2 bacterium concentrations and 2 inoculations involving ambient aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The most effective antimicrobial activity for Salmonella Typhimurium was observed with n-butyric acid, with 90% inhibition rate at a concentration of 1,500 mg/kg. Although minimal inhibition for Salmonella Typhimurium was observed with butyric acid glycerides, lipase addition to a mixture of mono-, di-, and triglycerides of butyric acid increased (P < 0.01) antimicrobial activity of these derivatives. Antimicrobial activity of butyric acid and its derivative against C. perfringens was higher when using a moderate initial inoculation concentration (10(5)) compared with a higher initial concentration (10(7)) of this bacterium. At a lower inoculation of C. perfringens (10(5)), >90% inhibition rate by all butyric acid glycerides was observed with prior aerobic inoculation at 2,000 mg/kg, whereas using anaerobic inoculation, only 50% monobutyrin maintained >90% inhibitory effect at 3,000 mg/kg. The antimicrobial effect of monobutyrin against C. perfringens was generally higher (P < 0.01) for 50% monobutyrin than for 100% monobutyrin. Either a mixture of butyric acid derivatives or 50% monobutyrin decreased (P < 0.01) C. perfringens in a media containing intestinal contents whereas only 50% monobutyrin decreased (P < 0.01) Salmonella Typhimurium within a media containing cecal contents from mature Leghorns. These results show that n-butyric acid and 50% monobutyrin could be used to control Salmonella

  1. Effects of dietary sodium butyrate on hepatic biotransformation and pharmacokinetics of erythromycin in chickens.

    PubMed

    Csikó, G; Nagy, G; Mátis, G; Neogrády, Z; Kulcsár, Á; Jerzsele, A; Szekér, K; Gálfi, P

    2014-08-01

    Butyrate, a commonly applied feed additive in poultry nutrition, can modify the expression of certain genes, including those encoding cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In comparative in vitro and in vivo experiments, the effect of butyrate on hepatic CYP genes was examined in primary cultures of chicken hepatocytes and in liver samples of chickens collected from animals that had been given butyrate as a feed additive. Moreover, the effect of butyrate on the biotransformation of erythromycin, a marker substance for the activity of enzymes of the CYP3A family, was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Butyrate increased the expression of the avian-specific CYP2H1 both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the avian CYP3A37 expression was decreased in hepatocytes following butyrate exposure, but not in the in vivo model. CYP1A was suppressed by butyrate in the in vitro experiments, and overexpressed in vivo in butyrate-fed animals. The concomitant incubation of hepatocytes with butyrate and erythromycin led to an increased CYP2H1 expression and a less pronounced inhibition of CYP3A37. In in vivo pharmacokinetic experiments, butyrate-fed animals given a single i.m. injection of erythromycin, a slower absorption phase (longer T(half-abs) and delayed T(max)) but a rapid elimination phase of this marker substrate was observed. Although these measurable differences were detected in the pharmacokinetics of erythromycin, it is unlikely that a concomitant application of sodium butyrate with erythromycin or other CYP substrates will cause clinically significant feed-drug interaction in chickens.

  2. Butyrate enhances antibacterial effects while suppressing other features of alternative activation in IL-4-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Maria R; Saxena, Alpana; Reyes, José-Luis; McKay, Derek M

    2016-05-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate is produced by fermentation of dietary fiber by the intestinal microbiota; butyrate is the primary energy source of colonocytes and has immunomodulatory effects. Having shown that macrophages differentiated with IL-4 [M(IL-4)s] can suppress colitis, we hypothesized that butyrate would reinforce an M(IL-4) phenotype. Here, we show that in the presence of butyrate M(IL-4)s display reduced expression of their hallmark markers Arg1 and Ym1 and significantly suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide, IL-12p40, and IL-10 production. Butyrate treatment likely altered the M(IL-4) phenotype via inhibition of histone deacetylation. Functionally, M(IL-4)s treated with butyrate showed increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria, compared with M(IL-4) and this was not accompanied by enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production. Culture of regulatory T cells with M(IL-4)s and M(IL-4 + butyrate)s revealed that both macrophage subsets suppressed expression of the regulatory T-cell marker Foxp3. However, Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4 + butyrate) produced less IL-17A than Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4). These data illustrate the importance of butyrate, a microbial-derived metabolite, in the regulation of gut immunity: the demonstration that butyrate promotes phagocytosis in M(IL-4)s that can limit T-cell production of IL-17A reveals novel aspects of bacterial-host interaction in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  4. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  5. Intraperitoneal administration of butyrate prevents the severity of acetic acid colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malago, Joshua J.; Sangu, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarectal infusion of butyrate improves colorectal disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). However, it is not established whether systemically administered butyrate benefits such patients. The current study aimed at exploring and comparing the potential of intraperitoneally, intrarectally, and orally administered butyrate against acetic acid (AA)-induced UC in rats. Intrarectal administration of 2 ml of 50% AA was done after or without prior treatment of rats for 7 consecutive days with 100 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB) intraperitoneally, intrarectally, or orally. Rats were sacrificed after 48 h of AA-treatment. Subsequently, colon sections were processed routinely for histopathological examination. We clinically observed diarrhea, loose stools, and hemoccult-positive stools, and histologically, epithelial loss and ulceration, crypt damage, goblet cell depletion, hemorrhage, and mucosal infiltration of inflammatory cells. The changes were significantly reduced by intraperitoneal, intrarectal, or oral butyrate, with intraperitoneal butyrate exhibiting the highest potency. It is concluded that intraperitoneal administration of butyrate abrogates the lesions of AA-induced UC and its potency surpasses that of intrarectal or oral butyrate. PMID:25743124

  6. Effect of butyrate on immune response of a chicken macrophage cell line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyric acid is a major short chain fatty acid (SCFA) produced in the gastrointestinal tract by anaerobic bacterial fermentation which has been demonstrated to have beneficial health effects in many species including poultry. To understand the immunomodulating effects of butyrate on chicken macropha...

  7. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  8. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  9. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  10. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  11. Effect of Sodium Butyrate on Growth Performance and Response to Lipopolysaccharide in Weanling Pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of dietary sodium butyrate on growth performance and response to E. coli. lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in weanling pigs. In the first 28 d experiment, 180 pigs (initial BW 6.3 kg) were fed 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% sodium butyrate, or 110 mg/kg d...

  12. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH...

  13. Butyric acid production from red algae by a newly isolated Clostridium sp. S1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Min; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Yunje; Han, Sung Ok; Sang, Byoung-In; Um, Youngsoon

    2015-09-01

    To produce butyric acid from red algae such as Gelidium amansii in which galactose is a main carbohydrate, microorganisms utilizing galactose and tolerating inhibitors in hydrolysis including levulinic acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are required. A newly isolated bacterium, Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid not only from galactose as the sole carbon source but also from a mixture of galactose and glucose through simultaneous utilization. Notably, Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid and a small amount of acetic acid with the butyrate:acetate ratio of 45.4:1 and it even converted acetate to butyric acid. Clostridium sp. S1 tolerated 0.5-2 g levulinic acid/l and recovered from HMF inhibition at 0.6-2.5 g/l, resulting in 85-92% butyric acid concentration of the control culture. When acid-pretreated G. amansii hydrolysate was used, Clostridium sp. S1 produced 4.83 g butyric acid/l from 10 g galactose/l and 1 g glucose/l. Clostridium sp. S1 produces butyric acid from red algae due to its characteristics in sugar utilization and tolerance to inhibitors, demonstrating its advantage as a red algae-utilizing microorganism.

  14. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain RPT-4213

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A newly isolated Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found to produce butyrate under anaerobic conditions. Fermentations using Lactobacilli MRS Broth produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from glucose (0.48 g/g glucose). However, the strain was not capable of utilizing five carbon sugars. To assess the a...

  15. Butyric acid production from softwood hydrolysate by acetate-consuming Clostridium sp. S1 with high butyric acid yield and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsun; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Kyung Min; Youn, Sung Hun; Lee, Sun-Mi; Woo, Han Min; Oh, Min-Kyu; Um, Youngsoon

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the butyric acid production from softwood hydrolysate by acetate-consuming Clostridium sp. S1. Results showed that Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid by simultaneously utilizing glucose and mannose in softwood hydrolysate and, more remarkably, it consumed acetic acid in hydrolysate. Clostridium sp. S1 utilized each of glucose, mannose, and xylose as well as mixed sugars simultaneously with partially repressed xylose utilization. When softwood (Japanese larch) hydrolysate containing glucose and mannose as the main sugars was used, Clostridium sp. S1 produced 21.17g/L butyric acid with the yield of 0.47g/g sugar and the selectivity of 1 (g butyric acid/g total acids) owing to the consumption of acetic acid in hydrolysate. The results demonstrate potential of Clostridium sp. S1 to produce butyric acid selectively and effectively from hydrolysate not only by utilizing mixed sugars simultaneously but also by converting acetic acid to butyric acid.

  16. Is butyrate the link between diet, intestinal microbiota and obesity-related metabolic diseases?

    PubMed

    Brahe, L K; Astrup, A; Larsen, L H

    2013-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that there is a connection between diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal barrier function and the low-grade inflammation that characterizes the progression from obesity to metabolic disturbances, making dietary strategies to modulate the intestinal environment relevant. In this context, the ability of some Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria to produce the short-chain fatty acid butyrate is interesting. A lower abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria has been associated with metabolic risk in humans, and recent studies suggest that butyrate might have an anti-inflammatory potential that can alleviate obesity-related metabolic complications, possibly due to its ability to enhance the intestinal barrier function. Here, we review and discuss the potential of butyrate as an anti-inflammatory mediator in metabolic diseases, and the potential for dietary interventions increasing the intestinal availability of butyrate.

  17. Gas-permeable cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Hales, R H

    1977-09-01

    Gas-permeable cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) contact lenses may often be worn succesfully by aphakic and other patients who are unable to wear hard contact lenses. The comfort characteristics of the CAB lenses are betweeen those of hard and soft contact lenses. They are much more permeable to O2 and CO2 than soft lenses and thus are less apt to cause edema. They are more flexible and more wettable than hard lenses. This study presents 50 patients who, having had to discontinue wearing hard contact lenses because of discomfort, diffuse central corneal edema, or visual problems, were fitted with CAB contact lenses. Thirty of the fifty were able to wear the CAB lenses successfully.

  18. Induction of erythroid differentiadon in K562 cells by different butyrate regimens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jie; Qian, Xin-Hua; Li, Xi-Ping; Yao, Ying-Min

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hemoglobinization induced by butyrate and observe the effects of different butyrate regimens on erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. METHODS: K562 cells, used as an in vitro model system, were stained with benzidine to assess hemoglobin (Hb) production in response to different treatment regimens of butyrate at varied concentrations. Comparison of the percentage of benzidine-positive cells (BZ%)in untreated and butyrate-treated K562 cells was performed. Protein absorption at 414 nm using a spectrophotometer and cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis were employed to determine the changes of Hb production in K562 cells. RESULT: The BZ% increased by 4 to 6 fold and Hb production by 9 to 14 fold 3 d after the cells were incubated with butyrate which selectively promoted fetal hemoglobin(HbF) production in K562 cells. The BZ% increased gradually and reached the peak of l9% to 28% on day 3 or 4 in cells receiving pulse treatment with butyrate for only once, followed by a subsequent rapid fall and on day 7 to 9, it decreased to the level of untreated K562 cells. The length of time for incubation with butyrate was not related to in the increment or the maintenance of the increased level of BZ%. Continuous treatment with butyrate yielded a similar result to that of a single administration of pulse treatment. In contrast, in cells with intermittent pulse treatment the BZ% reached a peak after 72 h and was maintained between 20% and 30% till 3 cycles of treatment was completed. CONCLUSION: Butyrate can induce the expression of globin genes and augment Hb producfion especially that of HbF. A sustained erythroid differentiation of K562 cells can be achieved by intermittent pulse treatment with butyrate which can be an ideal regimen for children with beta globin diseases.

  19. Butyrate Regulates the Expression of Inflammatory and Chemotactic Cytokines In Human Acute Leukemic Cells During Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, Stephanie R.; Pellom, Samuel T.; Shanker, Anil; Adunyah, Samuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor implicated in many studies as a potential therapy for various forms of cancer. High concentrations of butyrate (>1.5 mM) have been shown to activate apoptosis in several cancer cell lines including prostate, breast, and leukemia. Butyrate is also known to influence multiple signaling pathways that are mediators of cytokine production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of high concentrations of butyrate on the cancer microenvironment vis-à-vis apoptosis, cellular migration, and capacity to modulate cytokine expression in cancer cells. The results indicate that high concentrations of butyrate induced a 2-fold activation of caspase-3 and reduced cell viability by 60% in U937 leukemia cells. Within 24 hours, butyrate significantly decreased the levels of chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in HL-60 and U937 cells, and decreased CCL5 in THP-1 leukemia cells. Differential effects were observed in treatments with valproic acid for CCL2 and CCL5 indicating butyrate-specificity. Many of the biological effects examined in this study are linked to activation of the AKT and MAPK signaling pathways; therefore, we investigated whether butyrate alters the levels of phosphorylated forms of these signaling proteins and how it correlated with the expression of chemokines. The results show that butyrate may partially regulate CCL5 production via p38 MAPK. The decrease in p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT levels correlated with the decrease in CCL2 production. These data suggest that while promoting apoptosis, butyrate has the potential to influence the cancer microenvironment by inducing differential expression of cytokines. PMID:27253488

  20. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Claycombe, Kate J; Reindl, Katie M

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk, while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer-preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and butyrate (two major metabolites in colon lumen), we examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of butyrate (0.5-2 mmol/l) and DCA (0.05-0.3 mmol/l) on colon cell proliferation. We hypothesize that butyrate and DCA each modulates the cell cycle and apoptosis via common and distinct cellular signaling targets. In this study, we demonstrated that both butyrate and DCA inhibited cell proliferation by up to 89% and 92% and increased cell apoptosis rate by up to 3.1- and 4.5-fold, respectively. Cell cycle analyses revealed that butyrate led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction, but DCA induced an increase in only G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction when compared with the untreated cells. The examination of early cellular signaling revealed that DCA but not butyrate increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, genomic DNA breakage, the activation of ERK1/2, caspase-3 and PARP. In contrast, DCA decreased activated Rb protein level, and butyrate but not DCA increased p21 expression. Collectively, although both butyrate and DCA inhibit colonic cell proliferation, butyrate increases tumor suppressor gene expression, whereas DCA decreases tumor suppressor activation in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Butyrate-rich Colonic Microenvironment Is a Relevant Selection Factor for Metabolically Adapted Tumor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Serpa, Jacinta; Caiado, Francisco; Carvalho, Tânia; Torre, Cheila; Gonçalves, Luís G.; Casalou, Cristina; Lamosa, Pedro; Rodrigues, Margarida; Zhu, Zhenping; Lam, Eric W. F.; Dias, Sérgio

    2010-01-01

    The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) buyrate is a product of colonic fermentation of dietary fibers. It is the main source of energy for normal colonocytes, but cannot be metabolized by most tumor cells. Butyrate also functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor to control cell proliferation and apoptosis. In consequence, butyrate and its derived drugs are used in cancer therapy. Here we show that aggressive tumor cells that retain the capacity of metabolizing butyrate are positively selected in their microenvironment. In the mouse xenograft model, butyrate-preselected human colon cancer cells gave rise to subcutaneous tumors that grew faster and were more angiogenic than those derived from untreated cells. Similarly, butyrate-preselected cells demonstrated a significant increase in rates of homing to the lung after intravenous injection. Our data showed that butyrate regulates the expression of VEGF and its receptor KDR at the transcriptional level potentially through FoxM1, resulting in the generation of a functional VEGF:KDR autocrine growth loop. Cells selected by chronic exposure to butyrate express higher levels of MMP2, MMP9, α2 and α3 integrins, and lower levels of E-cadherin, a marker for epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The orthotopic model of colon cancer showed that cells preselected by butyrate are able to colonize the animals locally and at distant organs, whereas control cells can only generate a local tumor in the cecum. Together our data shows that a butyrate-rich microenvironment may select for tumor cells that are able to metabolize butyrate, which are also phenotypically more aggressive. PMID:20926374

  2. Iron Modulates Butyrate Production by a Child Gut Microbiota In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dostal, Alexandra; Bircher, Lea; Pham, Van Thanh; Follador, Rainer; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; Chassard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of iron (Fe) availability on butyrate production in the complex bacterial ecosystem of the human gut. Hence, different Fe availabilities were mimicked in an in vitro colonic fermentation model (the polyfermenter intestinal model called PolyFermS) inoculated with immobilized gut microbiota from a child and in batch cultures of the butyrate producer Roseburia intestinalis. Shifts in the microbial community (16S rRNA sequencing and quantitative PCR), metabolic activity (high-performance liquid chromatography), and expression of genes involved in butyrate production were assessed. In the PolyFermS, moderate Fe deficiency resulted in a 1.4-fold increase in butyrate production and a 5-fold increase in butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase gene expression, while very strong Fe deficiency significantly decreased butyrate concentrations and butyrate-producing bacteria compared with the results under normal Fe conditions. Batch cultures of R. intestinalis grown in a low-Fe environment preferentially produced lactate and had reduced butyrate and hydrogen production, in parallel with upregulation of the lactate dehydrogenase gene and downregulation of the pyruvate:ferredoxin-oxidoreductase gene. In contrast, under high-Fe conditions, R. intestinalis cultures showed enhanced butyrate and hydrogen production, along with increased expression of the corresponding genes, compared with the results under normal-Fe conditions. Our data reveal the strong regulatory effect of Fe on gut microbiota butyrate producers and on the concentrations of butyrate, which contributes to the maintenance of host gut health. PMID:26578675

  3. In vitro intestinal bioaccessibility of alkylglycerols versus triacylglycerols as vehicles of butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Martín, Diana; Morán-Valero, María I; Señoráns, Francisco J; Reglero, Guillermo; Torres, Carlos F

    2011-03-01

    Butyric acid has been the subject of much attention last years due to its bioactivity. However, the potential advantages of butyrate are limited by the problem to reach enough plasma concentrations; therefore, pro-drugs have been proposed as an alternative to natural butyrate. A comparative study on in vitro intestinal digestion of 2,3-dibutyroil-1-O-octadecyl glycerol (D-SCAKG) and tributyrin (TB), as potential pro-drugs of butyric acid, was performed. Aliquots were taken at different times of digestion for studying the extent and rate of hydrolysis of both substrates. The micellar phase (MP) and oily phase (OP) formed in the digestion media were separated and their composition in lipid products was analyzed. Initially, it was confirmed that the in vitro model reproduced physiological results by testing against olive oil as a standard lipid. The progress of in vitro intestinal digestion of D-SCAKG was slower than that of TB. TB hydrolyzed completely to butyric acid, whereas D-SCAKG mainly yielded 2-butyroil-1-O-octadecyl glycerol (M-SCAKG), followed by butyric acid and 1-O-octadecyl glycerol (AKG). The MP from both substrates mainly consisted of butyric acid. Minor levels of M-SCAKG and AKG were also found in the MP after hydrolysis of D-SCAKG, the M-SCAKG being mainly distributed in the OP. Therefore, D-SCAKG produced a stable form of esterified butyric acid as M-SCAKG after in vitro intestinal digestion, unlike TB. Additionally, such a product would integrate both bioactive compounds, butyric acid and alkylglycerol, within the same molecule. Free butyric acid and AKG would be also released, which are lipid products of interest as well.

  4. Butyrate induces ROS-mediated apoptosis by modulating miR-22/SIRT-1 pathway in hepatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pant, Kishor; Yadav, Ajay K; Gupta, Parul; Islam, Rakibul; Saraya, Anoop; Venugopal, Senthil K

    2017-03-07

    Butyrate is one of the short chain fatty acids, produced by the gut microbiota during anaerobic fermentation of dietary fibres. It has been shown that it can inhibit tumor progression via suppressing histone deacetylase and can induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, the comprehensive pathway by which butyrate mediates apoptosis and growth arrest in cancer cells still remains unclear. In this study, the role of miR-22 in butyrate-mediated ROS release and induction of apoptosis was determined in hepatic cells. Intracellular expression of miR-22 was increased when the Huh 7 cells were incubated with sodium butyrate. Over-expression of miR-22 or addition of sodium butyrate inhibited SIRT-1 expression and enhanced the ROS production. Incubation of cells with anti-miR-22 reversed the effects of butyrate. Butyrate induced apoptosis via ROS production, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3, whereas addition of N-acetyl cysteine or anti-miR-22 reversed these butyrate-induced effects. Furthermore, sodium butyrate inhibited cell growth and proliferation, whereas anti-miR-22 inhibited these butyrate-mediated changes. The expression of PTEN and gsk-3 was found to be increased while p-akt and β-catenin expression was decreased significantly by butyrate. These data showed that butyrate modulated both apoptosis and proliferation via miR-22 expression in hepatic cells.

  5. In vitro and in vivo study of transcriptome alternation induced by butyrate in cattle using deep RNA-seq

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs,), especially butyrate, affect cell differentiation, proliferation, and motility. Furthermore, butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its inhibition on histone deacetylases (HDACs). Butyrate is a potent inducer of histone hyper-acetylation in cells a...

  6. Butyrate plays differential roles in cellular signaling in cancerous HCT116 and noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects in colon. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate plays differential roles in cancerous and non-cancerous cells through si...

  7. AMPK synergizes with the combined treatment of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate and sodium butyrate to upregulate phase II detoxifying enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Keisuke; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Konishi, Yotaro; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2013-07-01

    Phase II enzymes play important roles in detoxifying xenobiotics. We previously reported that both 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) and sodium butyrate individually increased phase II enzyme activities. Here, we determined the combined action of ACA and sodium butyrate on phase II enzyme activities in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC 6). ACA and sodium butyrate synergistically increased phase II enzyme activities. Protein levels of intranuclear transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were increased by ACA or sodium butyrate treatment, but treatment with both did not produce a synergistic effect. Intranuclear p53 protein levels were increased by ACA but decreased by sodium butyrate alone or combined treatment with ACA and sodium butyrate. In contrast, p53 acetylation was promoted by sodium butyrate and the ACA and sodium butyrate combination. Inhibition of AMPK activity decreased phase II enzyme activities that were upregulated by treatment with ACA plus sodium butyrate or other phytochemicals, including kaempferol, quercetin, and epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Combined treatment with ACA and sodium butyrate increased phosphorylated AMPK levels. These results suggest that ACA and sodium butyrate synergistically contribute to xenobiotics metabolism. The combined ACA and sodium butyrate treatment synergistically upregulated phase II enzyme activities through AMPK activation and p53 acetylation. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. In vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of calcium [1-14C]butyrate in free or protected forms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyrate is a by-product of microbial carbohydrate fermentation that occurs primarily in the large intestine. When added to feed, butyrate quickly disappears in the upper digestive tract. Because butyrate is important for the epithelial cell development and for mucosal integrity, and for animal grow...

  9. Butyrate inhibits cancerous HCT116 cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser...

  10. Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Oh; Wang, Yi; Lu, Ting; Jin, Yong-Su; Blaschek, Hans P

    2017-01-01

    Spo0A is a master regulator that governs the metabolic shift of solventogenic Clostridium species such as Clostridium beijerinckii. Its disruption can thus potentially cause a significant alteration of cellular physiology as well as metabolic patterns. To investigate the specific effect of spo0A disruption in C. beijerinckii, a spo0A mutant of C. beijerinckii was characterized in this study. In a batch fermentation with pH control at 6.5, the spo0A mutant accumulated butyrate and butanol up to 8.96 g/L and 3.32 g/L, respectively from 60 g/L glucose. Noticing the unique phenotype of the spo0A mutant accumulating both butyrate and butanol at significant concentrations, we decided to use the spo0A mutant for the production of butyl butyrate that can be formed by the condensation of butyrate and butanol during the ABE fermentation in the presence of the enzyme lipase. Butyl butyrate is a value-added chemical that has numerous uses in the food and fragrance industry. Moreover, butyl butyrate as a biofuel is compatible with Jet A-1 aviation kerosene and used for biodiesel enrichment. In an initial trial of small-scale extractive batch fermentation using hexadecane as the extractant with supplementation of lipase CalB, the spo0A mutant was subjected to acid crash due to the butyrate accumulation, and thus produced only 98 mg/L butyl butyrate. To alleviate the butyrate toxicity, the biphasic medium was supplemented with 10 g/L CaCO3 and 5 g/L butanol. The butyl butyrate production was then increased up to 2.73 g/L in the hexadecane layer. When continuous agitation was performed to enhance the esterification and extraction of butyl butyrate, 3.32 g/L butyl butyrate was obtained in the hexadecane layer. In this study, we successfully demonstrated the use of the C. beijerinckii spo0A mutant for the butyl butyrate production through the simultaneous ABE fermentation, condensation, and extraction. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 106-112. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals

  11. Mechanism of butyrate-induced vasorelaxation of rat mesenteric resistance artery.

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, P. I.; McKinnon, W.; Poston, L.

    1996-01-01

    1. The vasorelaxant effect of the sodium salt of the short chain fatty acid, butyrate, on preconstricted rat small mesenteric arteries (mean inner diameter approximately 300 microns) was characterized. Isometric force development was measured with a myograph, and intracellular pH (pHi) was simultaneously monitored, in arteries loaded with the fluorescent dye BCECF in its acetomethoxy form. Sodium butyrate (substituted isosmotically for NaCl) was applied to arteries after noradrenaline (NA) or high K+ contractures were established. 2. Arteries preconstricted with a concentration of NA inducing an approximately half maximal contraction were relaxed by 91.5 +/- 6.3% by 50 mmol l-1 butyrate. This concentration of butyrate did not, however, cause a significant relaxation of contractures to a maximal (5 mumol l-1) NA concentration, and also failed to relax significantly contractures stimulated by high (45 and 90 mmol l-1) K+ solutions. Contractures elicited with a combination of NA (at a submaximal concentration) and 45 mmol l-1 K+ were, however, markedly relaxed by butyrate. 3. Investigation of the concentration-dependency of the butyrate-induced relaxation of the half maximal NA response revealed an EC50 for butyrate of approximately 22 mmol l-1. 4. Sodium butyrate (50 mmol l-1) caused pHi to decrease from 7.25 +/- 0.02 to 6.89 +/- 0.08 (n = 4, P < 0.001). However, the vasorelaxant effect of butyrate on the submaximal NA contracture was not significantly modified when this fall in intracellular pH was prevented by the simultaneous application of NH4Cl. 5. Butyrate-induced relaxation was also unaffected by endothelial denudation and inhibition of NO synthase with N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 mumol l-1). 6. The relaxation of the NA contracture by 50 mmol l-1 sodium butyrate was abolished in arteries pretreated with the cyclic AMP antagonist Rp-cAMPS (25 mumol l-1). 7. We conclude that the butyrate-induced relaxation of the NA contracture is independent of

  12. Two cytotoxic cell proteinase genes are differentially sensitive to sodium butyrate.

    PubMed Central

    Frégeau, C J; Helgason, C D; Bleackley, R C

    1992-01-01

    The 5'-flanking regions of two cytotoxic cell protease genes, CCP1 and 2, are sufficient to confer cytotoxic T lymphocyte-specific expression when fused to a reporter gene. The two regulatory regions are, however, differentially sensitive to treatment of the recipient cell, MTL 2.8.2, with sodium butyrate. With CCP1 a six-fold increase in cat expression was observed, whereas CCP2 was insensitive to the butyrate treatment. One major butyrate-sensitive regions was defined in the CCP1 5'-flanking sequence between -243 to -112 and another less effective one between-682 to -427. These fragments of DNA were also able to confer responsiveness to butyrate when ligated to a heterologous fos promoter. These sequences within the 5' flank of CCP1 share homology with other elements that have been defined as butyrate-responsive. We believe that our results argue against a pleiotropic affect of butyrate such as histone acetylation. More likely sodium butyrate is mediating a specific stimulation of transcription through modification of the activities of selected transcriptional regulatory proteins that in turn affect their interactions with proteins bound to the promoter. Images PMID:1620608

  13. Butyrate Protects Rat Liver against Total Hepatic Ischemia Reperfusion Injury with Bowel Congestion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingbao; Wang, Fangrui; Ma, Zhenyu; Qiao, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable consequence of major liver surgery, especially in liver transplantation with bowel congestion, during which endotoxemia is often evident. The inflammatory response aggravated by endotoxin after I/R contributes to liver dysfunction and failure. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of butyrate, a naturally occurring four-carbon fatty acid in the body and a dietary component of foods such as cheese and butter, on hepatic injury complicated by enterogenous endotoxin, as well as to examine the underlying mechanisms involved. SD rats were subjected to a total hepatic ischemia for 30 min after pretreatment with either vehicle or butyrate, followed by 6 h and 24 h of reperfusion. Butyrate preconditioning markedly improved hepatic function and histology, as indicated by reduced transaminase levels and ameliorated tissue pathological changes. The inflammatory factors levels, macrophages activation, TLR4 expression, and neutrophil infiltration in live were attenuated by butyrate. Butyrate also maintained the intestinal barrier structures, reversed the aberrant expression of ZO-1, and decreased the endotoxin translocation. We conclude that butyrate inhibition of endotoxin translocation, macrophages activation, inflammatory factors production, and neutrophil infiltration is involved in the alleviation of total hepatic I/R liver injury in rats. This suggests that butyrate should potentially be utilized in liver transplantation. PMID:25171217

  14. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  16. Sodium butyrate mitigates in vitro ammonia generation in cecal content of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anping; Wang, Yan; Di Liao, Xin; Wu, Yinbao; Liang, Juan Boo; Laudadio, Vito; Tufarelli, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    One of the environmental challenges that modern poultry industry faced is odor pollution caused by ammonia emission. The objectives of the study were to determine the effect of sodium butyrate on the production of ammonia in the cecal contents of laying hens using in vitro gas production study and to elucidate the mechanism behind it. The study consisted of a control (without sodium butyrate), and three experimental groups added with 10, 15, and 20 mg of sodium butyrate, respectively. Results showed that ammonia production in headspace of the syringe decreased by 8.2, 23, and 23 %, respectively, while ammonium production from the fermentation broth decreased by 6.3, 14.4, and 13.7 %, respectively. Sodium butyrate had no significant effect on the contents of uric acid and urea, nitrate-N, or total N in all treatments. However, sodium butyrate decreased the urease and uricase activities (P < 0.05) in the fermentation broth. Sodium butyrate also altered volatile fatty acids profile of the fermentation broth by decreasing the production of isovalerate (P < 0.05) and increasing those of acetate, butyrate, and isobutyrate (P < 0.05). The MiSeq System Sequencing results showed that sodium butyrate increased the relative abundance of Bacteroides and Faecalibacterium (P < 0.05) and decreased the relative abundance of Desulfovibrio, Helicobacter, and Campylobacter (P < 0.05).Our results concluded that sodium butyrate changes the diversity and relative abundance of the microbes which altered the fermentation characteristics leading to reduction in ammonia production.

  17. Butyrate stimulates tissue-type plasminogen-activator synthesis in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, T; van den Berg, J; Töns, A; Platenburg, G; Rijken, D C; van den Berg, E

    1987-01-01

    Incubation of cultured human endothelial cells with 5 mM-dibutyryl cyclic AMP led to an approx. 2-fold increase in tissue-type plasminogen-activator (t-PA) production over a 24 h incubation period. The stimulating effect of dibutyryl cyclic AMP could be explained by the slow liberation of butyrate, as the effect could be reproduced by addition of free butyrate to the medium, but not by addition of 8-bromo cyclic AMP or forskolin, agents known to raise intracellular cyclic AMP levels. With butyrate, an accelerated accumulation of t-PA antigen in the conditioned medium (CM) was observed after a lag period of about 6 h. Increasing amounts of butyrate caused an increasingly stimulatory effect, reaching a plateau at 5 mM-butyrate. The relative enhancement of t-PA production in the presence of 5 mM-butyrate varied among different endothelial cell cultures from 6- to 25-fold in 24 h CM. Such an increase in t-PA production was observed with both arterial and venous endothelial cells. The butyrate-induced increases in t-PA production were accompanied by increased t-PA mRNA levels. Analysis of radiolabelled CM and cell extracts by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated that the potent action of butyrate is probably restricted to a small number of proteins. The accumulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in CM from butyrate-treated cells varied only moderately. In our study of the relationship between structure and stimulatory activity, we found that a straight-chain C4 monocarboxylate structure with a methyl group at one end and a carboxy moiety at the other seems to be required for the optimal induction of t-PA in cultured endothelial cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2827633

  18. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Methods Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5–5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Results Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin

  19. Comparative In silico Analysis of Butyrate Production Pathways in Gut Commensals and Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Swadha; Kaur, Harrisham; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of butyrate by commensal bacteria plays a crucial role in maintenance of human gut health while dysbiosis in gut microbiome has been linked to several enteric disorders. Contrastingly, butyrate shows cytotoxic effects in patients with oral diseases like periodontal infections and oral cancer. In addition to these host associations, few syntrophic bacteria couple butyrate degradation with sulfate reduction and methane production. Thus, it becomes imperative to understand the distribution of butyrate metabolism pathways and delineate differences in substrate utilization between pathogens and commensals. The bacteria utilize four pathways for butyrate production with different initial substrates (Pyruvate, 4-aminobutyrate, Glutarate and Lysine) which follow a polyphyletic distribution. A comprehensive mining of complete/draft bacterial genomes indicated conserved juxtaposed genomic arrangement in all these pathways. This gene context information was utilized for an accurate annotation of butyrate production pathways in bacterial genomes. Interestingly, our analysis showed that inspite of a beneficial impact of butyrate in gut, not only commensals, but a few gut pathogens also possess butyrogenic pathways. The results further illustrated that all the gut commensal bacteria (Faecalibacterium, Roseburia, Butyrivibrio, and commensal species of Clostridia etc) ferment pyruvate for butyrate production. On the contrary, the butyrogenic gut pathogen Fusobacterium utilizes different amino acid metabolism pathways like those for Glutamate (4-aminobutyrate and Glutarate) and Lysine for butyrogenesis which leads to a concomitant release of harmful by-products like ammonia in the process. The findings in this study indicate that commensals and pathogens in gut have divergently evolved to produce butyrate using distinct pathways. No such evolutionary selection was observed in oral pathogens (Porphyromonas and Filifactor) which showed presence of pyruvate as well as

  20. Preparation and characterization of a customized cellulose acetate butyrate dispersion for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vaithiyalingam, Siva; Nutan, Mohammad; Reddy, Indra; Khan, Mansoor

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to prepare and characterize the aqueous-based pseudolatex system of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) for controlled drug delivery. Aqueous pseudolatex systems are advantageous over organic-based coating systems because these systems are devoid of criteria pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nonmethane volatile organic compounds, and sulfur dioxide. Pseudolatex was prepared with CAB and polyvinyl alcohol (stabilizer) by a polymer emulsification technique. The stability of pseudolatex was evaluated. Particle size was measured and rheological experiments were conducted. The glass transition temperature, microscopic free volume, permeation coefficient, and mechanical properties of plasticized pseudolatex films were estimated. Surface roughness of coating on inert Nu-Pareil beads (Ingredient Technology Corp., Mahwah, NJ) was measured as a function of coating weight gain. The CAB Pseudolatex was found to be stabilized by steric forces. From intrinsic viscosity, the thickness of the stabilization layer was estimated. An increase in polymeric particles proportionately decreased the thickness of the stabilization layer. All the essential properties of a coating membrane such as microscopic free-volume fraction, permeability coefficient, mechanical properties, and glass transition temperature were fairly controllable as a function of plasticizer concentration. The pseudolatex dispersion of CAB was stable with negligible sedimentation volume and a particle size of 300 nm. Because CAB is water insoluble and non-ionizable, this pseudolatex can be used for pH-independent coating. The films obtained were strong and flexible for controlled drug delivery applications. Coating with the CAB dispersion reduced the surface roughness of beads but it remained stable as a function of increase in coating weight gain.

  1. Sodium butyrate attenuates high-fat diet-induced steatohepatitis in mice by improving gut microbiota and gastrointestinal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Da; Pan, Qin; Xin, Feng-Zhi; Zhang, Rui-Nan; He, Chong-Xin; Chen, Guang-Yu; Liu, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Wen; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate whether gut microbiota metabolite sodium butyrate (NaB) is an effective substance for attenuating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the internal mechanisms. METHODS Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups, normal control were fed standard chow and model group were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk, the intervention group were fed HFD for 16 wk and treated with NaB for 8 wk. Gut microbiota from each group were detected at baseline and at 16 wk, liver histology were evaluated and gastrointestinal barrier indicator such as zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1) were detected by immunohistochemistry and realtime-PCR, further serum or liver endotoxin were determined by ELISA and inflammation- or metabolism-associated genes were quantified by real-time PCR. RESULTS NaB corrected the HFD-induced gut microbiota imbalance in mice, while it considerably elevated the abundances of the beneficial bacteria Christensenellaceae, Blautia and Lactobacillus. These bacteria can produce butyric acid in what seems like a virtuous circle. And butyrate restored HFD induced intestinal mucosa damage, increased the expression of ZO-1 in small intestine, further decreased the levels of gut endotoxin in serum and liver compared with HF group. Endotoxin-associated genes such as TLR4 and Myd88, pro-inflammation genes such as MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IFN-γ in liver or epididymal fat were obviously downregulated after NaB intervention. Liver inflammation and fat accumulation were ameliorated, the levels of TG and cholesterol in liver were decreased after NaB intervention, NAS score was significantly decreased, metabolic indices such as FBG and HOMA-IR and liver function indicators ALT and AST were improved compared with HF group. CONCLUSION NaB may restore the dysbiosis of gut microbiota to attenuate steatohepatitis, which is suggested to be a potential gut microbiota modulator and therapeutic substance for NAFLD. PMID:28104981

  2. Chitin butyrate coated electrospun nylon-6 fibers for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Hem Raj; Kim, Han Joo; Bhatt, Lok Ranjan; Joshi, Mahesh Kumar; Kim, Eun Kyo; Kim, Jeong In; Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Hui, K. S.; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we describe the preparation and characterizations of chitin butyrate (CB) coated nylon-6 nanofibers using single-spinneret electrospinning of blends solution. The physicochemical properties of nylon-6 composite fibers with different proportions of CB to nylon-6 were determined using FE-SEM, TEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed that the nylon-6 and CB were immiscible in the as-spun nanofibers, and phase separated nanofiber morphology becomes more pronounced with increasing amounts of CB. The bone formation ability of composite fibers was evaluated by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid. In order to assay the cytocompatibility and cell behavior on the composite scaffolds, osteoblast cells were seeded on the matrix. Results suggest that the deposition of CB layer on the surface of nylon-6 could increase its cell compatibility and bone formation ability. Therefore, as-synthesized nanocomposite fibrous mat has great potentiality in hard tissue engineering.

  3. Aspects of pharmacodynamics and biotransformation of the glucocorticoid resocortol butyrate.

    PubMed

    Coert, A; Verheijen, F; Horspool, L J I; Mol, J A

    2004-10-01

    Aspects of the biotransformation and pharmacodynamics of the novel glucocorticoid resocortol butyrate (RCB) and its metabolites were assessed in vitro and in vivo in comparison with selected reference compounds. The main route of biotransformation of ((3)H)-RCB in the skin and the liver was 5alpha-reduction of the A-ring followed by reduction of the 3-carbonyl group. In the liver, metabolism was much more rapid than in the skin and 5beta-reduction also occurred. RCB had a relative binding affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor similar to that of triamcinolone acetonide, about 1.5 times that of dexamethasone, three times that of betamethasone valerate (BMV) and 10-14 times that of cortisol. The metabolites of RCB displayed only low to very low affinities for the receptor. The suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis was investigated in placebo- and positive-controlled studies in dogs by measurement of basal and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulated plasma cortisol concentrations. The AUC of the plasma cortisol vs. time curve following CRH stimulation, a measure of adrenal suppression, was reduced significantly after topical application of BMV compared with the pretreatment values. The AUC in the RCB group was not reduced significantly. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone concentrations were not affected. Oral administration of RCB did not suppress adrenocortical function, whereas BMV induced almost complete suppression of basal and CRH-induced cortisol concentrations. The pharmacodynamics of RCB makes it a relatively safe glucocorticosteroid for topical application.

  4. Comparative pharmaceutical evaluation of brand and generic clobetasone butyrate ointments.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Fukami, Toshiro; Koide, Tatsuo; Onuki, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Toyofumi; Metori, Koichi; Katori, Noriko; Hiyama, Yukio; Tomono, Kazuo

    2014-03-10

    In the present study, we performed comprehensive pharmaceutical evaluation among an original clobetasone butyrate (CLB) ointment product and three generic products. Although spherocrystal images were observed under a polarizing microscope for only Kindavate®, the original product, distribution of active and inactive ingredients was chemically equivalent between the original and generic medicine by the attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. These results suggest that the spherocrystals observed in Kindavate® are composed of hydrocarbon. On GC/MS, it was revealed that linear alkanes having 25-27 carbon atoms are densely present in Sun White®, the base used in Kindavate®. On the other hand, linear alkanes having 22-31 carbon atoms were broadly distributed in most other white petrolatums. In the CLB ointment products, the distribution equivalent of linear alkane to Sun White® was observed only in Kindavate®. Thus, the GC/MS method is extremely useful for identification of white petrolatum used in the ointment. A similar amount of CLB among the pharmaceutical products was detected in the skin tissue by skin accumulation test, although there were the differences in rheological properties and the quality of white petrolatum. The present results will be very useful for pharmacists in selecting medicine products that match the needs of the patient. Such pharmaceutical information will help spread objective knowledge about products in the future, and will contribute to the appropriate selection of medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diakos, Christos; Prieschl, Eva E.; Saeemann, Marcus D.; Boehmig, Georg A.; Csonga, Robert; Sobanov, Yury; Baumruker, Thomas; Zlabinger, Gerhard J. . E-mail: gerhard.zlabinger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-10-20

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-{alpha} transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling.

  7. Combining microbial cultures for efficient production of electricity from butyrate in a microbial electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Joseph F; Garcia-Peña, Ines; Parameswaran, Prathap; Torres, César I; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-10-01

    Butyrate is an important product of anaerobic fermentation; however, it is not directly used by characterized strains of the highly efficient anode respiring bacteria (ARB) Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrochemical cells. By combining a butyrate-oxidizing community with a Geobacter rich culture, we generated a microbial community which outperformed many naturally derived communities found in the literature for current production from butyrate and rivaled the highest performing natural cultures in terms of current density (∼ 11A/m(2)) and Coulombic efficiency (∼ 70%). Microbial community analyses support the shift in the microbial community from one lacking efficient ARB in the marine hydrothermal vent community to a community consisting of ∼ 80% Geobacter in the anode biofilm. This demonstrates the successful production and adaptation of a novel microbial culture for generating electrical current from butyrate with high current density and high Coulombic efficiency, by combining two mixed microbial cultures containing complementing biochemical pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Combining microbial cultures for efficient production of electricity from butyrate in a microbial electrochemical cell

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Joseph F.; Garcia-Peña, Ines; Parameswaran, Prathap; Torres, César I.; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Butyrate is an important product of anaerobic fermentation; however, it is not directly used by characterized strains of the highly efficient anode respiring bacteria (ARB) Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrochemical cells. By combining a butyrate-oxidizing community with a Geobacter rich culture, we generated a microbial community which outperformed many naturally derived communities found in the literature for current production from butyrate and rivaled the highest performing natural cultures in terms of current density (~11 A/m2) and Coulombic efficiency (~70%). Microbial community analyses support the shift in the microbial community from one lacking efficient ARB in the marine hydrothermal vent community to a community consisting of ~80% Geobacter in the anode biofilm. This demonstrates the successful production and adaptation of a novel microbial culture for generating electrical current from butyrate with high current density and high Coulombic efficiency, by combining two mixed micro bial cultures containing complementing biochemical pathways. PMID:25048958

  9. Excess rumen product anions in cattle. II. Toxic and lethal effects with butyrate.

    PubMed Central

    Bide, R W; Dorward, W J

    1983-01-01

    Toxicity to butyrate was observed in 100-250 kg male Holstein calves following intravenous injection of 0.7-3.6 mmole/kg body weight, intravenous infusion with 0.12-0.53 mmole/min/kg body weight and intraruminal dosage with 19.4 mmole/kg body weight butyrate. Lower doses produced ataxia and serous nasal discharge. Higher doses produced sudden flaccid paralysis and death from asphyxia. No postmortem lesions, gross or histological, were observed. Plasma K+ was reduced to 2.2-2.5 mEq/L. When infusions were stopped, rapid recovery preceded clearance of butyrate and low K+ remained. Nerve depolarization in the central nervous system may be the cause of the toxic effects. Butyrate acidosis is suggested as a factor in unexplained sudden deaths in ruminants. PMID:6883190

  10. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (a) General. (1) A tolerance is established for the herbicide 4-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric... established for the combined residues, free and conjugated, of the herbicide MCPB, 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy...

  11. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (a) General. (1) A tolerance is established for the herbicide 4-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric... established for the combined residues, free and conjugated, of the herbicide MCPB, 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy...

  12. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (a) General. (1) A tolerance is established for the herbicide 4-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric... established for the combined residues, free and conjugated, of the herbicide MCPB, 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy...

  13. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (a) General. (1) A tolerance is established for the herbicide 4-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric... established for the combined residues, free and conjugated, of the herbicide MCPB, 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy...

  14. Butyrate and glucose metabolism by colonocytes in experimental colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, M; Krishnan, S; Ramakrishna, B; Mathan, M; Pulimood, A; Murthy, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Impaired colonocyte metabolism of butyrate has been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Colonocyte butyrate metabolism was investigated in experimental colitis in mice.
METHODS—Colitis was induced in Swiss outbred white mice by oral administration of 4% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Colonocytes isolated from colitic and normal control mice were incubated with [14C]butyrate or glucose, and production of 14CO2, as well as of intermediate metabolites (acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate), was measured. The effect of different substrate concentrations on oxidation was also examined.
RESULTS—Butyrate oxidation (µmol/h per mg protein; mean (SEM)) was significantly reduced in DSS colitis, values on day 7 of DSS administration being 0.177 (0.007) compared with 0.406 (0.035) for control animals (p<0.001). Glucose oxidation (µmol/h per mg protein; mean (SEM)) on day 7 of DSS administration was significantly higher than in controls (0.06 (0.006) v 0.027 (0.004), p<0.001). Production of β-hydroxybutyrate was decreased and production of lactate increased in DSS colitis compared with controls. Increasing butyrate concentration from 10 to 80 mM enhanced oxidation in DSS colitis (0.036 (0.002) to 0.285 (0.040), p<0.001), although it continued to remain lower than in controls. Surface and crypt epithelial cells showed similar ratios of butyrate to glucose oxidation. When 1 mM DSS was added to normal colonocytes in vitro, it did not alter butyrate oxidation. The initial histological lesion of DSS administration was very patchy and involved crypt cells. Abnormal butyrate oxidation became apparent only after six days of DSS administration, at which time histological abnormalities were more widespread.
CONCLUSIONS—Colonocyte metabolism of butyrate, but not of glucose, is impaired in DSS colitis, and may be important in pathophysiology. Histological abnormalities preceded measurable defects in butyrate

  15. Butyrate induces reactive oxygen species production and affects cell cycle progression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, M-C; Tsai, Y-L; Chen, Y-W; Chan, C-P; Huang, C-F; Lan, W-C; Lin, C-C; Lan, W-H; Jeng, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids, such as butyric acid and propionic acid, are metabolic by-products generated by periodontal microflora such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, the effects of butyrate on the biological activities of gingival fibroblasts (GFs) are not well elucidated. Human GFs were exposed to various concentrations of butyrate (0.5-16 mm) for 24 h. Viable cells that excluded trypan blue were counted. Cell cycle distribution of GFs was analyzed by propidium iodide-staining flow cytometry. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). Total RNA and protein lysates were isolated and subjected to RT-PCR using specific primers or to western blotting using specific antibodies, respectively. Butyrate inhibited the growth of GFs, as indicated by a decrease in the number of viable cells. This event was associated with an induction of G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest by butyrate (4-16 mm) in GFs. However, no marked apoptosis of GFs was noted in this experimental condition. Butyrate (> 2 mm) inhibited the expression of cdc2, cdc25C and cyclinB1 mRNAs and reduced the levels of Cdc2, Cdc25C and cyclinB1 proteins in GFs, as determined using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. This toxic effect of butyrate was associated with the production of ROS. These results suggest that butyrate generated by periodontal pathogens may be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases via the induction of ROS production and the impairment of cell growth, cell cycle progression and expression of cell cycle-related genes in GFs. These events are important in the initiation and prolongation of inflammatory processes in periodontal diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Comparison of three different application routes of butyrate to improve colonic anastomotic strength in rats.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, J W A M; Jongen, A C H M; Boonen, B T C; van Rijn, S; Scognamiglio, F; Stucchi, L; Gijbels, M J J; Marsich, E; Bouvy, N D

    2017-03-01

    Despite extensive research, anastomotic leakage (AL) remains one of the most dreaded complications after colorectal surgery. Since butyrate enemas are known to enhance anastomotic healing, several administration routes have been explored in this study. Three intraluminal approaches involving butyrate were investigated: (1) butyrin-elucidating patch, (2) a single injection of hyaluronan-butyrate (HA-But) prior to construction of the proximal anastomosis and (3) rectal hyaluronan-butyrate (HA-But) enemas designed for distal anastomoses. The main outcome was AL and secondary outcomes were bursting pressure, histological analysis of the anastomosis, zymography to detect MMP activity and qPCR for gene expression of MMP2, MMP9, MUC2 and TFF3. Neither the patches nor the injections led to a reduction of AL in experiments 1 and 2. In experiment 3, a significant reduction of AL was accomplished with the (HA-But) enema compared to the control group together with a higher bursting pressure. Histological analysis detected only an increased inflammation in experiment 2 in the hyaluronan injection group compared to the control group. No other differences were found regarding wound healing. Zymography identified a decreased proenzyme of MMP9 when HA-But was administered as a rectal enema. qPCR did not show any significant differences between groups in any experiment. Butyrate enemas are effective in the enhancement of colonic anastomosis. Enhanced butyrate-based approaches designed to reduce AL in animal models for both proximal and distal anastomoses were not more effective than were butyrate enemas alone. Further research should focus on how exogenous butyrate can improve anastomotic healing after gastrointestinal surgery.

