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Sample records for bypass model turbofan

  1. Advanced modeling of active control of fan noise for ultra high bypass turbofan engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Florence Vanel

    1999-11-01

    An advanced model of active control of fan noise for ultra high bypass turbofan engines has been developed. This model is based on a boundary integral equation method and simulates the propagation, radiation and control of the noise generated by an engine fan surrounded by a duct of finite length and cylindrical shape, placed in a uniform flow. Control sources, modeled by point monopoles placed along the wall of the engine inlet or outlet duct, inject anti-noise into the duct to destructively interfere with the sound field generated by the fan. The duct inner wall can be lined or rigid. Unlike current methods, reflection from the duct openings is taken into account, as well as the presence of the evanescent modes. Forward, as well as backward (i.e., from the rear of the engine), external radiation is computed. The development of analytical expressions for the sound field resulting from both the fan loading noise and the control sources is presented. Two fan models are described. The first model uses spinning line sources with radially distributed strength to model the loading force that the fan blades exert on the medium. The second model uses radial arrays of spinning point dipoles to simulate the generation of fan modes of specific modal amplitudes. It is shown that these fan models can provide a reasonable approximation of actual engine fan noise in the instance when the modal amplitude of the propagating modes or the loading force distribution on the fan blades, is known. Sample cases of active noise control are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the model. The results from these tests indicate that this model (1)is conducive to more realistic studies of active control of fan noise on ultra high bypass turbofan engines because it accounts for the presence of evanescent modes and for interference between inlet and outlet radiation, which were shown to have some impact on the performance of the active control system; (2)is very useful because it allows

  2. The Effect of Bypass Nozzle Exit Area on Fan Aerodynamic Performance and Noise in a Model Turbofan Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary, G.; Woodward, Richard P.; Jeracki, Robert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on identifying and understanding the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine, as well as determining their contribution to the overall aircraft noise signature. Therefore, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test program was conducted called the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test as part of the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology program. The test was performed in the anechoic NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a 1/5 scale model turbofan simulator which represented a current generation, medium pressure ratio, high bypass turbofan aircraft engine. The investigation focused on simulating in model scale only the bypass section of the turbofan engine. The test objectives were to: identify the noise sources within the model and determine their noise level; investigate several component design technologies by determining their impact on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan stage; and conduct detailed flow diagnostics within the fan flow field to characterize the physics of the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan model. This report discusses results obtained for one aspect of the Source Diagnostic Test that investigated the effect of the bypass or fan nozzle exit area on the bypass stage aerodynamic performance, specifically the fan and outlet guide vanes or stators, as well as the farfield acoustic noise level. The aerodynamic performance, farfield acoustics, and Laser Doppler Velocimeter flow diagnostic results are presented for the fan and four different fixed-area bypass nozzle configurations. The nozzles simulated fixed engine operating lines and encompassed the fan stage operating envelope from near stall to cruise. One nozzle was selected as a baseline reference, representing the nozzle area which would achieve the design point operating conditions and fan stage performance. The total area change from

  3. Acoustic Performance of Novel Fan Noise Reduction Technologies for a High Bypass Model Turbofan at Simulated Flights Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David M.; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    Two novel fan noise reduction technologies, over the rotor acoustic treatment and soft stator vane technologies, were tested in an ultra-high bypass ratio turbofan model in the NASA Glenn Research Center s 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. The performance of these technologies was compared to that of the baseline fan configuration, which did not have these technologies. Sideline acoustic data and hot film flow data were acquired and are used to determine the effectiveness of the various treatments. The material used for the over the rotor treatment was foam metal and two different types were used. The soft stator vanes had several internal cavities tuned to target certain frequencies. In order to accommodate the cavities it was necessary to use a cut-on stator to demonstrate the soft vane concept.

  4. Turbofan Noise Reduction Associated With Increased Bypass Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced 22-in. scale model turbofan, typical of a current-generation aircraft engine design by GE Aircraft Engines, was tested in NASA Glenn Research Center s 9- by 15- Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to explore the far-field acoustic effects of an increased bypass nozzle area at simulated aircraft speeds of takeoff, approach, and landing. The wind-tunnel-scale model consisted of the bypass stage fan, stators, and nacelle (including the fan exit nozzle) of a typical turbofan. This fan-stage test was part of the NASA Glenn Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test, second entry, which acquired aeroacoustic results over a range of test conditions. A baseline nozzle was selected, and the nozzle area was chosen for maximum performance at sea-level conditions. Two additional nozzles were also tested--one with a 5.4-percent increase in nozzle area over the baseline nozzle (sized for design point conditions), corresponding to a 5-percent increase in fan weight flow, and another nozzle with a 10.9-percent increase in nozzle area over the baseline nozzle (sized for maximum weight flow at sea-level conditions), corresponding to a 7.5 percent increase in fan weight flow. Measured acoustic benefits with increased nozzle area were very encouraging, showing overall sound power level reductions of 2 dB or more (left graph) while the stage adiabatic efficiency (right graph) and thrust (final graph) actually increased by several percentage points. These noise-reduction benefits were seen to include both rotor-interaction tones and broadband noise, and were evident throughout the range of measured sideline angles.

  5. H2-fueled high-bypass turbofan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riple, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The study developed preliminary design concepts for the exploitation of the properties of LH2 in a turbofan engine intended for air transport use, and showed the benefits which accrue in reduction of aircraf direct operating cost. Design concepts for the engine fuel delivery and control system, including the engine high pressure fuel pump, were developed, and general concept feasibility was shown. For both the engine and the fuel delivery and control system, recommendations were made for the advanced development which is necessary to bring the technology to a state of readiness for design application. The study was of necessity abbreviated in nature: more intensive study of both the engine and fuel delivery and control system is recommended.

  6. Extended frequency turbofan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Park, J. W.; Jaekel, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The fan model was developed using two dimensional modeling techniques to add dynamic radial coupling between the core stream and the bypass stream of the fan. When incorporated into a complete TF-30 engine simulation, the fan model greatly improved compression system frequency response to planar inlet pressure disturbances up to 100 Hz. The improved simulation also matched engine stability limits at 15 Hz, whereas the one dimensional fan model required twice the inlet pressure amplitude to stall the simulation. With verification of the two dimensional fan model, this program formulated a high frequency F-100(3) engine simulation using row by row compression system characteristics. In addition to the F-100(3) remote splitter fan, the program modified the model fan characteristics to simulate a proximate splitter version of the F-100(3) engine.

  7. Comparison of turbine bypass and mixed flow turbofan engines for a high-speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Jonathan A.; Haller, William J.; Berton, Jeffrey J.

    1991-01-01

    A comparison of the turbine bypass engine and the mixed flow turbofan for a Mach 2.4 cruise application is presented. A parametric assessment is conducted for each cycle. Parameters that are investigated for the turbine bypass engine include design bypass, combustor exit temperature, and overall pressure ratio. Parameters that are investigated for the mixed flow turbofan include fan pressure ratio, mixer design pressure ratio, and combustor exit temperature. The engines are analyzed for a 5000-nautical-mile, all supersonic cruise mission to determine the aircraft takeoff gross weights. The effects of takeoff noise, cruise emissions, the addition of subsonic cruise legs, and constrained supersonic cruise altitudes are also evaluated.

  8. Preliminary Study on Acoustic Detection of Faults Experienced by a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2014-01-01

    The vehicle integrated propulsion research (VIPR) effort conducted by NASA and several partners provided an unparalleled opportunity to test a relatively low TRL concept regarding the use of far field acoustics to identify faults occurring in a high bypass turbofan engine. Though VIPR Phase II ground based aircraft installed engine testing wherein a multitude of research sensors and methods were evaluated, an array of acoustic microphones was used to determine the viability of such an array to detect failures occurring in a commercially representative high bypass turbofan engine. The failures introduced during VIPR testing included commanding the engine's low pressure compressor (LPC) exit and high pressure compressor (HPC) 14th stage bleed values abruptly to their failsafe positions during steady state

  9. Analytical evaluation of the impact of broad specification fuels on high bypass turbofan engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Six conceptual combustor designs for the CF6-50 high bypass turbofan engine and six conceptual combustor designs for the NASA/GE E3 high bypass turbofan engine were analyzed to provide an assessment of the major problems anticipated in using broad specification fuels in these aircraft engine combustion systems. Each of the conceptual combustor designs, which are representative of both state-of-the-art and advanced state-of-the-art combustion systems, was analyzed to estimate combustor performance, durability, and pollutant emissions when using commercial Jet A aviation fuel and when using experimental referee board specification fuel. Results indicate that lean burning, low emissions double annular combustor concepts can accommodate a wide range of fuel properties without a serious deterioration of performance or durability. However, rich burning, single annular concepts would be less tolerant to a relaxation of fuel properties. As the fuel specifications are relaxed, autoignition delay time becomes much smaller which presents a serious design and development problem for premixing-prevaporizing combustion system concepts.

  10. Effect of Installation of Mixer/Ejector Nozzles on the Core Flow Exhaust of High-Bypass-Ratio Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas E.

    1998-01-01

    The aerospace industry is currently investigating the effect of installing mixer/ejector nozzles on the core flow exhaust of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. This effort includes both full-scale engine tests at sea level conditions and subscale tests in static test facilities. Subscale model tests are to be conducted prior to full-scale testing. With this approach, model results can be analyzed and compared with analytical predications. Problem areas can then be identified and design changes made and verified in subscale prior to committing to any final design configurations for engine ground tests. One of the subscale model test programs for the integrated mixer/ejector development was a joint test conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. This test was conducted to study various mixer/ejector nozzle configurations installed on the core flow exhaust of advanced, high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines for subsonic, commercial applications. The mixer/ejector concept involves the introduction of largescale, low-loss, streamwise vortices that entrain large amounts of secondary air and rapidly mix it with the primary stream. This results in increased ejector pumping relative to conventional ejectors and in more complete mixing within the ejector shroud. The latter improves thrust performance through the efficient energy exchange between the primary and secondary streams. This experimental program was completed in April 1997 in Lewis' CE-22 static test facility. Variables tested included the nozzle area ratio (A9/A8), which ranged from 1.6 to 3.0. This ratio was varied by increasing or decreasing the nozzle throat area, A8. Primary nozzles tested included both lobed mixers and conical primaries. These configurations were tested with and without an outer shroud, and the shroud position was varied by inserting spacers in it. In addition, data were acquired with and without secondary flow.

  11. Aerodynamic Performance of Scale-Model Turbofan Outlet Guide Vanes Designed for Low Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on an understanding of the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine. In order to more fully understand the physics of noise in a turbofan engine, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test programs was conducted called the 'Source Diagnostic Test.' The text was cooperative effort between NASA and General Electric Aircraft Engines, as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. A 1/5-scale model simulator representing the bypass stage of a current technology high bypass ratio turbofan engine was used in the test. The test article consisted of the bypass fan and outlet guide vanes in a flight-type nacelle. The fan used was a medium pressure ratio design with 22 individual, wide chord blades. Three outlet guide vane design configurations were investigated, representing a 54-vane radial Baseline configuration, a 26-vane radial, wide chord Low Count configuration and a 26-vane, wide chord Low Noise configuration with 30 deg of aft sweep. The test was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9 by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at velocities simulating the takeoff and approach phases of the aircraft flight envelope. The Source Diagnostic Test had several acoustic and aerodynamic technical objectives: (1) establish the performance of a scale model fan selected to represent the current technology turbofan product; (2) assess the performance of the fan stage with each of the three distinct outlet guide vane designs; (3) determine the effect of the outlet guide vane configuration on the fan baseline performance; and (4) conduct detailed flowfield diagnostic surveys, both acoustic and aerodynamic, to characterize and understand the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan engine. This paper addresses the fan and stage aerodynamic performance results from the Source Diagnostic Test.

  12. Mixing effectiveness test of an exhaust gas mixer in a high bypass turbofan at altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullom, R. R.; Bobula, G. A.; Burkardt, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal mixing effectiveness characteristics of an eighteen lobe, scalloped and unscalloped, partial, forced mixer were measured in a high-bypass turbofan engine. Data were also obtained without the mixer installed, i.e., free mixing. Tests were conducted at four combinations of simulated flight conditions from 0.3 to 0.8 Mach number and from 6,096 meters (20,000 ft) to 13,715 m (45,000 ft) altitude, mixing chamber lengths of L/D=0.52 and 0.65 were tested. For this range of test conditions and mixer configurations, the forced mixing effectiveness varied from 59 to 68 percent. Values of mixing effectiveness and total pressure loss were calculated from temperature and pressure data obtained at the mixer inlet and exhaust nozzle exit.

  13. The Potential Benefits of Advanced Casing Treatment for Noise Attenuation in Utra-High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David

    2007-01-01

    In order to increase stall margin in a high-bypass ratio turbofan engine, an advanced casing treatment was developed that extracted a small amount of flow from the casing behind the fan and injected it back in front of the fan. Several different configurations of this casing treatment were designed by varying the distance of the extraction and injection points, as well as varying the amount of flow. These casing treatments were tested on a 55.9 cm (22 in.) scale model of the Pratt & Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor in the NASA Glenn 9 by 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel. While all of the casing treatment configurations showed the expected increase in stall margin, a few of the designs showed a potential noise benefit for certain engine speeds. This paper will show the casing treatments and the results of the testing as well as propose further research in this area. With better prediction and design techniques, future casing treatment configurations could be developed that may result in an optimized casing treatment that could conceivably reduce the noise further.

  14. Enhanced Fan Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Stone, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work by consultants to Diversitech Inc. for the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to revise the fan noise prediction procedure based on fan noise data obtained in the 9- by 15 Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at GRC. The purpose of this task is to begin development of an enhanced, analytical, more physics-based, fan noise prediction method applicable to commercial turbofan propulsion systems. The method is to be suitable for programming into a computational model for eventual incorporation into NASA's current aircraft system noise prediction computer codes. The scope of this task is in alignment with the mission of the Propulsion 21 research effort conducted by the coalition of NASA, state government, industry, and academia to develop aeropropulsion technologies. A model for fan noise prediction was developed based on measured noise levels for the R4 rotor with several outlet guide vane variations and three fan exhaust areas. The model predicts the complete fan noise spectrum, including broadband noise, tones, and for supersonic tip speeds, combination tones. Both spectra and directivity are predicted. Good agreement with data was achieved for all fan geometries. Comparisons with data from a second fan, the ADP fan, also showed good agreement.

  15. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 3: Noise measurement addendum. [CF6-50 high bypass turbofan engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, V. L.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic characteristics of the double annular combustor in a CF6-50 high bypass turbofan engine were investigated. Internal fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the combustor region and in the core exhaust. The transmission loss across the turbine and nozzle was determined from the measurements and compared to previous component results and present theory. The primary noise source location in the combustor was investigated. Spectral comparisons of test rig results were made with the engine results. The measured overall power level was compared with component and engine correlating parameters.

  16. Noise predictions of a high bypass turbofan engine using the Lockheed Near-Field Noise Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawls, J. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The prediction of engine noise during cruise using the Near-Field Noise Prediction Program developed by Lockheed is examined. Test conditions were established which simulate the operation of a high bypass turbofan engine under a wide range of operating conditions. These test conditions include variations in altitude, flight Mach number and thrust setting. Based on the results of noise prediction made using the Lockheed program, an evaluation of the impact of these test conditions on the overall sound pressure level(OASPL)and the one-third octave band spectra is made. An evaluation of the sensitivity of flight condition parameters is also made. The primary noise source from a high bypass turbofan was determined to be fan broadband shock noise. This noise source can be expected to be present during normal cruising conditions. When present, fan broadband shock noise usually dominates at all frequencies and all directivity angles. Other noise sources of importance are broadband shock noise from the primary jet, fan noise, fan mixing noise and turbine noise.

  17. Noise predictions of a high bypass turbofan engine using the Lockheed Near-Field Noise Prediction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, J. W., Jr.

    1986-07-01

    The prediction of engine noise during cruise using the Near-Field Noise Prediction Program developed by Lockheed is examined. Test conditions were established which simulate the operation of a high bypass turbofan engine under a wide range of operating conditions. These test conditions include variations in altitude, flight Mach number and thrust setting. Based on the results of noise prediction made using the Lockheed program, an evaluation of the impact of these test conditions on the overall sound pressure level(OASPL)and the one-third octave band spectra is made. An evaluation of the sensitivity of flight condition parameters is also made. The primary noise source from a high bypass turbofan was determined to be fan broadband shock noise. This noise source can be expected to be present during normal cruising conditions. When present, fan broadband shock noise usually dominates at all frequencies and all directivity angles. Other noise sources of importance are broadband shock noise from the primary jet, fan noise, fan mixing noise and turbine noise.

  18. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  19. Testing and Performance Verification of a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Podboy, Gary G.; Miller, Christopher J.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    A 1/5 scale model rotor representative of a current technology, high bypass ratio, turbofan engine was installed and tested in the W8 single-stage, high-speed, compressor test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The same fan rotor was tested previously in the GRC 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel as a fan module consisting of the rotor and outlet guide vanes mounted in a flight-like nacelle. The W8 test verified that the aerodynamic performance and detailed flow field of the rotor as installed in W8 were representative of the wind tunnel fan module installation. Modifications to W8 were necessary to ensure that this internal flow facility would have a flow field at the test package that is representative of flow conditions in the wind tunnel installation. Inlet flow conditioning was designed and installed in W8 to lower the fan face turbulence intensity to less than 1.0 percent in order to better match the wind tunnel operating environment. Also, inlet bleed was added to thin the casing boundary layer to be more representative of a flight nacelle boundary layer. On the 100 percent speed operating line the fan pressure rise and mass flow rate agreed with the wind tunnel data to within 1 percent. Detailed hot film surveys of the inlet flow, inlet boundary layer and fan exit flow were compared to results from the wind tunnel. The effect of inlet casing boundary layer thickness on fan performance was quantified. Challenges and lessons learned from testing this high flow, low static pressure rise fan in an internal flow facility are discussed.

  20. Optimal design and installation of ultra high bypass ratio turbofan nacelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, Andrey; Zlenko, Nikolay; Matyash, Evgeniy; Mikhaylov, Sergey; Shenkin, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    The paper is devoted to the problem of designing and optimizing the nacelle of turbojet bypass engine with high bypass ratio and high thrust. An optimization algorithm EGO based on development of surrogate models and the method for maximizing the probability of improving the objective function has been used. The designing methodology has been based on the numerical solution of the Reynolds equations system. Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model has been chosen for RANS closure. The effective thrust losses has been uses as an objective function in optimizing the engine nacelle. As a result of optimization, effective thrust has been increased by 1.5 %. The Blended wing body aircraft configuration has been studied as a possible application. Two variants of the engine layout arrangement have been considered. It has been shown that the power plant changes the pressure distribution on the aircraft surface. It results in essential diminishing the configuration lift-drag ratio.

  1. Conceptual study of an advanced supersonic technology transport (AST-107) for transpacific range using low-bypass-ratio turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, S. J., Jr.; Foss, W. E., Jr.; Neubauer, M. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced supersonic technology configuration concept designated the AST-107, using a low bypass ratio turbofan engine, is described and analyzed. The aircraft had provisions for 273 passengers arranged five abreast. The cruise Mach number was 2.62. The mission range for the AST-107 was 8.48 Mm (4576 n.mi.) and an average lift drag ratio of 9.15 during cruise was achieved. The available lateral control was not sufficient for the required 15.4 m/s (30 kt) crosswind landing condition, and a crosswind landing gear or a significant reduction in dihedral effect would be necessary to meet this requirement. The lowest computed noise levels, including a mechanical suppressor noise reduction of 3 EPNdB at the flyover and sideline monitoring stations, were 110.3 EPNdB (sideline noise), 113.1 EPNdB (centerline noise) and 110.5 EPNdB (approach noise).

  2. Investigation of performance deterioration of the CF6/JT9D, high-bypass ratio turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemianski, J. A.; Mehalic, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The aircraft energy efficiency program within NASA is developing technology required to improve the fuel efficiency of commercial subsonic transport aricraft. One segment of this program includes engine diagnostics which is directed toward determining the sources and causes of performance deterioration in the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT9D and General Electric CF6 high-bypass ratio turbofan engines and developing technology for minimizing the performance losses. Results of engine performance deterioration investigations based on historical data, special engine tests, and specific tests to define the influence of flight loads and component clearances on performance are presented. The results of analysis of several damage mechanisms that contribute to performance deterioration such as blade tip rubs, airfoil surface roughness and erosion, and thermal distortion are also included. The significance of these damage mechanisms on component and overall engine performance is discussed.

  3. CFD simulations of the flow control performance applied for inlet of low drag high-bypass turbofan engine at cross flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursakov, I. A.; Kazhan, E. V.; Lysenkov, A. V.; Savelyev, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Paper describes the optimization procedure for low cruise drag inlet of high-bypass ratio turbofan engine (HBRE). The critical cross-flow velocity when the flow separation on the lee side of the inlet channel occurs is determined. The effciency of different flow control devices used to improve the flow parameters at inlet section cross flow regime is analyzed. Boundary layer suction, bypass slot and vortex generators are considered. It is shown that flow control devices enlarge the stability range of inlet performance at cross flow regimes.

  4. Application of laminar flow control to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Y. S.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, the concept of the application of hybrid laminar flow to modern commercial transport aircraft was successfully flight tested on a Boeing 757 aircraft. In this limited demonstration, in which only part of the upper surface of the swept wing was designed for the attainment of laminar flow, significant local drag reduction was measured. This paper addresses the potential application of this technology to laminarize the external surface of large, modern turbofan engine nacelles which may comprise as much as 5-10 percent of the total wetted area of future commercial transports. A hybrid-laminar-flow-control (HLFC) pressure distribution is specified and the corresponding nacelle geometry is computed utilizing a predictor/corrector design method. Linear stability calculations are conducted to provide predictions of the extent of the laminar boundary layer. Performance studies are presented to determine potential benefits in terms of reduced fuel consumption.

  5. Turbofan engine with a low pressure turbine driven supercharger in a bypass duct operated by a fuel rich combustor and an afterburner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, James W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A multiple bypass turbofan engine includes a core Brayton Cycle gas generator with a fuel rich burning combustor and is provided with a variable supercharged bypass duct around the gas generator with a supercharging means in the supercharged bypass duct powered by a turbine not mechanically connected to the gas generator. The engine further includes a low pressure turbine driven forward fan upstream and forward of an aft fan and drivingly connected to a low pressure turbine by a low pressure shaft, the low pressure turbine being aft of and in serial flow communication with the core gas generator. A fan bypass duct is disposed radially outward of the core engine assembly and has first and second inlets disposed between the forward and aft fans. An inlet duct having an annular duct wall is disposed radially inward of the bypass duct and connects the second inlet to the bypass duct. A supercharger means for compressing air is drivingly connected to the low pressure turbine and is disposed in the inlet duct. A secondary combustor or augmentor is disposed in an exhaust duct downstream of and in fluid flow communication with the bypass duct and the gas generator.

  6. Effect of combined pressure and temperature distortion orientation on high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, R. H.; Mehalic, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Total-temperature, static-pressure and total-pressure distributions were measured in the inlet duct upstream of the engine inlet and within the fan and compressor of a YTF34 turbofan engine. Free-stream and boundary layer yaw angle variations were measured between a rotable screen assembly and the engine inlet. Total pressure distortions were generated using three 180 deg extent screens and total temperature distortions were generated using a rotatable hydrogen burner. Reynolds number index upstream of the rotatable screen assembly was maintained at 0.5 (based on the undistorted sectors at station 1, the inlet flow measuring station). The engine mechanical fan speed at sea level condition was rated at 7005 rpm. The engine was tested at a corrected fan speed of 90 percent of rated condition. Yaw angle increased between the rotatable screen assembly and the engine inlet. The largest variation in free-stream and boundary layer yaw angle occurs when the combined distortions are 180 deg out-of-phase. Static-pressure distortion increased exponentially as flow approached the engine. Total-pressure distortions were attenuated between the engine inlet and the compressor exit. Total-temperature distortion persisted through the compressor for all four combined distortions investigated.

  7. Digital computer program for generating dynamic turbofan engine models (DIGTEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Krosel, S. M.; Szuch, J. R.; Westerkamp, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes DIGTEM, a digital computer program that simulates two spool, two-stream turbofan engines. The turbofan engine model in DIGTEM contains steady-state performance maps for all of the components and has control volumes where continuity and energy balances are maintained. Rotor dynamics and duct momentum dynamics are also included. Altogether there are 16 state variables and state equations. DIGTEM features a backward-differnce integration scheme for integrating stiff systems. It trims the model equations to match a prescribed design point by calculating correction coefficients that balance out the dynamic equations. It uses the same coefficients at off-design points and iterates to a balanced engine condition. Transients can also be run. They are generated by defining controls as a function of time (open-loop control) in a user-written subroutine (TMRSP). DIGTEM has run on the IBM 370/3033 computer using implicit integration with time steps ranging from 1.0 msec to 1.0 sec. DIGTEM is generalized in the aerothermodynamic treatment of components.

  8. Acoustic Performance of an Advanced Model Turbofan in Three Aeroacoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot-Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT), and in two other aeroacoustic facilities. The Universal Propulsion Simulator (UPS) fan was designed and manufactured by the General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) Company, and featured active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The reference test configurations were with the metal, M4, rotor with hardwall and treated bypass flow ducts. The UPS fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20 (limited flow data were also acquired at a Mach number of 0.25) which is representative of aircraft takeoff and approach conditions. Comparisons were made between data acquired within the airflow (9x15 LSWT and German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)) and outside of a free jet (Boeing Low Speed Aero acoustic Facility (LSAF) and DNW). Sideline data were acquired on an 89-in. (nominal 4 fan diameters) sideline using the same microphone assembly and holder in the 9x15 LSWT and DNW facilities. These data showed good agreement for similar UPS operating conditions and configurations. Distortion of fan spectra tonal content through a free jet shear layer was documented, suggesting that in-flow acoustic measurements are required for comprehensive fan noise diagnostics. However, there was good agreement for overall sound power level (PWL) fan noise measurements made both within and outside of the test facility airflow.

  9. Ramjet bypass duct and preburner configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A combined turbofan and ramjet aircraft engine includes a forward bypass duct which allows the engine to operate more efficiently during the turbofan mode of operation. By mounting a ramjet preburner in the forward duct and isolating this duct from the turbofan bypass air, a transition from turbofan operation to ramjet operation can take place at lower flight Mach numbers without incurring pressure losses or blockage in the turbofan bypass air.

  10. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  11. Frequency domain compensation of a DYNGEN turbofan engine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, R. M.; Gejji, R. R.; Hoppner, P. W.; Longenbaker, W. E.; Sain, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Following Rosenbrock's ideas regarding the advantages of dominance in linear multivariable control systems, a new graphical technique is used for the design of compensators that achieve dominance. The technique is illustrated with an application to the problem of designing compensators for a linear turbofan-engine model. The resulting design is put into perspective by examining it in the light of two other multivariable frequency-domain methods. One, MacFarlane's method of characteristic loci, is used to realize a final design for stability and low interaction. The other is a direct technique based upon the algebraic expansion of the determinant of the return difference in terms of it's elements. Results from simulations carried out on the NASA DYNGEN software are included.

  12. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine With Ice Crystal Ingestion: Follow-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  13. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine with Ice Crystal Ingestion; Follow-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  14. Analytical Modeling of Herschel-Quincke Concept Applied to Inlet Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallez, Raphael F.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Gerhold, Carl H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the period from January 1999 to December 2000 on the project 'Investigation of an Adaptive Herschel-Quincke Tube Concept for the Reduction of Tonal and Broadband Noise from Turbofan Engines', funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The Herschel-Quincke (HQ) tube concept is a developing technique the consists of circumferential arrays of tubes around the duct. The analytical model is developed to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of the HQ concept to turbofan engine inlets. An infinite duct model is developed and used to provide insight into attenuation mechanisms and design strategies. Based on this early model, the NASA-developed TBIEM3D code is modified for the HQ system. This model allows for investigation of the HQ system combined with a passive liner.

  15. ADAM: An Axisymmetric Duct Aeroacoustic Modeling system. [aircraft turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    An interconnected system of computer programs for analyzing the propagation and attenuation of sound in aeroengine ducts containing realistic compressible subsonic mean flows, ADAM was developed primarily for research directed towards the reduction of noise emitted from turbofan aircraft engines. The two basic components are a streamtube curvature program for determination of the mean flow, and a finite element code for solution of the acoustic propagation problem. The system, which has been specifically tailored for ease of use, is presently installed at NASA Langley Reseach Center on a Control Data Cyber 175 Computer under the NOS Operating system employing a Tektronix terminal for interactive graphics. The scope and organization of the ADAM system is described. A users guide, examples of input data, and results for selected cases are included.

  16. The Aerodynamic Performance of an Over-the-Rotor Liner With Circumferential Grooves on a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Buckley, James

    2013-01-01

    While liners have been utilized throughout turbofan ducts to attenuate fan noise, additional attenuation is obtainable by placing an acoustic liner over-the-rotor. Previous experiments have shown significant fan performance losses when acoustic liners are installed over-the-rotor. The fan blades induce an oscillating flow in the acoustic liners which results in a performance loss near the blade tip. An over-the-rotor liner was designed with circumferential grooves between the fan blade tips and the acoustic liner to reduce the oscillating flow in the acoustic liner. An experiment was conducted in the W-8 Single-Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center on a 1.5 pressure ratio fan to evaluate the impact of this over-the-rotor treatment design on fan aerodynamic performance. The addition of a circumferentially grooved over-the-rotor design between the fan blades and the acoustic liner reduced the performance loss, in terms of fan adiabatic efficiency, to less than 1 percent which is within the repeatability of this experiment.

  17. The Aerodynamic Performance of an Over-The-Rotor Liner with Circumferential Grooves on a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Rick; Hughes, Christopher; Buckley, James

    2013-01-01

    While liners have been utilized throughout turbofan ducts to attenuate fan noise, additional attenuation is obtainable by placing an acoustic liner over-the-rotor. Previous experiments have shown significant fan performance losses when acoustic liners are installed over-the-rotor. The fan blades induce an oscillating flow in the acoustic liners which results in a performance loss near the blade tip. An over-the-rotor liner was designed with circumferential grooves between the fan blade tips and the acoustic liner to reduce the oscillating flow in the acoustic liner. An experiment was conducted in the W-8 Single-Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center on a 1.5 pressure ratio fan to evaluate the impact of this over-the-rotor treatment design on fan aerodynamic performance. The addition of a circumferentially grooved over-the-rotor design between the fan blades and the acoustic liner reduced the performance loss, in terms of fan adiabatic efficiency, to less than 1% which is within the repeatability of this experiment.

  18. Large Engine Technology (LET) Task XXXVII Low-Bypass Ratio Mixed Turbofan Engine Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction Program Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Joseph R.; Zysman, Steven H.; Barber, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center supported a three year effort to develop the technology for reducing jet noise from low-bypass ratio engines. This effort concentrated on both analytical and experimental approaches using various mixer designs. CFD and MGB predictions are compared with LDV and noise data, respectively. While former predictions matched well with data, experiment shows a need for improving the latter predictions. Data also show that mixing noise can be sensitive to engine hardware upstream of the mixing exit plane.

  19. Luminescent Paints Used for Rotating Temperature and Pressure Measurements on Scale-Model High-Bypass-Ratio Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is a leader in the application of temperature- and pressuresensitive paints (TSP and PSP) in rotating environments. Tests were recently completed on several scale model, high-bypass-ratio turbofans in Lewis' 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Two of the test objectives were to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan designs. Using TSP and PSP, researchers successfully achieved fullfield aerodynamic loading profiles. The visualized loading profiles may help researchers identify factors contributing to the fans' performance and to the acoustic characteristics associated with the flow physics on the surface of the blades.

  20. Numerical modeling of multi-mode active control of turbofan tonal noise using a boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Laralee Gordon

    A numerical model was developed to investigate the possibility of implementing active control (ANC) to minimize noise radiation from high-bypass turbofan engines. Previous experimental work on the NASA Glenn Research Center active noise control fan (ANCF) was encouraging, but the question remained whether the modal approach investigated could be effective on real engines. The engine model developed for this research project uses an indirect boundary element method, implemented with Sysnoise, and a multi-mode Newton's algorithm, implemented with MATLAB(TM), to simulate the active control. Noise from the inlet was targeted. Both the experimental and numerical results based on the NASA ANCF simplified cylindrical engine geometry indicate overall reductions in the m = 2 component of the noise. Reductions obtained at the numerical sensor rings range from 17 dB to 63 dB and at a plane in the duct inlet, -8 dB to 33 dB. Rings mounted on the inlet duct are unable to accurately predict the total reduction of the inlet field, but the controller is still able to effectively reduce the total acoustic field. Generally, one sensor ring and one actuator ring per propagating mode were necessary to control the inlet field. At frequencies close to the cut-off frequency of a mode, an additional sensor and actuator ring were needed to adequately control the inlet field due to the evanescent mode. A more realistic, but still axisymmetric, engine geometry based on the GE CF6-80C engine was developed and the same algorithm used. Reductions obtained at the sensor rings range from 4 dB to 56 dB and at the duct inlet plane, from 12 dB to 26 dB. The overall far field noise radiation from the engine remained unchanged (0.4 dB) or decreased slightly (3.6 dB). The inlet noise was controlled at all frequencies but the noise from the exhaust was increased. The effect of inlet control on the exhaust radiation suggests the need for a controller that targets both the inlet and exhaust noise

  1. Rate-Based Model Predictive Control of Turbofan Engine Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    An innovative model predictive control strategy is developed for control of nonlinear aircraft propulsion systems and sub-systems. At the heart of the controller is a rate-based linear parameter-varying model that propagates the state derivatives across the prediction horizon, extending prediction fidelity to transient regimes where conventional models begin to lose validity. The new control law is applied to a demanding active clearance control application, where the objectives are to tightly regulate blade tip clearances and also anticipate and avoid detrimental blade-shroud rub occurrences by optimally maintaining a predefined minimum clearance. Simulation results verify that the rate-based controller is capable of satisfying the objectives during realistic flight scenarios where both a conventional Jacobian-based model predictive control law and an unconstrained linear-quadratic optimal controller are incapable of doing so. The controller is evaluated using a variety of different actuators, illustrating the efficacy and versatility of the control approach. It is concluded that the new strategy has promise for this and other nonlinear aerospace applications that place high importance on the attainment of control objectives during transient regimes.

  2. Improved Finite Element Modeling of the Turbofan Engine Inlet Radiation Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Indranil Danda; Eversman, Walter; Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    Improvements have been made in the finite element model of the acoustic radiated field from a turbofan engine inlet in the presence of a mean flow. The problem of acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet is difficult to model numerically because of the large domain and high frequencies involved. A numerical model with conventional finite elements in the near field and wave envelope elements in the far field has been constructed. By employing an irrotational mean flow assumption, both the mean flow and the acoustic perturbation problem have been posed in an axisymmetric formulation in terms of the velocity potential; thereby minimizing computer storage and time requirements. The finite element mesh has been altered in search of an improved solution. The mean flow problem has been reformulated with new boundary conditions to make it theoretically rigorous. The sound source at the fan face has been modeled as a combination of positive and negative propagating duct eigenfunctions. Therefore, a finite element duct eigenvalue problem has been solved on the fan face and the resulting modal matrix has been used to implement a source boundary condition on the fan face in the acoustic radiation problem. In the post processing of the solution, the acoustic pressure has been evaluated at Gauss points inside the elements and the nodal pressure values have been interpolated from them. This has significantly improved the results. The effect of the geometric position of the transition circle between conventional finite elements and wave envelope elements has been studied and it has been found that the transition can be made nearer to the inlet than previously assumed.

  3. Modeling of near wall turbulence and modeling of bypass transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives for this project are as follows: (1) Modeling of the near wall turbulence: We aim to develop a second order closure for the near wall turbulence. As a first step of this project, we try to develop a kappa-epsilon model for near wall turbulence. We require the resulting model to be able to handle both near wall turbulence and turbulent flows away from the wall, computationally robust, and applicable for complex flow situations, flow with separation, for example, and (2) Modeling of the bypass transition: We aim to develop a bypass transition model which contains the effect of intermittency. Thus, the model can be used for both the transitional boundary layers and the turbulent boundary layers. We require the resulting model to give a good prediction of momentum and heat transfer within the transitional boundary and a good prediction of the effect of freestream turbulence on transitional boundary layers.

  4. Comprehensive Report of Fan Performance From Duct Rake Instrumentation on 1.294 Pressure Ratio, 806 ft/sec Tip Speed Turbofan Simulator Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeracki, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    A large scale model representative of an advanced ducted propulsor-type, low-noise, very high bypass ratio turbofan engine was tested for acoustics, aerodynamic performance, and off-design operability in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. The test was part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. The low tip speed fan, nacelle, and un-powered core passage were simulated. As might be expected, the effect of stall management casing treatment was a performance penalty. Reducing the recirculating flow at the fan tip reduced the penalty while still providing sufficient stall margin. Two fans were tested with the same aerodynamic design; one with graphite composite material, and the other with solid titanium. There were surprising performance differences between the two fans, though both blades showed some indication of transitional flow near the tips. Though the pressure and temperature ratios were low for this fan design, the techniques used to improve thermocouple measurement accuracy gave repeatable data with adiabatic efficiencies agreeing within 1 percent. The measured fan adiabatic efficiency at simulated takeoff conditions was 93.7 percent and matched the design intent.

  5. Noise Benefits of Rotor Trailing Edge Blowing for a Model Turbofan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Fite, E. Brian; Podboy, Gary G.

    2007-01-01

    An advanced model turbofan was tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) to explore far field acoustic effects associated with rotor Trailing-Edge-Blowing (TEB) for a modern, 1.294 stage pressure ratio turbofan model. The TEB rotor (Fan9) was designed to be aerodynamically similar to the previously tested Fan1, and used the same stator and nacelle hardware. Fan9 was designed with trailing edge blowing slots using an external air supply directed through the rotor hub. The TEB flow was heated to approximate the average fan exit temperature at each fan test speed. Rotor root blockage inserts were used to block TEB to all but the outer 40 and 20% span in addition to full-span blowing. A configuration with full-span TEB on alternate rotor blades was also tested. Far field acoustic data were taken at takeoff/approach conditions at 0.10 tunnel Mach. Far-field acoustic results showed that full-span blowing near 2.0% of the total flow could reduce the overall sound power level by about 2 dB. This noise reduction was observed in both the rotor-stator interaction tones and for the spectral broadband noise levels. Blowing only the outer span region was not very effective for lowering noise, and actually increased the far field noise level in some instances. Full-span blowing of alternate blades at 1.0% of the overall flow rate (equivalent to full-span blowing of all blades at 2.0% flow) showed a more modest noise decrease relative to full-span blowing of all blades. Detailed hot film measurements of the TEB rotor wake at 2.0% flow showed that TEB was not every effective for filling in the wake defect at approach fan speed toward the tip region, but did result in overfilling the wake toward the hub. Downstream turbulence measurements supported this finding, and support the observed reduction in spectral broadband noise.

  6. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 1: Experimental and analytical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.; Paterson, R. W.; Skebe, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A joint analytical and experimental investigation of three-dimensional flowfield development within the lobe region of turbofan forced mixer nozzles is described. The objective was to develop a method for predicting the lobe exit flowfield. In the analytical approach, a linearized inviscid aerodynamical theory was used for representing the axial and secondary flows within the three-dimensional convoluted mixer lobes and three-dimensional boundary layer analysis was applied thereafter to account for viscous effects. The experimental phase of the program employed three planar mixer lobe models having different waveform shapes and lobe heights for which detailed measurements were made of the three-dimensional velocity field and total pressure field at the lobe exit plane. Velocity data was obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and total pressure probing and hot wire anemometry were employed to define exit plane total pressure and boundary layer development. Comparison of data and analysis was performed to assess analytical model prediction accuracy. As a result of this study a planar mixed geometry analysis was developed. A principal conclusion is that the global mixer lobe flowfield is inviscid and can be predicted from an inviscid analysis and Kutta condition.

  7. Development in Geared Turbofan Aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Tobi, A. L.; Ismail, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper looks into the implementation of epicyclic gear system to the aeroengine in order to increase the efficiency of the engine. The improvement made is in the direction of improving fuel consumption, reduction in pollutant gasses and perceived noise. Introduction of epicyclic gear system is capable to achieve bypass ratio of up to 15:1 with the benefits of weight and noise reduction. Radical new aircraft designs and engine installation are being studied to overcome some of the challenges associated with the future geared turbofan and open-rotor engine.

  8. 75 FR 67253 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Models PW4074 and PW4077 Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... airworthiness directive (AD) for PW PW4074 and PW4077 turbofan engines with 15th stage high-pressure compressor... Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD... removing the disks from service. As of June 30, 2010, 53 disks with cracks in the front rail of the...

  9. 77 FR 11017 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Models PW4074 and PW4077 Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... FR 47056, August 4, 2011), and adding the following new AD: Pratt & Whitney: Docket No. FAA-2010-1095... (76 FR 47056, August 4, 2011), for all PW PW4074 and PW4077 turbofan engines with 15th stage HPC disks...-14-07 (76 FR 47056, August 4, 2011), we received a request from an operator that we clarify...

  10. Potential improvements in turbofan engine fuel economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, R. W.; Gaffin, W. O.

    1976-01-01

    The method developed for initial evaluation of possible performance improvements in the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program, directed toward improving the fuel economy of turbofan engines, is outlined, and results of the evaluation of 100 candidate engine modifications are presented. The study indicates that fuel consumption improvements of as much as 5% may be possible in current JT3D, JT8D, and JT9D turbofan engines. Aerodynamic, thermodynamic, material, and structural advances are expected to yield fuel consumption improvements on the order of 10 to 15% in advanced turbofan engines, with the greatest improvement stemming from significantly higher cycle pressure ratios. Higher turbine temperature and fan bypass ratios are also expected to contribute to fuel conservation.

  11. Turbofan synchrophaser

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, B.H.

    1993-07-06

    A synchronizing system for an aircraft having a master turbofan engine and at least one slave turbofan engine, each of the engines having a fan rotor which rotates independently from a core rotor, the system is described comprising: fuel control means for modulating the fuel flow rate to the slave engine to synchronize the operation of the fan rotors; variable stator vane control means for modulating the position of variable stator vanes within the slave engine to synchronize the operation of the core rotors; means for synchronizing the fan rotors prior to synchronizing the core rotors; the variable rotor vane control means includes means responsive to a core rotor speed error signal having a magnitude indicative of the difference in the core rotor rotational speeds of the master engine and the slave engine to the rotational speed of the slave engine's core rotor through modulation of the position of variable stator vanes within the slave engine; the fuel control means further includes means for altering the phase relationship between the fan rotors of the slave engine and the master engine; the variable stator vane control means further includes means for altering the phase relationship between the core rotors of the slave engine and the master engine; and the means for altering the phase relationship between the core rotors is responsive to a core rotor vibrational phase signal having a magnitude indicative of the difference in the core rotor vibration of the master engine and slave engine to modulate the rotational speed of the drive engine's core rotor through modulation of the position of variable stator vanes within the slave engine.

  12. Application of frequency-domain linearized Euler solutions to the prediction of aft fan tones and comparison with experimental measurements on model scale turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özyörük, Y.; Tester, B. J.

    2011-08-01

    Although it is widely accepted that aircraft noise needs to be further reduced, there is an equally important, on-going requirement to accurately predict the strengths of all the different aircraft noise sources, not only to ensure that a new aircraft is certifiable and can meet the ever more stringent local airport noise rules but also to prioritize and apply appropriate noise source reduction technologies at the design stage. As the bypass ratio of aircraft engines is increased - in order to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and jet mixing noise - the fan noise that radiates from the bypass exhaust nozzle is becoming one of the loudest engine sources, despite the large areas of acoustically absorptive treatment in the bypass duct. This paper addresses this 'aft fan' noise source, in particular the prediction of the propagation of fan noise through the bypass exhaust nozzle/jet exhaust flow and radiation out to the far-field observer. The proposed prediction method is equally applicable to fan tone and fan broadband noise (and also turbine and core noise) but here the method is validated with measured test data using simulated fan tones. The measured data had been previously acquired on two model scale turbofan engine exhausts with bypass and heated core flows typical of those found in a modern high bypass engine, but under static conditions (i.e. no flight simulation). The prediction method is based on frequency-domain solutions of the linearized Euler equations in conjunction with perfectly matched layer equations at the inlet and far-field boundaries using high-order finite differences. The discrete system of equations is inverted by the parallel sparse solver MUMPS. Far-field predictions are carried out by integrating Kirchhoff's formula in frequency domain. In addition to the acoustic modes excited and radiated, some non-acoustic waves within the cold stream-ambient shear layer are also captured by the computations at some flow and excitation frequencies. By

  13. 'Flight effect' analysis of turbojet and turbofan nozzle models in the CEPRA 19 anechoic wind tunnel at the CEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayot, C.; Gely, D.

    Measurements have been obtained at the Centre d'Essais des Propulseurs CEPRA 19 anechoic wind tunnel using turbojet and turbofan nozzle models in order to study the effect of flight velocity on jet noise. The present results are found to be in good general agreement with both theoretical results and flight test data. It is suggested that noise spectra anomalies noted at frequencies higher than 40 kHz may reflect the passage of sound waves across the mixing zone and/or the turbulent boundary layer which develops along the nozzle fuel line.

  14. HYTESS 2: A Hypothetical Turbofan Engine Simplified Simulation with multivariable control and sensor analytical redundancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    A hypothetical turbofan engine simplified simulation with a multivariable control and sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation logic (HYTESS II) is presented. The digital program, written in FORTRAN, is self-contained, efficient, realistic and easily used. Simulated engine dynamics were developed from linearized operating point models. However, essential nonlinear effects are retained. The simulation is representative of the hypothetical, low bypass ratio turbofan engine with an advanced control and failure detection logic. Included is a description of the engine dynamics, the control algorithm, and the sensor failure detection logic. Details of the simulation including block diagrams, variable descriptions, common block definitions, subroutine descriptions, and input requirements are given. Example simulation results are also presented.

  15. RNG in turbulence and modeling of bypass transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Zhigang

    1991-01-01

    Two projects are considered: the Renormalization Group (RNG) analysis of turbulence modeling, and the calculation of bypass transition through turbulence modeling. RNG is a process which eliminates small scales on the uneliminated large scales as the change in the transport properties. It is because of this property of RNG that it was previously suggested that RNG could be used as a model builder in turbulence modeling. The possibility is studied of constructing RNG based turbulence models, and to try to proceed to do the modeling through RNG in parallel with the classical approach. The numerical predictions made by RNG models and by classical models is compared against data from Direct Numerical Simulation. While in an environment with freestream turbulence, the transition initiated by the instability of the laminar boundary layer to Tollmien-Schlichting waves is found to be a bypass one in which turbulent spots are formed without T-S wave amplification. The formation is a random process, and flow within a turbulent spot is almost fully turbulent. This suggests the possibility of using turbulence modeling to describe and predict the bypass transition.

  16. Parameterization of a Conventional and Regenerated UHB Turbofan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Fábio; Brójo, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    The attempt to improve aircraft engines efficiency resulted in the evolution from turbojets to the first generation low bypass ratio turbofans. Today, high bypass ratio turbofans are the most traditional type of engine in commercial aviation. Following many years of technological developments and improvements, this type of engine has proved to be the most reliable facing the commercial aviation requirements. In search of more efficiency, the engine manufacturers tend to increase the bypass ratio leading to ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system like reducing the specific fuel consumption. This study is aimed at a parametric analysis of a UHB turbofan engine focused on short haul flights. Two cycle configurations (conventional and regenerated) were studied, and estimated values of their specific fuel consumption (TSFC) and specific thrust (Fs) were determined. Results demonstrate that the regenerated cycle may contribute towards a more economic and friendly aero engines in a higher range of bypass ratio.

  17. Turbofan engine cycle design selection - Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmetz, R.B.; Wagner, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    To define the optimum turbofan engine cycle for the year 2000, a parametric study was undertaken to define candidate engine thermodynamic cycles for advanced long range aircraft. Performance comparisons are based on uninstalled cruise specific fuel consumption (SFC). A base cycle design with current state-of-the-art technology was established as a reference. A parametric study was then conducted where component technologies projected for the year 2000 were included in the cycle design process. As bypass ratio increased, the transition from direct drive to geared fans was accounted for. Separate versus mixed flow exhaust systems were also studied. An uninstalled SFC improvement of approximately 18 percent was found for the year 2000 turbofan relative to the baseline engine.

  18. Turbofan Volume Dynamics Model for Investigations of Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic Effects in a Supersonic Commercial Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Lemon, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan simulation has been developed for use in aero-propulso-servo-elastic coupling studies, on supersonic vehicles. A one-dimensional lumped volume approach is used whereby each component (fan, high-pressure compressor, combustor, etc.) is represented as a single volume using characteristic performance maps and conservation equations for continuity, momentum and energy. The simulation is developed in the MATLAB/SIMULINK (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment in order to facilitate controls development, and ease of integration with a future aero-servo-elastic vehicle model being developed at NASA Langley. The complete simulation demonstrated steady state results that closely match a proposed engine suitable for a supersonic business jet at the cruise condition. Preliminary investigation of the transient simulation revealed expected trends for fuel flow disturbances as well as upstream pressure disturbances. A framework for system identification enables development of linear models for controller design. Utilizing this framework, a transfer function modeling an upstream pressure disturbance s impacts on the engine speed is developed as an illustrative case of the system identification. This work will eventually enable an overall vehicle aero-propulso-servo-elastic model

  19. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 2: Three-dimensional inviscid mixer analysis (FLOMIX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional potential analysis (FLOMIX) was formulated and applied to the inviscid flow over a turbofan foced mixer. The method uses a small disturbance formulation to analytically uncouple the circumferential flow from the radial and axial flow problem, thereby reducing the analysis to the solution of a series of axisymmetric problems. These equations are discretized using a flux volume formulation along a Cartesian grid. The method extends earlier applications of the Cartesian method to complex cambered geometries. The effects of power addition are also included within the potential formulation. Good agreement is obtained with an alternate small disturbance analysis for a high penetration symmetric mixer in a planar duct. In addition, calculations showing pressure distributions and induced secondary vorticity fields are presented for practical trubofan mixer configurations, and where possible, comparison was made with available experimental data. A detailed description of the required data input and coordinate definition is presented along with a sample data set for a practical forced mixer configuration. A brief description of the program structure and subroutines is also provided.

  20. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage "FOD" Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/ health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite-element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  1. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage (FOD) Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  2. JT8D-100 turbofan engine, phase 1. [noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The JT8D turbofan engine, widely used in short and medium range transport aircraft, contributes substantially to airport community noise. The jet noise is predominant in the JT8D engine and may be reduced in a modified engine, without loss of thrust, by increasing the airflow to reduce jet velocity. A configuration study evaluated the effects of fan airflow, fan pressure ratio, and bypass ratio on noise, thrust, and fuel comsumption. The cycle selected for the modified engine was based upon an increased diameter, single-stage fan and two additional core engine compressor stages, which replace the existing two-stage fan. Modifications were also made to the low pressure turbine to provide the increased torque required by the larger diameter fan. The resultant JT8D-100 engine models have the following characteristics at take-off thrust, compared to the current JT8D engine: Airflow and bypass ratio are increased, and fan pressure ratio and engine speed are reduced. The resultant engine is also longer, larger in diameter, and heavier than the JT8D base model, but these latter changes are compensated by the increased thrust and decreased fuel comsumption of the modified engine, thus providing the capability for maintaining the performance of the current JT8D-powered aircraft.

  3. A baboon model for hematologic studies of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Y; Gikakis, N; Gorman, J H; Khan, M M; Hack, C E; Velthuis, H T; Sun, L; Marcinkiewicz, C; Rao, A K; Niewiarowski, S; Colman, R W; Edmunds, L H; Anderson, H L

    1997-10-01

    Objective investigation of new inhibitors of blood protein or cellular systems that are activated during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is impeded by the absence of a satisfactory animal model. Because most baboon hematologic proteins immunologically cross-react with those used for human assays, we developed a robust, reusable baboon model of CPB. Blood samples were obtained from adult baboons at six time intervals before, during, and after 60 minutes of partial CPB at 37 degrees C with peripheral cannulas. Both membrane (n = 7) and bubble oxygenators (n = 7) were investigated. We measured platelet and white blood cell counts; platelet response to adenosine diphosphate and release of beta-thromboglobulin; fibrinopeptide A, prothrombin fragment F1.2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, D-dimer, and plasmin-antiplasmin complex; activated complement (C3b/c and C4b/c); elastase-alpha1 proteinase inhibitor complex; and bleeding times. Adherent glycoprotein IIIa antigen in Triton X-100 washes of the perfusion circuit was also measured. Markers of baboon platelet, complement, and neutrophil activation and thrombosis significantly increased during CPB with bubble oxygenator systems but did not change appreciably in membrane oxygenator circuits. Markers of fibrinolysis, D-dimer, and plasmin-antiplasmin complex did not change with either oxygenator. The baboon model of CPB, when a bubble oxygenator is used, is a robust, reusable animal model for evaluating inhibitors of platelet, complement, and neutrophil activation and thrombosis during and after CPB.

  4. Bypass Transitional Flow Calculations Using a Navier-Stokes Solver and Two-Equation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liuo, William W.; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, L. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Bypass transitional flows over a flat plate were simulated using a Navier-Stokes solver and two equation models. A new model for the bypass transition, which occurs in cases with high free stream turbulence intensity (TI), is described. The new transition model is developed by including an intermittency correction function to an existing two-equation turbulence model. The advantages of using Navier-Stokes equations, as opposed to boundary-layer equations, in bypass transition simulations are also illustrated. The results for two test flows over a flat plate with different levels of free stream turbulence intensity are reported. Comparisons with the experimental measurements show that the new model can capture very well both the onset and the length of bypass transition.

  5. Towards an Automated Full-Turbofan Engine Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.; Turner, Mark G.; Norris, Andrew; Veres, Joseph P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the high-fidelity numerical simulation of a modern high-bypass turbofan engine. The simulation utilizes the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) thermodynamic cycle modeling system coupled to a high-fidelity full-engine model represented by a set of coupled three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) component models. Boundary conditions from the balanced, steady-state cycle model are used to define component boundary conditions in the full-engine model. Operating characteristics of the three-dimensional component models are integrated into the cycle model via partial performance maps generated automatically from the CFD flow solutions using one-dimensional meanline turbomachinery programs. This paper reports on the progress made towards the full-engine simulation of the GE90-94B engine, highlighting the generation of the high-pressure compressor partial performance map. The ongoing work will provide a system to evaluate the steady and unsteady aerodynamic and mechanical interactions between engine components at design and off-design operating conditions.

  6. Analysis of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. It is possible that future designs will continue this trend, leading to very-high or ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. Regardless of the engine architecture chosen, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  7. Airesearch QCGAT program. [quiet clean general aviation turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.; Norgren, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    A model TFE731-1 engine was used as a baseline for the NASA quiet clean general aviation turbofan engine and engine/nacelle program designed to demonstrate the applicability of large turbofan engine technology to small general aviation turbofan engines, and to obtain significant reductions in noise and pollutant emissions while reducing or maintaining fuel consumption levels. All new technology design for rotating parts and all items in the engine and nacelle that contributed to the acoustic and pollution characteristics of the engine system were of flight design, weight, and construction. The major noise, emissions, and performance goals were met. Noise levels estimated for the three FAR Part 36 conditions, are 10 t0 15 ENPdB below FAA requirements; emission values are considerably reduced below that of current technology engines; and the engine performance represents a TSFC improvement of approximately 9 percent over other turbofan engines.

  8. Experimental investigations of the steady flow through an idealized model of a femoral artery bypass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgea, Corina; Bode, Florin; Ioan Budiu, Octavian; Nascutiu, Lucian; Banyai, Daniel; Damian, Mihai

    2014-03-01

    The present paper presents the steps taken by the authors in the first stage of an experimental program within a larger national research project whose objective is to characterize the flow through a femoral artery bypass with a view to finding solutions for its optimization. The objective of the stage is to investigate by means of the PIV method the stationary flow through a bypass model with an idealized geometry. A bypass assembly which reunites the idealized geometry models of the proximal and distal anastomoses, and which respects the lengths of a femoral artery bypass was constructed on the basis of data for a real patient provided by medical investigations. With the aim of testing the model and the established experimental set-up with regard to their suitability for the assessment of the velocity field associated to the steady flow through the bypass, three zones that can restore the whole distal anastomosis were PIV investigated. The measurements were taken in the conditions of maintained inflow at the bypass entry of 0.9 l / min (Re = 600). The article presents comparatively the flow spectra and the velocity fields for each zone obtained in two situations: with the femoral artery completely occluded and completely open.

  9. Aircraft turbofan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; Rice, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Turbofan noise generation and suppression in aircraft engines are reviewed. The chain of physical processes which connect unsteady flow interactions with fan blades to far field noise is addressed. Mechanism identification and description, duct propagation, radiation and acoustic suppression are discussed. The experimental technique of fan inflow static tests are discussed. Rotor blade surface pressure and wake velocity measurements aid in the determination of the types and strengths of the generation mechanisms. Approaches to predicting or measuring acoustic mode content, optimizing treatment impedance to maximize attenuation, translating impedance into porous wall structure and interpreting far field directivity patterns are illustrated by comparisons of analytical and experimental results. The interdependence of source and acoustic treatment design to minimize far field noise is emphasized. Area requiring further research are discussed and the relevance of aircraft turbofan results to quieting other turbomachinery installations is addressed.

  10. Aircraft turbofan noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; Rice, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Turbofan noise generation and suppression in aircraft engines are reviewed. The chain of physical processes which connect unsteady flow interactions with fan blades to far field noise is addressed. Mechanism identification and description, duct propagation, radiation, and acoustic suppression are discussed. The experimental techniques of fan inflow static tests are discussed. Rotor blade surface pressure and wake velocity measurements aid in the determination of the types and strengths of the generation mechanisms. Approaches to predicting or measuring acoustic mode content, optimizing treatment impedance to maximize attenuation, translating impedance into porous wall structure, and interpreting far field directivity patterns are illustrated by comparisons of analytical and experimental results. The interdependence of source and acoustic treatment design to minimize far field noise is emphasized. Areas requiring further research are discussed, and the relevance of aircraft turbofan results to quieting other turbomachinery installation is addressed.

  11. Aircraft turbofan noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; Rice, E. J.

    1983-03-01

    Turbofan noise generation and suppression in aircraft engines are reviewed. The chain of physical processes which connect unsteady flow interactions with fan blades to far field noise is addressed. Mechanism identification and description, duct propagation, radiation and acoustic suppression are discussed. The experimental technique of fan inflow static tests are discussed. Rotor blade surface pressure and wake velocity measurements aid in the determination of the types and strengths of the generation mechanisms. Approaches to predicting or measuring acoustic mode content, optimizing treatment impedance to maximize attenuation, translating impedance into porous wall structure and interpreting far field directivity patterns are illustrated by comparisons of analytical and experimental results. The interdependence of source and acoustic treatment design to minimize far field noise is emphasized. Area requiring further research are discussed and the relevance of aircraft turbofan results to quieting other turbomachinery installations is addressed.

  12. 77 FR 75071 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Electrical/Electronic Equipment Bay...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478... Model EMB-550 airplane. The Model EMB-550 airplane is the first of a new family of jet airplanes... 12 passengers. It is equipped with two Honeywell HTF7500-E medium bypass ratio turbofan...

  13. 75 FR 27489 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW615F-A Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    .... Investigation showed that the Fuel Filter Bypass Valve poppet in the Fuel Oil Heat Exchanger (FOHE) on that.... PW615F-A turbofan engines with fuel/oil heat exchanger (FOHE) part number (P/ N) 35C3778-01 or P/N... Federal holidays. Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp., 1000...

  14. An application of tensor ideas to nonlinear modeling of a turbofan jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingler, T. A.; Yurkovich, S.; Sain, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    An application of tensor modelling to a digital simulation of NASA's Quiet, Clean, Shorthaul Experimental (QCSE) gas turbine engine is presented. The results show that the tensor algebra offers a universal parametrization which is helpful in conceptualization and identification for plant modelling prior to feedback or for representing scheduled controllers over an operating line.

  15. Combined pressure and temperature distortion effects on internal flow of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braithwaite, W. M.; Soeder, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    An additional data base for improving and verifying a computer simulation developed by an engine manufacturer was obtained. The multisegment parallel compressor simulation was designed to predict the effects of steady-state circumferential inlet total-pressure and total-temperature distortions on the flows into and through a turbofan compression system. It also predicts the degree of distortion that will result in surge of the compressor. The effect of combined 180 deg square-wave distortion patterns of total pressure and total temperature in various relative positions is reported. The observed effects of the combined distortion on a unitary bypass ratio turbofan engine are presented in terms of total and static pressure profiles and total temperature profiles at stations ahead of the inlet guide vanes as well as through the fan-compressor system. These observed profiles are compared with those predicted by the complex multisegment model. The effects of relative position of the two components comprising the combined distortion on the degree resulting in surge are discussed. Certain relative positions required less combined distortion than either a temperature or pressure distortion by itself.

  16. Noise levels from a model turbofan engine with simulated noise control measures applied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A study of estimated full-scale noise levels based on measured levels from the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) sub-scale model is presented. Testing of this model was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) estimates for the baseline configuration are documented, and also used as the control case in a study of the potential benefits of two categories of noise control. The effect of active noise control is evaluated by artificially removing various rotor-stator interaction tones. Passive noise control is simulated by applying a notch filter to the wind tunnel data. Cases with both techniques are included to evaluate hybrid active-passive noise control. The results for EPNL values are approximate because the original source data was limited in bandwidth and in sideline angular coverage. The main emphasis is on comparisons between the baseline and configurations with simulated noise control measures.

  17. A Mode Detection Method Using the Azimuthal Directivity of a Turbofan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.; Farassat, F.; Clark, L. R.; Gerhold, C. H.; Kelly, J. J.; Becker, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    The azimuthal, far field directivity of a scale fan model was measured in high resolution. The model is a 12 inch diameter rotor with 16 blades followed by 40 stator vanes. The tests were conducted at the nominal 100% speed corresponding to a tip speed of 905 ft/sec. Measurement of the radiated sound field, forward of the fan, was made in an anechoic chamber with an inflow control device and a baffle separating the aft and forward radiated interaction noise. The acoustic field was surveyed with a circular hoop array of 16 microphones which was moved to 14 axial stations. At each axial station the hoop was rotated in half-degree increments to take 736 points in the azimuthal angle. In addition to sound pressure level, the phase angle relative to a reference microphone was measured at each point. The sound pressure level is shown to vary in patterns by 10-15 dB especially for the fundamental tone but also for the first and second harmonic. A far field mode detection method has been developed and used with the data which determines the modes generated by the fan and which then interact to form the azimuthal directivity.

  18. Acoustic Mode Measurements in the Inlet of a Model Turbofan Using a Continuously Rotating Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Hall, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements of the spinning acoustic mode structure in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) have been completed. These measurements were taken using a unique and previously untried method which was first proposed by T.G. Sofrin. A continuously rotating microphone system was employed. The ADP model was designed and built by Pratt & Whitney and tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Three inlet configurations were tested with cut-on and cutoff stator vane sets. The cutoff stator was designed to suppress all modes at the blade passing frequency. Rotating rake measurements indicate that several extraneous circumferential modes were active. The mode orders suggest that their source was an interaction between the rotor and small interruptions in the casing tip treatment. The cut-on stator produced the expected circumferential modes plus higher levels of the unexpected modes seen with the cutoff stator.

  19. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Hall, David G.

    1993-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements of the spinning acoustic mode structure in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) have been completed. These measurements were taken using a unique and previously untried method which was first proposed by T.G. Sofrin. A continuously rotating microphone system was employed. The ADP model was designed and built by Pratt & Whitney and tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Three inlet configurations were tested with cut-on and cutoff stator vane sets. The cutoff stator was designed to suppress all modes at the blade passing frequency. Rotating rake measurements indicate that several extraneous circumferential modes were active. The mode orders suggest that their source was an interaction between the rotor and small interruptions in the casing tip treatment. The cut-on stator produced the expected circumferential modes plus higher levels of the unexpected modes seen with the cutoff stator.

  20. Experimental study of noise sources and acoustic propagation in a turbofan model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, S.; Canard-Caruana, S.; Julliard, J.

    1990-10-01

    Experimental studies of the acoustic radiation of subsonic fans mainly due to blade and vane presure fluctuations were performed in the SNECMA 5C2 compressor anechoic facility. A brief description of the test rig is presented noting that the CA5 turbojet engine model fan has a diameter of 47 cm, 48 blades, and a nominal rotation speed of 12,600 rpm. The two chief experiments discussed are the measurement of blade and vane pressure fluctuations by thin-film transducers and the spinning mode analysis of the sound field propagating in the intake duct. Several examples of applications are discussed, and it is shown that an inflow control device, as expected, reduces the aerodynamic disturbances by about 10 dB. Rotor-stator interaction tones are determined by the modal analysis, and it is found that a duct lining with a length of one duct radius could give an insertion loss up to 20 dB in flight.

  1. Advanced turbofan blade refurbishment technique

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of the work reported here is to investigate whether the lessons learned from the work of Suder et al. can be used to reduce the in-service performance deterioration of a fan on a high bypass ratio turbofan engine. To this end, a back-to-back test was done on the fan of an RB211-22B engine with the cooperation of Delta Airlines. The fan and engine were first overhauled per normal airline practice and cell-tested to establish that the engine performance met flight acceptance standards. This test, which the engine passed, also established a performance baseline for the overhauled engine. At this point the fan blade leading edge had not been filed or scraped and the blade surfaces had not been polished because the leading edge damage and blade surface roughness fell within the acceptable limits specified by the manufacturer for normal overhaul practice. After the cell test, the fan was removed from the engine and sent to Sermatech International where the following additional operations were performed: (1) the blade surfaces were polished to a finish of 20 rms {micro}in; (2) leading edge roughness due to particle impact damage was removed and the leading edge was polished to a finish of 20 rms {micro}in; (3) the leading edge shape was rounded and the leading edge thickness was reduced over the first 5--10% of chord. Test results indicated a 0.7% drop in thrust specific fuel consumption (lb fuel/lb thrust/hr) relative to the baseline engine after the enhanced fan overhaul. Based on the results of Suder et al. (1995) it appears that 70--80% of this performance gain is due to the thin smooth leading edge and the remainder to the highly polished finish of the blade.

  2. Comparison of Far-Field Noise for Three Significantly Different Model Turbofans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Far-field noise sound power level (PWL) spectra and overall sound pressure level (OASPL) directivities were compared for three significantly different model fan stages which were tested in the NASA Glenn 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The test fans included the Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) Fan1, the baseline Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) fan, and the Quiet High Speed Fan2 (QHSF2) These fans had design rotor tangential tip speeds from 840 to 1474 ft/s and stage pressure ratios from 1.29 to 1.82. Additional parameters included rotor-stator spacing, stator sweep, and downstream support struts. Acoustic comparison points were selected on the basis of stage thrust. Acoustic results for the low tip speed/low pressure ratio fan (ADP Fan1) were thrust-adjusted to show how a geometrically-scaled version of this fan might compare at the higher design thrust levels of the other two fans. Lowest noise levels were typically observed for ADP Fan1 (which had a radial stator) and for the intermediate tip speed fan (Source Diagnostics Test, SDT, R4 rotor) with a swept stator. Projected noise levels for the ADP fan to the SDT swept stator configuration at design point conditions showed the fans to have similar noise levels. However, it is possible that the ADP fan could be 2 to 3 dB quieter with incorporation of a swept stator. Benefits of a scaled ADP fan include avoidance of multiple pure tones associated with transonic and higher blade tip speeds. Penalties of a larger size ADP fan would include increased nacelle size and drag.

  3. Comparison of Far-field Noise for Three Significantly Different Model Turbofans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Far-field noise sound power level (PWL) spectra and overall sound pressure level (OASPL) directivities were compared for three significantly different model fan stages which were tested in the NASA Glenn 9 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The test fans included the Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) Fan1, the baseline Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) fan, and the Quiet High Speed Fan2 (QHSF2). These fans had design rotor tangential tip speeds from 840 to 1474 ft/s and stage pressure ratios from 1.29 to 1.82. Additional parameters included rotor-stator spacing, stator sweep, and downstream support struts. Acoustic comparison points were selected on the basis of stage thrust. Acoustic results for the low tip speed/low pressure ratio fan (ADP Fan1) were thrust-adjusted to show how a geometrically-scaled version of this fan might compare at the higher design thrust levels of the other two fans. Lowest noise levels were typically observed for ADP Fan1 (which had a radial stator) and for the intermediate tip speed fan (Source Diagnostics Test, SDT, R4 rotor) with a swept stator. Projected noise levels for the ADP fan to the SDT swept stator configuration at design point conditions showed the fans to have similar noise levels. However, it is possible that the ADP fan could be 2 to 3 dB quieter with incorporation of a swept stator. Benefits of a scaled ADP fan include avoidance of multiple pure tones associated with transonic and higher blade tip speeds. Penalties of a larger size ADP fan would include increased nacelle size and drag.

  4. Analysis of an advanced technology subsonic turbofan incorporating revolutionary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, Gerald, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Successful implementation of revolutionary composite materials in an advanced turbofan offers the possibility of further improvements in engine performance and thrust-to-weight ratio relative to current metallic materials. The present analysis determines the approximate engine cycle and configuration for an early 21st century subsonic turbofan incorporating all composite materials. The advanced engine is evaluated relative to a current technology baseline engine in terms of its potential fuel savings for an intercontinental quadjet having a design range of 5500 nmi and a payload of 500 passengers. The resultant near optimum, uncooled, two-spool, advanced engine has an overall pressure ratio of 87, a bypass ratio of 18, a geared fan, and a turbine rotor inlet temperature of 3085 R. Improvements result in a 33-percent fuel saving for the specified misssion. Various advanced composite materials are used throughout the engine. For example, advanced polymer composite materials are used for the fan and the low pressure compressor (LPC).

  5. Development of a Twin-spool Turbofan Engine Simulation Using the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Johathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) is a tool that has been developed to allow a user to build custom models of systems governed by thermodynamic principles using a template to model each basic process. Validation of this tool in an engine model application was performed through reconstruction of the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) (v2) using the building blocks from the T-MATS (v1) library. In order to match the two engine models, it was necessary to address differences in several assumptions made in the two modeling approaches. After these modifications were made, validation of the engine model continued by integrating both a steady-state and dynamic iterative solver with the engine plant and comparing results from steady-state and transient simulation of the T-MATS and C-MAPSS models. The results show that the T-MATS engine model was accurate within 3 of the C-MAPSS model, with inaccuracy attributed to the increased dimension of the iterative solver solution space required by the engine model constructed using the T-MATS library. This demonstrates that, given an understanding of the modeling assumptions made in T-MATS and a baseline model, the T-MATS tool provides a viable option for constructing a computational model of a twin-spool turbofan engine that may be used in simulation studies.

  6. Development of a Twin-Spool Turbofan Engine Simulation Using the Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) is a tool that has been developed to allow a user to build custom models of systems governed by thermodynamic principles using a template to model each basic process. Validation of this tool in an engine model application was performed through reconstruction of the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) (v2) using the building blocks from the T-MATS (v1) library. In order to match the two engine models, it was necessary to address differences in several assumptions made in the two modeling approaches. After these modifications were made, validation of the engine model continued by integrating both a steady-state and dynamic iterative solver with the engine plant and comparing results from steady-state and transient simulation of the T-MATS and C-MAPSS models. The results show that the T-MATS engine model was accurate within 3% of the C-MAPSS model, with inaccuracy attributed to the increased dimension of the iterative solver solution space required by the engine model constructed using the T-MATS library. This demonstrates that, given an understanding of the modeling assumptions made in T-MATS and a baseline model, the T-MATS tool provides a viable option for constructing a computational model of a twin-spool turbofan engine that may be used in simulation studies.

  7. Particles deposition induced by the magnetic field in the coronary bypass graft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, Sandor I.; Totorean, Alin F.; Vekas, Ladislau

    2016-03-01

    Bypass graft failures is a complex process starting with intimal hyperplasia development which involve many hemodynamic and biological factors. This work presents experimental results regarding the possibility to use magnetic drug delivery to prevent the development of the intimal hyperplasia using a simplified but intuitive model. The primary goal is to understand the magnetic particle deposition in the anastomosis region of the bypass graft taking into account the complex flow field created in this area which involves recirculation region, flow mixing and presence of particles with high residence time. The three-dimensional geometry model was used to simulate the motion and accumulation of the particles under the magnetic field influence in anastomotic region of the coronary bypass graft. The flow patterns are evaluated both numerically and experimentally and show a good correlation in term of flow parameters like vortex length and flow stagnation point positions. Particle depositions are strongly dependent on the magnet position and consequently of the magnetic field intensity and field gradient. Increased magnetic field controlled by the magnet position induces increased particle depositions in the bypass graft anastomosis. The result shows that particle depositions depend on the bypass graft angle, and the deposition shape and particle accumulation respectively, depend by the flow pattern in the anastomosis region.

  8. Effect of flight loads on turbofan engine performance deterioration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Jay, A.; Todd, E. S.; Kafka, P. G.; White, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    A significant percentage of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine performance deterioration is caused by an increase in operating clearance between fan/compressor and turbine blades and their outer air seals. These increased clearances result from rubs induced by a combination of engine power transients and aircraft flight loads. An analytical technique for predicting the effect of quasi-steady state aircraft flight loads on engine performance deterioration has been developed and is presented. Thrust, aerodynamic and inertia loads are considered. Analytical results are shown and compared to actual engine test experience.

  9. Effect of flight loads on turbofan engine performance deterioration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Jay, A.; Todd, E. S.; Kafka, P. G.; White, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    A significant percentage of high bypass ratio, turbofan engine performance deterioration was caused by an increase in operating clearance between fan/compressor and turbine blades and their outer air seals. These increased clearances resulted from rubs induced by a combination of engine power transients and aircraft flight loads. An analytical technique for predicting the effect of quasi-steady state aircraft flight loads on engine performance deterioration was developed and is presented. Thrust, aerodynamic and inertia loads were considered. Analytical results are shown and compared to actual engine test experience.

  10. Core noise measurements on a YF-102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, M.; Karchmer, A. M.; Penko, P. F.; Mcardle, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Core noise from a YF-102 high bypass ratio turbofan engine was investigated through the use of simultaneous measurements of internal fluctuating pressures and far field noise. Acoustic waveguide probes, located in the engine at the compressor exit, in the combustor, at the turbine exit, and in the core nozzle, were employed to measure internal fluctuating pressures. Spectra showed that the internal signals were free of tones, except at high frequency where machinery noise was present. Data obtained over a wide range of engine conditions suggest that below 60% of maximum fan speed the low frequency core noise contributes significantly to the far field noise.

  11. Preliminary Study of the Fuel Saving Potential of Regenerative Turbofans for Commercial Subsonic Transports. [engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    The fuel savings potential of regenerative turbofans was calculated and compared with that of a reference turbofan. At the design altitude of 10.67 km and Mach 0.80, the turbine-inlet-temperature of the regenerative turbofan was fixed at 1700 K while the overall pressure ratio was varied from 10 to 20. The fan pressure ratio was fixed at 1.6 and the bypass ratio varied from 8 to 10. The heat exchanger design parameters such as pressure drop and effectiveness varied from 4 to 8 percent and from 0.80 to 0.90, respectively. Results indicate a fuel savings due to regeneration of 4.1 percent and no change in takeoff gross weight.

  12. Study of Turbofan Engines Designed for Low Enery Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, R. E.; Hirschkron, R.; Johnston, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    Subsonic transport turbofan engine design and technology features which have promise of improving aircraft energy consumption are described. Task I addressed the selection and evaluation of features for the CF6 family of engines in current aircraft, and growth models of these aircraft. Task II involved cycle studies and the evaluation of technology features for advanced technology turbofans, consistent with initial service in 1985. Task III pursued the refined analysis of a specific design of an advanced technology turbofan engine selected as the result of Task II studies. In all of the above, the impact upon aircraft economics, as well as energy consumption, was evaluated. Task IV summarized recommendations for technology developments which would be necessary to achieve the improvements in energy consumption identified.

  13. A mouse model for nonsense mutation bypass therapy shows a dramatic multiday response to geneticin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunmei; Feng, Jinong; Song, Wenjia; Wang, Jicheng; Tsai, Becky; Zhang, Yunwu; Scaringe, William A.; Hill, Kathleen A.; Margaritis, Paris; High, Katherine A.; Sommer, Steve S.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycosides can bypass nonsense mutations and are the prototypic agents for translational bypass therapy (TBT). Initial results demonstrate the need for more potent drugs and an in vivo model system for quantitative assessment of TBT. Herein, we present an in vivo system for evaluating the efficacy of premature stop codon management therapies: in vivo quantitative stop codon management repli-sampling TBT efficacy assay (IQSCMaRTEA). Application of IQSCMaRTEA reveals that geneticin is much more efficacious in vivo than gentamicin. Treatment with geneticin elicits a multiday response, and residual F9 antigen can be detected after 3 weeks. These data demonstrate the utility of IQSCMaRTEA for evaluating drugs that bypass nonsense mutations. In addition, IQSCMaRTEA may be helpful for testing inhibitors of nonsense-mediated decay, as stop codon management therapy will sometimes require inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay and translational bypass of the nonsense mutation. Furthermore, geneticin, its metabolites, or better tolerated analogues should be evaluated as a general treatment with multiday response for severe genetic disease caused by nonsense mutation. PMID:17881586

  14. Turbofan gas turbine engine with variable fan outlet guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter John (Inventor); Zenon, Ruby Lasandra (Inventor); LaChapelle, Donald George (Inventor); Mielke, Mark Joseph (Inventor); Grant, Carl (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan gas turbine engine includes a forward fan section with a row of fan rotor blades, a core engine, and a fan bypass duct downstream of the forward fan section and radially outwardly of the core engine. The forward fan section has only a single stage of variable fan guide vanes which are variable fan outlet guide vanes downstream of the forward fan rotor blades. An exemplary embodiment of the engine includes an afterburner downstream of the fan bypass duct between the core engine and an exhaust nozzle. The variable fan outlet guide vanes are operable to pivot from a nominal OGV position at take-off to an open OGV position at a high flight Mach Number which may be in a range of between about 2.5-4+. Struts extend radially across a radially inwardly curved portion of a flowpath of the engine between the forward fan section and the core engine.

  15. Analysis of the pedestrian arching at bottleneck based on a bypassing behavior model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Jia, Hongfei; Ran, Bin; Li, Jun

    2016-07-01

    A bypassing behavior model was proposed, in which the local optimal decision behavior in the strategy level was modeled in velocity-time domain, to describe how pedestrians bypass the local obstacles considering the relative speed. The model contains (1) pedestrian visual and contact information acquisition; (2) motion state prediction of the local obstacles based on the visual and contact information; (3) pedestrian bypass strategy modeling in the velocity-time domain; (4) moving and overlapping solution. In the numerical solution, velocity domain was divided into n equal angle, the value of n ranges from 2 to infinity, the Manhattan space was refined gradually to Euclid Space accordingly, in which the movement of pedestrians was described. The model was applied to the analysis of pedestrian arching at the bottleneck in the emergent evacuation situation. (1) The results showed that the formation of the pedestrian arching at the bottleneck was deformation pressure, because many pedestrians try to pass through the bottleneck simultaneously, even in the absence of friction, the pedestrian arching still occurs; (2) In the emergent situation, we are more concerned about the bottleneck attribution of resistance to form the arching, the calculation and simulation results showed that the probability of an arching and the bottleneck width is an exponential function relationship, so when the stampede occurs in the middle of the bottleneck, the probability of arching will increase exponentially.

  16. Performance analysis of a turbofan as a part of an airbreathing propulsion system for space shuttles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinebach, D. A.; Kuehl, W.; Gallus, H. E.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the design and performance analysis of airbreathing engines for aerospace planes. The analysis is illustrated by introducing an exemplary twin-shaft turbofan engine with post-combustion and bypass-combustion. Some modules of the performance analysis algorithm such as inlet pressure recovery or real gas effects are also presented. The jet engine is designed in view of increasing temperatures at high flight Mach numbers. Hence, the engine design data are dependent on the characteristics of the available materials as well as on the trajectory of the aerospace plane. The results illustrate the strong influence of the real gas effects on the engine thrust particularly in the case of over-stoichiometric combustion of hydrogen. Turbofan engines offer the following advantages in comparison with equivalent turbojet engines: higher thrust performance in supersonic flight range and lower fuel consumption due to operation management of post-combustion and bypass-combustion.