  17. Sustained Induction of Fetal Hemoglobin by Pulse Butyrate Therapy in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atweh, George F.; Sutton, Millicent; Nassif, Imad; Boosalis, Vassiliki; Dover, George J.; Wallenstein, Sylvan; Wright, Elizabeth; McMahon, Lillian; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Faller, Douglas V.; Perrine, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) protect from many of the complications of sickle cell disease and lead to improved survival. Butyrate and other short chain fatty acids were previously shown to increase Hb F production in erythroid cells in vitro and in animal models in vivo. However, butyrates are also known to inhibit the proliferation of many cell types, including erythroid cells. Experience with the use of butyrate in animal models and in early clinical trials demonstrated that the Hb F response may be lost after prolonged administration of high doses of butyrate. We hypothesized that this loss of response may be a result of the antiproliferative effects of butyrate. We designed a regimen consisting of intermittent or pulse therapy in which butyrate was administered for 4 days followed by 10 to 24 days with no drug exposure. This pulse regimen induced fetal globin gene expression in 9 of 11 patients. The mean Hb F in this group increased from 7.2% to 21.0% (P < .002) after intermittent butyrate therapy for a mean duration of 29.9 weeks. This was associated with a parallel increase in the number of F cells and F reticulocytes. The total hemoglobin levels also increased from a mean of 7.8 g/dL to a mean of 8.8 g/dL (P < .006). The increased levels of Hb F were sustained in all responders, including 1 patient who has been on pulse butyrate therapy for more than 28 months. This regimen, which resulted in a marked and sustained increase in Hb F levels in more than two thirds of the adult sickle cell patients enrolled in this study, was well tolerated without adverse side effects. These encouraging results require confirmation along with an appropriate evaluation of clinical outcomes in a larger number of patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:10068649

  18. Oncogenic Ras promotes butyrate-induced apoptosis through inhibition of gelsolin expression.

    PubMed

    Klampfer, Lidija; Huang, Jie; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji; Augenlicht, Leonard

    2004-08-27

    Activation of Ras promotes oncogenesis by altering a multiple of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. Oncogenic Ras can either promote or inhibit apoptosis, depending on the cell type and the nature of the apoptotic stimuli. The response of normal and transformed colonic epithelial cells to the short chain fatty acid butyrate, a physiological regulator of epithelial cell maturation, is also divergent: normal epithelial cells proliferate, and transformed cells undergo apoptosis in response to butyrate. To investigate the role of k-ras mutations in butyrate-induced apoptosis, we utilized HCT116 cells, which harbor an oncogenic k-ras mutation and two isogenic clones with targeted inactivation of the mutant k-ras allele, Hkh2, and Hke-3. We demonstrated that the targeted deletion of the mutant k-ras allele is sufficient to protect epithelial cells from butyrate-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this, we showed that apigenin, a dietary flavonoid that has been shown to inhibit Ras signaling and to reverse transformation of cancer cell lines, prevented butyrate-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. To investigate the mechanism whereby activated k-ras sensitizes colonic cells to butyrate, we performed a genome-wide analysis of Ras target genes in the isogenic cell lines HCT116, Hkh2, and Hke-3. The gene exhibiting the greatest down-regulation by the activating k-ras mutation was gelsolin, an actin-binding protein whose expression is frequently reduced or absent in colorectal cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We demonstrated that silencing of gelsolin expression by small interfering RNA sensitized cells to butyrate-induced apoptosis through amplification of the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-7. These data therefore demonstrate that gelsolin protects cells from butyrate-induced apoptosis and suggest that Ras promotes apoptosis, at least in part, through its ability to down-regulate the expression of gelsolin.

  19. CREB-binding protein, p300, butyrate, and Wnt signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina L

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the distinctive roles played by the transcriptional coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell physiology in colorectal cancer (CRC). Specifically, we focus on the effects of CBP- and p300-mediated Wnt activity on (1) neoplastic progression; (2) the activities of butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber, on cell signaling and colonic cell physiology; (3) the development of resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including butyrate and synthetic HDACis, in colonic cells; and (4) the physiology and number of cancer stem cells. Mutations of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway initiate the majority of CRC cases, and we have shown that hyperactivation of this pathway by butyrate and other HDACis promotes CRC cell apoptosis. This activity by butyrate may in part explain the preventive action of fiber against CRC. However, individuals with a high-fiber diet may still develop neoplasia; therefore, resistance to the chemopreventive action of butyrate likely contributes to CRC. CBP or p300 may modify the ability of butyrate to influence colonic cell physiology since the two transcriptional coactivators affect Wnt signaling, and likely, its hyperactivation by butyrate. Also, CBP and p300 likely affect colonic tumorigenesis, as well as stem cell pluripotency. Improvement of CRC prevention and therapy requires a better understanding of the alterations in Wnt signaling and gene expression that underlie neoplastic progression, stem cell fate, and the development of resistance to butyrate and clinically relevant HDACis. Detailed knowledge of how CBP- and p300 modulate colonic cell physiology may lead to new approaches for anti-CRC prevention and therapeutics, particularly with respect to combinatorial therapy of CBP/p300 inhibitors with HDACis. PMID:26217075

  20. Kinetic and thermodynamic control of butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities.

    PubMed

    Junicke, H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kleerebezem, R

    2016-01-01

    Many anaerobic conversions proceed close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the microbial groups involved need to share their low energy budget to survive at the thermodynamic boundary of life. This study aimed to investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic control mechanisms of the electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities. Despite the rather low energy content of butyrate, results demonstrate unequal energy sharing between the butyrate-utilizing species (17 %), the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (9-10 %), and the acetoclastic methanogens (73-74 %). As a key finding, the energy disproportion resulted in different growth strategies of the syntrophic partners. Compared to the butyrate-utilizing partner, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens compensated their lower biomass yield per mole of electrons transferred with a 2-fold higher biomass-specific electron transfer rate. Apart from these thermodynamic control mechanisms, experiments revealed a ten times lower hydrogen inhibition constant on butyrate conversion than proposed by the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, suggesting a much stronger inhibitory effect of hydrogen on anaerobic butyrate conversion. At hydrogen partial pressures exceeding 40 Pa and at bicarbonate limited conditions, a shift from methanogenesis to reduced product formation was observed which indicates an important role of the hydrogen partial pressure in redirecting electron fluxes towards reduced products such as butanol. The findings of this study demonstrate that a careful consideration of thermodynamics and kinetics is required to advance our current understanding of flux regulation in energy-limited syntrophic ecosystems.

  1. Perturbation Dynamics of the Rumen Microbiota in Response to Exogenous Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Robert W.; Wu, Sitao; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Li, Weizhong; Li, Congjun

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of the rumen microbiota to produce volatile fatty acids (VFAs) has important implications in animal well-being and production. We investigated temporal changes of the rumen microbiota in response to butyrate infusion using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Twenty one phyla were identified in the rumen microbiota of dairy cows. The rumen microbiota harbored 54.5±6.1 genera (mean ± SD) and 127.3±4.4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. However, the core microbiome comprised of 26 genera and 82 OTUs. Butyrate infusion altered molar percentages of 3 major VFAs. Butyrate perturbation had a profound impact on the rumen microbial composition. A 72 h-infusion led to a significant change in the numbers of sequence reads derived from 4 phyla, including 2 most abundant phyla, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. As many as 19 genera and 43 OTUs were significantly impacted by butyrate infusion. Elevated butyrate levels in the rumen seemingly had a stimulating effect on butyrate-producing bacteria populations. The resilience of the rumen microbial ecosystem was evident as the abundance of the microorganisms returned to their pre-disturbed status after infusion withdrawal. Our findings provide insight into perturbation dynamics of the rumen microbial ecosystem and should guide efforts in formulating optimal uses of probiotic bacteria treating human diseases. PMID:22253719

  2. Butyrate production in phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes isolated from the chicken caecum.

    PubMed

    Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska; De Baere, Siegrid; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Louis, Petra; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Sixteen butyrate-producing bacteria were isolated from the caecal content of chickens and analysed phylogenetically. They did not represent a coherent phylogenetic group, but were allied to four different lineages in the Firmicutes phylum. Fourteen strains appeared to represent novel species, based on a level of ≤ 98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity towards their nearest validly named neighbours. The highest butyrate concentrations were produced by the strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, clusters which are predominant in the chicken caecal microbiota. In only one of the 16 strains tested, the butyrate kinase operon could be amplified, while the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene was detected in eight strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV, XIVa and XIVb. None of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates carried this gene based on degenerate PCR analyses. However, another CoA-transferase gene more similar to propionate CoA-transferase was detected in the majority of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates. Since this gene is located directly downstream of the remaining butyrate pathway genes in several human cluster XVI bacteria, it may be involved in butyrate formation in these bacteria. The present study indicates that butyrate producers related to cluster XVI may play a more important role in the chicken gut than in the human gut.

  3. Maternal butyrate supplementation induces insulin resistance associated with enhanced intramuscular fat deposition in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanping; Gao, Shixing; Chen, Jinglong; Albrecht, Elke; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2017-02-21

    Maternal nutrition is important for the risk of the offspring to develop insulin resistance and adiposity later in life. The study was undertaken to determine effects of maternal butyrate supplementation on lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in the offspring skeletal muscle. The offspring of rats, fed a control diet or a butyrate diet (1% sodium butyrate) throughout gestation and lactation, was studied at weaning and at 60 days of age. The offspring of dams fed a butyrate diet had higher HOMA-insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. This was associated with elevated mRNA and protein expressions of lipogenic genes and decreased amounts of lipolytic enzyme. Simultaneously, enhanced acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 and histone H3 lysine 27 modification on the lipogenic genes in skeletal muscle of adult offspring was observed. Higher concentration of serum insulin and intramuscular triglyceride in skeletal muscle of offspring from the butyrate group at weaning were accompanied by increasing levels of lipogenic genes and enrichment of acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27. Maternal butyrate supplementation leads to insulin resistance and ectopic lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle of offspring, indicating the importance of short chain fatty acids in the maternal diet on lipid metabolism.

  4. Cellulose acetate butyrate/poly(caprolactonetriol) blends: Miscibility, mechanical properties, and in vivo inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Kanis, Luiz A; Marques, Ellen L; Zepon, Karine M; Pereira, Jefferson R; Pamato, Saulo; de Oliveira, Marcelo T; Danielski, Lucinéia G; Petronilho, Fabricia C

    2014-11-01

    This study reports the results of the characterization of cellulose acetate butyrate and polycaprolactone-triol blends in terms of miscibility, swelling capacity, mechanical properties, and inflammatory response in vivo. The cellulose acetate butyrate film was opaque and rigid, with glass transition (T g ) at 134℃ and melting temperature of 156℃. The cellulose acetate butyrate/polycaprolactone-triol films were transparent up to a polycaprolactone-triol content of 60%. T g of the cellulose acetate butyrate films decreased monotonically as polycaprolactone-triol was added to the blend, thus indicating miscibility. FTIR spectroscopy revealed a decrease in intramolecular hydrogen bonding in polycaprolactone-triol, whereas no hydrogen bonding was observed between cellulose acetate butyrate and -OH from polycaprolactone-triol. The increase in polycaprolactone-triol content in the blend decreased the water uptake. An increase in polycaprolactone-triol content decreased the modulus of elasticity and increased the elongation at break. A cellulose acetate butyrate/polycaprolactone-triol 70/30 blend implanted in rats showed only an acute inflammatory response 7 days after surgery. No change in inflammation mediators was observed.

  5. Butyrate Enhances Disease Resistance of Chickens by Inducing Antimicrobial Host Defense Peptide Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T.; Achanta, Mallika; Schreiber, Nicole B.; Bommineni, Yugendar R.; Dai, Gan; Jiang, Weiyu; Lamont, Susan; Lillehoj, Hyun S.; Beker, Ali; Teeter, Robert G.; Zhang, Guolong

    2011-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute a large group of natural broad-spectrum antimicrobials and an important first line of immunity in virtually all forms of life. Specific augmentation of synthesis of endogenous HDPs may represent a promising antibiotic-alternative approach to disease control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous administration of butyrate, a major type of short-chain fatty acids derived from bacterial fermentation of undigested dietary fiber, is capable of inducing HDPs and enhancing disease resistance in chickens. We have found that butyrate is a potent inducer of several, but not all, chicken HDPs in HD11 macrophages as well as in primary monocytes, bone marrow cells, and jejuna and cecal explants. In addition, butyrate treatment enhanced the antibacterial activity of chicken monocytes against Salmonella enteritidis, with a minimum impact on inflammatory cytokine production, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst capacities of the cells. Furthermore, feed supplementation with 0.1% butyrate led to a significant increase in HDP gene expression in the intestinal tract of chickens. More importantly, such a feeding strategy resulted in a nearly 10-fold reduction in the bacterial titer in the cecum following experimental infections with S. enteritidis. Collectively, the results indicated that butyrate-induced synthesis of endogenous HDPs is a phylogenetically conserved mechanism of innate host defense shared by mammals and aves, and that dietary supplementation of butyrate has potential for further development as a convenient antibiotic-alternative strategy to enhance host innate immunity and disease resistance. PMID:22073293

  6. Black Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  7. Sodium Butyrate Stimulates Expression of Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 in Liver by Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huating; Gao, Zhanguo; Zhang, Jin; Ye, Xin; Xu, Aimin; Ye, Jianping; Jia, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) stimulates fatty acid oxidation and ketone body production in animals. In this study, we investigated the role of FGF21 in the metabolic activity of sodium butyrate, a dietary histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. FGF21 expression was examined in serum and liver after injection of sodium butyrate into dietary obese C57BL/6J mice. The role of FGF21 was determined using antibody neutralization or knockout mice. FGF21 transcription was investigated in liver and HepG2 hepatocytes. Trichostatin A (TSA) was used in the control as an HDAC inhibitor. Butyrate was compared with bezafibrate and fenofibrate in the induction of FGF21 expression. Butyrate induced FGF21 in the serum, enhanced fatty acid oxidation in mice, and stimulated ketone body production in liver. The butyrate activity was significantly reduced by the FGF21 antibody or gene knockout. Butyrate induced FGF21 gene expression in liver and hepatocytes by inhibiting HDAC3, which suppresses peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-α function. Butyrate enhanced bezafibrate activity in the induction of FGF21. TSA exhibited a similar set of activities to butyrate. FGF21 mediates the butyrate activity to increase fatty acid use and ketogenesis. Butyrate induces FGF21 transcription by inhibition of HDAC3. PMID:22338096

  8. Utilization of multiple substrates by butyrate kinase from Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Galva, Charitha; Saunders, Lauren P; Sen, Suranjana; Jayaswal, Radheshyam; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gatto, Craig

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of listeriosis, can build up to dangerous levels in refrigerated foods potentially leading to expensive product recalls. An important aspect of the bacterium's growth at low temperatures is its ability to increase the branched-chain fatty acid anteiso C15:0 content of its membrane at lower growth temperatures, which imparts greater membrane fluidity. Mutants in the branched-chain α-keto dehydrogenase (bkd) complex are deficient in branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs,) but these can be restored by feeding C4 and C5 branched-chain carboxylic acids (BCCAs). This suggests the presence of an alternate pathway for production of acyl CoA precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis. We hypothesize that the alternate pathway is composed of butyrate kinase (buk) and phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb) encoded in the bkd complex which produce acyl CoA products by their sequential action through the metabolism of carboxylic acids. We determined the steady state kinetics of recombinant His-tagged Buk using 11 different straight-chain and BCCA substrates in the acyl phosphate forming direction. Buk demonstrated highest catalytic efficiency with pentanoate as the substrate. Low product formation observed with acetate (C2) and hexanoate (C6) as the substrates indicates that Buk is not involved in either acetate metabolism or long chain carboxylic acid activation. We were also able to show that Buk catalysis occurs through a ternary complex intermediate. Additionally, Buk demonstrates a strong preference for BCCAs at low temperatures. These results indicate that Buk may be involved in the activation and assimilation of exogenous carboxylic acids for membrane fatty acid biosynthesis.

  9. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    PubMed Central

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F–254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  10. Effects of Sodium Butyrate on Methamphetamine-Sensitized Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, John H.; Hitzemann, Robert J.; Edmunds, Stephanie; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroadaptations associated with behavioral sensitization induced by repeated exposure to methamphetamine (MA) appear to be involved in compulsive drug pursuit and use. Increased histone acetylation, an epigenetic effect resulting in altered gene expression, may promote sensitized responses to psychostimulants. The role of histone acetylation in the expression and acquisition of MA-induced locomotor sensitization was examined by measuring the effect of histone deacetylase inhibition by sodium butyrate (NaB). For the effect on expression, vehicle or NaB (630 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered 30 min prior to MA challenge in mice treated repeatedly with MA (10 days of 2 mg/kg MA) or saline (10 days), and then locomotor response to MA challenge was measured. NaB treatment increased the locomotor response to MA in both acutely MA treated and sensitized animals. For acquisition, NaB was administered 30 min prior to each MA exposure (10 days of 1 or 2 mg/kg), but not prior to the MA challenge test. Treatment with NaB during the sensitization acquisition period significantly increased locomotor activation by MA in sensitized mice only. NaB alone did not significantly alter locomotor activity. Acute NaB or MA, but not the combination, appeared to increase striatal acetylation at histone H4. Repeated treatment with MA, but not NaB or MA plus NaB, increased striatal acetylation at histone H3. Although increased histone acetylation may alter the expression of genes involved in acute locomotor response to MA and in the acquisition of MA-induced sensitization, results for acetylation at H3 and H4 showed little correspondence with behavior. PMID:23137698

  11. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out < in) and is not Na(+) dependent. Moreover, butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  12. Bicarbonate-dependent transport of acetate and butyrate across the basolateral membrane of sheep rumen epithelium.

    PubMed

    Dengler, F; Rackwitz, R; Benesch, F; Pfannkuche, H; Gäbel, G

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of HCO₃⁻ in the transport of acetate and butyrate across the basolateral membrane of rumen epithelium and to identify transport proteins involved. The effects of basolateral variation in HCO₃⁻ concentrations on acetate and butyrate efflux out of the epithelium and the transepithelial flux of these short-chain fatty acids were tested in Ussing chamber experiments using (14)C-labelled substrates. HCO₃⁻-dependent transport mechanisms were characterized by adding specific inhibitors of candidate proteins to the serosal side. Effluxes of acetate and butyrate out of the epithelium were higher to the serosal side than to the mucosal side. Acetate and butyrate effluxes to both sides of rumen epithelium consisted of HCO₃⁻-independent and -dependent parts. HCO₃⁻-dependent transport across the basolateral membrane was confirmed in studies of transepithelial fluxes. Mucosal to serosal fluxes of acetate and butyrate decreased with lowering serosal HCO₃⁻ concentrations. In the presence of 25 mm HCO₃⁻, transepithelial flux of acetate was inhibited effectively by p-hydroxymercuribenzoic acid or α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, while butyrate flux was unaffected by the blockers. Fluxes of both acetate and butyrate from the serosal to the mucosal side were diminished largely by the addition of NO₃⁻ to the serosal side, with this effect being more pronounced for acetate. Our results indicate the existence of a basolateral short-chain fatty acid/HCO₃⁻ exchanger, with monocarboxylate transporter 1 as a primary candidate for acetate transfer. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Monocarboxylate 4 mediated butyrate transport in a rat intestinal epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Kekuda, Ramesh; Manoharan, Palanikumar; Baseler, Walter; Sundaram, Uma

    2013-03-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) are absorbed by carrier mediated uptake in the small intestine by pH-dependent SCFA/HCO3 (-) exchangers on the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Conventional assumption is that MCT1 mediates SCFA/HCO3 (-) exchange in the intestine. Further, due to the presence of multiple such anion exchangers, the identity of the intestinal SCFA/HCO3 (-) has been controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the identities of the butyrate transporter in the intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18). IEC-18 cells were treated with specific siRNAs for MCT1 and MCT4, and butyrate and lactate uptake studies were performed. Alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid inhibited lactate uptake but not butyrate uptake in IEC-18 cells, indicating that these two substrates are transported via two different transporter systems. MCT1 siRNA treatment abolished both MCT1 mRNA by more than 95 % and protein expression by 83 % as evidenced by RTQ-PCR and western blotting experiments. However, MCT1 siRNA treatment inhibited butyrate uptake upto 24 %, whereas it inhibited lactate uptake significantly by 70 %. Treatment with MCT4 siRNA inhibited MCT4 mRNA expression by 75 % and protein expression by 85 % in these cells. MCT4 siRNA inhibited butyrate uptake by 40 %. Further, several non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are transported by the butyrate transporter. Finally, MCT4 siRNA inhibited salicylate uptake by 27 % indicating direct evidence for the transport of salicylate by MCT4. These data indicate that MCT1 is the high affinity lactate transporter and MCT4 is the high affinity butyrate transporter in the intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-18.

  14. Sodium Butyrate Protects against Severe Burn-Induced Remote Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sheng; Guo, Feng; Sun, Li; Wang, Yong-Jie; Sun, Ye-Xiang; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, drives proinflammatory responses when released extracellularly. It plays a key role as a distal mediator in the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has been demonstrated to inhibit HMGB1 expression. This study investigates the effect of sodium butyrate on burn-induced lung injury. Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into three groups: 1) sham group, sham burn treatment; 2) burn group, third-degree burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA) with lactated Ringer’s solution for resuscitation; 3) burn plus sodium butyrate group, third-degree burns over 30% TBSA with lactated Ringer’s solution containing sodium butyrate for resuscitation. The burned animals were sacrificed at 12, 24, and 48 h after burn injury. Lung injury was assessed in terms of histologic changes and wet weight to dry weight (W/D) ratio. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HMGB1 expression in the lung was determined by Western blot analysis. Pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration were measured to reflect neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress in the lung, respectively. As a result, sodium butyrate significantly inhibited the HMGB1 expressions in the lungs, reduced the lung W/D ratio, and improved the pulmonary histologic changes induced by burn trauma. Furthermore, sodium butyrate administration decreased the TNF-α and IL-8 concentrations in BALF and serum, suppressed MPO activity, and reduced the MDA content in the lungs after severe burn. These results suggest that sodium butyrate attenuates inflammatory responses, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the lungs, and protects against remote ALI induced by severe burn, which is associated with inhibiting HMGB1

  15. Butyrate modulates antioxidant enzyme expression in malignant and non-malignant human colon tissues.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Franziska; Wilhelm, Anne; Jablonowski, Nadja; Mothes, Henning; Greulich, Karl Otto; Glei, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The induction of antioxidant enzymes is an important mechanism in colon cancer chemoprevention, but the response of human colon tissue to butyrate, a gut fermentation product derived from dietary fiber, remains largely unknown. Therefore, our study investigated the effect of a butyrate treatment on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in matched human colon tissues of different transformation stages (n = 3-15 in each group) ex vivo. By performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and spectrophotometric measurements, we found an increase in SOD2 at expression and activity level in colonic adenocarcinomas (mRNA: 1.96-fold; protein: 1.41-fold, activity: 1.8-fold; P < 0.05). No difference was detectable for CAT between normal, adenoma, and carcinoma colon tissues. Treatment of normal colon epithelium (12 h) with a physiologically relevant concentration of butyrate (10 mM) resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CAT mRNA (1.24-fold) and protein (1.39-fold), without affecting the enzymatic activity. Consequently, preliminary experiments failed to show any protective effect of butyrate against H2 O2 -mediated DNA damage. Despite a significantly lowered SOD2 transcript (0.51-fold, P < 0.01) and, to a lesser extent, protein level (0.86-fold) after butyrate exposure of normal colon cells, the catalytic activity was significantly enhanced (1.19-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting an increased protection against tissue superoxide radicals. In malignant tissues, greater variations in response to butyrate were observed. Furthermore, both enzymes showed an age-dependent decrease in activity in normal colon epithelium (CAT: r = -0.49, P = 0.09; SOD2: r = -0.58, P = 0.049). In conclusion, butyrate exhibited potential antioxidant features ex vivo but cellular consequences need to be investigated more in depth.

  16. Propolis Augments Apoptosis Induced by Butyrate via Targeting Cell Survival Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Eric; Bordonaro, Michael; Lee, Seon; Atamna, Wafa; Lazarova, Darina L.

    2013-01-01

    Diet is one of the major lifestyle factors affecting incidence of colorectal cancer (CC), and despite accumulating evidence that numerous diet-derived compounds modulate CC incidence, definitive dietary recommendations are not available. We propose a strategy that could facilitate the design of dietary supplements with CC-preventive properties. Thus, nutrient combinations that are a source of apoptosis-inducers and inhibitors of compensatory cell proliferation pathways (e.g., AKT signaling) may produce high levels of programmed death in CC cells. Here we report the combined effect of butyrate, an apoptosis inducer that is produced through fermentation of fiber in the colon, and propolis, a honeybee product, on CC cells. We established that propolis increases the apoptosis of CC cells exposed to butyrate through suppression of cell survival pathways such as the AKT signaling. The programmed death of CC cells by combined exposure to butyrate and propolis is further augmented by inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway. Analyses on the contribution of the downstream targets of JNK signaling, c-JUN and JAK/STAT, to the apoptosis of butyrate/propolis-treated CC cells ascertained that JAK/STAT signaling has an anti-apoptotic role; whereas, the role of cJUN might be dependent upon regulatory cell factors. Thus, our studies ascertained that propolis augments apoptosis of butyrate-sensitive CC cells and re-sensitizes butyrate-resistant CC cells to apoptosis by suppressing AKT signaling and downregulating the JAK/STAT pathway. Future in vivo studies should evaluate the CC-preventive potential of a dietary supplement that produces high levels of colonic butyrate, propolis, and diet-derived JAK/STAT inhibitors. PMID:24023824

  17. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Butyrate metabolism upstream and downstream acetyl-CoA synthesis and growth control of human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Leschelle, X; Delpal, S; Goubern, M; Blottière, H M; Blachier, F

    2000-11-01

    Butyrate is a short chain fatty acid (SCFA) produced by bacterial fermentation of dietary fibers in the colon lumen which severely affects the proliferation of colon cancer cells in in vitro experiments. Although butyrate is able to interfere with numerous cellular targets including cell cycle regulator expression, little is known about butyrate metabolism and its possible involvement in its effect upon colon carcinoma cell growth. In this study, we found that HT-29 Glc-/+ cells strongly accumulated and oxidized sodium butyrate without producing ketone bodies, nor modifying oxygen consumption nor mitochondrial ATP synthesis. HT-29 cells accumulated and oxidized sodium acetate at a higher level than butyrate. However, sodium butyrate, but not sodium acetate, reduced cell growth and increased the expression of the cell cycle effector cyclin D3 and the inhibitor of the G1/S cdk-cyclin complexes p21/WAF1/Cip1, demonstrating that butyrate metabolism downstream of acetyl-CoA synthesis is not required for the growth-restraining effect of this SCFA. Furthermore, HT-29 cells modestly incorporated the 14C-labelled carbon from sodium butyrate into cellular triacylglycerols and phospholipids. This incorporation was greatly increased when D-glucose was present in the incubation medium, corresponding to the capacity of hexose to circulate in the pentose phosphate pathway allowing NADPH synthesis required for lipogenesis. Interestingly, when HT-29 cells were cultured in the presence of sodium butyrate, their capacity to incorporate 14C-labelled sodium butyrate into triacylglycerols and phospholipids was increased more than twofold. In such experimental conditions, HT-29 cells when observed under an electronic microscope, were found to be characterized by an accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytosol. Our data strongly suggest that butyrate acts upon colon carcinoma cells upstream of acetyl-CoA synthesis. In contrast, the metabolism downstream of acetyl-CoA [i.e. oxidation in

  19. Mechanism of Butyrate Stimulation of Triglyceride Storage and Adipokine Expression during Adipogenic Differentiation of Porcine Stromovascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hui; Ajuwon, Kolapo M.

    2015-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), products of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, exert multiple metabolic effects in cells. Previously, we had demonstrated that soluble fiber influenced fat mass accumulation, gut microbial community structure and SCFA production in pigs. The current study was designed to identify effects of SCFA treatment during adipogenic differentiation of porcine stromovascular cells on lipid metabolism and adipokine expression. Differentiating cells were treated with varying concentrations of butyrate. Results show that butyrate treatment enhanced adipogenesis and lipid accumulation, perhaps through upregulation of glucose uptake and de novo lipogenesis and other mechanisms that include induction of SREBP-1c, C/EBPα/β, GLUT4, LPL, PPARγ, GPAT4, DGAT1 and DGAT2 expression. In addition, butyrate induced adiponectin expression, resulting in activation of downstream target genes, such as AMPK and AKT. Activation of AMPK by butyrate led to phosphorylation of ACC. Although increased ACO gene expression was seen with butyrate treatment, experiments with the peroxisomal fatty acid inhibitor, thioridazine, suggest that butyrate may have an inhibitory effect on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Our studies also provide evidence that butyrate may inhibit lipolysis, perhaps in an FFAR3-dependent manner. Therefore, this study presents a novel paradigm for butyrate action in adipocytes and shows that adipocytes are capable of utilizing butyrate, leading to increased expression of adiponectin for enhanced glucose uptake and improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:26713737

  20. Isolation of a Butyrate-Utilizing Bacterium in Coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum from a Thermophilic Digester †

    PubMed Central

    Henson, J. Michael; Smith, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Sludge from a thermophilic, 55°C digester produced methane without a lag period when enriched with butyrate. The sludge was found by most-probable-number enumeration to have ca. 5 × 106 butyrate-utilizing bacteria per ml. A thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium was isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. This bacterium was a gram-negative, slightly curved rod, occurred singly, was nonmotile, and did not appear to produce spores. When this coculture was incubated with Methanospirillum hungatei at 37°C, the quantity of methane produced was less than 5% of the methane produced when the coculture was incubated at 55°C, the routine incubation temperature. The coculture required clarified digester fluid. The addition of yeast extract to medium containing 5% clarified digester fluid stimulated methane production when a Methanosarcina sp. was present. Hydrogen in the gas phase prevented butyrate utilization. However, when the hydrogen was removed, butyrate utilization began. Penicillin G and d-cycloserine caused the complete inhibition of butyrate utilization by the coculture. The ability of various ecosystems to convert butyrate to methane was studied. Marine sediments enriched with butyrate required a 2-week incubation period before methanogenesis began. Hypersaline sediments did not produce methane after 3 months when enriched with butyrate. Images PMID:16346813

  1. Butyrate Inhibits Cancerous HCT116 Colon Cell Proliferation but to a Lesser Extent in Noncancerous NCM460 Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Taussig, David P; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, LuAnn K; Hakkak, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous cells through regulating apoptosis and cellular-signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by exposing cancerous HCT116 or non-cancerous NCM460 colon cells to physiologically relevant doses of butyrate. Cellular responses to butyrate were characterized by Western analysis, fluorescent microscopy, acetylation, and DNA fragmentation analyses. Butyrate inhibited cell proliferation, and led to an induction of apoptosis, genomic DNA fragmentation in HCT116 cells, but to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Although butyrate increased H3 histone deacetylation and p21 tumor suppressor expression in both cell types, p21 protein level was greater with intense expression around the nuclei in HCT116 cells when compared with that in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, butyrate treatment increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), a survival signal, in NCM460 cells while it decreased p-ERK1/2 in HCT116 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic potential in HCT116 cells may confer the increased sensitivity of cancerous colon cells to butyrate in comparison with noncancerous colon cells.

  2. Butyrate production from oligofructose fermentation by the human faecal flora: what is the contribution of extracellular acetate and lactate?

    PubMed

    Morrison, Douglas J; Mackay, William G; Edwards, Christine A; Preston, Tom; Dodson, Brian; Weaver, Lawrence T

    2006-09-01

    Butyrate is an important substrate for maintenance of colonic health and oligofructose fermentation by human faecal bacteria can increase butyrate production in vitro. However, oligofructose appears to be fermented by mainly acetate and lactate-producing bacteria rather than butyrate-producing bacteria. Isotope labelling studies using [U-(13)C(6)]glucose were used to show that (13)C(2) and (13)C(4) were the major labelled butyrate species produced from glucose fermentation, via [(13)C(2)]acetate-acetyl CoA as intermediate. Bacterial interconversion reactions were quantified and acetate conversion to butyrate and lactate conversion to acetate, propionate and butyrate were observed. Addition of oligofructose to faecal batch cultures significantly increased butyrate production. Of the newly synthesised butyrate from oligofructose fermentation, 80 % was derived from interconversion of extracellular acetate and lactate, with acetate being quantitatively more significant. Carbohydrates, such as oligofructose, have prebiotic properties. In addition, oligofructose selectively stimulates the bacterial conversion of acetate and lactate to butyrate. Carbohydrates with similar properties represent a refinement of the prebiotic definition, termed butyrogenic prebiotics, because of their additional functionality.

  3. Butyrate Inhibits Cancerous HCT116 Colon Cell Proliferation but to a Lesser Extent in Noncancerous NCM460 Colon Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huawei; Taussig, David P.; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, LuAnn K.; Hakkak, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous cells through regulating apoptosis and cellular-signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by exposing cancerous HCT116 or non-cancerous NCM460 colon cells to physiologically relevant doses of butyrate. Cellular responses to butyrate were characterized by Western analysis, fluorescent microscopy, acetylation, and DNA fragmentation analyses. Butyrate inhibited cell proliferation, and led to an induction of apoptosis, genomic DNA fragmentation in HCT116 cells, but to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Although butyrate increased H3 histone deacetylation and p21 tumor suppressor expression in both cell types, p21 protein level was greater with intense expression around the nuclei in HCT116 cells when compared with that in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, butyrate treatment increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), a survival signal, in NCM460 cells while it decreased p-ERK1/2 in HCT116 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic potential in HCT116 cells may confer the increased sensitivity of cancerous colon cells to butyrate in comparison with noncancerous colon cells. PMID:28045428

  4. Consolidated Bioprocessing for Butyric Acid Production from Rice Straw with Undefined Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Binling; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Sheng, Zhanwu; Zheng, Lili; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianzheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L· d). In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41 and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27822203

  5. Butyrate production in phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes isolated from the chicken caecum

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska; De Baere, Siegrid; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Louis, Petra; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sixteen butyrate‐producing bacteria were isolated from the caecal content of chickens and analysed phylogenetically. They did not represent a coherent phylogenetic group, but were allied to four different lineages in the Firmicutes phylum. Fourteen strains appeared to represent novel species, based on a level of ≤ 98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity towards their nearest validly named neighbours. The highest butyrate concentrations were produced by the strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, clusters which are predominant in the chicken caecal microbiota. In only one of the 16 strains tested, the butyrate kinase operon could be amplified, while the butyryl‐CoA : acetate CoA‐transferase gene was detected in eight strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV, XIVa and XIVb. None of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates carried this gene based on degenerate PCR analyses. However, another CoA‐transferase gene more similar to propionate CoA‐transferase was detected in the majority of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates. Since this gene is located directly downstream of the remaining butyrate pathway genes in several human cluster XVI bacteria, it may be involved in butyrate formation in these bacteria. The present study indicates that butyrate producers related to cluster XVI may play a more important role in the chicken gut than in the human gut. PMID:21375722

  6. Comparison of Butyric acid concentrations in ordinary and probiotic yogurt samples in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vaseji, N; Mojgani, N; Amirinia, C; Iranmanesh, M

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives Butyric acid has many applications in chemical, food and pharmaceutical industries. Applications of butyric acid are as an additive to food, flavorings, varnishes, perfumes, pharmaceuticals and disinfectants. Butyric acid concentrations have positive impact on the quality control of milk, yogurt and other probiotic dairy products. The present investigation was undertaken to determine and compare the concentrations of butyric acid (C4) in the ordinary and probiotic yogurt samples by GC method. Materials and Methods Probiotic yogurt samples were prepared under laboratory scale conditions using two different commercial starters ABY1 and 211, while ordinary yogurt samples lacked the probiotic starter cultures. All samples were analyzed in duplicate, for C4 concentrations by gas chromatography after day 1, 2, 10 and 20 of production, during storage at 4°C. The results were analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan test. Results The level of the mentioned fatty acid in ABY1 yogurt sample was significantly higher (0.2%) than in 211 samples (0.17%). These values were significantly lower in ordinary yogurt samples and only 0.07% was recorded in these samples on first day of storage which decreased gradually during storage. The level of reduction in the yogurt samples tested during different time intervals was not similar in all the examined samples, and some showed enhanced reduction than other samples. Conclusions Compared to ordinary yogurt samples, probiotic yogurt samples used in study showed higher levels of butyric acid with increased shelf life. PMID:22973475

  7. New holographic polymeric composition based on plexiglass, polyvinyl butyral, and phenanthrenquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusevich, Vladislav; Tolstik, Elen; Kowarschik, Richard; Egorova, Elena; Matusevich, Yuri I.; Krul, Leonid

    2013-05-01

    The newly developed Plexiglas films containing polyvinyl butyral resins and phenanthrenequinone molecules as photosensitive dopant, which are proposed for the practical application as interlayer of laminated safety glass, are shown for the first time. The injection of the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate) into the polyvinyl butyral protective interlayer provides a homogenous distribution of the recording holographic medium in the layer and allows fixing the entire surface grating in the laminated glass. In addition, the original properties of polyvinyl butyral as a connecting material were preserved during manufacturing of the laminated glass. This allows a recording of holographic structures directly after baking of the laminated glass, thus reducing the destruction of the gratings due to the elevated temperatures. The diffractive structures in phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral polymeric layers with thicknesses of hundreds of microns are sealed between two panels of glass (so-called laminated glass) and are generated by illumination with an Argon-laser of 514 nm. Efficiently fixed and long-term stable holographic gratings recorded in the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral layer enable to produce transparent laminated glass with inserted diffractive elements, which can be used e.g. for Head-up Displays in automobile windshields or as holographic light concentrators for solar cells.

  8. Butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and hydrolysed wheat straw by an adapted Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain

    PubMed Central

    Baroi, G N; Baumann, I; Westermann, P; Gavala, H N

    2015-01-01

    Butyric acid is a valuable building-block for the production of chemicals and materials and nowadays it is produced exclusively from petroleum. The aim of this study was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces butyric acid at a high yield and selectivity from lignocellulosic biomasses. Pretreated (by wet explosion) and enzymatically hydrolysed wheat straw (PHWS), rich in C6 and C5 sugars (71.6 and 55.4 g l−1 of glucose and xylose respectively), was used as substrate. After one year of serial selections, an adapted strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. The adapted strain was able to grow in 80% (v v−1) PHWS without addition of yeast extract compared with an initial tolerance to less than 10% PHWS and was able to ferment both glucose and xylose. It is noticeable that the adapted C. tyrobutyricum strain was characterized by a high yield and selectivity to butyric acid. Specifically, the butyric acid yield at 60–80% PHWS lie between 0.37 and 0.46 g g−1 of sugar, while the selectivity for butyric acid was as high as 0.9–1.0 g g−1 of acid. Moreover, the strain exhibited a robust response in regards to growth and product profile at pH 6 and 7. PMID:26230610

  9. [Effect of dietary fiber in the quantitative expression of butyrate receptor GPR43 in rats colon].

    PubMed

    Corte Osorio, L Y; Martínez Flores, H E; Ortiz Alvarado, R

    2011-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate and butyrate are the major anions produced by the bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber (DF) in colon. Recently, butyrate has been recently studied because is important to maintain colonic functions and because it has been related with a protective effect in colorectal cancer, which is mainly, explained by its potential to regulate gene expression by inhibiting enzyme histonedeacetylase (HDAC). Several investigationsshown that SCFAreceptor GPR43 is involved insignal transduction mechanisms once they bind to ligands such as butyrate to generate different physiological effects in colonocytes. Determine if dietary fiber consumption from nopal (Opuntia ficus I.) containing a ratio of soluble-insoluble fiber 40/60, has a direct influence on the quantitative expression of butyrate-specific receptor GPR43. Wistar rats were fed with four different diets formulated at different concentrations of dietary fiber of 0, 5, 15 and 25% of dietary fiber from opuntia, respectively. The results shown an increase in the expression of GPR43 (93.1%) when rats was fed with a 5% fiber diet, using β-actin as a reference gene. The results of this investigation will contribute to determinate the relation of diet with intestinal health for the purpose of expanding the knowledge of butyric acid on colonic functions.

  10. The inhibitor of histone deacetylases sodium butyrate enhances the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Gospodinov, Anastas; Popova, Stanislava; Vassileva, Ivelina; Anachkova, Boyka

    2012-10-01

    The use of histone deacetylase inhibitors has been proposed as a promising approach to increase the cell killing effect of DNA damage-inducing drugs in chemotherapy. However, the molecular mechanism of their action remains understudied. In the present article, we have assessed the effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate on the DNA damage response induced by the crosslinking agent mitomycin C. Sodium butyrate increased mitomycin C cytotoxicity, but did not impair the repair pathways required to remove mitomycin C-induced lesions as neither the rate of nucleotide excision repair nor the homologous recombination repair rate were diminished. Sodium butyrate treatment abrogated the S-phase cell-cycle checkpoint in mitomycin C-treated cells and induced the G(2)-M checkpoint. However, sodium butyrate treatment alone resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen species, double-strand breaks in DNA, and apoptosis. These results imply that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species-mediated increase in DNA lesion burden may be the major mechanism by which sodium butyrate enhances the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C.

  11. The induction of vimentin gene expression by sodium butyrate in human promonocytic leukemia U937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rius, C.; Aller, P. ); Cabanas, C. Universidad Complutense, Madrid )

    1990-05-01

    The administration of 1 mM sodium butyrate induced the phenotypic differentiation of human promonocytic leukemia U937 cells, as judged by the expression of cD11b and cD11c antigens, two differentiation-specific surface markers. At the same time, butyrate greatly induced the expression at the mRNA level of the vimentin gene. The increase in the level of this RNA started at 6 hours of treatment and reached the maximum at Hour 24. Such an increase was caused at least in part by a stimulation in the rate of gene transcription, as suggested by transcription assays in isolated nuclei. Experiments in the presence of cycloheximide suggested that vimentin induction is probably a direct response to the action of butyrate, not mediated by the prior induction of other gene products. Unlike the case the vimentin, the levels of other RNAs, namely {beta}-actin ornithine decarboxylase, and c-myc, were not enhanced, but they decreased at different times of treatment with butyrate. Finally, the authors observed that butyrate induced also the differentiation of HL60 cells, another human myeloid cell type. Nevertheless, the drug failed to stimulate the expression of vimentin in this cell line.

  12. Consolidated Bioprocessing for Butyric Acid Production from Rice Straw with Undefined Mixed Culture.

    PubMed

    Ai, Binling; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Sheng, Zhanwu; Zheng, Lili; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianzheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L· d). In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41 and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes.

  13. Integrative analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression in butyrate-treated CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Wippermann, Anna; Rupp, Oliver; Brinkrolf, Karina; Hoffrogge, Raimund; Noll, Thomas

    2016-11-24

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the versatile properties of CHO cells as the major production cell line for biopharmaceutical molecules are not entirely understood yet, although several 'omics' data facilitate the understanding of CHO cells and their reactions to environmental conditions. However, genome-wide studies of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation are still limited. To prove the applicability and usefulness of integrating DNA methylation and gene expression data in a biotechnological context, we exemplarily analyzed the time course of cellular reactions upon butyrate addition in antibody-producing CHO cells by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and CHO-specific cDNA microarrays. Gene expression and DNA methylation analyses showed that pathways known to be affected by butyrate, including cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as pathways potentially involved in butyrate-induced hyperproductivity such as central energy metabolism and protein biosynthesis were affected. Differentially methylated regions were furthermore found to contain binding-site motifs of specific transcription factors and were hypothesized to represent regulatory regions closely connected to the cellular response to butyrate. Generally, our experiment underlines the benefit of integrating DNA methylation and gene expression data, as it provided potential novel candidate genes for rational cell line development and allowed for new insights into the butyrate effect on CHO cells.

  14. Production of Butyrate from Lactate by a Newly Isolated Clostridium sp. BPY5.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Hu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Jin, Hong; Xu, Zhancheng; Tang, Qinglan; Li, Xiangzhen

    2016-06-01

    Lactate-utilizing bacteria play important roles in the production of Chinese strong-flavored liquor (CSFL). However, the identity of these bacteria and their lactate-utilizing properties are largely unknown. Here, a lactate-utilizing, butyrate-producing bacterium BPY5 was isolated from an old fermentation pit for CSFL production. The isolate represented a novel species belonging to Clostridium cluster XIVa of family Lachnospiraceae based on phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences. Strain BPY5 could ferment lactate into butyrate as the major metabolic product. Butyrate was significantly formed at initial lactate concentration from 66 to 104 mM, but substantially declined when initial lactate exceeded 133 mM. At initial lactate concentration of 66 mM, lactate conversion was independent on initial pH from 5.5 to 7.0, but the conversion was completely inhibited when pH dropped below 4.8. Nevertheless, the inhibition on lactate conversion was largely relieved by the addition of acetate, suggesting that exogenous acetate could enhance lactate conversion at low pH condition. Additionally, lactate in CSFL-brewing wastewater was dramatically removed when inoculated with strain BPY5. These results implicate that the isolate may be applied for the industrial production of butyrate or the recovery of butyrate from lactate-containing wastewater.

  15. Lipase catalyzed transesterification of ethyl butyrate synthesis in n-hexane- a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Devi, N Annapurna; Radhika, G B; Bhargavi, R J

    2017-08-01

    Kinetics of lipase catalyzed transesterification of ethyl caprate and butyric acid was investigated. The objective of this work was to propose a reaction mechanism and develop a rate equation for the synthesis of ethyl butyrate by transesterification using surfactant coated lipase from Candida rugosa. The reaction rate could be described in terms of Michaelis-Menten equation with a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism and competitive inhibition by both the substrates. The values of kinetic parameters computed were Vmax = 2.861 μmol/min/mg; Km(acid) = 0.0746 M; Km(ester) = 0.125 M; Ki acid = 0.450 M. This study indicated a competitive enzyme inhibition by butyric acid during lipase catalyzed transesterification reaction. Experimental observations had clearly indicated that the substrates as well as product act as dead-end inhibitors.

  16. Collagen-Immobilized Lipases Show Good Activity and Reusability for Butyl Butyrate Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dewei, Song; Min, Chen; Haiming, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Candida rugosa lipases were immobilized onto collagen fibers through glutaraldehyde cross-linking method. The immobilization process has been optimized. Under the optimal immobilization conditions, the activity of the collagen-immobilized lipase reached 340 U/g. The activity was recovered of 28.3 % by immobilization. The operational stability of the obtained collagen-immobilized lipase for hydrolysis of olive oil emulsion was determined. The collagen-immobilized lipase showed good tolerance to temperature and pH variations in comparison to free lipase. The collagen-immobilized lipase was also applied as biocatalyst for synthesis of butyl butyrate from butyric acid and 1-butanol in n-hexane. The conversion yield was 94 % at the optimal conditions. Of its initial activity, 64 % was retained after 5 cycles for synthesizing butyl butyrate in n-hexane.

  17. Diclofenac sodium loaded-cellulose acetate butyrate: effect of processing variables on microparticles properties, drug release kinetics and ulcerogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Nahla S; Ahmad, Amany A E

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize diclofenac sodium loaded-cellulose acetate butyrate microparticles in order to obtain a controlled-release system. The influence of the type of polymer, the volume and composition of the internal phase, drug loading, surfactant concentration and additive added on microparticles characteristics (particle size, encapsulation efficiency, surface morphology and in vitro release profiles) was studied to optimize the microparticles system. The resultant microparticles were evaluated for the recovery, average particle size, drug loading and incorporation efficiency. The microparticles exhibited good flowing nature and compressibility index when compared to pure drug. Dissolution rate of diclofenac sodium in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) increased with increases in initial drug loading, surfactant concentration and addition of alcohol as co-solvent but decreased with increases in the concentration of additives such as Gantrez AN or Eudragit S100 in the internal phase. The dissolution data showed a Higuchi diffusion pattern for most of the formulations. About 56-81% reduction in ulcerogenic activity was observed with microparticles containing Eudragit S100 17-25%, based on total polymer concentration, when compared with pure diclofenac sodium.

  18. Alcohols toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Wimer, W.W.; Russell, J.A.; Kaplan, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive reference volume which summarizes literature reports of the known consequences of human and animal contact with alcohols and alcohol-derived substances is presented. Following a discussion of alcohol nomenclature and a brief history of alcohols, the authors have provided detailed chapters on the toxicology of methanol, ethanol, normal and isopropanol, and the butanols. Properties of these alcohols are compared; industrial hygiene and exposure limits are discussed. Additional sections are included covering processing and production technology and exhaust emissions studies. Of particular interest are the section containing abstracts and synopses of principal works and the extensive bibliography of studies dating from the 1800s. 331 references, 26 figures, 56 tables

  19. Improved outcome in shigellosis associated with butyrate induction of an endogenous peptide antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Raqib, Rubhana; Sarker, Protim; Bergman, Peter; Ara, Gul; Lindh, Monica; Sack, David A; Nasirul Islam, K M; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Andersson, Jan; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2006-06-13

    Shigella is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and growth retardation for children in developing countries. Emergence of antibiotic resistance among Shigellae demands the development of effective medicines. Previous studies found that the endogenous antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is down-regulated in the rectal epithelium of patients during shigellosis and that butyrate up-regulates the expression of LL-37 in colonic epithelial cells in vitro and decreases severity of inflammation in experimental shigellosis. In this study, Shigella-infected dysenteric rabbits were treated with butyrate (0.14 mmol/kg of body weight) twice daily for 3 days, and the expression levels of the rabbit homologue to LL-37, CAP-18, were monitored in the colon. Butyrate treatment resulted in (i) reduced clinical illness, severity of inflammation in the colon, and bacterial load in the stool, (ii) significant up-regulation of CAP-18 in the surface epithelium, and (iii) disappearance of CAP-18-positive cells in lamina propria. The active CAP-18 peptide was released in stool from its proform by butyrate treatment. In healthy controls, CAP-18 expression was localized predominantly to the epithelial surface of the colon. In infected rabbits, CAP-18 expression was localized to immune and inflammatory cells in the colon, whereas the ulcerated epithelium was devoid of CAP-18 expression. The combination of CAP-18 and butyrate was more efficient in killing Shigella in vitro than CAP-18 alone. Our findings indicate that oral butyrate treatment in shigellosis may be of clinical value because of induction of the endogenous cathelicidin CAP-18 in the colonic epithelium, stimulation of the release of the active peptide CAP-18, and promoting elimination of Shigella.