  17. Active Control of Inlet Noise on the JT15D Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerome P.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the year from November 1997 to December 1998 on the Active Noise Control of Turbofan Engines research project funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The concept of implementing active noise control techniques with fuselage-mounted error sensors is investigated both analytically and experimentally. The analytical part of the project involves the continued development of an advanced modeling technique to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of active noise control techniques to large, realistic high bypass engines of the type on which active control methods are expected to be applied. Results from the advanced analytical model are presented that show the effectiveness of the control strategies, and the analytical results presented for fuselage error sensors show good agreement with the experimentally observed results and provide additional insight into the control phenomena. Additional analytical results are presented for active noise control used in conjunction with a wavenumber sensing technique. The experimental work is carried out on a running JT15D turbofan jet engine in a test stand at Virginia Tech. The control strategy used in these tests was the feedforward Filtered-X LMS algorithm. The control inputs were supplied by single and multiple circumferential arrays of acoustic sources equipped with neodymium iron cobalt magnets mounted upstream of the fan. The reference signal was obtained from an inlet mounted eddy current probe. The error signals were obtained from a number of pressure transducers flush-mounted in a simulated fuselage section mounted in the engine test cell. The active control methods are investigated when implemented with the control sources embedded within the acoustically absorptive material on a passively-lined inlet. The experimental results show that the combination of active control techniques with fuselage

  18. 78 FR 47235 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Electric Company (GE) model GEnx-2B67 and GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by the... in Boeing 747-8 flight tests had consumed more cyclic life than they would have in revenue flight cycles. These parts were then installed into engines and introduced into revenue service...

  19. Design and evaluation of an integrated Quiet, Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) engine and aircraft propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    German, J.; Fogel, P.; Wilson, C.

    1980-01-01

    The design was based on the LTS-101 engine family for the core engine. A high bypass fan design (BPR=9.4) was incorporated to provide reduced fuel consumption for the design mission. All acoustic and pollutant emissions goals were achieved. A discussion of the preliminary design of a business jet suitable for the developed propulsion system is included. It is concluded that large engine technology can be successfully applied to small turbofans, and noise or pollutant levels need not be constraints for the design of future small general aviation turbofan engines.

  20. ACOUSTIC LINERS FOR TURBOFAN ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed to design acoustic liners for turbofan engines. This program combines results from theoretical models of wave alternation in acoustically treated passages with experimental data from full-scale fan noise suppressors. By including experimentally obtained information, the program accounts for real effects such as wall boundary layers, duct terminations, and sound modal structure. The program has its greatest use in generating a number of design specifications to be used for evaluation of trade-offs. The program combines theoretical and empirical data in designing annular acoustic liners. First an estimate of the noise output of the fan is made based on basic fan aerodynamic design variables. Then, using a target noise spectrum after alternation and the estimated fan noise spectrum, a design spectrum is calculated as their difference. Next, the design spectrum is combined with knowledge of acoustic liner performance and the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. Details of the liner design are calculated by combining the required acoustic impedance with a mathematical model relating acoustic impedance to the physical structure of the liner. Input to the noise prediction part of the program consists of basic fan operating parameters, distance that the target spectrum is to be measured and the target spectrum. The liner design portion of the program requires the required alternation spectrum, desired values of length to height and several option selection parameters. Output from the noise prediction portion is a noise spectrum consisting of discrete tones and broadband noise. This may be used as input to the liner design portion of the program. The liner design portion of the program produces backing depths, open area ratios, and face plate thicknesses. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented in batch mode on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a central memory requirement of 12K (decimal) of 36 bit words.

  1. Turbofan Engine Simulated in a Graphical Simulation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the development of intelligent engine technology with advanced active component control. The computer engine models used in these control studies are component-level models (CLM), models that link individual component models of state space and nonlinear algebraic equations, written in a computer language such as Fortran. The difficulty faced in performing control studies on Fortran-based models is that Fortran is not supported with control design and analysis tools, so there is no means for implementing real-time control. It is desirable to have a simulation environment that is straightforward, has modular graphical components, and allows easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface. Such a tool should also provide the ability to convert a control design into real-time code, helping to make it an extremely powerful tool in control and diagnostic system development. Simulation time management is shown: Mach number versus time, power level angle versus time, altitude versus time, ambient temperature change versus time, afterburner fuel flow versus time, controller and actuator dynamics, collect initial conditions, CAD output, and component-level model: CLM sensor, CAD input, and model output. The Controls and Dynamics Technologies Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and demonstrated a flexible, generic turbofan engine simulation platform that can meet these objectives, known as the Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS). MAPSS is a Simulink-based implementation of a Fortran-based, modern high pressure ratio, dual-spool, low-bypass, military-type variable-cycle engine with a digital controller. Simulink (The Mathworks, Natick, MA) is a computer-aided control design and simulation package allows the graphical representation of dynamic systems in a block diagram form. MAPSS is a nonlinear, non-real-time system composed of controller and actuator dynamics

  2. Patient-Specific Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Moghadam, Mahdi Esmaily; Kahn, Andrew M.; Tseng, Elaine E.; Guccione, Julius M.; Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational framework for multiscale modeling and simulation of blood flow in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients. Using this framework, only CT and non-invasive clinical measurements are required without the need to assume pressure and/or flow waveforms in the coronaries and we can capture global circulatory dynamics. We demonstrate this methodology in a case study of a patient with multiple CABGs. A patient-specific model of the blood vessels is constructed from CT image data to include the aorta, aortic branch vessels (brachiocephalic artery and carotids), the coronary arteries and multiple bypass grafts. The rest of the circulatory system is modeled using a lumped parameter network (LPN) 0 dimensional (0D) system comprised of resistances, capacitors (compliance), inductors (inertance), elastance and diodes (valves) that are tuned to match patient-specific clinical data. A finite element solver is used to compute blood flow and pressure in the 3D (3 dimensional) model, and this solver is implicitly coupled to the 0D LPN code at all inlets and outlets. By systematically parameterizing the graft geometry, we evaluate the influence of graft shape on the local hemodynamics, and global circulatory dynamics. Virtual manipulation of graft geometry is automated using Bezier splines and control points along the pathlines. Using this framework, we quantify wall shear stress, wall shear stress gradients and oscillatory shear index for different surgical geometries. We also compare pressures, flow rates and ventricular pressure–volume loops pre- and post-bypass graft surgery. We observe that PV loops do not change significantly after CABG but that both coronary perfusion and local hemodynamic parameters near the anastomosis region change substantially. Implications for future patient-specific optimization of CABG are discussed. PMID:22539149

  3. Patient-specific multiscale modeling of blood flow for coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Esmaily Moghadam, Mahdi; Kahn, Andrew M; Tseng, Elaine E; Guccione, Julius M; Marsden, Alison L

    2012-10-01

    We present a computational framework for multiscale modeling and simulation of blood flow in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients. Using this framework, only CT and non-invasive clinical measurements are required without the need to assume pressure and/or flow waveforms in the coronaries and we can capture global circulatory dynamics. We demonstrate this methodology in a case study of a patient with multiple CABGs. A patient-specific model of the blood vessels is constructed from CT image data to include the aorta, aortic branch vessels (brachiocephalic artery and carotids), the coronary arteries and multiple bypass grafts. The rest of the circulatory system is modeled using a lumped parameter network (LPN) 0 dimensional (0D) system comprised of resistances, capacitors (compliance), inductors (inertance), elastance and diodes (valves) that are tuned to match patient-specific clinical data. A finite element solver is used to compute blood flow and pressure in the 3D (3 dimensional) model, and this solver is implicitly coupled to the 0D LPN code at all inlets and outlets. By systematically parameterizing the graft geometry, we evaluate the influence of graft shape on the local hemodynamics, and global circulatory dynamics. Virtual manipulation of graft geometry is automated using Bezier splines and control points along the pathlines. Using this framework, we quantify wall shear stress, wall shear stress gradients and oscillatory shear index for different surgical geometries. We also compare pressures, flow rates and ventricular pressure-volume loops pre- and post-bypass graft surgery. We observe that PV loops do not change significantly after CABG but that both coronary perfusion and local hemodynamic parameters near the anastomosis region change substantially. Implications for future patient-specific optimization of CABG are discussed. PMID:22539149

  4. Flood Bypass Capacity Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siclari, A.; Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Large river flows can damage adjacent flood-prone areas, by exceeding river channel and levee capacities. Particularly large floods are difficult to contain in leveed river banks alone. Flood bypasses often can efficiently reduce flood risks, where excess river flow is diverted over a weir to bypasses, that incur much less damage and cost. Additional benefits of bypasses include ecosystem protection, agriculture, groundwater recharge and recreation. Constructing or expanding an existing bypass costs in land purchase easements, and levee setbacks. Accounting for such benefits and costs, this study develops a simple mathematical model for optimizing flood bypass capacity using benefit-cost and risk analysis. Application to the Yolo Bypass, an existing bypass along the Sacramento River in California, estimates optimal capacity that economically reduces flood damage and increases various benefits, especially for agriculture. Land availability is likely to limit bypass expansion. Compensation for landowners could relax such limitations. Other economic values could affect the optimal results, which are shown by sensitivity analysis on major parameters. By including land geography into the model, location of promising capacity expansions can be identified.

  5. Electrical and thermal finite element modeling of arc faults in photovoltaic bypass diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Ward Isaac; Quintana, Michael A.; Johnson, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Arc faults in photovoltaic (PV) modules have caused multiple rooftop fires. The arc generates a high-temperature plasma that ignites surrounding materials and subsequently spreads the fire to the building structure. While there are many possible locations in PV systems and PV modules where arcs could initiate, bypass diodes have been suspected of triggering arc faults in some modules. In order to understand the electrical and thermal phenomena associated with these events, a finite element model of a busbar and diode was created. Thermoelectrical simulations found Joule and internal diode heating from normal operation would not normally cause bypass diode or solder failures. However, if corrosion increased the contact resistance in the solder connection between the busbar and the diode leads, enough voltage potentially would be established to arc across micron-scale electrode gaps. Lastly, an analytical arc radiation model based on observed data was employed to predicted polymer ignition times. The model predicted polymer materials in the adjacent area of the diode and junction box ignite in less than 0.1 seconds.

  6. Overview of ERA Ultra High Bypass Propulsor Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A review of the current research being conducted under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Ultra High Bypass (UHB) Testing subelement is presented. The four exiting tasks under the subelement, a description of each task, and the current status of each are given. The four tasks are: 1. Collaborate with P&W to design, fabricate and test a second generation of Geared Turbofan 2. Design, fabricate and test advanced Over the Rotor acoustic treatment and acoustically treated Soft Vanes 3. Develop a Shape Memory Alloy Variable Area Nozzle concept and demonstrate prototype 4. Refurbish and update the GRC Ultra High Bypass Drive Rig Following the current task updates, an overview of three proposed additional tasks to support the existing tasks is presented. The additional tasks would allow noise reduction and noise diagnostic testing technologies to be demonstrated at TRL 4 as part of existing planned fan model testing in the NASA Glenn 9 x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel under the ERA UHB Testing subelement.

  7. Simulating the Use of Alternative Fuels in a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Chin, Jeffrey Chevoor; Liu, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The interest in alternative fuels for aviation has created a need to evaluate their effect on engine performance. The use of dynamic turbofan engine simulations enables the comparative modeling of the performance of these fuels on a realistic test bed in terms of dynamic response and control compared to traditional fuels. The analysis of overall engine performance and response characteristics can lead to a determination of the practicality of using specific alternative fuels in commercial aircraft. This paper describes a procedure to model the use of alternative fuels in a large commercial turbofan engine, and quantifies their effects on engine and vehicle performance. In addition, the modeling effort notionally demonstrates that engine performance may be maintained by modifying engine control system software parameters to account for the alternative fuel.

  8. Performance deterioration of commercial high-bypass ratio turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, C. M.; Ziemianski, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of engine performance deterioration investigations based on historical data, special engine tests, and specific tests to define the influence of flight loads and component clearances on performance are presented. The results of analyses of several damage mechanisms that contribute to performance deterioration such as blade tip rubs, airfoil surface roughness and erosion, and thermal distortion are also included. The significance of these damage mechanisms on component and overall engine performance is discussed.

  9. Mechanistic Comparison between Gastric Bypass vs. Duodenal Switch with Sleeve Gastrectomy in Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Yosuke; Johannessen, Helene; Furnes, Marianne W.; Zhao, Chun-Mei; Johnsen, Gjermund; Mårvik, Ronald; Kulseng, Bård; Chen, Duan

    2013-01-01

    Background Both gastric bypass (GB) and duodenal switch with sleeve gastrectomy (DS) have been widely used as bariatric surgeries, and DS appears to be superior to GB. The aim of this study was to better understand the mechanisms leading to body weight loss by comparing these two procedures in experimental models of rats. Methods Animals were subjected to GB, DS or laparotomy (controls), and monitored by an open-circuit indirect calorimeter composed of comprehensive laboratory animal monitoring system and adiabatic bomb calorimeter. Results Body weight loss was greater after DS than GB. Food intake was reduced after DS but not GB. Energy expenditure was increased after either GB or DS. Fecal energy content was increased after DS but not GB. Conclusion GB induced body weight loss by increasing energy expenditure, whereas DS induced greater body weight loss by reducing food intake, increasing energy expenditure and causing malabsorption in rat models. PMID:24039816

  10. Advanced Engine Cycles Analyzed for Turbofans With Variable-Area Fan Nozzles Actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    Con) Program, has the potential to enable the next generation of efficient, quiet, very high bypass ratio turbofans. NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Analysis Office, along with NASA Langley Research Center's Systems Analysis Branch, conducted an independent analytical assessment of this new technology to provide strategic guidance to UEET and RevCon. A 2010-technology-level high-spool engine core was designed for this evaluation. Two families of low-spool components, one with and one without VAFN's, were designed to operate with the core. This "constant core" approach was used to hold most design parameters constant so that any performance differences between the VAFN and fixed nozzle cycles could be attributed to the VAFN technology alone. In this manner, the cycle design regimes that offer a performance payoff when VAFN's are used could be identified. The NASA analytical model of a performance-optimized VAFN turbofan with a fan pressure ratio of 1.28 is shown. Mission analyses of the engines were conducted using the notional, long-haul, advanced commercial twinjet shown. A high wing design was used to accommodate the large high-bypassratio engines. The mission fuel reduction benefit of very high bypass shape-memory-alloy VAFN aircraft was calculated to be 8.3 percent lower than a moderate bypass cycle using a conventional fixed nozzle. Shape-memory-alloy VAFN technology is currently under development in NASA's UEET and RevCon Programs.

  11. Does littoral sand bypass the head of Mugu Submarine Canyon? - a modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Jingping; Elias, Edwin; Kinsman, Nicole; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    A newly developed sand-tracer code for the process-based model Delft3D (Deltares, The Netherlands) was used to simulate the littoral transport near the head of the Mugu Submarine Canyon in California, USA. For westerly swells, which account for more than 90% of the wave conditions in the region, the sand tracers in the downcoast littoral drift were unable to bypass the canyon head. A flow convergence near the upcoast rim of the canyon intercepts the tracers and moves them either offshore onto the shelf just west of the canyon rim (low wave height conditions) or into the canyon head (storm wave conditions). This finding supports the notion that Mugu Canyon is the true terminus of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell.

  12. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  13. Bypass Mechanisms of the Androgen Receptor Pathway in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rute B.; Dits, Natasja F.; Erkens-Schulze, Sigrun; van Weerden, Wytske M.; Jenster, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is initially dependent on androgens for survival and growth, making hormonal therapy the cornerstone treatment for late-stage tumors. However, despite initial remission, the cancer will inevitably recur. The present study was designed to investigate how androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells eventually survive and resume growth under androgen-deprived and antiandrogen supplemented conditions. As model system, we used the androgen-responsive PC346C cell line and its therapy-resistant sublines: PC346DCC, PC346Flu1 and PC346Flu2. Methodology/Principal Findings Microarray technology was used to analyze differences in gene expression between the androgen-responsive and therapy-resistant PC346 cell lines. Microarray analysis revealed 487 transcripts differentially-expressed between the androgen-responsive and the therapy-resistant cell lines. Most of these genes were common to all three therapy-resistant sublines and only a minority (∼5%) was androgen-regulated. Pathway analysis revealed enrichment in functions involving cellular movement, cell growth and cell death, as well as association with cancer and reproductive system disease. PC346DCC expressed residual levels of androgen receptor (AR) and showed significant down-regulation of androgen-regulated genes (p-value = 10−7). Up-regulation of VAV3 and TWIST1 oncogenes and repression of the DKK3 tumor-suppressor was observed in PC346DCC, suggesting a potential AR bypass mechanism. Subsequent validation of these three genes in patient samples confirmed that expression was deregulated during prostate cancer progression. Conclusions/Significance Therapy-resistant growth may result from adaptations in the AR pathway, but androgen-independence may also be achieved by alternative survival mechanisms. Here we identified TWIST1, VAV3 and DKK3 as potential players in the bypassing of the AR pathway, making them good candidates as biomarkers and novel therapeutical targets. PMID:20976069

  14. Impaired microcirculatory perfusion in a rat model of cardiopulmonary bypass: the role of hemodilution.

    PubMed

    Koning, Nick J; de Lange, Fellery; Vonk, Alexander B A; Ahmed, Yunus; van den Brom, Charissa E; Bogaards, Sylvia; van Meurs, Matijs; Jongman, Rianne M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Begieneman, Mark P V; Niessen, Hans W; Baufreton, Christophe; Boer, Christa

    2016-03-01

    Although hemodilution is attributed as the main cause of microcirculatory impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), this relationship has never been investigated. We investigated the distinct effects of hemodilution with or without CPB on microvascular perfusion and subsequent renal tissue injury in a rat model. Male Wistar rats (375-425 g) were anesthetized, prepared for cremaster muscle intravital microscopy, and subjected to CPB (n = 9), hemodilution alone (n = 9), or a sham procedure (n = 6). Microcirculatory recordings were performed at multiple time points and analyzed for perfusion characteristics. Kidney and lung tissue were investigated for mRNA expression for genes regulating inflammation and endothelial adhesion molecule expression. Renal injury was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit levels dropped to 0.24 ± 0.03 l/l and 0.22 ± 0.02 l/l after onset of hemodilution with or without CPB. Microcirculatory perfusion remained unaltered in sham rats. Hemodilution alone induced a 13% decrease in perfused capillaries, after which recovery was observed. Onset of CPB reduced the perfused capillaries by 40% (9.2 ± 0.9 to 5.5 ± 1.5 perfused capillaries per microscope field; P < 0.001), and this reduction persisted throughout the experiment. Endothelial and inflammatory activation and renal histological injury were increased after CPB compared with hemodilution or sham procedure. Hemodilution leads to minor and transient disturbances in microcirculatory perfusion, which cannot fully explain impaired microcirculation following cardiopulmonary bypass. CPB led to increased renal injury and endothelial adhesion molecule expression in the kidney and lung compared with hemodilution. Our findings suggest that microcirculatory impairment during CPB may play a role in the development of kidney injury.

  15. Implementation of intrinsic lumped parameter modeling into computational fluid dynamics studies of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Tim A S; Neidlin, Michael; Büsen, Martin; Sonntag, Simon J; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Stroke and cerebral hypoxia are among the main complications during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The two main reasons for these complications are the cannula jet, due to altered flow conditions and the sandblast effect, and impaired cerebral autoregulation which often occurs in the elderly. The effect of autoregulation has so far mainly been modeled using lumped parameter modeling, while Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been applied to analyze flow conditions during CPB. In this study, we combine both modeling techniques to analyze the effect of lumped parameter modeling on blood flow during CPB. Additionally, cerebral autoregulation is implemented using the Baroreflex, which adapts the cerebrovascular resistance and compliance based on the cerebral perfusion pressure. The results show that while a combination of CFD and lumped parameter modeling without autoregulation delivers feasible results for physiological flow conditions, it overestimates the loss of cerebral blood flow during CPB. This is counteracted by the Baroreflex, which restores the cerebral blood flow to native levels. However, the cerebral blood flow during CPB is typically reduced by 10-20% in the clinic. This indicates that either the Baroreflex is not fully functional during CPB, or that the target value for the Baroreflex is not a full native cerebral blood flow, but the plateau phase of cerebral autoregulation, which starts at approximately 80% of native flow.

  16. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake - Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  17. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake: Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  18. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Turbofan for an Advanced, Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest surrounds the design of the next generation of single-aisle commercial transports in the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 class. Aircraft designers will depend on advanced, next-generation turbofan engines to power these airplanes. The focus of this study is to apply single- and multi-objective optimization algorithms to the conceptual design of ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines for this class of aircraft, using NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project metrics as multidisciplinary objectives for optimization. The independent design variables investigated include three continuous variables: sea level static thrust, wing reference area, and aerodynamic design point fan pressure ratio, and four discrete variables: overall pressure ratio, fan drive system architecture (i.e., direct- or gear-driven), bypass nozzle architecture (i.e., fixed- or variable geometry), and the high- and low-pressure compressor work split. Ramp weight, fuel burn, noise, and emissions are the parameters treated as dependent objective functions. These optimized solutions provide insight to the ultrahigh bypass engine design process and provide information to NASA program management to help guide its technology development efforts.

  19. Modeling the Effects of Ice Accretion on the Low Pressure Compressor and the Overall Turbofan Engine System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Wright, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is on utilizing a mean line compressor flow analysis code coupled to an engine system thermodynamic code, to estimate the effects of ice accretion on the low pressure compressor, and quantifying its effects on the engine system throughout a notional flight trajectory. In this paper a temperature range in which engine icing would occur was assumed. This provided a mechanism to locate potential component icing sites and allow the computational tools to add blockages due to ice accretion in a parametric fashion. Ultimately the location and level of blockage due to icing would be provided by an ice accretion code. To proceed, an engine system modeling code and a mean line compressor flow analysis code were utilized to calculate the flow conditions in the fan-core and low pressure compressor and to identify potential locations within the compressor where ice may accrete. In this study, an "additional blockage" due to the accretion of ice on the metal surfaces, has been added to the baseline aerodynamic blockage due to boundary layer, as well as the blade metal blockage. Once the potential locations of ice accretion are identified, the levels of additional blockage due to accretion were parametrically varied to estimate the effects on the low pressure compressor blade row performance operating within the engine system environment. This study includes detailed analysis of compressor and engine performance during cruise and descent operating conditions at several altitudes within the notional flight trajectory. The purpose of this effort is to develop the computer codes to provide a predictive capability to forecast the onset of engine icing events, such that they could ultimately help in the avoidance of these events.

  20. Design study of a dual-cycle turbofan-ramjet engine for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.; Suwanprasert, S.

    1983-01-01

    Computer modelling was used with two different designs of an advanced turbofan-ramjet in order to derive performance predictions. The engine would enable an aircraft to take-off, accelerate to Mach 5.0, and climb to 90,000 ft. The two concepts included a turbofan with a ramjet annularly wrapped around it and a side-by-side configuration with the ramjet having a rectangular shape and mounted alongside the turbofan. The studies were performed to model weight, length, fuel efficiency, and the requirements of the thrust/drag ratio to exceed unity over the entire flight path. LH2 would be used for fuel and to regeneratively cool the combustion chamber. Turbofan operation with and without afterburner and with and without the ramjet inlet open were examined, as were variable areas for the burners. A side-by-side configuration displayed the best performance predictions, with a ramjet mass flow being 75 percent that of the turbofan and maximum temperatures being equal.

  1. Turbofan engine core noise source diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, Allen M.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes a turbofan-engine measurement program utilizing a variety of diagnostic techniques to identify a source of core-generated noise which contributes to the overall external engine noise characteristics. Included in the turbofan engine diagnostics are data examination, time domain correlation, and frequency domain analysis. It is found that the turbulent pressure fluctuations within the combustor are a source for core noise which propagates through the nozzle and radiates to the far-field.

  2. Design of an air ejector for boundary-layer bleed of an acoustically treated turbofan engine inlet during ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    An air ejector was designed and built to remove the boundary-layer air from the inlet a turbofan engine during an acoustic ground test program. This report describes; (1) how the ejector was sized; (2) how the ejector performed; and (3) the performance of a scale model ejector built and tested to verify the design. With proper acoustic insulation, the ejector was effective in reducing boundary layer thickness in the inlet of the turbofan engine while obtaining the desired acoustic test conditions.

  3. Modeling of the heat transfer in bypass transitional boundary-layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Stephens, Craig A.

    1991-01-01

    A low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model and conditioned momentum, energy and turbulence equations were used to predict bypass transition heat transfer on a flat plate in a high-disturbance environment with zero pressure gradient. The use of conditioned equations was demonstrated to be an improvement over the use of the global-time-averaged equations for the calculation of velocity profiles and turbulence intensity profiles in the transition region of a boundary layer. The approach of conditioned equations is extended to include heat transfer and a modeling of transition events is used to predict transition onset and the extent of transition on a flat plate. The events, which describe the boundary layer at the leading edge, result in boundary-layer regions consisting of: (1) the laminar, (2) pseudolaminar, (3) transitional, and (4) turbulent boundary layers. The modeled transition events were incorporated into the TEXSTAN 2-D boundary-layer code which is used to numerically predict the heat transfer. The numerical predictions in general compared well with the experimental data and revealed areas where additional experimental information is needed.

  4. Fluctuating pressures on fan blades of a turbofan engine: Static and wind-tunnel investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenster, J. A.

    1982-03-01

    To investigate the fan noise generated from turbofan engines, miniature pressure transducers were used to measure the fluctuating pressure on the fan blades of a JT15D engine. Tests were conducted with the engine operating on an outdoor test stand and in a wind tunnel. It was found that a potential flow interaction between the fan blades and six, large support struts in the bypass duct is a dominant noise source in the JT15D engine. Effects of varying fan speed and the forward speed on the blade pressure are also presented.

  5. A Numerical Multiscale Framework for Modeling Patient-Specific Coronary Artery Bypass Surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Abhay B.; Kahn, Andrew; Marsden, Alison

    2014-11-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is performed to revascularize diseased coronary arteries, using arterial, venous or synthetic grafts. Vein grafts, used in more than 70% of procedures, have failure rates as high as 50% in less than 10 years. Hemodynamics is known to play a key role in the mechano-biological response of vein grafts, but current non-invasive imaging techniques cannot fully characterize the hemodynamic and biomechanical environment. We numerically compute hemodynamics and wall mechanics in patient-specific 3D CABG geometries using stabilized finite element methods. The 3D patient-specific domain is coupled to a 0D lumped parameter circulatory model and parameters are tuned to match patient-specific blood pressures, stroke volumes, heart rates and heuristic flow-split values. We quantify differences in hemodynamics between arterial and venous grafts and discuss possible correlations to graft failure. Extension to a deformable wall approximation will also be discussed. The quantification of wall mechanics and hemodynamics is a necessary step towards coupling continuum models in solid and fluid mechanics with the cellular and sub-cellular responses of grafts, which in turn, should lead to a more accurate prediction of the long term outcome of CABG surgeries, including predictions of growth and remodeling.

  6. Procedure for Separating Noise Sources in Measurements of Turbofan Engine Core Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2006-01-01

    The study of core noise from turbofan engines has become more important as noise from other sources like the fan and jet have been reduced. A multiple microphone and acoustic source modeling method to separate correlated and uncorrelated sources has been developed. The auto and cross spectrum in the frequency range below 1000 Hz is fitted with a noise propagation model based on a source couplet consisting of a single incoherent source with a single coherent source or a source triplet consisting of a single incoherent source with two coherent point sources. Examples are presented using data from a Pratt & Whitney PW4098 turbofan engine. The method works well.

  7. NASA / Pratt and Whitney Collaborative Partnership Research in Ultra High Bypass Cycle Propulsion Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Chris; Lord, Wed

    2008-01-01

    Current collaborative research with Pratt & Whitney on Ultra High Bypass Engine Cycle noise, performance and emissions improvements as part of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Ultra High Bypass Engine Partnership Element is discussed. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project goals are reviewed, as well as their relative technology level compared to previous NASA noise program goals. Progress toward achieving the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project goals over the 2008 fiscal year by the UHB Partnership in this area of research are reviewed. The current research activity in Ultra High Bypass Engine Cycle technology, specifically the Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan, at NASA and Pratt & Whitney are discussed including the contributions each entity bring toward the research project, and technical plans and objectives. Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan current and future technology and business plans are also discussed, including the role the NASA SFW UHB partnership plays toward achieving those goals.

  8. An Assessment of Gas Foil Bearing Scalability and the Potential Benefits to Civilian Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years the term oil-free turbomachinery has been used to describe a rotor support system for high speed turbomachinery that does not require oil for lubrication, damping, or cooling. The foundation technology for oil-free turbomachinery is the compliant foil bearing. This technology can replace the conventional rolling element bearings found in current engines. Two major benefits are realized with this technology. The primary benefit is the elimination of the oil lubrication system, accessory gearbox, tower shaft, and one turbine frame. These components account for 8 to 13 percent of the turbofan engine weight. The second benefit that compliant foil bearings offer to turbofan engines is the capability to operate at higher rotational speeds and shaft diameters. While traditional rolling element bearings have diminished life, reliability, and load capacity with increasing speeds, the foil bearing has a load capacity proportional to speed. The traditional applications for foil bearings have been in small, lightweight machines. However, recent advancements in the design and manufacturing of foil bearings have increased their potential size. An analysis, grounded in experimentally proven operation, is performed to assess the scalability of the modern foil bearing. This analysis was coupled to the requirements of civilian turbofan engines. The application of the foil bearing to larger, high bypass ratio engines nominally at the 120 kN (approx.25000 lb) thrust class has been examined. The application of this advanced technology to this system was found to reduce mission fuel burn by 3.05 percent.

  9. [Pathogenic variants of brain injuries and pharmalogic cerebroprotection performed on the model of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery].

    PubMed

    Tsygan, N V; Trashkov, A P

    2014-10-01

    Developed and approved a pathogenic grounded experimental model of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery. Undertaken in Wistar rats research allowed to evaluate in detail effectiveness and safety of protracted cerebroprotective treatment. Advantages of this model are researches in laboratory animals with the aim to research condition of nerve tissue, not intensive procedures and consequently high reproducibility and possibility of complex evaluation of changes at every stage of research. Results of neurons, neuroglia and activation of neurotrophic mechanisms prove that simulation of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery is accompanied with acute and delayed brain injuries. Use of Cytoflavin under pharmalogic cerebroprotection had prolonged multimodal and neuroprotactive effect, leading to improvement of neurotrophic protection from the first days.

  10. Turbofans turn to UHB propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.E.; Conliffe, C.H. General Electric Co., Fairfield, CT )

    1990-07-01

    While ducted fan engines typical of current transport aircraft practice are able to achieve bypass ratios of the order of between 10 and 20 at most, the full benefits of bypass ratio maximization are only achievable at ratios of the order of 30 to 50, which require open-fan configurations. An account is presently given of the development status of the two fundamentally different ultrahigh bypass (UHB) engine designs currently undergoing testing: one of which uses a gearbox, while the other relies on a contrarotating turbine configuration to achieve the requisite speed reduction. Both engines have undergone flight testing on an MD-80 airliner. Additional advanced UHB engine development programs undertaken by foreign manufacturers are noted.

  11. A Pre-operative Risk Model for Post-operative Pneumonia following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Raymond J.; Liang, Qixing; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoting; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Theurer, Patricia F.; Fishstrom, Astrid B.; Harrington, Steven D.; DeLucia, Alphonse; Paone, Gaetano; Patel, Himanshu J.; Prager, Richard L.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-operative pneumonia is the most prevalent of all hospital-acquired infections following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CAB). Accurate prediction of a patient’s risk of this morbid complication is hindered by its low relative incidence. In an effort to support clinical decision-making and quality improvement, we developed a pre-operative prediction model for post-operative pneumonia following CAB. Methods We undertook an observational study of 16,084 patients undergoing CAB between Q3 2011 – Q2 2014 across 33 institutions participating in the Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons – Quality Collaborative. Variables related to patient demographics, medical history, admission status, comorbid disease, cardiac anatomy and the institution performing the procedure were investigated. Logistic regression via forwards stepwise selection (p < 0.05 threshold) was utilized to develop a risk prediction model for estimating the occurrence of pneumonia. Traditional methods were employed to assess the model’s performance. Results Post-operative pneumonia occurred in 3.30% of patients. Multivariable analysis identified 17 pre-operative factors, including: demographics, laboratory values, comorbid disease, pulmonary and cardiac function, and operative status. The final model significantly predicted the occurrence of pneumonia, and performed well (C-statistic: 0.74). These findings were confirmed via sensitivity analyses by center and clinically important sub-groups. Conclusions We identified 17 readily obtainable pre-operative variables associated with post-operative pneumonia. This model may be used to provide individualized risk estimation and to identify opportunities to reduce a patient’s pre-operative risk of pneumonia through pre-habilitation. PMID:27261082

  12. Drug disposition and modelling before and after gastric bypass: immediate and controlled-release metoprolol formulations

    PubMed Central

    Gesquiere, Ina; Darwich, Adam S; Van der Schueren, Bart; de Hoon, Jan; Lannoo, Matthias; Matthys, Christophe; Rostami, Amin; Foulon, Veerle; Augustijns, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to evaluate the disposition of metoprolol after oral administration of an immediate and controlled-release formulation before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in the same individuals and to validate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for predicting oral bioavailability following RYGB. Methods A single-dose pharmacokinetic study of metoprolol tartrate 200 mg immediate release and controlled release was performed in 14 volunteers before and 6–8 months after RYGB. The observed data were compared with predicted results from the PBPK modelling and simulation of metoprolol tartrate immediate and controlled-release formulation before and after RYGB. Results After administration of metoprolol immediate and controlled release, no statistically significant difference in the observed area under the curve (AUC0–24 h) was shown, although a tendency towards an increased oral exposure could be observed as the AUC0–24 h was 32.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36, 63.5] and 55.9% (95% CI 5.73, 106) higher following RYGB for the immediate and controlled-release formulation, respectively. This could be explained by surgery-related weight loss and a reduced presystemic biotransformation in the proximal gastrointestinal tract. The PBPK values predicted by modelling and simulation were similar to the observed data, confirming its validity. Conclusions The disposition of metoprolol from an immediate-release and a controlled-release formulation was not significantly altered after RYGB; there was a tendency to an increase, which was also predicted by PBPK modelling and simulation. PMID:25917170

  13. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over-The-Wing (OTW) propulsion system test report. Volume 2: Aerodynamics and performance. [engine performance tests to define propulsion system performance on turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and testing of the over the wing engine, a high bypass, geared turbofan engine, are discussed. The propulsion system performance is examined for uninstalled performance and installed performance. The fan aerodynamic performance and the D nozzle and reverser thrust performance are evaluated.

  14. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y gastric bypass; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y; Weight-loss surgery - gastric bypass; Obesity surgery - gastric bypass ... Weight-loss surgery may be an option if you are very obese and have not been able to ...

  15. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity gastric bypass discharge; Weight loss - gastric bypass discharge ... al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised ...

  16. A Model to Assess the Risk of Ice Accretion Due to Ice Crystal Ingestion in a Turbofan Engine and its Effects on Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Wright, William B.; Struk, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that were attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was one or more of the following anomalies: degraded engine performance, engine roll back, compressor surge and stall, and flameout of the combustor. The main focus of this research is the development of a computational tool that can estimate whether there is a risk of ice accretion by tracking key parameters through the compression system blade rows at all engine operating points within the flight trajectory. The tool has an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, coupled with a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor blade rows. Assumptions are made to predict the complex physics involved in engine icing. Specifically, the code does not directly estimate ice accretion and does not have models for particle breakup or erosion. Two key parameters have been suggested as conditions that must be met at the same location for ice accretion to occur: the local wet-bulb temperature to be near freezing or below and the local melt ratio must be above 10%. These parameters were deduced from analyzing laboratory icing test data and are the criteria used to predict the possibility of ice accretion within an engine including the specific blade row where it could occur. Once the possibility of accretion is determined from these parameters, the degree of blockage due to ice accretion on the local stator vane can be estimated from an empirical model of ice growth rate and time spent at that operating point in the flight trajectory. The computational tool can be used to assess specific turbine engines to their susceptibility to

  17. Computational Modeling of Neonatal Cardiopulmonary Bypass Hemodynamics With Full Circle of Willis Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Senol; Ündar, Akif; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) procedure is employed to repair most congenital heart defects (CHD). Cannulation is a critical component of this procedure where the location and diameter of cannula controls the hemodynamic performance. State-of-the-art computational studies of neonatal CPB employed an isolated aortic arch region by truncating the three-dimensional (3D) patient-specific cerebral system. The present work expanded these studies where the 3D patient-specific MRI reconstruction of the cerebral system, including the Circle of Willis (CoW), is integrated with a hypoplastic neonatal aortic arch. The inlet of the arterial cannula is assigned a steady velocity boundary condition of the CPB pump, while all outlets are modeled as resistance boundary conditions, thus allowing acute comparisons between different cannula configurations. Three-dimensional (3D) flow simulations in the aortic arch model are performed at a Reynolds number of 2150 using an experimentally validated commercial solver. Results demonstrate that the inclusion of 3D CoW is essential to predict the accurate head-neck blood perfusion and therefore critical in deciding the neonatal aortic cannulation strategy preoperatively. Using this integrated model two CPB configurations are studied, where the cannulas were placed at innominate artery (IA) (IA-cannula configuration) and ductus arteriosus (DA) (DA-cannula configuration). Configuration change produced significant differences in flow splits and local hemodynamics of blood flow throughout the whole aortic arch, neck and cerebral arteries. Percent flow rate differences between the IA- and DA-cannula configurations are computed to be: 19%, for descending aorta, 198% for ascending aorta (perfusing coronary arteries), 91% for right anterior cerebral artery, and 68% for left anterior cerebral artery. Another important finding is the retrograde flow at vertebral arteries for IA-cannula configuration, but not for DA-cannula. These results may help to

  18. Minimum time acceleration of aircraft turbofan engines by using an algorithm based on nonlinear programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, F.

    1977-01-01

    Minimum time accelerations of aircraft turbofan engines are presented. The calculation of these accelerations was made by using a piecewise linear engine model, and an algorithm based on nonlinear programming. Use of this model and algorithm allows such trajectories to be readily calculated on a digital computer with a minimal expenditure of computer time.

  19. Design, evaluation and test of an electronic, multivariable control for the F100 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skira, C. A.; Dehoff, R. L.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A digital, multivariable control design procedure for the F100 turbofan engine is described. The controller is based on locally linear synthesis techniques using linear, quadratic regulator design methods. The control structure uses an explicit model reference form with proportional and integral feedback near a nominal trajectory. Modeling issues, design procedures for the control law and the estimation of poorly measured variables are presented.

  20. Prothrombin complex concentrate mitigates diffuse bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Kaspereit, F.; Hoffmann, S.; Pragst, I.; Dickneite, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circuit priming and intravascular volume expansion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may lead to dilutional coagulopathy and excessive diffuse postoperative bleeding. Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) containing clotting factors II (FII), VII (FVII), IX (FIX), and X (FX) could be of potential value in correcting dilutional coagulopathy and reducing blood loss. Methods Anaesthetized pigs underwent CPB with hypothermia for 2 h at 25°C followed by 1 h of normothermia. Approximately 1 h after CPB, animals randomly received either isotonic saline 1 ml kg−1 or PCC 30 IU kg−1 in a volume of 1 ml kg−1. Diffuse coagulopathic bleeding was assessed as suture hole blood loss from a Gore-Tex patch placed over a full-thickness incision in the left carotid artery. Results After CPB, levels of FII, FVII, FIX, and FX declined from baseline by 32% to 48%, and PCC fully or partially reversed those deficits. Median suture hole blood loss after administration of saline placebo was 74 ml. PCC reduced suture hole bleeding by a median of 54 ml with a 95% confidence interval of 6–112 ml (P=0.026) compared with saline. PCC, but not saline, normalized skin bleeding time. Peak thrombin generation markedly decreased after CPB, but then returned in PCC-treated animals to a level higher than baseline by 28.7 nM (14.5–41.1 nM; P=0.031). Conclusions PCC was effective in correcting dilutional coagulopathy and reducing diffuse bleeding in an in vivo large-animal CPB model. Further research is warranted on PCC as a haemostatic agent in CPB. PMID:20716565

  1. A new model of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass: design improvement, performance, and hemolysis tests.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Dos Santos, Alex Eugênio; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Andrade, Aron; Biscegli, José F

    2011-05-01

    A new model of blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) application has been developed and evaluated in our laboratories. Inside the pump housing is a spiral impeller that is conically shaped and has threads on its surface. Worm gears provide an axial motion of the blood column. Rotational motion of the conical shape generates a centrifugal pumping effect and improves pumping performance. One annular magnet with six poles is inside the impeller, providing magnetic coupling to a brushless direct current motor. In order to study the pumping performance, a mock loop system was assembled. Mock loop was composed of Tygon tubes (Saint-Gobain Corporation, Courbevoie, France), oxygenator, digital flowmeter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control. Experiments were performed on six prototypes with small differences in their design. Each prototype was tested and flow and pressure data were obtained for rotational speed of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. Hemolysis was studied using pumps with different internal gap sizes (1.35, 1.45, 1.55, and 1.7 mm). Hemolysis tests simulated CPB application with flow rate of 5 L/min against total pressure head of 350 mm Hg. The results from six prototypes were satisfactory, compared to the results from the literature. However, prototype #6 showed the best results. Best hemolysis results were observed with a gap of 1.45 mm, and showed a normalized index of hemolysis of 0.013 g/100 L. When combined, axial and centrifugal pumping principles produce better hydrodynamic performance without increasing hemolysis.

  2. Design of turbofan engine controls using output feedback regulator theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on output feedback regulator (OFR) theory is applied to the F100 turbofan engine. Results for the OFR design are compared to a design based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory. The OFR feedback control is designed in the full order state space and thus eliminates any need for model reduction techniques. Using the performance measure and control structure of the LQR design, an equivalent OFR feedback control is obtained. The flexibility of the OFR as a control design procedure is demonstrated, and differing feedback control structures are evaluated.

  3. Bypass Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  4. Nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, William B. (Inventor); Kontos, Karen B. (Inventor); Weir, Donald S. (Inventor); Nolcheff, Nick A. (Inventor); Gunaraj, John A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane having a characteristic curve that is characterized by a nonlinear sweep and a nonlinear lean is provided. The stator is in an axial fan or compressor turbomachinery stage that is comprised of a collection of vanes whose highly three-dimensional shape is selected to reduce rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction noise while maintaining the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of the vane. The nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane reduces noise associated with the fan stage of turbomachinery to improve environmental compatibility.

  5. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  6. Noise Benefits of Increased Fan Bypass Nozzle Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    An advanced model turbofan (typical of current engine technology) was tested in the NASA Glenn 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9-by 15-Foot LSWT) to explore far field acoustic effects of increased bypass nozzle area. This fan stage test was part of the NASA Glenn Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test, second entry (SDT2) which acquired aeroacoustic results over a range of test conditions. The baseline nozzle was sized to produce maximum stage performance for the engine at a high altitude, cruise point condition. However, the wind tunnel testing is conducted near sea level conditions. Therefore, in order to simulate and obtain performance at other aircraft operating conditions, two additional nozzles were designed and tested-one with a +5 percent increase in weight flow (+5.4 percent increase in nozzle area compared with the baseline nozzle), sized to simulate the performance at the stage design point conditions, and the other with a +7.5 percent increase in weight flow (+10.9 percent increase in nozzle area), sized for maximum weight flow with a fixed nozzle at sea level conditions. Measured acoustic benefits with increased nozzle area were very encouraging, showing overall sound power level (OAPWL) reductions of 2 or more dB while the stage thrust actually increased by several percentage points except fro the most open nozzle at takeoff rotor speed where stage performance decreased. These noise reduction benefits were seen to primarily affect broadband noise, and were evident throughout the range of measured sideline angles.

  7. Aero-acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several exhaust systems suitable for duct burning turbofan engines are evaluated. Scale models representing unsuppressed coannular exhaust systems are examined statically under varying exhaust conditions. Ejectors with both hardwall and acoustically treated inserts are investigated.

  8. The impact of uncertainty on shape optimization of idealized bypass graft models in unsteady flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Marsden, Alison L.

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that the fluid mechanics of bypass grafts impacts biomechanical responses and is linked to intimal thickening and plaque deposition on the vessel wall. In spite of this, quantitative information about the fluid mechanics is not currently incorporated into surgical planning and bypass graft design. In this work, we use a derivative-free optimization technique for performing systematic design of bypass grafts. The optimization method is coupled to a three-dimensional pulsatile Navier-Stokes solver. We systematically account for inevitable uncertainties that arise in cardiovascular simulations, owing to noise in medical image data, variable physiologic conditions, and surgical implementation. Uncertainties in the simulation input parameters as well as shape design variables are accounted for using the adaptive stochastic collocation technique. The derivative-free optimization framework is coupled with a stochastic response surface technique to make the problem computationally tractable. Two idealized numerical examples, an end-to-side anastomosis, and a bypass graft around a stenosis, demonstrate that accounting for uncertainty significantly changes the optimal graft design. Results show that small changes in the design variables from their optimal values should be accounted for in surgical planning. Changes in the downstream (distal) graft angle resulted in greater sensitivity of the wall-shear stress compared to changes in the upstream (proximal) angle. The impact of cost function choice on the optimal solution was explored. Additionally, this work represents the first use of the stochastic surrogate management framework method for robust shape optimization in a fully three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes design problem.

  9. Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielak, Gerald W.; Premo, John W.; Hersh, Alan S.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program goal is to reduce aircraft noise by 10 EPNdB by the year 2000 relative, to 1992 technology. The improvement goal for nacelle attenuation is 25% relative to 1992 technology by 1997 and 50% by 2000. The Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts Task work by Boeing presented in this document was in support of these goals. The basis for the technical approach was a Boeing study conducted in 1993-94 under NASA/FAA contract NAS1-19349, Task 6, investigating broadband acoustic liner concepts. As a result of this work, it was recommended that linear double layer, linear and perforate triple layer, parallel element, and bulk absorber liners be further investigated to improve nacelle attenuations. NASA LaRC also suggested that "adaptive" liner concepts that would allow "in-situ" acoustic impedance control also be considered. As a result, bias flow and high-temperature liner concepts were also added to the investigation. The major conclusion from the above studies is that improvements in nacelle liner average acoustic impedance characteristics alone will not result in 25% increased nacelle noise reduction relative to 1992 technology. Nacelle design advancements currently being developed by Boeing are expected to add 20-40% more acoustic lining to hardwall regions in current inlets, which is predicted to result in and additional 40-80% attenuation improvement. Similar advancements are expected to allow 10-30% more acoustic lining in current fan ducts with 10-30% more attenuation expected. In addition, Boeing is currently developing a scarf inlet concept which is expected to give an additional 40-80% attenuation improvement for equivalent lining areas.

  10. Energy Efficient Engine program advanced turbofan nacelle definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, David C.; Wynosky, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced, low drag, nacelle configurations were defined for some of the more promising propulsion systems identified in the earlier Benefit/Cost Study, to assess the benefits associated with these advanced technology nacelles and formulate programs for developing these nacelles and low volume thrust reversers/spoilers to a state of technology readiness in the early 1990's. The study results established the design feasibility of advanced technology, slim line nacelles applicable to advanced technology, high bypass ratio turbofan engines. Design feasibility was also established for two low volume thrust reverse/spoiler concepts that meet or exceed the required effectiveness for these engines. These nacelle and thrust reverse/spoiler designs were shown to be applicable in engines with takeoff thrust sizes ranging from 24,000 to 60,000 pounds. The reduced weight, drag, and cost of the advanced technology nacelle installations relative to current technology nacelles offer a mission fuel burn savings ranging from 3.0 to 4.5 percent and direct operating cost plus interest improvements from 1.6 to 2.2 percent.

  11. Tabulated pressure measurements on a large subsonic transport model airplane with high bypass ratio, powered, fan jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flechner, S. G.; Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel investigation to determine the aerodynamic interference and the jet-wake interference associated with the wing, pylon, and high-bypass-ratio, powered, fan-jet model engines has been conducted on a typical high-wing logistics transport airplane configuration. Pressures were measured on the wing and pylons and on the surfaces of the engine fan cowl, turbine cowl, and plug. Combinations of wing, pylons, engines, and flow-through nacelles were tested, and the pressure coefficients are presented in tabular form. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.700 to 0.825 and angles of attack from -2 to 4 deg.

  12. Development of a predictive model for major adverse cardiac events in a coronary artery bypass and valve population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality improvement initiatives in cardiac surgery largely rely on risk prediction models. Most often, these models include isolated populations and describe isolated end-points. However, with the changing clinical profile of the cardiac surgical patients, mixed populations models are required to accurately represent the majority of the surgical population. Also, composite model end-points of morbidity and mortality, better reflect outcomes experienced by patients. Methods The model development cohort included 4,270 patients who underwent aortic or mitral valve replacement, or mitral valve repair with/without coronary artery bypass grafting, or isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. A composite end-point of infection, stroke, acute renal failure, or death was evaluated. Age, sex, surgical priority, and procedure were forced, a priori, into the model and then stepwise selection of candidate variables was utilized. Model performance was evaluated by concordance statistic, Hosmer-Lemeshow Goodness of Fit, and calibration plots. Bootstrap technique was employed to validate the model. Results The model included 16 variables. Several variables were significant such as, emergent surgical priority (OR 4.3; 95% CI 2.9-7.4), CABG + Valve procedure (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.8-3.0), and frailty (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.2-2.5), among others. The concordance statistic for the major adverse cardiac events model in a mixed population was 0.764 (95% CL; 0.75-0.79) and had excellent calibration. Conclusions Development of predictive models with composite end-points and mixed procedure population can yield robust statistical and clinical validity. As they more accurately reflect current cardiac surgical profile, models such as this, are an essential tool in quality improvement efforts. PMID:23899075

  13. DYNGEN: A program for calculating steady-state and transient performance of turbojet and turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. F.; Daniele, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The DYNGEN, a digital computer program for analyzing the steady state and transient performance of turbojet and turbofan engines, is described. The DYNGEN is based on earlier computer codes (SMOTE, GENENG, and GENENG 2) which are capable of calculating the steady state performance of turbojet and turbofan engines at design and off-design operating conditions. The DYNGEN has the combined capabilities of GENENG and GENENG 2 for calculating steady state performance; to these the further capability for calculating transient performance was added. The DYNGEN can be used to analyze one- and two-spool turbojet engines or two- and three-spool turbofan engines without modification to the basic program. A modified Euler method is used by DYNGEN to solve the differential equations which model the dynamics of the engine. This new method frees the programmer from having to minimize the number of equations which require iterative solution. As a result, some of the approximations normally used in transient engine simulations can be eliminated. This tends to produce better agreement when answers are compared with those from purely steady state simulations. The modified Euler method also permits the user to specify large time steps (about 0.10 sec) to be used in the solution of the differential equations. This saves computer execution time when long transients are run. Examples of the use of the program are included, and program results are compared with those from an existing hybrid-computer simulation of a two-spool turbofan.

  14. Experimental laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypass.

    PubMed

    Dion, Y M; Chin, A K; Thompson, T A

    1995-08-01

    The goal of the present study is to develop a technique for laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypass. Piglets weighing between 60 and 78 kg were anesthetized with halothane. The lateral retroperitoneal approach was preferred to the more familiar anterior transperitoneal approach and was successfully completed in 19 piglets. The piglets were placed in the right lateral decubitus position. The first port (2 cm) was inserted halfway between the tip of the 12th rib and the iliac crest. Four other trocars were placed in the retroperitoneum after balloon inflation had allowed creation of a space which permitted visualization of the aorta from the left renal artery down to the aorto-iliac junction. After evacuation of the retropneumoperitoneum, the cavity was maintained using an abdominal lift device and a retractor. Using this approach, we performed four aorto-bifemoral bypasses (end-to-end aortic anastomosis) after conventional intravenous heparinization (100 IU/kg) in less than 4 h. Blood loss did not exceed 250 ml and the hematocrit remained stable. Postmortem evaluation of the grafts revealed they were positioned as in a conventional bypass, their limbs having followed in the created retroperitoneal tunnels along the path of the native arteries. No mortality occurred before sacrifice of the animals. We believe that this first performed series of totally retroperitoneal laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypasses in the porcine model is useful in preparation for human application due to the anatomical similarities in the periaortic region.

  15. Kalman Filtering with Inequality Constraints for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints (which may be based on physical considerations) are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. This paper develops two analytic methods of incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter. The first method is a general technique of using hard constraints to enforce inequalities on the state variable estimates. The resultant filter is a combination of a standard Kalman filter and a quadratic programming problem. The second method uses soft constraints to estimate state variables that are known to vary slowly with time. (Soft constraints are constraints that are required to be approximately satisfied rather than exactly satisfied.) The incorporation of state variable constraints increases the computational effort of the filter but significantly improves its estimation accuracy. The improvement is proven theoretically and shown via simulation results. The use of the algorithm is demonstrated on a linearized simulation of a turbofan engine to estimate health parameters. The turbofan engine model contains 16 state variables, 12 measurements, and 8 component health parameters. It is shown that the new algorithms provide improved performance in this example over unconstrained Kalman filtering.

  16. 78 FR 63848 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Sidestick Controllers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http... bypass ratio turbofan engines mounted on aft fuselage pylons. Each engine produces approximately...

  17. Rotating Rake Turbofan Duct Mode Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental measurement system was developed and implemented by the NASA Glenn Research Center in the 1990s to measure turbofan duct acoustic modes. The system is a continuously rotating radial microphone rake that is inserted into the duct. This Rotating Rake provides a complete map of the acoustic duct modes present in a ducted fan and has been used on a variety of test articles: from a low-speed, concept test rig, to a full-scale production turbofan engine. The Rotating Rake has been critical in developing and evaluating a number of noise reduction concepts as well as providing experimental databases for verification of several aero-acoustic codes. More detailed derivation of the unique Rotating Rake equations are presented in the appendix.

  18. Noise Reduction Technologies for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2007-01-01

    Significant progress continues to be made with noise reduction for turbofan engines. NASA has conducted and sponsored research aimed at reducing noise from commercial aircraft. Since it takes many years for technologies to be developed and implemented, it is important to have aggressive technology goals that lead the target entry into service dates. Engine noise is one of the major contributors to the overall sound levels as aircraft operate near airports. Turbofan engines are commonly used on commercial transports due to their advantage for higher performance and lower noise. The noise reduction comes from combinations of changes to the engine cycle parameters and low noise design features. In this paper, an overview of major accomplishments from recent NASA research programs for engine noise will be given.

  19. Particle image velocimetry measurements in a representative gas-cooled prismatic reactor core model for the estimation of bypass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, Thomas E.

    Core bypass flow is considered one of the largest contributors to uncertainty in fuel temperature within the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). It refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial regions between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. These flows are of concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels, and thereby have significant influence on the maximum fuel element and coolant exit temperatures. Thus, accurate prediction of the bypass flow is important because it directly impacts core temperature, influencing the life and efficiency of the reactor. An experiment was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to quantify the flow in the coolant channels in relation to the interstitial gaps between fuel blocks in a representative MHTGR core. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the flow fields within a simplified model, which comprised of a stacked junction of six partial fuel blocks with nine coolant tubes, separated by a 6mm gap width. The model had three sections: The upper plenum, upper block, and lower block. Model components were fabricated from clear, fused quartz where optical access was needed for the PIV measurements. Measurements were taken in three streamwise locations: in the upper plenum and in the midsection of the large and small fuel blocks. A laser light sheet was oriented parallel to the flow, while velocity fields were measured at millimeter intervals across the width of the model, totaling 3,276 PIV measurement locations. Inlet conditions were varied to incorporate laminar, transition, and turbulent flows in the coolant channels---all which produced laminar flow in the gap and non-uniform, turbulent flow in the upper plenum. The images were analyzed to create vector maps, and the data was exported for processing and compilation. The bypass flow was estimated by calculating the flow rates through the coolant

  20. Surgical Models of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery and Sleeve Gastrectomy in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Bote G.; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L.; Saeidi, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only definitive solution currently available for the present obesity pandemic. These operations typically involve reconfiguration of gastrointestinal tract anatomy and impose profound metabolic and physiological benefits, such as substantially reducing body weight and ameliorating type II diabetes. Therefore, animal models of these surgeries offer unique and exciting opportunities to delineate the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the resolution of obesity and diabetes. Here we describe a standardized procedure for mouse and rat models of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (80–90 minutes operative time) and sleeve gastrectomy (30–45 minutes operative time), which, to a high degree resemble operations in human. We also provide detailed protocols for both pre- and post-operative techniques that ensure a high success rate in the operations. These protocols provide the opportunity to mechanistically investigate the systemic effects of the surgical interventions, such as regulation of body weight, glucose homeostasis, and gut microbiome. PMID:25719268

  1. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Typical Turbofan Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel l.; Brown, Clifford A.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14- by 22-ft wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8 percent scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8 percent rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft using the projected signature of the engine currently proposed for the HWB. The modal structures at the rating points were generated from inlet and exhaust nacelle configurations--a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface and vertical control surfaces with correct plan form shapes were also tested to determine their additional impact on shielding. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 in. Two planes perpendicular, and two planes parallel, to the axis of the nacelle were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed four sweeps, for a total span of 168 in. acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Levels, and integrated Power Levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct mode power levels

  2. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Typical Turbofan Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Brown, Cliff; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14x22 wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8% scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8% rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft using the projected signature of the engine currently proposed for the HWB. The modal structures at the rating points were generated from inlet and exhaust nacelle configurations - a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface and vertical control surfaces with correct plan form shapes were also tested to determine their additional impact on shielding. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 inches. Two planes perpendicular, and two planes parallel, to the axis of the nacelle were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed 4 sweeps, for a total span of 168 inches acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Levels, and integrated Power Levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct mode power levels.

  3. 78 FR 63902 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Flight Envelope Protection: Normal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http... medium bypass ratio turbofan engines mounted on aft fuselage pylons. Each engine produces approximately...

  4. Study of turbofan engines designed for low energy consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    The near-term technology improvements which can reduce the fuel consumed in the JT9D, JT8D, and JT3D turbofans in commercial fleet operation through the 1980's are identified. Projected technology advances are identified and evaluated for new turbofans to be developed after 1985. Programs are recommended for developing the necessary technology.

  5. A Parametric Cycle Analysis of a Separate-Flow Turbofan with Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J. (Technical Monitor); Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.

    2005-01-01

    Today's modern aircraft is based on air-breathing jet propulsion systems, which use moving fluids as substances to transform energy carried by the fluids into power. Throughout aero-vehicle evolution, improvements have been made to the engine efficiency and pollutants reduction. This study focuses on a parametric cycle analysis of a dual-spool, separate-flow turbofan engine with an Interstage Turbine Burner (ITB). The ITB considered in this paper is a relatively new concept in modern jet engine propulsion. The JTB serves as a secondary combustor and is located between the high- and the low-pressure turbine, i.e., the transition duct. The objective of this study is to use design parameters, such as flight Mach number, compressor pressure ratio, fan pressure ratio, fan bypass ratio, linear relation between high- and low-pressure turbines, and high-pressure turbine inlet temperature to obtain engine performance parameters, such as specific thrust and thrust specific fuel consumption. Results of this study can provide guidance in identifying the performance characteristics of various engine components, which can then be used to develop, analyze, integrate, and optimize the system performance of turbofan engines with an ITB.

  6. Aircraft Turbofan Engine Health Estimation Using Constrained Kalman Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints (which may be based on physical considerations) are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. This paper develops an analytic method of incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter. The resultant filter is a combination of a standard Kalman filter and a quadratic programming problem. The incorporation of state variable constraints increases the computational effort of the filter but significantly improves its estimation accuracy. The improvement is proven theoretically and shown via simulation results obtained from application to a turbofan engine model. This model contains 16 state variables, 12 measurements, and 8 component health parameters. It is shown that the new algorithms provide improved performance in this example over unconstrained Kalman filtering.

  7. Simulating Effects of High Angle of Attack on Turbofan Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Claus, Russell W.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A method of investigating the effects of high angle of attack (AOA) flight on turbofan engine performance is presented. The methodology involves combining a suite of diverse simulation tools. Three-dimensional, steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is used to model the change in performance of a commercial aircraft-type inlet and fan geometry due to various levels of AOA. Parallel compressor theory is then applied to assimilate the CFD data with a zero-dimensional, nonlinear, dynamic turbofan engine model. The combined model shows that high AOA operation degrades fan performance and, thus, negatively impacts compressor stability margins and engine thrust. In addition, the engine response to high AOA conditions is shown to be highly dependent upon the type of control system employed.

  8. Study of stator-vane fluctuating pressures in a turbofan engine for static and flight tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A. W.

    1984-04-01

    As part of a program to study the fan noise generated from turbofan engines, fluctuating surface pressures induced by fan-rotor wakes were measured on core- and bypass-stator outlet guide vanes of a modified JT15D-1 engine. Tests were conducted with the engine operating on an outdoor test stand and in flight. The amplitudes of pressures measured at fan-rotor blade-passage fundamental frequencies were generally higher and appeared less stable for the static tests than for the flight tests. Fluctuating pressures measured at the blade-passage frequency of the high-speed core compressor were interpreted to be acoustic; however, disturbance trace velocities for either the convected rotor wakes or acoustic pressures were difficult to interpret because of the complex environment.

  9. The Rolls Royce Allison RB580 turbofan - Matching the market requirement for regional transport

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, J.H.R.; Peacock, N.J.; Snyder, L.

    1989-01-01

    The RB580 high bypass turbofan engine has a thrust growth capability to 10,000 lb and has been optimized for efficient operation in regional markets involving 50-70 seat airliners with higher-than-turboprop cruise speeds. The two-spool engine configuration achieves an overall pressure ratio of 24 and features a single-stage wide-chord fan for high efficiency/low noise operation. The highly modular design of the configuration facilitates maintenance and repair; a dual-redundant full-authority digital electronic control system is incorporated. An SFC reduction of the order of 10 percent at cruise thrust is achieved, relative to current engines of comparable thrust class.

  10. Ulinastatin Protects against Acute Kidney Injury in Infant Piglets Model Undergoing Surgery on Hypothermic Low-Flow Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaocou; Xue, Qinghua; Yan, Fuxia; Liu, Jinping; Li, Shoujun; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infants are more vulnerable to kidney injuries induced by inflammatory response syndrome and ischemia-reperfusion injury following cardiopulmonary bypass especially with prolonged hypothermic low-flow (HLF). This study aims to evaluate the protective role of ulinastatin, an anti-inflammatory agent, against acute kidney injuries in infant piglets model undergoing surgery on HLF cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Eighteen general-type infant piglets were randomly separated into the ulinastatin group (Group U, n = 6), the control group (Group C, n = 6), and the sham operation group (Group S, n = 6), and anaesthetized. The groups U and C received following experimental procedure: median thoracotomy, routine CPB and HLF, and finally weaned from CPB. The group S only underwent sham median thoracotomy. Ulinastatin at a dose of 5,000 units/kg body weight and a certain volume of saline were administrated to animals of the groups U and C at the beginning of CPB and at aortic declamping, respectively. Venous blood samples were collected at 3 different time points: after anesthesia induction in all experimental groups, 5 minutes, and 120 minutes after CPB in the Groups U and C. Markers for inflammation and acute kidney injury were tested in the collected plasma. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) from urine, markers of oxidative stress injury and TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues were also detected. Results The expressions of plasma inflammatory markers and acute kidney injury markers increased both in Group U and Group C at 5 min and 120 min after CPB. Also, numbers of TUNEL-positive cells and oxidative stress markers in kidney rose in both groups. At the time point of 120-min after CPB, compared with the Group C, some plasma inflammatory and acute kidney injury markers as well as TUNEL-positive cells and oxidative stress markers in kidney were significantly reduced in the Group U. Histologic analyses showed that HLF promoted acute tubular necrosis and dilatation

  11. Using the Developmental Counseling and Therapy Model to Work with a Client in Spiritual Bypass: Some Preliminary Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Myers, Jane E.; Shurts, W. Matthew

    2004-01-01

    At a time when attention to spirituality within the counseling profession is unparalleled, 1 potential problem is that clients who engage in spiritual bypass will be supported in this dysfunctional pattern by their counselor. The purpose of this article is to define and describe spiritual bypass and to discuss the use of the developmental…

  12. Seal Bypass Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Joe Cartwright 3DLab, School of Earth, Ocean and Planetary Sciences, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3YE, Wales, UK (cartwrightja@cf.ac.uk) A conceptual model for the analysis of the sealing potential of caprock sequences is summarised here based on the recognition that many high quality seals are breached episodically or semi-permanently by a range of geological structures that act as seal by-pass systems (SBS). We formally define SBS as seismically resolvable geological features embedded within sealing sequences that promote cross-stratal fluid migration and allow fluids to bypass the pore network. We advance the concept that if such bypass systems exist within a given sealing sequence sequence, then predictions of sealing capacity based exclusively on rock physical properties such as capillary entry pressure/hydraulic conductivity will be largely negated by the capacity of the bypass system to breach the grain and pore network. This model is based largely on observations of sealing sequences using 3D seismic data, in which there is direct evidence of highly focused vertical or sub-vertical fluid flow from subsurface reservoirs up through the sealing sequence with leakage internally at higher levels or to the surface as seeps or pockmarks. We classify SBS into three main classes based on seismic interpretational criteria: (1) fault related, (2) intrusion-related, and (3) pipe-related. Examples are presented of each class of SBS in a relevant context of a particular sealing sequence, and where seismic evidence of hydrocarbon leakage allows the role of the bypass features to be evaluated. These include mud volcano conduits, sandstone intrusions, normal and thrust faults, blowout pipes and igneous intrusions. We show how each class exhibits different modes of behaviour with potential for different scaling relationships between flux and dimensions, and different short and long-term impacts on seal behaviour. We conclude with an analysis of

  13. A study to estimate and compare the total particulate matter emission indices (EIN) between traditional jet fuel and two blends of Jet A/Camelina biofuel used in a high by-pass turbofan engine: A case study of Honeywell TFE-109 engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shila, Jacob Joshua Howard

    and JT15D engines' families as representatives of other engines with rated thrust of 6000 pounds or below. The results of this study may be used to add to the knowledge of PM emission data that has been collected in other research studies. This study was quantitative in nature. Three factors were designated which were the types of fuels studied. The TFE-109 turbofan engine was the experimental subject. The independent variable was the engine thrust setting while the response variable was the emission index. Four engine runs were conducted for each fuel. In each engine run, four engine thrust settings were observed. The four engine thrust levels were 10%, 30%, 85%, and 100% rated thrusts levels. Therefore, for each engine thrust settings, there four replicates. The experiments were conducted using a TFE-109 engine test cell located in the Niswonger Aviation Technology building at the Purdue University Airport. The testing facility has the capability to conduct the aircraft PM emissions tests. Due to the equipment limitations, the study was limited to observe total PM emissions instead of specifically measuring the non-volatile PM emissions. The results indicate that the emissions indices of the blended biofuels were not statistically significantly lower compared to the emissions of the traditional jet fuel at rated thrust levels of 100% and 85% of TFE-109 turbofan engine. However, the emission indices for the 50%Jet A - 50%Camelina biofuel blend were statistically significantly lower compared to the emission indices of the 100% Jet A fuel at 10% and 30% engine rated thrusts levels of TFE-109 engine. The emission indices of the 50%-50% biofuel blend were lower by reductions of 15% and 17% at engine rated thrusts of 10% and 30% respectively compared to the emissions indices of the traditional jet fuel at the same engine thrust levels. Experimental modifications in future studies may provide estimates of the emissions indices range for this particular engine these

  14. Impact of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Respiratory Mucociliary Function in an Experimental Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Véliz, Rodrigo; Carmona, Maria José; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Freitas, Claudia; Benício, Anderson; Negri, Elnara Marcia; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on the respiratory mucociliary function is unknown. This study evaluated the effects of CPB and interruption of mechanical ventilation on the respiratory mucociliary system. Methods Twenty-two pigs were randomly assigned to the control (n = 10) or CPB group (n = 12). After the induction of anesthesia, a tracheostomy was performed, and tracheal tissue samples were excised (T0) from both groups. All animals underwent thoracotomy. In the CPB group, an aorto-bicaval CPB was installed and maintained for 90 minutes. During the CPB, mechanical ventilation was interrupted, and the tracheal tube was disconnected. A second tracheal tissue sample was obtained 180 minutes after the tracheostomy (T180). Mucus samples were collected from the trachea using a bronchoscope at T0, T90 and T180. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and in situ mucociliary transport (MCT) were studied in ex vivo tracheal epithelium. Mucus viscosity (MV) was assessed using a cone-plate viscometer. Qualitative tracheal histological analysis was performed at T180 tissue samples. Results CBF decreased in the CPB group (13.1 ± 1.9 Hz vs. 11.1 ± 2.1 Hz, p < 0.05) but not in the control group (13.1 ± 1 Hz vs. 13 ± 2.9 Hz). At T90, viscosity was increased in the CPB group compared to the control (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in in situ MCT. Tracheal histology in the CPB group showed areas of ciliated epithelium loss, submucosal edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Conclusion CPB acutely contributed to alterations in tracheal mucocilliary function. PMID:26288020

  15. Original Research: Establishment of an early embolus-related cerebral injury model after cardiopulmonary bypass in miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Weng, Guoxing; Li, Min; Yu, Shun; Bao, Jiayin; Cao, Xiying; Dou, Zhi; Wang, Huan; Chen, Haiyu

    2016-10-01

    Embolus-related cerebral injury is still a serious adverse event after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). But there is no stable animal model for basic and clinical research purposes. We chose miniature pig to establish a stable animal model of embolus-related cerebral injury after CPB and verified the validity of results by correlating the histopathological findings with those of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI). Based on different treatment regimens, 24 male miniature pigs were randomly assigned into four groups: Control, CPB, embolus, and CPB-embolus groups. DW-MRI was performed before and after surgery to diagnose and locate the brain lesions. Histopathological changes in brain tissues were examined using H&E and Nissl staining. All surgical procedures were uneventful with 100% postoperative survival of pigs. Two animals in the Embolus group and six animals in the CPB-embolus group showed signs of ischemic penumbra on DW-MRI performed 6 h after surgery. Consistent with the results of DW-MRI, histopathological examination showed necrosis and ischemic lesions. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility and validity of a pig model of embolus-related cerebral injury associated with CPB. This model may be used in the future for basic and translational research. PMID:27190268

  16. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart bypass surgery begins with an incision made in the chest, with the breastbone cut exposing the heart. Next, ... of this great vein will be used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous ...

  17. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  18. Coronary Artery Bypass

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 3 days in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Life After Bypass After bypass surgery, your doctor will recommend that you join a cardiac rehabilitation program. These programs help you make lifestyle changes ...

  19. Evaluation of a Novel Laser-assisted Coronary Anastomotic Connector - the Trinity Clip - in a Porcine Off-pump Bypass Model

    PubMed Central

    Stecher, David; Bronkers, Glenn; Noest, Jappe O.T.; Tulleken, Cornelis A.F.; Hoefer, Imo E.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Buijsrogge, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    To simplify and facilitate beating heart (i.e., off-pump), minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery, a new coronary anastomotic connector, the Trinity Clip, is developed based on the excimer laser-assisted nonocclusive anastomosis technique. The Trinity Clip connector enables simplified, sutureless, and nonocclusive connection of the graft to the coronary artery, and an excimer laser catheter laser-punches the opening of the anastomosis. Consequently, owing to the complete nonocclusive anastomosis construction, coronary conditioning (i.e., occluding or shunting) is not necessary, in contrast to the conventional anastomotic technique, hence simplifying the off-pump bypass procedure. Prior to clinical application in coronary artery bypass grafting, the safety and quality of this novel connector will be evaluated in a long-term experimental porcine off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) study. In this paper, we describe how to evaluate the coronary anastomosis in the porcine OPCAB model using various techniques to assess its quality. Representative results are summarized and visually demonstrated. PMID:25490000

  20. Jejunoileal bypass as the main procedure in the onset of immune-related conditions: the model of BADAS.

    PubMed

    Carubbi, Francesco; Ruscitti, Piero; Pantano, Ilenia; Alvaro, Saverio; Benedetto, Paola Di; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Giuliani, Antonio; Piccione, Federica; Ciccia, Francesco; Amicucci, Gianfranco; Triolo, Giovanni; Giacomelli, Roberto; Cipriani, Paola

    2013-05-01

    Bariatric surgery represents a common approach for the control of severe morbid obesity, reducing caloric intake by modifying the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract. Following jejunoileal bypass, a large spectrum of complications has been described, with rheumatic manifestation present in up to 20% of cases. Although bowel bypass syndrome, also called blind loop syndrome, is a well-recognized complication of jejunoileal bypass, the same syndrome was recognized in patients who had not had intestinal bypass surgery, and the term the 'bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome' (BADAS) was coined. The pathogenesis of BADAS is as yet poorly understood and only few data concerning this issue have been published in the literature. The aim of the present paper is to review the literature and to discuss putative pathogenic mechanisms of BADAS, focusing on the immune system.

  1. Noise-Reduction Benefits Analyzed for Over-the-Wing-Mounted Advanced Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    As we look to the future, increasingly stringent civilian aviation noise regulations will require the design and manufacture of extremely quiet commercial aircraft. Also, the large fan diameters of modern engines with increasingly higher bypass ratios pose significant packaging and aircraft installation challenges. One design approach that addresses both of these challenges is to mount the engines above the wing. In addition to allowing the performance trend towards large diameters and high bypass ratio cycles to continue, this approach allows the wing to shield much of the engine noise from people on the ground. The Propulsion Systems Analysis Office at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field conducted independent analytical research to estimate the noise reduction potential of mounting advanced turbofan engines above the wing. Certification noise predictions were made for a notional long-haul commercial quadjet transport. A large quad was chosen because, even under current regulations, such aircraft sometimes experience difficulty in complying with certification noise requirements with a substantial margin. Also, because of its long wing chords, a large airplane would receive the greatest advantage of any noise-shielding benefit.

  2. Tests and analysis of a vented D thrust deflecting nozzle on a turbofan engine. [conducted at the outdoor aerodynamic research facility of the Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseberg, E. W.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives were to: obtain nozzle performance characteristics in and out of ground effects; demonstrate the compatibility of the nozzle with a turbofan engine; obtain pressure and temperature distributions on the surface of the D vented nozzle; and establish a correlation of the nozzle performance between small scale and large scale models. The test nozzle was a boilerplate model of the MCAIR D vented nozzle configured for operation with a General Electric YTF-34-F5 turbofan engine. The nozzle was configured to provide: a thrust vectoring range of 0 to 115 deg; a yaw vectoring range of 0 to 10 deg; variable nozzle area control; and variable spacing between the core exit and nozzle entrance station. Compatibility between the YTF-34-T5 turbofan engine and the D vented nozzle was demonstrated. Velocity coefficients of 0.96 and greater were obtained for 90 deg of thrust vectoring. The nozzle walls remained cool during all test conditions.

  3. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of this... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine...

  4. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of this... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine...

  5. Ice crystal ingestion by turbofans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Pabon, Manuel A.

    This Thesis will present the problem of inflight icing in general and inflight icing caused by the ingestion of high altitude ice crystals produced by high energy mesoscale convective complexes in particular, and propose a new device to prevent it based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Inflight icing is known to be the cause of 583 air accidents and more than 800 deaths in more than a decade. The new ice crystal ingestion problem has caused more than 100 flights to lose engine power since the 1990's, and the NTSB identified it as one of the causes of the Air France flight 447 accident in 1-Jun2008. The mechanics of inflight icing not caused by ice crystals are well established. Aircraft surfaces exposed to supercooled liquid water droplets will accrete ice in direct proportion of the droplet catch and the freezing heat transfer process. The multiphase flow droplet catch is predicted by the simple sum of forces on each spherical droplet and a droplet trajectory calculation based on Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis. The most widely used freezing heat transfer model for inflight icing caused by supercooled droplets was established by Messinger. Several computer programs implement these analytical models to predict inflight icing, with LEWICE being based on Lagrangian analysis and FENSAP being based on Eulerian analysis as the best representatives among them. This Thesis presents the multiphase fluid mechanics particular to ice crystals, and explains how it differs from the established droplet multiphase flow, and the obstacles in implementing the former in computational analysis. A new modification of the Messinger thermal model is proposed to account for ice accretion produced by ice crystal impingement. Because there exist no computational and experimental ways to fully replicate ice crystal inflight icing, and because existing ice protections systems consume vast amounts of energy, a new ice protection device based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma is

  6. Robust fault detection of turbofan engines subject to adaptive controllers via a Total Measurable Fault Information Residual (ToMFIR) technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chowdhury, Fahmida N; Djuric, Ana; Yeh, Chih-Ping

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides a new design of robust fault detection for turbofan engines with adaptive controllers. The critical issue is that the adaptive controllers can depress the faulty effects such that the actual system outputs remain the pre-specified values, making it difficult to detect faults/failures. To solve this problem, a Total Measurable Fault Information Residual (ToMFIR) technique with the aid of system transformation is adopted to detect faults in turbofan engines with adaptive controllers. This design is a ToMFIR-redundancy-based robust fault detection. The ToMFIR is first introduced and existing results are also summarized. The Detailed design process of the ToMFIRs is presented and a turbofan engine model is simulated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed ToMFIR-based fault-detection strategy.

  7. Laparoscopic Revision of Jejunoileal Bypass to Gastric Bypass

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-12-28

    Clinically Severe Obesity; Metabolic Complications After Jejunoileal Bypass; Nutritional Complications After Jejunoileal Bypass; Obesity Recidivism; Inadequate Initial Weight Loss; Intestinal Malabsorptive Syndrome; Protein Malnutrition

  8. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 2; Comparison of CFD and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, Mark L.; Suder, Kenneth L.; Kulkarni, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    NASA and GE teamed to design and build a 57 percent engine scaled fan stage for a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space with multipoint operations. This fan stage was tested in NASA's transonic compressor facility. The objectives of this test were to assess the aerodynamic and aero mechanic performance and operability characteristics of the fan stage over the entire range of engine operation including: 1) sea level static take-off; 2) transition over large swings in fan bypass ratio; 3) transition from turbofan to ramjet; and 4) fan wind-milling operation at high Mach flight conditions. This paper will focus on an assessment of APNASA, a multistage turbomachinery analysis code developed by NASA, to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speeds (37 to 100 percent) and bypass ratios.

  9. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 1: A benchmark experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow field within a model turbofan forced mixer nozzle is described. Velocity and thermodynamic state variable data for use in assessing the accuracy and assisting the further development of computational procedures for predicting the flow field within mixer nozzles are provided. Velocity and temperature data suggested that the nozzle mixing process was dominated by circulations (secondary flows) of a length scale on the order the lobe dimensions which were associated with strong radial velocities observed near the lobe exit plane. The 'benchmark' model mixer experiment conducted for code assessment purposes is discussed.

  10. Adding Emulsified Isoflurane to Cardioplegia Solution Produces Cardiac Protection in a Dog Cardiopulmonary Bypass Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Jin; Song, Haibo; Qiu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether caridoplegia solution with Emulsified Isoflurane (EI) could improve cardiaoprotection in a dog CPB model of great similarity to clinical settings. Adult dogs were randomly assigned to receive one of the following cardioplegia solutions: St. Thomas with EI (group ST+EI), St. Thomas with 30% Intralipid (group ST+EL) and St. Thomas alone (group ST). The aorta was cross-clamped for two hours followed by reperfusion for another two hours, during which cardiac output was measured and dosages of positive inotropic agent to maintain normal hemodynamics were recorded. Serum level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and CK-MB were measured. Deletion of cardiac mitochondrial DNA was examined at the end of reperfusion. Compared with ST, ST+EI decreased the requirement of dopamine support while animals receiving ST+EI had a significantly larger cardiac output. ST+EI reduced post-CPB release of cTnI and CK-MB. Mitochondrial DNA loss was observed in only one of the tested animals from group ST+EI while it was seen in all the tested animals from group ST+EL and ST. Addition of emulsified isoflurane into cardioplegia solution protects against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. This protective effect might be mediated by preserving mitochondrial ultrastructure and DNA integrity. PMID:27121996

  11. Digital integrated control of a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression supersonic inlet and an augmented mixed-flow turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.; Arpasi, D. J.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A digitally implemented integrated inlet-engine control system was designed and tested on a mixed-compression, axisymmetric, Mach 2.5, supersonic inlet with 45 percent internal supersonic area contraction and a TF30-P-3 augmented turbofan engine. The control matched engine airflow to available inlet airflow. By monitoring inlet terminal shock position and over-board bypass door command, the control adjusted engine speed so that in steady state, the shock would be at the desired location and the overboard bypass doors would be closed. During engine-induced transients, such as augmentor light-off and cutoff, the inlet operating point was momentarily changed to a more supercritical point to minimize unstarts. The digital control also provided automatic inlet restart. A variable inlet throat bleed control, based on throat Mach number, provided additional inlet stability margin.