  20. Butyrate-producing Clostridium cluster XIVa species specifically colonize mucins in an in vitro gut model.

    PubMed

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Belzer, Clara; Goossens, Margot; Kleerebezem, Michiel; De Vos, Willem M; Thas, Olivier; De Weirdt, Rosemarie; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2013-05-01

    The human gut is colonized by a complex microbiota with multiple benefits. Although the surface-attached, mucosal microbiota has a unique composition and potential to influence human health, it remains difficult to study in vivo. Therefore, we performed an in-depth microbial characterization (human intestinal tract chip (HITChip)) of a recently developed dynamic in vitro gut model, which simulates both luminal and mucosal gut microbes (mucosal-simulator of human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME)). Inter-individual differences among human subjects were confirmed and microbial patterns unique for each individual were preserved in vitro. Furthermore, in correspondence with in vivo studies, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were enriched in the luminal content while Firmicutes rather colonized the mucin layer, with Clostridium cluster XIVa accounting for almost 60% of the mucin-adhered microbiota. Of the many acetate and/or lactate-converting butyrate producers within this cluster, Roseburia intestinalis and Eubacterium rectale most specifically colonized mucins. These 16S rRNA gene-based results were confirmed at a functional level as butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase gene sequences belonged to different species in the luminal as opposed to the mucin-adhered microbiota, with Roseburia species governing the mucosal butyrate production. Correspondingly, the simulated mucosal environment induced a shift from acetate towards butyrate. As not only inter-individual differences were preserved but also because compared with conventional models, washout of relevant mucin-adhered microbes was avoided, simulating the mucosal gut microbiota represents a breakthrough in modeling and mechanistically studying the human intestinal microbiome in health and disease. Finally, as mucosal butyrate producers produce butyrate close to the epithelium, they may enhance butyrate bioavailability, which could be useful in treating diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Membrane Complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei Involved in Syntrophic Butyrate Degradation and Hydrogen Formation

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Sieber, Jessica R.; Mao, Xinwei; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Gunsalus, Robert; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Nguyen, Hong; McInerney, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Syntrophic butyrate metabolism involves the thermodynamically unfavorable production of hydrogen and/or formate from the high potential electron donor, butyryl-CoA. Such redox reactions can occur only with energy input by a process called reverse electron transfer. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen production from butyrate requires the presence of a proton gradient, but the biochemical machinery involved has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the gene and enzyme systems involved in reverse electron transfer by Syntrophomonas wolfei were investigated using proteomic and gene expression approaches. S. wolfei was grown in co-culture with Methanospirillum hungatei or Dehalococcoides mccartyi under conditions requiring reverse electron transfer and compared to both axenic S. wolfei cultures and co-cultures grown in conditions that do not require reverse electron transfer. Blue native gel analysis of membranes solubilized from syntrophically grown cells revealed the presence of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, Hyd2, which exhibited hydrogenase activity during in gel assays. Bands containing a putative iron-sulfur (FeS) oxidoreductase were detected in membranes of crotonate-grown and butyrate grown S. wolfei cells. The genes for the corresponding hydrogenase subunits, hyd2ABC, were differentially expressed at higher levels during syntrophic butyrate growth when compared to growth on crotonate. The expression of the FeS oxidoreductase gene increased when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei. Additional membrane-associated proteins detected included FoF1 ATP synthase subunits and several membrane transporters that may aid syntrophic growth. Furthermore, syntrophic butyrate metabolism can proceed exclusively by interspecies hydrogen transfer, as demonstrated by growth with D. mccartyi, which is unable to use formate. These results argue for the importance of Hyd2 and FeS oxidoreductase in reverse electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate degradation

  2. Evaluation of recycling the effluent of hydrogen fermentation for biobutanol production: kinetic study with butyrate and sucrose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hsing; Jian, Zih-Ce

    2013-10-01

    Butyrate in the effluent of hydrogen-producing bioreactor is a potential feed for biobutanol production. For recycling butyrate, this study investigated the kinetics of biobutanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592 from different paired concentrations of butyrate and sucrose in a series of batch reactors. Results show that the lag time of butanol production increased with higher concentration of either sucrose or butyrate. In regression analyses, the maximum specific butanol production potential of 6.49 g g(-1) of dry cell was projected for 31.9 g L(-1) sucrose and 1.3 g L(-1) butyrate, and the maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.87 g d(-1) g(-1) of dry cell was predicted for 25.0 g L(-1) sucrose and 2.6 g L(-1) butyrate. The specific butanol production potential will decrease if more butyrate is added to the reactor. However, both sucrose and butyrate concentrations are weighted equally on the specific butanol production rate. This observation also is true on butanol yield. The maximum butanol yield of 0.49 mol mol(-1) was projected for 25.0 g L(-1) sucrose and 2.3 g L(-1) butyrate. In addition, a confirmation study found butanol yield increased from 0.2 to 0.3 mol mol(-1) when butyrate addition increased from 0 to 1 g L(-1) under low sugar concentration (3.8 g L(-1) sucrose). The existence of butyrate increases the activity of biobutanol production and reduces the fermentable sugar concentration needed for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

  3. Fecal butyrate levels vary widely among individuals but are usually increased by a diet high in resistant starch.

    PubMed

    McOrist, Alexandra L; Miller, Rosalind B; Bird, Anthony R; Keogh, Jennifer B; Noakes, Manny; Topping, David L; Conlon, Michael A

    2011-05-01

    Butyrate and other SCFA produced by bacterial fermentation of resistant starch (RS) or nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) promote human colonic health. To examine variation in fecal variables, especially butyrate, among individuals and the response to these fibers, a randomized cross-over study was conducted that compared the effects of foods supplying 25 g of NSP or 25 g of NSP plus 22 g of RS/d over 4 wk in 46 healthy adults (16 males, 30 females; age 31-66 y). Fecal SCFA levels varied widely among participants at entry (butyrate concentrations: 3.5-32.6 mmol/kg; butyrate excretions: 0.3-18.2 mmol/48 h). BMI explained 27% of inter-individual butyrate variation, whereas protein, starch, carbohydrate, fiber, and fat intake explained up to 16, 6, 2, 4, and 2% of butyrate variation, respectively. Overall, acetate, butyrate, and total SCFA concentrations were higher when participants consumed RS compared with entry and NSP diets, but individual responses varied. Individual and total fecal SCFA excretion, weight, and moisture were higher than those for habitual diets when either fiber diet was consumed. SCFA concentrations (except butyrate) and excretions were higher for males than for females. Butyrate levels increased in response to RS in most individuals but often decreased when entry levels were high. Fecal butyrate and ammonia excretions were positively associated ((2) = 0.76; P < 0.001). In conclusion, fecal butyrate levels vary widely among individuals but consuming a diet high in RS usually increases levels and may help maintain colorectal health.

  4. Blockade of ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization by sodium butyrate: descriptive analysis of gene regulations in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Legastelois, Rémi; Botia, Béatrice; Naassila, Mickaël

    2013-07-01

    Behavioral sensitization induced by repeated ethanol (EtOH) exposure may play a critical role in the development of alcohol dependence. Because recent data demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) may be of interest in the treatment of addiction, we explored the effect of the HDACi sodium butyrate (NaB) on EtOH-induced behavioral sensitization (EIBS) in DBA/2J mice. We also investigated gene regulations in the striatum of sensitized mice using epigenetic- and signal transduction-related PCR arrays. Mice were injected with saline or EtOH (0.5 to 2.5 g/kg) once a day for 10 days. Mice received NaB (200 to 600 mg/kg) 30 minutes before each injection (prevention protocol) or once daily between days 11 and 16 (reversal protocol). At day 17, brains were removed 30 minutes after a saline or EtOH challenge to assess gene and proteins levels. Only the intermediate EtOH doses (1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) were effective in inducing EIBS, and both doses were associated with specific gene regulations in the striatum. The induction of sensitization by 1.0 g/kg (but not 2.0 g/kg) EtOH was dose-dependently prevented or reversed by NaB. Among the 168 studied genes, EIBS blockade was associated with specific gene regulations (bcl-2, bdnf, hdac4, pak1, penk, tacr1, vip…) and changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor in both striatum and prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that EIBS is associated with specific gene regulations in the striatum depending on the EtOH dose and that NaB can be useful in blocking some long-lasting neuro-adaptations to repeated EtOH administrations. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Facts about Alcohol and Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Leonard C.

    Recognition of alcoholism as a treatable illness is a result of public education based on scientific facts. This publication, a digest of a more detailed survey of research about drinking and alcoholism, presents information about alcohol and its effects on individuals and society. It provides facts about the short-term and long-term effects of…

  6. Production of electricity from acetate or butyrate using a single-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-01-15

    Hydrogen can be recovered by fermentation of organic material rich in carbohydrates, but much of the organic matter remains in the form of acetate and butyrate. An alternative to methane production from this organic matter is the direct generation of electricity in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). Electricity generation using a single-chambered MFC was examined using acetate or butyrate. Power generated with acetate (800 mg/L) (506 mW/m2 or 12.7 mW/ L) was up to 66% higher than that fed with butyrate (1000 mg/L) (305 mW/m2 or 7.6 mW/L), demonstrating that acetate is a preferred aqueous substrate for electricity generation in MFCs. Power output as a function of substrate concentration was well described by saturation kinetics, although maximum power densities varied with the circuit load. Maximum power densities and half-saturation constants were Pmax = 661 mW/m2 and Ks = 141 mg/L for acetate (218 ohms) and Pmax = 349 mW/m2 and Ks = 93 mg/L for butyrate (1000 ohms). Similar open circuit potentials were obtained in using acetate (798 mV) or butyrate (795 mV). Current densities measured for stable power outputwere higher for acetate (2.2 A/m2) than those measured in MFCs using butyrate (0.77 A/m2). Cyclic voltammograms suggested that the main mechanism of power production in these batch tests was by direct transfer of electrons to the electrode by bacteria growing on the electrode and not by bacteria-produced mediators. Coulombic efficiencies and overall energy recovery were 10-31 and 3-7% for acetate and 8-15 and 2-5% for butyrate, indicating substantial electron and energy losses to processes other than electricity generation. These results demonstrate that electricity generation is possible from soluble fermentation end products such as acetate and butyrate, but energy recoveries should be increased to improve the overall process performance.

  7. Diallyl disulphide, a beneficial component of garlic oil, causes a redistribution of cell-cycle growth phases, induces apoptosis, and enhances butyrate-induced apoptosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29).

    PubMed

    Altonsy, Mohammed O; Andrews, Simon C

    2011-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading and expanding cause of death worldwide. A major contributory factor to this disease is diet composition; some components are beneficial (e.g, dietary fiber), whereas others are detrimental (e.g., alcohol). Garlic oil is a prominent dietary constituent that prevents the development of colorectal cancer. This effect is believed to be mainly due to diallyl disulphide (DADS), which selectively induces redox stress in cancerous (rather than normal) cells that leads to apoptotic cell death. However, the detailed mechanism by which DADS causes apoptosis remains unclear. We show that DADS treatment of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) initiates a cascade of molecular events characteristic of apoptosis. These include a decrease in cellular proliferation, translocation of phosphatidylserine to the plasma-membrane outer-layer, activation of caspase-3 and -9, genomic DNA fragmentation, and G(2)/M phase cell-cycle arrest. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly butyrate (abundantly produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary polysaccharides), enhance colonic cell integrity but, in contrast, inhibit colonic cancer cell growth. Combining DADS with butyrate augmented the apoptotic effect of butyrate on HT-29 cells. These results suggest that the anticancerous properties of DADS afford greater benefit when supplied with other favorable dietary factors (short chain fatty acids/polysaccharides) that likewise reduce colonic tumor development.

  8. Dietary calcium phosphate content and oat β-glucan influence gastrointestinal microbiota, butyrate-producing bacteria and butyrate fermentation in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Zijlstra, Ruurd T; Mosenthin, Rainer; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of oat β-glucan in combination with low- and high-dietary calcium phosphate (CaP) content on gastrointestinal bacterial microbiota, prevalence of butyrate-production pathway genes and fermentation end-products in 32 weaned pigs allocated to four diets: a cornstarch-casein-based diet with low [65% of the calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) requirement] and high CaP content (125% and 115% of the Ca and P requirement, respectively); and low and high CaP diets supplemented with 8.95% of oat β-glucan concentrate. Pigs were slaughtered after 14 days, and digesta were collected for quantitative PCR analysis, and quantification of short-chain fatty acids and lactate. The high CaP content reduced gastric lactate and streptococci and propionate in the large intestine. Oat β-glucan distinctly raised gastric bacterial numbers, and colonic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. Although not reflected by gene copies of butyrate-production pathway genes, oat β-glucan also increased gastric, caecal and colonic butyrate concentrations, which may be favourable for intestinal development in weaned pigs. Thus, a high CaP content negatively affected the intestinal abundance of certain fermentation end-products, whereas oat β-glucan generally enhanced bacterial numbers and activity. The results emphasize the importance of the stomach for bacterial metabolism of oat β-glucan in weaned pigs. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, U; Hu, Q; Baldwin, R L; Bequette, B J

    2015-05-01

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling on the basis of increased expression of urea transporter in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concentrations on N balance, urea kinetics and rumen epithelial proliferation. Wether sheep (n= 4), fitted with a rumen cannula, were fed a pelleted ration (∼165 g CP/kg DM, 10.3 MJ ME/kg DM) at 1.8 × ME requirement. In Exp. 1, sheep were infused intraruminally with either an electrolyte buffer solution (Con-Buf) or butyrate dissolved in the buffer solution (But-Buf) during 8-d periods in a balanced crossover design. In Exp. 2, sheep were infused intraruminally with either sodium acetate (Na-Ac) or sodium butyrate (Na-But) for 9 d. All solutions were adjusted to pH 6.8 and 8.0 in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively, and VFA were infused at 10% of ME intake. [15N2] urea was continuously infused intravenously for the last 5 d of each period, and total urine and feces were collected. In Exp. 1, 2H5-phenylalanine was continuously infused intravenously over the last 12 h, after which a biopsy from the rumen papillae was taken for measurement of fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR). Butyrate infusion treatments increased (P = 0.1 in Exp. 1; P < 0.05 in Exp. 2) the proportion of rumen butyrate, and acetate infusion increased (P < 0.05) rumen acetate. All animals were in positive N balance (4.2 g N/d in Exp. 1; 7.0 g N/d in Exp. 2), but no difference in N retention was observed between treatments. In Exp. 2, urea entry (synthesis) rate was reduced ( < 0.05) by Na-But compared with the Na-Ac control. In Exp. 1, although But-Buf infusion increased the FSR of rumen papillae (35.3% ± 1.08%/d vs. 28.7% ± 1.08%/d; P < 0.05), urea kinetics were not altered by But-Buf compared with Con-Buf. These studies are the first to directly assess the role of butyrate in urea recycling and its effects on

  10. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We present evidence that butyrate induced histone acetylation regulates miRNA expression. MicroRNA expression microarray profiling revealed that 35 miRNA transcripts are significantly (p <0.05) differentially expressed after cells were treated with 10 mM butyrate. Among them, 11 transcripts are dif...

  11. Metabolism of silage alcohols in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, N B; Storm, A; Raun, B M L; Røjen, B A; Harmon, D L

    2007-03-01

    Dairy cows fed silage are subjected to various alcohols and low molecular weight esters. Four lactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the hepatic portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and mesenteric artery were used to study the absorption of alcohols into portal blood and the metabolism of feed alcohols in the rumen and splanchnic tissues. The cows were allocated to 4 experimental treatments in a Latin square design. All treatments were formulated as total mixed rations with the same overall nutrient composition, differing by the source of corn silage. Treatments were a control silage and 3 qualities of problematic corn silage (silage with Fusarium toxin, Penicillium-infected silage, and silage with a high propanol content). Feeding was followed by a decreasing ruminal pH, as well as decreasing molar proportions of ruminal acetate and isobutyrate. The ruminal concentrations of total VFA, ethanol, propanol, 2-butanol, ethyl acetate, propyl acetate, glucose, and L-lactate, and molar proportions of propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, valerate, and caproate increased after feeding. Treatments affected ruminal concentrations of propanol, propyl acetate, and butyrate and a strong correlation was observed between ruminal propyl acetate and the molar proportion of butyrate (r = -0.79). Arterial concentrations of ethanol, propanol, propanal, acetone (sum of acetone and acetoacetate), 3-hydroxybutyrate, L-lactate, glutamate, and glutamine increased, and the arterial concentration of glucose decreased after feeding, but no effects of treatment were observed for arterial variables. The postprandial increase in arterial ethanol was maintained for 5 h. The net portal release of ethanol tended to decrease with the treatment with the lowest ethanol content, and the net splanchnic release of ethanol increased after feeding, but overall, the net splanchnic flux of ethanol was not different from zero, in agreement with the

  12. Genome Sequence of the Butyrate-Producing Anaerobic Bacterium Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ravi; Rasinkangas, Pia; Satokari, Reetta; Pietilä, Taija E; Palva, Airi

    2015-04-02

    Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85, which was isolated from human feces, is a Gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium. The species may play an important role in gut health, as it was previously reported to produce butyric acid. Here, we present the genome assembly of PEL 85, a novel strain of A. hadrus.

  13. Butyrate: A dietary inhibitor of histone deacetylases and an epigenetic regulator

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate and butyrate, also known as volatile fatty acids (VFA), are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by microbial fermentation. Consumption of dietary fibers has been shown to have positive metabolic health effects, such as increasing satiety, an...

  14. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of D...

  15. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and...

  16. Exploring the Genome of a Butyric Acid Producer, Clostridium butyricum INCQS635

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fernanda Gomes; Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Miranda, Milene; Pereira, Nei; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Clostridium butyricum INCQS635 was obtained by means of ion sequencing. The genome provides further insight into the genetic repertoire involved with metabolic pathways related to the fermentation of different compounds and organic solvents synthesis (i.e., butyric acid) with biofuel applications. PMID:25414496

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus 74-2 and butyrate induce cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 expression in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahkonen, Anna; Putaala, Heli; Mustonen, Harri; Rautonen, Nina; Puolakkainen, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) profile predicts prognosis of gastric cancer; COX-2 positive tumors are more often aggressive, and COX-2 suppression is protective against gastric cancer. In contrast, COX-1 suppression is harmful to the intestinal mucosa. The COX-1, COX-2, and COX-1ir expression profiles were measured with real-time PCR in primary (AGS) and metastatic (NCI-N87) gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines treated with butyrate, hyperosmolar medium, and, in the case of NCI-N87, cell-free supernatants of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus 74-2 and Bifidobacterium lactis 420. The cell lines showed differences in the profile when treated with either hyperosmolar medium or butyrate. In NCI-N87 COX-2 expression was higher but only COX-1 expression was significantly upregulated by butyrate. Similarly to butyrate, the cell-free supernatant of L. acidophilus 74-2 upregulated COX-1, while COX-2 expression remained unchanged. COX-1ir, including COX-3, was upregulated by probiotics and osmotic stress. In conclusion, consumption of L. acidophilus 74-2 could be beneficial for the expression of cytoprotective COX-1.

  18. An Acute Butyr-Fentanyl Fatality: A Case Report with Postmortem Concentrations.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Iain M; Trochta, Amber; Gary, Ray D; Wright, Jennifer; Mena, Othon

    2016-03-01

    In this case report, we present an evaluation of the distribution of postmortem concentrations of butyr-fentanyl in a fatality attributed principally to the drug. A man who had a history of intravenous drug abuse was found unresponsive on the bathroom floor of his home. Drug paraphernalia was located on the bathroom counter. Toxicology testing, which initially screened positive for fentanyl by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, subsequently confirmed butyr-fentanyl, which was then quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-specific ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM) analysis following liquid-liquid extraction. The butyr-fentanyl peripheral blood concentration was quantitated at 58 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 97 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 320 ng/g, the vitreous was 40 ng/mL, the urine was 670 ng/mL and the gastric contained 170 mg. Acetyl-fentanyl was also detected in all biological specimens tested. Peripheral blood concentration was quantitated at 38 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 32 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 110 ng/g, the vitreous was 38 ng/mL, the urine was 540 ng/mL and the gastric contained <70 mg. The only other drug detected was a relatively low concentration of benzoylecgonine. The cause of death was certified as acute butyr-fentanyl, acetyl-fentanyl and cocaine intoxication, and the manner of death was certified as accident.

  19. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues...

  20. Genome Sequence of the Butyrate-Producing Anaerobic Bacterium Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85

    PubMed Central

    Rasinkangas, Pia; Satokari, Reetta; Pietilä, Taija E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85, which was isolated from human feces, is a Gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium. The species may play an important role in gut health, as it was previously reported to produce butyric acid. Here, we present the genome assembly of PEL 85, a novel strain of A. hadrus. PMID:25838483

  1. Production of butyrate from lysine and the Amadori product fructoselysine by a human gut commensal

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Thi Phuong Nam; Ritari, Jarmo; Boeren, Sjef; de Waard, Pieter; Plugge, Caroline M.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2015-01-01

    Human intestinal bacteria produce butyrate, which has signalling properties and can be used as energy source by enterocytes thus influencing colonic health. However, the pathways and the identity of bacteria involved in this process remain unclear. Here we describe the isolation from the human intestine of Intestinimonas strain AF211, a bacterium that can convert lysine stoichiometrically into butyrate and acetate when grown in a synthetic medium. Intestinimonas AF211 also converts the Amadori product fructoselysine, which is abundantly formed in heated foods via the Maillard reaction, into butyrate. The butyrogenic pathway includes a specific CoA transferase that is overproduced during growth on lysine. Bacteria related to Intestinimonas AF211 as well as the genetic coding capacity for fructoselysine conversion are abundantly present in colonic samples from some healthy human subjects. Our results indicate that protein can serve as a source of butyrate in the human colon, and its conversion by Intestinimonas AF211 and related butyrogens may protect the host from the undesired side effects of Amadori reaction products. PMID:26620920

  2. Simultaneous Clostridial fermentation, lipase-catalyzed esterification, and ester extraction to enrich diesel with butyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Corjan; Heeres, Arjan S; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of 1-butanol from fermentation broth is energy-intensive since typical concentrations in fermentation broth are below 20 g L(-1). To prevent butanol inhibition and high downstream processing costs, we aimed at producing butyl esters instead of 1-butanol. It is shown that it is possible to perform simultaneously clostridial fermentation, esterification of the formed butanol to butyl butyrate, and extraction of this ester by hexadecane. The very high partition coefficient of butyl butyrate pulls the esterification towards the product side even at fermentation pH and relatively low butanol concentrations. The hexadecane extractant is a model diesel compound and is nontoxic to the cells. If butyl butyrate enriched diesel can directly be used as car fuel, no product recovery is required. A proof-of-principle experiment for the one-pot bio-ester production from glucose led to 5 g L(-1) butyl butyrate in the hexadecane phase. The principle may be extended to a wide range of esters, especially to longer chain ones. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)butyric acid (2,4-DB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2,4 - Dichlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( 2,4 - DB ) ; CASRN 94 - 82 - 6 Health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in IRIS only after a comprehensive review of chronic toxicity data by U.S . EPA health scientists from several Program Offices and the Office of Research and

  4. Evaluation of butyrate-induced production of a mannose-6-phosphorylated therapeutic enzyme using parallel bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Wong, Lily; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Braulke, Thomas; Khan, Mansoor; Anderson, Howard; Johnson, Gibbes R

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactor process changes can have a profound effect on the yield and quality of biotechnology products. Mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) glycan content and the enzymatic catalytic kinetic parameters are critical quality attributes (CQAs) of many therapeutic enzymes used to treat lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Here, we have evaluated the effect of adding butyrate to bioreactor production cultures of human recombinant β-glucuronidase produced from CHO-K1 cells, with an emphasis on CQAs. The β-glucuronidase produced in parallel bioreactors was quantified by capillary electrophoresis, the catalytic kinetic parameters were measured using steady-state analysis, and mannose-6-phosphorylation status was assessed using an M6P-specific single-chain antibody fragment. Using this approach, we found that butyrate treatment increased β-glucuronidase production up to approximately threefold without significantly affecting the catalytic properties of the enzyme. However, M6P content in β-glucuronidase was inversely correlated with the increased enzyme production induced by butyrate treatment. This assessment demonstrated that although butyrate dramatically increased β-glucuronidase production in bioreactors, it adversely impacted the mannose-6-phosphorylation of this LSD therapeutic enzyme. This strategy may have utility in evaluating manufacturing process changes to improve therapeutic enzyme yields and CQAs.

  5. Morphological development of polypropylene in immiscible blends with cellulose acetate butyrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) with different melt flow indexes were melt blended with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and then prepared into microspheres or nanofibers following a novel process of producing well dispersed CAB/iPP immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The morp...

  6. Effect of abomasal butyrate infusion on gene expression in the duodenum of lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A previous study infusing butyrate into the abomasum of sheep produced increased oxygen, glucose, glutamate, and glutamine uptake by the portal-drained viscera. These changes were thought to be partially due to increases in glycolysis and cell proliferation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate...

  7. Perturbation dynamics of the rumen microbiota in response to exogenous butyrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The capacity of the rumen microbiota to produce volatile fatty acids (VFA) has important implications in animal well-being and production. We investigated temporal changes of the rumen microbiota in response to butyrate infusion using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Phyla were identified in ...

  8. Inhibition of mouse B16 melanoma by sodium butyrate correlated to tumor associated macrophages differentiation suppression

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fen; Mou, Yun-Zhu; Xiang, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As one member of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) family, Sodium butyrate (NaB) was found out that could be used as a differentiation inducer of much cancer cell. But its effects on tumor microenvironment cells are not well recognized. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of NaB on B16 melanoma and analysis its relevant mechanism. Methods: We observed the effect of sodium butyrate on B16 melanoma in vivo and in vitro. MTT method was performed to detect cell apoptosis rate after treatment. Tumor associated macrophage infiltration condition was detected by flow cytometry. Western-blotting and immunohistochemical method were used to detect the expression of tumor associated macrophage cytokines. Results: A certain concentration of sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth in vivo and in vitro, and this inhibition effects related to the suppression of tumor associated macrophage differentiation. At the same time we observed the relevant macrophage factors were down-regulated compared to the control. Conclusion: Sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth through suppressing tumor associated macrophage proliferation and reduce relevant pro-tumor macrophage factors expression, which may help to promote the clinical study of melanoma epigenetic therapy. PMID:26064327

  9. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxalylglycine and butyrate incorporated into α-calcium sulfate on bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kyung Mi; Jung, Hong-Moon; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Kim, Soung Min; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis is closely related to angiogenesis, and the combined delivery of angiogenic and osteogenic factors has been suggested to enhance bone regeneration. Small molecules have been explored as alternatives to growth factors for tissue regeneration applications. In this study, we examined the effects of the combined application of angiogenic and osteogenic small molecules on bone regeneration using a prolyl hydroxylase, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, butyrate. In a critical size bone defect model in rats, DMOG and butyrate, which were incorporated into α calcium sulfate (αCS), resulted in synergistic enhancements in bone and blood vessel formation, eventually leading to bone healing, as confirmed by micro-CT and histological analyses. In MC4 pre-osteoblast cultures, DMOG and butyrate enhanced the pro-angiogenic responses and osteoblast differentiation, respectively, which were evaluated based on the levels of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α protein and the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules (VEGF, home oxidase-1, glucose transporter-1) and by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expression of osteoblast phenotype marker molecules (ALP, α1(I)col, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein). DMOG combined with butyrate synergistically improved osteoblast differentiation and pro-angiogenic responses, the levels of which were drastically increased in the cultures on αCS disks. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that αCS increased the level of HIF-1α and as a consequence VEGF expression, and supported osteoblast differentiation through the release of calcium ions from the αCS. Altogether, the results of this study provide evidence that a combination treatment with the small molecules DMOG and butyrate can expedite the process of bone regeneration and that αCS can be an efficient delivery vehicle for the small molecules for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alcohol project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    It is reported that Savannah Foods and Industries, in a joint venture with United States Sugar Corporation have applied for a loan guarantee for the production of alcohol from agricultural commodities. The two phase program calls for research and development, before a prototype plant will be built for the conversion of cellulosic compounds found in bagasse into alcohol for use as a fuel.

  12. Alcoholism & depression.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mellisa

    2012-10-01

    One out of 2 Americans report drinking on a routine basis, making the excessive consumption of alcohol the third leading cause of preventable death in America (). Alcoholism and depression are common comorbidities that home healthcare professionals frequently encounter. To achieve the best patient outcomes, alcoholism should be addressed initially. Although all age groups are at risk, alcoholism and depression occur in more than 8 percent of older adults. Prevention through identifying alcohol use early in adolescence is vital to reduce the likelihood of alcohol dependence. This article provides an overview of the long-term effects of alcohol abuse, including alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. The diagnostic criteria for substance dependence and ideas for nonthreatening screening questions to use with patients who are adolescent or older are discussed. While providing patient care, home healthcare nurses share the patient's intimate home environment. This environment is perceived as a safe haven by the patient and home care nurses can take advantage of counseling and treatment opportunities in this nonthreatening environment.

  13. Effect of partially protected butyrate used as feed additive on growth and intestinal metabolism in sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Robles, R; Lozano, A B; Sevilla, A; Márquez, L; Nuez-Ortín, W; Moyano, F J

    2013-12-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid extensively used in animal nutrition since it promotes increases in body weight and other multiple beneficial effects on the intestinal tract. Although such effects have been demonstrated in several species, very few studies have assessed them in fish. On the other hand, little is known about the metabolic processes underlying these effects. In the present work, growth parameters and changes in more than 80 intestinal metabolites (nucleotides, amino acids and derivatives, glycolytic intermediates, redox coenzymes and lipid metabolism coenzymes) have been quantified in juvenile sea bream fed a butyrate-supplemented diet. Results showed a significant increase in the weight of fish receiving butyrate, while metabolomics provided some clues on the suggested effects of this feed additive. It seems that butyrate increased the availability of several essential amino acids and nucleotide derivatives. Also, the energy provision for enteric cells might have been enhanced by a decrease in glucose and amino acid oxidation related to the use of butyrate as fuel. Additionally, butyrate might have increased transmethylation activity. This work represents an advance in the knowledge of the metabolic consequences of using butyrate as an additive in fish diets.

  14. Sodium Butyrate Reduces Colitogenic Immunoglobulin A-Coated Bacteria and Modifies the Composition of Microbiota in IL-10 Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tenghui; Ding, Chao; Zhao, Mingli; Dai, Xujie; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Wei, Yao; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-11-24

    High levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-coated bacteria may have a role in driving inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We therefore investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on microbiota in IBD prone interleukin (IL)-10(-/-) mice. At 8 weeks of age, mice were allocated into three groups (n = 4/group): normal (C57BL/6), IL-10(-/-), and IL-10(-/-) treated with sodium butyrate (100 mM). Severity of colitis, inflammatory cytokine and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration in proximal colon contents, the percentage of IgA-coated bacteria and microbiota composition by 16S ribosomal RNA assessment of stool were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Sodium butyrate ameliorated histological colitis and decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 in IL-10(-/-) mice compared with those without treatment. At the phylum level, a reduction in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Firmicutes in IL-10(-/-) mice treated with sodium butyrate were observed. Additionally, Prevotellaceae species were reduced in IL-10(-/-) mice treated with sodium butyrate as compared with those without treatment. The level of biodiversity was slightly increased and the amount of IgA-coated bacteria decreased in IL-10(-/-) mice treated with sodium butyrate compared with those without treatment. Our results indicate that sodium butyrate protects against colitis, possibly through modifying the gut microbiota, enriching biodiversity and reducing the amount of colitogenic IgA-coated bacteria in IL-10(-/-) mice.

  15. Comparison of the butyrate effects on neurotransmitter receptors in neurohybrids NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Chuang, D.M.

    1987-08-31

    The authors previous study demonstrated that long term treatment of NCB-20 cells with sodium butyrate resulted in a marked increase in the density of delta-opioid receptors with a much lesser effect on muscarinic cholinergic and no effect on alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors. In the present study the authors investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on these three types of receptors in NG108-15 cells whose neuroblastoma parent is the same as that of NCB-20 cells. Long term treatment of NG108-15 cells with sodium butyrate (0.5 mM) induced a 2-fold increase in the density of the specific binding of /sup 3/H-clonidine. A comparable increase in the number of binding sites was detected when /sup 3/H-yohimbine was used as the receptor ligand. The butyrate-induced increase in the alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptor binding could be totally abolished by treatment with a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, suggesting that synthesis of receptor protein is involved. The same butyrate treatment had no significant effect on opioid and muscarinic cholinergic receptor bindings. Thus, butyrate effects on the expression of these three types of receptors in NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells are dramatically different. These data suggest that induction by butyrate of neurotransmitter receptors requires concerted action of genetic factors of both parents of the neurohybrids. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Supplementing the maternal diet of rats with butyrate enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscles of weaned offspring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanping; Gao, Shixing; Jun, Guo; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of maternal dietary butyrate supplementation on energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in offspring skeletal muscle and the possible mediating mechanisms. Virgin female rats were randomly assigned to either control or butyrate diets (1 % butyrate sodium) throughout gestation and lactation. At the end of lactation (21 d), the offspring were killed by exsanguination from the abdominal aorta under anaesthesia. The results showed that maternal butyrate supplementation throughout gestation and lactation did not affect offspring body weight. However, the protein expressions of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR) 43 and 41 were significantly enhanced in offspring skeletal muscle of the maternal butyrate-supplemented group. The ATP content, most of mitochondrial DNA-encoded gene expressions, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 4 protein contents and the mitochondrial DNA copy number were significantly higher in the butyrate group than in the control group. Meanwhile, the protein expressions of type 1 myosin heavy chain, mitochondrial transcription factor A, PPAR-coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and uncoupling protein 3 were significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of the treatment group compared with the control group. These results indicate for the first time that maternal butyrate supplementation during the gestation and lactation periods influenced energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through the GPR and PGC-1α pathways in offspring skeletal muscle at weaning.

  17. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon; Uyeno, Yutaka

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10.

  18. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10. PMID:26921420

  19. Markers for detecting alcoholism and monitoring for continued abuse.

    PubMed

    Morgan, M Y

    1980-01-01

    Several biochemical and haematological abnormalities are associated with excessive alcohol intake and some are used in the recognition and management of alcoholics. The ideal biological marker for detecting and monitoring alcoholics should be sensitive and highly specific for alcohol abuse; its value should be affected by changes in alcohol intake over relatively short periods of time and it should be quick, simple, convenient and inexpensive to estimate. At the present time no simple reliable marker is available which fulfills these criteria. Measurements of serum aspartate transaminase, serum gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase and mean corpuscular volume are of proven value however and the majority of alcoholics can be detected and monitored by combining the measurements of these three tests. Blood/breath alcohol measurements are of limited value for detection but are useful for follow up. Measurement of the plasma alpha-amino-n-butyric acid/leucine ratio is of disputed value and not likely to be of great practical use. Measurement of serum alpha-lipoproteins, erythrocyte delta-aminolaevulinic acid dehydrase activity and qualitative estimation of serum transferrin have all been proposed as markers for alcohol abuse and are currently under evaluation.

  20. Effect of Butyrate on Collagen Expression, Cell Viability, Cell Cycle Progression and Related Proteins Expression of MG-63 Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Ling; Liou, Eric Jein-Wein; Tang, Chia-Mei; Wang, Tong-Mei; Liu, Hsin-Cheng; Liao, Ming-Wei; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Chan, Chiu-Po; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Aims Butyric acid is one major metabolic product generated by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria of periodontal and root canal infection. Butyric acid affects the activity of periodontal cells such as osteoblasts. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of butyrate on MG-63 osteoblasts. Methods MG-63 cells were exposed to butyrate and cell viability was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and cell cycle-related proteins were measured by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. Cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence flow cytometry. Results Exposure to butyrate suppressed cell proliferation, and induced G2/M (8 and 16 mM) cell cycle arrest of MG-63 cells. Some cell apoptosis was noted. The mRNA expression of cdc2 and cyclin-B1 decreased after exposure to butyrate. The protein expression of type I collagen, cdc2 and cyclin B1 were decreased, whereas the expression of p21, p27 and p57 was stimulated. Under the treatment of butyrate, ROS production in MG-63 cells markedly increased. Conclusions The secretion of butyric acid by periodontal and root canal microorganisms may inhibit bone cell growth and matrix turnover. This is possibly due to induction of cell cycle arrest and ROS generation and inhibition of collagen expression. These results suggest the involvement of butyric acid in the pathogenesis of periodontal and periapical tissue destruction by impairing bone healing responses. PMID:27893752

  1. Efficacy of sodium butyrate adjunct therapy in shigellosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of shigellosis in rabbits with butyrate reduces clinical severity and counteracts the downregulation of cathelicidin (CAP-18) in the large intestinal epithelia. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether butyrate can be used as an adjunct to antibiotics in the treatment of shigellosis in patients. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group designed clinical trial was conducted. Eighty adult patients with shigellosis were randomized to either the Intervention group (butyrate, n = 40) or the Placebo group (normal saline, n = 40). The Intervention group was given an enema containing sodium butyrate (80 mM), twice daily for 3 days, while the Placebo group received the same dose of normal saline. The primary endpoint of the trial was to assess the efficacy of butyrate in improving clinical, endoscopic and histological features of shigellosis. The secondary endpoint was to study the effect of butyrate on the induction of antimicrobial peptides in the rectum. Clinical outcomes were assessed and concentrations of antimicrobial peptides (LL-37, human beta defensin1 [HBD-1] and human beta defensin 3 [HBD-3]) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β] and interleukin-8 [IL-8]) were measured in the stool. Sigmoidoscopic and histopathological analyses, and immunostaining of LL-37 in the rectal mucosa were performed in a subgroup of patients. Results Compared with placebo, butyrate therapy led to the early reduction of macrophages, pus cells, IL-8 and IL-1β in the stool and improvement in rectal histopathology. Butyrate treatment induced LL-37 expression in the rectal epithelia. Stool concentration of LL-37 remained significantly higher in the Intervention group on days 4 and 7. Conclusion Adjunct therapy with butyrate during shigellosis led to early reduction of inflammation and enhanced LL-37 expression in the rectal epithelia with prolonged release of LL-37 in the stool. Trial Registration Clinical

  2. Dietary fibres modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chunlong; Zhang, Lingli; He, Xiangyu; Smidt, Hauke; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-02-04

    Dietary fibres have been shown to affect early-life microbiota colonization in the large intestine of suckling piglets, however, much less is known as to whether they also modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of dietary fibres on the abundance, composition, and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in suckling piglets. Piglets were fed a control diet or creep feeds containing alfalfa, wheat bran, or pure cellulose, respectively, from postnatal day 7 to 22. Large intestinal digesta and mucosa samples were collected for quantitative analysis of bacterial group-specific 16S ribosomal RNA- and butyrate production-related genes, and digesta samples for quantification of short-chain fatty acids. The alfalfa diet increased (P < 0.05) Clostridium cluster XIVa abundance, copies of genes encoding proteins involved in butyrate production (butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase, butyrate kinase), and butyrate concentration compared to the wheat bran diet in the digesta of the proximal colon. In the distal colonic digesta, animals fed the alfalfa diet had the highest number of butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene copies (P < 0.05) and numerically the highest butyrate concentration, albeit not significant (P > 0.05), compared to other groups. In the distal colonic mucosa, the cellulose diet increased (P < 0.05) the abundance of Clostridium cluster XIVa and copies of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene compared to the alfalfa diet. These results indicated that dietary fibres modulate the abundance and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets, and that a moderate supplementation of alfalfa and cellulose may benefit early-life gut health through the delivery of butyrate to the mucosa.

  3. The hypophagic response to heat stress is not mediated by GPR109A or peripheral β-OH butyrate.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Chelsea; Foy, Caroline E; Higgins, Mark R; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-05-15

    Rising temperatures resulting from climate change will increase the incidence of heat stress, negatively impacting the labor force and food animal production. Heat stress elevates circulating β-OH butyrate, which induces vasodilation through GPR109a. Interestingly, both heat stress and intraperitoneal β-OH butyrate administration induce hypophagia. Thus, we aimed to investigate the role of β-OH butyrate in heat stress hypophagia in mice. We found that niacin, a β-OH butyrate mimetic that cannot be oxidized to generate ATP, also reduces food intake. Interestingly, the depression in food intake as a result of 8-h intraperitoneal niacin or 48-h heat exposure did not result from changes in hypothalamic expression of orexigenic or anorexigenic signals (AgRP, NPY, or POMC). Genetically eliminating GPR109a expression did not prevent the hypophagic response to heat exposure, intraperitoneal β-OH butyrate (5.7 mmol/kg), or niacin (0.8 mmol/kg). Hepatic vagotomy eliminated the hypophagic response to β-OH butyrate and niacin but did not affect the hypophagic response to heat exposure. We subsequently hypothesized that the hypophagic response to heat stress may depend on direct effects of β-OH butyrate at the central nervous system: β-OH butyrate induced hormonal changes (hyperinsulinemia, hypercorticosteronemia, and hyperleptinemia), or gene expression changes. To test these possibilities, we blocked expression of hepatic hydroxyl methyl glutaryl CoA synthase II (HMGCS2) to prevent hepatic β-OH butyrate synthesis. Mice that lack HMGCS2 maintain a hypophagic response to heat stress. Herein, we establish that the hypophagia of heat stress is independent of GPR109a, the hepatic vagus afferent nerve, and hepatic ketone body synthesis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 24099 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  5. Alcohol and pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy; Fetal alcohol syndrome - pregnancy; FAS - fetal alcohol syndrome ... lead to lifelong damage. DANGERS OF ALCOHOL DURING PREGNANCY Drinking a lot of alcohol during pregnancy can ...

  6. Alcohol conversion

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2002-01-01

    Preparing an aldehyde from an alcohol by contacting the alcohol in the presence of oxygen with a catalyst prepared by contacting an intimate mixture containing metal oxide support particles and particles of a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, with a gaseous stream containing an alcohol to cause metal oxide from the discrete catalytically active metal oxide particles to migrate to the metal oxide support particles and to form a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on said metal oxide support particles.

  7. Carboxymethyl Cellulose Acetate Butyrate: A Review of the Preparations, Properties, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Samir; Salama, Ahmed; Sarhan, Hebat-Allah

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) has gained increasing importance in several fields, particularly in coating technologies and pharmaceutical research. CMCAB is synthesized by esterification of CMC sodium salt with acetic and butyric anhydrides. CMCAB mixed esters are relatively high molecular weight (MW) thermoplastic polymers with high glass transition temperatures (Tg). CMCAB ester is dispersible in water and soluble in a wide range of organic solvents, allowing varied opportunity to the solvent choice. It makes application of coatings more consistent and defect-free. Its ability to slow down the release rate of highly water-soluble compounds and to increase the dissolution of poorly soluble compounds makes CMCAB a unique and potentially valuable tool in pharmaceutical and amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) formulations. PMID:25548679

  8. Butyrate Infusions in the Ovine Fetus Delay the Biologic Clock for Globin Gene Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Rudolph, Abraham; Faller, Douglas V.; Roman, Christine; Cohen, Ruth A.; Chen, Shao-Jing; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1988-11-01

    The switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin expression is regulated in many mammalian species by a developmental clock-like mechanism and determined by the gestational age of the fetus. Prolonging fetal globin gene expression is of considerable interest for therapeutic potential in diseases caused by abnormal β -globin genes. Butyric acid, which is found in increased plasma concentrations in infants of diabetic mothers who have delayed globin gene switching, was infused into catheterized fetal lambs in utero during the time of the normal globin gene switch period. The globin gene switch was significantly delayed in three of four butyrate-treated fetuses compared with controls and was entirely prevented in one fetus in whom the infusion was begun before the globin switch was under way. These data provide a model for investigating and arresting the biologic clock of hemoglobin switching.

  9. Carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate: a review of the preparations, properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    El-Sakhawy, Mohamed; Kamel, Samir; Salama, Ahmed; Sarhan, Hebat-Allah

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) has gained increasing importance in several fields, particularly in coating technologies and pharmaceutical research. CMCAB is synthesized by esterification of CMC sodium salt with acetic and butyric anhydrides. CMCAB mixed esters are relatively high molecular weight (MW) thermoplastic polymers with high glass transition temperatures (Tg). CMCAB ester is dispersible in water and soluble in a wide range of organic solvents, allowing varied opportunity to the solvent choice. It makes application of coatings more consistent and defect-free. Its ability to slow down the release rate of highly water-soluble compounds and to increase the dissolution of poorly soluble compounds makes CMCAB a unique and potentially valuable tool in pharmaceutical and amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) formulations.

  10. Structural Analysis and Quantitative Determination of Clevidipine Butyrate Impurities Using an Advanced RP-HPLC Method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuxia; Zhou, Fan; Yan, Fei; Yang, Feng; Yao, Yuxian; Zou, Qiaogen

    2016-03-01

    Eleven potential impurities, including process-related compounds and degradation products, have been analyzed by comprehensive studies on the manufacturing process of clevidipine butyrate. Possible formation mechanisms could also be devised. MS and NMR techniques have been used for the structural characterization of three previously unreported impurities (Imp-3, Imp-5 and Imp-11). To separate and quantify the potential impurities in a simultaneous fashion, an efficient and advanced RP-HPLC method has been developed. In doing so, four major degradation products (Imp-2, Imp-4, Imp-8 and Imp-10) can be observed under varying stress conditions. This analytical method has been validated according to ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, accuracy, linearity, robustness and stability. The method described has been demonstrated to be applicable in routine quality control processes and stability evaluation studies of clevidipine butyrate.

  11. Hydrocortisone 17-butyrate degradation in the presence of micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Rabouan-Guyon, S M; Fauvaud, C M; Courtois, P Y; Barthes, D M

    1997-02-01

    This study compared the degradation of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate (H17B) in the presence of six different bacteria, commonly found on psoriatic skin. H17B and its degradation products (hydrocortisone and hydrocortisone 21-butyrate (H21B)) were assayed by HPLC. In the absence of micro-organisms, we observed 16.6 +/- 7.1% degradation. In the presence of micro-organisms and otherwise similar conditions, we noted that H17B degradation was not modified by cocci (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae). Three bacilli increased degradation, Escherichia coli 59.1 +/- 19.4%, Klebsiella oxytoca 62.1 +/- 6.7% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 56.0 +/- 17.9%. The degradation of H17B into hydrortisone and H21B may produce a loss of therapeutic activity.

  12. Differential Effects of Sodium Butyrate and Lithium Chloride on Rhesus Monkey Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyadarsini; Thirkill, Twanda L.; Ji, Jennifer; Monte, Louise H.; Douglas, Gordon C.

    2015-01-01

    Trophoblast differentiation during early placental development is critical for successful pregnancy and aberrant differentiation causes preeclampsia and early pregnancy loss. During the first trimester, cytotrophoblasts are exposed to low oxygen tension (equivalent to~2%-3% O2) and differentiation proceeds along an extravillous pathway (giving rise to invasive extravillous cytotrophoblasts) and a villous pathway (giving rise to multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast). Interstitial extravillous cytotrophoblasts invade the decidua, while endovascular extravillous cytotrophoblasts are involved in re-modelling uterine spiral arteries. We tested the idea that sodium butyrate (an epigenetic modulator) induces trophoblast differentiation in early gestation rhesus monkey trophoblasts through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results show that syncytiotrophoblast formation was increased by butyrate, accompanied by nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, and increased expression of EnvV2 and galectin-1 (two factors thought to be involved in trophoblast fusion). Surprisingly, the expression of GCM1 and syncytin-2 was not affected by sodium butyrate. When trophoblasts were incubated with lithium chloride, a GSK3 inhibitor that mimics Wnt activation, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin also occurred but differentiation into syncytiotrophoblast was not observed. Instead the cells differentiated to mononucleated spindle-shaped cells and showed molecular and behavioral characteristics of endovascular trophoblasts. Another highly specific inhibitor of GSK3, CHIR99021, failed to induce endovascular trophoblast characteristics. These observations suggest that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway correlates with both trophoblast differentiation pathways, but that additional factors determine specific cell fate decisions. Other experiments suggested that the differential effects of sodium butyrate and lithium chloride might be explained by their effects on TNFα production. The

  13. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  14. Synthesis of the building block 2-hydroxyisobutyrate from fructose and butyrate by Cupriavidus necator H16.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Denise; Rohwerder, Thore; Harms, Hauke; Yaneva, Nadya; Müller, Roland H

    2013-10-01

    2-Hydroxyisobutyryl-coenzyme A mutase, originally discovered in the context of methyl tert-butyl ether degradation in Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108, catalyzes the isomerization of 3-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (3-HB-CoA) to 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA. It thus constitutes the basis for a biotechnological route from practically any renewable carbon to 2-hydroxyisobutyrate (2-HIB) via the common metabolite 3-hydroxybutyrate. At first sight, recombinant Cupriavidus necator H16 expressing the mutase seems to be well suited for such a synthesis process, as a strong overflow metabolism via (R)-3-HB-CoA is easily induced in this bacterium possessing the poly-3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism. However, the recently established stereospecificity of the mutase, dominantly preferring the (S)-enantiomer of 3-HB-CoA, calls for a closer investigation of C. necator as potential 2-HIB production strain and raised the question about the strain's potential to yield 2-HIB from substrates directly providing (S)-3-HB-CoA. We compared two mutase-expressing C. necator H16 strains for their capability to synthesize 2-HIB from fructose and butyrate, delivering either (R)- or (S)-3-HB-CoA. Our results indicate that due to the enantiospecificity of the mutase, fructose is a weaker substrate for 2-HIB synthesis than butyrate. Production rates achieved with the PHB-negative strain H16 PHB(-)4 on butyrate were higher than on fructose. Using the wild-type did not significantly improve the production rates as the latter showed a 34-fold and a 5-fold lower 2-HIB synthesis rate compared to H16 PHB(-)4 on fructose and butyrate, respectively. Moreover, both strains showed concomitant excretion of undesired side products, such as pyruvate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, significantly decreasing the 2-HIB yield.

  15. A cereal-based evening meal rich in indigestible carbohydrates increases plasma butyrate the next morning.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anne C; Östman, Elin M; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Holst, Jens J; Björck, Inger M E

    2010-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relation between a whole grain consumption and risk of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. One tentative mechanism relates to colonic metabolism of indigestible carbohydrates. In a previous study, we reported a positive relation between colonic fermentation and improved glucose tolerance. This work can be seen as an extension of that study, focusing on the tentative role of specific colonic metabolites, i.e. SCFA. Plasma concentrations of acetate, propionate, and butyrate were determined in the morning in healthy participants (5 women and 10 men, mean ± SD: 25.9 ± 3.2 y, BMI < 25) following 8 different cereal-based evening meals (50 g available starch) varying in content of indigestible carbohydrates. Each participant consumed all test meals in a random order on separate evenings. At a standardized breakfast following evening test meals, the postprandial glucose response (incremental area under the curve, 0-120 min) was inversely related to plasma butyrate (r = -0.26; P < 0.01) and acetate (r = -0.20; P < 0.05) concentrations. Evening meals composed of high-amylose barley kernels or high-β-glucan barley kernels resulted in higher plasma butyrate concentrations the following morning compared with an evening meal with white wheat bread (P < 0.05). The results support the view that cereal products rich in indigestible carbohydrates may improve glucose tolerance through a mechanism involving colonic fermentation and generation of SCFA, where in particular butyric acid may be involved. This mechanism may be one explanation by which whole grain is protective against type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  16. Polyvinyl butyral films containing leuco-malachite green as low-dose dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Hoang Hoa; Solomon, H. M.; Taguchi, M.; Kojima, T.

    2008-04-01

    Thin films containing leuco-malachite green (LMG) dye in polyvinyl butyral (PVB) have been developed for dose measurements of a few hundreds Gy level. The film shows significant color change in the visible range, and the sensitivity of the film to absorbed dose was enhanced by addition of chloride-containing compounds, such as chloral hydrate or 2,2,2-trichloroethanol. The film is suitable as dosimeters for dose measurements, e.g. in food irradiation and environmental protection.