  12. Full-scale altitude engine test of a turbofan exhaust-gas-forced mixer to reduce thrust specific fuel consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullom, R. R.; Johnson, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The specific fuel consumption of a low-bypass-ratio, confluent-flow, turbofan engine was measured with and without a mixer installed. Tests were conducted for flight Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.4 and altitudes from 10,670 to 14,630 meters (35,000 to 48,000 ft) for core-stream-to-fan-stream temperature ratios of 2.0 and 2.5 and mixing-length-to-diameter ratios of 0.95 and 1.74. For these test conditions, the reduction in specific fuel consumption varied from 2.5 percent to 4.0 percent. Pressure loss measurements as well as temperature and pressure surveys at the mixer inlet, the mixer exit, and the nozzle inlet were made.

  13. Computer method for design of acoustic liners for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A design package is presented for the specification of acoustic liners for turbofans. An estimate of the noise generation was made based on modifications of existing noise correlations, for which the inputs are basic fan aerodynamic design variables. The method does not predict multiple pure tones. A target attenuation spectrum was calculated which was the difference between the estimated generation spectrum and a flat annoyance-weighted goal attenuated spectrum. The target spectrum was combined with a knowledge of acoustic liner performance as a function of the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. The liner design method at present is limited to annular duct configurations. The detailed structure of the liner was specified by combining the required impedance (which is a result of the previous step) with a mathematical model relating impedance to the detailed structure. The design procedure was developed for a liner constructed of perforated sheet placed over honeycomb backing cavities. A sample calculation was carried through in order to demonstrate the design procedure, and experimental results presented show good agreement with the calculated results of the method.

  14. Active control of low-speed turbofan tonal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Remington, Paul J.

    2003-10-01

    Active noise control has been proposed as a technique for reducing the tonal noise radiated from turbofan engines. The sound field in the duct of a turbofan engine is characterized by acoustic modes, which exhibit both a radial and a circumferential spatial dependence. The dominant circumferential modes are determined by the relationship between the number of rotor and stator blades. Using these concepts, an active noise control system has been developed to measure and minimize the modes in the duct of a turbofan engine. By using multiple source and sensor locations, it has also been shown that it is possible to control multiple radial modes within the engine duct. Some of the issues associated with the design of the control system will be reviewed, and results obtained using the Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) at NASA Glenn Research Center will be presented. [Work supported by NASA.

  15. An automated procedure for developing hybrid computer simulations of turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.; Krosel, S. M.; Bruton, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper offers a systematic, computer-aided, self-documenting methodology for developing hybrid computer simulations of turbofan engines. The methodology that is presented makes use of a host program that can run on a large digital computer and a machine-dependent target (hybrid) program. The host program performs all of the calculations and data manipulations that are needed to transform user-supplied engine design information to a form suitable for the hybrid computer. The host program also trims the self-contained engine model to match specified design point information. A test case is described and comparisons between hybrid simulation and specified engine performance data are presented.

  16. An automated procedure for developing hybrid computer simulations of turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.; Krosel, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic, computer-aided, self-documenting methodology for developing hybrid computer simulations of turbofan engines is presented. The methodology makes use of a host program that can run on a large digital computer and a machine-dependent target (hybrid) program. The host program performs all of the calculations and date manipulations needed to transform user-supplied engine design information to a form suitable for the hybrid computer. The host program also trims the self contained engine model to match specified design point information. A test case is described and comparisons between hybrid simulation and specified engine performance data are presented.

  17. Application of the MNA design method to a nonlinear turbofan engine. [multivariable Nyquist array method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    Using nonlinear digital simulation as a representative model of the dynamic operation of the QCSEE turbofan engine, a feedback control system is designed by variable frequency design techniques. Transfer functions are generated for each of five power level settings covering the range of operation from approach power to full throttle (62.5% to 100% full power). These transfer functions are then used by an interactive control system design synthesis program to provide a closed loop feedback control using the multivariable Nyquist array and extensions to multivariable Bode diagrams and Nichols charts.

  18. Design and verification of a turbofan swirl augmentor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. J., Jr.; Shadowen, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the details of the design and verification testing of a full-scale turbofan 'swirl' augmentor at sea level and altitude. No flameholders are required in the swirl augmentor since the radial motion of the hot pilot gases and subsequent combustion products provides a continuous ignition front across the stream. Results of rig testing of this full-scale swirl augmentor on an F100 engine, which are very encouraging, and future development plans are presented. The results validate the application of the centrifugal-force swirling flow concept to a turbofan augmentor.

  19. Ice Particle Transport Analysis With Phase Change for the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ice Particle trajectory calculations with phase change were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The particle trajectory computations were performed using the new Glenn Ice Particle Phase Change Model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for ice particle sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns and a free stream particle concentration of 0.3 g/cu m. The impingement efficiency results showed that as particle size increased average impingement efficiencies and scoop factors increased for the various components. The particle analysis also showed that the amount of mass entering the inner core decreased with increased particle size because the larger particles were less able to negotiate the turn into the inner core due to particle inertia. The particle phase change analysis results showed that the larger particles warmed less as they were transported through the low pressure compressor. Only the smallest 5 micron particles were warmed enough to produce melting and the amount of melting was relatively small with a maximum average melting fraction of 0.836. The results also showed an appreciable amount of particle sublimation and evaporation for the 5 micron particles entering the engine core (22 percent).

  20. Analytical evaluation of the impact of broad specification fuels on high bypass turbofan engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Szetela, E. J.; Vranos, A.

    1978-01-01

    The impact of the use of broad specification fuels on the design, performance durability, emissions and operational characteristics of combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines was assessed. Single stage, vorbix and lean premixed prevaporized combustors, in the JT9D and an advanced energy efficient engine cycle were evaluated when operating on Jet A and ERBS (Experimental Referee Broad Specification) fuels. Design modifications, based on criteria evolved from a literature survey, were introduced and their effectiveness at offsetting projected deficiencies resulting from the use of ERBS was estimated. The results indicate that the use of a broad specification fuel such as ERBS, will necessitate significant technology improvements and redesign if deteriorated performance, durability and emissions are to be avoided. Higher radiant heat loads are projected to seriously compromise liner life while the reduced thermal stability of ERBS will require revisions to the engine-airframe fuel system to reduce the thermal stress on the fuel. Smoke and emissions output are projected to increase with the use of broad specification fuels. While the basic geometry of the single stage and vorbix combustors are compatible with the use of ERBS, extensive redesign of the front end of the lean premixed prevaporized burner will be required to achieve satisfactory operation and optimum emissions.

  1. 77 FR 9868 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation... turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of a rim/web separation of a first stage low... uncontained disk separation, leading to fuel tank penetration, fire, personal injury, and damage to...

  2. Advanced component technologies for energy-efficient turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    A cooperative government-industry effort, the Energy Efficient Engine Project, to develop the advanced technology base for future commercial development of a new generation of more fuel conservative turbofan engines for airline use is described. Engine configurations that are dependent upon technology advances in each major engine component are defined and current design and development of the advanced components are included.

  3. 78 FR 9003 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  4. State-of-the-art of turbofan engine noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    The technology of turbofan engine noise reduction is surveyed. Specific topics discussed include: (1) new fans for low noise; (2) fan and core noise suppression; (3) turbomachinery noise sources; and (4) a new program for improving static noise testing of fans and engines.

  5. 77 FR 67763 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... NPRM published in the Federal Register on July 11, 2012 (77 FR 40822). That NPRM proposed to require... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule....

  6. 78 FR 76045 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines with certain high pressure compressor (HPC) rotor stage... flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the...

  7. 78 FR 38195 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ...; AD 2013-10-52] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines... are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all General Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and... information identified in this AD, contact General Electric Company, GE-Aviation, Room 285, 1 Neumann...

  8. 76 FR 64844 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric... General Electric Company (GE) CF6-45 and CF6-50 series turbofan engines with certain low-pressure turbine... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this AD, contact General...

  9. 77 FR 76977 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... (65 FR 10698, February 29, 2000). (c) Applicability This AD applies to all General Electric Company... proposed airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan... information identified in this AD, contact General Electric Company, GE Aviation, Room 285, 1 Neumann...

  10. 77 FR 48110 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric... certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan engines. The existing AD requires... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this AD, contact General...

  11. 78 FR 19628 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric... directive (AD): General Electric Company: Docket No. FAA-2013-0186; Directorate Identifier 2013-NE-11-AD. (a... AD applies to General Electric Company (GE): (1) GE90-76B, -85B, -90B, and -94B turbofan engines...

  12. 77 FR 51695 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... (1) This AD applies to Honeywell International Inc. TFE731-20R, -20AR, -20BR, -40, -40AR, -40R, -50R.... SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Honeywell International Inc. TFE731-20R, -20AR, -20BR, -40, -40AR, - 40R, -50R, and -60 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by a...

  13. The Promise and Challenges of Ultra High Bypass Ratio Engine Technology and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Chris

    2011-01-01

    In this presentation, an overview of the research being conducted by the ERA Project in Ultra High Bypass aircraft propulsion and in partnership with Pratt & Whitney with their Geared TurboFan (GTF) is given. The ERA goals are shown followed by a discussion of what areas need to be addressed on the engine to achieve the goals and how the GTF is uniquely qualified to meet the goals through a discussion of what benefits the cycle provides. The first generation GTF architecture is then shown highlighting the areas of collaboration with NASA, and the fuel burn, noise and emissions reductions possible based on initial static ground test and flight test data of the first GTF engine. Finally, a 5 year technology roadmap is presented focusing on Ultra High Bypass propulsion technology research areas that are being pursued and being planned by ERA and P&W under their GTF program.

  14. Refined Exploration of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of the turbofan engine design space for an advanced technology single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) was conducted previously by the authors and is documented in a prior report. Through the course of that study and in a subsequent evaluation of the approach and results, a number of enhancements to the engine design ground rules and assumptions were identified. A follow-on effort was initiated to investigate the impacts of these changes on the original study results. The fundamental conclusions of the prior study were found to still be valid with the revised engine designs. The most significant impact of the design changes was a reduction in the aircraft weight and block fuel penalties incurred with low fan pressure ratio, ultra-high bypass ratio designs. This enables lower noise levels to be pursued (through lower fan pressure ratio) with minor negative impacts on aircraft weight and fuel efficiency. Regardless of the engine design selected, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  15. Near-field sound radiation of fan tones from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Alan; Gaffney, James; Kingan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The development of a distributed source model to predict fan tone noise levels of an installed turbofan aero-engine is reported. The key objective is to examine a canonical problem: how to predict the pressure field due to a distributed source located near an infinite, rigid cylinder. This canonical problem is a simple representation of an installed turbofan, where the distributed source is based on the pressure pattern generated by a spinning duct mode, and the rigid cylinder represents an aircraft fuselage. The radiation of fan tones can be modelled in terms of spinning modes. In this analysis, based on duct modes, theoretical expressions for the near-field acoustic pressures on the cylinder, or at the same locations without the cylinder, have been formulated. Simulations of the near-field acoustic pressures are compared against measurements obtained from a fan rig test. Also, the installation effect is quantified by calculating the difference in the sound pressure levels with and without the adjacent cylindrical fuselage. Results are shown for the blade passing frequency fan tone radiated at a supersonic fan operating condition. PMID:26428770

  16. Separating Turbofan Engine Noise Sources Using Auto and Cross Spectra from Four Microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2008-01-01

    The study of core noise from turbofan engines has become more important as noise from other sources such as the fan and jet were reduced. A multiple-microphone and acoustic-source modeling method to separate correlated and uncorrelated sources is discussed. The auto- and cross spectra in the frequency range below 1000 Hz are fitted with a noise propagation model based on a source couplet consisting of a single incoherent monopole source with a single coherent monopole source or a source triplet consisting of a single incoherent monopole source with two coherent monopole point sources. Examples are presented using data from a Pratt& Whitney PW4098 turbofan engine. The method separates the low-frequency jet noise from the core noise at the nozzle exit. It is shown that at low power settings, the core noise is a major contributor to the noise. Even at higher power settings, it can be more important than jet noise. However, at low frequencies, uncorrelated broadband noise and jet noise become the important factors as the engine power setting is increased.

  17. Constrained Kalman Filtering Via Density Function Truncation for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints (which may be based on physical considerations) are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. This paper develops an analytic method of incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter. The resultant filter truncates the PDF (probability density function) of the Kalman filter estimate at the known constraints and then computes the constrained filter estimate as the mean of the truncated PDF. The incorporation of state variable constraints increases the computational effort of the filter but significantly improves its estimation accuracy. The improvement is demonstrated via simulation results obtained from a turbofan engine model. The turbofan engine model contains 3 state variables, 11 measurements, and 10 component health parameters. It is also shown that the truncated Kalman filter may be a more accurate way of incorporating inequality constraints than other constrained filters (e.g., the projection approach to constrained filtering).

  18. Cardiac Strain in a Swine Model of Regional Hibernating Myocardium: Effects of CoQ10 on Contractile Reserve Following Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hocum Stone, Laura; Butterick, Tammy A; Duffy, Cayla; Swingen, Corey; Ward, Herbert B; Kelly, Rosemary F; McFalls, Edward O

    2016-08-01

    There is conflicting clinical evidence whether administration of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) improves function following coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Using a swine model of hibernating myocardium, we tested whether daily CoQ10 would improve contractile function by MRI at 4-week post-CABG. Twelve pigs underwent a thoracotomy and had a constrictor placed on the left anterior descending (LAD). At 12 weeks, they underwent off-pump bypass and received daily dietary supplements of either CoQ10 (10 mg/kg/day) or placebo. At 4-week post-CABG, circumferential strain measurements in the hibernating LAD region from placebo and CoQ10 groups were not different and increased to a similar extent with dobutamine (-14.7 ± 0.6 versus -14.8 ± 0.1, respectively (NS)). Post-sacrifice, oxidant stress markers were obtained in the mitochondrial isolates and protein carbonyl in the placebo, and CoQ10 groups were 6.14 ± 0.36 and 5.05 ± 0.32 nmol/mg, respectively (NS). In summary, CoQ10 did not improve contractile reserve or reduce oxidant stress at 4-week post-CABG.

  19. Cardiac Strain in a Swine Model of Regional Hibernating Myocardium: Effects of CoQ10 on Contractile Reserve Following Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hocum Stone, Laura; Butterick, Tammy A; Duffy, Cayla; Swingen, Corey; Ward, Herbert B; Kelly, Rosemary F; McFalls, Edward O

    2016-08-01

    There is conflicting clinical evidence whether administration of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) improves function following coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Using a swine model of hibernating myocardium, we tested whether daily CoQ10 would improve contractile function by MRI at 4-week post-CABG. Twelve pigs underwent a thoracotomy and had a constrictor placed on the left anterior descending (LAD). At 12 weeks, they underwent off-pump bypass and received daily dietary supplements of either CoQ10 (10 mg/kg/day) or placebo. At 4-week post-CABG, circumferential strain measurements in the hibernating LAD region from placebo and CoQ10 groups were not different and increased to a similar extent with dobutamine (-14.7 ± 0.6 versus -14.8 ± 0.1, respectively (NS)). Post-sacrifice, oxidant stress markers were obtained in the mitochondrial isolates and protein carbonyl in the placebo, and CoQ10 groups were 6.14 ± 0.36 and 5.05 ± 0.32 nmol/mg, respectively (NS). In summary, CoQ10 did not improve contractile reserve or reduce oxidant stress at 4-week post-CABG. PMID:27184805

  20. Ultra-high speed vacuum pump system with first stage turbofan and second stage turbomolecular pump

    DOEpatents

    Jostlein, Hans

    2006-04-04

    An ultra-high speed vacuum pump evacuation system includes a first stage ultra-high speed turbofan and a second stage conventional turbomolecular pump. The turbofan is either connected in series to a chamber to be evacuated, or is optionally disposed entirely within the chamber. The turbofan employs large diameter rotor blades operating at high linear blade velocity to impart an ultra-high pumping speed to a fluid. The second stage turbomolecular pump is fluidly connected downstream from the first stage turbofan. In operation, the first stage turbofan operates in a pre-existing vacuum, with the fluid asserting only small axial forces upon the rotor blades. The turbofan imparts a velocity to fluid particles towards an outlet at a high volume rate, but moderate compression ratio. The second stage conventional turbomolecular pump then compresses the fluid to pressures for evacuation by a roughing pump.

  1. A Foreign Object Damage Event Detector Data Fusion System for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    A Data Fusion System designed to provide a reliable assessment of the occurrence of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in a turbofan engine is presented. The FOD-event feature level fusion scheme combines knowledge of shifts in engine gas path performance obtained using a Kalman filter, with bearing accelerometer signal features extracted via wavelet analysis, to positively identify a FOD event. A fuzzy inference system provides basic probability assignments (bpa) based on features extracted from the gas path analysis and bearing accelerometers to a fusion algorithm based on the Dempster-Shafer-Yager Theory of Evidence. Details are provided on the wavelet transforms used to extract the foreign object strike features from the noisy data and on the Kalman filter-based gas path analysis. The system is demonstrated using a turbofan engine combined-effects model (CEM), providing both gas path and rotor dynamic structural response, and is suitable for rapid-prototyping of control and diagnostic systems. The fusion of the disparate data can provide significantly more reliable detection of a FOD event than the use of either method alone. The use of fuzzy inference techniques combined with Dempster-Shafer-Yager Theory of Evidence provides a theoretical justification for drawing conclusions based on imprecise or incomplete data.

  2. Aeroacoustic Analysis of Fan Noise Reduction With Increased Bypass Nozzle Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced model turbofan was tested in the NASA Glenn 9-by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) to explore far field acoustic effects of increased bypass nozzle area. This fan stage test was part of the NASA Glenn Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test, second entry (SDT2) which acquired aeroacoustic results over a range of test conditions. The baseline nozzle was sized to produce maximum stage performance at cruise condition. However, the wind tunnel testing is conducted near sea level condition. Therefore, in order to simulate and obtain performance at other operating conditions, two additional nozzles were designed and tested one with +5 percent increase in weight flow (+5.4 percent increase in nozzle area compared with the baseline nozzle), sized to simulate the performance at the stage design point (takeoff) condition, and the other with a +7.5 percent increase in weight flow (+10.9 percent increase in nozzle area) sized for maximum weight flow with a fixed nozzle at sea level condition. Measured acoustic benefits with increased nozzle area were very encouraging, showing overall sound power level (OAPWL) reductions of 2 or more dB while the stage thrust actually increased by 2 to 3 percent except for the most open nozzle at takeoff rotor speed where stage performance decreased. Effective perceived noise levels for a 1500 ft engine flyover and 3.35 scale factor showed a similar noise reduction of 2 or more EPNdB. Noise reductions, principally in the level of broadband noise, were observed everywhere in the far field. Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements taken downstream of the rotor showed that the total turbulent velocity decreased with increasing nozzle flow, which may explain the reduced rotor broadband noise levels.

  3. Stimulation of a turbofan engine for evaluation of multivariable optimal control concepts. [(computerized simulation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seldner, K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of control systems for jet engines requires a real-time computer simulation. The simulation provides an effective tool for evaluating control concepts and problem areas prior to actual engine testing. The development and use of a real-time simulation of the Pratt and Whitney F100-PW100 turbofan engine is described. The simulation was used in a multi-variable optimal controls research program using linear quadratic regulator theory. The simulation is used to generate linear engine models at selected operating points and evaluate the control algorithm. To reduce the complexity of the design, it is desirable to reduce the order of the linear model. A technique to reduce the order of the model; is discussed. Selected results between high and low order models are compared. The LQR control algorithms can be programmed on digital computer. This computer will control the engine simulation over the desired flight envelope.

  4. Hypoxaemia during cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Muir, A. L.; Davidson, I. A.

    1971-01-01

    Blood oxygenation was studied in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass using the Rygg-Kyvsgaard bubble oxygenator. Oxygenation was satisfactory in perfusions carried out at normothermia and during hypothermia. During the rewarming phase of hypothermic perfusions hypoxaemia occurred. This could be prevented by a ganglion blocking agent (trimetaphan) given during the cooling phase. PMID:5565791

  5. Utilizing numerical techniques in turbofan inlet acoustic suppressor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    Numerical theories in conjunction with previously published analytical results are used to augment current analytical theories in the acoustic design of a turbofan inlet nacelle. In particular, a finite element-integral theory is used to study the effect of the inlet lip radius on the far field radiation pattern and to determine the optimum impedance in an actual engine environment. For some single mode JT15D data, the numerical theory and experiment are found to be in a good agreement.

  6. Quiet Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) technology study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design of an engine which satisfies the requirements of a quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) engine is described. Also an experimental program to demonstrate performance is suggested. The T700 QCGAT engine preliminary design indicates that it will radiate noise at the same level as an aircraft without engine noise, have exhaust emissions within the EPA 1981 Standards, have lower fuel consumption than is available in comparable size engines, and have sufficient life for five years between overhauls.

  7. Conceptual design of single turbofan engine powered light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, F. S.; Voorhees, C. G.; Heinrich, A. M.; Baisden, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptual design of a four place single turbofan engine powered light aircraft was accomplished utilizing contemporary light aircraft conventional design techniques as a means of evaluating the NASA-Ames General Aviation Synthesis Program (GASP) as a preliminary design tool. In certain areas, disagreement or exclusion were found to exist between the results of the conventional design and GASP processes. Detail discussion of these points along with the associated contemporary design methodology are presented.

  8. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    A study of quiet turbofan short takeoff aircraft for short haul air transportation was conducted. The objectives of the study were to: (1) define representative aircraft configurations, characteristics, and costs associated with their development, (2) identify critical technology and technology related problems to be resolved in successful introduction of representative short haul aircraft, (3) determine relationships between quiet short takeoff aircraft and the economic and social viability of short haul, and (4) identify high payoff technology areas.

  9. The effect of factor VIII deficiencies and replacement and bypass therapies on thrombus formation under venous flow conditions in microfluidic and computational models.

    PubMed

    Onasoga-Jarvis, Abimbola A; Leiderman, Karin; Fogelson, Aaron L; Wang, Michael; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Di Paola, Jorge A; Neeves, Keith B

    2013-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that individuals with factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency (hemophilia A) are protected against venous thrombosis, but treatment with recombinant proteins can increase their risk for thrombosis. In this study we examined the dynamics of thrombus formation in individuals with hemophilia A and their response to replacement and bypass therapies under venous flow conditions. Fibrin and platelet accumulation were measured in microfluidic flow assays on a TF-rich surface at a shear rate of 100 s⁻¹. Thrombin generation was calculated with a computational spatial-temporal model of thrombus formation. Mild FVIII deficiencies (5-30% normal levels) could support fibrin fiber formation, while severe (<1%) and moderate (1-5%) deficiencies could not. Based on these experimental observations, computational calculations estimate an average thrombin concentration of ∼10 nM is necessary to support fibrin formation under flow. There was no difference in fibrin formation between severe and moderate deficiencies, but platelet aggregate size was significantly larger for moderate deficiencies. Computational calculations estimate that the local thrombin concentration in moderate deficiencies is high enough to induce platelet activation (>1 nM), but too low to support fibrin formation (<10 nM). In the absence of platelets, fibrin formation was not supported even at normal FVIII levels, suggesting platelet adhesion is necessary for fibrin formation. Individuals treated by replacement therapy, recombinant FVIII, showed normalized fibrin formation. Individuals treated with bypass therapy, recombinant FVIIa, had a reduced lag time in fibrin formation, as well as elevated fibrin accumulation compared to healthy controls. Treatment of rFVIIa, but not rFVIII, resulted in significant changes in fibrin dynamics that could lead to a prothrombotic state. PMID:24236042

  10. Triiodothyronine increases myocardial function and pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle after reperfusion in a model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) supplementation improves clinical outcomes in infants after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass by unknown mechanisms. We utilized a translational model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC), thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-(13)Carbon((13)C)]pyruvate for 40 min (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (control) or immediately after reperfusion (I/R) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (I/R-Tr) received T3 (1.2 μg/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC) using [2-(13)C]pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. When compared with I/R, T3 (group I/R-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after I/R while elevating flux of both PDC and PC (∼4-fold). Although neither I/R nor I/R-Tr modified absolute CAC levels, T3 inhibited I/R-induced reductions in their molar percent enrichment. Furthermore, (13)C-labeling of CAC intermediates suggests that T3 may decrease entry of unlabeled carbons at the level of oxaloacetate through anaplerosis or exchange reaction with asparate. T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC fluxes, thereby providing potential substrate for elevated cardiac function after reperfusion. This T3-induced increase in pyruvate fluxes occurs with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Our labeling data raise the possibility that T3 reduces reliance on amino acids for anaplerosis after reperfusion.

  11. System Noise Prediction of the DGEN 380 Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    The DGEN 380 is a small, separate-flow, geared turbofan. Its manufacturer, Price Induction, is promoting it for a small twinjet application in the emerging personal light jet market. Smaller, and producing less thrust than other entries in the industry, Price Induction is seeking to apply the engine to a 4- to 5-place twinjet designed to compete in an area currently dominated by propeller-driven airplanes. NASA is considering purchasing a DGEN 380 turbofan to test new propulsion noise reduction technologies in a relevant engine environment. To explore this possibility, NASA and Price Induction have signed a Space Act Agreement and have agreed to cooperate on engine acoustic testing. Static acoustic measurements of the engine were made by NASA researchers during July, 2014 at the Glenn Research Center. In the event that a DGEN turbofan becomes a NASA noise technology research testbed, it is in the interest of NASA to develop procedures to evaluate engine system noise metrics. This report documents the procedures used to project the DGEN static noise measurements to flight conditions and the prediction of system noise of a notional airplane powered by twin DGEN engines.

  12. 75 FR 44725 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On June 3, 2010 (75 FR 31330), we published a proposed AD, FR Doc. 2010-13314, in the... PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines; Correction AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... PW4000 series turbofan engines. The docket number is incorrect in all three of its locations....

  13. Study of small turbofan engines applicable to general-aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, G. L.; Burnett, G. A.; Alsworth, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The applicability of small turbofan engines to general aviation aircraft is discussed. The engine and engine/airplane performance, weight, size, and cost interrelationships are examined. The effects of specific engine noise constraints are evaluated. The factors inhibiting the use of turbofan engines in general aviation aircraft are identified.

  14. 75 FR 57660 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation (RRC) AE 3007A Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Corporation (RRC) AE 3007A Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires performing an eddy current inspection (ECI) or...-08-51, Amendment 39-15905 (74 FR 22091, May 12, 2009), with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies...

  15. 75 FR 7209 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation (RRC) AE 3007A Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation (RRC) AE 3007A Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation...: The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for RRC AE 3007A series turbofan engines... (ECIs) or surface wave ultrasonic testing (SWUT) inspections on high-pressure turbine (HPT) stage...

  16. 76 FR 68660 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... airworthiness directive (AD) for PW4000 series turbofan engines. This proposed AD would require replacing the fuel metering unit (FMU), part number (P/N) 50U150, at the next shop visit after the effective date...

  17. Doppler derived quantitative flow estimate in coronary artery bypass graft: a computational multiscale model for the evaluation of the current clinical procedure.

    PubMed

    Ponzini, Raffaele; Lemma, Massimo; Morbiducci, Umberto; Montevecchi, Franco M; Redaelli, Alberto

    2008-09-01

    In order to investigate the reliability of the so called mean velocity/vessel area formula adopted in clinical practice for the estimation of the flow rate using an intravascular Doppler guide wire instrumentation, a multiscale computational model was used to give detailed predictions on flow profiles within Y-shaped coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) models. At this purpose three CABG models were built from clinical patient's data and used to evaluate and compare, in each model, the computed flow rate and the flow rate estimated according to the assumption of parabolic velocity profile. A consistent difference between the exact and the estimated value of the flow rate was found in every branch of all the graft models. In this study we showed that this discrepancy in the flow rate estimation is coherent to the theory of Womersley regarding spatial velocity profiles in unsteady flow conditions. In particular this work put in evidence that the error in flow rate estimation can be reduced by using the estimation formula recently proposed by Ponzini et al. [Ponzini R, Vergara C, Redaelli A, Veneziani A. Reliable CFD-based estimation of flow rate in haemodynamics measures. Ultrasound Med Biol 2006;32(10):1545-55], accounting for the unsteady nature of blood, applicable in the clinical practice without resorting to further measurements. PMID:17980641

  18. Low speed test of a high-bypass-ratio propulsion system with an asymmetric inlet designed for a tilt-nacelle V/STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syberg, J.

    1978-01-01

    A large scale model of a lift/cruise fan inlet designed for a tilt nacelle V/STOL airplane was tested with a high bypass ratio turbofan. Testing was conducted at low freestream velocities with inlet angles of attack ranging from 0 deg to 120 deg. The operating limits for the nacelle were found to be related to inlet boundary layer separation. Small separations originating in the inlet diffuser cause little or no performance degradation. However, at sufficiently severe freestream conditions the separation changes abruptly to a lip separation. This change is associated with a significant reduction in nacelle net thrust as well as a sharp increase in fan blade vibratory stresses. Consequently, the onset of lip separation is regarded as the nacelle operating limit. The test verified that the asymmetric inlet design will provide high performance and stable operation at the design forward speed and angle of attack conditions. At some of these, however, operation near the lower end of the design inlet airflow range is not feasible due to the occurrence of lip separation.

  19. Haemodynamic analysis of vessel remodelling in STA-MCA bypass for Moyamoya disease and its impact on bypass patency.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng-Ping; Zhang, Yu; Higurashi, Masakazu; Xu, Bin; Gu, Yu-Xiang; Mao, Ying; Morgan, Michael Kerin; Qian, Yi

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the remodelling characteristics of STA-MCA bypass and its influence on patency via the use of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. The reconstructed three-dimensional geometries from MRA were segmented to create computational domains for CFD simulations. Eleven patients, who underwent regular MRA both immediately following surgery and at the six months follow-up, were studied. The flow velocities at STA were measured via the use of quantitative MRA (QMRA) to validate simulation results. STA-MCA bypass patency was confirmed for each patient immediately following surgery. The simulation indicated that the remodelling of the arterial pedicle in nine patients was associated with a reduction in the resistance to flow through the bypass. For these cases, the modelling of a driving pressure of 10mmHg through the bypass at 6 months post-surgery resulted in a 50% greater blood flow than those found immediately following surgery. However, two patients were found to exhibit contradictory patterns of remodelling, in which a highly curved bending at the bypass immediately post-surgery underwent progression, with increased resistance to flow through the bypass at 6 months follow-up, thereby resulting in a modelled flow rate reduction of 50% and 25%, respectively. This study revealed that STA-MCA bypass has a characteristic remodelling that usually reduces flow resistance. The initial morphology of the bypass may have had a significant effect on the outcome of vessel remodelling.

  20. Possible Mechanisms for Turbofan Engine Ice Crystal Icing at High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Struk, Peter M.; Oliver, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented to describe possible mechanisms of ice formation on unheated surfaces inside a turbofan engine compression system from fully glaciated ice crystal clouds often formed at high altitude near deep convective weather systems. It is shown from the analysis that generally there could be two distinct types of ice formation: (1) when the "surface freezing fraction" is in the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the freezing of water melt from fully or partially melted ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accretion with strong adhesion to the surface, and (2) when the "surface melting fraction" is the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the further melting of ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accumulation of un-melted ice crystals with relatively weak bonding to the surface. The model captures important qualitative trends of the fundamental ice-crystal icing phenomenon reported earlier (Refs. 1 and 2) from the research collaboration work by NASA and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. Further, preliminary analysis of test data from the 2013 full scale turbofan engine ice crystal icing test (Ref. 3) conducted in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) has also suggested that (1) both types of ice formation occurred during the test, and (2) the model has captured some important qualitative trend of turning on (or off) the ice crystal ice formation process in the tested engine low pressure compressor (LPC) targeted area under different icing conditions that ultimately would lead to (or suppress) an engine core roll back (RB) event.

  1. Possible Mechanisms for Turbofan Engine Ice Crystal Icing at High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Struk, Peter M.; Oliver, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented to describe possible mechanisms of ice formation on unheated surfaces inside a turbofan engine compression system from fully glaciated ice crystal clouds often formed at high altitude near deep convective weather systems. It is shown from the analysis that generally there could be two distinct types of ice formation: (1) when the "surface freezing fraction" is in the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the freezing of water melt from fully or partially melted ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accretion with strong adhesion to the surface, and (2) when the "surface melting fraction" is the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the further melting of ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accumulation of un-melted ice crystals with relatively weak bonding to the surface. The model captures important qualitative trends of the fundamental ice-crystal icing phenomenon reported earlier1,2 from the research collaboration work by NASA and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. Further, preliminary analysis of test data from the 2013 full scale turbofan engine ice crystal icing test3 conducted in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) has also suggested that (1) both types of ice formation occurred during the test, and (2) the model has captured some important qualitative trend of turning on (or off) the ice crystal ice formation process in the tested engine low pressure compressor (LPC) targeted area under different icing conditions that ultimately would lead to (or suppress) an engine core roll back (RB) event.

  2. Alongshore sediment bypassing as a control on river mouth morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Nardin, William; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    River mouths, shoreline locations where fluvial and coastal sediments are partitioned via erosion, trapping, and redistribution, are responsible for the ultimate sedimentary architecture of deltas and, because of their dynamic nature, also pose great management and engineering challenges. To investigate the interaction between fluvial and littoral processes at wave-dominated river mouths, we modeled their morphologic evolution using the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. Model experiments replicate alongshore migration of river mouths, river mouth spit development, and eventual spit breaching, suggesting that these are emergent phenomena that can develop even under constant fluvial and wave conditions. Furthermore, we find that sediment bypassing of a river mouth develops though feedbacks between waves and river mouth morphology, resulting in either continuous bypassing pathways or episodic bar bypassing pathways. Model results demonstrate that waves refracting into the river mouth bar create a zone of low alongshore sediment transport updrift of the river mouth, which reduces sediment bypassing. Sediment bypassing, in turn, controls the river mouth migration rate and the size of the river mouth spit. As a result, an intermediate amount of river discharge maximizes river mouth migration. The fraction of alongshore sediment bypassing can be predicted from the balance between the jet and the wave momentum flux. Quantitative comparisons show a match between our modeled predictions of river mouth bypassing and migration rates observed in natural settings.

  3. Effect of Two Advanced Noise Reduction Technologies on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Ultra High Bypass Ratio Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christoper E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center anechoic 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate two new advanced noise reduction technologies in support of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate the noise reduction potential and effect on fan model performance of the two noise reduction technologies in a scale model Ultra-High Bypass turbofan at simulated takeoff and approach aircraft flight speeds. The two novel noise reduction technologies are called Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment and Soft Vanes. Both technologies were aimed at modifying the local noise source mechanisms of the fan tip vortex/fan case interaction and the rotor wake-stator interaction. For the Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment, two noise reduction configurations were investigated. The results showed that the two noise reduction technologies, Over-the-Rotor and Soft Vanes, were able to reduce the noise level of the fan model, but the Over-the-Rotor configurations had a significant negative impact on the fan aerodynamic performance; the loss in fan aerodynamic efficiency was between 2.75 to 8.75 percent, depending on configuration, compared to the conventional solid baseline fan case rubstrip also tested. Performance results with the Soft Vanes showed that there was no measurable change in the corrected fan thrust and a 1.8 percent loss in corrected stator vane thrust, which resulted in a total net thrust loss of approximately 0.5 percent compared with the baseline reference stator vane set.

  4. Pulmonary microRNA expression profiling in an immature piglet model of cardiopulmonary bypass-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlei; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jinping; Wang, Xu; Li, Shoujun

    2015-04-01

    After surgery performed under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), severe lung injury often occurs in infants. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially involved in diverse pathophysiological processes via regulation of gene expression. The objective of this study was to investigate differentially expressed miRNAs and their potential target genes in immature piglet lungs in response to CPB. Fourteen piglets aged 18.6 ± 0.5 days were equally divided into two groups that underwent sham sternotomy or CPB. The duration of aortic cross-clamping was 2 h, followed by 2 h reperfusion. Lung injury was evaluated by lung function indices, levels of cytokines, and histological changes. We applied miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis to determine miRNA expression. Meanwhile, qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for validation of predicted mRNA targets. The deterioration of lung function and histopathological changes revealed the piglets' lungs were greatly impaired due to CPB. The levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and interleukin 10 increased in the lung tissue after CPB. Using miRNA microarray, statistically significant differences were found in the levels of 16 miRNAs in the CPB group. Up-regulation of miR-21 was verified by PCR. We also observed down-regulation in the levels of miR-127, miR-145, and miR-204, which were correlated with increases in the expression of the products of their potential target genes PIK3CG, PTGS2, ACE, and IL6R in the CPB group, suggesting a potential role for miRNA in the regulation of inflammatory response. Our results show that CPB induces severe lung injury and dynamic changes in miRNA expression in piglet lungs. Moreover, the changes in miRNA levels and target gene expression may provide a basis for understanding the pathogenesis of CPB-induced injury to immature lungs.

  5. Automated procedure for developing hybrid computer simulations of turbofan engines. Part 1: General description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.; Krosel, S. M.; Bruton, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic, computer-aided, self-documenting methodology for developing hybrid computer simulations of turbofan engines is presented. The methodology that is pesented makes use of a host program that can run on a large digital computer and a machine-dependent target (hybrid) program. The host program performs all the calculations and data manipulations that are needed to transform user-supplied engine design information to a form suitable for the hybrid computer. The host program also trims the self-contained engine model to match specified design-point information. Part I contains a general discussion of the methodology, describes a test case, and presents comparisons between hybrid simulation and specified engine performance data. Part II, a companion document, contains documentation, in the form of computer printouts, for the test case.

  6. Analytical investigation of adaptive control of radiated inlet noise from turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risi, John D.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the resulting far field radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. A feedforward control algorithm was simulated to predict the controlled far field radiation from the destructive combination of fan noise and secondary control sources. Numerical results were developed for two system configurations, with the resulting controlled far field radiation patterns showing varying degrees of attenuation and spillover. With one axial station of twelve control sources and error sensors with equal relative angular positions, nearly global attenuation is achieved. Shifting the angular position of one error sensor resulted in an increase of spillover to the extreme sidelines. The complex control inputs for each configuration was investigated to identify the structure of the wave pattern created by the control sources, giving an indication of performance of the system configuration. It is deduced that the locations of the error sensors and the control source configuration are equally critical to the operation of the active noise control system.

  7. Real-time simulation of F100-PW-100 turbofan engine using the hybrid computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.; Seldner, K.

    1975-01-01

    A real-time hybrid computer simulation of the F100-PW-100 augmented turbofan is presented. The digital portion of the hybrid computer is used to perform the bivariate function generation associated with modeling the performance of the engine's rotating components. The remaining calculations are performed on the analog computer. Steady state simulation data along with sea level, static, transient data are presented to show that the real-time simulation matches baseline digital simulation results over a wide range of power settings and flight conditions. Steady state simulation data are compared with sea level, experimental data to show that the real-time hybrid and baseline digital simulations do adequately predict the performance of the actual engine. FORTRAN listings and analog patching diagrams are provided.

  8. A multiscale 0-D/3-D approach to patient-specific adaptation of a cerebral autoregulation model for computational fluid dynamics studies of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Kaufmann, Tim A S

    2014-06-01

    Neurological complication often occurs during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). One of the main causes is hypoperfusion of the cerebral tissue affected by the position of the cannula tip and diminished cerebral autoregulation (CA). Recently, a lumped parameter approach could describe the baroreflex, one of the main mechanisms of cerebral autoregulation, in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of CPB. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) was overestimated and the physiological meaning of the variables and their impact on the model was unknown. In this study, we use a 0-D control circuit representation of the Baroreflex mechanism, to assess the parameters with respect to their physiological meaning and their influence on CBF. Afterwards the parameters are transferred to 3D-CFD and the static and dynamic behavior of cerebral autoregulation is investigated. The parameters of the baroreflex mechanism can reproduce normotensive, hypertensive and impaired autoregulation behavior. Further on, the proposed model can mimic the effects of anesthetic agents and other factors controlling dynamic CA. The CFD simulations deliver similar results of static and dynamic CBF as the 0-D control circuit. This study shows the feasibility of a multiscale 0-D/3-D approach to include patient-specific cerebral autoregulation into CFD studies. PMID:24746017

  9. 78 FR 44899 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska to the extent... events of a leaking variable bypass valve (VBV) actuator fuel supply tube. This proposed AD would require... bypass valve (VBV) actuator fuel supply tube, part number (P/N) 2165M22P01, installed. (d)...

  10. Low-Voltage Bypass Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved bypass device provides low-resistance current shunt around low-voltage power cell when cell fails in open-circuit condition during operation. In comparison with older bypass devices for same application, this one weighs less, generates less heat, and has lower voltage drop (less resistance). Bypass device connected in parallel with power cell. Draws very little current during normal operation of cell.

  11. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    Conceptual designs of Quiet Turbofan STOL Short-Haul Transport Aircraft for the mid-1980 time period are developed and analyzed to determine their technical, operational, and economic feasibility. A matrix of aircraft using various high-lift systems and design parameters are considered. Variations in aircraft characteristics, airport geometry and location, and operational techniques are analyzed systematically to determine their effects on the market, operating economics, and community acceptance. In these studies, the total systems approach is considered to be critically important in analyzing the potential of STOL aircraft to reduce noise pollution and alleviate the increasing air corridor and airport congestion.

  12. The Design and Testing of a Miniature Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosentino, Gary B.; Murray, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf jet propulsion in the 50 - 500 lb thrust class sparse. A true twin-spool turbofan in this range does not exist. Adapting an off-the-shelf turboshaft engine is feasible. However the approx.10 Hp SPT5 can t quite make 50 lbs. of thrust. Packaging and integration is challenging, especially the exhaust. Building on our engine using a 25 Hp turboshaft seems promising if the engine becomes available. Test techniques used, though low cost, adequate for the purpose.

  13. Receptivity and Bypass Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasseigne, D. G.; Criminale, W. O.; Joslin, R. D.; Jackson, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    Problems concerning laminar-turbulent transition are addressed by solving a series of initial value problems. Solutions to the temporal, initial-value problem .with an inhomogeneous forcing term imposed upon the flow are sought. It is shown that: (1) A transient disturbance lying located outside of the boundary layer can lead to the growth of an unstable Tollmein-Schlicting wave; (2) A resonance with the continuous spectrum may provide a mechanism for bypass transition; and (3) The continuum modes of a disturbance feed directly into the Tollmein-Schlicting wave downstream through non-parallel effects.

  14. Thrombin during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, L Henry; Colman, Robert W

    2006-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) ignites a massive defense reaction that stimulates all blood cells and five plasma protein systems to produce a myriad of vasoactive and cytotoxic substances, cell-signaling molecules, and upregulated cellular receptors. Thrombin is the key enzyme in the thrombotic portion of the defense reaction and is only partially suppressed by heparin. During CPB, thrombin is produced by both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation pathways and activated platelets. The routine use of a cell saver and the eventual introduction of direct thrombin inhibitors now offer the possibility of completely suppressing thrombin production and fibrinolysis during cardiac surgery with CPB. PMID:17126170

  15. Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric bypass surgery - your diet; Obesity - diet after bypass; Weight loss - diet after bypass ... lot of calories. Avoid drinks that have sugar, fructose, or corn syrup in them. Avoid carbonated drinks ( ...

  16. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronary artery bypass - discharge; RACAB - discharge; Keyhole heart surgery - discharge ... You had minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery on one ... an artery from your chest to create a detour, or bypass, around ...

  17. Bypass Surgery for Lower Extremity Limb Salvage: Vein Bypass

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bypass surgery for limb salvage in cases of chronic limb ischemia is a well-established treatment modality. Use of an autogenous vein provides the best conduit for infrainguinal arterial bypass procedures, particularly for bypass to the infrapopliteal arteries. In this article, we discuss infrainguinal vein bypass surgery including indications, perioperative care, and long-term follow up. We also discuss the outcomes of the procedure with regard to patient survival and limb salvage. The autogenous vein continues to be the best available conduit with the highest patency rate and the best treatment option. Compared to all other revascularization options for infrainguinal disease, the vein bypass has the best limb salvage and long-term survival in patients appropriately selected for the procedure. PMID:23342187

  18. Interference effects of very high bypass ratio nacelle installations on a low-wing transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingraldi, Anthony M.; Re, Richard J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Kariya, Timmy T.

    1991-01-01

    A twin-engine, low-wing transport model, with a supercritical wing designed for a cruise Mach number of 0.77 and a lift coefficient of 0.55 was tested in the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this test was to compare the wing/nacelle interference effects of superfans (BPR 18) with the interference effects of advanced turbofans (BPR 6). Flow-through nacelles were used. Forces and moments on the complete model were measured using a strain gage balance, and extensive surface static pressure measurements were made on the model's wing, nacelles, and pylons. Results of the investigation indicate that superfan nacelles can be installed with approximately the same drag penalty as conventional turbofan nacelles.

  19. Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

  20. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  1. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  2. 77 FR 20987 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ..., Amendment 39-16970 (77 FR 13485, March 7, 2012), currently requires inspecting the front combustion liner...; AD 2012-04-14] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines...

  3. Preliminary design study of a quiet, high flow fan (QHF) stage. [turbofans - quiet engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, C. L.; Kisner, L. S.; Delaney, R. A.; Beguhn, A. A.; Frye, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts selected to reduce fan generated noise in a turbofan are presented. Near-sonic flow at the fan inlet to reduce upstream propagated noise and the use of long-chord vanes to reduce downstream noise is discussed. The near-sonic condition at the rotor inlet plane was achieved by designing for high specific mass flow and by maintaining the high flow at reduced power by variable stators and variable fan exhaust nozzle. The long-chord vanes reduce response to unsteady flow. The acoustic design showed that long-chord stators would significantly reduce turbofan source noise and that other stator design parameters have no appreciable effect on noise for the spacing and chord length of the turbofan design. Four rig flow paths studied in the aerodynamic preliminary design are discussed. Noise prediction results indicate that a turbofan powered aircraft would be under federal air regulations levels without any acoustic treatment.

  4. Bypass diode integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Protective bypass diodes and mounting configurations which are applicable for use with photovoltaic modules having power dissipation requirements in the 5 to 50 watt range were investigated. Using PN silicon and Schottky diode characterization data on packaged diodes and diode chips, typical diodes were selected as representative for each range of current carrying capacity, an appropriate heat dissipating mounting concept along with its environmental enclosure was defined, and a thermal analysis relating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation was performed. In addition, the heat dissipating mounting device dimensions were varied to determine the effect on junction temperature. The results of the analysis are presented as a set of curves indicating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation for each diode package.

  5. Bypass flow computations on the LOFA transient in a VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Yu-Hsin; Johnson, Richard W.; Ferng, Yuh-Ming; Chieng, Ching-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Bypass flow in the prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is not intentionally designed to occur, but is present in the gaps between graphite blocks. Previous studies of the bypass flow in the core indicated that the cooling provided by flow in the bypass gaps had a significant effect on temperature and flow distributions for normal operating conditions. However, the flow and heat transports in the core are changed significantly after a Loss of Flow Accident (LOFA). This study aims to study the effect and role of the bypass flow after a LOFA in terms of the temperature and flow distributions and for the heat transport out of the core by natural convection of the coolant for a 1/12 symmetric section of the active core which is composed of images and mirror images of two sub-region models. The two sub-region models, 9 x 1/12 and 15 x 1/12 symmetric sectors of the active core, are employed as the CFD flow models using computational grid systems of 70.2 million and 117 million nodes, respectively. It is concluded that the effect of bypass flow is significant for the initial conditions and the beginning of LOFA, but the bypass flow has little effect after a long period of time in the transient computation of natural circulation.

  6. Parametric (On-Design) Cycle Analysis for a Separate-Exhaust Turbofan Engine With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Siow, Y. K.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    Today s modern aircraft is based on air-breathing jet propulsion systems, which use moving fluids as substances to transform energy carried by the fluids into power. Throughout aero-vehicle evolution, improvements have been made to the engine efficiency and pollutants reduction. The major advantages associated with the addition of ITB are an increase in thermal efficiency and reduction in NOx emission. Lower temperature peak in the main combustor results in lower thermal NOx emission and lower amount of cooling air required. This study focuses on a parametric (on-design) cycle analysis of a dual-spool, separate-flow turbofan engine with an Interstage Turbine Burner (ITB). The ITB considered in this paper is a relatively new concept in modern jet engine propulsion. The ITB serves as a secondary combustor and is located between the high- and the low-pressure turbine, i.e., the transition duct. The objective of this study is to use design parameters, such as flight Mach number, compressor pressure ratio, fan pressure ratio, fan bypass ratio, and high-pressure turbine inlet temperature to obtain engine performance parameters, such as specific thrust and thrust specific fuel consumption. Results of this study can provide guidance in identifying the performance characteristics of various engine components, which can then be used to develop, analyze, integrate, and optimize the system performance of turbofan engines with an ITB. Visual Basic program, Microsoft Excel macrocode, and Microsoft Excel neuron code are used to facilitate Microsoft Excel software to plot engine performance versus engine design parameters. This program computes and plots the data sequentially without forcing users to open other types of plotting programs. A user s manual on how to use the program is also included in this report. Furthermore, this stand-alone program is written in conjunction with an off-design program which is an extension of this study. The computed result of a selected design

  7. A cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest rat model for the investigation of the systemic inflammation response and induced organ damage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a commonly used technique in cardiac surgery. CPB is however associated with a strong induction of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) which in conjunction with ischemia and reperfusion may lead to multiple organ failure. The aim of the study was to establish and characterize a CPB rat model incorporating deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with a specific focus on the extent of the inflammatory reactions and organ damage as a groundwork for novel therapeutics against SIRS and I/R induced organ injury. Materials and methods Male Wistar rats (n = 6) were cannulated for CPB, connected to a heart-lung-machine (HLM) and cooled to a temperature of 16°C before they underwent 45 minutes of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with global ischaemia. Arrest was followed by rewarming and 60 minutes of reperfusion. Haemodynamic and vital parameters were recorded throughout the CPB procedure. Only animals displaying sinus rhythm throughout reperfusion were utilized for analysis. Rats were euthanized and tissue samples were harvested. Blood gas analysis was performed and blood samples were taken. Induction of organ damage was examined by analysis of protein levels and phosphorylation status of kinases and stress proteins. Results were compared to animals (n = 6) which did not undergo CPB. Results CPB induced leucocytosis and an increase of interleukin-6 and TNF-α plasma values indicating an inflammatory response. Markers of tissue damage and dysfunction, such as troponin T, creatinine and AST were elevated. Phosphorylation of STAT3 was induced in all examined organs. Activation of MAPK and induction of heat shock proteins occurred in an organ-specific manner with most pronounced effects in heart, lungs and kidneys. Conclusions The presented CPB rat model shows the induction of SIRS and activation of specific signalling cascades. SIRS seems not to be provoked during DHCA and is elicited mainly during reperfusion

  8. Turbofan noise generation. Volume 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Theobald, M. A.; Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    Computer programs were developed which calculate the in-duct acoustic modes excited by a fan/stator stae operating at subsonic tip speed. Three noise source mechanisms are included: (1) sound generated by the rotor blades interacting with turbulence ingested into, or generated within, the inlet duct; (2) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the turbulent wakes of the rotors blades; and (3) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the mean velocity deficit wakes of the rotor blades. The fan/stator stage is modeled as an ensemble of blades and vanes of zero camber and thickness enclosed within an infinite hard-walled annular duct. Turbulence drawn into or generated within the inlet duct is modeled as nonhomogeneous and anisotropic random fluid motion, superimposed upon a uniform axial mean flow, and convected with that flow. Equations for the duct mode amplitudes, or expected values of the amplitudes, are derived.

  9. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDCAB; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass; RACAB; Keyhole heart surgery ... To perform this surgery: The heart surgeon will make a 3- to 5-inch-long surgical cut in the left part of your chest between your ribs ...

  10. Photovoltaic module bypass diode encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented. The Semicon PN junction diode cells were selected. Diode junction to heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1 deg C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150 deg C. Three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed. Thermal testing of these modules enabled the formulation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally mounted packaged diodes. It is concluded that, when proper designed and installed, these bypass diode devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  11. Core noise measurements from a small, general aviation turbofan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshotko, M.; Karchmer, A.

    1980-11-01

    As part of a program to investigate combustor and other core noises, simultaneous measurements of internal fluctuating pressure and far field noise were made with a JT15D turbofan engine. Acoustic waveguide probes, located in the engine at the combustor, at the turbine exit and in the core nozzle wall, were used to measure internal fluctuating pressures. Low frequency acoustic power determined at the core nozzle exit corresponds in level to the far field acoustic power at engine speeds below 65% of maximum, the approach condition. At engine speeds above 65% of maximum, the jet noise dominates in the far field, greatly exceeding that of the core. From coherence measurements, it is shown that the combustor is the dominant source of the low frequency core noise. The results obtained from the JT15D engine were compared with those obtained previously from a YF102 engine, both engines having reverse flow annular combustors and being in the same size class.

  12. Aeroacoustic Analysis of Turbofan Noise Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.; Envia, Edmane

    1996-01-01

    This report provides an updated version of analytical documentation for the V072 Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. It presents the theoretical derivation of the equations used in the code and, where necessary, it documents the enhancements and changes made to the original code since its first release. V072 is a package of FORTRAN computer programs which calculate the in-duct acoustic modes excited by a fan/stator stage operating in a subsonic mean flow. Sound is generated by the stator vanes interacting with the mean wakes of the rotor blades. In this updated version, only the tonal noise produced at the blade passing frequency and its harmonics, is described. The broadband noise component analysis, which was part of the original report, is not included here. The code provides outputs of modal pressure and power amplitudes generated by the rotor-wake/stator interaction. The rotor/stator stage is modeled as an ensemble of blades and vanes of zero camber and thickness enclosed within an infinite hard-walled annular duct. The amplitude of each propagating mode is computed and summed to obtain the harmonics of sound power flux within the duct for both upstream and downstream propagating modes.

  13. Further development of a method for computing three-dimensional subsonic viscous flows in turbofan lobe mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. J.; Kreskovsky, J. P.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1983-01-01

    Procedure for computing subsonic, turbulent flow in turbofan lobe mixers was extended to allow consideration of flow fields in which a swirl component of velocity may be present. Additional, an optional k-lambda turbulence model was added to the procedure. The method of specifying the initial flow field was also modified, allowing parametric specification or radial secondary flow velocities, and making it possible to consider initial flow fields which have significant inlet secondary flow vorticity. A series of example calculations was performed which demonstrate the various capabilities of the modified code. These calculations demonstrate the effects of initial secondary flows of various magnitudes, the effects of swirl, and the effects of turbulence model on the mixing process. The results of these calculations indicate that the initial secondary flows, presumed to be generated within the lobes, play a dominant role in the mixing process, and that the predicted results are relatively insensitive to the turbulence model used.

  14. Spatial correlation in the ambient core noise field of a turbofan engine.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic transfer function relating combustion noise and turbine exit noise in the presence of enclosed ambient core noise is investigated using a dynamic system model and an acoustic system model for the particular turbofan engine studied and for a range of operating conditions. Measurements of cross-spectra magnitude and phase between the combustor and turbine exit and auto-spectra at the turbine exit and combustor are used to show the presence of indirect and direct combustion noise over the frequency range of 0-400 Hz. The procedure used evaluates the ratio of direct to indirect combustion noise. The procedure used also evaluates the post-combustion residence time in the combustor which is a factor in the formation of thermal NO(x) and soot in this region. These measurements are masked by the ambient core noise sound field in this frequency range which is observable since the transducers are situated within an acoustic wavelength of one another. An ambient core noise field model based on one and two dimensional spatial correlation functions is used to replicate the spatially correlated response of the pair of transducers. The spatial correlation function increases measured attenuation due to destructive interference and masks the true attenuation of the turbine. PMID:22712936

  15. Spatial Correlation in the Ambient Core Noise Field of a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic transfer function relating combustion noise and turbine exit noise in the presence of enclosed ambient core noise is investigated using a dynamic system model and an acoustic system model for the particular turbofan engine studied and for a range of operating conditions. Measurements of cross-spectra magnitude and phase between the combustor and turbine exit and auto-spectra at the turbine exit and combustor are used to show the presence of indirect and direct combustion noise over the frequency range of 0 400 Hz. The procedure used evaluates the ratio of direct to indirect combustion noise. The procedure used also evaluates the post-combustion residence time in the combustor which is a factor in the formation of thermal NOx and soot in this region. These measurements are masked by the ambient core noise sound field in this frequency range which is observable since the transducers are situated within an acoustic wavelength of one another. An ambient core noise field model based on one and two dimensional spatial correlation functions is used to replicate the spatially correlated response of the pair of transducers. The spatial correlation function increases measured attenuation due to destructive interference and masks the true attenuation of the turbine.

  16. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring.

  17. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring.

  18. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring. PMID:27627320

  19. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 1; Fan Stage Design and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is investigating turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems for access to space because it provides the potential for aircraft-like, space-launch operations that may significantly reduce launch costs and improve safety. To this end, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and General Electric (GE) teamed to design a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space. To enable the wide operating range of a Mach 4+ variable cycle turbofan ramjet required the development of a unique fan stage design capable of multi-point operation to accommodate variations in bypass ratio (10 ), fan speed (7 ), inlet mass flow (3.5 ), inlet pressure (8 ), and inlet temperature (3 ). In this paper, NASA has set out to characterize a TBCC engine fan stage aerodynamic performance and stability limits over a wide operating range including power-on and hypersonic-unique "windmill" operation. Herein, we will present the fan stage design, and the experimental test results of the fan stage operating from 15 to 100 percent corrected design speed. Whereas, in the companion paper, we will provide an assessment of NASA s APNASA code s ability to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speed and bypass ratio.

  20. Hyperamylasemia following cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Chang, H; Chung, Y T; Wu, G J; Hwang, F Y; Chen, K T; Peng, W L; Hung, C R

    1992-01-01

    In order to study the occurrence of postbypass hyperamylasemia, 75 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were studied from March 1989 to January 1990. There were 49 males and 26 females. Among them, 27 had congenital heart disease, 30 had valvular disease, and 18 had coronary artery disease. There were 27 patients with at least one elevated serum amylase sample after operation. Thus, the overall incidence of hyperamylasemia was 36%. As compared with the preoperative data (1.3%), there was a statistically significant difference in the occurrence of hyperamylasemia (p less than 0.05). Three patients had overt clinical pancreatitis postoperatively. There was no positive correlation between the serum amylase level and the occurrence of pancreatitis (p greater than 0.05). Forty-two cases had a significant elevation of the amylase creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) after CPB. However, there was no significant difference between the groups with pulsatile and nonpulsatile CPB (p greater than 0.05). Three patients (4%) died in our series. The causes of death were heart failure in two and fulminant pancreatitis associated with low cardiac output in one. Although our experience in dealing with pancreatitis improved survival, mortality was still high (33.3%) in our series. Nevertheless, there was no apparent correlation between mortality and postbypass hyperamylasemia (p greater than 0.05). Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the risk factors of the occurrence of hyperamylasemia, and the analysis revealed that patients with coronary artery disease were susceptible to postbypass hyperamylasemia. Our studies indicate that the use of total serum amylase or ACCR to monitor for the occurrence of pancreatitis in postbypass patients is inadequate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1377742

  1. On the leading edge; Combining maturity and advanced technology on the F404 turbofan engine

    SciTech Connect

    Powel, S.F. IV )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the overall design concept of the F404 afterburning turbofan engine is reviewed together with some of the lessons learned from over 2 million flight hours in service. GE Aircraft Engines' derivative and growth plans for the F404 family are then reviewed including the Building Block component development approach. Examples of advanced technologies under development for introduction into new F404 derivative engine models are presented in the areas of materials, digital and fiber optic controls systems, and vectoring exhaust nozzles. The design concept and details of the F404-GE-402, F412-GE-400, and other derivative engines under full-scale development are described. Studies for future growth variants and the benefits of the F404 derivative approach to development of afterburning engines in the 18,000-24,000 lb (80--107 kN) thrust class and non- afterburning engines in the 12,000--19,000 lb (53--85 kN) class are discussed.

  2. Heat exchanger bypass test report

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, M.L.

    1995-01-26

    This test report documents the results that were obtained while conducting the test procedure which bypassed the heat exchangers in the HC-21C sludge stabilization process. The test was performed on November 15, 1994 using WHC-SD-CP-TC-031, ``Heat Exchanger Bypass Test Procedure.`` The primary objective of the test procedure was to determine if the heat exchangers were contributing to condensation of moisture in the off-gas line. This condensation was observed in the rotameters. Also, a secondary objective was to determine if temperatures at the rotameters would be too high and damage them or make them inaccurate without the heat exchangers in place.

  3. Psychological Effects of Intestinal Bypass Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Richard S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative intestinal bypass patients were evaluated. Results suggest that postoperative bypass patients have improved psychological health and an increased sense of freedom and well-being but may need assistance in improving self-concepts. (Author)

  4. Secondary and College LD Bypass Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosby, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the Developmental By-Pass (DBP) Instructional technology for teaching secondary and college learning disabled (LD) students by allowing students to bypass ordering and organizational deficits. (SB)

  5. Technology Solutions Case Study: Preventing Thermal Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This project highlights the importance of continuous air barriers in full alignment with insulation to prevent thermal bypasses and achieve high energy performance, and recommends use of ENERGY STAR's Thermal Bypass Inspection Checklist.

  6. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 3: A computer code for 3-D mixing in axisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreskovsky, J. P.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1982-01-01

    A finite difference method is developed for making detailed predictions of three dimensional subsonic turbulent flow in turbofan lobe mixers. The governing equations are solved by a forward-marching solution procedure which corrects an inviscid potential flow solution for viscous and thermal effects, secondary flows, total pressure distortion and losses, internal flow blockage and pressure drop. Test calculations for a turbulent coaxial jet flow verify that the turbulence model performs satisfactorily for this relatively simple flow. Lobe mixer flows are presented for two geometries typical of current mixer design. These calculations included both hot and cold flow conditions, and both matched and mismatched Mach number and total pressure in the fan and turbine streams.

  7. Perforation in the bypassed stomach following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Papasavas, Pavlos K; Yeaney, Woodrow W; Caushaj, Philip F; Keenan, Robert J; Landreneau, Rodney J; Gagné, Daniel J

    2003-10-01

    Access to the bypassed stomach is difficult following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP). The bypassed stomach is not readily available for endoscopic or radiographic evaluation. Diagnosis and treatment of peptic ulcer disease and its complications in the excluded stomach becomes difficult. We present a case of perforation in the bypassed stomach following LRYGBP secondary to peptic ulcer disease.

  8. An Overview of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project and Ultra High Bypass Partnership Research Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) mission and goals is presented. One of the subprograms under the FAP, the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project (SFW), is the focus of the presentation. The SFW system environmental metrics are discussed, along with highlights of planned, systematic approach to research to reduce the environmental impact of commercial aircraft in the areas of acoustics, fuel burn and emissions. The presentation then focuses on collaborative research being conducted with U.S. Industry on the Ultra High Bypass (UHB) engine cycle, the propulsion cycle selected by the SFW to meet the system goals. The partnerships with General Electric Aviation to investigate Open Rotor propulsion concepts and with Pratt & Whitney to investigate the Geared Turbofan UHB engine are highlighted, including current and planned future collaborative research activities with NASA and each organization.

  9. 34 CFR 76.672 - Bypass procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bypass procedures. 76.672 Section 76.672 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE-ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Procedures for Bypass § 76.672 Bypass procedures. Sections...

  10. Full 3D Analysis of the GE90 Turbofan Primary Flowpath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark G.

    2000-01-01

    The multistage simulations of the GE90 turbofan primary flowpath components have been performed. The multistage CFD code, APNASA, has been used to analyze the fan, fan OGV and booster, the 10-stage high-pressure compressor and the entire turbine system of the GE90 turbofan engine. The code has two levels of parallel, and for the 18 blade row full turbine simulation has 87.3 percent parallel efficiency with 121 processors on an SGI ORIGIN. Grid generation is accomplished with the multistage Average Passage Grid Generator, APG. Results for each component are shown which compare favorably with test data.

  11. Study of small turbofan engines applicable to single-engine light airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The design, efficiency and cost factors are investigated for application of turbofan propulsion engines to single engine, general aviation light airplanes. A companion study of a hypothetical engine family of a thrust range suitable to such aircraft and having a high degree of commonality of design features and parts is presented. Future turbofan powered light airplanes can have a lower fuel consumption, lower weight, reduced airframe maintenance requirements and improved engine overhaul periods as compared to current piston engined powered airplanes. Achievement of compliance with noise and chemical emission regulations is expected without impairing performance, operating cost or safety.

  12. Preliminary QCGAT program test results. [Quiet, Clean General Aviation Turbofan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, R. W.; Sievers, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents the NASA Lewis program to demonstrate that large engine technology can be applied to general aviation engines to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel consumption. After a Phase I study, two contractors, Garrett AiResearch and AVCO-Lycoming, were selected to design, manufacture, assemble, test, and deliver their Quiet, Clean, General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) engines to NASA. Noise, emission, and performance goals and how well they were met are discussed. Noise goals involve take off noise 3.5 n. mi. from runway threshold, sideline noise at .25 n mi. and approach noise 1 n mi. from the runway at an altitude of 370 ft. The AiResearch engines power a stretched Learjet 35 and the Lycoming a specially conceived Beech executive jet, resulting in differing power goals. Thus the thrust goal for the Lycoming was 1622 lb. while the AiResearch goal was 3937 lb. Cruise thrust goals were 485 lb. at Mach 0.6 at 25,000 ft. and 903 lb. at Mach 0.8 at 40,000 ft. respectively. The design of both engines, based on existing cores, is studied, noting such special QCGAT features as new reduction gears, combustor and power turbine. Test results are given, indicating that while the goals for noise and thrust were met those for emissions were only partially met.

  13. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1994-01-01

    A three-channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and the high-pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provide blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. To minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three-channel controller by up to 16 dB over a +/- 30-deg angle about the engine axis. A single-channel controller could produce reduction over a +/- 15-deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Outside of the areas contolled, the levels of the tone actually increased due to the generation of radial modes by the control sources. Simultaneous control of two tones is achieved with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high-pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  14. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine in order to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and high pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provides blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. In order to minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three channel controller by up to 16 dB over a 60 deg angle about the engine axis. A single channel controller could produce reduction over a 30 deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Simultaneous control of two tones is done with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 dBA and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  15. Spectral Separation of the Turbofan Engine Coherent Combustion Noise Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2008-01-01

    The core noise components of a dual spool turbofan engine (Honeywell TECH977) were separated by the use of a coherence function. A source location technique based on adjusting the time delay between the combustor pressure sensor signal and the far-field microphone signal to maximize the coherence and remove as much variation of the phase angle with frequency as possible was used. While adjusting the time delay to maximize the coherence and minimize the cross spectrum phase angle variation with frequency, the discovery was made that for the 130 microphone a 90.027 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 0 to 200 Hz while a 86.975 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 200 to 400 Hz. Since the 0 to 200 Hz band signal took more time to travel the same distance, it is slower than the 200 to 400 Hz band signal. This suggests the 0 to 200 Hz coherent cross spectral density band is partly due to indirect combustion noise attributed to hot spots interacting with the turbine. The signal in the 200 to 400 Hz frequency band is attributed mostly to direct combustion noise.

  16. Program Predicts Broadband Noise from a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2004-01-01

    Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) is a computer program that, as its name indicates, predicts the broadband noise generated by the fan stage of a turbofan engine. This noise is the sum of (1) turbulent-inflow noise, which is caused by turbulence impinging on leading edges of the fan and the fan exit guide vane and (2) self noise, which is caused by turbulence convecting past the corresponding trailing edges. The user provides input data on the fan-blade, vane, and flow-path geometries and on the mean and turbulent components of the flow field. BFaNS then calculates the turbulent-inflow noise by use of D. B. Hanson's theory, which relates sound power to the inflow turbulence characteristics and the cascade geometry. Hanson s program, BBCASCADE, is incorporated into BFaNS, wherein it is applied to the rotor and stator in a stripwise manner. The spectra of upstream and downstream sound powers radiated by each strip are summed to obtain the total upstream and downstream sound-power spectra. The self-noise contributions are calculated by S. A. L. Glegg's theory, which is also applied in a stripwise manner. The current version of BFaNS is limited to fans with subsonic tip speeds.

  17. Kalman Filter Constraint Tuning for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2005-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. Recently published work has shown a new method for incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter, which has been shown to generally improve the filter s estimation accuracy. However, the incorporation of inequality constraints poses some risk to the estimation accuracy as the Kalman filter is theoretically optimal. This paper proposes a way to tune the filter constraints so that the state estimates follow the unconstrained (theoretically optimal) filter when the confidence in the unconstrained filter is high. When confidence in the unconstrained filter is not so high, then we use our heuristic knowledge to constrain the state estimates. The confidence measure is based on the agreement of measurement residuals with their theoretical values. The algorithm is demonstrated on a linearized simulation of a turbofan engine to estimate engine health.

  18. Bypassing shake, rattle and roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Michele; Movchan, Alexander; Jones, Ian; McPhedran, Ross

    2013-05-01

    The Tacoma Narrows Bridge is perhaps the most famous example of a bridge that collapsed unexpectedly in response to external forces. But new "wave bypass" technology - similar to that underpinning invisibility cloaks - could help avoid such disasters, as Michele Brun, Alexander Movchan, Ian Jones and Ross McPhedran explain.

  19. Compact bypass-flow filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W. G.; Ulanovsky, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Annular filter consisting of stacked rings separates particulates from bypass fluid passing through it in radial direction without slowing down main flow across unimpeded flow of fluid through its center. Applications include fluidized bed reactors, equipment for catalyst operations, and water purification.

  20. Simulating nitrate leaching under winter wheat grown on a structured clay soil considering bypass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, R.; Coopers, D. M.; Harris, G. L.; Catt, J. A.

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate leaching from drained plots of structured clay soil under winter wheat is simulated for one growing season using the SOILN model. Results are compared with field measurements from two replicate plots. Soil water movement is simulated both with and without a bypass flow component using the SOIL model. Flow to field drains and soil water content in the root zone are simulated better when bypass flow is included. The results emphasise the importance of considering bypass flow in modelling leaching from structured clay soils. Simulations of nitrate leaching using the SOILN model show that the model captures the main features of the cumulative loss of nitrate over the year.

  1. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors.

    PubMed

    Vafai, Scott B; Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as "complex I bypass." In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology. PMID:27622560

  2. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W.; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as “complex I bypass.” In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology. PMID:27622560

  3. Surgical cartographic navigation system for endoscopic bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Voruganti, Arun; Mayoral, Rafael; Jacobs, Stephan; Grunert, Ronny; Moeckel, Hendrik; Korb, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic bypass grafting with the da Vinci system is still challenging and needs high level of experience and skill of the surgeon. Therefore, it is necessary to support the surgeon with enhanced vision and augmented reality. The augmentation of the patient model into the view of the endoscope is a direct approach to enhance support. The results of a preclinical study are shown in this paper. The method applied is suitable for endoscopic bypass grafting and in general applicable to minimal invasive surgery. The system was designed as an open architecture to facilitate easy transfer of the methodology into other surgical domain applications. PMID:18002243

  4. Analytical and computational investigations of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) energy-bypass system for supersonic gas turbine engines to enable hypersonic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyo, Theresa Louise

    Historically, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used rocket-powered vehicles as launch vehicles for access to space. A familiar example is the Space Shuttle launch system. These vehicles carry both fuel and oxidizer onboard. If an external oxidizer (such as the Earth's atmosphere) is utilized, the need to carry an onboard oxidizer is eliminated, and future launch vehicles could carry a larger payload into orbit at a fraction of the total fuel expenditure. For this reason, NASA is currently researching the use of air-breathing engines to power the first stage of two-stage-to-orbit hypersonic launch systems. Removing the need to carry an onboard oxidizer leads also to reductions in total vehicle weight at liftoff. This in turn reduces the total mass of propellant required, and thus decreases the cost of carrying a specific payload into orbit or beyond. However, achieving hypersonic flight with air-breathing jet engines has several technical challenges. These challenges, such as the mode transition from supersonic to hypersonic engine operation, are under study in NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program. One propulsion concept that is being explored is a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy- bypass generator coupled with an off-the-shelf turbojet/turbofan. It is anticipated that this engine will be capable of operation from takeoff to Mach 7 in a single flowpath without mode transition. The MHD energy bypass consists of an MHD generator placed directly upstream of the engine, and converts a portion of the enthalpy of the inlet flow through the engine into electrical current. This reduction in flow enthalpy corresponds to a reduced Mach number at the turbojet inlet so that the engine stays within its design constraints. Furthermore, the generated electrical current may then be used to power aircraft systems or an MHD accelerator positioned downstream of the turbojet. The MHD accelerator operates in reverse of the MHD generator, re-accelerating the

  5. The altered expression profile of microRNAs in cardiopulmonary bypass canine models and the effects of mir-499 on myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs were enrolled in various cardiovascular disease especially ischemic heart diseases, but the microRNA changes during myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury underwent cardiopulmonary bypass are still unknown. This study screens the microRNA differences in CPB canines and evaluates the relationship of microRNAs with myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Methods 13 healthy canines received CPB with 60 minutes of aortic clamping and cardioplegic arrest, followed by 90 minutes reperfusion. Left ventricular myocardial samples, blood samples and hemodynamic data were taken at different time points. We performed microRNAs microarray experiments upon the left ventricle myocardium tissue of canines before CPB and after reperfusion for 90 minutes by pooling 3 tissue samples together and used qRT-PCR for confirmation. Results Statistically significant difference was found in mir-499 level before CPB and after reperfusion (T1 vs. T4, p = 0.041). We further examined the mir-499 levels by using qRT-PCR in all 13 canines at 4 different time points (T1 vs. T4, p = 0.029). Mir-499 expression was negatively correlated with cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and creatine kinase- MB (CK-MB) levels of canines in all time points samples (r = 0.469, p < 0.001 and r = 0.273, p = 0.050 respectively). Moreover, higher mir-499 expression level was associated with higher dP/dtmax at 25 minutes and 90 minutes after reperfusion. Conclusion Myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury with cardiopulmonary bypass results in declining level of mir-499 expression in left ventricle myocardium of canines, suggesting mir-499 would be a potential therapeutic target in cardiac protection during open heart surgery. PMID:23800236

  6. 78 FR 22180 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have...-Trent 977B-84, and RB211-Trent 980-84 turbofan engines that incorporate RR production Modification...

  7. 77 FR 56760 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code... Order 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR... plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule;...

  8. 77 FR 32007 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... FR 19477-78). Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3... plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule;...

  9. 78 FR 68360 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ...: Airworthiness Directive 2013-19-17, Amendment 39-17599 (78 FR 61171, October 3, 2013), currently requires...-01-AD; Amendment 39-17599; AD 2013-19-17] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc.... That AD applies to all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535E4-B-37 series turbofan engines. The AD number...

  10. 75 FR 12663 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. TFE731 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... intermediate case is removed from the low-pressure compressor case. Installation Prohibition (h) After the... Inc. TFE731 series turbofan engines with certain second stage low-pressure compressor rotor (LPCR... NPRM was published in the Federal Register on April 13, 2009 (74 FR 16807) and proposed to remove...

  11. 75 FR 55459 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    .... We published the proposed AD in the Federal Register on March 25, 2010 (75 FR 14375). That action... Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final...

  12. 75 FR 14375 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ..., 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Would not have a significant...) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice...

  13. FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

  14. 77 FR 12755 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Division Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska...) Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed.... 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): Pratt & Whitney Division: Docket...

  15. 78 FR 48339 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... ; Internet: www.rolls- royce.com . You may view this service information at the FAA, Engine & Propeller... material at the FAA, call 781-238-7125. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the...-16429 (75 FR 57660, September 22, 2010), for RRC AE 3007A series turbofan engines with an HPT stage...

  16. 78 FR 17080 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-710 series turbofan engines. This AD requires replacement of the affected fuel... the splined coupling on the fuel pump. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the engine and... coupling. This condition, if not corrected, could lead to failure of engine fuel supply, likely...

  17. 78 FR 35752 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ...-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-725A1-12 turbofan engines with fuel pump tube part number... loss of fuel supply to the engine, which could result in in-flight engine shutdown of one or more... fuel leaks. This condition, if not corrected, could lead to loss of engine fuel supply,...

  18. Analytical and computational investigations of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) energy-bypass system for supersonic gas turbine engines to enable hypersonic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyo, Theresa Louise

    Historically, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used rocket-powered vehicles as launch vehicles for access to space. A familiar example is the Space Shuttle launch system. These vehicles carry both fuel and oxidizer onboard. If an external oxidizer (such as the Earth's atmosphere) is utilized, the need to carry an onboard oxidizer is eliminated, and future launch vehicles could carry a larger payload into orbit at a fraction of the total fuel expenditure. For this reason, NASA is currently researching the use of air-breathing engines to power the first stage of two-stage-to-orbit hypersonic launch systems. Removing the need to carry an onboard oxidizer leads also to reductions in total vehicle weight at liftoff. This in turn reduces the total mass of propellant required, and thus decreases the cost of carrying a specific payload into orbit or beyond. However, achieving hypersonic flight with air-breathing jet engines has several technical challenges. These challenges, such as the mode transition from supersonic to hypersonic engine operation, are under study in NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program. One propulsion concept that is being explored is a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy- bypass generator coupled with an off-the-shelf turbojet/turbofan. It is anticipated that this engine will be capable of operation from takeoff to Mach 7 in a single flowpath without mode transition. The MHD energy bypass consists of an MHD generator placed directly upstream of the engine, and converts a portion of the enthalpy of the inlet flow through the engine into electrical current. This reduction in flow enthalpy corresponds to a reduced Mach number at the turbojet inlet so that the engine stays within its design constraints. Furthermore, the generated electrical current may then be used to power aircraft systems or an MHD accelerator positioned downstream of the turbojet. The MHD accelerator operates in reverse of the MHD generator, re-accelerating the

  19. Sediment Bypassing of River Mouths: Mechanisms and Effects on Delta Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, J.; Ashton, A. D.; Giosan, L.; Nardin, W.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-influenced deltas are shaped by wave-driven transport of river-borne sediments. Near the river mouth, combined jet and wave dynamics, along with morphodynamic feedbacks, control the fraction of sediment transported alongshore by littoral currents that can bypass the river channel. Here we study how different bypassing rates influence large-scale delta evolution and examine the effect of waves and the river mouth jet on alongshore sediment bypassing. First, we use a modified version of the Coastline Evolution Model (CEM) to look at the effects of wave climate, fluvial sediment supply, and alongshore sediment bypassing rates on channel orientation. This modified version of CEM progrades the channel in a direction perpendicular to the local shoreline orientation at the river mouth, allowing feedbacks between alongshore sediment transport and fluvial sediment delivery to steer the river channel. Additionally, we allow a prescribed fraction of littoral sediment to bypass the river mouth. We find that deltas that have a large fluvial sediment flux can orient themselves into the direction of dominant wave approach. Lower fluvial inputs result in channels that are deflected downdrift, with increasing deflection as bypassing is reduced. In contrast, channels do not deflect downdrift (but can reorient themselves updrift for large fluvial fluxes) when full bypassing is allowed. These results demonstrate the importance of river mouth sediment bypassing on delta growth patterns, but, as we explore arbitrary bypassing laws, the simulations cannot help us constrain natural bypassing fluxes. To further investigate the natural extent and mechanisms of bypassing, we use the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. With a simplified shoreface and river channel, the model is able to construct river mouth morphology from the combined action of alongshore transport and a river mouth jet. Exploring river mouth morphology and sediment bypassing under various wave

  20. The jejunoileal bypass and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Woods, J R; Brinkman, C R

    1978-11-01

    The combined experience regarding pregnancy in the jejunoileal bypass patient is too limited to draw any firm conclusions. Nevertheless, the observations made in this report suggest that: (1) Safe elapse of time from shunt procedure to pregnancy has not been established and the risk of pregnancy during the period of rapid postoperative weight loss remains speculative. Limited experience suggests that there is only a relative risk during this period of metabolic derangement. (2) Pregnancy does not appear to influence the expected clinical or metabolic changes commonly observed postoperatively in the bypass patient. Dietary supplementation should be based on the weight trend, serial laboratory chemistries, and the presence or absence of ketones in the urine. (3) Neonatal outcome appears to be good in pregnancies of patients with intestinal shunt operations. It has been suggested that small for dates babies are frequent in this group of patients. This point lacks conclusive documentation. (4) Birth control pills for contraception are not advised in intestinal bypass patients because of the uncertain intestinal absorption of the medication and the subsequent risk of an unwanted pregnancy.