  17. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  18. Chicory increases acetate turnover, but not propionate and butyrate peripheral turnovers in rats.

    PubMed

    Pouteau, Etienne; Rochat, Florence; Jann, Alfred; Meirim, Isabelle; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose-Luis; Ornstein, Kurt; German, Bruce; Ballèvre, Olivier

    2008-02-01

    Chicory roots are rich in inulin that is degraded into SCFA in the caecum and colon. Whole-body SCFA metabolism was investigated in rats during food deprivation and postprandial states. After 22 h of food deprivation, sixteen rats received an IV injection of radioactive 14C-labelled SCFA. The volume of distribution and the fractional clearance rate of SCFA were 0.25-0.27 litres/kg and 5.4-5.9 %/min, respectively. The half-life in the first extracellular rapidly decaying compartment was between 0.9 and 1.4 min. After 22 h of food deprivation, another seventeen rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Isotope enrichment (13C) of SCFA was determined in peripheral arterial blood by MS. Peripheral acetate, propionate and butyrate turnover rates were 29, 4 and 0.3 micromol/kg per min respectively. Following 4 weeks of treatment with chicory root or control diets, eighteen fed rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Intestinal degradation of dietary chicory lowered caecal pH, enhanced caecal and colonic weights, caecal SCFA concentrations and breath H2. The diet with chicory supplementation enhanced peripheral acetate turnover by 25 % (P = 0.017) concomitant with an increase in plasma acetate concentration. There were no changes in propionate or butyrate turnovers. In conclusion, by setting up a multi-tracer approach to simultaneously assess the turnovers of acetate, propionate and butyrate it was demonstrated that a chronic chicory-rich diet significantly increases peripheral acetate turnover but not that of propionate or butyrate in rats.

  19. Alcohol Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... your drinks The rate and amount of alcohol consumption Your tolerance level Complications Severe complications can result ... pressure and fast heart rate. Seizures. Your blood sugar level may drop low enough to cause seizures. ...

  20. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tests may include: Arterial blood gases (measure the acid/base balance and oxygen level in blood) Blood alcohol ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 161. Seifter JL. Acid-Base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  1. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  2. Alcoholic Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcoholic hepatitis include: Fluid accumulation in your abdomen (ascites) Confusion and behavior changes due to a buildup ... is life-threatening and requires immediate medical care. Ascites. Fluid that accumulates in the abdomen might become ...

  3. Propyl alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... clear liquid commonly used as a germ killer (antiseptic). This article discusses poisoning from swallowing propyl alcohol. ... Airway support, including oxygen, breathing tube through the mouth (intubation),and ventilator (breathing machine) Blood and urine ...

  4. Potentiated antitumor effects of a combination therapy with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Maciej; Strusinska, Katarzyna; Legat, Magdalena; Makowski, Marcin; Jakobisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub

    2004-05-01

    Farnesyltransferase inhibitors, butyrate and butyric acid derivatives have previously been reported to exert anti-tumor activity in experimental models in vitro and in vivo and have recently gained acceptance as potential anticancer agents. In our study, we examined antitumor effects of a combination of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate in vitro against MDA-MB-231 and MIA PaCa-2 human cancer cells. This combination therapy showed synergistic antitumor activity against MDA-MB-231 cells, which was at least in part due to induction of p27KIP1 expression. Both drugs increased intracellular levels of p53 as well but there was no significant difference between the groups treated with single drugs and the group treated with their combination. In MIA PaCa-2 cells, the combination therapy exerted additive antitumor activity. Our results illustrate possible application of the farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate as a combination therapy of cancer.

  5. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    PubMed Central

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg−1 protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24–7.64 U mg−1 protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  6. Impact of butyrate on microbial selection in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial selection in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was investigated in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor fed exclusively with butyrate as a carbon source. As reported in the few previous studies, butyrate uptake was slow and phosphorus (P) release occurred during the entire anaerobic period. Polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO), i.e. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (named as Accumulibacter), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), i.e. Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis (named as Competibacter) and Defluviicoccus-related, tetrad-forming alphaproteobacteria (named as Defluviicoccus) were identified using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The results show that Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus were selected in the butyrate-fed reactor, whereas Competibacter was not selected. P removal was efficient at the beginning of the experiment with an increasing percentage relative abundance (% RA) of PAOs. The % RA of Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus increased from 13% to 50% and 8% to 16%, respectively, and the % RA of Competibacter decreased from 8% to 2% during the experiment. After 6 weeks, P removal deteriorated with the poor correlation between the percentage of P removal and % RA of GAOs.

  7. Quantitative Influences of Butyrate or Propionate on Thermophilic Production of Methane from Biomass †

    PubMed Central

    Henson, J. Michael; Bordeaux, F. M.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Smith, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Sodium butyrate and sodium propionate were continuously infused into separate 4-liter thermophilic digesters. These digesters were operated at 55°C, had a retention time of 20 days, and had a pH of 7.8. Infusion rates were started at 10 mM day−1 and were increased incrementally when new stable external organic acid pool sizes and new stable gas production rates were observed. Stable conditions were obtained in both digesters at an infusion rate of 15 mM day−1, with methanogenesis elevated over that of control digesters. Calculations based on expected CH4 at this infusion rate and measured CH4 production in the treated and control digesters, however, showed an approximately 25% inhibition of methanogenesis in both digesters. A digester infused with sodium chloride showed little or no inhibition at this infusion rate, but was totally inhibited when its infusion rate was increased to 20 mM day−1, and cumulative added NaCl reached 0.38 M. The butyrate and propionate-amended digesters tolerated addition rates of 20 mM day−1, but both failed when they were increased to 25 mM day−1. These results indicate that the thermophilic digesters could function stably at higher external pool sizes of butyrate or propionate than routinely observed. PMID:16346985

  8. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nylund, L; Nermes, M; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S; de Vos, W M; Satokari, R

    2015-02-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory, and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were characterized. Further, the changes in intestinal microbiota composition related to the improvement of this disease 3 months later were assessed. The severity of eczema correlated inversely with microbiota diversity (r = -0.54, P = 0.002) and with the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (r = -0.52, P = 0.005). During the 3-month follow-up, microbiota diversity increased (P < 0.001) and scoring atopic dermatitis values decreased (P < 0.001) in all infants. This decrease coincided with the increase in bacteria related to butyrate-producing Coprococcus eutactus (r = -0.59, P = 0.02). In conclusion, the high diversity of microbiota and high abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria were associated with milder eczema, thus suggesting they have a role in alleviating symptoms of atopic eczema.

  9. TLR ligands and butyrate increase Pyy expression through two distinct but inter-regulated pathways.

    PubMed

    Larraufie, Pierre; Doré, Joël; Lapaque, Nicolas; Blottière, Hervé M

    2017-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium is an active barrier separating the host from its microbiota. It senses microbial compounds through expression of a wide range of receptors including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs have been shown to regulate epithelium permeability or secretion of defensin by Paneth cells. However, the expression and function of TLRs in enteroendocrine L-cells, a specific subtype of intestinal cells secreting PYY and GLP-1, have not yet been assessed. PYY and GLP-1 are implicated in regulation of gut motility, food intake and insulin secretion, and are of great interest regarding obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a cellular model of human L-cells and a reporter system for NF-κB activation pathway, we reported functional expression of TLRs in these cells. Stimulation with specific TLR-agonists increased expression of Pyy but not Proglucagon in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Moreover, the effect of TLR stimulation was additive to butyrate, a product of bacterial fermentation, on Pyy expression. Additionally, butyrate also increased Tlr expression, including Tlr4, and the NF-κB response to TLR stimulation. Altogether, our results demonstrated a role of TLRs in the modulation of Pyy expression and the importance of butyrate, a product of bacterial fermentation in regulation of microbial TLR-dependent sensing.

  10. The effects of prebiotics on microbial dysbiosis, butyrate production and immunity in HIV-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, S; Vázquez-Castellanos, J F; Vallejo, A; Latorre, A; Sainz, T; Ferrando-Martínez, S; Rojo, D; Martínez-Botas, J; Del Romero, J; Madrid, N; Leal, M; Mosele, J I; Motilva, M J; Barbas, C; Ferrer, M; Moya, A; Moreno, S; Gosalbes, M J; Estrada, V

    2017-09-01

    Altered interactions between the gut mucosa and bacteria during HIV infection seem to contribute to chronic immune dysfunction. A deeper understanding of how nutritional interventions could ameliorate gut dysbiosis is needed. Forty-four subjects, including 12 HIV(+) viremic untreated (VU) patients, 23 antiretroviral therapy-treated (ART(+)) virally suppressed patients (15 immunological responders and 8 non-responders) and 9 HIV(-) controls (HIV(-)), were blindly randomized to receive either prebiotics (scGOS/lcFOS/glutamine) or placebo (34/10) over 6 weeks in this pilot study. We assessed fecal microbiota composition using deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing and several immunological and genetic markers involved in HIV immunopathogenesis. The short dietary supplementation attenuated HIV-associated dysbiosis, which was most apparent in VU individuals but less so in ART(+) subjects, whose gut microbiota was found more resilient. This compositional shift was not observed in the placebo arm. Significantly, declines in indirect markers of bacterial translocation and T-cell activation, improvement of thymic output, and changes in butyrate production were observed. Increases in the abundance of Faecalibacterium and Lachnospira strongly correlated with moderate but significant increases of butyrate production and amelioration of the inflammatory biomarkers soluble CD14 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, especially among VU. Hence, the bacterial butyrate synthesis pathway holds promise as a viable target for interventions.

  11. Phenibut (4-amino-3-phenyl-butyric acid): Availability, prevalence of use, desired effects and acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Owen, David R; Wood, David M; Archer, John R H; Dargan, Paul I

    2016-09-01

    There has been a global increase in the availability and use of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) over the last decade. Phenibut (β-phenyl-γ-aminobutyric acid) is a GABAB agonist that is used as an NPS. Here, we bring together published scientific and grey information sources to further understand the prevalence of use, desired effects and acute toxicity of phenibut. Using European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction Internet snapshot methodology, we undertook an English language Internet snapshot survey in May 2015 to gather information on the availability and price of phenibut from Internet NPS retailers. To gather information on prevalence of use, desired effects and/or adverse effects, we searched grey literature (online drug discussion forums) and medical literature (PubMed and abstracts from selected International Toxicology conferences). We found 48 unrelated Internet suppliers selling phenibut in amounts ranging from 5 g (US$1.60, £1.01/g) to 1000 kg (US$0.23, £0.14/g). Capsules containing 200-500 mg of phenibut were available in packs of between 6 (US$4.45, £2.80/g) and 360 (US$0.43, £0.27/g). According to the grey literature, phenibut is taken for its anxiolytic and euphoric properties, with tolerance and withdrawal syndromes commonly reported adverse effects. Phenibut is taken orally at an average dose of 2.4 g. Case reports in the medical literature feature users who present to emergency departments heavily sedated or experiencing withdrawal. There have been no reported deaths relating to phenibut use. Phenibut is readily available in the UK from Internet sites selling NPS. Its desired and adverse effects appear similar to other gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor agonists. [Owen DR, Wood DM, Archer JRH, Dargan PI. Phenibut (4-amino-3-phenyl-butyric acid): Availability, prevalence of use, desired effects and acute toxicity. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:591-596]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  12. Feed-drug interaction of orally applied butyrate and phenobarbital on hepatic cytochrome P450 activity in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mátis, G; Kulcsár, A; Petrilla, J; Hermándy-Berencz, K; Neogrády, Zs

    2016-08-01

    The expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes may be affected by several nutrition-derived compounds, such as by the commonly applied feed additive butyrate, possibly leading to feed-drug interactions. The aim of this study was to provide some evidence if butyrate can alter the activity of hepatic CYPs in chickens exposed to CYP-inducing xenobiotics, monitoring for the first time the possibility of such interaction. Ross 308 chickens in the grower phase were treated with daily intracoelomal phenobarbital (PB) injection (80 mg/kg BW), applied as a non-specific CYP-inducer, simultaneously with two different doses of intra-ingluvial sodium butyrate boluses (0.25 and 1.25 g/kg BW) for 5 days. Activity of CYP2H and CYP3A subfamilies was assessed by specific enzyme assays from isolated liver microsomes. According to our results, the lower dose of orally administered butyrate significantly attenuated the PB-triggered elevation of both hepatic CYP2H and CYP3A activities, which might be in association with the partly common signalling pathways of butyrate and CYP-inducing drugs, such as that of PB. Based on these data, butyrate may take part in pharmacoepigenetic interactions with simultaneously applied drugs or other CYP-inducing xenobiotics, with possible consequences for food safety and pharmacotherapy. Butyrate was found to be capable to maintain physiological CYP activity by attenuating CYP induction, underlining the safety of butyrate application in poultry nutrition. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Phase Diagram, Caesium-133 NMR Spectra and Electrical Conductivity of the Binary System Caesium and Zinc Butyrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnaya, T. A.; Trachevski, V. V.; Dradrakh, V. S.; Bylina, D. V.

    2000-12-01

    Phase equilibria of non-mesogenic caesium- and zinc-butyrate mixtures were studied by differential thermal analysis and hot stage polarization microscopy. Smectic liquid crystals were found in some composition range. Their appearance is explained by the latent mesomorphism of caesium butyrate. |133Cs NMR spectra and the specific electrical conductivity of the molten mixtures at 155°C were employed to investigate the peculiarities of ionic association and interaction in the melts.

  14. [Alcohol experience, alcohol knowledge, and alcohol expectancy in early adolescents].

    PubMed

    Tak, Young-Ran; Yun, E-hwa; An, Ji-Yeon

    2007-02-01

    This study was to explore the prevalence of alcohol experiences and to identify the expectancy on the effects of alcohol and alcohol knowledge in early adolescents. The cross-sectional survey of 1854 students from seven middle schools in one district of Seoul was conducted by convenience sampling. Alcohol experience and early onset of alcohol use were measured by the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Alcohol expectancy was measured by an Alcohol Effects Questionnaire. Over sixty five percent of adolescents reported that they had previous drinking experiences. The participants with no alcohol drinking experience had a lower level of alcohol knowledge than those with experience(t=2.73, p=.007). In expectancy on effects of alcohol, girls had a more positive alcohol expectation than boys(t=-2.54, p=.011). Alcohol knowledge negatively correlated with alcohol expectancy(r=-.40 p=.000). In regression of alcohol expectancy, gender and alcohol knowledge were significant predictors explaining 17%. The results support that alcohol expectancy is an important link with early drinking experiences and alcohol knowledge, focusing on the importance of gender differences. Therefore, an alcohol prevention program in early adolescence is needed and should be focused on multidimensionality of the alcohol expectancy with developmental and psychosocial factors for early adolescents.

  15. Proboscis conditioning experiments with honeybees, Apis mellifera caucasica, with butyric acid and DEET mixture as conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Charles I; Giray, Tugrul; Mixson, T Andrew; Nolf, Sondra L; Wells, Harrington; Kence, Aykut; Kence, Meral

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments are described investigating whether olfactory repellents DEET and butyric acid can support the classical conditioning of proboscis extension in the honeybee, Apis mellifera caucasica (Hymenoptera: Apidae). In the first experiment DEET and butyric acid readily led to standard acquisition and extinction effects, which are comparable to the use of cinnamon as a conditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that the odor of DEET or butyric acid is not intrinsically repellent to honey bees. In a second experiment, with DEET and butyric acid mixed with sucrose as an unconditioned stimulus, proboscis conditioning was not established. After several trials, few animals responded to the unconditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that these chemicals are gustatory repellents when in direct contact. In the last experiment a conditioned suppression paradigm was used. Exposing animals to butyric acid or DEET when the proboscis was extended by direct sucrose stimulation or by learning revealed that retraction of the proboscis was similar to another novel odor, lavender, and in all cases greatest when the animal was not permitted to feed. These results again demonstrate that DEET or butyric acid are not olfactory repellents, and in addition, conditioned suppression is influenced by feeding state of the bee.

  16. Proboscis Conditioning Experiments with Honeybees, Apis Mellifera Caucasica, with Butyric Acid and DEET Mixture as Conditioned and Unconditioned Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Charles I.; Giray, Tugrul; Mixson, T. Andrew; Nolf, Sondra L.; Wells, Harrington; Kence, Aykut; Kence, Meral

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments are described investigating whether olfactory repellents DEET and butyric acid can support the classical conditioning of proboscis extension in the honeybee, Apis mellifera caucasica (Hymenoptera: Apidae). In the first experiment DEET and butyric acid readily led to standard acquisition and extinction effects, which are comparable to the use of cinnamon as a conditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that the odor of DEET or butyric acid is not intrinsically repellent to honey bees. In a second experiment, with DEET and butyric acid mixed with sucrose as an unconditioned stimulus, proboscis conditioning was not established. After several trials, few animals responded to the unconditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that these chemicals are gustatory repellents when in direct contact. In the last experiment a conditioned suppression paradigm was used. Exposing animals to butyric acid or DEET when the proboscis was extended by direct sucrose stimulation or by learning revealed that retraction of the proboscis was similar to another novel odor, lavender, and in all cases greatest when the animal was not permitted to feed. These results again demonstrate that DEET or butyric acid are not olfactory repellents, and in addition, conditioned suppression is influenced by feeding state of the bee. PMID:20879917

  17. Butyrate induced cell cycle arrest in bovine cells through targeting gene expression relevant to DNA replication apparatus.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-jun; Li, Robert W

    2008-03-17

    Using real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in bovine kidney epithelial cells, we systematically investigated the effects of butyrate on patterns of gene expression relevant to DNA replication apparatus. The real-time PCR and Western blot data generally confirmed previously reported microarray data. Of the five genes tested by quantitative RT-PCR, CDKN1A (p21(waf1)) was up regulated, CDC2/cdk1, MCM6, ORC1L were down regulated, while ORC3L expression remained unchanged following butyrate treatment. Also consistent with RT-PCR results, Western blot analysis confirmed that butyrate up-regulated cyclin-kinase inhibitor p21(waf1) in a does-dependent manner. In contrast, butyrate treatment had no effect on the expression of ERK 1/2 proteins. Also consistent with mRNA results, ORC1 and MCM3 proteins were down-regulated by butyrate treatment, while ORC2 protein remained unchanged. The present results suggest that ORC1, not ORC2 or ORC3, along with MCM proteins play a critical role in regulating the initiation of DNA replication and cell cycle progression in MDBK cells and are targets of butyrate regulation.

  18. A Proteomic View at the Biochemistry of Syntrophic Butyrate Oxidation in Syntrophomonas wolfei

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Alexander; Müller, Nicolai; Schink, Bernhard; Schleheck, David

    2013-01-01

    In syntrophic conversion of butyrate to methane and CO2, butyrate is oxidized to acetate by secondary fermenting bacteria such as Syntrophomonas wolfei in close cooperation with methanogenic partner organisms, e.g., Methanospirillum hungatei. This process involves an energetically unfavourable shift of electrons from the level of butyryl-CoA oxidation to the substantially lower redox potential of proton and/or CO2 reduction, in order to transfer these electrons to the methanogenic partner via hydrogen and/or formate. In the present study, all prominent membrane-bound and soluble proteins expressed in S. wolfei specifically during syntrophic growth with butyrate, in comparison to pure-culture growth with crotonate, were examined by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and identified by peptide fingerprinting-mass spectrometry. A membrane-bound, externally oriented, quinone-linked formate dehydrogenase complex was expressed at high level specifically during syntrophic butyrate oxidation, comprising a selenocystein-linked catalytic subunit with a membrane-translocation pathway signal (TAT), a membrane-bound iron-sulfur subunit, and a membrane-bound cytochrome. Soluble hydrogenases were expressed at high levels specifically during growth with crotonate. The results were confirmed by native protein gel electrophoresis, by formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase-activity staining, and by analysis of formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities in intact cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, constitutive expression of a membrane-bound, internally oriented iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (DUF224) was confirmed, together with expression of soluble electron-transfer flavoproteins (EtfAB) and two previously identified butyryl-CoA dehydrogenases. Our findings allow to depict an electron flow scheme for syntrophic butyrate oxidation in S. wolfei. Electrons derived from butyryl-CoA are transferred through a membrane-bound EtfAB:quinone oxidoreductase (DUF224) to a

  19. Deciding to quit drinking alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol abuse - quitting drinking; Quitting drinking; Quitting alcohol; Alcoholism - deciding to quit ... pubmed/23698791 . National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol and health. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol- ...

  20. Butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by facilitating tight junction assembly via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Luying; Li, Zhong-Rong; Green, Robert S; Holzman, Ian R; Lin, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Butyrate, one of the SCFA, promotes the development of the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the butyrate regulation of the intestinal barrier are unknown. To test the hypothesis that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier is mediated by the regulation of the assembly of tight junctions involving the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and inulin permeability in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. We further used a calcium switch assay to study the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and determined the effect of butyrate on the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and AMPK activity. We demonstrated that the butyrate treatment increased AMPK activity and accelerated the assembly of tight junctions as shown by the reorganization of tight junction proteins, as well as the development of TER. AMPK activity was also upregulated by butyrate during calcium switch-induced tight junction assembly. Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor, inhibited the butyrate-induced activation of AMPK. The facilitating effect of butyrate on the increases in TER in standard culture media, as well as after calcium switch, was abolished by compound C. We conclude that butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by regulating the assembly of tight junctions. This dynamic process is mediated by the activation of AMPK. These results suggest an intriguing link between SCFA and the intracellular energy sensor for the development of the intestinal barrier.

  1. Butyrate Enhances the Intestinal Barrier by Facilitating Tight Junction Assembly via Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers12

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Luying; Li, Zhong-Rong; Green, Robert S.; Holzman, Ian R.; Lin, Jing

    2009-01-01

    Butyrate, one of the SCFA, promotes the development of the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the butyrate regulation of the intestinal barrier are unknown. To test the hypothesis that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier is mediated by the regulation of the assembly of tight junctions involving the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and inulin permeability in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. We further used a calcium switch assay to study the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and determined the effect of butyrate on the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and AMPK activity. We demonstrated that the butyrate treatment increased AMPK activity and accelerated the assembly of tight junctions as shown by the reorganization of tight junction proteins, as well as the development of TER. AMPK activity was also upregulated by butyrate during calcium switch-induced tight junction assembly. Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor, inhibited the butyrate-induced activation of AMPK. The facilitating effect of butyrate on the increases in TER in standard culture media, as well as after calcium switch, was abolished by compound C. We conclude that butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by regulating the assembly of tight junctions. This dynamic process is mediated by the activation of AMPK. These results suggest an intriguing link between SCFA and the intracellular energy sensor for the development of the intestinal barrier. PMID:19625695

  2. Alcohol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Manasco, Anton; Chang, Shannon; Larriviere, Joseph; Hamm, L Lee; Glass, Marcia

    2012-11-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is a common clinical condition that has a variety of complications and morbidities. The manifestations can range from mild agitation to withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. The treatments for alcohol withdrawal include benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, beta-blockers and antihypertensives. Although benzodiazepines are presently a first-line therapy, there is controversy regarding the efficacies of these medications compared with others. Treatment protocols often involve one of two contrasting approaches: symptom-triggered versus fixed-schedule dosing of benzodiazepines. We describe these protocols in our review and examine the data supporting symptom-triggered dosing as the preferred method for most patients in withdrawal.The Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol scoring system for alcohol withdrawal streamlines care, optimizes patient management, and is the best scale available for withdrawal assessment. Quality improvement implications for inpatient management of alcohol withdrawal include increasing training for signs of withdrawal and symptom recognition, adding new hospital protocols to employee curricula, and ensuring manageable patient-to-physician and patient-to-nurse ratios.

  3. Alcoholic sialosis.

    PubMed

    Kastin, B; Mandel, L

    2000-01-01

    Sialosis (sialadenosis) is a term used to describe a disorder that involves both secretory and parenchymal changes of the major salivary glands, most commonly the parotid. Seen often in a dental office, it is recognized as an indolent, bilateral, non-inflammatory, non-neoplastic, soft, symmetrical, painless and persistent enlargement of the parotid glands. Four major entities have commonly been associated with this disorder. They are alcoholism, endocrinopathy (particularly diabetes mellitus), maLnutrition and idiopathic. We are reporting a case of alcoholic sialosis with its clinical and diagnostic aspects. It is important for the dental practitioner to recognize sialosis, because it often indicates the existence of an unsuspected systemic disease.

  4. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... code here Enter ZIP code here Daily Living: Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one ... related to choices you make about your lifestyle . Alcohol and fibrosis Fibrosis is the medical term for ...

  5. Steering Endogenous Butyrate Production in the Intestinal Tract of Broilers as a Tool to Improve Gut Health

    PubMed Central

    Onrust, Lonneke; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Driessche, Karolien; De Maesschalck, Celine; Vermeulen, Karen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The ban on antimicrobial growth promoters and efforts to reduce therapeutic antibiotic usage has led to major problems of gastrointestinal dysbiosis in livestock production in Europe. Control of dysbiosis without the use of antibiotics requires a thorough understanding of the interaction between the microbiota and the host mucosa. The gut microbiota of the healthy chicken is highly diverse, producing various metabolic end products, including gases and fermentation acids. The distal gut knows an abundance of bacteria from within the Firmicutes Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa that produce butyric acid, which is one of the metabolites that are sensed by the host as a signal. The host responds by strengthening the epithelial barrier, reducing inflammation, and increasing the production of mucins and antimicrobial peptides. Stimulating the colonization and growth of butyrate-producing bacteria thus may help optimizing gut health. Various strategies are available to stimulate butyrate production in the distal gut. These include delivery of prebiotic substrates that are broken down by bacteria into smaller molecules which are then used by butyrate producers, a concept called cross-feeding. Xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) are such compounds as they can be converted to lactate, which is further metabolized to butyrate. Probiotic lactic acid producers can be supplied to support the cross-feeding reactions. Direct feeding of butyrate-producing Clostridium cluster IV and XIVa strains are a future tool provided that large scale production of strictly anaerobic bacteria can be optimized. Current results of strategies that promote butyrate production in the gut are promising. Nevertheless, our current understanding of the intestinal ecosystem is still insufficient, and further research efforts are needed to fully exploit the capacity of these strategies. PMID:26734618

  6. The synergistic effect of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate and sodium butyrate on the death of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Rie; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Azuma, Hideki; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2014-04-05

    It has been suggested that the combined effect of natural products may improve the effect of treatment against the proliferation of cancer cells. In this study, we evaluated the combination of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), obtained from Alpinia galangal, and sodium butyrate, a major short chain fatty acid, on the growth of HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and found that treatment had a synergistic inhibitory effect. The number of HepG2 cells was synergistically decreased via apoptosis induction when cells were treated with both ACA and sodium butyrate. In ACA- and sodium butyrate-treated cells, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and NADPH oxidase activities were increased significantly. The decrease in cell number after combined treatment of ACA and sodium butyrate was diminished when cells were pretreated with catalase. These results suggest that an increase in intracellular ROS levels is involved in cancer cell death. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor, plays an essential role in controlling processes related to tumor development. In ACA- and sodium butyrate-treated cells, AMPK phosphorylation was induced significantly, and this induction improved when cells were pretreated with catalase. These results suggest that the increase in intracellular ROS is involved in the increase of AMPK phosphorylation. In normal hepatocyte cells, treatment with ACA and sodium butyrate did not decrease cell numbers or increase ROS levels. In conclusion, combined treatment with ACA and sodium butyrate synergistically induced apoptotic cell death via an increase in intracellular ROS and phosphorylation of AMPK. Our findings may provide new insight into the development of novel combination therapies against hepatocellular carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of butyrate on the insulin homeostasis of chickens kept on maize- or wheat-based diets.

    PubMed

    Kulcsár, Anna; Mátis, Gábor; Molnár, Andor; Petrilla, Janka; Husvéth, Ferenc; Huber, Korinna; Dublecz, Károly; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of butyrate as a feed supplement on the expression of insulin signalling proteins as potent regulators of metabolism and growth in Ross 308 broiler chickens fed maize- or wheat-based diets. Both diets were supplemented with non-protected butyrate (1.5 and 3.0 g/kg of diet, respectively) or with protected butyrate (0.2 g/kg of diet); the diet of the control groups was prepared without any additives (control). On day 42 of life, systemic blood samples were drawn for analyses of glucose and insulin concentrations, and tissue samples (liver, gastrocnemius muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue) were taken for Western blotting examinations. The expression of key insulin signalling proteins (IRβ, PKCζ and mTOR) was assessed by semiquantitative Western blotting from the tissues mentioned. The type of diet had a remarkable influence on the insulin homeostasis of chickens. The wheat-based diet significantly increased IRβ and mTOR expression in the liver as well as mTOR and PKCζ expression in the adipose tissue when compared to animals kept on a maize-based diet. IRβ expression in the liver was stimulated by the lower dose of non-protected butyrate as well, suggesting the potential of butyrate as a feed additive to affect insulin sensitivity. Based on the results obtained, the present study shows new aspects of nutritional factors by comparing the special effects of butyrate as a feed additive and those of the cereal type, presumably in association with dietary non-starch polysaccharide- (NSP-) driven enteric shortchain fatty acid release including butyrate, influencing insulin homeostasis in chickens. As the tissues of chickens have physiologically lower insulin sensitivity compared to mammals, diet-associated induction of the insulin signalling pathway can be of special importance in improving growth and metabolic health.

  8. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  9. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n=38), Aves (n=8) and Reptilia (n=8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large ‘unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild. PMID:25343515

  10. Increased Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure Is Associated With Altered Gut Microbiota Composition and Butyrate Production in Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Arango, Luisa F; Barrett, Helen L; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Morrison, Mark; Dekker Nitert, Marloes

    2016-10-01

    The risk of developing pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia is higher in obese pregnant women. In obesity, the composition of the gut microbiota is altered. Obesity is also associated with low-grade inflammation. Metabolites from the gut microbiota may contribute to both hypertension and inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the composition of the gut microbiota in overweight and obese pregnant women is associated with blood pressure and levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The composition of the gut microbiota was determined with 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing in 205 women at 16 weeks gestation from the SPRING study (the Study of Probiotics in Gestational Diabetes). Expression of butyrate-producing genes in the gut microbiota was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were measured in fasting serum of a subset of 70 women. Blood pressure was slightly but significantly higher in obese compared with overweight women. The abundance of the butyrate-producing genus Odoribacter was inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure. Butyrate production capacity was decreased, but plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations increased in obese pregnant women. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were inversely correlated with expression of butyrate kinase and Odoribacter abundance. This study shows that in overweight and obese pregnant women at 16 weeks gestation, the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and butyrate production in the gut microbiota is significantly negatively associated with blood pressure and with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels. Increasing butyrate-producing capacity may contribute to maintenance of normal blood pressure in obese pregnant women.

  11. Sodium Butyrate Reduces Colitogenic Immunoglobulin A-Coated Bacteria and Modifies the Composition of Microbiota in IL-10 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tenghui; Ding, Chao; Zhao, Mingli; Dai, Xujie; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Wei, Yao; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    High levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-coated bacteria may have a role in driving inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We therefore investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on microbiota in IBD prone interleukin (IL)-10−/− mice. At 8 weeks of age, mice were allocated into three groups (n = 4/group): normal (C57BL/6), IL-10−/−, and IL-10−/− treated with sodium butyrate (100 mM). Severity of colitis, inflammatory cytokine and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration in proximal colon contents, the percentage of IgA-coated bacteria and microbiota composition by 16S ribosomal RNA assessment of stool were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Sodium butyrate ameliorated histological colitis and decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 in IL-10−/− mice compared with those without treatment. At the phylum level, a reduction in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Firmicutes in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate were observed. Additionally, Prevotellaceae species were reduced in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate as compared with those without treatment. The level of biodiversity was slightly increased and the amount of IgA-coated bacteria decreased in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate compared with those without treatment. Our results indicate that sodium butyrate protects against colitis, possibly through modifying the gut microbiota, enriching biodiversity and reducing the amount of colitogenic IgA-coated bacteria in IL-10−/− mice. PMID:27886121

  12. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-03-17

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n = 38), Aves (n = 8) and Reptilia (n = 8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild.

  13. Use of Additives to Improve Performance of Methyl Butyrate-Based Lithium-Ion Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. To this end, a number of electrolyte formulations have been developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl butyrate-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), which have been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. Improved performance has been demonstrated of Li-ion cells with methyl butyrate-based electrolytes, including 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %); 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 4% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + lithium oxalate; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% VC; and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 0.10M LiBOB. These electrolytes have been shown to improve performance in MCMB-LiNiCoO2 and graphite-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 experimental Li-ion cells. A number of LiPF6-based mixed carbonate electrolyte formulations have been developed that contain ester co-solvents, which have been optimized for operation at low temperature, while still providing reasonable performance at high temperature. For example, a number of ester co-solvents were investigated, including methyl propionate (MP), ethyl propionate (EP), methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate (EB), propyl butyrate (PB), and butyl butyrate (BB) in multi-component electrolytes of the following composition: 1.0M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + X (20:60:20 v/v %) [where X = ester co-solvent]. ["Optimized Car bon ate and Ester-Based Li-Ion Electrolytes", NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 4 (April 2008), p. 56.] Focusing upon improved rate

  14. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  15. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  16. Alcohol Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... ingredients commonly found in alcoholic beverages, especially in beer or wine, can cause intolerance reactions. These include: Sulfites or other preservatives Chemicals, grains or other ingredients Histamine, a byproduct of fermentation or brewing In some cases, reactions can be triggered by ...

  17. Isobutyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isobutyl alcohol ; CASRN 78 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  18. Allyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  19. Propargyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propargyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 19 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  20. Alcohol project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The Great Western Sugar Company has announced plans for the construction of a $300 million plant for the production of fuel grade alcohol from corn. The plant at Reserve, Lousiana, will also produce high fructose corn syrup and animal feed by-products and will employ an additional 200 people.

  1. Lactate-utilizing bacteria, isolated from human feces, that produce butyrate as a major fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2004-10-01

    The microbial community of the human colon contains many bacteria that produce lactic acid, but lactate is normally detected only at low concentrations (<5 mM) in feces from healthy individuals. It is not clear, however, which bacteria are mainly responsible for lactate utilization in the human colon. Here, bacteria able to utilize lactate and produce butyrate were identified among isolates obtained from 10(-8) dilutions of fecal samples from five different subjects. Out of nine such strains identified, four were found to be related to Eubacterium hallii and two to Anaerostipes caccae, while the remaining three represent a new species within clostridial cluster XIVa based on their 16S rRNA sequences. Significant ability to utilize lactate was not detected in the butyrate-producing species Roseburia intestinalis, Eubacterium rectale, or Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Whereas E. hallii and A. caccae strains used both D- and L-lactate, the remaining strains used only the d form. Addition of glucose to batch cultures prevented lactate utilization until the glucose became exhausted. However, when two E. hallii strains and one A. caccae strain were grown in separate cocultures with a starch-utilizing Bifidobacterium adolescentis isolate, with starch as the carbohydrate energy source, the L-lactate produced by B. adolescentis became undetectable and butyrate was formed. Such cross-feeding may help to explain the reported butyrogenic effect of certain dietary substrates, including resistant starch. The abundance of E. hallii in particular in the colonic ecosystem suggests that these bacteria play important roles in preventing lactate accumulation.

  2. Shaping reactor microbiomes to produce the fuel precursor n-butyrate from pretreated cellulosic hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Agler, Matthew T; Werner, Jeffrey J; Iten, Loren B; Dekker, Arjan; Cotta, Michael A; Dien, Bruce S; Angenent, Largus T

    2012-09-18

    To maximize the production of carboxylic acids with open cultures of microbial consortia (reactor microbiomes), we performed experiments to understand which factors affect the community dynamics and performance parameters. We operated six thermophilic (55 °C) bioreactors to test how the factors: (i) biomass pretreatment; (ii) bioreactor operating conditions; and (iii) bioreactor history (after perturbations during the operating period) affected total fermentation product and n-butyrate performance parameters with corn fiber as the cellulosic biomass waste. We observed a maximum total fermentation product yield of 39%, a n-butyrate yield of 23% (both on a COD basis), a maximum total fermentation production rate of 0.74 g COD l(-1) d(-1) and n-butyrate production rate of 0.47 g COD l(-1) d(-1) in bioreactors that were fed with dilute-acid pretreated corn fiber at a pH of 5.5. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes with constrained ordination and other statistical methods showed that changes in operating conditions to enable dilution of toxic carboxylic acid products, which lead to these maximum performance parameters, also altered the composition of the microbiome, and that the microbiome, in turn, affected the performance. Operating conditions are an important factor (tool for operators) to shape reactor microbiomes, but other factors, such as substrate composition after biomass pretreatment and bioreactor history are also important. Further optimization of operating conditions must relieve the toxicity of carboxylic acids at acidic bioreactor pH levels even more, and this can, for example, be accomplished by extracting the product from the bioreactor solutions.

  3. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors.

    PubMed

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23-0.99 U mg(-1) protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg(-1) protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24-7.64 U mg(-1) protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Direct interspecies electron transfer accelerates syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in paddy soil enrichments.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijuan; Chang, Jiali; Liu, Pengfei; Fu, Li; Ding, Dewen; Lu, Yahai

    2015-05-01

    Syntrophic interaction occurs during anaerobic fermentation of organic substances forming methane as the final product. H2 and formate are known to serve as the electron carriers in this process. Recently, it has been shown that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) occurs for syntrophic CH4 production from ethanol and acetate. Here, we constructed paddy soil enrichments to determine the involvement of DIET in syntrophic butyrate oxidation and CH4 production. The results showed that CH4 production was significantly accelerated in the presence of nanoFe3 O4 in all continuous transfers. This acceleration increased with the increase of nanoFe3 O4 concentration but was dismissed when Fe3 O4 was coated with silica that insulated the mineral from electrical conduction. NanoFe3 O4 particles were found closely attached to the cell surfaces of different morphology, thus bridging cell connections. Molecular approaches, including DNA-based stable isotope probing, revealed that the bacterial Syntrophomonadaceae and Geobacteraceae, and the archaeal Methanosarcinaceae, Methanocellales and Methanobacteriales, were involved in the syntrophic butyrate oxidation and CH4 production. Among them, the growth of Geobacteraceae strictly relied on the presence of nanoFe3 O4 and its electrical conductivity in particular. Other organisms, except Methanobacteriales, were present in enrichments regardless of nanoFe3 O4 amendment. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the nanoFe3 O4 -facilitated DIET occurred in syntrophic CH4 production from butyrate, and Geobacter species played the key role in this process in the paddy soil enrichments.

  5. Tarsi of Male Heliothine Moths Contain Aldehydes and Butyrate Esters as Potential Pheromone Components.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Park, Kye-Chung; Meer, Robert Vander; Cardé, Ring T; Jurenka, Russell

    2016-05-01

    The Noctuidae are one of the most speciose moth families and include the genera Helicoverpa and Heliothis. Females use (Z)-11-hexadecenal as the major component of their sex pheromones except for Helicoverpa assulta and Helicoverpa gelotopoeon, both of which utilize (Z)-9-hexadecenal. The minor compounds found in heliothine sex pheromone glands vary with species, but hexadecanal has been found in the pheromone gland of almost all heliothine females so far investigated. In this study, we found a large amount (0.5-1.5 μg) of hexadecanal and octadecanal on the legs of males of four heliothine species, Helicoverpa zea, Helicoverpa armigera, H. assulta, and Heliothis virescens. The hexadecanal was found on and released from the tarsi, and was in much lower levels or not detected on the remaining parts of the leg (tibia, femur, trochanter, and coxa). Lower amounts (0.05-0.5 μg) of hexadecanal were found on female tarsi. This is the first known sex pheromone compound to be identified from the legs of nocturnal moths. Large amounts of butyrate esters (about 16 μg) also were found on tarsi of males with lower amounts on female tarsi. Males deposited the butyrate esters while walking on a glass surface. Decapitation did not reduce the levels of hexadecanal on the tarsi of H. zea males, indicating that hexadecanal production is not under the same neuroendocrine regulation system as the production of female sex pheromone. Based on electroantennogram studies, female antennae had a relatively high response to hexadecanal compared to male antennae. We consider the possible role of aldehydes and butyrate esters as courtship signals in heliothine moths.

  6. Cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles inhibit the adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Minelli, R; Serpe, L; Pettazzoni, P; Minero, V; Barrera, G; Gigliotti, CL; Mesturini, R; Rosa, AC; Gasco, P; Vivenza, N; Muntoni, E; Fantozzi, R; Dianzani, U; Zara, GP; Dianzani, C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles (cholbut SLN) provide a delivery system for the anti-cancer drug butyrate. These SLN inhibit the adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells to the endothelium and may act as anti-inflammatory agents. As cancer cell adhesion to endothelium is crucial for metastasis dissemination, here we have evaluated the effect of cholbut SLN on adhesion and migration of cancer cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cholbut SLN was incubated with a number of cancer cell lines or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and adhesion was quantified by a computerized micro-imaging system. Migration was detected by the scratch ‘wound-healing’ assay and the Boyden chamber invasion assay. Expression of ERK and p38 MAPK was analysed by Western blot. Expression of the mRNA for E-cadherin and claudin-1 was measured by RT-PCR. KEY RESULTS Cholbut SLN inhibited HUVEC adhesiveness to cancer cell lines derived from human colon–rectum, breast, prostate cancers and melanoma. The effect was concentration and time-dependent and exerted on both cancer cells and HUVEC. Moreover, these SLN inhibited migration of cancer cells and substantially down-modulated ERK and p38 phosphorylation. The anti-adhesive effect was additive to that induced by the triggering of B7h, which is another stimulus inhibiting both ERK and p38 phosphorylation, and cell adhesiveness. Furthermore, cholbut SLN induced E-cadherin and inhibited claudin-1 expression in HUVEC. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that cholbut SLN could act as an anti-metastastic agent and they add a new mechanism to the anti-tumour activity of this multifaceted preparation of butyrate. PMID:22049973

  7. In Vitro Effects of Dietary Inulin on Human Fecal Microbiota and Butyrate Production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Jeon, Woo-Min; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Administration of dietary fibers has various health benefits, mainly by increasing numbers of beneficial bacteria and enhancing production of short-chain fatty acids in the colon. There has been growing interest in the addition of dietary fiber to human diet, due to its prebiotic effects. This study aimed to evaluate the prebiotic activity of inulin using an in vitro batch fermentation system with human fecal microbiota. Fermentation of inulin resulted in a significantly greater ratio of Lactobacillus or Bifidobacteria to Enterobacteria strains as an index of healthy human intestine and elevated butyrate concentration, which are related to improvement of gut health.

  8. Enhancement of memory consolidation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Blank, Martina; Werenicz, Aline; Velho, Luciana Azevedo; Pinto, Diana F; Fedi, Ana Cláudia; Lopes, Mark William; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Roesler, Rafael

    2015-05-06

    Here we show that a systemic injection of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate (NaB) immediately after training in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task produced an enhancement of memory consolidation that persisted across consecutive retention tests during 14 days in aged rats, while it did not significantly affect memory in young adults. Control aged and young adult rats showed comparable basal levels of memory retention. Our results suggest that HDACis can display memory-enhancing effects specific for aged animals, even in the absence of age-related memory impairment.

  9. Cellulose acetate butyrate and polycaprolactone for ketoprofen spray-dried microsphere preparation.

    PubMed

    Giunchedi, P; Conti, B; Maggi, L; Conte, U

    1994-01-01

    Ketoprofen-loaded microspheres made with a polymeric blend were prepared by a spray-drying technique. Organic solutions of two polymers, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), in different weight ratios, and of ketoprofen (Ket) were prepared and sprayed, in different experimental conditions, achieving drug-loaded microspheres. The obtained spray-dried microspheres were characterized in terms of yield of production, shape, size, surface properties and drug content, and their in vitro drug release behaviours were determined at different pH values.

  10. Untangling the fiber yarn: butyrate feeds Warburg to suppress colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Carlos; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2014-12-01

    Dietary composition has an important role in shaping the gut microbiota. In turn, changes in the diet directly impinge on bacterial metabolites present in the intestinal lumen. Whether such metabolites play a role in intestinal cancer has been a topic of hot debate. In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Donohoe and colleagues show that dietary fiber protects against colorectal carcinoma in a microbiota-dependent manner. Furthermore, fiber-derived butyrate acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells experiencing the Warburg effect.

  11. Long-term stability of cellulose acetate butyrate thin films for nuclear certified reference materials.

    PubMed

    Buják, Renáta; Delva, Laurens; Erkoç, Mustafa; Bauwens, Jeroen; Jakopič, Rožle; Vincze, Laszlo; Aregbe, Yetunde; Cardon, Ludwig

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) thin films with 17, 35 and 52 wt% butyryl is carried out to select the most suitable matrix material for the U and Pu containing large-sized dried spike reference material. The virgin CAB samples were aged by vibrations, heat, humidity, UV light and X-rays. Characterization was done by thermo-analytical techniques, gel permeation chromatography, mechanical tests and via Rayleigh and Compton scattering. The results show that CAB with lower butyryl content can withstand higher operational temperatures and has greater mechanical strength while CAB with higher butyryl content seems to be more resistant to radiation.

  12. Radiation induces acid tolerance of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and enhances bioproduction of butyric acid through a metabolic switch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Butyric acid as a renewable resource has become an increasingly attractive alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T is well documented as a fermentation strain for the production of acids. However, it has been reported that butyrate inhibits its growth, and the accumulation of acetate also inhibits biomass synthesis, making production of butyric acid from conventional fermentation processes economically challenging. The present study aimed to identify whether irradiation of C. tyrobutyricum cells makes them more tolerant to butyric acid inhibition and increases the production of butyrate compared with wild type. Results In this work, the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 3.6, 7.2 and 10.8 g·L-1 equivalents were studied. The results showed that, regardless of the irradiation used, there was a gradual inhibition of cell growth at butyric acid concentrations above 10.8 g·L-1, with no growth observed at butyric acid concentrations above 3.6 g·L-1 for the wild-type strain during the first 54 h of fermentation. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also showed significantly different expression levels of proteins with molecular mass around the wild-type and irradiated strains. The results showed that the proportion of proteins with molecular weights of 85 and 106 kDa was much higher for the irradiated strains. The specific growth rate decreased by 50% (from 0.42 to 0.21 h-1) and the final concentration of butyrate increased by 68% (from 22.7 to 33.4 g·L-1) for the strain irradiated at 114 AMeV and 40 Gy compared with the wild-type strains. Conclusions This study demonstrates that butyric acid production from glucose can be significantly improved and enhanced by using 12C6+ heavy ion-irradiated C. tyrobutyricum. The approach is economical, making it competitive compared with similar fermentation processes. It may prove useful as

  13. Butyrate and propionate protect against diet-induced obesity and regulate gut hormones via free fatty acid receptor 3-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua V; Frassetto, Andrea; Kowalik, Edward J; Nawrocki, Andrea R; Lu, Mofei M; Kosinski, Jennifer R; Hubert, James A; Szeto, Daphne; Yao, Xiaorui; Forrest, Gail; Marsh, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), primarily acetate, propionate, and butyrate, are metabolites formed by gut microbiota from complex dietary carbohydrates. Butyrate and acetate were reported to protect against diet-induced obesity without causing hypophagia, while propionate was shown to reduce food intake. However, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are unclear. It was suggested that SCFAs may regulate gut hormones via their endogenous receptors Free fatty acid receptors 2 (FFAR2) and 3 (FFAR3), but direct evidence is lacking. We examined the effects of SCFA administration in mice, and show that butyrate, propionate, and acetate all protected against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Butyrate and propionate, but not acetate, induce gut hormones and reduce food intake. As FFAR3 is the common receptor activated by butyrate and propionate, we examined these effects in FFAR3-deficient mice. The effects of butyrate and propionate on body weight and food intake are independent of FFAR3. In addition, FFAR3 plays a minor role in butyrate stimulation of Glucagon-like peptide-1, and is not required for butyrate- and propionate-dependent induction of Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide. Finally, FFAR3-deficient mice show normal body weight and glucose homeostasis. Stimulation of gut hormones and food intake inhibition by butyrate and propionate may represent a novel mechanism by which gut microbiota regulates host metabolism. These effects are largely intact in FFAR3-deficient mice, indicating additional mediators are required for these beneficial effects.

  14. The Short-Chain Fatty Acid Sodium Butyrate Functions as a Regulator of the Skin Immune System.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Agatha; Bruhs, Anika; Schwarz, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    There is evidence that gut commensal microbes affect the mucosal immune system via expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the colon. This is mediated via short-chain fatty acids, bacterial metabolites generated during fiber fermentation, which include butyrate, propionate, and acetate. We postulated that short-chain fatty acids produced by commensal skin bacteria may also activate resident skin Tregs, the activity of which is diminished in certain inflammatory dermatoses. Sodium butyrate (SB) either injected subcutaneously or applied topically onto the ears of hapten-sensitized mice significantly reduced the contact hypersensitivity reaction. This effect was histone acetylation-dependent because suppression was abrogated by anacardic acid, a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor. The genes encoding for the Treg-specific transcription factor foxp3 and for IL-10 were up-regulated upon treatment with sodium butyrate, as determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. Immunofluorescence analysis showed enhanced numbers of Foxp3-positive cells in sodium butyrate-treated skin. Additionally, CD4(+)CD25(-) nonregulatory human T cells exerted suppressive features upon incubation with sodium butyrate. This indicates that Tregs can be induced by short-chain fatty acids, suggesting (i) that resident skin microbes may prevent exaggerated inflammatory responses by exerting a down-regulatory function and thereby maintaining a stable state under physiologic conditions and (ii) that short-chain fatty acids may be used therapeutically to mitigate inflammatory skin reactions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Accelerated dysbiosis of gut microbiota during aggravation of DSS-induced colitis by a butyrate-producing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianpeng; Wu, Yanqiu; Wang, Jing; Wu, Guojun; Long, Wenmin; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yufeng; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Chenhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria (BPB) are potential probiotic candidates for inflammatory bowel diseases as they are often depleted in the diseased gut microbiota. However, here we found that augmentation of a human-derived butyrate-producing strain, Anaerostipes hadrus BPB5, significantly aggravated colitis in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-treated mice while exerted no detrimental effect in healthy mice. We explored how the interaction between BPB5 and gut microbiota may contribute to this differential impact on the hosts. Butyrate production and severity of colitis were assessed in both healthy and DSS-treated mice, and gut microbiota structural changes were analysed using high-throughput sequencing. BPB5-inoculated healthy mice showed no signs of colitis, but increased butyrate content in the gut. In DSS-treated mice, BPB5 augmentation did not increase butyrate content, but induced significantly more severe disease activity index and much higher mortality. BPB5 didn’t induce significant changes of gut microbiota in healthy hosts, but expedited the structural shifts 3 days earlier toward the disease phase in BPB5-augmented than DSS-treated animals. The differential response of gut microbiota in healthy and DSS-treated mice to the same potentially beneficial bacterium with drastically different health consequences suggest that animals with dysbiotic gut microbiota should also be employed for the safety assessment of probiotic candidates. PMID:27264309

  16. The effect of butyrate concentration on hydrogen production via photofermentation for use in a Martian habitat resource recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Klaus, David M.; Maness, Pin-Ching; Spear, John R.