  1. Experimental laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypass for occlusive aortoiliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Yves-Marie; Gaillard, Félix; Demalsy, Jean-Claude; Gracia, Carlos R.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To describe a totally laparoscopic technique for aortobifemoral bypass to treat aortoiliac atheromatous occlusive disease. Design A feasibility study. Setting A university teaching hospital. Subjects Six piglets weighing between 70 and 80 kg were submitted to a totally laparoscopic retroperitoneal aortobifemoral bypass, performed through six trocar sites, with abdominal suspension and a gasless technique. No minilaparotomy was performed. After systemic heparinization, the infrarenal aorta was cross-clamped and the aortic bifurcation stapled. An end-to-end aorto–prosthetic anastomosis was performed. Retroperitoneal tunnels were created to allow each limb of the graft to join its corresponding femoral artery by a conventional anastomosis. Intervention Totally laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypass. Main Outcome Measures Duration of the procedure, intraoperative blood loss and operative complications, bleeding in the immediate postoperative period. Evaluation of the aortic anastomosis at autopsy. Results All aortobifemoral bypasses were completed in less than 4 hours. Intraoperative blood loss did not exceed 250 mL. No intraoperative complication was encountered except occasional bleeding at the aortic anastomosis upon releasing the arterial clamp. This was controlled with a collagen sponge (three cases) or extra stitches (two cases). The animals were observed for 15 minutes before sacrifice. Autopsy revealed a normal aortic anastomosis in all cases and a normal progression of the limbs of the graft under the ureters in the retroperitoneal tunnels. Conclusions This animal model demonstrates the feasibility of the aortobifemoral bypass through a laparoscopic approach. The retroperitoneal anatomy of the piglet is similar to that of man. Aortic surgery can be conducted as for the standard technique. We used a similar approach to perform the first human, totally laparoscopic aortobifemoral bypass with an end-to-end anastomosis. PMID:8956809

  2. 75 FR 51659 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW617F-E Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... uncommanded power reduction on one of its engines. Investigation showed that the Fuel Filter Bypass Valve... that introduced a new fuel Filter Bypass Valve Assembly with an improved design poppet to help... uncommanded power reduction on one of its engines. Investigation showed that the Fuel Filter Bypass...

  3. Comparison of parametric duct-burning turbofan and non-afterburning turbojet engines in a Mach 2.7 transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, J. B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A parametric study was made of duct-burning turbofan and suppressed dry turbojet engines installed in a supersonic transport. A range of fan pressure ratios was considered for the separate-flow-fan engines. The turbofan engines were studied both with and without jet noise suppressors. Single- as well as dual-stream suppression was considered. Attention was concentrated on designs yielding sideline noises of FAR 36 (108 EPNdB) and below. Trades were made between thrust and wing area for a constant takeoff field length. The turbofans produced lower airplane gross weights than the turbojets at FAR 36 and below. The advantage for the turbofans increased as the sideline noise limit was reduced. Jet noise suppression, especially for the duct stream, was very beneficial for the turbofan engines as long as duct burning was permitted during takeoff. The maximum dry unsuppressed takeoff mode, however, yielded better results at extremely low noise levels. Noise levels as low as FAR 36-11 EPNdB were obtained with a turbofan in this takeoff mode, but at a considerable gross weight penalty relative to the best FAR 36 results.

  4. System Would Detect Foreign-Object Damage in Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed data-fusion system, to be implemented mostly in software, would further process the digitized and preprocessed outputs of sensors in a turbofan engine to detect foreign-object damage (FOD) [more precisely, damage caused by impingement of such foreign objects as birds, pieces of ice, and runway debris]. The proposed system could help a flight crew to decide what, if any, response is necessary to complete a flight safely, and could aid mechanics in deciding what post-flight maintenance action might be needed. The sensory information to be utilized by the proposed system would consist of (1) the output of an accelerometer in an engine-vibration-monitoring subsystem and (2) features extracted from a gas path analysis. ["Gas path analysis" (GPA) is a term of art that denotes comprehensive analysis of engine performance derived from readings of fuel-flow meters, shaft-speed sensors, temperature sensors, and the like.] The acceleration signal would first be processed by a wavelet-transform-based algorithm, using a wavelet created for the specific purpose of finding abrupt FOD-induced changes in noisy accelerometer signals. Two additional features extracted would be the amplitude of vibration (determined via a single- frequency Fourier transform calculated at the rotational speed of the engine), and the rate of change in amplitude due to an FOD-induced rotor imbalance. This system would utilize two GPA features: the fan efficiency and the rate of change of fan efficiency with time. The selected GPA and vibrational features would be assessed by two fuzzy-logic inference engines, denoted the "Gas Path Expert" and the "Vibration Expert," respectively (see Figure 1). Each of these inference engines would generate a "possibility" distribution for occurrence of an FOD event: Each inference engine would assign, to its input information, degrees of membership, which would subsequently be transformed into basic probability assignments for the gas path and vibration

  5. History of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2015-06-01

    The development of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), thereby permitting open-heart surgery, is one of the most important advances in medicine in the 20th century. Many currently practicing cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiac surgeons, and perfusionists are unaware of how recently it came into use (60 years) and how much the practice of CPB has changed during its short existence. In this paper, the development of CPB and the many changes and progress that has taken place over this brief period of time, making it a remarkably safe endeavor, are reviewed. The many as yet unresolved questions are also identified, which sets the stage for the other papers in this issue of this journal.

  6. Design concepts for low-cost composite turbofan engine frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, S. C.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    Design concepts for low cost, lightweight composite engine frames were applied to the design requirements for the frame of a commercial, high bypass engine. Four alternative composite frame design concepts identified which consisted of generic type components and subcomponents that could be adapted to use in different locations in the engine and the different engine sizes. A variety of materials and manufacturing methods were projected with a goal for the lowest number of parts at the lowest possible cost. After a preliminary evaluation of all four frame concepts, two designs were selected for an extended design and evaluation which narrowed the final selection down to one frame that was significantly lower in cost and slighty lighter than the other frame. An implementation plan for this lowest cost frame is projected for future development and includes prospects for reducing its weight with proposed unproven, innovative fabrication techniques.

  7. Event-Based Sedimentation in a Flood Bypass: Examples From the Sacramento Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, M. B.; Aalto, R.; Dunne, T.; Nittrouer, J.; Nittrouer, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Flood bypasses are miniature, anthropogenic analogs of flood basins, which abutted many lowland rivers before the advent of major flood control engineering. Whereas natural lowland floodplains are frequently inundated by diffuse overbank flow or localized crevasse splays, an engineered bypass is only activated when passive weirs near the main channel are overtopped during large floods. Consequently, a bypass represents a focused pathway for the transport of water and sediment that may reflect a legacy of event-based sediment accumulation, compared with the more chronic, diffuse sedimentation across natural flood basins. Our investigations suggest that bypasses are net receivers of suspended sediment from the main channel, with recent sediment accumulation patterns that reflect the dimensions, flow history, and frequency of over-weir sediment delivery. Our preliminary field observations and laboratory measurements indicate that sedimentation in Colusa and Yolo Bypasses may be dominated by a few large sedimentation events (of order ˜1 m of deposition per event). However, little is known about how sediment accumulation occurs in bypasses during floods. This study commences a detailed investigation of the links between hydrology and sedimentation in the flood bypasses of the Sacramento Valley. Our strategy is to 1) model the over-weir conveyance and intra-bypass accumulation of fine sediment during floods, and 2) sample, describe, and date these sediment deposits to verify the numerical model. We modeled the influence of the 1964-1965 hydrologic event on sedimentation in the Colusa-Sutter-Yolo Bypass system by combining hydrologic records with empirical models of suspended-sediment concentration and suspendibility calculations. We used records of flood discharge for the event period into and through Colusa, Sutter, and Yolo Bypasses to compute sediment concentration entering the system based on discharge-concentration relationships and simplified hydraulics within the

  8. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions. (1) Bypass means the intentional diversion of wastestreams from any portion of an Industrial User... applicable Pretreatment Standards or Requirements. An Industrial User may allow any bypass to occur which... paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section. (c) Notice. (1) If an Industrial User knows in advance of the...

  9. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass....

  10. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Definitions. (1) Bypass means the intentional diversion of wastestreams from any portion of an Industrial User... applicable Pretreatment Standards or Requirements. An Industrial User may allow any bypass to occur which... paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section. (c) Notice. (1) If an Industrial User knows in advance of the...

  11. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Definitions. (1) Bypass means the intentional diversion of wastestreams from any portion of an Industrial User... applicable Pretreatment Standards or Requirements. An Industrial User may allow any bypass to occur which... paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section. (c) Notice. (1) If an Industrial User knows in advance of the...

  12. Bypassing An Open-Circuit Power Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannemacher, Harry E.

    1994-01-01

    Collection of bypass circuits enables battery consisting series string of cells to continue to function when one of its cells fails in open-circuit (high-resistance) condition. Basic idea simply to shunt current around defective cell to prevent open circuit from turning off battery altogether. Bypass circuits dissipate little power and are nearly immune to false activation.

  13. By-Pass Diode Temperature Tests of a Solar Array Coupon under Space Thermal Environment Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Wu, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    By-Pass diodes are a key design feature of solar arrays and system design must be robust against local heating, especially with implementation of larger solar cells. By-Pass diode testing was performed to aid thermal model development for use in future array designs that utilize larger cell sizes that result in higher string currents. Testing was performed on a 56-cell Advanced Triple Junction solar array coupon provided by SSL. Test conditions were vacuum with cold array backside using discrete by-pass diode current steps of 0.25 A ranging from 0 A to 2.0 A.

  14. Evaluation of a Stirling engine heater bypass with the NASA Lewis nodal-analysis performance code

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    In support of the US Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems program, the NASA Lewis Research Center investigated whether bypassing the P-40 Stirling engine heater during regenerative cooling would improve the engine thermal efficiency. The investigation was accomplished by using the Lewis nodal-analysis Stirling engine computer model. Bypassing the P-40 Stirling engine heater at full power resulted in a rise in the indicated thermal efficiency from 40.6 to 41.0 percent. For the idealized (some losses not included) heater bypass that was analyzed, this benefit is not considered significant.

  15. Particle Trajectory and Icing Analysis of the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Particle trajectory and ice shape calculations were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The particle trajectory and icing computations were performed using the new "block-to-block" collection efficiency method which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for three drop sizes and two drop distributions typically used in aircraft design and certification. Particle trajectory computations were made for water drop sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns. Particle trajectory and ice shape predictions were made for a 20 micron Langmuir-D distribution and for a 92 mm Super-cooled Large Droplet (SLD) distribution with and without splashing effects for a Liquid Water Content (LWC) of 0.3 g/cu m and an icing time of 30 min. The E3 fan and spinner combination proved to be an effective ice removal mechanism as they removed greater than 36 percent of the mass entering the inlet for the icing cases. The maximum free stream catch fraction for the fan and spinner combination was 0.60 while that on the elements downstream of the fan was 0.03. The non-splashing trajectory and collection efficiency results showed that as drop size increased impingement rates increased on the spinner and fan leaving less mass to impinge on downstream components. The SLD splashing case yielded more mass downstream of the fan than the SLD non-splashing case due to mass being splashed from the upstream inlet lip, spinner and fan components. The ice shapes generated downstream of the fan were either small or nonexistent due to the small available mass

  16. Experimental program for the evaluation of turbofan/turboshaft c conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, J. G.; Wenzel, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    A TF34 turbofan engine is being modified to produce shaft power from an output coupling on the fan disk when variable inlet guide vanes are closed to reduce fan airflow. The engine, called a convertible engine, could be used on advanced rotorcraft such as X-wing, ABC (Advanced Blade Concept), and Folding Tilt Rotor, and on V/STOL craft in which two engines are cross-coupled. The engine will be tested on an outdoor static test stand at NASA Lewis Research Center. Steady-state tests will be made to measure performance in turbofan, turboshaft, and combined power output modes. Transient tests will be made to determine the response to the engine and a new digital engine control system for several types of rapid changes in thrust and shaft loads. The paper describes the engine modifications, the test facility equipment, proposed testing techniques for several types of tests, and typical test results predicted from engine performance computer programs.

  17. Evaluation of an Outer Loop Retrofit Architecture for Intelligent Turbofan Engine Thrust Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane

    2006-01-01

    The thrust control capability of a retrofit architecture for intelligent turbofan engine control and diagnostics is evaluated. The focus of the study is on the portion of the hierarchical architecture that performs thrust estimation and outer loop thrust control. The inner loop controls fan speed so the outer loop automatically adjusts the engine's fan speed command to maintain thrust at the desired level, based on pilot input, even as the engine deteriorates with use. The thrust estimation accuracy is assessed under nominal and deteriorated conditions at multiple operating points, and the closed loop thrust control performance is studied, all in a complex real-time nonlinear turbofan engine simulation test bed. The estimation capability, thrust response, and robustness to uncertainty in the form of engine degradation are evaluated.

  18. CFD modeling and experimental verification of a single-stage coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler without either double-inlet or multi-bypass operating at 30-35 K using mixed stainless steel mesh regenerator matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Haizheng; Zhao, Yibo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the CFD modeling and experimental verifications of a single-stage inertance tube coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 30-35 K using mixed stainless steel mesh regenerator matrices without either double-inlet or multi-bypass. A two-dimensional axis-symmetric CFD model with the thermal non-equilibrium mode is developed to simulate the internal process, and the underlying mechanism of significantly reducing the regenerator losses with mixed matrices is discussed in detail based on the given six cases. The modeling also indicates that the combination of the given different mesh segments can be optimized to achieve the highest cooling efficiency or the largest exergy ratio, and then the verification experiments are conducted in which the satisfactory agreements between simulated and tested results are observed. The experiments achieve a no-load temperature of 27.2 K and the cooling power of 0.78 W at 35 K, or 0.29 W at 30 K, with an input electric power of 220 W and a reject temperature of 300 K.

  19. Dynamic Performance of High Bypass Ratio Turbine Engines With Water Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1996-01-01

    The research on dynamic performance of high bypass turbofan engines includes studies on inlets, turbomachinery and the total engine system operating with air-water mixture; the water may be in vapor, droplet, or film form, and their combinations. Prediction codes (WISGS, WINCOF, WINCOF-1, WINCLR, and Transient Engine Performance Code) for performance changes, as well as changes in blade-casing clearance, have been established and demonstrated in application to actual, generic engines. In view of the continuous changes in water distribution in turbomachinery, the performance of both components and the total engine system must be determined in a time-dependent mode; hence, the determination of clearance changes also requires a time-dependent approach. In general, the performance and clearances changes cannot be scaled either with respect to operating or ingestion conditions. Removal of water prior to phase change is the most effective means of avoiding ingestion effects. Sufficient background has been established to perform definitive, full scale tests on a set of components and a complete engine to establish engine control and operability with various air-water vapor-water mixtures.

  20. Modeling of gas turbine - solid oxide fuel cell systems for combined propulsion and power on aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Daniel Francis

    This dissertation investigates the use of gas turbine (GT) engine integrated solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to reduce fuel burn in aircraft with large electrical loads like sensor-laden unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). The concept offers a number of advantages: the GT absorbs many SOFC balance of plant functions (supplying fuel, air, and heat to the fuel cell) thereby reducing the number of components in the system; the GT supplies fuel and pressurized air that significantly increases SOFC performance; heat and unreacted fuel from the SOFC are recaptured by the GT cycle offsetting system-level losses; good transient response of the GT cycle compensates for poor transient response of the SOFC. The net result is a system that can supply more electrical power more efficiently than comparable engine-generator systems with only modest (<10%) decrease in power density. Thermodynamic models of SOFCs, catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) reactors, and three GT engine types (turbojet, combined exhaust turbofan, separate exhaust turbofan) are developed that account for equilibrium gas phase and electrochemical reaction, pressure losses, and heat losses in ways that capture `down-the-channel' effects (a level of fidelity necessary for making meaningful performance, mass, and volume estimates). Models are created in a NASA-developed environment called Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). A sensitivity analysis identifies important design parameters and translates uncertainties in model parameters into uncertainties in overall performance. GT-SOFC integrations reduce fuel burn 3-4% in 50 kW systems on 35 kN rated engines (all types) with overall uncertainty <1%. Reductions of 15-20% are possible at the 200 kW power level. GT-SOFCs are also able to provide more electric power (factors >3 in some cases) than generator-based systems before encountering turbine inlet temperature limits. Aerodynamic drag effects of engine-airframe integration are by far the most important

  1. Core noise investigation of the CF6-50 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic data obtained during the running of the CF6-50 turbofan engine on an outdoor test stand are presented. The test was conducted to acquire simultaneous internal and far-field measurements to determine the influence of internally generated noise on the far-field measurements. The data includes internal and far-field narrowband and one-third octave band pressure spectra.

  2. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 2: Computational fluid dynamic predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, M. J.; Vasta, V. N.

    1982-01-01

    A general program was conducted to develop and assess a computational method for predicting the flow properties in a turbofan forced mixed duct. The detail assessment of the resulting computer code is presented. It was found that the code provided excellent predictions of the kinematics of the mixing process throughout the entire length of the mixer nozzle. The thermal mixing process between the hot core and cold fan flows was found to be well represented in the low speed portion of the flowfield.

  3. Advanced laser shearography inspection of turbo-fan engine composite fan cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lape, Dale; Newman, John W.; Craig, David

    1995-07-01

    Shearography inspection techniques have been developed and implemented for the inspection of aluminum honeycomb turbofan aircraft engine fan cases for the JT15D-5D. Shearography has yielded improved sensitivity to unbonds and throughput over ultrasonic techniques formerly used in the production inspection. This paper discusses vacuum stress shearography, test method verification on the JT15D-5D fan case and shearography data correlation with destructive evaluation of test parts.

  4. Method and apparatus for rapid thrust increases in a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. E.; Corley, R. C.; Fraley, T. O.; Saunders, A. A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Upon a landing approach, the normal compressor stator schedule of a fan speed controlled turbofan engine is temporarily varied to substantially close the stators to thereby increase the fuel flow and compressor speed in order to maintain fan speed and thrust. This running of the compressor at an off-design speed substantially reduces the time required to subsequently advance the engine speed to the takeoff thrust level by advancing the throttle and opening the compressor stators.

  5. The E3 combustors: Status and challenges. [energy efficient turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, D. E.; Rohde, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial testing of energy efficient engine combustors, developed for the next generation of turbofan engines for commercial aircraft, are described. The combustor designs utilize an annular configuration with two zone combustion for low emissions, advanced liners for improved durability, and short, curved-wall, dump prediffusers for compactness. Advanced cooling techniques and segmented construction characterize the advanced liners. Linear segments are made from castable, turbine-type materials.

  6. 77 FR 20508 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ..., we issued AD 2011-08-07, Amendment 39-16657 (76 FR 24798, May 3, 2011), for all RR RB211-Trent 875-17..., and RB211-Trent 895-17 turbofan engines. On September 9, 2011, we also issued a correction (76 FR... Issued Since we issued AD 2011-08-07 (76 FR 24798, May 3, 2011), RR determined that additional S/Ns of...

  7. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  8. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  9. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is... through the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  11. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker... Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350... bypass oxygenator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator is a device used to exchange... the FDA guidance document entitled “Guidance for Cardiopulmonary Bypass Oxygenators 510(k) Submissions.”...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer. 870.4230 Section... bypass defoamer. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer is a device used in conjunction with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  15. 34 CFR 76.677 - Continuation of a bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation of a bypass. 76.677 Section 76.677... Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Procedures for Bypass § 76.677 Continuation of a bypass. The Secretary continues a bypass until the Secretary determines that the grantee or subgrantee will meet...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  2. Parallel 3D Multi-Stage Simulation of a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark G.; Topp, David A.

    1998-01-01

    A 3D multistage simulation of each component of a modern GE Turbofan engine has been made. An axisymmetric view of this engine is presented in the document. This includes a fan, booster rig, high pressure compressor rig, high pressure turbine rig and a low pressure turbine rig. In the near future, all components will be run in a single calculation for a solution of 49 blade rows. The simulation exploits the use of parallel computations by using two levels of parallelism. Each blade row is run in parallel and each blade row grid is decomposed into several domains and run in parallel. 20 processors are used for the 4 blade row analysis. The average passage approach developed by John Adamczyk at NASA Lewis Research Center has been further developed and parallelized. This is APNASA Version A. It is a Navier-Stokes solver using a 4-stage explicit Runge-Kutta time marching scheme with variable time steps and residual smoothing for convergence acceleration. It has an implicit K-E turbulence model which uses an ADI solver to factor the matrix. Between 50 and 100 explicit time steps are solved before a blade row body force is calculated and exchanged with the other blade rows. This outer iteration has been coined a "flip." Efforts have been made to make the solver linearly scaleable with the number of blade rows. Enough flips are run (between 50 and 200) so the solution in the entire machine is not changing. The K-E equations are generally solved every other explicit time step. One of the key requirements in the development of the parallel code was to make the parallel solution exactly (bit for bit) match the serial solution. This has helped isolate many small parallel bugs and guarantee the parallelization was done correctly. The domain decomposition is done only in the axial direction since the number of points axially is much larger than the other two directions. This code uses MPI for message passing. The parallel speed up of the solver portion (no 1/0 or body force

  3. The Benefits of Photorespiratory Bypasses: How Can They Work?1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Chang-Peng; Tholen, Danny; Devloo, Vincent; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Bypassing the photorespiratory pathway is regarded as a way to increase carbon assimilation and, correspondingly, biomass production in C3 crops. Here, the benefits of three published photorespiratory bypass strategies are systemically explored using a systems-modeling approach. Our analysis shows that full decarboxylation of glycolate during photorespiration would decrease photosynthesis, because a large amount of the released CO2 escapes back to the atmosphere. Furthermore, we show that photosynthesis can be enhanced by lowering the energy demands of photorespiration and by relocating photorespiratory CO2 release into the chloroplasts. The conductance of the chloroplast membranes to CO2 is a key feature determining the benefit of the relocation of photorespiratory CO2 release. Although our results indicate that the benefit of photorespiratory bypasses can be improved by increasing sedoheptulose bisphosphatase activity and/or increasing the flux through the bypass, the effectiveness of such approaches depends on the complex regulation between photorespiration and other metabolic pathways. PMID:25516604

  4. Rotordynamic analysis of asymmetric turbofan rotor due to fan blade-loss event with contact-impact rub loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sunil K.

    2013-04-01

    Loss of a blade from a running turbofan rotor introduces not only huge imbalance into the dynamical system rather it makes the entire rotor asymmetric as well. In a nonsymmetric rotor, the various terms of mass, gyroscopic and stiffness matrices also become time-dependent. In this paper, all the dynamical equations include the effect of the rotary inertia and gyroscopic moments as a result of both shaft bending as well as staggered blades flexing in-and-out of the plane of the disk. The governing equations also account for internal material damping in the shaft and the external damping in the support bearing system. In addition to the unbalance load at the disk location, the shaft may also be subjected to a torque and axial forces. Here, the fan blades are modeled as pre-twisted thin shallow shells. They have coupled flexural-torsional motion in the lateral out-of-plane direction as well as extensional degrees-of-freedom in the longitudinal spanwise direction of the blade airfoil. The effect of blade tip rub forces being transmitted to the shaft are analyzed in terms of the dynamic stability of the rotor, especially during windmilling.

  5. Identification and measurement of combustion noise from a turbofan engine using correlation and coherence techniques. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure measurements within the combustor and tailpipe of a turbofan engine are made simultaneously with far field acoustic measurements. The pressure measurements within the engine are accomplished with cooled semi-infinite waveguide probes utilizing conventional condenser microphones as the transducers. The measurements are taken over a broad range of engine operating conditions and for 16 far field microphone positions between 10 deg and 160 deg relative to the engine inlet axis. Correlation and coherence techniques are used to determine the relative phase and amplitude relationships between the internal pressures and far field acoustic pressures. The results indicate that the combustor is a low frequency source region for acoustic propagation through the tailpipe and out to the far field. Specifically, it is found that the relation between source pressure and the resulting sound pressure involves a 180 deg phase shift. The latter result is obtained by Fourier transforming the cross correlation function between the source pressure and acoustic pressure after removing the propagation delay time. Further, it is found that the transfer function between the source pressure and acoustic pressure has a magnitude approximately proportional to frequency squared. These results are shown to be consistent with a model using a modified source term in Lighthill's turbulence stress tensor, wherein the fluctuating Reynolds stresses are replaced with the pressure fluctuations due to fluctuating entropy.

  6. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise. [NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise was refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy. This theory was then verified by carrying out extensive data/theory comparisons. The resulting model computer program was then employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line on rotor/turbulence noise for outdoor test stand. NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  7. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  8. Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

    2012-09-04

    A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

  9. Flow Simulation of Supersonic Inlet with Bypass Annular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, HyoungJin; Kumano, Takayasu; Liou, Meng-Sing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Conners, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    A relaxed isentropic compression supersonic inlet is a new concept that produces smaller cowl drag than a conventional inlet, but incurs lower total pressure recovery and increased flow distortion in the (radially) outer flowpath. A supersonic inlet comprising a bypass annulus to the relaxed isentropic compression inlet dumps out airflow of low quality through the bypass duct. A reliable computational fluid dynamics solution can provide considerable useful information to ascertain quantitatively relative merits of the concept, and further provide a basis for optimizing the design. For a fast and reliable performance evaluation of the inlet performance, an equivalent axisymmetric model whose area changes accounts for geometric and physical (blockage) effects resulting from the original complex three-dimensional configuration is proposed. In addition, full three-dimensional calculations are conducted for studying flow phenomena and verifying the validity of the equivalent model. The inlet-engine coupling is carried out by embedding numerical propulsion system simulation engine data into the flow solver for interactive boundary conditions at the engine fan face and exhaust plane. It was found that the blockage resulting from complex three-dimensional geometries in the bypass duct causes significant degradation of inlet performance by pushing the terminal normal shock upstream.

  10. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  11. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter J.

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  12. Monsanto may bypass NIH in microbe test.

    PubMed

    Sun, Marjorie

    1985-01-11

    The Monsanto Company is planning to ask the Environmental Protection Agency for clearance to field test a genetically engineered microbial pesticide, bypassing the traditional approval process of the National Institutes of Health. Although only federally funded institutions are required to obtain NIH approval for genetic engineering tests, Monsanto is the first company to bypass the NIH regulatory process, which has become mired in a lawsuit brought by Jeremy Rifkin. PMID:11643692

  13. Monsanto may bypass NIH in microbe test.

    PubMed

    Sun, Marjorie

    1985-01-11

    The Monsanto Company is planning to ask the Environmental Protection Agency for clearance to field test a genetically engineered microbial pesticide, bypassing the traditional approval process of the National Institutes of Health. Although only federally funded institutions are required to obtain NIH approval for genetic engineering tests, Monsanto is the first company to bypass the NIH regulatory process, which has become mired in a lawsuit brought by Jeremy Rifkin.

  14. Ultra-High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, John K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The jet noise from a 1/15 scale model of a Pratt and Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was measured in the United Technology Research Center anechoic research tunnel (ART) under a range of operating conditions. Conditions were chosen to match engine operating conditions. Data were obtained at static conditions and at wind tunnel Mach numbers of 0.2, 0.27, and 0.35 to simulate inflight effects on jet noise. Due to a temperature dependence of the secondary nozzle area, the model nozzle secondary to primary area ratio varied from 7.12 at 100 percent thrust to 7.39 at 30 percent thrust. The bypass ratio varied from 10.2 to 11.8 respectively. Comparison of the data with predictions using the current Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Jet Noise Prediction Method showed that the current prediction method overpredicted the ADP jet noise by 6 decibels. The data suggest that a simple method of subtracting 6 decibels from the SAE Coaxial Jet Noise Prediction for the merged and secondary flow source components would result in good agreement between predicted and measured levels. The simulated jet noise flight effects with wind tunnel Mach numbers up to 0.35 produced jet noise inflight noise reductions up to 12 decibels. The reductions in jet noise levels were across the entire jet noise spectra, suggesting that the inflight effects affected all source noise components.

  15. Ultra-high bypass ratio jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, John K. C.

    1994-10-01

    The jet noise from a 1/15 scale model of a Pratt and Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was measured in the United Technology Research Center anechoic research tunnel (ART) under a range of operating conditions. Conditions were chosen to match engine operating conditions. Data were obtained at static conditions and at wind tunnel Mach numbers of 0.2, 0.27, and 0.35 to simulate inflight effects on jet noise. Due to a temperature dependence of the secondary nozzle area, the model nozzle secondary to primary area ratio varied from 7.12 at 100 percent thrust to 7.39 at 30 percent thrust. The bypass ratio varied from 10.2 to 11.8 respectively. Comparison of the data with predictions using the current Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Jet Noise Prediction Method showed that the current prediction method overpredicted the ADP jet noise by 6 decibels. The data suggest that a simple method of subtracting 6 decibels from the SAE Coaxial Jet Noise Prediction for the merged and secondary flow source components would result in good agreement between predicted and measured levels. The simulated jet noise flight effects with wind tunnel Mach numbers up to 0.35 produced jet noise inflight noise reductions up to 12 decibels. The reductions in jet noise levels were across the entire jet noise spectra, suggesting that the inflight effects affected all source noise components.

  16. Sufentanil disposition during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Flezzani, P; Alvis, M J; Jacobs, J R; Schilling, M M; Bai, S; Reves, J G

    1987-11-01

    In order to investigate the ability of a computer-assisted continuous infusion (CACI) system to maintain constant plasma levels of sufentanil during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) using pharmacokinetic data derived from healthy surgical patients to determine the infusion rate, ten patients were anaesthetized with diazepam, enflurane and oxygen until ten minutes prior to the expected time of initiation of CPB. At that point, an infusion of sufentanil, aimed to reach a central compartment concentration of 5 ng.ml-1, was started via CACI. Plasma concentrations of sufentanil, haematocrit, total protein and albumin concentrations, and nasopharyngeal and CPB inflow temperatures were obtained at predetermined intervals before and up to 90 min after the initiation of CPB. Plasma concentrations of sufentanil reached 3.8 +/- 0.4 ng.ml-1 before CPB and approached the 5.0 ng.ml-1 set point (4.7 +/- 0.4 ng.ml-1) over the 90 min of CPB. In conclusion, our results show that it is possible to obtain stable plasma levels of sufentanil on CPB using a pharmacokinetically driven infusion scheme; however, our data suggest that use of such a system may lead to accumulation of drug during CPB. PMID:2960465

  17. Bubbles and bypass: an update.

    PubMed

    Kurusz, Mark; Butler, Bruce D

    2004-01-01

    Bubbles in the bloodstream are not a normal condition--yet they remain a fact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), having been extensively studied and documented since its inception some 50 years ago. While detectable levels of gaseous microemboli (GME) have decreased significantly in recent years and gross air embolism has been nearly eliminated due to increased awareness of etiologies and technological advances, methods of use of current perfusion systems continue to elicit concerns over how best to totally eliminate GME during open-heart procedures. A few studies have correlated adverse neurocognitive manifestations associated with excessive quantities of GME. Newer techniques currently in vogue, such as vacuum-assisted venous drainage, low-prime perfusion circuits, and carbon dioxide flooding of the operative field, have, in some instances, exacerbated the problem of gas embolism or engendered secondary complications in the safe conduct of CPB. Doppler monitoring (circuit or transcranial) primarily remains a research tool to detect GME emanating from the circuit or passing into the patients' cerebral vasculature. Newer developments not yet widely available, such as multiple-frequency harmonics, may finally provide a tool to distinguish particulate microemboli from GME and further delineate the clinical significance of GME.

  18. Bias in peak clad temperature predictions due to uncertainties in modeling of ECC bypass and dissolved non-condensable gas phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Neymotin, L.Y.; Jo, J.; Wulff, W. )

    1990-09-01

    This report describes a general method for estimating the effect on the Reflood Phase PCT from systematic errors (biases) associated with the modelling of the ECCS and dissolved nitrogen, and the application of this method in estimating biases in the Reflood Phase PCT (second PCT) predicted by the TRAC/PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. The bias in the second PCT due to the uncertainty in the existing code models for ECCS related phenomena is {minus}19{degree}K ({minus}34{degree}F). The negative bias implies that the code models for this phenomena are conservative. The bias in the second PCT due to the lack of modelling of dissolved N{sub 2} in the code is estimated to be 9.9{degree}K (17.8{degree}F). The positive bias implies that the absence of dissolved N{sub 2} model makes the code prediction of PCT non-conservative. The bias estimation in this report is a major exception among all other uncertainty and bias assessments performed in conjunction with the CSAU methodology demonstration, because this bias estimation benefitted from using full-scale test data from the full-scale Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Thus, the bias estimates presented here are unaffected by scale distortions in test facilities. Data from small size facilities were also available and an estimate of bias based on these data will be conservative. 35 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Patient’s Perception About Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Kelminda Maria Bulhões; de Andrade, Tarcisio Matos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The diagnosis of coronary artery disease referred for heart surgery has an important psychological component. The purpose of this study was to access the difficulties experienced by individuals awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting and to determine strategies that facilitate adaptation to a new lifestyle, modified by the disease. METHODS A qualitative, exploratory study involving patients admitted to a university teaching hospital in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting. Semi-structured interviews were performed in accordance with a previously defined script based on the study objective. Each transcription was read in its entirety to verify the representativeness, homogeneity and pertinence of the data obtained (pre-analysis), followed by separation of categories of analysis. RESULTS The descriptions of this study show that patients admitted to the completion of coronary artery bypass grafting experience a wide range of psychological difficulties, considering that surgery acquires interpretations that vary according to individuals' subjectivity. The patients recognized the benefit of being able to discuss their feelings as a means of diminishing their fear and anxiety. CONCLUSION Helping patients find resources to confront more positively the daily hospitalization is an important aspect for the health care professionals who assist them. This goal can be achieved through modification of the biomedical model of care for a biopsychosocial view. The investment of time and attention is of fundamental importance and aims to overcome existing deficiencies that interfere with the outcome of patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:26735601

  20. Photo-consistency registration of a 4D cardiac motion model to endoscopic video for image guidance of robotic coronary artery bypass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Rueckert, Daniel; Edwards, Eddie

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the work described in this paper is registration of a 4D preoperative motion model of the heart to the video view of the patient through the intraoperative endoscope. The heart motion is cyclical and can be modelled using multiple reconstructions of cardiac gated coronary CT. We propose the use of photoconsistency between the two views through the da Vinci endoscope to align to the preoperative heart surface model from CT. The temporal alignment from the video to the CT model could in principle be obtained from the ECG signal. We propose averaging of the photoconsistency over the cardiac cycle to improve the registration compared to a single view. Though there is considerable motion of the heart, after correct temporal alignment we suggest that the remaining motion should be close to rigid. Results are presented for simulated renderings and for real video of a beating heart phantom. We found much smoother sections at the minimum when using multiple phases for the registration, furthermore convergence was found to be better when more phases are used.

  1. GENENG: A program for calculating design and off-design performance for turbojet and turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, R. W.; Fishbach, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program entitled GENENG employs component performance maps to perform analytical, steady state, engine cycle calculations. Through a scaling procedure, each of the component maps can be used to represent a family of maps (different design values of pressure ratios, efficiency, weight flow, etc.) Either convergent or convergent-divergent nozzles may be used. Included is a complete FORTRAN 4 listing of the program. Sample results and input explanations are shown for one-spool and two-spool turbojets and two-spool separate- and mixed-flow turbofans operating at design and off-design conditions.

  2. Preliminary experiments on active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.; Burdisso, R. A.; Fuller, C. R.; O'Brien, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    In the preliminary experiments reported here, active acoustic sources positioned around the circumference of a turbofan engine were used to control the fan noise radiated forward through the inlet. The main objective was to demonstrate the potential of active techniques to alleviate the noise pollution that will be produced by the next generation of larger engines. A reduction of up to 19 dB in the radiation directivity was demonstrated in a zone that encompasses a 30-deg angle, near the error sensor, while spillover effects were observed toward the lateral direction. The simultaneous control of two tones was also demonstrated using two identical controllers in a parallel control configuration.

  3. Statistical Turbofan Architecture Management for Use in a Supercirculation Wing Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drãgan, Valeriu

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents an attempt to determine weather the architecture difference between the two spool and three spool turbofan engines can have any significant effect uppon their use in super circulation wing (SCW) aircraft. Such aircraft have been experimented with since 1970's and have been revived because of growing interest in silent STOL aircraft. The approach used is statistical, i.e. actual data provided by engine manufacturers and regulating authorities such as ICAO and EASA was used to derive certain relevant parameters which were then analyzed and conclusions were formulated.

  4. Effects of casing boundary-layer removal on noise of a turbofan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, A. W.; Glaser, F. W.; Coates, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of casing boundary-layer removal on noise produced by a turbofan rotor was measured. The outlet guide vanes were removed for these tests. A comparison was made between the noise measurements when the boundary layer was bled off and under zero bleed conditions. When the boundary layer was removed, overall sound pressure level was reduced 2 dB with moderate blade loading and 3 dB with heavier blade loading. An analysis of the changes in the spectral density with bleed is presented.

  5. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short-haul transportation. Volume 6: Systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A systems analysis of the quiet turbofan aircraft for short-haul transportation was conducted. The purpose of the study was to integrate the representative data generated by aircraft, market, and economic analyses. Activities of the study were to develop the approach and to refine the methodologies for analytic tradeoff, and sensitivity studies of propulsive lift conceptual aircraft and their performance in simulated regional airlines. The operations of appropriate airlines in each of six geographic regions of the United States were simulated. The offshore domestic regions were evaluated to provide a complete domestic evaluation of the STOL concept applicability.

  6. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short-haul transportation. Volume 2: Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study of the quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation was conducted. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) to determine the relationships between STOL characteristics and economic and social viability of short haul air transportation, (2) to identify critical technology problems involving introduction of STOL short haul systems, (3) to define representative aircraft configurations, characteristics, and costs, and (4) to identify high payoff technology areas to improve STOL systems. The analyses of the aircraft designs which were generated to fulfill the objectives are summarized. The baseline aircraft characteristics are documented and significant trade studies are presented.

  7. Effect of spatial inlet temperature and pressure distortion on turbofan engine stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, circumferential pressure distortion, and combined temperature and pressure distortion on the stability of an advanced turbofan engine were investigated experimentally at simulated altitude conditions. With circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, a flow instability generated by the fan operating near stall caused the high-pressure compressor to surge at, or near, the same time as the fan. The effect of combined distortion was dependent on the relative location of the high-temperature and low-pressure regions; high-pressure compressor stalls occurred when the regions coincided, and fan stalls occurred with the regions separated.

  8. Net thrust calculation sensitivity of an afterburning turbofan engine to variations in input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Ray, R. J.; Walton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The calculated value of net thrust of an aircraft powered by a General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine was evaluated for its sensitivity to various input parameters. The effects of a 1.0-percent change in each input parameter on the calculated value of net thrust with two calculation methods are compared. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and also gives the estimated accuracy of the overall net thrust calculation as determined from the influence coefficients and estimated parameter measurement accuracies.

  9. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines. [YF 102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines were measured using a technique which requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine vore. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an Avco Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  10. Advanced detection, isolation, and accommodation of sensor failures in turbofan engines: Real-time microcomputer implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaat, John C.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation Program is to improve the overall demonstrated reliability of digital electronic control systems for turbine engines. For this purpose, an algorithm was developed which detects, isolates, and accommodates sensor failures by using analytical redundancy. The performance of this algorithm was evaluated on a real time engine simulation and was demonstrated on a full scale F100 turbofan engine. The real time implementation of the algorithm is described. The implementation used state-of-the-art microprocessor hardware and software, including parallel processing and high order language programming.

  11. Development of dynamic simulation of TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine with post-stall capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krosel, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hybrid computer simulation of a TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine with post-stall capability. The simulation operates in real-time and will be used to test and evaluate stall recovery control modes for this engine. The simulation calculations are performed by an analog computer with a peripheral multivariable function generation unit used for computing bivariate functions. Tabular listings of simulation variables are obtained by interfacing to a digital computer and using a custom software package for data collection and display.