    2007-10-01

    Biological hydrogen production from waste biomass has both terrestrial and Martian advanced life support applications. Several forms of this process exist, but one process, indirect biophotolysis, is suitable for a potential Mars mission. This process is two-stage, combining a dark fermentation of starch or sugars with photofermentation of the remaining waste organic acids to produce hydrogen gas. Since butyrate is expected as one of the major inputs into photofermentation from the first stage, Rhodobacter sphaeroides SCJ, a photoheterotrophic purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium was examined for its potential in hydrogen production at 10–100 mM butyrate concentrations. As butyrate levels increased, hydrogen production increased up to 25 mM butyrate, and then decreased and ceased by 100 mM. Additionally, lag phase increased with butyrate concentration, possibly indicating substrate inhibition. Maximal substrate conversion efficiency was 8.0%; maximal light efficiency was 0.89%; and maximal hydrogen production rate was 7.7 μmol/(mg cdwh) (173 μL/ (mg cdwh)).These are generally lower than values reported in the literature.

  17. Alcohol use and safe drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... to alcohol use Get into trouble with the law, family members, friends, school, or dates because of alcohol THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL Alcoholic drinks have different amounts of alcohol in them. Beer is about 5% alcohol, although some beers can ...

  18. Acetate adaptation of clostridia tyrobutyricum for improved fermentation production of butyrate.

    PubMed

    Jaros, Adam M; Rova, Ulrika; Berglund, Kris A

    2013-12-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an acidogenic bacterium capable of utilizing xylose for the fermentation production of butyrate. Hot water extraction of hardwood lingocellulose is an efficient method of producing xylose where autohydrolysis of xylan is catalysed by acetate originating from acetyl groups present in hemicellulose. The presence of acetic acid in the hydrolysate might have a severe impact on the subsequent fermentations. In this study the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 26.3 g/L acetate equivalents were studied. Analysis of xylose batch fermentations found that even in the presence of high levels of acetate, acetate adapted strains had similar fermentation kinetics as the parental strain cultivated without acetate. The parental strain exposed to acetate at inhibitory conditions demonstrated a pronounced lag phase (over 100 hours) in growth and butyrate production as compared to the adapted strain (25 hour lag) or non-inhibited controls (0 lag). Additional insight into the metabolic pathway of xylose consumption was gained by determining the specific activity of the acetate kinase (AK) enzyme in adapted versus control batches. AK activity was reduced by 63% in the presence of inhibitory levels of acetate, whether or not the culture had been adapted.

  19. Beneficial Metabolic Effects of a Probiotic via Butyrate-induced GLP-1 Hormone Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Hariom; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Lloyd, John; Walter, Peter; Rane, Sushil G.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excess caloric intake and reduced energy expenditure resulting in a negative energy balance. The incidence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, and childhood diabetes and obesity are increasing alarmingly. Therefore, it is important to develop safe, easily deliverable, and economically viable treatment alternatives for these diseases. Here, we provide data supporting the candidacy of probiotics as such a therapeutic modality against obesity and diabetes. Probiotics are live bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tract and impart beneficial effects for health. However, their widespread prescription as medical therapies is limited primarily because of the paucity of our understanding of their mechanism of action. Here, we demonstrate that the administration of a probiotic, VSL#3, prevented and treated obesity and diabetes in several mouse models. VSL#3 suppressed body weight gain and insulin resistance via modulation of the gut flora composition. VSL#3 promoted the release of the hormone GLP-1, resulting in reduced food intake and improved glucose tolerance. The VSL#3-induced changes were associated with an increase in the levels of a short chain fatty acid (SCFA), butyrate. Using a cell culture system, we demonstrate that butyrate stimulated the release of GLP-1 from intestinal L-cells, thereby providing a plausible mechanism for VSL#3 action. These findings suggest that probiotics such as VSL#3 can modulate the gut microbiota-SCFA-hormone axis. Moreover, our results indicate that probiotics are of potential therapeutic utility to counter obesity and diabetes. PMID:23836895

  20. Prebiotic stimulation of human colonic butyrate-producing bacteria and bifidobacteria, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Scott, Karen P; Martin, Jennifer C; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J

    2014-01-01

    Dietary macronutrients affect the composition of the gut microbiota, and prebiotics are used to improve and maintain a healthy gut. The impact of prebiotics on dominant gut bacteria other than bifidobacteria, however, is under-researched. Here, we report carbohydrate utilisation patterns for representative butyrate-producing anaerobes, belonging to the Gram-positive Firmicutes families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, by comparison with selected Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium species. Growth assessments using anaerobic Hungate tubes and a new rapid microtitre plate assay were generally in good agreement. The Bacteroides strains tested showed some growth on basal medium with no added carbohydrates, utilising peptides in the growth medium. The butyrate-producing strains exhibited different growth profiles on the substrates, which included starch, inulin, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), galactooligosaccharides (GOS) and xylooligosaccharides (XOS). Eleven were able to grow on short-chain FOS, but this number decreased as the chain length of the fructan substrates increased. Long-chain inulin was utilised by Roseburia inulinivorans, but by none of the Bifidobacterium species examined here. XOS was a more selective growth substrate than FOS, with only six of the 11 Firmicutes strains able to use XOS for growth. These results illustrate the selectivity of different prebiotics and help to explain why some are butyrogenic.

  1. Kineothrix alysoides, gen. nov., sp. nov., a saccharolytic butyrate-producer within the family Lachnospiraceae.

    PubMed

    Haas, Kelly Nicole; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2017-02-01

    An anaerobic, saccharolytic, spore-forming, butyrate-producing bacterium, strain KNHs209T, was isolated from a switchgrass microcosm seeded with forest soil. Cells were highly motile rods, often forming long filamentous chains which were easily observed moving under the microscope. Its closest phylogenetic relative was Eisenbergiella tayi (16S rRNA gene sequence identity 94.2 %), although it was easily distinguishable based on its morphology and physiology. Whole-genome sequencing enabled development of a minimal medium, and also suggested that the organism is capable of fixing nitrogen. Its wide variety of growth substrates was mirrored by a high number of encoded chemotaxis receptors (45, the highest in the family Lachnospiraceae). Strain KNHs209T utilized a wide variety of carbohydrates, but not cellulose or xylan. Fermentation products included formate, acetate and butyrate; sulfur compounds and nitrate were not reduced. Strain KNHs209T grew optimally at 35-40 °C and pH 7. The genomic DNA G+C content was 42.74 mol%; the major membrane fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. Based on phenotypic, genomic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses, this organism represents a novel genus and species within the family Lachnospiraceae for which the name Kineothrix alysoides, gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KNHs209T (=ATCC TSD-26T=DSM 100556T).

  2. Melatonin and its precursors in Y79 human retinoblastoma cells: Effect of sodium butyrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Mei Hua; Coviella, Ignacio Lopez G.; Lynch, Harry J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    The release of melatonin and the production of its precursors, S-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin, in cultured Y79 human retinoblastoma cells were studied. This biosynthetic capability was found to be dependent on cell differentiation, which was initiated by culturing Y79 cells for 7 days in dishes coated with poly-D-lysine to promote cell adhesion to the surface of the culture dishes. Differentiation was further induced by exposing the cell monolayer to sodium butyrate (3 mM) for 3 days. This protocol dramatically increased the release of melatonin, and the syntheses of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin in response to forskolin stimulation. Exposure to dopamine (10 micro-M) or L-DOPA (100 micro-M) markedly diminished the forskolin-stimulated release of melatonin, as well as the production of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin. These observations indicate that Y79 cells represent a primitive cell line which, following appropriate differentiation (e.g. treatment with sodium butyrate) can display biochemical characteristics similar to those of the human retina. Moreover, serotonin synthesis and melatonin release appear to be coupled in Y79 cells. The inhibition of melatonin release by dopamine supports the hypothesis that in these cells, melatonin and dopamine are components of a retinal feedback loop.

  3. Comparative genomics and physiology of the butyrate-producing bacterium Intestinimonas butyriciproducens.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thi Phuong Nam; Shetty, Sudarshan Anand; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Ritari, Jarmo; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Douillard, François P; Paulin, Lars; Piironen, Vieno; Clavel, Thomas; Plugge, Caroline M; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-12-01

    Intestinimonas is a newly described bacterial genus with representative strains present in the intestinal tract of human and other animals. Despite unique metabolic features including the production of butyrate from both sugars and amino acids, there is to date no data on their diversity, ecology, and physiology. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach, Intestinimomas was found to include at least three species that colonize primarily the human and mouse intestine. We focused on the most common and cultivable species of the genus, Intestinimonas butyriciproducens, and performed detailed genomic and physiological comparison of strains SRB521(T) and AF211, isolated from the mouse and human gut respectively. The complete 3.3-Mb genomic sequences of both strains were highly similar with 98.8% average nucleotide identity, testifying to their assignment to one single species. However, thorough analysis revealed significant genomic rearrangements, variations in phage-derived sequences, and the presence of new CRISPR sequences in both strains. Moreover, strain AF211 appeared to be more efficient than strain SRB521(T) in the conversion of the sugars arabinose and galactose. In conclusion, this study provides genomic and physiological insight into Intestinimonas butyriciproducens, a prevalent butyrate-producing species, differentiating strains that originate from the mouse and human gut. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology Reports published by Society for Applied Microbiology and JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Butyrate and bioactive proteolytic form of Wnt-5a regulate colonic epithelial proliferation and spatial development

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Hasebe, Takumu; Musch, Mark W.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasushi; He, Tong-Chuan; Lichtenstein, Lev; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Jabri, Bana; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Chang, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and spatial development of colonic epithelial cells are highly regulated along the crypt vertical axis, which, when perturbed, can result in aberrant growth and carcinogenesis. In this study, two key factors were identified that have important and counterbalancing roles regulating these processes: pericrypt myofibroblast-derived Wnt-5a and the microbial metabolite butyrate. Cultured YAMC cell proliferation and heat shock protein induction were analzyed after butryate, conditioned medium with Wnt5a activity, and FrzB containing conditioned medium. In vivo studies to modulate Hsp25 employed intra-colonic wall Hsp25 encoding lentivirus. To silence Wnt-5a in vivo, intra-colonic wall Wnt-5a silencing RNA was used. Wnt-5a, secreted by stromal myofibroblasts of the lower crypt, promotes proliferation through canonical β-catenin activation. Essential to this are two key requirements: (1) proteolytic conversion of the highly insoluble ~40 kD Wnt-5a protein to a soluble 36 mer amino acid peptide that activates epithelial β-catenin and cellular proliferation, and (2) the simultaneous inhibition of butyrate-induced Hsp25 by Wnt-5a which is necessary to arrest the proliferative process in the upper colonic crypt. The interplay and spatial gradients of these factors insures that crypt epithelial cell proliferation and development proceed in an orderly fashion, but with sufficient plasticity to adapt to physiological perturbations including inflammation. PMID:27561676

  5. Reduction of butyrate- and methane-producing microorganisms in patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pozuelo, Marta; Panda, Suchita; Santiago, Alba; Mendez, Sara; Accarino, Anna; Santos, Javier; Guarner, Francisco; Azpiroz, Fernando; Manichanh, Chaysavanh

    2015-08-04

    The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains unclear. Here we investigated the microbiome of a large cohort of patients to identify specific signatures for IBS subtypes. We examined the microbiome of 113 patients with IBS and 66 healthy controls. A subset of these participants provided two samples one month apart. We analyzed a total of 273 fecal samples, generating more than 20 million 16S rRNA sequences. In patients with IBS, a significantly lower microbial diversity was associated with a lower relative abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (P = 0.002; q < 0.06), in particular in patients with IBS-D and IBS-M. IBS patients who did not receive any treatment harboured a lower abundance of Methanobacteria compared to healthy controls (P = 0.005; q = 0.05). Furthermore, significant correlations were observed between several bacterial taxa and sensation of flatulence and abdominal pain (P < 0.05). Altogether, our findings showed that IBS-M and IBS-D patients are characterized by a reduction of butyrate producing bacteria, known to improve intestinal barrier function, and a reduction of methane producing microorganisms a major mechanism of hydrogen disposal in the human colon, which could explain excess of abdominal gas in IBS.

  6. Beneficial metabolic effects of a probiotic via butyrate-induced GLP-1 hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Hariom; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Lloyd, John; Walter, Peter; Rane, Sushil G

    2013-08-30

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excess caloric intake and reduced energy expenditure resulting in a negative energy balance. The incidence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, and childhood diabetes and obesity are increasing alarmingly. Therefore, it is important to develop safe, easily deliverable, and economically viable treatment alternatives for these diseases. Here, we provide data supporting the candidacy of probiotics as such a therapeutic modality against obesity and diabetes. Probiotics are live bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tract and impart beneficial effects for health. However, their widespread prescription as medical therapies is limited primarily because of the paucity of our understanding of their mechanism of action. Here, we demonstrate that the administration of a probiotic, VSL#3, prevented and treated obesity and diabetes in several mouse models. VSL#3 suppressed body weight gain and insulin resistance via modulation of the gut flora composition. VSL#3 promoted the release of the hormone GLP-1, resulting in reduced food intake and improved glucose tolerance. The VSL#3-induced changes were associated with an increase in the levels of a short chain fatty acid (SCFA), butyrate. Using a cell culture system, we demonstrate that butyrate stimulated the release of GLP-1 from intestinal L-cells, thereby providing a plausible mechanism for VSL#3 action. These findings suggest that probiotics such as VSL#3 can modulate the gut microbiota-SCFA-hormone axis. Moreover, our results indicate that probiotics are of potential therapeutic utility to counter obesity and diabetes.

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of Clostridium butyricum against Vascular Dementia in Mice via Metabolic Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaming; Sun, Jing; Wang, Fangyan; Yu, Xichong; Ling, Zongxin; Li, Haixiao; Zhang, Huiqing; Jin, Jiangtao; Chen, Wenqian; Pang, Mengqi; Yu, Junjie; He, Yiwen; Xu, Jiru

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics actively participate in neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the role of gut microbiota in brain disorders and vascular dementia (VaD) remains unclear. We used a mouse model of VaD induced by a permanent right unilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (rUCCAO) to investigate the neuroprotective effects and possible underlying mechanisms of Clostridium butyricum. Following rUCCAO, C. butyricum was intragastrically administered for 6 successive weeks. Cognitive function was estimated. Morphological examination was performed by electron microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. The BDNF-PI3K/Akt pathway-related proteins were assessed by western blot and immunohistochemistry. The diversity of gut microbiota and the levels of butyrate in the feces and the brains were determined. The results showed that C. butyricum significantly attenuated the cognitive dysfunction and histopathological changes in VaD mice. C. butyricum not only increased the levels of BDNF and Bcl-2 and decreased level of Bax but also induced Akt phosphorylation (p-Akt) and ultimately reduced neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, C. butyricum could regulate the gut microbiota and restore the butyrate content in the feces and the brains. These results suggest that C. butyricum might be effective in the treatment of VaD by regulating the gut-brain axis and that it can be considered a new therapeutic strategy against VaD. PMID:26523278

  8. Reduction of butyrate- and methane-producing microorganisms in patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pozuelo, Marta; Panda, Suchita; Santiago, Alba; Mendez, Sara; Accarino, Anna; Santos, Javier; Guarner, Francisco; Azpiroz, Fernando; Manichanh, Chaysavanh

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains unclear. Here we investigated the microbiome of a large cohort of patients to identify specific signatures for IBS subtypes. We examined the microbiome of 113 patients with IBS and 66 healthy controls. A subset of these participants provided two samples one month apart. We analyzed a total of 273 fecal samples, generating more than 20 million 16S rRNA sequences. In patients with IBS, a significantly lower microbial diversity was associated with a lower relative abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (P = 0.002; q < 0.06), in particular in patients with IBS-D and IBS-M. IBS patients who did not receive any treatment harboured a lower abundance of Methanobacteria compared to healthy controls (P = 0.005; q = 0.05). Furthermore, significant correlations were observed between several bacterial taxa and sensation of flatulence and abdominal pain (P < 0.05). Altogether, our findings showed that IBS-M and IBS-D patients are characterized by a reduction of butyrate producing bacteria, known to improve intestinal barrier function, and a reduction of methane producing microorganisms a major mechanism of hydrogen disposal in the human colon, which could explain excess of abdominal gas in IBS. PMID:26239401

  9. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  10. Mixed culture syngas fermentation and conversion of carboxylic acids into alcohols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kan; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Stevenson, Bradley S; Tanner, Ralph S; Wilkins, Mark R; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Higher alcohols such as n-butanol and n-hexanol have higher energy density than ethanol, are more compatible with current fuel infrastructure, and can be upgraded to jet and diesel fuels. Several organisms are known to convert syngas to ethanol, but very few can produce higher alcohols alone. As a potential solution, mixed culture fermentation between the syngas fermenting Alkalibaculum bacchi strain CP15 and propionic acid producer Clostridium propionicum was studied. The monoculture of CP15 produced only ethanol from syngas without initial addition of organic acids to the fermentation medium. However, the mixed culture produced ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol from syngas. The addition of propionic acid, butyric acid and hexanoic acid to the mixed culture resulted in a 50% higher conversion efficiency of these acids to their respective alcohols compared to CP15 monoculture. These findings illustrate the great potential of mixed culture syngas fermentation in production of higher alcohols.

  11. Butyrate mediates decrease of histone acetylation centered on transcription start sites and down-regulation of associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Enroth, Stefan; Ameur, Adam; Koch, Christoph M.; Clelland, Gayle K.; Respuela-Alonso, Patricia; Wilcox, Sarah; Dovey, Oliver M.; Ellis, Peter D.; Langford, Cordelia F.; Dunham, Ian; Komorowski, Jan; Wadelius, Claes

    2007-01-01

    Butyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) with anti-neoplastic properties, which theoretically reactivates epigenetically silenced genes by increasing global histone acetylation. However, recent studies indicate that a similar number or even more genes are down-regulated than up-regulated by this drug. We treated hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells with butyrate and characterized the levels of acetylation at DNA-bound histones H3 and H4 by ChIP-chip along the ENCODE regions. In contrast to the global increases of histone acetylation, many genomic regions close to transcription start sites were deacetylated after butyrate exposure. In order to validate these findings, we found that both butyrate and trichostatin A treatment resulted in histone deacetylation at selected regions, while nucleosome loss or changes in histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) did not occur in such locations. Furthermore, similar histone deacetylation events were observed when colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells were treated with butyrate. In addition, genes with deacetylated promoters were down-regulated by butyrate, and this was mediated at the transcriptional level by affecting RNA polymerase II (POLR2A) initiation/elongation. Finally, the global increase in acetylated histones was preferentially localized to the nuclear periphery, indicating that it might not be associated to euchromatin. Our results are significant for the evaluation of HDACi as anti-tumourogenic drugs, suggesting that previous models of action might need to be revised, and provides an explanation for the frequently observed repression of many genes during HDACi treatment. PMID:17567991

  12. Only fibres promoting a stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem decrease the rate of aberrant crypt foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P; Pierre, F; Patry, Y; Champ, M; Berreur, M; Pradal, G; Bornet, F; Meflah, K; Menanteau, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dietary fibres have been proposed as protective agents against colon cancer but results of both epidemiological and experimental studies are inconclusive.
AIMS—Hypothesising that protection against colon cancer may be restricted to butyrate producing fibres, we investigated the factors needed for long term stable butyrate production and its relation to susceptibility to colon cancer.
METHODS—A two part randomised blinded study in rats, mimicking a prospective study in humans, was performed using a low fibre control diet (CD) and three high fibre diets: starch free wheat bran (WB), type III resistant starch (RS), and short chain fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Using a randomised block design, 96 inbred rats were fed for two, 16, 30, or 44 days to determine the period of adaptation to the diets, fermentation profiles, and effects on the colon, including mucosal proliferation on day 44. Subsequently, 36 rats fed the same diets for 44 days were injected with azoxymethane and checked for aberrant crypt foci 30 days later.
RESULTS—After fermentation had stabilised (44 days), only RS and FOS produced large amounts of butyrate, with a trophic effect in the large intestine. No difference in mucosal proliferation between the diets was noted at this time. In the subsequent experiment one month later, fewer aberrant crypt foci were present in rats fed high butyrate producing diets (RS, p=0.022; FOS, p=0.043).
CONCLUSION—A stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem related to selected fibres appears to be less conducive to colon carcinogenesis.


Keywords: fibre; fermentation; butyrate; colon carcinogenesis; aberrant crypt foci; rat PMID:11115823

  13. Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum, a butyrate producer with probiotic potential, is intrinsically tolerant to stomach and small intestine conditions.

    PubMed

    Geirnaert, Annelies; Steyaert, Alix; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Debruyne, Bo; Arends, Jan B A; Van Immerseel, Filip; Boon, Nico; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Butyrate has several beneficial properties that are essential to maintain gastrointestinal health. Therefore butyrate-producing bacteria are seen as the next generation of probiotics. The butyrate-producing bacterium Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (a clostridial cluster IV strain) is such a promising probiotic candidate for people suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. To exert its beneficial properties, it is crucial that B. pullicaecorum survives the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract to arrive in the colon in a viable and metabolically active state. Before developing a stable formulation of B. pullicaecorum for oral administration, it is important to know its intrinsic acid and bile tolerance. We monitored the survival during and short chain fatty acid production after incubation in conditions simulating the stomach and small intestine using in vitro batch experiments. In case of acid conditions (pH 2 and pH 3), B. pullicaecorum was viable and active but not cultivable. Cultivability was restored during subsequent small intestine conditions. Importantly, bile and pancreatic juice had no lethal effect. Milk, as a suspension medium, only had a protective effect on the cultivability during the first hour at pH 2. B. pullicaecorum was still metabolically active after upper gastrointestinal conditions and produced short chain fatty acids, but a shift from butyrate to acetate production was observed. Although the butyrate-producing anaerobe B. pullicaecorum showed good intrinsic acid and bile tolerance in terms of viability and metabolic activity, colonization efficiency and butyrate production under colon conditions is needed to further evaluate its probiotic potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Alcohol production through volatile fatty acids reduction with hydrogen as electron donor by mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Steinbusch, Kirsten J J; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2008-09-01

    In this research we demonstrated a new method to produce alcohols. It was experimentally feasible to produce ethanol, propanol and butanol from solely volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with hydrogen as electron donor. In batch tests, VFAs such as acetic, propionic and butyric acids were reduced by mixed microbial cultures with a headspace of 1.5 bar of hydrogen. Observed alcohol concentrations were 3.69+/-0.25 mM of ethanol, 8.08+/-0.85 mM of propanol and 3.66+/-0.05 mM of n-butanol. The conversion efficiency based on the electron balance was 55.1+/-5.6% with acetate as substrate, 50.3+/-4.7% with propionate and 46.7+/-2.2% with n-butyrate. Methane was the most predominant by-product in each batch experiment, 33.6+/-9.6% of VFA and hydrogen was converted to methane with acetate as substrate; which was 27.1+/-7.1% with propionate and 36.6+/-2.2% with n-butyrate. This VFAs reducing renewable fuel production process does not require carbohydrates like fermentable sugars, but uses biomass with high water content or low sugar content that is unsuitable as feedstock for current fermentation processes. This so-called low-grade biomass is abundantly present in many agricultural areas and is economically very attractive feedstock for the production of biofuels.

  15. Clinical evaluation of clobetasone butyrate: a comparative study of its effects in postoperative inflammation and on intraocular pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsell, T G; Bartholomew, R S; Walker, S R

    1980-01-01

    Clobetasone butyrate, a new corticosteroid with a high topical activity, has been compared with prednisolone phosphate and a placebo in the treatment of inflammation following cataract extraction. These 2 steroids were more effective in relieving postoperative inflammation than placebo (P less than 0.05), though no obvious clinical differences between the 2 compounds emerged from this investigation. However, a single-blind comparative study against betamethasone phosphate in patients suspected of having steroid-induced glaucoma showed that, while betamethasone phosphate significantly raised intraocular pressure, clobetasone butyrate had only a minimal effect, and this difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.02). PMID:6986899

  16. Direct hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol over a ruthenium-tin bimetallic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Min; Upare, Pravin P; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Young Kyu; Lee, Jeong Ho; Hwang, Dong Won; Hong, Do-Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of organic carboxylic acids and their esters, for example, cellulosic ethanol from fermentation of acetic acid and hydrogenation of ethyl acetate is a promising possibility for future biorefinery concepts. A hybrid conversion process based on selective hydrogenation of butyric acid combined with fermentation of glucose has been developed for producing biobutanol. ZnO-supported Ru-Sn bimetallic catalysts exhibits unprecedentedly superior performance in the vapor-phase hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol (>98% yield) for 3500 h without deactivation.

  17. [Out of addictions: Alcohol, or alcohol to alcohol].

    PubMed

    Simmat-Durand, L; Vellut, N; Lejeune, C; Jauffret-Roustide, M; Mougel, S; Michel, L; Planche, M

    2016-06-29

    Pathways from alcoholism to recovery are documented; less often are those from drug addiction to alcoholism. Biographical approaches allow analyzing how people change their uses and talk about their trajectories of recovery.

  18. Butyrate pretreatment attenuates heart depression in a mice model of endotoxin-induced sepsis via anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyan; Jin, Zengyou; Shen, Kaiyi; Weng, Tingting; Chen, Zhisong; Feng, Jiahui; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Xiaolong; Chu, Maoping

    2017-03-01

    The depressed heart function is the main complication to cause death of septic patients in clinic. It is urgent to find effective interventions for this intractable disease. In this study, we investigated whether butyrate could be protective for heart against sepsis and the underlying mechanism. Mice were randomly divided into three groups. Model group challenged with LPS (30 mg/kg, i.p.) only. Butyrate group received butyrate (200 mg/kg·d) for 3days prior to LPS administration (30 mg/kg). Normal group received saline only. 6h and 12h after LPS administration were chosen for detection the parameters to estimate the effects or mechanism of butyrate pretreatment on heart of sepsis. The data showed that septic heart depression was attenuated by butyrate pretreatment through improvement of heart function depression (P<0.01) and reduction of morphological changes of myocardium. The overexpression of proinflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6 and LTB4, in heart tissues induced by sepsis was significantly alleviated by butyrate pretreatment (P<0.01). As oxidative stress indicators, SOD and CAT activity, and MDA content in heart were deteriorated by LPS challenge, which was noticeably ameliorated by butyrate pretreatment (P<0.01 or P<0.05). In conclusion, pretreatment with butyrate attenuated septic heart depression via anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Short-term infusion of sodium butyrate, but not lactose, increases plasma ß-hydroxybutyrate and insulin in lactating dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several previous studies have identified beneficial effects of butyrate on rumen development and intestinal health in pre-ruminants. These encouraging findings have led to further investigations related to butyrate supplementation in the mature ruminant. However, the maximum tolerable dosage rate of...

  20. Feeding lactose to increase ruminal butyrate and the metabolic status of transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    DeFrain, J M; Hippen, A R; Kalscheur, K F; Schingoethe, D J

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows (775 +/- 24 kg body weight; 3.4 +/- 0.11 body condition score) were used in a randomized complete block design experiment to determine the impact of increased ruminal butyrate from the fermentation of lactose on metabolism and lactation. Dietary treatments were either a corn-based control diet (CON) or a diet containing lactose at 15.7% of diet dry matter (LAC). Experimental diets were fed from 21 d before expected calving through 21 d in milk (DIM). Blood was sampled at -21, -14, -7, -2, 2, 7, 14, and 21 DIM, rumen fluid at -21, -7, and 7 DIM, and liver tissue via biopsy at 7 and 14 DIM. Pre- and postpartum dry matter intake (DMI) through 28 DIM averaged 12.8 and 17.7 kg/d, respectively, and did not differ between treatments; however, cows fed LAC did not exhibit a prepartum decrease in DMI. Milk yield was unaffected by treatments and averaged 45.7 kg/d during the first 70 DIM. Plasma glucose, insulin, and non-esterified fatty acids were not affected by dietary treatments. Feeding LAC increased the ruminal proportion of butyrate both pre- (11.3 vs. 9.2 +/- 0.45%) and postpartum (13.0 vs. 10.3 +/- 0.67%). Likewise, circulating plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate was increased both pre- (6.1 vs. 4.2 +/- 0.31 mg/dL) and postpartum (14.6 vs. 8.34 +/- 1.7 mg/dL) when feeding LAC compared with CON. Liver lipid content was decreased (8.6. vs. 14.7 +/- 1.5% of wet weight) in cows fed LAC relative to those fed CON, whereas liver glycogen was not affected by dietary treatments. Feeding lactose to transition dairy cows increased the proportion of butyrate in the rumen and beta-hydroxybutyrate in plasma and decreased liver lipid but did not affect lactation performance.

  1. Experimental feed induction of ruminal lactic, propionic, or butyric acidosis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lettat, A; Nozière, P; Silberberg, M; Morgavi, D P; Berger, C; Martin, C

    2010-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility to induce rumen acidosis with propionate, butyrate, or lactate as the major fermentation end products. Three rumen-cannulated Texel wethers were used in a 3 x 3 Latin square design. Each period consisted of 11 d of adaptation where wethers were daily fed at 90% of ad libitum intake a hay and wheat-based concentrate diet (4:1 ratio on a DM basis) in 2 equal portions followed by 3 d of acidosis induction. During the challenge, the morning feeding was replaced by an intraruminal supply of wheat (readily fermentable starch), corn (slowly fermentable starch), or beet pulp (easily digestible fiber), dosed at 1.2% of BW. Ruminal liquid samples were taken daily 1 h before (-1) and 1, 3, 5, and 6 h after intraruminal feed supply to measure pH, VFA, and lactic acid concentration. The differences between treatments accentuated throughout the 3-d challenge, being maximal and significant on d 3. Indeed, 6 h after the third day of the challenge, mean ruminal pH was less for wheat (4.85) than for corn (5.61; P = 0.008) and beet pulp (6.09; P = 0.001), and total VFA tended to be less for wheat (48.7 mM) than for corn and beet pulp (84.7 mM on average; P = 0.08). At the same time, the proportion of acetate was greater for wheat than for corn (75.5 and 62.2%, respectively; P = 0.005) but did not differ from beet pulp challenge (69.0%). The proportion of propionate was greatest for beet pulp compared with corn and wheat (21.0, 17.3, and 12.1%, respectively; P = 0.03), whereas the butyrate proportion was greatest for corn, intermediate for wheat, and least for beet pulp (16.3, 10.8, and 8.3%, respectively; P = 0.05). Lactate concentration was greatest for wheat (45.5 mM) compared with corn and beet pulp (8.3 mM on average; P = 0.01). Under our experimental conditions, ruminal lactic acidosis was successfully induced by wheat, whereas butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis were respectively provoked by corn and beet pulp. We

  2. The response of gastrointestinal microbiota to avilamycin, butyrate, and plant extracts in early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Castillo, M; Martín-Orúe, S M; Roca, M; Manzanilla, E G; Badiola, I; Perez, J F; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    An experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of 3 different additives on the gastrointestinal microbiota of early-weaned pigs. Early-weaned (18 to 22 d; n = 32) pigs (6.0 +/- 0.10 kg of BW) from 8 litters were randomly distributed into 8 pens. Each pen was assigned 1 of 4 dietary treatments: a prestarter or control diet, the control diet with 0.04% avilamycin (AB), with 0.3% sodium butyrate, or with 0.03% plant extract mixture (XT; standardized mixture with 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol extracted from Origanum spp., 3% cinnamaldehyde extracted from Cinnamonum spp., and 2% capsicum oleoresin from Capsicum annum). At the end of the experimental period, 8 pigs per treatment were killed, and samples of their intestinal content were taken. The total bacterial load along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT; stomach, jejunum, cecum, and distal colon) and the lactobacilli and enterobacteria in the jejunum and cecum were measured by quantitative PCR. The total microbial counts along the GIT did not differ among the diets, but there was an increase in the lactobacilli:enterobacteria ratio in the cecum of the piglets on the XT diet (P = 0.003). Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the PCR-amplified V3, V4, and V5 regions of the 16S rDNA gene showed changes in the structure of the microbial community in the jejunum. Dendrograms grouped animals by diets; control with 0.3% sodium butyrate was the treatment that promoted the biggest changes in the microbial ecosystem, followed by AB and then XT. Biodiversity increased when using additives compared with the control diet (P = 0.002). Microbial metabolic activity along the hindgut was studied using the concentration of purine bases and carbohydrase activities. Different patterns for purine bases were observed between diets (diet x intestinal section, P = 0.01). The control diet reached a maximum purine base concentration at the end of the colon, whereas that of the AB diet was reached at the cecum. We could not detect any cellulase

  3. Poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid interaction with the transgenic flax fibers: FT-IR and Raman spectra of the composite extracted from a GM flax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Żuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan; Dymińska, Lucyna; Mączka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy

    2009-07-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman studies have been performed on commercial 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, commercial poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid as well as poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid (PHB) produced by bacteria. The data were compared to those obtained for poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid extracted from natural and genetically modified flax. Genetically modified flax was generated by expression of three bacterial genes coding for synthesis of poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid. Thus transgenic flaxes were enhanced with different amount of the PHB. The discussion of polymer structure and vibrational properties has been done in order to get insight into differences among these materials. The interaction between the cellulose of flax fibers and embedded poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid has been also discussed. The spectroscopic data provide evidences for structural changes in cellulose and in PHB when synthesized in fibers. Based on this data it is suggesting that cellulose and PHB interact by hydrogen and ester bonds.

  4. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders with similar signs and symptoms. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders The range of consequences from drinking alcohol during pregnancy are collectively called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, as not all signs and symptoms are ...

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate promotes the osteogenic differentiation of rat adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Fu, Yutuo; Zhang, Xin; Dai, Linghui; Zhu, Jingxian; Bi, Zhenggang; Ao, Yingfang; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-04-01

    Adult stem cells hold great promise for use in tissue repair and regeneration. Recently, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were found to be an appealing alternative to bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) for bone tissue engineering. The main benefit of ADSCs is that they can be easily and abundantly available from adipose tissue. However, our prior study discovered an important phenomenon that BMSCs have greater osteogenic potential than ADSCs in vitro and epigenetic regulation plays a critical role in runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression and thus osteogenesis. In this study, we aimed to improve the osteogenic potential of ADSCs by histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBu). We found that NaBu promoted rat ADSC osteogenic differentiation by altering the epigenetic modifications on the Runx2 promoter.

  7. Transport and Metabolism of the Endogenous Auxin Precursor Indole-3-Butyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Strader, Lucia C.; Bartel, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth and morphogenesis depend on the levels and distribution of the plant hormone auxin. Plants tightly regulate cellular levels of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Although the transporters that move IAA into and out of cells are well characterized and play important roles in development, little is known about the transport of IAA precursors. In this review, we discuss the accumulating evidence suggesting that the IAA precursor indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) is transported independently of the characterized IAA transport machinery along with the recent identification of specific IBA efflux carriers and enzymes suggested to metabolize IBA. These studies have revealed important roles for IBA in maintaining IAA levels and distribution within the plant to support normal development. PMID:21357648

  8. Polyethylene-supported polyvinylidene fluoride-cellulose acetate butyrate blended polymer electrolyte for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Weishan; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Liu, Shengqi; Li, Zhao

    2013-03-01

    The polyethylene (PE)-supported polymer membranes based on the blended polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) are prepared for gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) of lithium ion battery. The performances of the prepared membranes and the resulting GPEs are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, linear potential sweep, and charge-discharge test. The effect of the ratio of PVDF to CAB on the performance of the prepared membranes is considered. It is found that the GPE based on the blended polymer with PVDF:CAB = 2:1 (in weight) has the largest ionic conductivity (2.48 × 10-3 S cm-1) and shows good compatibility with anode and cathode of lithium ion battery. The LiCoO2/graphite battery using this GPE exhibits superior cyclic stability at room temperature, storage performance at elevated temperature, and rate performance.

  9. Cell growth on in situ photo-cross-linked electrospun acrylated cellulose acetate butyrate.

    PubMed

    Çakmakçı, Emrah; Güngör, Atilla; Kayaman-Apohan, Nilhan; Kuruca, Serap Erdem; Çetin, Muzaffer Beyza; Dar, Kadriye Akgün

    2012-01-01

    In this study, electrospinning was combined with UV curing technology for producing in situ photo cross-linked fibers from methacrylated cellulose acetate butyrate (CABIEM). ECV304 and 3T3 cells were seeded on electrospun fibrous scaffolds. Collagen modified CABIEM fibers were also prepared for improving cell adhesion and proliferation. Cross-linking and the morphology of the fibers were characterized by ATR-FTIR spectrometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The cytotoxicity of the fibers was examined using the MTT cytotoxicity assay. According to the results, electrospun fibrous scaffolds are non-toxic and cell viability depends on the amount of collagen. It was found that cell adhesion and cell growth were enhanced as the collagen percentage was increased.

  10. Ketotifen controlled release from cellulose acetate propionate and cellulose acetate butyrate membranes.

    PubMed

    Sobral, Manuela C C M; Sobral, Abilio J F N; Guthrie, J T; Gil, M H

    2008-02-01

    Ketotifen was immobilised in cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) membranes and in cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes. The characteristics of each system were evaluated under a range of experimental conditions. The topography and uniformity of the membranes was assessed using scanning electron microscopy. The release characteristics associated with Ketotifen were monitored spectrophotometrically. The swelling capacity of the membranes was evaluated and attributed to the combined effects of diffusion and of complex dissociation, during swelling. The materials produced were able to provide controlled release of Ketotifen due to their controlled swelling behaviour and adequate release properties. The results showed that the release of Ketotifen from the CAB membranes is higher but the release from the CAP membranes is more uniform.

  11. Combined treatment with sodium butyrate and PD153035 enhances keratinocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, Sandra Leon; Sutter, Carrie Hayes; Sutter, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signaling is a critical determinant of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in both normal and diseased skin. Here we explore the effects of combined treatment with the differentiation-promoting agent sodium butyrate (SB) and the EGFR inhibitor (EGFRI) PD153035 on terminal differentiation of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). Cells treated with SB showed increased expression of the levels of mRNA and protein of the differentiation markers filaggrin and transglutaminase 1. Co-treatment with EGF significantly blunted these effects of SB. Combined treatment with SB and PD153035 alleviated these inhibitory actions of EGF, resulting in improved effects of decreased cell growth and increased terminal differentiation, relative to the individual treatments. These results indicate that the combined use of a differentiation-promoting agent and an EGFR inhibitor may offer an additional approach to the management of hyperproliferative skin diseases. PMID:24451036

  12. Photochromic properties of the N-Salicylideneaniline in Polyvinyl Butyral matrix: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Siyamak; Filippovich, Liudmila; Aharodnikova, M.; Almodarresiyeh, Hora A.; Hajikolaee, Fatemeh Haji; Kumar, Rakesh; Mashayekhi, Mahsa

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, isomerization, photophysical properties, thermal conductivity (λ) and spectral study of the N-Salicylideneaniline: 2-[(E)-(phenylimino)methyl]phenol (SA) under the action of UV radiation in the Polyvinyl Butyral (PVB) matrix were studied using the Indicator method and Density Functional Theory (DFT). The electronic absorption spectra of SA and its isomers (SA1 and SA2) in dimethylformamide (DMF) solutions were also calculated. The nature of absorption bands of SA, SA1 and SA2 in the visible and near ultraviolet spectral regions was interpreted. The excitation energies, electronic transitions and oscillator strengths for SA, SA1 and SA2 have also been calculated. Thermal Conductivity of PVB-films containing SA before and after UV radiation was also measured. A Photochromic PVB - film on the basis of SA for application in optical devices and display technologies was made.

  13. Production of γ-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of γ-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25°C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  14. Pervaporation of water and ethanol using a cellulose acetate butyrate membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.S.; Lau, W.W.Y.; Rangaiah, G.P.; Sourirajan, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-15

    Okada and Matsuura's transport equations for pervaporation give rise to three fundamental parameters, namely, interfacial saturation vapor pressure P*, liquid transport parameter A/[delta], and vapor transport parameter B/[delta]. The effects of the chemical nature of the membrane material and the upstream operating pressures of 101.3 and 303.9 kPa on the above parameters were investigated from the pervaporation data at laboratory temperature (24 C) for water and ethanol using a cellulose acetate butyrate membrane. The results show that the P. values are essentially unaffected by the upstream pressure, and that they are generally higher than the literature values of saturation vapor pressure at 24 C. Further, the values for A/[delta] and B/[delta] tend to increase with increased upstream pressure for both systems studied. These results are discussed.

  15. Kinetics and species of flash pyrolysis of cellulose acetate butyrate: The binder of LOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Gongwer, P.E.; Arisawa, H.; Brill, T.B.

    1996-07-01

    The principal binder of many LOVA propellants is cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB). By the use of T-Jump/FTIR spectroscopy, CAB was flash-pyrolyzed to set temperatures in the 465--600 C range, while rapid-scan IR spectra were used to identify the main decomposition products and to measure the rate of formation of each product as a function of temperature. Eleven specific products, which include oligomers of CAB, acids, aldehydes, ketenes, esters, CO{sub 2} and CO, were quantified by chemometric procedures. The ketenes are the most novel products. The Arrhenius parameters reveal that below 510 {+-} 20 C, the rate of product evolution is controlled mainly by condensed phase reactions. Above 510 {+-} 20 C, the rate of product evolution is controlled by desorption/evaporation of the volatile products.

  16. Nanonization of poorly water-soluble drug clobetasone butyrate by using femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Sunqiang; Takebe, Gen; Suzuki, Masumi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Ge, Jianhong; Liu, Chong; Hiramatsu, Mitsuo

    2014-02-01

    Nanonization, which involves the formation of the drug with nanometer particle size, is an effective method to improve the dissolution rate and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. A pulsewidth-tunable femtosecond laser was used to produce nanoparticles of clobetasone butyrate using poloxamer 188 as stabilizing agent. The effects of temperature and pulsewidth on the particle size and concentration were studied for the first time. The particle size and drug concentration dependence on the laser intensity and irradiation time were also investigated. Permeability test releaved that laser nanonization improved the drug permeability across Caco-2 cell monolayer. This laser nanonization method has a great potential to be used for new drug development.

  17. Butyrate Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Bovine Cells through Targeting Gene Expression relevance to DNA Replication Apparatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using both real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in bovine kidney epithelial cells, we systematically investigated the gene expression relevance to DNA replication apparatus targeted by butyrate. The real-time PCR and Western blot data generally confirmed the microarray analysis. From the quan...

  18. Sodium Butyrate Ameliorates High-Concentrate Diet-Induced Inflammation in the Rumen Epithelium of Dairy Goats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongyu; Liu, Xinxin; Yan, Jinyu; Aabdin, Zain Ul; Bilal, Muhammad Shahid; Shen, Xiangzhen

    2017-01-25

    To investigate the effect of sodium butyrate on high-concentrate diet-induced local inflammation of the rumen epithelium, 18 midlactating dairy goats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a low-concentrate diet group as the control (concentrate:forage = 4:6), a high-concentrate (HC) diet group (concentrate:forage = 6:4), and a sodium butyrate (SB) group (concentrate:forage = 6:4, with 1% SB by weight). The results showed that, with the addition of sodium butyrate, the concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rumen fluid (2.62 × 10(4) ± 2.90 × 10(3) EU/mL) was significantly lower than that in the HC group (4.03 × 10(4) ± 2.77 × 10(3) EU/mL). The protein abundance of pp65, gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2,9 in the rumen epithelium were significantly down-regulated by SB compared with those in the HC group. With sodium butyrate administration, the concentration of NH3-N (19.2 ± 0.890 mM) in the rumen fluid was significantly higher than that for the HC group (12.7 ± 1.38 mM). Severe disruption of the rumen epithelium induced by HC was also ameliorated by dietary SB. Therefore, local inflammation and disruption of the rumen epithelium induced by HC were alleviated with SB administration.

  19. Effects of dietary humic and butyric acid on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide in young pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Humic acid (MFG) and fat protected butyric acid (BA) has been shown to modulate energy metabolism and inflammation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of MFG and BA, alone and in combination, on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced in...

  20. A high-resolution whole-genome map of the distinctive epigenomic landscape induced by butyrate in bovine cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This report presents a study utilizing next-generation sequencing technology, combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq) technology to analyze histone modification induced by butyrate and to construct a high-definition map of the epigenomic landscape with normal histone H3, H4, and their...

  1. Identification and quantitation of extractables from cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and estimation of their in vivo exposure levels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Decheng; Wasylaschuk, Walter R; Beasley, Christopher; Zhao, Zhongxi Zack; Harmon, Paul A; Ballard, John M; Pitzenberger, Steven M; Varga, Sandor L; Reed, Robert A

    2004-06-29

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively determine potential cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) extractables in a way to meaningfully predict the in vivo exposure resulting from clinical administration. Extractions of CAB-381-20 were performed in several solvent systems, consistently resulting in the detection of three extractables. The extractables have been identified as acetic acid, butyric acid, and E-2-ethyl-2-hexenoic acid (E-EHA) by LC/UV, LC/MS and NMR. Extraction studies of CAB powders in acetonitrile/phosphate buffer demonstrated quantitative extraction in 1 h for acetic acid (approximately 150 microg/g), butyric acid (approximately 200 microg/g), and EHA (approximately 20 microg/g). Subsequently, extraction studies for CAB powders and coated tablets in USP simulated gastric and intestinal fluids were performed to evaluate potential in vivo exposure. Similarly, acetic and butyric acids were quantitatively extracted from CAB-381-20 powder after 24 h exposure in both USP simulated fluids. The amounts of EHA extracted from CAB powder after 24 h were determined to be 2 and 16 microg/g in USP simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, respectively. After 24 h exposure in USP simulated fluids, the maximum amount of EHA extracted corresponds to < 0.3 microg of EHA per tablet. Pepsin and pancreatin in USP simulated fluids had no effect on EHA extraction and quantitation.

  2. Effect of sodium butyrate on induction of cellular and viral DNA syntheses in polyoma virus-infected mouse kidney cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wawra, E; Pöckl, E; Müllner, E; Wintersberger, E

    1981-01-01

    Sodium butyrate inhibited initiation of viral and cellular DNA replication in polyoma virus-infected mouse kidney cells. Ongoing viral or cellular DNA replication, however, was not affected by the presence of the substance. Butyrate had no effect on T-antigen synthesis and on the stimulation of transcription, one of the earliest reactions of the infected cells to the appearance of T-antigen, nor did it inhibit expression of late viral genes (synthesis of viral capsid proteins). In addition to blocking the onset of DNA synthesis, butyrate also inhibited stimulation of the activities of enzymes involved in DNA synthesis. When butyrate was removed, viral and cellular DNA syntheses were induced in parallel after a lag period of approximately 4 h. At the same time, the activities of enzymes involved in DNA synthesis increase. If protein synthesis was inhibited during part of the lag period, the initiation of DNA synthesis was retarded for the same time interval, suggesting that the proteins involved in the initiation of DNA replication had to be made. We have developed an in vitro system for measuring DNA synthesis in crude nuclear preparations which mimics the status of DNA replication in intact cells and may help in future experiments to study the requirements for initiation of cellular and viral DNA synthesis and the possible involvement of T-antigens in this reaction. Images PMID:6264167

  3. ChIp-seq of bovine cells (MDBK) to study butyrate-induced histone modification with 10 datasets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next-generation sequencing was combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology to analyze histone modification (acetylation) induced by butyrate and to map the epigenomic landscape of normal histone H3, H4 in rumen cells of the cow. Ten variants of histone H3 and H4 modification were m...

  4. Fabrication of Tunable Submicro- or Nano-structured Polyethylene Materials form Immiscible Blends with Cellulose Acetate Butyrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) was prepared into micro- or submicro-spheres or nanofibers via melt blending or extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/LDPE immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The sizes of the PE spheres or fibers can be successfully controlled by varyi...

  5. Effect of abomasal butyrate infusion on net nutrient flux across the portal-drained viscera and liver of growing lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine if supplying butyrate to the post-ruminal gastrointestinal tract of growing lambs alters blood flow and nutrient flux across the portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hepatic tissues. Polled Dorset wether lambs (n = 10; initial BW = 55 ± 3.3 kg) had cathet...

  6. Pathways of acetate, propionate, and butyrate formation by the human fecal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L; Wolin, M J

    1996-05-01

    The pathways of short-chain fatty acid (SCFA; acetate, propionate, and butyrate) formation from glucose were determined for the human fecal microbial communities of two subjects. The pathways were identified by radioisotope analysis of the SCFA and CO2 obtained after incubation of fecal suspensions with glucose under 20% CO2 with [1-14C]glucose, [3,4-14C]glucose, or 14CO2. Acetate was chemically degraded to learn the labeling of the methyl and carboxyl carbons. The labeling of CO2 and acetate showed that the major route of glucose catabolism was the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, with production of CO2 from pyruvate carboxyl carbon. Labeling of the methyl and carboxyl carbons of acetate by 14CO2 or [3,4-14C]glucose proved that acetate was formed from CO2 by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. CO2 reduction accounted for about one-third of the acetate formed by suspensions from subject 1 and about one-fourth of the acetate formed by suspensions from subject 2. Propionate was formed by a CO2 fixation pathway, and butyrate was formed by classical routes of acetyl-S coenzyme A condensation. The amount of CO2 formed from [1-14C] glucose and acetate labeling patterns obtained with the other 14C precursors indicated that the Entner-Doudoroff, transketolase-transaldolase, and heterolactic pathways were not significant. Fermentation of cabbage cellulose by subject 1 followed the same pathways as were used for glucose. The results with suspensions from subject 2 suggested that some radioactive acetate was formed from the C-3 of glucose by the Bifidobacterium pathway.

  7. In situ esterification and extractive fermentation for butyl butyrate production with Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Tian; Taylor, Steven; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-15

    Butyl butyrate (BB) is a valuable chemical that can be used as flavor, fragrance, extractant, etc. in various industries. Meanwhile, BB can also be used as a fuel source with excellent compatibility as gasoline, aviation kerosene and diesel components. The conventional industrial production of BB is highly energy-consuming and generates various environmental pollutants. Recently, there have been tremendous interests in producing BB from renewable resources through biological routes. In this study, based on the fermentation using the hyper-butyrate producing strain Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755, efficient BB production through in situ esterification was achieved by supplementation of lipase and butanol into the fermentation. Three commercially available lipases were assessed and the one from Candida sp. (recombinant, expressed in Aspergillus niger) was identified with highest catalytic activity for BB production. Various conditions that might affect BB production in the fermentation have been further evaluated, including the extractant type, enzyme loading, agitation, pH, and butanol supplementation strategy. Under the optimized conditions (5.0 g L(-1) of enzyme loading, pH at 5.5, butanol kept at 10.0 g/L), 34.7 g L(-1) BB was obtained with complete consumption of 50 g L(-1) glucose as the starting substrate. To our best knowledge, the BB production achieved in this study is the highest among the ever reported from the batch fermentation process. Our results demonstrated an excellent biological platform for renewable BB production from low-value carbon sources. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Conformational preferences and internal rotation of methyl butyrate by microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Abeysekera, Chamara; Hays, Brian M.; Kleiner, Isabelle; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-07-01

    The broadband rotational spectrum of methyl butyrate from 8 to 18 GHz, recorded using a chirp-pulsed Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer, was combined with high resolution FTMW measurements over the 2-26.5 GHz region to provide a comprehensive account of its microwave spectrum under jet-cooled conditions. Two low-energy conformers, one with a fully extended, heavy-atom planar anti/anti structure (a, a), and the other with a gauche propyl chain (g±, a), were assigned in the spectrum. Torsional A/E splittings due to the internal rotation of the methoxy methyl group were resolved for both lower energy conformers, and were fitted using the program XIAM and BELGI, providing an estimate of the barrier to methyl internal rotation of V3 ≈ 420 cm-1. The conformational landscape of methyl butyrate occurs on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, which was mapped out by quantum chemical calculations at the B2PLYP-D3BJ/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The low torsional barrier about the Csbnd C(dbnd O)O bond leads to collisional removal of population originally in the (a, g±) and (g±, g±) minima into the (a, a) and (g±, a) minima, respectively, during the cooling in the expansion. Analysis of experimental intensities in the spectrum provide percent populations downstream in the expansion of 41 ± 4% (a, a), and 59 ± 6% (g±, a).

  9. Effects of Early Intervention with Sodium Butyrate on Gut Microbiota and the Expression of Inflammatory Cytokines in Neonatal Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jumei; Chen, Xue; Yu, Shuiqing; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate in the gut of animals has potential properties including regulating the innate immune, modulating the lipid metabolism, and protecting gut healthy. So far, only limited information on the impact of butyrate on the neonatal is available. This study aimed to investigate effects of oral administration of sodium butyrate (SB) on gut microbiota and the expression of inflammatory cytokine in neonatal piglets. Ten litters of crossbred newborn piglets were randomly allocated to the SB and control (CO) groups, each group consisted of five litters (replicates). Piglets in the SB group were orally administrated with 7 to 13 ml sodium butyrate solution (150 mmol/l) per day from the age of 1 to 7 days, respectively; piglets in the CO group were treated with the same dose of physiological saline. On days 8 and 21 (of age), gut digesta and tissues were collected for the analysis of microbiota, butyrate concentration and gene expression of inflammatory cytokine. Results showed that there was no difference in the butyrate concentration in the gut of piglets on days 8 and 21 between two groups. Real-time PCR assay showed that SB had no effect on the numbers of total bacteria in the stomach, ileum, and colon. MiSeq sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that SB increased the richness in the stomach and colon, and the diversity of colonic microbiota on day 8 (P < 0.05). Genera Acinetobacter, Actinobacillus, Facklamia, Globicatella, Kocuria, Rothia, unclassified Leptotrichiaceae, unclassified Neisseriaceae, and unclassified Prevotellaceae in the stomach were increased in relative abundance by SB treatment, whereas the abundances of Lactobacillus decreased on day 8 (P < 0.05). At the genus and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) levels, SB had low impact on bacterial community in the ileum and colon on days 8 and 21. SB treatment decreased the expression of IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-10, TGF-β, and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) in the ileum of piglets on day 8

  10. Effects of Early Intervention with Sodium Butyrate on Gut Microbiota and the Expression of Inflammatory Cytokines in Neonatal Piglets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jumei; Chen, Xue; Yu, Shuiqing; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate in the gut of animals has potential properties including regulating the innate immune, modulating the lipid metabolism, and protecting gut healthy. So far, only limited information on the impact of butyrate on the neonatal is available. This study aimed to investigate effects of oral administration of sodium butyrate (SB) on gut microbiota and the expression of inflammatory cytokine in neonatal piglets. Ten litters of crossbred newborn piglets were randomly allocated to the SB and control (CO) groups, each group consisted of five litters (replicates). Piglets in the SB group were orally administrated with 7 to 13 ml sodium butyrate solution (150 mmol/l) per day from the age of 1 to 7 days, respectively; piglets in the CO group were treated with the same dose of physiological saline. On days 8 and 21 (of age), gut digesta and tissues were collected for the analysis of microbiota, butyrate concentration and gene expression of inflammatory cytokine. Results showed that there was no difference in the butyrate concentration in the gut of piglets on days 8 and 21 between two groups. Real-time PCR assay showed that SB had no effect on the numbers of total bacteria in the stomach, ileum, and colon. MiSeq sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that SB increased the richness in the stomach and colon, and the diversity of colonic microbiota on day 8 (P < 0.05). Genera Acinetobacter, Actinobacillus, Facklamia, Globicatella, Kocuria, Rothia, unclassified Leptotrichiaceae, unclassified Neisseriaceae, and unclassified Prevotellaceae in the stomach were increased in relative abundance by SB treatment, whereas the abundances of Lactobacillus decreased on day 8 (P < 0.05). At the genus and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) levels, SB had low impact on bacterial community in the ileum and colon on days 8 and 21. SB treatment decreased the expression of IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-10, TGF-β, and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) in the ileum of piglets on day 8

  11. High-level expression and characterization of a novel cutinase from Malbranchea cinnamomea suitable for butyl butyrate production.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojie; Liu, Yu; You, Xin; Jiang, Zhengqiang; Yang, Shaoxiang; Yang, Shaoqing

    2017-01-01

    Butyl butyrate has been considered as a promising fuel source because it is a kind of natural ester which can be converted from renewable and sustainable lignocellulosic biomass. Compared with the conventional chemical methods for butyl butyrate production, the enzymatic approach has been demonstrated to be more attractive, mainly owing to the mild reaction conditions, high specificity, low energy consumption, and environmental friendliness. Cutinases play an important role in the butyl butyrate production process. However, the production level of cutinases is still relatively low. Thus, to identify novel cutinases suitable for butyl butyrate synthesis and enhance their yields is of great value in biofuel industry. A novel cutinase gene (McCut) was cloned from a thermophilic fungus Malbranchea cinnamomea and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The highest cutinase activity of 12, 536 U/mL was achieved in 5-L fermentor, which is by far the highest production for a cutinase. McCut was optimally active at pH 8.0 and 45 °C. It exhibited excellent stability within the pH range of 3.0-10.5 and up to 75 °C. The cutinase displayed broad substrate specificity with the highest activity towards p-nitrophenyl butyrate and tributyrin. It was capable of hydrolyzing cutin, polycaprolactone, and poly(butylene succinate). Moreover, McCut efficiently synthesized butyl butyrate with a maximum esterification efficiency of 96.9% at 4 h. The overall structure of McCut was resolved as a typical α/β-hydrolase fold. The structural differences between McCut and Aspergillus oryzae cutinase in groove and loop provide valuable information for redesign of McCut. These excellent features make it useful in biosynthesis and biodegradation fields. A novel cutinase from M. cinnamomea was identified and characterized for the first time. High-level expression by P. pastoris is by far the highest for a cutinase. The enzyme exhibited excellent stability and high esterification efficiency for butyl

  12. Alcohol Alert: Link Between Stress and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA Journal Alcohol Alert Bulletin ... Cortisol also has a role in cognition, including learning and memory. In particular, it has been found ...

  13. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA Journal Alcohol Alert Bulletin Professional Education Materials Classroom Resources Presentations & Videocasts Video Bank Publicaciones en Español ...

  14. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/alcoholismandalcoholabuse.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  15. α4-Containing GABAA Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Mediate Moderate Intake of Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Rewal, Mridula; Jurd, Rachel; Gill, T. Michael; He, Dao-Yao; Ron, Dorit; Janak, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol has subjective and behavioral effects at the pharmacological levels typically reached during the consumption of one or two alcoholic drinks. Here we provide evidence that an α4-subunit-containing gamma-amino-butyric acid A (GABAA) receptor contributes to the consumption of low-to-moderate levels of alcohol. Using viral-mediated RNA-interference (RNAi), we found that reduced expression of the α4 subunit in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell of rats decreased their free consumption of and preference for alcohol. The time course for the reduced alcohol intake paralleled the time course of α4 mRNA reductions achieved after viral-mediated RNAi for α4. Further, the reduction in drinking was region- and alcohol-specific: there was no effect of reductions in α4 expression in the NAc core on alcohol intake, and reductions in α4 expression in the NAc shell did not alter sucrose or water intake. These results indicate that the GABAAR α4 subunit in the NAc shell mediates alcohol intake. PMID:19144854

  16. Characterization of the Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine IL-1β on Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Megan; Bennett, Natalie; Standifer, Cynthia; Smith, Alexis; Han, Anna; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2017-06-01

    Cancer, in part, is driven, by alterations in cellular metabolism that promote cell survival and cell proliferation. Identifying factors that influence this shift in cellular metabolism in cancer cells is important. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to be elevated in colorectal cancer patients. While much is known toward the effect of dietary nutrients on regulating inflammation and the inflammatory response, which includes cytokines such as IL-1β, far less is understood how cytokines impact nutrient fate to alter cancer cell metabolism. Butyrate, a nutrient derived from the fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon, is the preferential exogenous energetic substrate used by non-cancerous colonocytes, but is used less efficiently by colorectal cancer cells. To test whether IL-1β alters colonocyte energy metabolism, we measured butyrate oxidation in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells with and without IL-1β. We hypothesize that IL-1β will push cancerous colonocytes away from the utilization and oxidation of butyrate. In this study, we demonstrate that pretreatment of colorectal cancer cells with IL-1β diminished butyrate oxidation and NADH levels. This effect was blocked with the interleukin receptor antagonist A (IL-1RA). Moreover, IL-1β suppressed basal mitochondrial respiration and lowered the mitochondrial spare capacity. By using inhibitors to block downstream targets of the interleukin-1 receptor pathway, we show that p38 is required for the IL-1β-mediated decrease in butyrate oxidation. These data provide insight into the metabolic effects induced by IL-1β in colorectal cancer, and identify relevant targets that may be exploited to block the effects of this cytokine. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1614-1621, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Olfactory Impact of Higher Alcohols on Red Wine Fruity Ester Aroma Expression in Model Solution.

    PubMed

    Cameleyre, Margaux; Lytra, Georgia; Tempere, Sophie; Barbe, Jean-Christophe

    2015-11-11

    This study focused on the impact of five higher alcohols on the perception of fruity aroma in red wines. Various aromatic reconstitutions were prepared, consisting of 13 ethyl esters and acetates and 5 higher alcohols, all at the average concentrations found in red wine. These aromatic reconstitutions were prepared in several matrices. Sensory analysis revealed the interesting behavior of certain compounds among the five higher alcohols following their individual addition or omission. The "olfactory threshold" of the fruity pool was evaluated in several matrices: dilute alcohol solution, dilute alcohol solution containing 3-methylbutan-1-ol or butan-1-ol individually, and dilute alcohol solution containing the mixture of five higher alcohols, blended together at various concentrations. The presence of 3-methylbutan-1-ol or butan-1-ol alone led to a significant decrease in the "olfactory threshold" of the fruity reconstitution, whereas the mixture of alcohols raised the olfactory threshold. Sensory profiles highlighted changes in the perception of fruity nuances in the presence of the mixture of higher alcohols, with specific perceptive interactions, including a relevant masking effect on fresh- and jammy-fruit notes of the fruity mixture in both dilute alcohol solution and dearomatized red wine matrices. When either 3-methylbutan-1-ol or butan-1-ol was added to the fruity reconstitution in dilute alcohol solution, an enhancement of butyric notes was reported with 3-methylbutan-1-ol and fresh- and jammy-fruit with butan-1-ol. This study, the first to focus on the impact of higher alcohols on fruity aromatic expression, revealed that these compounds participate, both quantitatively and qualitatively, in masking fruity aroma perception in a model fruity wine mixture.

  18. The enhancement of phase 2 enzyme activities by sodium butyrate in normal intestinal epithelial cells is associated with Nrf2 and p53.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Keisuke; Enami, Yuka; Kurajyo, Chika; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Konishi, Yotaro; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2012-11-01

    Dietary fiber fermentation by the colonic bacterial flora produces short-chain fatty acids, acetate, propionate and butyrate. Among them, butyrate is considered to be the major energy substrate for colonocytes and, at least in rats, seems to protect against colonic carcinogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect and the mechanisms of short-chain fatty acids on the activity of phase 2 enzymes. Sodium butyrate increased phase 2 enzyme activities in normal rat small intestine epithelial cells, Glutathione S-transferase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) in a dose-dependent manner(;) however, other short-chain fatty acids did not increase them. The mechanism of the induction of phase 2 enzymes with sodium butyrate sodium butyrate, but not other short-chain fatty acids was related to the increase of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation and the decrease in the levels of nuclear fraction p53. Sodium butyrate also caused enhancement of Nrf2 mRNA levels and suppression of p53 mRNA levels. Sodium butyrate enhances the activities of phase 2 enzymes via an increase in the Nrf2 protein levels in the nucleus and a decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of p53.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Dibutyric cAMP and Butyric Acid on the Differentiation of Human Eosinophilic Leukemia EoL-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, YunJae

    2015-12-01

    Purification of enough numbers of circulating eosinophils is difficult because eosinophils account for less than 5% peripheral blood leukocytes. Human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells have been considered an in vitro source of eosinophils as they can differentiate into mature eosinophil-like cells when incubated with dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) or butyric acid. In this study, the viability and phenotypic maturation of EoL-1 cells stimulated by either dbcAMP or butyric acid were comparatively analyzed. After treatment with 100 µM dbcAMP or 0.5 µM butyric acid, EoL-1 cells showed morphological signs of differentiation, although the number of nonviable EoL-1 cells was significantly increased following butyric acid treatment. Stimulation of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid more effectively induced the expression of mature eosinophil markers than stimulation with dbcAMP. These results suggest that treatment of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid for limited duration could be an effective strategy for inducing their differentiation. Considering that expression of CCR3 was not sufficient in EoL-1 cells stimulated with 0.5 µM butyric acid, treatment of the chemically stimulated EoL-1 cells with cytokines, which primarily support eosinophil maturation, would help to obtain differentiated EoL-1 cells with greater functional maturity.

  20. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krois, Deborah Helen

    Although alcoholism has long been considered a serious problem, the impact of parental alcoholism on children has only recently begun to receive attention from researchers and clinicians. A review of the empirical literature on children of alcoholics was conducted and it was concluded that children raised in an alcoholic family are at increased…

  1. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  2. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krois, Deborah Helen

    Although alcoholism has long been considered a serious problem, the impact of parental alcoholism on children has only recently begun to receive attention from researchers and clinicians. A review of the empirical literature on children of alcoholics was conducted and it was concluded that children raised in an alcoholic family are at increased…

  3. Alcoholic metabolic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; McCurdy, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Ethanol intoxication and ethanol use are associated with a variety of metabolic derangements encountered in the Emergency Department. In this article, the authors discuss alcohol intoxication and its treatment, dispel the myth that alcohol intoxication is associated with hypoglycemia, comment on electrolyte derangements and their management, review alcoholic ketoacidosis, and end with a section on alcoholic encephalopathy.

  4. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Auden C.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. METHODS A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. RESULTS At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. CONCLUSIONS Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. PMID:26738886

  5. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use.

    PubMed

    McClure, Auden C; Tanski, Susanne E; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D

    2016-02-01

    Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. [Biomarkers of alcohol abuse. Part II. New biomarkers and their interpretation].

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Popławska, Regina; Konarzewska, Beata; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Galińska, Beata; Rutkowski, Piotr; Leśniak, Radosław; Szulc, Agata

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of new biomarkers of alcohol abuse appear in the literature. The most commonly used biomarkers (5-hydroxytryptophol, fatty acid ethyl esters, ethyl glucuronide, phosphatidyl ethanol, ethyl sulphate, mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, carbohydrate deficient transferrin, acetaldehyde adducts, beta-hexosaminidase, and sialic acid) were described. Then other known and less known biomarkers associated with alcohol abuse were described in brief (e.g. acetaldehyde, acetate, methanol, alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, dolichol, proteomics). Their sensitivity and specificity is generally higher than that of traditional biomarkers. The time of detection in biological fluids occur from one day to few months after alcohol consumption. Hence, their usefulness in clinical practice as well as in experimental studies is increasing.

  7. Alcohol and bone.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed across the world in different cultural and social settings. Types of alcohol consumption differ between (a) light, only occasional consumption, (b) heavy chronic alcohol consumption, and (c) binge drinking as seen as a new pattern of alcohol consumption among teenagers and young adults. Heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Osteoporosis is regularly mentioned as a secondary consequence of alcoholism, and chronic alcohol abuse is established as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. The review will present the different mechanisms and effects of alcohol intake on bone mass, bone metabolism, and bone strength, including alcoholism-related "life-style factors" such as malnutrition, lack of exercise, and hormonal changes as additional causative factors, which also contribute to the development of osteoporosis due to alcohol abuse.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Regulation of Gene Expression for Lipid Catabolism in Young Broilers by Butyrate Glycerides

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fugui; Yu, Hai; Lepp, Dion; Shi, Xuejiang; Yang, Xiaojian; Hu, Jielun; Leeson, Steve; Yang, Chengbo; Nie, Shaoping; Hou, Yongqing; Gong, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Butyrate has been shown to potently regulate energy expenditure and lipid metabolism in animals, yet the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of butyrate (in the form of butyrate glycerides, BG)-induced lipid metabolism at the level of gene expression in the jejunum and liver of broilers. Methodology/Principal Findings Two animal experiments were included in this study. In Experiment 1, two hundred and forty male broiler chickens were equally allocated into two groups: 1) basal diet (BD), 2) BG diets (BD + BG). Growth performance was compared between treatments for the 41-day trial. In Experiment 2, forty male broiler chickens were equally allocated into two groups. The general experimental design, group and management were the same as described in Experiment 1 except for reduced bird numbers and 21-day duration of the trial. Growth performance, abdominal fat deposition, serum lipid profiles as well as serum and tissue concentrations of key enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were compared between treatments. RNA-seq was employed to identify both differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and treatment specifically expressed genes (TSEGs). Functional clustering of DEGs and TSEGs and signaling pathways associated with lipid metabolism were identified using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources 6.7 (DAVID-BR). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were subsequently conducted to further examine the expression of genes in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) signaling pathway identified by DAVID-BR. Dietary BG intervention significantly reduced abdominal fat ratio (abdominal fat weight/final body weight) in broilers. The decreased fat deposition in BG-fed chickens was in accordance with serum lipid profiles as well as the level of lipid metabolism-related enzymes in the serum, abdominal adipose, jejunum and liver. RNA-seq analysis

  9. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  10. Syntrophic associations from hypersaline soda lakes converting organic acids and alcohols to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2016-09-01

    Until now anaerobic oxidation of VFA at high salt-pH has been demonstrated only at sulfate-reducing conditions. Here, we present results of a microbiological investigation of anaerobic conversion of organic acids and alcohols at methanogenic conditions by syntrophic associations enriched from hypersaline soda lakes in Central Asia. Sediment incubation experiments showed active, albeit very slow, methane formation from acetate, propionate, butyrate and C2 C4 alcohols at pH 10 and various levels of salinity. Enrichments of syntrophic associations using hydrogenotrophic members of the genus Methanocalculus from soda lakes as partners resulted in several highly enriched cultures converting acetate, propionate, butyrate, benzoate and EtOH to methane. Most syntrophs belonged to Firmicutes, while the propionate-oxidizer formed a novel lineage within the family Syntrophobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. The acetate-oxidizing syntroph was identified as 'Ca. Syntrophonatronum acetioxidans' previously found to oxidize acetate at sulfate-reducing conditions up to salt-saturating concentrations. Butyrate and a benzoate-degrading syntrophs represent novel genus-level lineages in Syntrophomonadales which are proposed as Candidatus taxons 'Syntrophobaca', 'Syntrophocurvum' and 'Syntropholuna'. Overall, despite very slow growth, the results indicated the presence of a functionally competent syntrophic community in hypersaline soda lakes, capable of efficient oxidation of fermentation products to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

  11. The effect of butyric acid with autogenous omental graft on healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Jahani, S; Moslemi, H. R.; Dehghan, M. M.; Sedaghat, R; Mazaheri Nezhad, R; Rezaee Moghaddam, D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the role of local injection of butyric acid (BA) with autogenous omental graft was evaluated in healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits. Nine adult male New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized and a partial thickness tenotomy was created on both hindlimbs. In treated group, omental graft was secured in place using BA soaked polygalactin 910 suture. In control group, the graft was sutured without BA. Butyric acid and normal saline were injected daily to treatment and control groups for three days, respectively. Based on the findings, on day 15 after injury, the tendon sections showed that healing rate in BA treated group was higher than that in control group. Furthermore, at days 28 and 45, comparison between BA treated and control groups demonstrated that BA increased the healing rate but with no significance. In summary, results of this study show that application of BA with autogenous omental graft can improve healing process of damaged Achilles tendon. PMID:27175160

  12. Homogeneous preparation of cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) from sugarcane bagasse cellulose in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kelin; Wang, Ben; Cao, Yan; Li, Huiquan; Wang, Jinshu; Lin, Weijiang; Mu, Chaoshi; Liao, Dankui

    2011-05-25

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were prepared homogeneously in a 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) ionic liquid system from sugarcane bagasse (SB). The reaction temperature, reaction time, and molar ratio of butyric (propionic) anhydride/anhydroglucose units in the cellulose affect the butyryl (B) or propionyl (P) content of CAB or CAP samples. The (13)C NMR data revealed the distribution of the substituents of CAB and CAP. The thermal stability of sugar cane bagasse cellulose was found by thermogravimetric analysis to have decreased after chemical modification. After reaction, the ionic liquid was effectively recycled and reused. This study provides a new way for high-value-added utilization of SB and realizing the objective of turning waste into wealth.

  13. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeong Chae; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sang Woo; Chae, Yun-Soek; Kang, Hyun-Kyung; Yun, Byung-Wook; Hong, Jeum Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA), has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM). BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant. PMID:25288957

  14. Sodium butyrate reverses the inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes induced by amphetamine in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Valvassori, Samira S; Calixto, Karen V; Budni, Josiane; Resende, Wilson R; Varela, Roger B; de Freitas, Karolina V; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the possibility that mitochondrial impairment may play an important role in bipolar disorder (BD). The Krebs cycle is the central point of oxidative metabolism, providing carbon for biosynthesis and reducing agents for generation of ATP. Recently, studies have suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have antimanic effects. The present study aims to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a HDAC inhibitor, on Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by D-amphetamine (D-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given D-AMPH or saline (Sal) for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with SB or Sal. The citrate synthase (CS), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were evaluated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The D-AMPH administration inhibited Krebs cycle enzymes activity in all analyzed brain structures and SB reversed D-AMPH-induced dysfunction analyzed in all brain regions. These findings suggest that Krebs cycle enzymes' inhibition can be an important link for the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in BD and SB exerts protective effects against the D-AMPH-induced Krebs cycle enzymes' dysfunction.

  15. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    DOE PAGES

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; ...

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceaemore » (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.« less

  16. Polyvinylpyrrolidone/polyvinyl butyral composite as a stable binder for castable supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, M.; Weingarth, D.; Herbeck-Engel, P.; Grobelsek, I.; Presser, V.

    2015-04-01

    Mixtures of polyvinylpyrrolidone/polyvinyl butyral (PVP/PVB) are attractive binders for the preparation of carbon electrodes for aqueous electrolyte supercapacitors. The use of PVP/PVB offers several key advantages: They are soluble in ethanol and can be used to spray coat or drain cast activated carbon (AC) electrodes directly on a current collector. Infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements show that the PVP-to-PVB ratio determines the degree of binder hydrophilicity. Within our study, the most favorable performance was obtained for AC electrodes with a composition of AC + 1.5 mass% PVP + 6.0 mass% PVB; such electrodes were mechanically stabile and water resistant with a PVP release of less than 5% of total PVP while PVB itself is water insoluble. Compared to when using PVDF, the specific surface area (SSA) of the assembled electrodes was 10% higher, indicating a reduced pore blocking tendency. A good electrochemical performance was observed in different aqueous electrolytes for composite electrodes with the optimized binder composition: 160 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 for 1 M H2SO4 and 6 M KOH and 120 F g-1 for 1 M NaCl. The capacitance was slightly reduced by 2.5% after cycling to 1.2 V with 1.28 A g-1 in 1 M NaCl for 10,000 times.

  17. Cortical and subcortical gamma amino acid butyric acid deficits in anxiety and stress disorders: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress disorders are a major public health issue. However, their pathophysiology is still unclear. The gamma amino acid butyric acid (GABA) neurochemical system has been strongly implicated in their pathogenesis and treatment by numerous preclinical and clinical studies, the most recent of which have been highlighted and critical review in this paper. Changes in cortical GABA appear related to normal personality styles and responses to stress. While there is accumulating animal and human neuroimaging evidence of cortical and subcortical GABA deficits across a number of anxiety conditions, a clear pattern of findings in specific brain regions for a given disorder is yet to emerge. Neuropsychiatric conditions with anxiety as a clinical feature may have GABA deficits as an underlying feature. Different classes of anxiolytic therapies support GABA function, and this may be an area in which newer GABA neuroimaging techniques could soon offer more personalized therapy. Novel GABAergic pharmacotherapies in development offer potential improvements over current therapies in reducing sedative and physiologic dependency effects, while offering rapid anxiolysis. PMID:27014597

  18. Arginine butyrate per os protects mdx mice against cardiomyopathy, kyphosis and changes in axonal excitability.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Sara; Bouyon, Sophie; Benoit, Evelyne; Sebrié, Catherine; Boerio, Delphine; Herbin, Marc; Roulot, Morgane; Fromes, Yves; de la Porte, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disease caused by lack of dystrophin, a sub-sarcolemmal protein, which leads to dramatic muscle deterioration. We studied in mdx mice, the effects of oral administration of arginine butyrate (AB), a compound currently used for the treatment of sickle cell anemia in children, on cardiomyopathy, vertebral column deformation and electromyographic abnormalities. Monthly follow-up by echocardiography from the 8th month to the 14th month showed that AB treatment protected the mdx mice against drastic reduction (20-23%) of ejection fraction and fractional shortening, and also against the ≈20% ventricular dilatation and 25% cardiac hypertrophy observed in saline-treated mdx mice. The phenotypic improvement was corroborated by the decrease in serum CK level and by better fatigue resistance. Moreover, AB treatment protected against the progressive spinal deformity observed in mdx mice, another similarity with DMD patients. The value of the kyphosis index in AB-treated mice reached 94% of the value in C57BL/10 mice. Finally, axonal excitability parameters such as the membrane resting potential, the threshold and amplitude of the action potential, the absolute and relative refractory periods and the supernormal and subnormal periods, recorded from caudal and plantar muscles in response to excitability tests, that were modified in saline-treated mdx mice were not significantly changed, compared with wild-type animals, in AB-treated mdx mice. All of these results suggest that AB could be a potential treatment for DMD patients.

  19. Disc-electrospun cellulose acetate butyrate nanofibers show enhanced cellular growth performances.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Niu, Haitao; Wu, Chunchen; Ke, Qinfei; Mo, Xiumei; Lin, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate nanofibers were prepared separately by two electrospinning techniques; a needleless electrospinning using a disc as spinneret and a rotary drum as collector and a conventional needle electrospinning using a rotary drum as collector. Compared to the needle-electrospun nanofibers, the disc-electrospun nanofibers were coarser with a wider diameter distribution. Both fibers had a similar surface morphology and they showed no difference in chemical components, but the disc-electrospun nanofibers were slightly higher in crystallinity. The productivity of disc electrospinning was 150 times larger than that of needle electrospinning. The disc-electrospun nanofiber mats were found to have a three dimensional fibrous structure with an average pore size of 9.1 μm, while the needle-electrospun nanofibers looked more like a two-dimensional sheet with a much smaller average pore size (3.2 μm). Fibroblasts and Schwann cells were cultured on the fibrous matrices to assess the biocompatibility. The disc-electrospun nanofiber webs showed enhanced cellular growth for both fibroblasts and Schwann cells, especially in a long culture period.

  20. Therapeutic Effect of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Sodium Butyrate, on Allergic Rhinitis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wen, Liting; Wang, Ye; Chen, Fuquan

    2016-04-01

    Despite the well-documented therapeutic effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) on various diseases, including arthritis and asthma, the therapeutic effect of HDACi on allergic rhinitis remains unmentioned in the literature. This study investigated the therapeutic effect of sodium butyrate (SoB), a form of HDACi, on mice with allergic rhinitis. The results showed that the expression levels of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were significantly upregulated in mice with allergic rhinitis, whereas H3 acetylation at lysine 9 (H3AcK9) was decreased. The intranasal application of SoB inhibited the expression levels of TSLP levels and upregulated the expression of H3AcK9 in a mouse model of allergic rhinitis. Furthermore, SoB treatment significantly decreased the increased levels of ovalbumin-specific IgE and improved clinical symptoms and nasal mucosa epithelial morphology in the mouse model of allergic rhinitis. In addition, we further demonstrated that SoB treatment significantly increased the serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ and decreased the serum levels of IL-4 and IL-10, correcting the Th1/Th2 imbalance in the mouse model of allergic rhinitis. Taken together, our study suggests that SoB has the potential to treat allergic rhinitis.

  1. Preparation and characterization of poly (hydroxy butyrate)/chitosan blend scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi, Saeed; Khorasani, Saied Nouri; Ebrahimi, Somayeh; Khalili, Shahla; Fekrat, Farnoosh; Sadeghi, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poly (hydroxy butyrate) (PHB) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer with good mechanical properties. This polymer could be a promising material for scaffolds if some features improve. Materials and Methods: In the present work, new PHB/chitosan blend scaffolds were prepared as a three-dimensional substrate in cartilage tissue engineering. Chitosan in different weight percent was added to PHB and solved in trifluoroacetic acid. Statistical Taguchi method was employed in the design of experiments. Results: The Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy test revealed that the crystallization of PHB in these blends is suppressed with increasing the amount of chitosan. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a thin and rough top layer with a nodular structure, supported with a porous sub-layer in the surface of the scaffolds. In vitro degradation rate of the scaffolds was higher than pure PHB scaffolds. Maximum degradation rate has been seen for the scaffold with 90% wt. NaCl and 40% wt. chitosan. Conclusions: The obtained results suggest that these newly developed PHB/chitosan blend scaffolds may serve as a three-dimensional substrate in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:28028517

  2. Melatonin and its precursors in Y79 human retinoblastoma cells - Effect of sodium butyrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Mei H.; Lopez G.-Coviella, Ignacio; Lynch, Harry J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the release of melatonin and the production of its precursors, 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin, in cultured Y79 human retinoblastoma cells. This biosynthetic capability was found to be dependent on cell differentiation, which was initiated by culturing Y79 cells for 7 days in dishes coated with poly-D-lysine to promote cell adhesion to the surface of the culture dishes. Differentiation was further induced by exposing the cell monolayer to sodium butyrate (3 mM) for three days. This protocol dramatically increased the release of melatonin, and the syntheses of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin in response to forskolin stimulation. Exposure to dopamine or L-DOPA markedly diminished the forskolin-stimulated release of melatonin, as well as the production of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin. These observations indicate that Y79 cells represent a primitive cell line which, following appropriate differentiation can display biochemical characteristics similar to those of the human retina. Moreover, serotonin synthesis and melatonin release appear to be coupled in Y79 ceils.

  3. Improvement of CO2/N2 separation performance by polymer matrix cellulose acetate butyrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. J.; Jawad, Z. A.; Ahmad, A. L.; Ngo, J. Q.; Chua, H. B.

    2017-06-01

    With the rapid development of modern civilization, carbon dioxide (CO2) is produced in large quantities and mainly generated from industrial sectors. The gas emission is the major contributor to global warming. To address this issue, the membrane technology is implemented for the CO2 removal, due to the energy efficiency and economic advantages presented. Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) is selected as the polymeric material, due to the excellent film-forming properties and capable of developing a defect-free layer of neat membrane. This study described the fabrication development of CAB using a wet phase inversion method with different casting conditions. Where the composition of the casting solutions (3-5 wt %) and solvent evaporation time (4-6 min) were determined. The outcomes of these dominant parameters were then used to determine the best CAB membrane for CO2/Nitrogen (N2) separation and supported by the characterization i.e. scanning electron micrograph. Gas permeation measurements showed satisfactory performance for CAB membrane fabricated with 5 min evaporation time and 4 wt% polymer composition (M2). Where, its permeance and selectivity are 120.19 GPU and 3.17, respectively. In summary, this study showed a brief outlined of the future direction and perspective of CAB membrane for CO2/N2 separation.

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    PubMed Central

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A; Gilbert, Jack A; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. Our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut. PMID:26394008

  5. Partition coefficients for acetic, propionic, and butyric acids in a crude oil/water system

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsel, M.A.; Borkowski, J.J.; Sears, J.T. . National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Biofilm Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, and organic acid concentration on the partition coefficients for short-chain organic acids were measured in a crude oil/water system. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, as probable substrates for microbial souring of oil reservoirs, were used in conjunction with two types of crude oil. Temperatures of 35--75 C, pH values of 4.0--7.0, and acid concentrations of 10--1,000 mg/L were studied. Initial naturally occurring levels of organic acids in the crude oils were also determined. pH had by far the largest effect on the partition coefficient for all three organic acids for both types oil. At conditions normally seen in an oil reservoir (pH 5--7), the great percentage (85+%) of these acids were dissolved in the aqueous phase. The log of the partition coefficient K increased approximately linearly with the number of carbon atoms in the acid. It was seen that organic acids are readily available carbon sources for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at normal reservoir conditions, and that crude oil may provide a source of organic acids in a low-pH, water-flooded reservoir.

  6. Recycling of waste automotive laminated glass and valorization of polyvinyl butyral through mechanochemical separation.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Ryang Park, Jae; Yoon Shin, Dong; Park, Kyung-Soo; Hwan Hong, Myung; Gi Lee, Chan

    2015-10-01

    Due to strong binding, optical clarity, adhesion to many surfaces, toughness and flexibility polyvinyl butyral (PVB) resin films are commonly used in the automotive and architectural application as a protective interlayer in the laminated glass. Worldwide million tons of PVB waste generated from end-of-life automotive associated with various environmental issues. Stringent environmental directive, higher land cost eliminates land filling option, needs a study, we have developed a mechanochemical separation process to separate PVB resins from glass and characterized the separated PVB through various techniques, i.e., scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Commercial nonionic surfactants D201 used for the mechanochemical separation purpose. Through parameter optimization following conditions are considered to be the optimum condition; 30v ol% D201, stirring speed of 400 rpm, 35 °C temperature, operation time 1h, and dilute D201 volume to waste automotive laminated glass weight ratio of ≈25. The technology developed in our laboratory is sustainable, environmentally friendly, techno-economical feasible process, capable of mass production (recycling).

  7. Electron Affinity of Phenyl-C61-Butyric Acid Methyl Ester (PCBM)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Bryon W.; Whitaker, James B.; Wang, Xue B.; Popov, Alexey A.; Rumbles, Garry; Kopidakis, Nikos; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

    2013-07-25

    The gas-phase electron affinity (EA) of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), one of the best-performing electron acceptors in organic photovoltaic devices, is measured by lowtemperature photoelectron spectroscopy for the first time. The obtained value of 2.63(1) eV is only ca. 0.05 eV lower than that of C60 (2.68(1) eV), compared to a 0.09 V difference in their E1/2 values measured in this work by cyclic voltammetry. Literature E(LUMO) values for PCBM that are typically estimated from cyclic voltammetry, and commonly used as a quantitative measure of acceptor properties, are dispersed over a wide range between -4.3 and -3.62 eV; the reasons for such a huge discrepancy are analyzed here, and the protocol for reliable and consistent estimations of relative fullerene-based acceptor strength in solution is proposed.

  8. Antidepressant-like effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor, sodium butyrate, in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Frederick A; Lin, Cong Lily; Crusio, Wim E; Akbarian, Schahram

    2007-07-01

    Chromatin remodeling, including changes in histone acetylation, might play a role in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. We investigated whether the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate (SB) administered as single drug or in combination with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine exerts antidepressant-like effects in mice. Mice (C57BL/6J) received injections of SB, fluoxetine, or a combination of both drugs either acutely or chronically for a period of 28 days and were subjected to a battery of tests to measure anxiety and behavioral despair. Histone acetylation and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were monitored in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Co-treatment with SB and fluoxetine resulted in a significant 20%-40% decrease in immobility scores in the tail suspension test (TST), a measure for behavioral despair, both acutely and chronically. In contrast, decreased immobility after single drug regimens was limited either to the acute (fluoxetine) or chronic (SB) paradigm. Systemic injection of SB induced short-lasting histone hyperacetylation in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Among the four treatment paradigms that resulted in improved immobility scores in the TST, three were associated with a transient, at least 50% increase in BDNF transcript in frontal cortex, whereas changes in hippocampus were less consistent. The histone deacetylase inhibitor SB exerts antidepressant-like effects in the mouse. The therapeutic benefits and molecular actions of histone modifying drugs, including co-treatment with SSRIs and other newer generation antidepressant medications, warrant further exploration in experimental models.

  9. Butyric acid released during milk lipolysis triggers biofilm formation of Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Pasvolsky, Ronit; Zakin, Varda; Ostrova, Ievgeniia; Shemesh, Moshe

    2014-07-02

    Bacillus species form biofilms within milking pipelines and on surfaces of equipment in the dairy industry which represent a continuous hygiene problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Although much is known about the mechanism by which the model organism Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms in laboratory mediums in vitro, little is known of how these biofilms are formed in natural environments such as milk. Besides, little is known of the signaling pathways leading to biofilm formation in other Bacillus species, such as Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis, both of which are known to contaminate milk. In this study, we report that milk triggers the formation of biofilm-related structures, termed bundles. We show this to be a conserved phenomenon among all Bacillus members tested. Moreover, we demonstrate that the tasA gene, which encodes a major portion of the matrix which holds the biofilm together, is vital for this process. Furthermore, we show that the free fatty acid (FFA) - butyric acid (BA), which is released during lipolysis of milk fat and demonstrates antimicrobial activity, is the potent trigger for biofilm bundle formation. We finally show that BA-triggered biofilm bundle formation is mediated by the histidine kinase, KinD. Taken together, these observations indicate that BA, which is a major FFA within milk triggers biofilm formation in a conserved mechanism among members of the Bacillus genus.

  10. Performance evaluation of biofilters and biotrickling filters in odor control of n-butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Han, Zhiying; Wu, Weixiang; Shi, Dezhi; Chen, Yingxu; Li, Wenhong

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid development of swine production in China, odor pollution associated with piggery facilities has become an increasing environmental concern. N-butyric acid (n-BA) is one of the key odor compounds selected to represent volatile fatty acids (VFAs) found in piggery facilities. In this study, two biofilters (BFs) packed with compost (BFC) or sludge (BFS) and two biotrickling filters (BTFs) packed with pall rings (BTFP) or multidimensional hollow balls (BTFM), respectively, were compared with regard to their performances in the removal of n-BA. The non-biological removal capacities of packing material of the bioreactors on a per unit volume basis were BFS>BFC>BTFM>BTFP. Maximum biological removal capacities per unit volume of packing material of the bioreactors all exceeded 9.1 kg/m(3)·d and in the order of BFC>BTFM>BFS>BTFP. Kinetic analysis as well as overall evaluation by radar graphs showed that the BTFs achieved superior removal rates to the BFs in the order of BTFM>BTFP>BFC>BFS. The biotrickling filter packed with multidimensional hollow balls could be an effective technology for VFAs removal. Results from this research provide economical and effective alternatives for odor control in piggery facilities.

  11. Effects of sodium butyrate on aversive memory in rats submitted to sepsis.

    PubMed

    Steckert, Amanda V; Comim, Clarissa M; Igna, Dhébora M Dall; Dominguini, Diogo; Mendonça, Bruna P; Ornell, Felipe; Colpo, Gabriela D; Gubert, Carolina; Kapczinski, Flávio; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2015-05-19

    Epigenetic mechanisms are involved in normal behavior and are implicated in several brain neurodegenerative conditions, psychiatric and inflammatory diseases as well. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that sepsis lead to an imbalance in acetylation of histones and that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) can reverse this condition. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of a microinjection of sodium butyrate (SB, HDACi) into cerebral ventricle on aversive memory in rats submitted to the sepsis. Rats were given a single intraventricular injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) or SB and immediately after the stereotaxic surgery and the drug infusion, the animals were subjected to cecal ligation and perforation (CLP). The animals were killed twenty four hours or ten days after sepsis induction and the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cortex were obtained to the determination of histone deacetylase activity. In a separate cohort of animals 10 days after sepsis induction, it was performed the inhibitory avoidance task. SB administration was able to reverse the impairment in aversive memory and inhibited the HDAC activity in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus 10 days after CLP. These support a role for an epigenetic mechanism in the long-term cognitive impairments observed in sepsis survivors animals.

  12. Preparation and characterization of nanoparticles of carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate containing acyclovir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Venkata Bharadwaz; Chopra, Maulick; Joseph, Emil; Mazumder, Sonal

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles of carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate complexed with the poorly soluble antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) were produced by precipitation process and the formulation process and properties of nanoparticles were investigated. Two different particle synthesis methods were explored—a conventional precipitation method and a rapid precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. The particles were processed by rotavap followed by freeze-drying. Particle diameters as measured by dynamic light scattering were dependent on the synthesis method used. The conventional precipitation method did not show desired particle size distribution, whereas particles prepared by the mixer showed well-defined particle size ~125-450 nm before and after freeze-drying, respectively, with narrow polydispersity indices. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed chemical stability and intactness of entrapped drug in the nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the drug was in amorphous state in the polymer matrix. ACV drug loading was around 10 wt%. The release studies showed increase in solution concentration of drug from the nanoparticles compared to the as-received crystalline drug.

  13. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-06-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype. Furthermore, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1/1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1/1 genotype was 67 and 62% among the white population compared with 9 and 24% among the East Asian population.

  14. Butyrate activates the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 expression in breast cancer cells and enhances the antitumor activity of 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Odília; Preto, Ana; Pacheco, António; Pinheiro, Céline; Azevedo-Silva, João; Moreira, Roxana; Pedro, Madalena; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Baltazar, Fátima; Casal, Margarida

    2012-02-01

    Most malignant tumors exhibit the Warburg effect, which consists in increased glycolysis rates with production of lactate, even in the presence of oxygen. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), maintain these glycolytic rates, by mediating the influx and/or efflux of lactate and are overexpressed in several cancer cell types. The lactate and pyruvate analogue 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an inhibitor of the energy metabolism, which has been proposed as a specific antitumor agent. In the present study, we aimed at determining the effect of 3-BP in breast cancer cells and evaluated the putative role of MCTs on this effect. Our results showed that the three breast cancer cell lines used presented different sensitivities to 3-BP: ZR-75-1 ER (+)>MCF-7 ER (+)>SK-BR-3 ER (-). We also demonstrated that 3-BP reduced lactate production, induced cell morphological alterations and increased apoptosis. The effect of 3-BP appears to be cytotoxic rather than cytostatic, as a continued decrease in cell viability was observed after removal of 3-BP. We showed that pre-incubation with butyrate enhanced significantly 3-BP cytotoxicity, especially in the most resistant breast cancer cell line, SK-BR-3. We observed that butyrate treatment induced localization of MCT1 in the plasma membrane as well as overexpression of MCT4 and its chaperone CD147. Our results thus indicate that butyrate pre-treatment potentiates the effect of 3-BP, most probably by increasing the rates of 3-BP transport through MCT1/4. This study supports the potential use of butyrate as adjuvant of 3-BP in the treatment of breast cancer resistant cells, namely ER (-).

  15. Contribution of C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes in association with C. tyrobutyricum to the butyric fermentation in Emmental type cheese.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, Anne-Gaëlle; Doré, Joël; Carlier, Jean-Philippe; Chamba, Jean-François; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Tholozan, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-25

    The relationship between C. tyrobutyricum, C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii in experimental cheese conditions, and their influences on late-blowing and butyric fermentation, have been investigated. A molecular approach using a PCR-TTGE method in combination with conventional methods, such as microbiological and physico-chemical analysis, was performed to monitor the evolution of these clostridial species, simultaneously with the occurrence of cheese defects. Sixteen Emmental type cheeses were produced from milk inoculated with different clostridial spore associations. In all cheeses inoculated with C. tyrobutyricum, obvious signs of late blowing were detected. In cheeses inoculated with C. beijerinckii or C. sporogenes, a formation of holes in cheese body was observed, with a concomitant slight amount of butyric acid production. Even though C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes were less metabolically active and less numerically important than C. tyrobutyricum in cheese as shown by TTGE profiles, the association of these species to C. tyrobutyricum enhanced the butyric fermentation and the cheese defects. The level of butyric content in ripened cheese increased to 268 mg 100 g(-1) in presence of C. tyrobutyricum, and reached a maximum of 414 mg 100 g(-1) in presence of the C. beijerinckii-C. tyrobutyricum (1:10) association. The propionic fermentation was also higher in cheese inoculated with C. tyrobutyricum, and was slowed down in presence of C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes. From 30 days of ripening, a strong correlation between the chemical contents and the intensity of cheese defects was demonstrated. A chemical analysis of cheese associated with a molecular method for microbial spoilage investigation allows the prediction of the level of late blowing at early stages of ripening, and the understanding of the origin of the defect.

  16. Modulation of microRNAs expression in hematopoietic stem cells treated with sodium butyrate in inducing fetal hemoglobin expression.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, Behnoosh; Abrishami, Fatemeh; Alizadeh, Shaban; Minayi, Neda; Mohammadian, Mozhdeh; Soleimani, Masoud; Dehghanifard, Ali; Atwan, Hossein; Ajami, Monireh; Ajami, Mansoureh

    2017-02-01

    Context Inherited hemoglobin diseases are the most common single-gene disorders. Induction of fetal hemoglobin in beta hemoglobin disorders compensate for abnormal chain and ameliorate the clinical complications. Sodium butyrate is used conventionally for fetal hemoglobin induction; it can be replaced by safer therapeutic tools like microRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that control number of epigenetic mechanisms. Objective In this study, we compared the changes in the microRNAs of differentiated erythroid cells between control and sodium butyrate treated groups. The objective is to find significant association between these changes and gamma chain up regulation. Materials and methods First, CD133(+ ) hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from cord blood by magnetic cell sorting (MACS) technique. After proliferation, the cells were differentiated to erythroid lineage in culture medium by EPO, SCF, and IL3. Meanwhile, the test group was treated with sodium butyrate. Then, gamma chain upregulation was verified by qPCR technique. Finally, microRNA profiling was performed through microarray assay and some of them confirmed by qPCR. Result Results demonstrated that gamma chain was 5.9-fold upregulated in the treated group. Significant changes were observed at 76 microRNAs, in which 20 were up-regulated and 56 were down-regulated. Discussion Five of these microRNAs including U101, hsa-miR-4726-5p, hsa-miR7109 5p, hsa-miR3663, and hsa-miR940 had significant changes in expression and volume. Conclusion In conclusion, it can be assumed that sodium butyrate can up-regulate gamma chain gene, and change miRNAs expression. These results can be profitable in future studies to find therapeutic goal suitable for such disorders.

  17. Alcohol effects on synaptic transmission in periaqueductal gray dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chia; McCall, Nora M.; Lopez, Alberto J.; Kash, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    The role of dopamine (DA) signaling in regulating the rewarding properties of drugs, including alcohol, has been widely studied. The majority of these studies, however, have focused on the DA neurons located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and their projections to the nucleus accumbens. DA neurons within the ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) have been shown to regulate reward but little is known about the functional properties of these neurons, or how they are modified by drugs of abuse. This lack of knowledge is likely due to the highly heterogeneous cell composition of the vPAG, with both γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) and glutamate neurons present in addition to DA neurons. In this study, we performed whole-cell recordings in a TH–eGFP transgenic mouse line to evaluate the properties of vPAG-DA neurons. Following this initial characterization, we examined how both acute and chronic alcohol exposure modify synaptic transmission onto vPAG-DA neurons. We found minimal effects of acute alcohol exposure on GABA transmission, but a robust enhancement of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in vPAG-DA. Consistent with this effect on excitatory transmission, we also found that alcohol caused an increase in firing rate. These data were in contrast to the effects of chronic intermittent alcohol exposure, which had no significant impact on either inhibitory or excitatory synaptic transmission on the vPAG-DA neurons. These data add to a growing body of literature that points to alcohol having both region-dependent and cell-type dependent effects on function. PMID:23597415

  18. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits.

  19. Experimental and Pathalogical study of Pistacia atlantica, butyrate, Lactobacillus casei and their combination on rat ulcerative colitis model.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Mahdi; Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Maqbool, Faheem; Baeeri, Maryam; Memariani, Zahra; Pousti, Iraj; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Pistacia atlantica (P. atlantica), butyrate, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and especially their combination therapy on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis model. Rats were divided into seven groups. Four groups received oral P. atlantica, butyrate, L. casei and the combination of three agents for 10 consecutive days. The remaining groups were negative and positive controls and a sham group. Macroscopic and histopathological examinations were carried out along with determination of the specific biomarker of colonic oxidative stress, the myeloperoxidase (MPO). Compared with controls, the combination therapy exhibited a significant alleviation of colitis in terms of pathological scores and reduction of MPO activity (55%, p=0.0009). Meanwhile, the macroscopic appearance such as stool consistency, tissue and histopathological scores (edema, necrosis and neutrophil infiltration) were improved. Although single therapy by each P. atlantica, butyrate, and L. casei was partially beneficial in reduction of colon oxidative stress markers, the combination therapy was much more effective. In conclusion, the combination therapy was able to reduce the severity of colitis that is clear from biochemical markers. Future studies have to focus on clinical effects of this combination in management of human ulcerative colitis. Further molecular and signaling pathway studies will help to understand the mechanisms involved in the treatment of colitis and inflammatory diseases.

  20. Influence of Butyrate Loaded Clinoptilolite Dietary Supplementation on Growth Performance, Development of Intestine and Antioxidant Capacity in Broiler Chickens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanan; Zhou, Yanmin; Lu, Changhui; Ahmad, Hussain; Zhang, Hao; He, Jintian; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary butyrate loaded clinoptilolite (CLI-B) on growth performance, pancreatic digestive enzymes, intestinal development and histomorphology, as well as antioxidant capacity of serum and intestinal mucosal in chickens. Two hundred forty 1-day-old commercial Arbor Acres broilers were randomly assigned to 4 groups: CON group (fed basal diets), SB group (fed basal diet with 0.05% sodium butyrate), CLI group (fed basal diet with 1% clinoptilolite), and CLI-B group (fed basal diet with 1% CLI-B). The results showed that supplementation of CLI-B significantly decreased (P < 0.05) feed conservation ratio at both 21 and 42 days of age, improved the pancreatic digestive enzymes activities (P < 0.05), increased the villus length and villus/crypt ratio (P < 0.05), and decreased the crypt depth of intestine (P < 0.05) as compared to the other experimental groups. Furthermore, the CLI-B environment improved the antioxidant capacity by increasing the antioxidant enzyme activities (P < 0.05) in intestine mucosal, and decreasing the NO content and iNOS activity (P < 0.05) in serum. In addition, CLI-B supplementation had improved the development of intestine and antioxidant capacity of broilers than supplementation with either clinoptilolite or butyrate sodium alone. In conclusion, 1% CLI-B supplementation improved the health status, intestine development and antioxidant capacity in broiler chickens, thus appearing as an important feed additive for the poultry industry.

  1. Influence of Butyrate Loaded Clinoptilolite Dietary Supplementation on Growth Performance, Development of Intestine and Antioxidant Capacity in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanan; Zhou, Yanmin; Lu, Changhui; Ahmad, Hussain; Zhang, Hao; He, Jintian; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary butyrate loaded clinoptilolite (CLI-B) on growth performance, pancreatic digestive enzymes, intestinal development and histomorphology, as well as antioxidant capacity of serum and intestinal mucosal in chickens. Two hundred forty 1-day-old commercial Arbor Acres broilers were randomly assigned to 4 groups: CON group (fed basal diets), SB group (fed basal diet with 0.05% sodium butyrate), CLI group (fed basal diet with 1% clinoptilolite), and CLI-B group (fed basal diet with 1% CLI-B). The results showed that supplementation of CLI-B significantly decreased (P < 0.05) feed conservation ratio at both 21 and 42 days of age, improved the pancreatic digestive enzymes activities (P < 0.05), increased the villus length and villus/crypt ratio (P < 0.05), and decreased the crypt depth of intestine (P < 0.05) as compared to the other experimental groups. Furthermore, the CLI-B environment improved the antioxidant capacity by increasing the antioxidant enzyme activities (P < 0.05) in intestine mucosal, and decreasing the NO content and iNOS activity (P < 0.05) in serum. In addition, CLI-B supplementation had improved the development of intestine and antioxidant capacity of broilers than supplementation with either clinoptilolite or butyrate sodium alone. In conclusion, 1% CLI-B supplementation improved the health status, intestine development and antioxidant capacity in broiler chickens, thus appearing as an important feed additive for the poultry industry. PMID:27104860

  2. Subclinical Ketosis on Dairy Cows in Transition Period in Farms with Contrasting Butyric Acid Contents in Silages

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, María Luisa; Martínez-Fernández, Adela; Soldado, Ana; Argamentería, Alejandro; Peláez, Mario; de la Roza-Delgado, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between subclinical ketosis (SCK) in dairy cows and the butyric acid content of the silage used in their feeding. Twenty commercial farms were monitored over a period of 12 months. The feed at each farm and the silages used in its ration were sampled monthly for proximal analysis and for volatile fatty acid analysis. A total of 2857 urine samples were taken from 1112 cows to examine the ketonuria from about 30 days prepartum to 100 postpartum. Wide variation was recorded in the quality of silages used in the preparation of diets. Approximately 80% of the urine samples analyzed had no detectable ketone bodies, 16% returned values indicative of slight SCK, and the remainder, 4%, showed symptoms of ketosis. Most of the cases of hyperkenuria were associated with the butyric acid content of the silage used (r2 = 0.56; P < 0.05). As the metabolizable energy content of the feed was similar, no relationship was observed between the proportion of cows with SCK and the energy content of the feed. In our study, the probability of dairy cows suffering SCK is higher when they are eating feed made from silage with a high butyric acid content (35.2 g/kg DM intake). PMID:25525616

  3. Conductive Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Accelerate Syntrophic Methane Production from Butyrate Oxidation in Two Different Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianchao; Lu, Yahai

    2016-01-01

    Syntrophic methanogenesis is an essential link in the global carbon cycle and a key bioprocess for the disposal of organic waste and production of biogas. Recent studies suggest direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is involved in electron exchange in methanogenesis occurring in paddy soils, anaerobic digesters, and specific co-cultures with Geobacter. In this study, we evaluate the possible involvement of DIET in the syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in the enrichments from two lake sediments (an urban lake and a natural lake). The results showed that the production of CH4 was significantly accelerated in the presence of conductive nanoscale Fe3O4 or carbon nanotubes in the sediment enrichments. Observations made with fluorescence in situ hybridization and scanning electron microscope indicated that microbial aggregates were formed in the enrichments. It appeared that the average cell-to-cell distance in aggregates in nanomaterial-amended enrichments was larger than that in aggregates in the non-amended control. These results suggested that DIET-mediated syntrophic methanogenesis could occur in the lake sediments in the presence of conductive materials. Microbial community analysis of the enrichments revealed that the genera of Syntrophomonas, Sulfurospirillum, Methanosarcina, and Methanoregula were responsible for syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in lake sediment samples. The mechanism for the conductive-material-facilitated DIET in butyrate syntrophy deserves further investigation. PMID:27597850

  4. Subclinical ketosis on dairy cows in transition period in farms with contrasting butyric acid contents in silages.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Fernando; Rodríguez, María Luisa; Martínez-Fernández, Adela; Soldado, Ana; Argamentería, Alejandro; Peláez, Mario; de la Roza-Delgado, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between subclinical ketosis (SCK) in dairy cows and the butyric acid content of the silage used in their feeding. Twenty commercial farms were monitored over a period of 12 months. The feed at each farm and the silages used in its ration were sampled monthly for proximal analysis and for volatile fatty acid analysis. A total of 2857 urine samples were taken from 1112 cows to examine the ketonuria from about 30 days prepartum to 100 postpartum. Wide variation was recorded in the quality of silages used in the preparation of diets. Approximately 80% of the urine samples analyzed had no detectable ketone bodies, 16% returned values indicative of slight SCK, and the remainder, 4%, showed symptoms of ketosis. Most of the cases of hyperkenuria were associated with the butyric acid content of the silage used (r2=0.56; P<0.05). As the metabolizable energy content of the feed was similar, no relationship was observed between the proportion of cows with SCK and the energy content of the feed. In our study, the probability of dairy cows suffering SCK is higher when they are eating feed made from silage with a high butyric acid content (35.2 g/kg DM intake).

  5. Activation of the receptor (Gpr109a) for niacin and the commensal metabolite butyrate suppresses colonic inflammation and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra; Gurav, Ashish; Sivaprakasam, Sathish; Brady, Evan; Padia, Ravi; Shi, Huidong; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D.; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Munn, David H.; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Commensal gut microflora and dietary fiber protect against colonic inflammation and colon cancer through unknown targets. Butyrate, a bacterial product from fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon, has been implicated in this process. GPR109A (encoded by Niacr1) is a receptor for butyrate in the colon. GPR109A is also a receptor for niacin, which is also produced by gut microbiota and suppresses intestinal inflammation. Here we showed that Gpr109a signaling promoted anti-inflammatory properties in colonic macrophages and dendritic cells and enabled them to induce differentiation of Treg cells and IL-10-producing T cells. Moreover, Gpr109a was essential for butyrate-mediated induction of IL-18 in colonic epithelium. Consequently, Niacr1−/− mice were susceptible to development of colonic inflammation and colon cancer. Niacin, a pharmacological Gpr109a agonist, suppressed colitis and colon cancer in a Gpr109a-dependent manner. Thus, Gpr10a has an essential role in mediating the beneficial effects of gut microbiota and dietary fiber in colon. PMID:24412617

  6. Conductive Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Accelerate Syntrophic Methane Production from Butyrate Oxidation in Two Different Lake Sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianchao; Lu, Yahai

    2016-01-01

    Syntrophic methanogenesis is an essential link in the global carbon cycle and a key bioprocess for the disposal of organic waste and production of biogas. Recent studies suggest direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is involved in electron exchange in methanogenesis occurring in paddy soils, anaerobic digesters, and specific co-cultures with Geobacter. In this study, we evaluate the possible involvement of DIET in the syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in the enrichments from two lake sediments (an urban lake and a natural lake). The results showed that the production of CH4 was significantly accelerated in the presence of conductive nanoscale Fe3O4 or carbon nanotubes in the sediment enrichments. Observations made with fluorescence in situ hybridization and scanning electron microscope indicated that microbial aggregates were formed in the enrichments. It appeared that the average cell-to-cell distance in aggregates in nanomaterial-amended enrichments was larger than that in aggregates in the non-amended control. These results suggested that DIET-mediated syntrophic methanogenesis could occur in the lake sediments in the presence of conductive materials. Microbial community analysis of the enrichments revealed that the genera of Syntrophomonas, Sulfurospirillum, Methanosarcina, and Methanoregula were responsible for syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in lake sediment samples. The mechanism for the conductive-material-facilitated DIET in butyrate syntrophy deserves further investigation.

  7. Differential effects of adenovirus-p16 on bladder cancer cell lines can be overcome by the addition of butyrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, C T; Seol, J Y; Park, K H; Yoo, C G; Kim, Y W; Ahn, C; Song, Y W; Han, S K; Han, J S; Kim, S; Lee, J S; Shim, Y S

    2001-01-01

    High frequency of p16 alteration and high local recurrence rate of bladder cancer make this cancer an ideal target for p16 gene therapy. However, a low transduction rate of p16 via adenoviral vector causes an inconsistent result. In this study, we have tested adenovirus-p16 in several bladder cancer cell lines and investigated a way of improving the low transduction rate. Adenovirus-p16 showed a strong antitumor effect on bladder cancer cell lines (253J and T24) with strong Coxackie-adenoviral receptor (CAR) expression but little antitumor effect on bladder cancer cell lines (J82 and HT1376) with little CAR expression. In this study, we suggest a simple way of overcoming the differential effects of the adenovirus. The addition of butyrate to media was found to increase the transduction rate of adenovirus remarkably and increase the antitumor effect of adenovirus-p16 in bladder cancer cell lines with little CAR expression. Butyrate effects were related with increased CAR expression on the cell surface as well as increased transgene expression from adenoviral vector. From these observations, application of adenovirus-p16 gene therapy with butyrate can overcome the obstacle of low gene transfer and enhance the antitumor effect of adenovirus-p16 in bladder cancer.

  8. Impact of sodium butyrate on the network of adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins in human colon cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Katzenmaier, Eva-Maria; André, Sabine; Kopitz, Jürgen; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The physiological compound sodium butyrate can induce differentiation in colon cancer cells in vitro. Due to the role of galectins in growth control we explored its effect on this network beyond galectins-1 and -3, with deliberate consideration of the status of microsatellite stability, for nine cell lines. Microscopical monitoring and measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity ascertained butyrate's impact on cells. Monitoring by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting with galectin-type-specific probes characterized galectin expression. Controlled by expectable strong up-regulation of galectin-1 and comparatively small effects on galectin-3 regulation for galectins-4, -7, -8 and -9 were reported with no obvious association to microsatellite stability status. Neoexpression of the GAL-12 gene was observed in eight out of nine tested lines. Butyrate affects the galectin network beyond galectins-1 and -3, warranting further cell biological and histochemical studies. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Elevated propionate and butyrate in fecal ferments of hydrolysates generated by oxalic acid treatment of corn bran arabinoxylan.

    PubMed

    Rumpagaporn, Pinthip; Reuhs, Brad L; Cantu-Jungles, Thaisa M; Kaur, Amandeep; Patterson, John A; Keshavarzian, Ali; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2016-12-07

    Previous work in our laboratory showed that alkali-solubilized corn arabinoxylan (CAX) has a slow initial, but later complete, in vitro human fecal fermentation. CAX and a moderately high molecular weight hydrolysate (CH) were propiogenic, and produced low levels of butyrate. Here, we show that oxalic acid-generated hydrolysates from CAX, which include a large xylooligosaccharide, and free arabinose fractions, increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production, which included relatively high levels of both propionate and butyrate, an unusual SCFA combination. Hydrolytic degradation of CAX by acid hydrolysis (0.05 M oxalic acid at 100 °C for 2 h) and subsequent graded ethanol precipitations were used to obtain mixtures with different molecular weight ranges. Ethanol-precipitated fractions (F 0-65%, F 65-75%, F 75-85%) were mostly lower than 100 kDa and F > 85% was composed of monosaccharides and oligosaccharides of DP 2-8. Oxalic acid treatment caused the removal of all single arabinose unit branch chains and some di/trisaccharide branch chains, producing lightly substituted xylan backbone fragments, most of which were in the oligosaccharide (DP < 10) size range. In vitro human fecal fermentation analyses showed all oxalic acid-hydrolysate fractions were slower fermenting than fructooligosaccharides (FOS), but produced similar or higher amounts of total SCFAs. Butyrate production in two hydrolyzate fractions was double that of CH, while propionate levels remained relatively high.

  10. The biochemistry of alcohol and alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Palmer, T N

    1989-01-01

    The vast majority of the adult population of most societies consume alcohol to some degree. In the U.K., although average alcohol consumption is moderate, it is not generally appreciated that the per capita consumption varies markedly within the population: approximately one-twentieth of the adult population accounts for half of the total alcohol consumed. Alcohol abuse is consequently a major health problem affecting 1-1.5 million people in this country. The most obvious effects of excessive alcohol consumption are on the central nervous system and on social behaviour. However, alcohol is metabolized predominantly in the liver and it can impair and impede the liver's capacity to metabolize other substances including nutrients, steroids, vitamins, and certain organic compounds foreign to the body (referred to as xenobiotics). It is possible therefore, from the biochemical perspective, to explain many of the effects of alcohol on the body on the basis of its interaction with essential liver metabolism. What remains obscure is the mechanism whereby chronic alcohol abuse leads to permanent damage to the liver and other organs. Recent research suggests that acetaldehyde (a metabolite of alcohol) may play a key role in this process.

  11. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  12. Alcohol and fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, E.R.

    1984-01-10

    Alcohol/water mixtures, such as those produced by fermentation of biomass material, are separated by extraction of alcohol with a solvent, comprising a higher aliphatic alcohol in major amount and an aliphatic hydrocarbon in minor amount, especially suited to such extraction and to subsequent removal. The solvent alcohol desirably has a branched chain, or the hydrocarbon an unsaturated bond, or both. Conventional distillation steps to concentrate alcohol and eliminate water are rendered unnecessary at a considerable reduction in heat energy requirement (usually met with fossil fuel). Optional addition of gasoline between the solvent extraction and solvent recovery steps not only aids the latter separation but produces alcohol already denatured for fuel use.

  13. Alcoholism and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Heine, M W

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of the reproductive capacities of both men and women in alcoholism is presented. A historical evaluation indicates a resurgence of interest in this area. The effect of chronic alcohol consumption on both male fertility and potency is reported in conjunction with alcohol-mediated effects on the female subject. Emphasis is placed on pharmacokinetics, metabolism and drinking behavior of the alcoholic female. The adverse actions of some therapeutic drugs and chronic alcohol consumption is discussed in relationship to fetal alcohol syndrome and the accompanied mental and somatic abnormalities.

  14. Na-H Exchanger Isoform-2 (NHE2) Mediates Butyrate-dependent Na+ Absorption in Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS)-induced Colitis*

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M.; Nanda Kumar, Navalpur S.; Tse, Chung M.; Binder, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) occurs primarily as a result of reduced Na+ absorption. Although colonic Na+ absorption is mediated by both epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC) and Na-H exchangers (NHE), inhibition of NHE-mediated Na+ absorption is the primary cause of diarrhea in UC. As there are conflicting observations reported on NHE expression in human UC, the present study was initiated to identify whether NHE isoforms (NHE2 and NHE3) expression is altered and how Na+ absorption is regulated in DSS-induced inflammation in rat colon, a model that has been used to study UC. Western blot analyses indicate that neither NHE2 nor NHE3 expression is altered in apical membranes of inflamed colon. Na+ fluxes measured in vitro under voltage clamp conditions in controls demonstrate that both HCO3−-dependent and butyrate-dependent Na+ absorption are inhibited by S3226 (NHE3-inhibitor), but not by HOE694 (NHE2-inhibitor) in normal animals. In contrast, in DSS-induced inflammation, butyrate-, but not HCO3−-dependent Na+ absorption is present and is inhibited by HOE694, but not by S3226. These observations indicate that in normal colon NHE3 mediates both HCO3−-dependent and butyrate-dependent Na+ absorption, whereas DSS-induced inflammation activates NHE2, which mediates butyrate-dependent (but not HCO3−-dependent) Na+ absorption. In in vivo loop studies HCO3−-Ringer and butyrate-Ringer exhibit similar rates of water absorption in normal rats, whereas in DSS-induced inflammation luminal butyrate-Ringer reversed water secretion observed with HCO3−-Ringer to fluid absorption. Lumen butyrate-Ringer incubation activated NHE3-mediated Na+ absorption in DSS-induced colitis. These observations suggest that the butyrate activation of NHE2 would be a potential target to control UC-associated diarrhea. PMID:26350456

  15. In vivo regulation of colonic cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and P27Kip1 by dietary fish oil and butyrate in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mee Young; Turner, Nancy D; Murphy, Mary E; Carroll, Raymond J; Chapkin, Robert S; Lupton, Joanne R

    2015-11-01

    We have shown that dietary fish oil is protective against experimentally induced colon cancer, and the protective effect is enhanced by coadministration of pectin. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that fish oil with butyrate, a pectin fermentation product, protects against colon cancer initiation by decreasing cell proliferation and increasing differentiation and apoptosis through a p27(Kip1)-mediated mechanism. Rats were provided diets of corn or fish oil, with/without butyrate, and terminated 12, 24, or 48 hours after azoxymethane (AOM) injection. Proliferation (Ki-67), differentiation (Dolichos Biflorus Agglutinin), apoptosis (TUNEL), and p27(Kip1) (cell-cycle mediator) were measured in the same cell within crypts in order to examine the coordination of cell cycle as a function of diet. DNA damage (N(7)-methylguanine) was determined by quantitative IHC analysis. Dietary fish oil decreased DNA damage by 19% (P = 0.001) and proliferation by 50% (P = 0.003) and increased differentiation by 56% (P = 0.039) compared with corn oil. When combined with butyrate, fish oil enhanced apoptosis 24 hours after AOM injection compared with a corn oil/butyrate diet (P = 0.039). There was an inverse relationship between crypt height and apoptosis in the fish oil/butyrate group (r = -0.53, P = 0.040). The corn oil/butyrate group showed a positive correlation between p27(Kip1) expression and proliferation (r = 0.61, P = 0.035). These results indicate the in vivo effect of butyrate on apoptosis and proliferation is dependent on dietary lipid source. These results demonstrate the presence of an early coordinated colonocyte response by which fish oil and butyrate protects against colon tumorigenesis. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. In Vivo Regulation of Colonic Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, Apoptosis and P27Kip1 by Dietary Fish Oil and Butyrate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mee Young; Turner, Nancy D.; Murphy, Mary E.; Carroll, Raymond J.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that dietary fish oil is protective against experimentally-induced colon cancer and the protective effect is enhanced by co-administration of pectin. However, the underlying mechanism(s) have not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that fish oil with butyrate, a pectin fermentation product, protects against colon cancer initiation by decreasing cell proliferation and increasing differentiation and apoptosis through a p27Kip1 mediated mechanism. Rats were provided diets of corn or fish oil, with/without butyrate, and terminated 12, 24 or 48 h post azoxymethane (AOM) injection. Proliferation (Ki-67), differentiation (Dolichos Biflorus Agglutinin), apoptosis (TUNEL) and p27Kip1 (cell cycle mediator) were measured in the same cell within crypts in order to examine the coordination of cell cycle as a function of diet. DNA damage (N7-methylguanine) was determined by quantitative immunohistochemical analysis. Dietary fish oil decreased DNA damage by 19% (P=0.001) and proliferation by 50% (P=0.003) and increased differentiation by 56% (P=0.039) compared to corn oil. When combined with butyrate, fish oil enhanced apoptosis 24 h post AOM injection compared to a corn oil/butyrate diet (P=0.039). There was an inverse relationship between crypt height and apoptosis in fish oil/butyrate group (r= −0.53, P=0.040). Corn oil/butyrate group showed a positive correlation between p27Kip1 expression and proliferation (r= 0.61, P=0.035). These results indicate the in vivo effect of butyrate on apoptosis and proliferation is dependent on dietary lipid source. These results demonstrate the presence of an early coordinated colonocyte response by which fish oil and butyrate protects against colon tumorigenesis. PMID:26323483

  17. Butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor, stimulates interplay between different posttranslational modifications of histone H3 and differently alters G1-specific cell cycle proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Omana P; Ranganna, Kasturi; Yatsu, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    HDACs and HATs regulate histone acetylation, an epigenetic modification that controls chromatin structure and through it, gene expression. Butyrate, a dietary HDAC inhibitor, inhibits VSMC proliferation, a crucial factor in atherogenesis, and the principle mechanism in arterial and in-stent restenosis. Here, the link between antiproliferation action of butyrate and the portraits of global covalent modifications of histone H3 that it induces are characterized to understand the mechanics of butyrate-arrested VSMC proliferation. Analysis of histone H3 modifications specific to butyrate arrested VSMC proliferation display induction of histone H3-Lysine9 acetylation, inhibition of histone H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, reduction of histone H3-Lysine9 dimethylation and stimulation of histone H3-Lysine4 di-methylation, which is linked to transcriptional activation, cell cycle/mitosis, transcriptional suppression and activation, respectively. Conversely, untreated VSMCs exhibit inhibition of H3-Lysine9 acetylation, induction of H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, stimulation of H3-Lysine9 di-methylation and reduction in H3-Lysine4 di-methylation. Butyrate's cooperative effects on H3-Lysine9 acetylation and H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, and contrasting effects on di-methylation of H3-Lysine9 and H3-Lysine4 suggests that the interplay between these site-specific modifications cause distinct chromatin alterations that allow cyclin D1 and D3 induction, G1-specific cdk4, cdk6 and cdk2 downregulation, and upregulation of cdk inhibitors, p15INK4b and p21Cip1. Regardless of butyrate's effect on D-type cyclins, downregulation of G1-specific cdks and upregulation of cdk inhibitors by butyrate prevents cell cycle progression by failing to inactivate Rb. Overall, through chromatin remodeling, butyrate appears to differentially alter G1-specific cell cycle proteins to ensure proliferation arrest of VSMCs, a crucial cellular component of blood vessel wall.

  18. Cooperation between the bacterial-derived short-chain fatty acid butyrate and interleukin-22 detected in human Caco2 colon epithelial/carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Malte; Meissner, Carlotta; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mühl, Heiko

    2017-03-01

    By generating biologically active factors luminal microbiota shape the intestinal micro-milieu thereby regulating pathological processes such as inflammation and carcinogenesis. Preclinical data suggest that bacterial-derived butyrate and the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 activating cytokine interleukin (IL)-22 display concordant protective properties at the inflamed colonic epithelium. Herein, biochemical cooperation between the short-chain fatty acid butyrate and IL-22 was investigated by focusing on human Caco2 colon epithelial/carcinoma cells. We report that physiological levels of butyrate enhance IL-22 signaling thereby enforcing expression of the prototypic STAT3-downstrean target genes α1-antichymotrypsin and suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3. A dual mode of butyrate action on the IL-22/STAT3 axis was identified. Butyrate acted by upregulating IL-22R1, the decisive chain of the heterodimeric IL-22 receptor, and, independent from that, has the potential to directly amplify STAT3-mediated gene activation as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of STAT3 binding to the SOCS3 promoter. Since trichostatin A acted similarly, inhibition of histone deacetylases is likely at the root of these butyrate biological properties. The mutual benefit gained from interactions between the host and commensal intestinal bacteria-derived factors is an expanding field of research beginning to affect clinical practice. Data presented herein propose a supportive and fine-tuning role for butyrate in IL-22 signaling that might be therapeutically exploited by local butyrate administration or by increasing its bacterial production in the context of a fiber-rich diet. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(2):283-292, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Blockade of dendritic cell development by bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate through a transporter (Slc5a8)-dependent inhibition of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nagendra; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D; Martin, Pamela M; Lambert, Nevin A; Boettger, Thomas; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2010-09-03

    Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria, yet there is no undue inflammatory response by the host against these bacteria under normal conditions. The bacterial fermentation products acetate, propionate, and butyrate are believed, at least in part, to be responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells play an essential role in presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes and initiation of adaptive immune responses. Here we report that butyrate and propionate block the generation of dendritic cells from bone marrow stem cells, without affecting the generation of granulocytes. This effect is dependent on the Na(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporter Slc5a8, which transports butyrate and propionate into cells, and on the ability of these two bacterial metabolites to inhibit histone deacetylases. Acetate, which is also a substrate for Slc5a8 but not an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, does not affect dendritic cell development, indicating the essential role of histone deacetylase inhibition in the process. The blockade of dendritic cell development by butyrate and propionate is associated with decreased expression of the transcription factors PU.1 and RelB. Butyrate also elicits its biologic effects through its ability to activate the G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr109a, but this mechanism is not involved in butyrate-induced blockade of dendritic cell development. The participation of Slc5a8 and the non-involvement of Gpr109a in butyrate effects have been substantiated using bone marrow cells obtained from Slc5a8(-/-) and Gpr109a(-/-) mice. These findings uncover an important mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory functions of the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate.

  20. Blockade of Dendritic Cell Development by Bacterial Fermentation Products Butyrate and Propionate through a Transporter (Slc5a8)-dependent Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D.; Martin, Pamela M.; Lambert, Nevin A.; Boettger, Thomas; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria, yet there is no undue inflammatory response by the host against these bacteria under normal conditions. The bacterial fermentation products acetate, propionate, and butyrate are believed, at least in part, to be responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells play an essential role in presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes and initiation of adaptive immune responses. Here we report that butyrate and propionate block the generation of dendritic cells from bone marrow stem cells, without affecting the generation of granulocytes. This effect is dependent on the Na+-coupled monocarboxylate transporter Slc5a8, which transports butyrate and propionate into cells, and on the ability of these two bacterial metabolites to inhibit histone deacetylases. Acetate, which is also a substrate for Slc5a8 but not an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, does not affect dendritic cell development, indicating the essential role of histone deacetylase inhibition in the process. The blockade of dendritic cell development by butyrate and propionate is associated with decreased expression of the transcription factors PU.1 and RelB. Butyrate also elicits its biologic effects through its ability to activate the G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr109a, but this mechanism is not involved in butyrate-induced blockade of dendritic cell development. The participation of Slc5a8 and the non-involvement of Gpr109a in butyrate effects have been substantiated using bone marrow cells obtained from Slc5a8−/− and Gpr109a−/− mice. These findings uncover an important mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory functions of the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate. PMID:20601425

  1. An Sp1 response element in the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 50 promoter mediates lytic cycle induction by butyrate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjiang; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can be driven into the lytic cycle in vitro by phorbol esters and sodium butyrate. This report begins to analyze the process by which butyrate activates the promoter of KSHV open reading frame 50 (ORF50), the key viral regulator of the KSHV latency to lytic cycle switch. A short fragment of the promoter, 134 nucleotides upstream of the translational start of ORF50, retained basal uninduced activity and conferred maximal responsiveness to sodium butyrate. The butyrate response element was mapped to a consensus Sp1-binding site. By means of electrophoretic mobility shift assays, both Sp1 and Sp3 were shown to form complexes in vitro with the ORF50 promoter at the Sp1 site. Butyrate induced the formation of a group of novel complexes, including several Sp3-containing complexes, one Sp1-containing complex, and several other complexes that were not identified with antibodies to Sp1 or Sp3. Formation of all butyrate-induced DNA-protein complexes was mediated by the consensus Sp1 site. In insect and mammalian cell lines, Sp1 significantly activated the ORF50 promoter linked to luciferase. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a PEL cell line showed that butyrate induced Sp1, CBP, and p300 binding to the ORF50 promoter in vivo in an on-off manner. The results suggest that induction of the KSHV lytic cycle by butyrate is mediated through interactions at the Sp1/Sp3 site located 103 to 112 nucleotides upstream of the translational initiation of ORF50 presumably by enhancing the binding of Sp1 to this site.

  2. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Alcohol Use Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . FASD Homepage Facts Secondary Conditions Videos Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Questions & Answers Quiz Alcohol Screening & Brief Intervention Diagnosis Treatments Data & Statistics Alcohol Consumption Rates Research & Tracking Monitoring Alcohol ...

  3. Effects of seasonal changes in food quality and food intake on the transport of sodium and butyrate across ruminal epithelium of reindeer.

    PubMed

    Storeheier, P V; Sehested, J; Diernaes, L; Sundset, M A; Mathiesen, S D

    2003-07-01

    Transport of 22Na and 14C-butyrate across the ruminal epithelium of captive reindeer fed a concentrate diet in summer (n=5) and in winter (n=5) and from free-ranging reindeer taken from summer (n=3) and winter pasture (n=5) was measured in vitro in Ussing chambers. Significant amounts of both Na+ and butyrate were transported across the isolated epithelium without any external driving force. The ruminal transport of Na+ and butyrate were interacting, as evidenced by both the observed amiloride-induced reduction of net butyrate-transport and by the positive correlation between net transport of butyrate and Na+. Amiloride also reduced the net transport of Na+ without significantly affecting the short-circuit current, indicating the presence of an apical Na+/H+ exchanger in the ruminal epithelium of reindeer. The captive reindeer increased the dry matter intake of a constant quality concentrate from winter to summer, but this neither affected their ruminal transport capacity nor their ruminal surface enlargement factor (SEF). Free-ranging reindeer increased their ruminal transport capacity for Na+ and butyrate from summer to winter but simultaneously reduced their ruminal SEF. The present data indicate that this food-induced increase in transport capacity was attributed to changes in the nutrient composition of the diet.

  4. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Pretranslational regulation of ectopic hCG alpha production in ChaGo lung cancer cells by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Nagelberg, S B; Burnside, J; Maniatis, A; Lippman, S S; Weintraub, B D

    1985-12-31

    Ectopic production of hCG and its free alpha subunit by ChaGo lung cancer cells is stimulated by sodium butyrate. To investigate pretranslational regulation in this system, we examined the response of the hCG alpha and beta subunit mRNAs in ChaGo-K1 cells, a clone that produces free hCG alpha but no hCG or hCG beta in the basal state. When a Northern blot of total RNA from ChaGo cells was hybridized to a [32P]- labeled hCG alpha cDNA probe, a single band was detected that was identical in size (approximately 850 bases) to placental hCG alpha mRNA. RNA from butyrate-stimulated (5 mM, 24 h) ChaGo cells contained 7.7 times as much hCG alpha mRNA as RNA from control ChaGo cells. This increase appeared to be relatively selective since no difference in total polyA-containing mRNA levels was detected between butyrate-treated and control cells by [32P]oligo(dT) hybridization. In addition, no hCG beta mRNA was detected when Northern and dot blots were hybridized to an hCG beta cDNA probe. In a time course experiment, hCG alpha mRNA accumulation in butyrate-treated cells increased significantly by 8 h with a maximum increase of 6.1-fold at 24 h compared to control values. Major differences in immunoactive hCG alpha accumulation were not apparent, however, until after 24 h. These studies show that stimulation of ChaGo hCG alpha production by butyrate can be completely accounted for by pretranslational events and that failure to detect hCG or free hCG beta production by these cells is not due to poorly translatable RNA or post-translational protein degradation. Thus, exclusive ectopic production of only one of the hCG subunits is likely to be due to selective genomic expression.

  6. Effect of feeding sodium butyrate in the late finishing period on Salmonella carriage, seroprevalence, and growth of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Walia, Kavita; Argüello, Hector; Lynch, Helen; Leonard, Finola C; Grant, Jim; Yearsley, Dermot; Kelly, Sinead; Duffy, Geraldine; Gardiner, Gillian E; Lawlor, Peadar G

    2016-09-01

    Pork is an important source of human salmonellosis and low-cost on-farm control measures may provide a useful element in reducing the prevalence of this pathogen in food. This study investigated the effectiveness of dietary supplementation with sodium butyrate administered to finisher pigs for ∼4-weeks prior to slaughter to control Salmonella shedding on highly contaminated farms. Two trials (A and B) were conducted on two commercial pig farms, which had a history of high Salmonella seroprevalence. In both trials, pens (14 pens of 12 pigs/pen in Trial A and 12 pens of 12-17 pigs/pen in Trial B) were randomly assigned to a control (finisher feed without additive) or a treatment group (the same feed with 3kg sodium butyrate/t) for 24-28days, depending on the trial. Faeces were collected from each pig on days 0, 12 and 24/28, and blood, caecal digesta and ileocaecal/mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from the slaughterhouse. Pigs were weighed at the start and end of the trials, feed intake was recorded, and carcass quality parameters were recorded at slaughter. In Trial A, Salmonella shedding was reduced in the treatment compared to the control group at the end of the trial (30% versus 57% probability of detecting Salmonella in faeces, respectively; p<0.001). This reflected the serology results, with detection of a lower seroprevalence in the treatment compared to the control group using the 20% optical density cut-off (69.5% versus 89%; p=0.001). However, no effect on faecal shedding or seroprevalance was observed in Trial B, which may be explained by the detection of a concomitant infection with Lawsonia intracellularis. No significant differences in Salmonella recovery rates were observed in the caecal digesta or lymph nodes in either trial. Furthermore, feed intake, weight gain, and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) did not differ between groups (p>0.05) in either trial. Numerical improvements in weight gain and FCE were found with sodium butyrate treatment

  7. An orally administered butyrate-releasing derivative reduces neutrophil recruitment and inflammation in dextran sulphate sodium-induced murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Simeoli, Raffaele; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Pirozzi, Claudio; Lama, Adriano; Santoro, Anna; Russo, Roberto; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Berni Canani, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Perretti, Mauro; Meli, Rosaria

    2017-06-01

    Butyrate has shown benefits in inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it is not often administered orally because of its rancid smell and unpleasant taste. The efficacy of a more palatable butyrate-releasing derivative, N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenylethyl) butyramide (FBA), was evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). Male 10 week-old BALB/c mice received DSS (2.5%) in drinking water (for 5 days) followed by DSS-free water for 7 days (DSS group). Oral FBA administration (42.5 mg·kg(-1) ) was started 7 days before DSS as preventive (P-FBA), or 2 days after DSS as therapeutic (T-FBA); both treatments lasted 19 days. One DSS-untreated group received only tap water (CON). FBA treatments reduced colitis symptoms and colon damage. P-FBA and T-FBA significantly decreased polymorphonuclear cell infiltration score compared with the DSS group. FBA reversed the imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (reducing inducible NOS protein expression, CCL2 and IL-6 transcripts in colon and increasing TGFβ and IL-10). Morever, P-FBA and T-FBA limited neutrophil recruitment (by expression and localization of the neutrophil granule protease Ly-6G), restored deficiency of the butyrate transporter and improved intestinal epithelial integrity, preventing tight-junction impairment (zonulin-1 and occludin). FBA, similar to its parental compound sodium butyrate, inhibited histone deacetylase-9 and restored H3 histone acetylation, exerting an anti-inflammatory effect through NF-κB inhibition and the up-regulation of PPARγ. FBA reduces inflammatory intestinal damage in mice indicating its potential as a postbiotic derivative without the problems associated with the oral administration of sodium butyrate. This article is part of a themed section on Principles of Pharmacological Research of Nutraceuticals. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.11/issuetoc. © 2016 The British

  8. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  9. Translational Studies of Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Natalie M.; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2008-01-01

    Human studies are necessary to identify and classify the brain systems predisposing individuals to develop alcohol use disorders and those modified by alcohol, while animal models of alcoholism are essential for a mechanistic understanding of how chronic voluntary alcohol consumption becomes compulsive, how brain systems become damaged, and how damage resolves. Our current knowledge of the neuroscience of alcohol dependence has evolved from the interchange of information gathered from both human alcoholics and animal models of alcoholism. Together, studies in humans and animal models have provided support for the involvement of specific brain structures over the course of alcohol addiction, including the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus, and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. PMID:20041042

  10. Overview of Alcohol Consumption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA Journal Alcohol Alert Bulletin Professional Education Materials Classroom Resources Presentations & Videocasts Video Bank Publicaciones en Español ...

  11. Alcohol Use Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA Journal Alcohol Alert Bulletin Professional Education Materials Classroom Resources Presentations & Videocasts Video Bank Publicaciones en Español ...

  12. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA Journal Alcohol Alert Bulletin Professional Education Materials Classroom Resources Presentations & Videocasts Video Bank Publicaciones en Español ...

  13. Alcohol use disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychology, such as being impulsive or having low self-esteem Drinking an excessive amount of alcohol can put ... or schizophrenia Can easily obtain alcohol Have low self-esteem Have problems with relationships Live a stressful lifestyle ...

  14. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chafetz, Morris E.

    1979-01-01

    It is estimated that 29 million American children have alcoholic parents. The author documents the unstable environment and psychological consequences suffered by these children, who are at great risk to become alcoholics themselves. (Editor)

  15. Alcohol Use Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers Mental Health Medical Library Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Instructions The following questions are a screening ... is also text-only version . Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  16. Epidemiology of Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helzer, John E.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the application of epidemiology to alcoholism. Discusses measurement and diagnostic issues and reviews studies of the prevalence of alcoholism, its risk factors, and the contributions of epidemiology to our knowledge of treatment and prevention. (Author/KS)

  17. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and hard alcohol calories you are consuming. Simply ... calories) Average Drinks Per Week Monthly Subtotal Calories Beer Regular 12 149 Regular Beer Light 12 110 ...

  18. Women and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Women and Alcohol Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Women react differently than men to alcohol and face higher risks from it. Pound for ...

  19. Myths about drinking alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000856.htm Myths about drinking alcohol To use the sharing features on this page, ... We know much more about the effects of alcohol today than in the past. Yet, myths remain ...

  20. Benzyl Alcohol Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Benzyl alcohol lotion is used to treat head lice (small insects that attach themselves to the skin) in adults ... children less than 6 months of age. Benzyl alcohol is in a class of medications called pediculicides. ...

  1. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Daily life skills, such as feeding and bathing Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, including wide-set and narrow ...

  2. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... resources for information on alcoholism: Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon Family Groups -- www.al-anon. ... exposures to the fetus. In: Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  3. Antidepressants and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... depressive disorder) Why is it bad to mix antidepressants and alcohol? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. It's best to avoid combining antidepressants and alcohol. It may worsen your symptoms, and ...

  4. Alcohol - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Alcohol URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/alcohol.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  5. Alcohol advertising and alcohol consumption by adolescents.

    PubMed

    Saffer, Henry; Dave, Dhaval

    2006-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of alcohol advertising on adolescent alcohol consumption. The theory of an industry response function and evidence from prior studies indicate the importance of maximizing the variance in advertising measures. Monitoring the Future (MTF) and National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) data are augmented with alcohol advertising, originating on the market level, for five media. The large sample of the MTF allows estimation of race and gender-specific models. The longitudinal nature of the NLSY97 allows controls for unobserved heterogeneity with state-level and individual fixed effects. Price and advertising effects are generally larger for females relative to males. Controls for individual heterogeneity yield larger advertising effects, implying that the MTF results may understate the effects of alcohol advertising. Results from the NLSY97 suggest that a 28% reduction in alcohol advertising would reduce adolescent monthly alcohol participation from 25% to between 24 and 21%. For binge participation, the reduction would be from 12% to between 11 and 8%. The past month price-participation elasticity is estimated at -0.26, consistent with prior studies. The results show that reduction of alcohol advertising can produce a modest decline in adolescent alcohol consumption, though effects may vary by race and gender.

  6. Distillation for alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, T.; Sawai, K.

    1983-02-22

    A new distillation equipment for alcohol which consists mainly of a brief concentrating column a, a concentrating column b, a compressor C to compress alcohol vapor generated in column B and water evaporator D heated by the compressed alcohol vapor is developed and this especially fits for a distillation source of a glue like solution obtained by alcohol fermentation because steam generated in the water evaporator D is directly blown into the solution in the concentrating column A.

  7. Alcohol and fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, E.R.

    1981-12-22

    Alcohol/water mixtures, such as those produced by fermentation of biomass material, are separated by extraction of alcohol with a solvent especially suited to such extraction and to subsequent removal. Conventional distillation steps to concentrate alcohol and eliminate water are rendered unnecessary at a considerable reduction in heat energy requirement (Usually met with fossil fuel). Addition of gasoline between the solvent extraction and solvent recovery steps not only aids the latter separation but produces alcohol already denatured for fuel use.

  8. Inhibition of NLRP3 Inflammasome Pathway by Butyrate Improves Corneal Wound Healing in Corneal Alkali Burn

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Fang; Xiao, Yangyan; Zaheer, Mahira; Volpe, Eugene A.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial cells are involved in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to different stresses. The purpose of this study was to investigate if alkali-injured corneal epithelia activate innate immunity through the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD)-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway. A unilateral alkali burn (AB) was created in the central cornea of C57BL/6 mice. Mice received either no topical treatment or topical treatment with sodium butyrate (NaB), β-hydroxybutyric acid (HBA), dexamethasone (Dex), or vehicle (balanced salt solution, BSS) quater in die (QID) for two or five days (d). We evaluated the expression of inflammasome components including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), and caspase-1, as well as the downstream cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. We found elevation of NLRP3 and IL-1β messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, as well as levels of inflammasome component proteins in the alkali-injured corneas compared to naïve corneas. Treatment with NLRP3 inhibitors using NaB and HBA preserved corneal clarity and decreased NLRP3, caspase-1, and IL-1β mRNA transcripts, as well as NLRP3 protein expression on post-injury compared to BSS-treated corneas. These findings identified a novel innate immune signaling pathway activated by AB. Blocking the NLRP3 pathway in AB mouse model decreases inflammation, resulting in greater corneal clarity. These results provide a mechanistic basis for optimizing therapeutic intervention in alkali injured eyes. PMID:28273882

  9. Effects of butyric acid and arsenic on isolated pancreatic islets and liver mitochondria of male mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Rezae, Mohsen; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Alboghobeish, Soheila; Zeinvand, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the different doses of Butyric acid (BA) and Arsenic (As) in liver mitochondria oxidative stress and pancreatic islet insulin secretion of male mouse. Background: BA is found in many foods and As as a toxic metal is present in drinking water. They can induce oxidative stress in tissues. Methods: In this experimental study, Liver mitochondria were isolated by administration of the different centrifugation method and pancreatic islets were isolated by collagenase method. Mitochondria were incubated by BA (35, 75, 150, 300 μM) and As (20, 50, 100, 200 μM) as the islets were incubated by BA (250, 500, 1000, 1500 μM) and As (50, 100, 200 μM) for 1 hour. At the end of the experiment, mitochondrial viability and membrane potential, ROS, MDA, GSH and islets insulin secretion were measured by their specific methods. Results: BA and As administration increased mitochondrial levels of ROS, MDA and decreased GSH and pancreatic islet insulin secretion in a dose dependent manner (p<0.05). The doses of BA 75μM and As 100μM have been revealed the most mitochondria toxic concentrations. Also, the doses of 1000μM for BA and 100μM for As were considered as reducing concentrations for islets insulin secretion. Additionally, co administration of them intensified more these effects Conclusion: Alone or in combination administration of BA and As induced oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and decreased insulin secretion of pancreatic islets. PMID:28331564

  10. Cell-associated alpha-amylases of butyrate-producing Firmicute bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Alan G; Scott, Karen P; Martin, Jenny C; Rincon, Marco T; Flint, Harry J

    2006-11-01

    Selected butyrate-producing bacteria from the human colon that are related to Roseburia spp. and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens showed a good ability to utilize a variety of starches for growth when compared with the Gram-negative amylolytic anaerobe Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. A major cell-associated amylase of high molecular mass (140-210 kDa) was detected in each strain by SDS-PAGE zymogram analysis, and genes corresponding to these enzymes were analysed for two representative strains. Amy13B from But. fibrisolvens 16/4 is a multi-domain enzyme of 144.6 kDa that includes a family 13 glycoside hydrolase domain, and duplicated family 26 carbohydrate-binding modules. Amy13A (182.4 kDa), from Roseburia inulinivorans A2-194, also includes a family 13 domain, which is preceded by two repeat units of approximately 116 aa rich in aromatic residues, an isoamylase N-terminal domain, a pullulanase-associated domain, and an additional unidentified domain. Both Amy13A and Amy13B have N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal cell-wall sorting signals, including a modified LPXTG motif similar to that involved in interactions with the cell surface in other Gram-positive bacteria, a hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and a basic C terminus. The overexpressed family 13 domains showed an absolute requirement for Mg2+ or Ca2+ for activity, and functioned as 1,4-alpha-glucanohydrolases (alpha-amylases; EC 3.2.1.1). These major starch-degrading enzymes thus appear to be anchored to the cell wall in this important group of human gut bacteria.

  11. Epigenetically Reprogramming of Human Embryonic Stem Cells by 3-Deazaneplanocin A and Sodium Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Azghadi, Soheila; Clark, Amander T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Infertility affects about 6.1 million women aged 15-44 in the United States. The leading cause of infertility in women is quantitative and qualitative defects in human germ-cell development (these sentences are not mentioned in introduction so it is not correct to mention in abstract, you can omit). Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of developing blastocysts and have a broad clinical potential. hESCs have been classified into three classes based on their epigenetic state. The goal of this study was to epigenetically reprogram Class II and Class III cell lines to Class I (naïve state), and to in vitro differentiation of potent hESCs to primordial germ cells (PGCs). Methods: Recent evidence suggests that 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) is a global histone methylation inhibitor which selectively inhibits trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3K27, and it is an epigenetic therapeutic for cancer. The characteristics of DZNep lead us to hypothesize that it is a good candidate to epigenetically reprogram hESCs to the Class I. Additionally, we used sodium butyrate (NaBu) shown in previous studies to up-regulate the expression of germ cell specific markers (these sentences should be come in introduction). Results: We used these two drugs to produce epigenetically stable hESC lines. hESC lines are an appropriate system for disease modeling and understanding developmental stages, therefore producing stable stem cell lines may have an outstanding impact in different research fields such as preventive medicine. Conclusions: X-Chromosome inactivation has been used as a tool to follow the reprogramming process. We have used immunostaining and western blot as methods to follow this reprogramming qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:21603011

  12. Sodium butyrate induces DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fusion and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Dhanir; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Kale, Raosaheb K; Singh, Shivendra V; Singh, Rana P

    2014-05-01

    Sodium butyrate (NaBt) is the byproduct of anaerobic microbial fermentation inside the gastro-intestinal tract that could reach up to 20mM, and has been shown to inhibit the growth of various cancers. Herein, we evaluated its effect on mitochondrial fusion and associated induction of apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). NaBt treatment at physiological (1-5mM) concentrations for 12 and 24h decreased the cell viability and induced G2-M phase cell cycle arrest in HCT116 (12h) and SW480 human CRC cells. This cell cycle arrest was associated with mitochondria-mediated apoptosis accompanied by a decrease in survivin and Bcl-2 expression, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, NaBt treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the mitochondrial mass which is an indicator of mitochondrial fusion. Level of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), a key regulator of mitochondrial fission and fusion where its up-regulation correlates with fission, was found to be decreased in CRC cells. Further, at early treatment time, DRP1 down-regulation was noticed in mitochondria which later became drastically reduced in both mitochondria as well as cytosol. DRP1 is activated by cyclin B1-CDK1 complex by its ser616 phosphorylation in which both cyclin B1-CDK1 complex and phospho-DRP1 (ser616) were strongly reduced by NaBt treatment. DRP1 was observed to be regulated by apoptosis as pan-caspase inhibitor showing rescue from NaBt-induced apoptosis also caused the reversal of DRP1 to the normal level as in control proliferating cells. Together, these findings suggest that NaBt can modulate mitochondrial fission and fusion by regulating the level of DRP1 and induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human CRC cells.

  13. Rooting response of five pomegranate varieties to indole butyric acid concentration and cuttings age.

    PubMed

    Owais, Saed J

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of cutting age and Indole Butyric Acid (IBA) treatments on five pomegranate varieties propagation by stem cuttings. The experiment was carried out in a partially controlled glasshouse conditions at Mutah University, Jordan. The treatments comprised of two types of cuttings, i.e., hardwood and semi-hardwood; five concentrations of IBA, i.e., 3,000, 6,000, 9,000 and 12,000 ppm as quick dip (10 sec) as well as five Jordanian pomegranate varieties (Kdaree Hello, Hmadee Hmaree, Kdaree Sfaree, Zeklabi, Maleese). In this study, the percentage of cuttings that rooted, the number of roots produced per cutting, root length and diameter and root weight per cutting were recorded. It was obvious that the rootability of pomegranate is influenced by the interactive effect of cuttings age, IBA concentration and variety as well as by the single effect of either. The cuttings taken from hardwood stems had higher rooting percentage than those taken from semi-hardwood stems with a considerable differences in rootability between varieties under this study. The highest percentage of cuttings that rooted was observed in Hmadee Hmaree (70%), Zeklabee (69%) and Malesse (73%), while the lowest rooting percentage in Khdaree Hello (58%) and Kdaree Sfaree (49%) varieties. Zeklabee and Hmadee Hmaree varieties when compared with other varieties gave more favorable results at 6000 to 9000 ppm IBA in terms of the percentage of cuttings that rooted, the number of roots produced per cutting and root weight per cutting using both semi- and hard-wood cuttings. It was concluded that the increasing dose of IBA could be useful in increasing rooting potential and other root characteristics in pomegranate.

  14. Intestinimonas butyriciproducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a butyrate-producing bacterium from the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Kläring, Karoline; Hanske, Laura; Bui, Nam; Charrier, Cédric; Blaut, Michael; Haller, Dirk; Plugge, Caroline M; Clavel, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    A Gram-positive, spore-forming, non-motile, strictly anaerobic rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from the caecal content of a TNF(deltaARE) mouse. The isolate, referred to as strain SRB-521-5-I(T), was originally cultured on a reduced agar medium containing yeast extract, rumen fluid and lactic acid as main energy and carbon sources. Phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the species most closely related to strain SRB-521-5-I(T) were Flavonifractor plautii and Pseudoflavonifractor capillosus (<95 % sequence similarity; 1436 bp). In contrast to F. plautii and P. capillosus, strain SRB-521-5-I(T) contained a substantial amount of C18 : 0 dimethylacetal. Additional major fatty acids were C14 : 0 methyl ester, C16 : 0 dimethylacetal and C18 : 0 aldehyde. Strain SRB-521-5-I(T) differed in its enzyme profile from F. plautii and P. capillosus by being positive for dextrin, maltotriose, turanose, dl-lactic acid and d-lactic acid methyl ester but negative for d-fructose. In reduced Wilkins-Chalgren-Anaerobe broth, strain SRB-521-5-I(T) produced approximately 8 mM butyrate and 4 mM acetate. In contrast to F. plautii, the strain did not metabolize flavonoids. It showed intermediate resistance towards the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, colistin and tetracycline. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, we propose the name Intestinimonas butyriciproducens gen. nov., sp. nov. to accommodate strain SRB-521-5-I(T) ( = DSM 26588(T) = CCUG 63529(T)) as the type strain.

  15. Analysis of indole-3-butyric acid-induced adventitious root formation on Arabidopsis stem segments.

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Vertocnik, Amy; Town, Christopher D

    2005-08-01

    Root induction by auxins is still not well understood at the molecular level. In this study a system has been devised which distinguishes between the two active auxins indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IBA, but not IAA, efficiently induced adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis stem segments at a concentration of 10 microM. In wild-type plants, roots formed exclusively out of calli at the basal end of the segments. Root formation was inhibited by 10 microM 3,4,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. At intermediate IBA concentrations (3-10 microM), root induction was less efficient in trp1, a tryptophan auxotroph of Arabidopsis with a bushy phenotype but no demonstrable reduction in IAA levels. By contrast, two mutants of Arabidopsis with measurably higher levels of IAA (trp2, amt1) show root induction characteristics very similar to the wild type. Using differential display, transcripts specific to the rooting process were identified by devising a protocol that distinguished between callus production only and callus production followed by root initiation. One fragment was identical to the sequence of a putative regulatory subunit B of protein phosphatase 2A. It is suggested that adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis stem segments is due to an interaction between endogenous IAA and exogenous IBA. In stem explants, residual endogenous IAA is transported to the basal end of each segment, thereby inducing root formation. In stem segments in which the polar auxin transport is inhibited by TIBA, root formation does not occur.

  16. Inhibition of NLRP3 Inflammasome Pathway by Butyrate Improves Corneal Wound Healing in Corneal Alkali Burn.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fang; Xiao, Yangyan; Zaheer, Mahira; Volpe, Eugene A; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Li, De-Quan; de Paiva, Cintia S

    2017-03-05

    Epithelial cells are involved in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to different stresses. The purpose of this study was to investigate if alkali-injured corneal epithelia activate innate immunity through the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD)-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway. A unilateral alkali burn (AB) was created in the central cornea of C57BL/6 mice. Mice received either no topical treatment or topical treatment with sodium butyrate (NaB), β-hydroxybutyric acid (HBA), dexamethasone (Dex), or vehicle (balanced salt solution, BSS) quater in die (QID) for two or five days (d). We evaluated the expression of inflammasome components including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), and caspase-1, as well as the downstream cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. We found elevation of NLRP3 and IL-1β messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, as well as levels of inflammasome component proteins in the alkali-injured corneas compared to naïve corneas. Treatment with NLRP3 inhibitors using NaB and HBA preserved corneal clarity and decreased NLRP3, caspase-1, and IL-1β mRNA transcripts, as well as NLRP3 protein expression on post-injury compared to BSS-treated corneas. These findings identified a novel innate immune signaling pathway activated by AB. Blocking the NLRP3 pathway in AB mouse model decreases inflammation, resulting in greater corneal clarity. These results provide a mechanistic basis for optimizing therapeutic intervention in alkali injured eyes.

  17. Protective Effects of Butyrate-based Compounds on a Mouse Model for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Butchbach, Matthew E. R.; Lumpkin, Casey J.; Harris, Ashlee W.; Saieva, Luciano; Edwards, Jonathan D.; Workman, Eileen; Simard, Louise R.; Pellizzoni, Livio; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a childhood-onset degenerative disease resulting from the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by the loss of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1) but retention of SMN2. The number of copies of SMN2 modifies disease severity in SMA patients as well as in mouse models, making SMN2 a target for therapeutics development. Sodium butyrate (BA) and its analogue (4PBA) have been shown to increase SMN2 expression in SMA cultured cells. In this study, we examined the effects of BA, 4PBA as well as two BA prodrugs—glyceryl tributyrate (BA3G) and VX563—on the phenotype of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. Treatment with 4PBA, BA3G and VX563 but not BA beginning at PND04 significantly improved the lifespan and delayed disease end stage, with administration of VX563 also improving the growth rate of these mice. 4PBA and VX563 improved the motor phenotype of SMNΔ7 SMA mice and prevented spinal motor neuron loss. Interestingly, neither 4PBA nor VX563 had an effect on SMN expression in the spinal cords of treated SMNΔ7 SMA mice; however, they inhibited histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and restored the normal phosphorylation states of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3β, both of which are altered by SMN deficiency in vivo. These observations show that BA-based compounds with favourable pharmacokinetics ameliorate SMA pathology possibly by modulating HDAC and Akt signaling. PMID:26892876

  18. Protective effects of butyrate-based compounds on a mouse model for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Butchbach, Matthew E R; Lumpkin, Casey J; Harris, Ashlee W; Saieva, Luciano; Edwards, Jonathan D; Workman, Eileen; Simard, Louise R; Pellizzoni, Livio; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2016-05-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a childhood-onset degenerative disease resulting from the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by the loss of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1) but retention of SMN2. The number of copies of SMN2 modifies disease severity in SMA patients as well as in mouse models, making SMN2 a target for therapeutics development. Sodium butyrate (BA) and its analog (4PBA) have been shown to increase SMN2 expression in SMA cultured cells. In this study, we examined the effects of BA, 4PBA as well as two BA prodrugs-glyceryl tributyrate (BA3G) and VX563-on the phenotype of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. Treatment with 4PBA, BA3G and VX563 but not BA beginning at PND04 significantly improved the lifespan and delayed disease end stage, with administration of VX563 also improving the growth rate of these mice. 4PBA and VX563 improved the motor phenotype of SMNΔ7 SMA mice and prevented spinal motor neuron loss. Interestingly, neither 4PBA nor VX563 had an effect on SMN expression in the spinal cords of treated SMNΔ7 SMA mice; however, they inhibited histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and restored the normal phosphorylation states of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3β, both of which are altered by SMN deficiency in vivo. These observations show that BA-based compounds with favorable pharmacokinetics ameliorate SMA pathology possibly by modulating HDAC and Akt signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transport of 3-hydroxy(3-/sup 14/C)butyrate by dissociated cells from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Tildon, J.T.; Roeder, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that the utilization of oxidizable substrates by the brain may be regulated in part by transport across the plasma membrane. Dissociated brain cells obtained by mechanical disruption of rat brain were used to measure the uptake of 3-hydroxy(3-14C)butyrate. Total uptake revealed two mechanisms (diffusion and a carrier-mediated system). A Lineweaver-Burk plot of the latter component yielded an apparent Km of 1.47 mM and a maximal velocity (Vmax) of 5 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1. The rates of uptake were temperature dependent and were significantly higher at pH 6.2 than at pH 7.4 or 8.2. Preloading the cells and increasing the intracellular concentration of 3-hydroxybutyrate using 12.5 and 25 mM increased the rate of uptake 143 and 206%, respectively, indicative of an accelerative exchange mechanism. Uptake was inhibited approximately 50% by (in mM) 10 phenylpyruvate, 10 alpha-ketoisocaproate, 10 KCN, and 1.5 NaAsO/sub 2/. Uptake was also decreased by (in mM) 5 lactate, 5 methyl malonic acid, 1 alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate, and 1 mersalyl. Dissociated brain cells from 14- to 16-day-old rats accumulated 3-hydroxybutyrate at a rate more than two-fold greater than cells from either younger (2-day-old) or older (28-day-old and adult) animals. These data are consistent with the proposal that 3-hydroxybutyrate is taken up by the brain by both diffusion and a carrier-mediated transport system, and they support the hypothesis that transport at the cellular level contributes to the regulation of substrate utilization by the brain.

  20. Alcohol and plasma triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Klop, Boudewijn; do Rego, Ana Torres; Cabezas, Manuel Castro

    2013-08-01

    This study reviews recent developments concerning the effects of alcohol on plasma triglycerides. The focus will be on population, intervention and metabolic studies with respect to alcohol and plasma triglycerides. Alcohol consumption and fat ingestion are closely associated and stimulated by each other via hypothalamic signals and by an elevated cephalic response. A J-shaped relationship between alcohol intake and plasma triglycerides has been described. A normal body weight, polyphenols in red wine and specific polymorphisms of the apolipoprotein A-V and apolipoprotein C-III genes may protect against alcohol-associated hypertriglyceridemia. In contrast, obesity exaggerates alcohol-associated hypertriglyceridemia and therefore the risk of pancreatitis. High alcohol intake remains harmful since it is associated with elevated plasma triglycerides, but also with cardiovascular disease, alcoholic fatty liver disease and the development of pancreatitis. Alcohol-induced hypertriglyceridemia is due to increased very-low-density lipoprotein secretion, impaired lipolysis and increased free fatty acid fluxes from adipose tissue to the liver. However, light to moderate alcohol consumption may be associated with decreased plasma triglycerides, probably determined by the type of alcoholic beverage consumed, genetic polymorphisms and lifestyle factors. Nevertheless, patients should be advised to reduce or stop alcohol consumption in case of hypertriglyceridemia.

  1. Alcoholism and Lesbians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedro, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the issues involved in the relationship between lesbianism and alcoholism. It examines the constellation of health and related problems created by alcoholism, and it critically interrogates the societal factors that contribute to the disproportionately high rates of alcoholism among lesbians by exploring the antecedents and…

  2. Alcohol and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Roland

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the acute effects of alcohol on aggressive responding. From experimental studies that use human subjects, it is concluded that a moderate dose of alcohol does not increase aggression if subjects are unprovoked. Under provocative situations, aggression is increased as a function of alcohol intoxication, provided that subjects are restricted…

  3. Alcohol and Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, Stephanie S.

    There is growing acknowledgement of the association between family violence and alcohol use. A study was conducted to examine the role that abuse plays in the lives of women and to investigate the relationship between alcohol and violence. Data were collected from 35 recovering female alcoholics and 35 nonalcoholic women on their sexual experience…

  4. Alcohol and the law.

    PubMed

    Karasov, Ariela O; Ostacher, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Society has had an interest in controlling the production, distribution, and use of alcohol for millennia. The use of alcohol has always had consequences, be they positive or negative, and the role of government in the regulation of alcohol is now universal. This is accomplished at several levels, first through controls on production, importation, distribution, and use of alcoholic beverages, and second, through criminal laws, the aim of which is to address the behavior of users themselves. A number of interventions and policies reduce alcohol-related consequences to society by regulating alcohol pricing, targeting alcohol-impaired driving, and limiting alcohol availability. The legal system defines criminal responsibility in the context of alcohol use, as an enormous percentage of violent crime and motor death is associated with alcohol intoxication. In recent years, recovery-oriented policies have aimed to expand social supports for recovery and to improve access to treatment for substance use disorders within the criminal justice system. The Affordable Care Act, also know as "ObamaCare," made substantial changes to access to substance abuse treatment by mandating that health insurance include services for substance use disorders comparable to coverage for medical and surgical treatments. Rather than a simplified "war on drugs" approach, there appears to be an increasing emphasis on evidence-based policy development that approaches alcohol use disorders with hope for treatment and prevention. This chapter focuses on alcohol and the law in the United States. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biological Vulnerability to Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuckit, Marc A.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the role of biological factors in the risk for alcoholism. Notes the importance of the definition of primary alcoholism and highlights data indicating that this disorder is genetically influenced. In studies of men at high risk for the future development of alcoholism, vulnerability shows up in reactions to ethanol brain wave amplitude and…

  6. Television: Alcohol's Vast Adland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Concern about how much television alcohol advertising reaches underage youth and how the advertising influences their attitudes and decisions about alcohol use has been widespread for many years. Lacking in the policy debate has been solid, reliable information about the extent of youth exposure to television alcohol advertising. To address this…

  7. Alcoholism's Hidden Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gress, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses children of alcoholics as victims of fetal alcohol syndrome, family violence, retarded social development, and severe emotional scars. These children bring family roles to school that allow survival in the alcoholic home but are dysfunctional outside it. Educators can take certain steps to address these students' problems. Includes six…

  8. Biological Vulnerability to Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuckit, Marc A.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the role of biological factors in the risk for alcoholism. Notes the importance of the definition of primary alcoholism and highlights data indicating that this disorder is genetically influenced. In studies of men at high risk for the future development of alcoholism, vulnerability shows up in reactions to ethanol brain wave amplitude and…

  9. Alcoholism's Hidden Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gress, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses children of alcoholics as victims of fetal alcohol syndrome, family violence, retarded social development, and severe emotional scars. These children bring family roles to school that allow survival in the alcoholic home but are dysfunctional outside it. Educators can take certain steps to address these students' problems. Includes six…

  10. Alcohol on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACU-I Bulletin, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Alcohol use on campus and strategies colleges are using to educate students about alcohol are considered in two articles. In "When Alternatives Aren't," Ruth Bradford Burnham and Stephen J. Nelson explore the role alcoholic beverages play in young people's social lives and some of the implications for planning social events. They offer a balanced…

  11. Alcoholism and Lesbians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedro, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the issues involved in the relationship between lesbianism and alcoholism. It examines the constellation of health and related problems created by alcoholism, and it critically interrogates the societal factors that contribute to the disproportionately high rates of alcoholism among lesbians by exploring the antecedents and…

  12. Contributions of GABA to alcohol responsivity during adolescence: Insights from preclinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Silveri, Marisa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a considerable body of literature demonstrating that adolescence is a unique age period, which includes rapid and dramatic maturation of behavioral, cognitive, hormonal and neurobiological systems. Most notably, adolescence is also a period of unique responsiveness to alcohol effects, with both hyposensitivity and hypersensitivity observed to the various effects of alcohol. Multiple neurotransmitter systems are undergoing fine-tuning during this critical period of brain development, including those that contribute to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The role of developmental maturation of the γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, however, has received less attention in contributing to age-specific alcohol sensitivities. This review integrates GABA findings from human magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies as they may translate to understanding adolescent-specific responsiveness to alcohol effects. Better understanding of the vulnerability of the GABA system both during adolescent development, and in psychiatric conditions that include alcohol dependence, could point to a putative mechanism, boosting brain GABA, that may have increased effectiveness for treating alcohol abuse disorders. PMID:24631274

  13. Increased butyrate formation in the pig colon by feeding raw potato starch leads to a reduction of colonocyte apoptosis and a shift to the stem cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Mentschel, J; Claus, R

    2003-11-01

    Whereas butyrate is well known to induce apoptosis in transformed colon cells in vitro, evidence exists that it inhibits apoptosis of colon crypt cells in vivo. In this study, pigs were fed with resistant potato starch to increase microbial butyrate formation in the colon and to investigate its effects on mitosis and apoptosis. In addition, apoptosis regulating proteins were determined by immunocytochemistry, such as proapoptotic Bak, antiapoptotic Bcl-2, and the epidermal growth factor (EGF), which is synthesized by goblet cells and functions as a survival factor. Two groups of 6 barrows were both supplied with 381 g crude protein and 31 MJ metabolizable energy (ME) daily over a 19-day experimental period. The rations differed in the carbohydrate composition. The controls received gelatinized starch as the main carbohydrate, whereas the experimental group (butyrate group) received a ration with raw potato starch (low ileal digestibility). In the feces, butyrate concentration and pH were monitored daily. After killing the pigs, colon tissue was obtained for histologic and immunocytochemical evaluation, which was performed separately in the luminal, middle, and stem cell compartment of the crypts. In the butyrate group, the total number of apoptotic cells was reduced by 34% (P< or =.001) compared with controls, whereas the mitotic rate was not altered. The crypt depth was only moderately increased by 15%. Apoptosis in the luminal compartment of the butyrate group was reduced by 18.8%, but was increased by 21.7% in the stem cell compartment. The effect of butyrate on apoptosis was paralleled by an increased number of Bcl-2 positive cells mainly in the luminal compartment (butyrate: 2.6 cells; controls: 1.2 cells, P< or =.001), which was more pronounced compared with the number of Bak positive cells in the same compartment. Bak activity in the stem cell compartment was 3.4-fold increased compared with controls (P< or =.001). The size of EGF-positive stained mucus

  14. Children of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Adler, R; Raphael, B

    1983-03-01

    The familial nature of alcoholism is well established, but the interaction of nature and nurture remains unresolved. Other effects of alcoholic parents on the psychopathology of their children are poorly documented, with studies variably claiming that there is no discernible impact or that there is a significantly higher incidence of problems, particularly in the area of antisocial and aggressive behaviour. The relative importance of family disharmony and disruption which so often accompanies alcohol abuse, as against the impact of the alcohol abuse itself, is rarely considered. The literature on the psychopathology of children of alcoholic parents is reviewed and the relevance of the last two issues explored.

  15. Control of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broilers by target-released butyric acid, fatty acids and essential oils.

    PubMed

    Timbermont, L; Lanckriet, A; Dewulf, J; Nollet, N; Schwarzer, K; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2010-04-01

    The efficacy of target-released butyric acid, medium-chain fatty acids (C(6) to C(12) but mainly lauric acid) and essential oils (thymol, cinnamaldehyde, essential oil of eucalyptus) micro-encapsulated in a poly-sugar matrix to control necrotic enteritis was investigated. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the different additives were determined in vitro, showing that lauric acid, thymol, and cinnamaldehyde are very effective in inhibiting the growth of Clostridium perfringens. The in vivo effects were studied in two trials in an experimental necrotic enteritis model in broiler chickens. In the first trial, four groups of chickens were fed a diet supplemented with butyric acid, with essential oils, with butyric acid in combination with medium-chain fatty acids, or with butyric acid in combination with medium-chain fatty acids and essential oils. In all groups except for the group receiving only butyric acid, a significant decrease in the number of birds with necrotic lesions was found compared with the infected, untreated control group. In the second trial the same products were tested but at a higher concentration. An additional group was fed a diet supplemented with only medium-chain fatty acids. In all groups except for that receiving butyric acid in combination with medium-chain fatty acids and essential oils, a significant decrease in the number of birds with necrotic lesions was found compared with the infected, untreated control group. These results suggest that butyric acid, medium-chain fatty acids and/or essential oils may contribute to the prevention of necrotic enteritis in broilers.

  16. Effects of Sodium Butyrate and Its Synthetic Amide Derivative on Liver Inflammation and Glucose Tolerance in an Animal Model of Steatosis Induced by High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Simeoli, Raffaele; Russo, Roberto; Iacono, Anna; Santoro, Anna; Paciello, Orlando; Ferrante, Maria Carmela; Canani, Roberto Berni; Calignano, Antonio; Meli, Rosaria

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease. Insulin resistance (IR) appears to be critical in its pathogenesis. We evaluated the effects of sodium butyrate (butyrate) and its synthetic derivative N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenyl-ethyl) butyramide (FBA) in a rat model of insulin resistance and steatosis induced by high-fat diet (HFD). Methods After weaning, young male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups receiving different diets for 6 weeks: 1. control group (standard diet); 2. HFD; 3. HFD plus butyrate (20 mg/kg/die) and 4. HFD plus FBA (42.5 mg/Kg/die, the equimolecular dose of butyrate). Liver tissues of the rats were analyzed by Western blot and real-time PCR. Insulin resistance, liver inflammation and Toll-like pattern modifications were determined. Results Evaluation of these two preparations of butyrate showed a reduction of liver steatosis and inflammation in HFD fed animals. The compounds showed a similar potency in the normalisation of several variables, such as transaminases, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index, and glucose tolerance. Both treatments significantly reduced hepatic TNF-α expression and restored GLUTs and PPARs, either in liver or adipose tissue. Finally, FBA showed a higher potency in reducing pro-inflammatory parameters in the liver, via suppression of Toll-like receptors and NF-κB activation. Conclusions Our results demonstrated a protective effect of butyrate in limiting molecular events underlying the onset of IR and NAFLD, suggesting a potential clinical relevance for this substance. In particular, its derivative, FBA, could represent an alternative therapeutic option to sodium butyrate, sharing a comparable efficacy, but a better palatability and compliance. PMID:23861927

  17. n-Butyrate, a cell cycle blocker, inhibits the replication of polyomaviruses and papillomaviruses but not that of adenoviruses and herpesviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Shadan, F F; Cowsert, L M; Villarreal, L P

    1994-01-01

    Small DNA viruses are dependent on the interaction of early proteins (such as large T antigen) with host p53 and Rb to bring about the G1-to-S cell cycle transition. The large DNA viruses are less dependent on host regulatory genes since additional early viral proteins (such as viral DNA polymerase, DNA metabolic enzymes, and other replication proteins) are involved in DNA synthesis. A highly conserved domain of large T antigen (similar to the p53-binding region) exclusively identifies papovavirus, parvovirus, and papillomaviruses from all other larger DNA viruses and implies a conserved interaction with host regulatory genes. In this report, we show that 3 to 6 mM butyrate, a general cell cycle blocker implicated in inhibition of the G1-to-S transition, inhibits DNA replication of polyomavirus and human papillomavirus type 11 but not the replication of larger DNA viruses such as adenovirus types 2 and 5, herpes simplex virus type 1, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus, which all bypass the butyrate-mediated cell cycle block. This butyrate effect on polyomavirus replication is not cell type specific, nor does it depend on the p53 or Rb gene, as inhibition was seen in fibroblasts with intact or homozygous deleted p53 or Rb, 3T6 cells, keratinocytes, C2C12 myoblasts, and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In addition, butyrate did not inhibit expression of polyomavirus T antigen. The antiviral effect of butyrate involves a form of imprinted state, since pretreatment of cells with 3 mM butyrate inhibits human papillomavirus type 11 DNA replication for at least 96 h after its removal. Butyrate, therefore, serves as a molecular tool in dissecting the life cycle of smaller DNA viruses from that of the larger DNA viruses in relation to the cell cycle. Images PMID:8035479

  18. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  19. Genetics and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed; however, excessive use creates serious physical, psychological and social problems and contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alcohol use disorders (that is, alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse) are maladaptive patterns of excessive drinking that lead to serious problems. Abundant evidence indicates that alcohol dependence (alcoholism) is a complex genetic disease, with variations in a large number of genes affecting a person's risk of alcoholism. Some of these genes have been identified, including two genes involved in the metabolism of alcohol (ADH1B and ALDH2) that have the strongest known affects on the risk of alcoholism. Studies continue to reveal other genes in which variants affect the risk of alcoholism or related traits, including GABRA2, CHRM2, KCNJ6 and AUTS2. As more variants are analysed and studies are combined for meta-analysis to achieve increased sample sizes, an improved picture of the many genes and pathways that affect the risk of alcoholism will be possible.

  20. [Alcohol induced cognitive deficits].

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elisabeth; Singewald, Evelin M; Ruepp, Beatrix; Marksteiner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies could show a complex relationship between alcohol consumption and cognition but also with processes of ageing both social and biological. Acute effects of alcohol during intoxication include clinical signs such as excitation and reduced inhibition, slurred speech, and increased reaction time but also cognitive dysfunction, especially deficits in memory functions. However, these cognitive deficits during alcohol intoxication are reversible while patients with alcohol addiction and chronic alcohol intake show severe impairments of cognitive functions especially deficits in executive functions. Frontal executive impairments in these patients include deficits in problem solving, abstraction, planning, organizing, and working memory.Additionally, gender specific deficits are relevant for the course of the disease and its concomitant health problems with female alcoholics showing a higher vulnerability for cognitive dysfunction and brain atrophy at earlier stages of alcoholism history.

  1. [Physical diseases in alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Takase, Kojiro

    2015-09-01

    Rapid excessive alcohol drinking frequently causes disturbance of consciousness due to head trauma, brain edema, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hepatic coma and so on, provoked by acute alcohol intoxication. Rapid differential diagnosis and management are extremely important to save a life. On the other hands, the chronic users of alcohol so called alcoholism has many kinds of physical diseases such as liver diseases (i.e., fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, alcoholic liver cirrhosis and miscellaneous liver disease), diabetes mellitus, injury to happen in drunkenness, pancreas disease (i.e., acute and chronic pancreatitis and deterioration of chronic pancreatitis), gastrontestinal diseases (i.e., gastroduodenal ulcer), and so on. Enough attention should be paid to above mentioned diseases, otherwise they would turn worse more with continuation and increase in quantity of the alcohol. It should be born in its mind that the excessive drinking becomes the weapon threatening life.

  2. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Manuela G; French, Samuel W; French, Barbara A; Seitz, Helmut K; Cohen, Lawrence B; Mueller, Sebastian; Osna, Natalia A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Seth, Devanshi; Bautista, Abraham; Thompson, Kyle J; McKillop, Iain H; Kirpich, Irina A; McClain, Craig J; Bataller, Ramon; Nanau, Radu M; Voiculescu, Mihai; Opris, Mihai; Shen, Hong; Tillman, Brittany; Li, Jun; Liu, Hui; Thomes, Paul G; Ganesan, Murali; Malnick, Steve

    2014-12-01

    This paper is based upon the "Charles Lieber Satellite Symposia" organized by Manuela G. Neuman at the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) Annual Meetings, 2013 and 2014. The present review includes pre-clinical, translational and clinical research that characterize alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In addition, a literature search in the discussed area was performed. Strong clinical and experimental evidence lead to recognition of the key toxic role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of ALD. The liver biopsy can confirm the etiology of NASH or alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) and assess structural alterations of cells, their organelles, as well as inflammatory activity. Three histological stages of ALD are simple steatosis, ASH, and chronic hepatitis with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. These latter stages may also be associated with a number of cellular and histological changes, including the presence of Mallory's hyaline, megamitochondria, or perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Genetic polymorphisms of ethanol metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome p450 (CYP) 2E1 activation may change the severity of ASH and NASH. Alcohol mediated hepatocarcinogenesis, immune response to alcohol in ASH, as well as the role of other risk factors such as its co-morbidities with chronic viral hepatitis in the presence or absence of human immunodeficiency virus are discussed. Dysregulation of hepatic methylation, as result of ethanol exposure, in hepatocytes transfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), illustrates an impaired interferon signaling. The hepatotoxic effects of ethanol undermine the contribution of malnutrition to the liver injury. Dietary interventions such as micro and macronutrients, as well as changes to the microbiota are suggested. The clinical aspects of NASH, as part of metabolic syndrome in the aging population, are offered. The integrative symposia investigate different aspects of alcohol-induced liver damage and possible

  3. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G.; French, Samuel W.; French, Barbara A.; Seitz, Helmut K.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Mueller, Sebastian; Osna, Natalia A.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Seth, Devanshi; Bautista, Abraham; Thompson, Kyle J.; McKillop, Iain H.; Kirpich, Irina A.; McClain, Craig J.; Bataller, Ramon; Nanau, Radu M.; Voiculescu, Mihai; Opris, Mihai; Shen, Hong; Tillman, Brittany; Li, Jun; Liu, Hui; Thomas, Paul G.; Ganesan, Murali; Malnick, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based upon the “Charles Lieber Satellite Symposia” organized by Manuela G. Neuman at the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) Annual Meetings, 2013 and 2014. The present review includes pre-clinical, translational and clinical research that characterize alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In addition, a literature search in the discussed area was performed. Strong clinical and experimental evidence lead to recognition of the key toxic role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of ALD. The liver biopsy can confirm the etiology of NASH or alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) and assess structural alterations of cells, their organelles, as well as inflammatory activity. Three histological stages of ALD are simple steatosis, ASH, and chronic hepatitis with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. These latter stages may also be associated with a number of cellular and histological changes, including the presence of Mallory's hyaline, megamitochondria, or perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Genetic polymorphisms of ethanol metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome p450 (CYP) 2E1 activation may change the severity of ASH and NASH. Alcohol mediated hepatocarcinogenesis, immune response to alcohol in ASH, as well as the role of other risk factors such as its comorbidities with chronic viral hepatitis in the presence or absence of human deficiency virus are discussed. Dysregulation of hepatic methylation, as result of ethanol exposure, in hepatocytes transfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), illustrates an impaired interferon signaling. The hepatotoxic effects of ethanol undermine the contribution of malnutrition to the liver injury. Dietary interventions such as micro and macronutrients, as well as changes to the microbiota are suggested. The clinical aspects of NASH, as part of metabolic syndrome in the aging population, are offered. The integrative symposia investigate different aspects of alcohol-induced liver damage and possible

  4. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  5. Coenzyme A-transferase-independent butyrate re-assimilation in Clostridium acetobutylicum-evidence from a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Millat, Thomas; Voigt, Christine; Janssen, Holger; Cooksley, Clare M; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2014-11-01

    The hetero-dimeric CoA-transferase CtfA/B is believed to be crucial for the metabolic transition from acidogenesis to solventogenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum as part of the industrial-relevant acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Here, the enzyme is assumed to mediate re-assimilation of acetate and butyrate during a pH-induced metabolic shift and to faciliate the first step of acetone formation from acetoacetyl-CoA. However, recent investigations using phosphate-limited continuous cultures have questioned this common dogma. To address the emerging experimental discrepancies, we investigated the mutant strain Cac-ctfA398s::CT using chemostat cultures. As a consequence of this mutation, the cells are unable to express functional ctfA and are thus lacking CoA-transferase activity. A mathematical model of the pH-induced metabolic shift, which was recently developed for the wild type, is used to analyse the observed behaviour of the mutant strain with a focus on re-assimilation activities for the two produced acids. Our theoretical analysis reveals that the ctfA mutant still re-assimilates butyrate, but not acetate. Based upon this finding, we conclude that C. acetobutylicum possesses a CoA-tranferase-independent butyrate uptake mechanism that is activated by decreasing pH levels. Furthermore, we observe that butanol formation is not inhibited under our experimental conditions, as suggested by previous batch culture experiments. In concordance with recent batch experiments, acetone formation is abolished in chemostat cultures using the ctfa mutant.

  6. A kinetic-metabolic model based on cell energetic state: study of CHO cell behavior under Na-butyrate stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ghorbaniaghdam, Atefeh; Henry, Olivier; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2013-04-01

    A kinetic-metabolic model approach describing and simulating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell behavior is presented. The model includes glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, respiratory chain, redox state and energetic metabolism. Growth kinetic is defined as a function of the major precursors for the synthesis of cell building blocks. Michaelis-Menten type kinetic is used for metabolic intermediates as well as for regulatory functions from energy shuttles (ATP/ADP) and cofactors (NAD/H and NADP/H). Model structure and parameters were first calibrated using results from bioreactor cultures of CHO cells expressing recombinant t-PA. It is shown that the model can simulate experimental data for all available experimental data, such as extracellular glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium concentration time profiles, as well as cell energetic state. A sensitivity analysis allowed identifying the most sensitive parameters. The model was then shown to be readily adaptable for studying the effect of sodium butyrate on CHO cells metabolism, where it was applied to the cases with sodium butyrate addition either at mid-exponential growth phase (48 h) or at the early plateau phase (74 h). In both cases, a global optimization routine was used for the simultaneous estimation of the most sensitive parameters, while the insensitive parameters were considered as constants. Finally, confidence intervals for the estimated parameters were calculated. Results presented here further substantiate our previous findings that butyrate treatment at mid-exponential phase may cause a shift in cellular metabolism toward a sustained and increased efficiency of glucose utilization channeled through the TCA cycle.

  7. Management of traveller's diarrhoea with a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Krokowicz, Lukasz; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Wejman-Matela, Anna; Krokowicz, Piotr; Drews, Michal; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Traveller's diarrhoea (TD), defined by UNICEF/WHO as three or more unformed stools with or without other symptoms, imposes a considerable burden on travellers from developed countries. Various efforts have focused on decreasing the prevalence and severity of this condition. To assess the efficacy of a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide in treatment providing symptomatic relief of TD. The study was conducted in accordance with a protocol presented to the Bioethical committee of Poznan University of Medical Sciences. A total of 278 patients travelling to countries with higher risk of diarrhoea for at least 10 days were divided into a study arm being administered, in case of TD, a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide (n = 139) and a placebo arm (n = 139) with placebo administration. Forty-seven patients completed the study (22 in the study arm and 25 in the placebo arm). The diarrhoea occurrence after initiation of treatment at first symptoms was significantly lower in the study arm as compared to the placebo arm (9% vs. 36%, p = 0.041). Also, subjects from the study arm more frequently reported that the regimen administered had been efficient for their symptoms in comparison to the placebo arm (72.7% vs. 32%, p = 0.008). No adverse effects of the administered medication were noted during the study. Sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide can be successful in decreasing symptoms of TD. Because of its efficacy and lack of observed side effects it has a strong potential in the treatment of patients with TD.

  8. Management of traveller's diarrhoea with a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Wejman-Matela, Anna; Krokowicz, Piotr; Drews, Michal; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Traveller's diarrhoea (TD), defined by UNICEF/WHO as three or more unformed stools with or without other symptoms, imposes a considerable burden on travellers from developed countries. Various efforts have focused on decreasing the prevalence and severity of this condition. Aim To assess the efficacy of a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide in treatment providing symptomatic relief of TD. Material and methods The study was conducted in accordance with a protocol presented to the Bioethical committee of Poznan University of Medical Sciences. A total of 278 patients travelling to countries with higher risk of diarrhoea for at least 10 days were divided into a study arm being administered, in case of TD, a combination of sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide (n = 139) and a placebo arm (n = 139) with placebo administration. Results Forty-seven patients completed the study (22 in the study arm and 25 in the placebo arm). The diarrhoea occurrence after initiation of treatment at first symptoms was significantly lower in the study arm as compared to the placebo arm (9% vs. 36%, p = 0.041). Also, subjects from the study arm more frequently reported that the regimen administered had been efficient for their symptoms in comparison to the placebo arm (72.7% vs. 32%, p = 0.008). No adverse effects of the administered medication were noted during the study. Conclusions Sodium butyrate, organic acids, and A-300 silicon dioxide can be successful in decreasing symptoms of TD. Because of its efficacy and lack of observed side effects it has a strong potential in the treatment of patients with TD. PMID:25396003

  9. Butyric Acid- and Dimethyl Disulfide-Assimilating Microorganisms in a Biofilter Treating Air Emissions from a Livestock Facility▿

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Anja; Lindholst, Sabine; Feilberg, Anders; Nielsen, Per H.; Neufeld, Josh D.; Nielsen, Jeppe L.

    2011-01-01

    Biofiltration has proven an efficient tool for the elimination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ammonia from livestock facilities, thereby reducing nuisance odors and ammonia emissions to the local environment. The active microbial communities comprising these filter biofilms have not been well characterized. In this study, a trickle biofilter treating air from a pig facility was investigated and proved efficient in removing carboxylic acids (>70% reduction), mainly attributed to the primary filter section within which reduced organic sulfur compounds were also depleted (up to 50%). The secondary filter eliminated several aromatic compounds: phenol (81%), p-cresol (89%), 4-ethylphenol (68%), indole (48%), and skatole (69%). The active butyric acid degrading bacterial community of an air filter sample was identified by DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) and microautoradiography, combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH). The predominant 16S rRNA gene sequences from a clone library derived from “heavy” DNA from [13C4]butyric acid incubations were Microbacterium, Gordonia, Dietzia, Rhodococcus, Propionibacterium, and Janibacter, all from the Actinobacteria. Actinobacteria were confirmed and quantified by MAR-FISH as being the major bacterial phylum assimilating butyric acid along with several Burkholderiales-related Betaproteobacteria. The active bacterial community assimilating dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) was characterized by DNA-SIP and MAR-FISH and found to be associated with the Actinobacteria, along with a few representatives of Flavobacteria and Sphingobacteria. Interestingly, ammonia-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria were also implicated in DMDS degradation, as were fungi. Thus, multiple isotope-based methods provided complementary data, enabling high-resolution identification and quantitative assessments of odor-eliminating Actinobacteria-dominated populations of these biofilter environments. PMID:22003018

  10. Li-Ion Cells Employing Electrolytes With Methyl Propionate and Ethyl Butyrate Co-Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate at low temperatures to satisfy the requirements of such applications as landers, rovers, and penetrators. A number of terrestrial applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) also require energy storage devices that can operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 C), while still providing high power capability and long life. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-30 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. These limitations at very low temperatures are due to poor electrolyte conductivity, poor lithium intercalation kinetics over the electrode surface layers, and poor ionic diffusion in the electrode bulk. Two wide-operating-temperature-range electrolytes have been developed based on advances involving lithium hexafluorophosphate-based solutions in carbonate and carbonate + ester solvent blends, which have been further optimized in the context of the technology and targeted applications. The approaches employed include further optimization of electrolytes containing methyl propionate (MP) and ethyl butyrate (EB), which are effective co-solvents, to widen the operating temperature range beyond the baseline systems. Attention was focused on further optimizing ester-based electrolyte formulations that have exhibited the best performance at temperatures ranging from -60 to +60 C, with an emphasis upon improving the rate capability at -20 to -40 C. This was accomplished by increasing electrolyte salt concentration to 1.20M and increasing the ester content to 60 percent by volume to increase the ionic conductivity at low temperatures. Two JPL-developed electrolytes 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MP (20:20:60 v/v %) and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+EB (20:20:60 v/v %) operate effectively over a wide

  11. Butyrate modulates the expression of. beta. -adrenergic receptor subtype in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Poksay, K.S.; Nakada, M.T.; Crooke, S.T.; Stadel, J.M.

    1986-03-05

    In mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex) affects a switch in ..beta..-adrenergic receptor (..beta..AR) subtype expression from ..beta../sub 1/AR to ..beta../sub 2/AR and increases total ..beta..AR number. They now demonstrate a similar effect by sodium butyrate (B) and find that the combined effect of these two gene-activating agents is greater than additive suggesting different mechanisms of action on the ..beta..AR. ..beta..AR are assayed in membranes prepared from 3T3-L1 cells using the radiolabeled ..beta..AR-specific antagonist (/sup 125/I)-cyanopindolol. ..beta..AR subtype is determined by competition binding of the ..beta../sub 2/AR-selective antagonist ICI 118.551 for the radioligand. B (2-10mM) causes a dose-dependent increase in total ..beta..AR number (up to 2-fold over control) and the proportion of ..beta../sub 2/AR. B (5mM) causes a time-dependent increase in total ..beta..AR number (2-fold) and the proportion of ..beta../sub 2/AR up to 24 hr. Dex maximally increases total ..beta..AR number (2-fold) when treated for 48 hr at concentrations greater than or equal to 100nM. B (2 or 5mM) together with dex (250nM) have a greater than additive effect on total ..beta..AR number at 24 hr (1.7-fold) and at 48 hr (1.4-2.4-fold, using 5 or 10mM B and dex greater than or equal to 10nM). The proportion of ..beta../sub 2/AR is also greater when both compounds are added together. In comparison with proprionate and valerate, B increases total ..beta..AR number and the proportion of ..beta../sub 2/AR to a greater extent and at lower concentrations. To determine a functional correlate to these findings, cells were pre-treated for 48 hr with B and/or dex, intracellular ATP labeled with /sup 3/H-adenine, followed by treatment with forskolin (10..mu..M) and ..beta..AR agonists. B caused a dramatic increase in /sup 3/H-cAMP produced compared to control and dex treatments and a greater than additive effect was again achieved when B and dex were

  12. Electron transport phosphorylation in rumen butyrivibrios: unprecedented ATP yield for glucose fermentation to butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Hackmann, Timothy J.; Firkins, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    From a genomic analysis of rumen butyrivibrios (Butyrivibrio and Pseudobutyrivibrio sp.), we have re-evaluated the contribution of electron transport phosphorylation (ETP) to ATP formation in this group. This group is unique in that most (76%) genomes were predicted to possess genes for both Ech and Rnf transmembrane ion pumps. These pumps act in concert with the NifJ and Bcd-Etf to form a electrochemical potential (ΔμH+ and ΔμNa+), which drives ATP synthesis by ETP. Of the 62 total butyrivibrio genomes currently available from the Hungate 1000 project, all 62 were predicted to possess NifJ, which reduces oxidized ferredoxin (Fdox) during pyruvate conversion to acetyl-CoA. All 62 possessed all subunits of Bcd-Etf, which reduces Fdox and oxidizes reduced NAD during crotonyl-CoA reduction. Additionally, 61 genomes possessed all subunits of the Rnf, which generates ΔμH+ or ΔμNa+ from oxidation of reduced Fd (Fdred) and reduction of oxidized NAD. Further, 47 genomes possessed all six subunits of the Ech, which generates ΔμH+ from oxidation of Fdred. For glucose fermentation to butyrate and H2, the electrochemical potential established should drive synthesis of ∼1.5 ATP by the F0F1-ATP synthase (possessed by all 62 genomes). The total yield is ∼4.5 ATP/glucose after accounting for three ATP formed by classic substrate-level phosphorylation, and it is one the highest yields for any glucose fermentation. The yield was the same when unsaturated fatty acid bonds, not H+, served as the electron acceptor (as during biohydrogenation). Possession of both Ech and Rnf had been previously documented in only a few sulfate-reducers, was rare in other rumen prokaryotic genomes in our analysis, and may confer an energetic advantage to rumen butyrivibrios. This unique energy conservation system might enhance the butyrivibrios’ ability to overcome growth inhibition by unsaturated fatty acids, as postulated herein. PMID:26157432

  13. Effects of sodium butyrate supplementation on reproductive performance and colostrum composition in gilts.

    PubMed

    He, B; Wang, M; Guo, H; Jia, Y; Yang, X; Zhao, R

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients are essential for the health and survival of human beings and animals. Also, they play a major role in enhancing reproductive efficiency. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB) on reproductive performance and colostrum composition in gilts. A total of 40 Large White×Landrace replacement gilts (at the age of 160 to 175 days) were fed either a standard diet (control group, n=20) or standard diet top dressed with encapsulated SB at the level of 500 mg/kg (SB group, n=20) from 1 month before mating to 7 days after farrowing. The rate of gilts regular return to estrus after insemination was lower in SB group than the control group. The total number of piglets born (P=0.179) and the litter weight at birth (P=0.063) did not differ between the two treatment groups. However, the mean BW at day 7 tended to be greater in SB group (P=0.051) and average daily gain of piglets was greater (P=0.011) compared with control group. Colostrum samples were collected at parturition and the concentrations of total protein (P=0.197), cholesterol (P=0.161) and lactose (P=0.923) were not influenced by SB supplementation. However, compared with control gilts, colostrum from SB-treated gilts contained lower triglyceride (P=0.050). Moreover, colostrum concentrations of prolactin (P=0.005) and leptin (P=0.006) were significantly lower in SB group. No significant differences were noted for the colostral concentrations of cortisol (P=0.899), thyroxine (P=0.891) or triiodothyronine (P=0.194). The concentration of lipopolysaccharide in colostrum was not influenced by SB supplementation (P=0.972). However, colostrum from SB-treated gilts had significantly lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) (P=0.030) and higher immunoglobulin A (IgA) (P=0.042). Collectively, SB supplementation could reduce the rate of gilts return to estrus, alter the composition of colostrum and enhance the growth rate of piglets. Moreover, SB could alter the immune function

  14. Bifidobacteria and Butyrate-Producing Colon Bacteria: Importance and Strategies for Their Stimulation in the Human Gut.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Audrey; Selak, Marija; Lantin, David; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of evidence linking certain disorders of the human body to a disturbed gut microbiota, there is a growing interest for compounds that positively influence its composition and activity through diet. Besides the consumption of probiotics to stimulate favorable bacterial communities in the human gastrointestinal tract, prebiotics such as inulin-type fructans (ITF) and arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS) can be consumed to increase the number of bifidobacteria in the colon. Several functions have been attributed to bifidobacteria, encompassing degradation of non-digestible carbohydrates, protection against pathogens, production of vitamin B, antioxidants, and conjugated linoleic acids, and stimulation of the immune system. During life, the numbers of bifidobacteria decrease from up to 90% of the total colon microbiota in vaginally delivered breast-fed infants to <5% in the colon of adults and they decrease even more in that of elderly as well as in patients with certain disorders such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, allergies, and regressive autism. It has been suggested that the bifidogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of strain-specific yet complementary carbohydrate degradation mechanisms within cooperating bifidobacterial consortia. Except for a bifidogenic effect, ITF and AXOS also have shown to cause a butyrogenic effect in the human colon, i.e., an enhancement of colon butyrate production. Butyrate is an essential metabolite in the human colon, as it is the preferred energy source for the colon epithelial cells, contributes to the maintenance of the gut barrier functions, and has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the butyrogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of cross-feeding interactions between bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (clostridial cluster IV

  15. Electronic properties of electron-doped [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester and silylmethylfullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, Sho; Okada, Susumu

    2017-06-01

    Electronic properties of electron-doped chemically decorated C60 fullerenes, [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and silylmethylfullerene (SIMEF), by a planar electrode were studied using density functional theory combined with the effective screening medium method to simulate the heterointerface between the chemically decorated C60 and cationic counter materials. We find that the distribution of accumulated electrons and induced electric field depend on the molecular arrangement with respect to the external electric field of the electrode. We also show that the quantum capacitance of the molecule is sensitive to molecular arrangement owing to the asymmetric distribution of the accumulated electrons.

  16. Bifidobacteria and Butyrate-Producing Colon Bacteria: Importance and Strategies for Their Stimulation in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Audrey; Selak, Marija; Lantin, David; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of evidence linking certain disorders of the human body to a disturbed gut microbiota, there is a growing interest for compounds that positively influence its composition and activity through diet. Besides the consumption of probiotics to stimulate favorable bacterial communities in the human gastrointestinal tract, prebiotics such as inulin-type fructans (ITF) and arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS) can be consumed to increase the number of bifidobacteria in the colon. Several functions have been attributed to bifidobacteria, encompassing degradation of non-digestible carbohydrates, protection against pathogens, production of vitamin B, antioxidants, and conjugated linoleic acids, and stimulation of the immune system. During life, the numbers of bifidobacteria decrease from up to 90% of the total colon microbiota in vaginally delivered breast-fed infants to <5% in the colon of adults and they decrease even more in that of elderly as well as in patients with certain disorders such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, allergies, and regressive autism. It has been suggested that the bifidogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of strain-specific yet complementary carbohydrate degradation mechanisms within cooperating bifidobacterial consortia. Except for a bifidogenic effect, ITF and AXOS also have shown to cause a butyrogenic effect in the human colon, i.e., an enhancement of colon butyrate production. Butyrate is an essential metabolite in the human colon, as it is the preferred energy source for the colon epithelial cells, contributes to the maintenance of the gut barrier functions, and has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the butyrogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of cross-feeding interactions between bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (clostridial cluster IV

  17. Alcohol and suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Hufford, M R

    2001-07-01

    Alcohol dependence and alcohol intoxication are important risk factors for suicidal behavior. However, the mechanism for the relationship remains unclear. This review presents a conceptual framework relating alcohol to suicidal behavior. Distal risk factors create a statistical potential for suicide. Alcohol dependence, as well as associated comorbid psychopathology and negative life events, act as distal risk factors for suicidal behavior. Proximal risk factors determine the timing of suicidal behavior by translating the statistical potential of distal risk factors into action. The acute effects of alcohol intoxication act as important proximal risk factors for suicidal behavior among the alcoholic and nonalcoholic alike. Mechanisms responsible for alcohol's ability to increase the proximal risk for suicidal behavior include alcohol's ability to: (1) increase psychological distress, (2) increase aggressiveness, (3) propel suicidal ideation into action through suicide-specific alcohol expectancies, and (4) constrict cognition which impairs the generation and implementation of alternative coping strategies. Moreover, the proximal risk factors associated with acute intoxication are consistent with Baumeister's (1990) escape theory of suicide. Suggestions for additional research are discussed, including the possibility that a nonlinear cusp catastrophe model characterizes the relationship between alcohol intoxication and suicidal behavior.

  18. Genetics of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Schuckit, M A; Li, T K; Cloninger, C R; Deitrich, R A

    1985-12-01

    Great progress has been made by research on the contribution genetic factors make to a vulnerability toward alcoholism. Animal studies have demonstrated the importance of genetics in ethanol preference and levels of consumption, and human family, twin, and adoption research have revealed a 4-fold higher risk for offspring of alcoholics, even if they were adopted out at birth. The work presented in this symposium reviews the ongoing search for genetic trait markers of a vulnerability toward alcoholism. Dr. Li has used both animal and human research to demonstrate the possible importance of the genetic control of enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism and has worked to help develop an animal model of alcoholism. The possible importance of subgroups with different levels of predisposition toward alcoholism is emphasized by Dr. Cloninger. An overview of the studies of sons of alcoholics, given by Dr. Schuckit, reveals the potential importance of a decreased intensity of reaction to ethanol as part of a predisposition toward alcoholism and discusses the possible impact of some brain waves and ethanol metabolites to an alcoholism vulnerability. Dr. Deitrich reviews interrelationships between studies of animals and humans in the search for factors involved in a genetic vulnerability toward alcoholism. Taken together, these presentations underscore the importance of genetic factors in alcoholism, review animal and human research attempting to identify markers of a vulnerability, and reveal the high level of interaction between human and animal research.

  19. ADOLESCENTS AND ALCOHOL

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Linda Patia

    2014-01-01

    The high levels of alcohol consumption characteristic of adolescence may be in part biologically based, given that elevated consumption levels are also evident during this developmental transition in other mammalian species as well. Studies conducted using a simple animal model of adolescence in the rat has shown adolescents to be more sensitive than adults to social facilitatory and rewarding effects of alcohol, but less sensitive to numerous alcohol effects that may serve as cues to limit intake. These age-specific alcohol sensitivities appear related to differential rates of development of neural systems underlying different alcohol effects as well as to an ontogenetic decline in rapid brain compensations to alcohol, termed “acute tolerance”. In contrast, these adolescent-typical sensitivities to alcohol do not appear to be notably influenced by pubertally-related increases in gonadal hormones. Although data are sparse, there are hints that similar alcohol sensitivities may also be seen in human adolescents, with this developmentally decreased sensitivity to alcohol’s intoxicating effects possibly exacerbated by genetic vulnerabilities also characterized by an insensitivity to alcohol intoxication, thereby perhaps permitting especially high levels of alcohol consumption among vulnerable youth. PMID:25309054

  20. [Alcohol and crime].

    PubMed

    Lévay, Boglárka

    2006-01-01

    The role alcohol abuse plays in criminality has been a matter of primary concern for scholars for decades, as indicated by numerous studies and research projects. Most of these studies focus on determining the presence of a relationship between criminal behaviour and alcohol use, and whether criminal inclinations increase with the consumption of alcohol. Research shows that alcohol use indeed increases the risk of criminal behaviour, and that there is an especially strong and consistent correlation between alcohol abuse and violent crimes. However, researchers still disagree on the exact extent to which alcohol use effects criminality, and on the mechanisms causing alcohol to induce violent behaviour. A significant proportion of studies have focused in recent years on aggressive behaviour as a result of drinking alcohol. One of the most important means of measurement is the study of violent behaviour in places where alcohol is on sale. Studying the forms and frequency of violence in pubs and near off-licence stores greatly enables experts to understand the general context of the problem. This is the reason for the increasing interest in the topic throughout the past few decades. The present study focuses mainly on the literature published in English and German in leading journals of criminology since 1980, as well as on the most recent and fundamental publications on the topic, with special regard to results concerning drinking habits, and the relationship between drinking alcohol and violent or criminal behaviour, respectively.