  12. Development of dynamic simulation of TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine with post-stall capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krosel, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hybrid computer simulation of a TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine with post-stall capability. The simulation operates in real-time and will be used to test and evaluate stall recovery control modes for this engine. The simulation calculations are performed by an analog computer with a peripheral multivariable function generation unit used for computing bivariate functions. Tabular listings of a simulation variables are obtained by interfacing to a digital computer and using a custom software package for data collection and display.

  13. Study of small civil turbofan engines applicable to military trainer airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.; Merrill, G. L.; Burnett, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Small turbofan engine design concepts were applied to military trainer airplanes to establish the potential for commonality between civil and military engines. Several trainer configurations were defined and studied. A ""best'' engine was defined for the trainer mission, and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the effects on airplane size and efficiency of wing loading, power loading, configuration, aerodynamic quality, and engine quality. It is concluded that a small civil aircraft is applicable to military trainer airplanes. Aircraft designed with these engines are smaller, less costly, and more efficient than existing trainer aircraft.

  14. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short-haul transportation. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual designs of Quiet Turbofan STOL Short-Haul Transport Aircraft for the mid-1980 time period are developed and analyzed to determine their technical, operational, and economic feasibility. A matrix of aircraft using various high-lift systems and design parameters are considered. Variations in aircraft characteristics, airport geometry and location, and operational techniques are analyzed systematically to determine their effects on the market, operating economics, and community acceptance. The total systems approach is considered to be critically important in analyzing the potential of STOL aircraft to reduce noise pollution and alleviate the increasing air corridor and airport congestion.

  15. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  16. Oxidative stress in coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Amaury Edgardo Mont’Serrat Ávila Souza; Melnikov, Petr; Cônsolo, Lourdes Zélia Zanoni

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this prospective study was to assess the dynamics of oxidative stress during coronary artery bypass surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Sixteen patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were enrolled. Blood samples were collected from the systemic circulation during anesthesia induction (radial artery - A1), the systemic venous return (B1 and B2) four minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamping, of the coronary sinus (CS1 and CS2) four minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamping and the systemic circulation four minutes after completion of cardiopulmonary bypass (radial artery - A2). The marker of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde, was measured using spectrophotometry. Results The mean values of malondialdehyde were (ng/dl): A1 (265.1), B1 (490.0), CS1 (527.0), B2 (599.6), CS2 (685.0) and A2 (527.2). Comparisons between A1/B1, A1/CS1, A1/B2, A1/CS2, A1/A2 were significant, with ascending values (P<0.05). Comparisons between the measurements of the coronary sinus and venous reservoir after the two moments of reperfusion (B1/B2 and CS1/CS2) were higher when CS2 (P<0.05). Despite higher values ​​after the end of cardiopulmonary bypass (A2), when compared to samples of anesthesia (A1), those show a downward trend when compared to the samples of the second moment of reperfusion (CS2) (P<0.05). Conclusion The measurement of malondialdehyde shows that coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass is accompanied by increase of free radicals and this trend gradually decreases after its completion. Aortic clamping exacerbates oxidative stress but has sharper decline after reperfusion when compared to systemic metabolism. The behavior of thiobarbituric acid species indicates that oxidative stress is an inevitable pathophysiological component. PMID:27163415

  17. Robotic coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Folliguet, Thierry A; Dibie, Alain; Philippe, François; Larrazet, Fabrice; Slama, Michel S; Laborde, François

    2010-12-01

    Robotically assisted surgery enables coronary surgery to be performed totally or partially endoscopically. Using the Da Vinci robotic technology allows minimally invasive treatments. We report on our experience with coronary artery surgery in our department: patients requiring single or double vessel surgical revascularization were eligible. The procedure was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass on a beating heart. From April 2004 to May 2008, 55 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study, and were operated on by a single surgical team. Operative outcomes included operative time, estimated blood loss, transfusions, ventilation time, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay. Average operative time was 270 ± 101 min with an estimated blood loss of 509 ± 328 ml, a postoperative ventilation time of 6 ± 12 h, ICU stay of 52 ± 23 h, and a hospital stay of 7 ± 3 days. Nine patients (16%) were converted to open techniques, and transfusion was required in four patients (7%). Follow-up was complete for all patients up to 1 year. There was one hospital death (1.7%) and two deaths at follow-up. Coronary anastomosis was controlled in 48 patients by either angiogram or computed tomography scan, revealing occlusion or anastomotic stenoses (>50%) in six patients. Overall permeability was 92%. Major adverse events occurred in 12 patients (21%). One-year survival was 96%. Our initial experience with robotically assisted coronary surgery is promising: it avoids sternotomy and with a methodical approach we were able to implement the procedure safely and effectively in our practice, combining minimal mortality with excellent survival. PMID:27627952

  18. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of Peripheral Bypass Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoksbergen, Arjan W.J.; Legemate, Dink A.; Reekers, Jim A.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Jacobs, Michael J.H.M.

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the success of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in treating peripheral bypass stenoses. Methods: Patients who received a femoropopliteal or femorocrural bypass graft for limb ischemia were included in a duplex surveillance program. If duplex ultrasound revealed a short (<2 cm) severe (peak systolic velocity ratio {>=} 4.5) stenosis, patients were scheduled for arteriography and PTA. Fifty-eight peripheral bypass stenoses in 39 grafts in 37 patients were treated with PTA. The cumulative primary patency of treated stenoses was calculated. Results: During the first year after PTA 31 (53%) treated lesions remained patent, 15 (26%) lesions restenosed at a median interval of 5.0 (range 1-12) months and 4 (7%) bypasses occluded. The cumulative primary patency of 58 treated graft stenoses at 1 year was 60% [95% confidence interval (CI) 46%-74%] and 55% (95% CI 41%-70%) at 2 years. Graft body stenoses showed a better 2-year cumulative primary patency (86%; 95% CI 68%-100%) compared with juxta-anastomotic lesions (45%; 95% CI 29%-62%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: PTA is justifiable as the initial treatment of peripheral bypass stenoses. Nevertheless, the restenosis rate is rather high, especially in juxta-anastomotic lesions. Continuation of duplex surveillance after PTA and timely reintervention is recommended.

  19. 75 FR 15326 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 500, 700, and 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... aviation product, and results from the risk of engine fuel-to-oil heat exchanger (FOHE) blockage. The MCAI..., 556A2-61, 556B2-61, and 560A2-61 turbofan engines with fuel-to-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs) part number... regulations as of January 4, 2010 (74 FR 6222, November 27, 2009). ADDRESSES: The Docket Operations office...

  20. 76 FR 16526 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney JT8D-209, -217, -217A, -217C, and -219 Series Turbofan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ...-209, -217, -217A, -217C, and -219 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...-13948 (70 FR 3867, January 27, 2005). That AD applies to the specified products. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on July 1, 2010 (75 FR 38052). That NPRM proposed the same torque...

  1. 75 FR 12661 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6-45 and CF6-50 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ...-05-AD; Amendment 39-16240; AD 2010-06-15] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric...) for General Electric Company (GE) CF6-45 and CF6-50 series turbofan engines with certain low-pressure.... 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive: 2010-06-15 General Electric...

  2. A Comparison of Hybrid Approaches for Turbofan Engine Gas Path Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng; Wang, Yafan; Huang, Jinquan; Wang, Qihang

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid diagnostic method utilizing Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA) is presented for performance degradation estimation and sensor anomaly detection of turbofan engine. The EKF is used to estimate engine component performance degradation for gas path fault diagnosis. The AGA is introduced in the integrated architecture and applied for sensor bias detection. The contributions of this work are the comparisons of Kalman Filters (KF)-AGA algorithms and Neural Networks (NN)-AGA algorithms with a unified framework for gas path fault diagnosis. The NN needs to be trained off-line with a large number of prior fault mode data. When new fault mode occurs, estimation accuracy by the NN evidently decreases. However, the application of the Linearized Kalman Filter (LKF) and EKF will not be restricted in such case. The crossover factor and the mutation factor are adapted to the fitness function at each generation in the AGA, and it consumes less time to search for the optimal sensor bias value compared to the Genetic Algorithm (GA). In a word, we conclude that the hybrid EKF-AGA algorithm is the best choice for gas path fault diagnosis of turbofan engine among the algorithms discussed.

  3. TRIIODOTHYRONINE INCREASES MYOCARDIAL FUNCTION AND PYRUVATE ENTRY INTO THE CITRIC ACID CYCLE AFTER REPERFUSION IN A MODEL OF INFANT CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2012-03-01

    We utilized a translational model of infant CPB to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion. Methods and Results: Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-13Carbon(13C)]-pyruvate for 40 minutes (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (Cont) or immediately after reperfusion (IR) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (IR-Tr) received T3 (1.2 ug/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels (aCAC) and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC ) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC; ) using 13C-labeled pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13C NMR. Neither IR nor IR-Tr modified aCAC. However, compared to IR, T3 (group IR-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after CPB while elevating both PDC and PC (~ four-fold). T3 inhibited IR induced reductions in CAC intermediate molar percent enrichment (MPE) and oxaloacetate(citrate)/malate MPE ratio; an index of aspartate entry into the CAC. Conclusions: T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC thereby providing substrate for elevated cardiac function and work after reperfusion. The increases in pyruvate flux occur with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Additionally, T3 inhibition of reductions in CAC intermediate MPEs indicates that T3 reduces the reliance on amino acids (AA) for anaplerosis after reperfusion. Thus, AA should be more available for other functions such as protein synthesis.

  4. [Simplified laparoscopic gastric bypass. Initial experience].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Miguelena, Luis; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Ríos-Cruz, Daniel; Marín-Domínguez, Raúl; Castillo-González, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la cirugía de la obesidad comprende diversos procedimientos gastrointestinales. El bypass gástrico en Y de Roux es el prototipo de los procedimientos mixtos y el más practicado en el mundo en sus diversas variedades. Una técnica similar y novedosa es la adoptada por Cardoso-Ramos y Galvao denominada "bypass simplificado" que rápidamente se aceptó por la mayor facilidad y resultados muy parecidos a la técnica convencional. Objetivo: describir los resultados a un año del bypass gástrico simplificado para el tratamiento de la obesidad mórbida. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo y descriptivo de todos los pacientes a quienes se realizó bypass gástrico de enero de 2008 a julio de 2012, en la clínica de obesidad de un hospital privado de la Ciudad de México. Resultados: se estudiaron 90 pacientes con diagnóstico de obesidad mórbida, con límites de edad de 18 y 65 años, operados para bypass gástrico simplificado. En 10% de los pacientes hubo complicaciones, las más frecuentes fueron: hemorragia y hernia interna. Durante el periodo de estudio la mortalidad fue de 0%. La pérdida de peso promedio a los 12 meses fue de 72.7%. Conclusión: el bypass gástrico simplificado laparoscópico es una cirugía segura, con buenos resultados a mediano plazo, y con una pérdida del exceso de peso adecuada en 71% de los casos.

  5. Battery Cell By-Pass Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evers, Jeffrey (Inventor); Gelger, Ronald V. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a circuit and method of limiting the charging current voltage from a power supply net work applied to an individual cell of a plurality of cells making up a battery being charged in series. It is particularly designed for use with batteries that can be damaged by overcharging, such as Lithium-ion type batteries. In detail. the method includes the following steps: 1) sensing the actual voltage level of the individual cell; 2) comparing the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and providing an error signal representative thereof; and 3) by-passing the charging current around individual cell necessary to keep the individual cell voltage level generally equal a specific voltage level while continuing to charge the remaining cells. Preferably this is accomplished by by-passing the charging current around the individual cell if said actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and allowing the charging current to the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level. In the step of bypassing the charging current, the by-passed current is transferred at a proper voltage level to the power supply. The by-pass circuit a voltage comparison circuit is used to compare the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and to provide an error signal representative thereof. A third circuit, designed to be responsive to the error signal, is provided for maintaining the individual cell voltage level generally equal to the specific voltage level. Circuitry is provided in the third circuit for bypassing charging current around the individual cell if the actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and transfers the excess charging current to the power supply net work. The circuitry also allows charging of the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level.

  6. Bypassing health facilities for childbirth: a multilevel study in three districts of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Mariano; Vora, Kranti; Costa, Ayesha De

    2016-01-01

    Background Bypassing available facilities for childbirth has important implications for maternal health service delivery and human resources within a health system. The results are the additional expenses imposed on the woman and her family, as well as the inefficient use of health system resources. Bypassing often indicates a lack of confidence in the care provided by the facility nearest to the mother, which implies a level of dysfunctionality that the health system needs to address. Over the past decade, India has experienced a steep rise in the proportion of facility births. The initiation of programs promoting facility births resulted in a rise from 39% in 2005 to 85% in 2014. There have been no reports on bypassing facilities for childbirth from India. In the context of steeply rising facility births, it is important to quantify the occurrence of and study the relative contributions of maternal characteristics and facility functionality to bypassing. Objectives 1) To determine the extent of bypassing health facilities for childbirth among rural mothers in three districts of Gujarat, India, 2) to identify associations between the functionality of an obstetric care (OC) facility and it being bypassed, and 3) to assess the relative contribution of maternal and facility characteristics to bypassing. Design A cross-sectional survey of 166 public and private OC facilities reporting ≥30 births in the 3 months before the survey was conducted in three purposively selected districts (Dahod, Sabarkantha, and Surendranagar) in the state of Gujarat, India. Besides information on each facility, data from 946 women giving birth at these facilities were also gathered. Data were analyzed using a multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression model. Results Off all mothers, 37.7% bypassed their nearest facility for childbirth. After adjusting for maternal characteristics, for every one-unit increase in the facility's emergency obstetric care (EmOC) signal functions, the odds

  7. Multiplexed Predictive Control of a Large Commercial Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, hanz; Singaraju, Anil; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01

    Model predictive control is a strategy well-suited to handle the highly complex, nonlinear, uncertain, and constrained dynamics involved in aircraft engine control problems. However, it has thus far been infeasible to implement model predictive control in engine control applications, because of the combination of model complexity and the time allotted for the control update calculation. In this paper, a multiplexed implementation is proposed that dramatically reduces the computational burden of the quadratic programming optimization that must be solved online as part of the model-predictive-control algorithm. Actuator updates are calculated sequentially and cyclically in a multiplexed implementation, as opposed to the simultaneous optimization taking place in conventional model predictive control. Theoretical aspects are discussed based on a nominal model, and actual computational savings are demonstrated using a realistic commercial engine model.

  8. Coronary artery bypass surgery without cardiopulmonary bypass: short- and mid-term results.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Y; Mehta, Y; Kohli, V M; Kohli, V; Mairal, M; Mishra, A; Bapna, R K; Trehan, N

    1997-01-01

    From March 1994 to April 1997, 433 patients had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass in our institute. Sixty-eight patients had various organ dysfunctions and/or aortic atheroma or calcification and were regarded as high risk for cardiopulmonary bypass. In 277 patients surgery was performed through midline sternotomy, while in 156 minithoracotomy approach was used. In 361 patients single coronary artery bypass grafting was done, and in 72 two-coronary arteries were bypassed. In 63 patients who had graftable vessels in anterior wall and diffusely diseased ungraftable vessels in posterolateral and/or inferior wall, transmyocardial laser revascularisation was also done along with coronary artery bypass grafting to achieve complete myocardial revascularisation. Nine patients in this series were also subjected to simultaneous carotid endarterectomy along with myocardial revascularisation. In two patients complementary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty of left circumflex coronary artery was done five days after minithoracotomy and left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending coronary artery bypass grafting. Forty-two cases were extubated in operating room. Average blood loss was 260 ml. Six patients were reexplored for postoperative bleeding. Seven patients had perioperative myocardial infarction. One developed neurological complication. Hospital mortality was 2.3 percent (10/433 cases) and four deaths were due to malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Nine patients developed chest wound complications. Average hospital stay after operation was six days, 423 patients were discharged from hospital and all of them were asymptomatic. During three years follow-up (range 3 to 38 months) there were three known cardiac deaths. Ninety percent (391) patients reported to the follow-up clinic and 91 percent of them were angina-free. In patients who were subjected to transmyocardial laser revascularisation along with coronary

  9. Acoustics and Trust of Separate-Flow Exhaust Nozzles With Mixing Devices for High-Bypass-Ratio Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, Naseem H.; Mikkelsen, Kevin L.; Bridges, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center recently completed an experimental study to reduce the jet noise from modern turbofan engines. The study concentrated on exhaust nozzle designs for high-bypass-ratio engines. These designs modified the core and fan nozzles individually and simultaneously. Several designs provided an ideal jet noise reduction of over 2.5 EPNdB for the effective perceived noise level (EPNL) metric. Noise data, after correcting for takeoff thrust losses, indicated over a 2.0-EPNdB reduction for nine designs. Individually modifying the fan nozzle did not provide attractive EPNL reductions. Designs in which only the core nozzle was modified provided greater EPNL reductions. Designs in which core and fan nozzles were modified simultaneously provided the greatest EPNL reduction. The best nozzle design had a 2.7-EPNdB reduction (corrected for takeoff thrust loss) with a 0.06-point cruise thrust loss. This design simultaneously employed chevrons on the core and fan nozzles. In comparison with chevrons, tabs appeared to be an inefficient method for reducing jet noise. Data trends indicate that the sum of the thrust losses from individually modifying core and fan nozzles did not generally equal the thrust loss from modifying them simultaneously. Flow blockage from tabs did not scale directly with cruise thrust loss and the interaction between fan flow and the core nozzle seemed to strongly affect noise and cruise performance. Finally, the nozzle configuration candidates for full-scale engine demonstrations are identified.

  10. 46 CFR 56.20-20 - Valve bypasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Valves § 56.20-20 Valve bypasses. (a) Sizes of bypasses shall be in accordance with MSS SP-45 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Pipe for bypasses should be at least Schedule 80 seamless... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve bypasses. 56.20-20 Section 56.20-20 Shipping...

  11. 46 CFR 56.20-20 - Valve bypasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Valves § 56.20-20 Valve bypasses. (a) Sizes of bypasses shall be in accordance with MSS SP-45 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Pipe for bypasses should be at least Schedule 80 seamless... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve bypasses. 56.20-20 Section 56.20-20 Shipping...

  12. Thrust reverser for a long duct fan engine. [for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, E. A.; Ryan, E. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A bypass duct outer cowl includes a fixed cascade disposed between axially spaced fixed cowl portions and a translatable cowl sleeve and blocker doors movably disposed on the respective radially outer and inner sides of the cascade. Actuation and linkage structure located entirely within the outer cowl provides for selectively moving the cowl sleeve rearwardly and rotating the blocker doors to a position across the bypass duct to cause the fan airflow to pass through the cascade in a thrust reversing manner.

  13. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Core Bypass Flow Phenomena in a Prismatic VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Sato; Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-09-01

    The core bypass flow in a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the important design considerations which impacts considerably on the integrity of reactor core internals including operating fuels. The interstitial gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The occurrence of hot spots in the core and lower plenum and hot streaking in the lower plenum (regions of very hot gas flow) will be affected by the bypass flow. In the present study, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations of a typical prismatic VHTR are conducted to understand better the bypass flow phenomenon and establish the evaluation method in the reactor core using commercial CFD code FLUENT. Parametric calculations changing several factors in a on-twelfth sector of a fuel column are performed. The simulations show the impact of each factor on bypass flow and the flow and temperature distributions in the prismatic core. The factors inlcude inter-column gap-width, turbulence model, axial heat generation profile and geometry change from irradiation-induced shrinkage in the graphite block region. It is shown that bypass flow provides a significant cooling effect on the prismatic block and that the maximum fuel and coolant channel outlet temperatures increase with an increase in gap-width, especially when a peak radial factor is applied to the total heat generation rate. Also, the presence of bypass flow causes a large lateral temperature gradient in the block that may have repurcussions on the structural integrity of the block and on the neutronics. These results indicate that bypass flow has a significant effect on hot spots in the core and on the temperature of jets flowing from the core into the lower plenum.

  15. Massive sediment bypassing on the lower shoreface offshore of a wide tidal inlet - Cat Island Pass, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, B.E.; List, J.H.; Sallenger, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of a series of historical bathymetric and shoreline surveys along the Louisiana coast west of the Mississippi River mouth detected a large area of deposition in water depths of 2.0-8.5 m offshore of a 9-km- wide tidal inlet, the Cat Island Pass/Wine Island Pass system. A 59.9 ?? 106 m3 sandy deposit formed from the 1930s-1980s, spanning 27 km in the alongshore direction, delineating the transport pathway for sediment bypassing offshore of the inlet on the shoreface. Bypassing connected the shorefaces of two barrier island systems, the Isles Dernieres and the Bayou Lafourche. The processes responsible for formation of this deposit are not well understood, but sediment-transport modeling suggests that sediment is transported primarily by wind-driven coastal currents during large storms and hurricanes. Deposition appears to be related to changes in shoreline orientation, closing of transport pathways into a large bay to the east and the presence of tidal inlets. This newly documented type of bypassing, an offshore bypassing of the inlet system, naturally nourished the immediate downdrift area, the eastern Isles Dernieres, where shoreface and shoreline erosion rates are about half of pre-bypassing rates. Erosion rates remained the same farther downdrift, where bypassing has not yet reached. As this offshore bypassing continues, the destruction of the Isles Dernieres will be slowed.

  16. 75 FR 51657 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PW615F-A Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... could result in an unsafe condition. The PW615F-A engine Fuel Filter Bypass Valve installation is very... uncommanded power reduction on one of its engines. Investigation showed that the Fuel Filter Bypass Valve... condition. The PW615F-A engine Fuel Filter Bypass Valve installation is very similar to that of...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870.4250 Section 870.4250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4300 - Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit. 870.4300 Section 870.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass gas control unit. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit is a device...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that assists... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device....

  1. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  6. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  7. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  8. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  9. Bypass apparatus and method for series connected energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Daigle, Dominik

    2000-01-01

    A bypass apparatus and method for series connected energy storage devices. Each of the energy storage devices coupled to a common series connection has an associated bypass unit connected thereto in parallel. A current bypass unit includes a sensor which is coupled in parallel with an associated energy storage device or cell and senses an energy parameter indicative of an energy state of the cell, such as cell voltage. A bypass switch is coupled in parallel with the energy storage cell and operable between a non-activated state and an activated state. The bypass switch, when in the non-activated state, is substantially non-conductive with respect to current passing through the energy storage cell and, when in the activated state, provides a bypass current path for passing current to the series connection so as to bypass the associated cell. A controller controls activation of the bypass switch in response to the voltage of the cell deviating from a pre-established voltage setpoint. The controller may be included within the bypass unit or be disposed on a control platform external to the bypass unit. The bypass switch may, when activated, establish a permanent or a temporary bypass current path.

  10. 21 CFR 870.4300 - Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... gas. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit. 870.4300... bypass gas control unit. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit is a device...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  16. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  17. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  18. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  19. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  20. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  1. Bypass transition in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervegt, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Transition to turbulence in aerospace applications usually occurs in a strongly disturbed environment. For instance, the effects of free-stream turbulence, roughness and obstacles in the boundary layer strongly influence transition. Proper understanding of the mechanisms leading to transition is crucial in the design of aircraft wings and gas turbine blades, because lift, drag and heat transfer strongly depend on the state of the boundary layer, laminar or turbulent. Unfortunately, most of the transition research, both theoretical and experimental, has focused on natural transition. Many practical flows, however, defy any theoretical analysis and are extremely difficult to measure. Morkovin introduced in his review paper the concept of bypass transition as those forms of transition which bypass the known mechanisms of linear and non-linear transition theories and are currently not understood by experiments. In an effort to better understand the mechanisms leading to transition in a disturbed environment, experiments are conducted studying simpler cases, viz. the effects of free stream turbulence on transition on a flat plate. It turns out that these experiments are very difficult to conduct, because generation of free stream turbulence with sufficiently high fluctuation levels and reasonable homogeneity is non trivial. For a discussion see Morkovin. Serious problems also appear due to the fact that at high Reynolds numbers the boundary layers are very thin, especially in the nose region of the plate where the transition occurs, which makes the use of very small probes necessary. The effects of free-stream turbulence on transition are the subject of this research and are especially important in a gas turbine environment, where turbulence intensities are measured between 5 and 20 percent, Wang et al. Due to the fact that the Reynolds number for turbine blades is considerably lower than for aircraft wings, generally a larger portion of the blade will be in a laminar

  2. History and current status of robotic totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeffrey D; Srivastava, Mukta; Bonatti, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Robotic totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass (TECAB) is a minimally invasive endoscopic surgical approach using the daVinci robotic telemanipulation system to perform coronary artery bypass grafting on the arrested or beating heart. It is a procedure that can be a useful alternative to the classic open procedure performed through sternotomy. After extensive modeling in cadavers, the first clinical case was performed in June 1998 placing a left internal thoracic artery graft (LITA) to the left anterior descending artery completely robotically on the arrested heart. During the early and late 2000s, international groups have adopted this evolving technology, which has included iterations such as beating-heart TECAB, use of bilateral ITA grafting and radial artery grafting, as well as 3- and 4-vessel TECAB. TECAB is combined with percutaneous coronary intervention in hybrid procedures. Despite increasing complexity of endoscopic coronary bypass surgery, conversion rates to open bypass surgery have dropped significantly and operative times have decreased. Published major morbidities and mortality rates in arrested-and beating-heart TECAB have been cumulatively in the 0-2% range and are considered well within the expected range for these highly complex surgical procedures. Long-term survival and freedom from major adverse events also meet the standards of open bypass surgery.

  3. Development of improved methods for locating large areas of bypassed oil in Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.

    1994-07-01

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a predictive method for locating Pockets of bypassed mobile oil and estimating the volume of this resource. A secondary objective of the project was to transfer the learned technology to small independent operators who drill a majority of the domestic wells but lack access to a research staff. Another objective was to develop a format for compiling data on Louisiana reservoirs in a form that can be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The format developed will be demonstrated using data compiled in the bypassed oil study for selected reservoirs. The project was being funded over a three-year period and was jointly funded by the DOE and the state of Louisiana. The objectives of the project were accomplished using an interdisciplinary approach which included the disciplines of engineering, geology, and computer science. The work was organized into the following major tasks: Selection of reservoirs for study of bypassed oil potential; development of improved reservoir simulator for bypassed oil prospecting; an interdisciplinary reservoir characterization study of Louisiana reservoirs; active modelling of bypassed oil for three Louisiana reservoirs; and technology transfer activities.

  4. 78 FR 72552 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ...: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company model GEnx... consumed more cyclic life than they would have in revenue flight cycles. These parts were then installed into engines and introduced into revenue service without adjustment to remaining cyclic life. This...

  5. 78 FR 50320 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ...-08-AD; Amendment 39-17553; AD 2013-16-15] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric...: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all General Electric Company (GE) model GEnx..., contact General Electric Company, GE Aviation, Room 285, One Neumann Way, Cincinnati, OH; phone:...

  6. Turbofan flowfield simulation using Euler equations with body forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankajakshan, Ramesh; Arabshahi, Abdollah; Whitfield, David L.

    1993-01-01

    A method for flow computations around ducted propfans is presented. The approach is to use the body force terms in the three-dimensional Euler equations to model the propeller. Numerical solutions are compared with experimental data for three ducted propfan configurations for different flow conditions.

  7. Migrating motor complex changes after side-to-side ileal bypass in mouse ileum ex-vivo: mechanism underlying the blind loop syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Suk-Bae; Moon, Jung-Sun; Choe, Eun-Kyoung; So, In-Suk; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was intended to investigate the migrating motor complex (MMC) changes after ileal bypass in ex-vivo mouse models. Methods Partial (side-to-side) and total bypass (occlusion of proximal part of bypassed loop) were performed on ileums of female Institute of Cancer Research mice. After 2 and 4 weeks, the bypassed segments were harvested and MMCs were recorded at 4 different sites ex-vivo. Amplitude, duration, interval, direction of propagation, and the area under the curve (AUC) of MMCs were measured and compared to those of the controls. Results In control mice (n = 7), most MMCs propagated aborally (91.1%). After 2 weeks of partial bypass (n = 4), there was a significant decrease in both amplitude and AUC, and orally-propagating MMCs increased significantly (45%, P = 0.002). Bidirectional MMCs (originating in the bypassed loop and propagating in both directions) were also observed (10%). The amplitude of the MMCs remained decreased at 4 weeks after partial bypass (n = 4), and neither the AUC nor the direction of propagation showed significant changes compared to 2 weeks. Similarly, in the total bypass model, both the amplitude and AUC of the MMCs decreased significantly compared to controls. In contrast to partial bypass, 95% of the MMCs within the bypassed loop propagated aborally after 2 weeks (n = 6), which was similar to the control state. After 4 weeks (n = 5), however, MMCs either lost their temporal relationship or completely disappeared. Conclusion The changes in propagation direction of the MMCs in the partially bypassed loop may contribute to stagnation of bowel contents and the development of blind loop syndrome. PMID:22066044

  8. Supersonic Stall Flutter of High Speed Fans. [in turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Stevens, W.; Jutras, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial flow compressors. The analysis is based on a modified two dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. It is applied to a rotor blade row by considering a cascade of airfoils whose geometry and dynamic response coincide with those of a rotor blade element at 85 percent of the span height (measured from the hub). The rotor blades are assumed to be unshrouded (i.e., free standing) and to vibrate in their first flexural mode. The effects of shock waves and flow separation are included in the model through quasi-steady, empirical, rotor total-pressure-loss and deviation-angle correlations. The actuator disk model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic force acting on the cascade blading as a function of the steady flow field entering the cascade and the geometry and dynamic response of the cascade. Calculations show that the present model predicts the existence of a bending flutter mode at supersonic inlet Mach numbers. This flutter mode is suppressed by increasing the reduced frequency of the system or by reducing the steady state aerodynamic loading on the cascade. The validity of the model for predicting flutter is demonstrated by correlating the measured flutter boundary of a high speed fan stage with its predicted boundary. This correlation uses a level of damping for the blade row (i.e., the log decrement of the rotor system) that is estimated from the experimental flutter data. The predicted flutter boundary is shown to be in good agreement with the measured boundary.

  9. Performance (Off-Design) Cycle Analysis for a Turbofan Engine With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Mattingly, J. D.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the performance of a steady-state, dual-spool, separate-exhaust turbofan engine, with an interstage turbine burner (ITB) serving as a secondary combustor. The ITB, which is located in the transition duct between the high- and the low-pressure turbines, is a relatively new concept for increasing specific thrust and lowering pollutant emissions in modern jet-engine propulsion. A detailed off-design performance analysis of ITB engines is written in Microsoft(Registered Trademark) Excel (Redmond, Washington) macrocode with Visual Basic Application to calculate engine performances over the entire operating envelope. Several design-point engine cases are pre-selected using a parametric cycle-analysis code developed previously in Microsoft(Registered Trademark) Excel, for off-design analysis. The off-design code calculates engine performances (i.e. thrust and thrust-specific-fuel-consumption) at various flight conditions and throttle settings.

  10. Novel error sensing microphone arrays for active control of turbofan rotor/stator tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Bruce E.; Hersh, Alan S.; Rice, Edward J.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2003-10-01

    Active control of turbofan rotor/stator interaction tones is complicated by the simultaneous presence of multiple duct propagation modes. In-duct error sensing microphone arrays that can adequately resolve these modes typically require duct lengths that are incompatible with modern compact engine design. Two alternative approaches have been investigated. For inlet noise, an external linear array of microphones was positioned in the near/far radiation field transition region and weighted to provide error signals resolved either by duct mode or by radiation angle. For the exhaust, radially spaced microphones have been placed on duct bifurcation panels to provide supplemental radial-mode resolution. The concepts were tested in combination with an adaptive segmented liner in a static duct and as part of an active stator-vane system in the ANCF research facility at NASA/Glenn Research Center. [Work sponsored by NASA/Langley Research Center.

  11. Performance Cycle Analysis of a Two-Spool, Separate-Exhaust Turbofan With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Mattingly, J. D.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the performance cycle analysis of a dual-spool, separate-exhaust turbofan engine, with an Interstage Turbine Burner serving as a secondary combustor. The ITB, which is located at the transition duct between the high- and the low-pressure turbines, is a relatively new concept for increasing specific thrust and lowering pollutant emissions in modern jet engine propulsion. A detailed performance analysis of this engine has been conducted for steady-state engine performance prediction. A code is written and is capable of predicting engine performances (i.e., thrust and thrust specific fuel consumption) at varying flight conditions and throttle settings. Two design-point engines were studied to reveal trends in performance at both full and partial throttle operations. A mission analysis is also presented to assure the advantage of saving fuel by adding ITB.

  12. Effects of temperature transients at fan inlet of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelwahab, M.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of fan inlet temperature transients on the performance and stability of a turbofan engine were determined. The experiment was conducted at 90 and 74 percent of low-pressure-rotor military speed (9525 rpm) and with fan inlet temperature distortions having circumferential extents of 90 deg, 180 deg, 270 deg, and 360 deg. Temperature transients were controlled by varying the magnitude and rate of change of the inlet temperature rise. The engine response ranged from a momentary compressor pressure disturbance to low-pressure-compressor stall. The compressor distortion limits decreased with decreasing low-pressure-rotor speed and increased with increasing circumferential extent of distortion. Analysis of the data suggests strongly that the distortion limits of the compressor are a function of a critical magnitude of inlet temperature rise and are independent of the temperature rise rate.

  13. Exhaust emission survey of an F100 afterburning turbofan engine at simulated altitude flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. E.; Cullom, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Emissions of carbon monoxide, total oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide from an F100, afterburning, two spool turbofan engine at simulated flight conditions are reported. For each flight condition emission measurements were made for two or three power levels from intermediate power (nonafterburning) through maximum afterburning. The data showed that emissions vary with flight speed, altitude, power level, and radial position across the nozzle. Carbon monoxide emissions were low for intermediate power (nonafterburning) and partial afterburning, but regions of high carbon monoxide were present downstream of the flame holder at maximum afterburning. Unburned hydrocarbon emissions were low for most of the simulated flight conditions. The local NOX concentrations and their variability with power level increased with increasing flight Mach number at constant altitude, and decreased with increasing altitude at constant Mach number. Carbon dioxide emissions were proportional to local fuel air ratio for all conditions.

  14. A flight study of tone radiation patterns generated by inlet rods in a small turbofan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisser, J. S.; Silcox, R. J.; Eversman, W.; Parrett, A. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a flight study of tone radiation patterns from a small turbofan engine and compares results with similar static test stand data and a recently developed radiation theory. An interaction tone was produced by a circumferential array of inlet rods placed just upstream of the fan blades. Overhead and sideline flight directivity patterns showed cut-on of a dominant single mode occurred where predicted and the absence of any other significant circumferential or radial modes. In general, good agreement was found between measured flight and static data, with small differences being attributed to inlet geometry and/or forward speed effects. Good agreement was also obtained between flight data and theory for directivity pattern shape, however, the theory consistently predicted higher values for peak radiation angle over a wide range of frequency.

  15. Finite element-integral acoustic simulation of JT15D turbofan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Horowitz, S. J.

    1984-07-01

    An iterative finite element integral technique is used to predict the sound field radiated from the JT15D turbofan inlet. The sound field is divided into two regions: the sound field within and near the inlet which is computed using the finite element method and the radiation field beyond the inlet which is calculated using an integral solution technique. The velocity potential formulation of the acoustic wave equation was employed in the program. For some single mode JT15D data, the theory and experiment are in good agreement for the far field radiation pattern as well as suppressor attenuation. Also, the computer program is used to simulate flight effects that cannot be performed on a ground static test stand.

  16. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliebe, P. R.

    1980-06-01

    An analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80-foot wind tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise, refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy, was employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line for outdoor test stand, NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels, they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  17. Low-cost directionally-solidified turbine blades, volume 2. [TFE731-3 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, R. E.; Hoppin, G. S., III; Hurst, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    An endothermically heated technology was used to manufacture low cost, directionally solidified, uncooled nickel-alloy blades for the TFE731-3 turbofan engine. The MAR-M 247 and MER-M 100+Hf blades were finish processed through heat treatment, machining, and coating operations prior to 150 hour engine tests consisting of the following sequences: (1) 50 hours of simulated cruise cycling (high fatigue evaluation); (2) 50 hours at the maximum continuous power rating (stress rupture endurance (low cycle fatigue). None of the blades visually showed any detrimental effects from the test. This was verified by post test metallurgical evaluation. The specific fuel consumption was reduced by 2.4% with the uncooled blades.

  18. Application of finite element techniques in predicting the acoustic properties of turbofan inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Sigman, R. K.; Zinn, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for predicting the acoustic performance of turbofan inlets carrying a subsonic axisymmetric steady flow. The finite element method combined with the method of weighted residuals is used in predicting the acoustic properties of variable area, annular ducts with or without acoustic treatments along their walls. An approximate solution for the steady inviscid flow field is obtained using an integral method for calculating the incompressible potential flow field in the inlet with a correction to account for compressibility effects. The accuracy of the finite element technique was assessed by comparison with available analytical solutions for the problems of plane and spinning wave propagation through a hard walled annular cylinder with a constant mean flow.

  19. Real-time simulation of the TF30-P-3 turbofan engine using a hybrid computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.; Bruton, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A real-time, hybrid-computer simulation of the TF30-P-3 turbofan engine was developed. The simulation was primarily analog in nature but used the digital portion of the hybrid computer to perform bivariate function generation associated with the performance of the engine's rotating components. FORTRAN listings and analog patching diagrams are provided. The hybrid simulation was controlled by a digital computer programmed to simulate the engine's standard hydromechanical control. Both steady-state and dynamic data obtained from the digitally controlled engine simulation are presented. Hybrid simulation data are compared with data obtained from a digital simulation provided by the engine manufacturer. The comparisons indicate that the real-time hybrid simulation adequately matches the baseline digital simulation.

  20. Tests of a D vented thrust deflecting nozzle behind a simulated turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    A D vented thrust deflecting nozzle applicable to subsonic V/STOL aircraft was tested behind a simulated turbofan engine in the verticle thrust stand. Nozzle thrust, fan operating characteristics, nozzle entrance conditions, and static pressures were measured. Nozzle performance was measured for variations in exit area and thrust deflection angle. Six core nozzle configurations, the effect of core exit axial location, mismatched core and fan stream nozzle pressure ratios, and yaw vane presence were evaluated. Core nozzle configuration affected performance at normal and engine out operating conditions. Highest vectored nozzle performance resulted for a given exit area when core and fan stream pressure were equal. Its is concluded that high nozzle performance can be maintained at both normal and engine out conditions through control of the nozzle entrance Mach number with a variable exit area.

  1. Measurement effects on the calculation of in-flight thrust for an F404 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed that investigates parameter measurement effects on calculated in-flight thrust for the General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine which powered the X-29A forward-swept wing research aircraft. Net-thrust uncertainty and influence coefficients were calculated and are presented. Six flight conditions were analyzed at five engine power settings each. Results were obtained using the mass flow-temperature and area-pressure thrust calculation methods, both based on the commonly used gas generator technique. Thrust uncertainty was determined using a common procedure based on the use of measurement uncertainty and influence coefficients. The effects of data nonlinearity on the uncertainty calculation procedure were studied and results are presented. The advantages and disadvantages of using this particular uncertainty procedure are discussed. A brief description of the thrust-calculation technique along with the uncertainty calculation procedure is included.

  2. Measurement of far field combustion noise from a turbofan engine using coherence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.; Reshotko, M.; Montegani, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Coherence measurements between fluctuating pressure in the combustor of a YF-102 turbofan engine and far-field acoustic pressure were made. The results indicated that a coherent relationship between the combustor pressure and far-field existed only at frequencies below 250 Hz, with the peak occurring near 125 Hz. The coherence functions and the far-field spectra were used to compute the combustor-associated far-field noise in terms of spectra, directivity, and acoustic power, over a range of engine operating conditions. The acoustic results so measured were compared with results obtained by conventional methods, as well as with various semiempirical predictions schemes. Examination of the directivity patterns indicated a peak in the combustion noise near 120 deg (relative to the inlet axis).

  3. Low frequency noise in a quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.; Groesbeck, D. E.; Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    A quiet, clean, general aviation, turbofan engine was instrumented to measure the fluctuating pressures in the combustor, turbine exit duct, engine nozzle and the far field. Both a separate flow nozzle and an internal mixer nozzle were tested. The fluctuating pressure data are presented in overall pressure and power levels and in spectral plots. The combustor data are compared to recent theory and found to be in excellent agreement. The results indicate that microphone correction procedures for elevated mean pressures are questionable. Ordinary coherence function analysis suggests the presence of an additional low frequency noise source downstream of the turbine that is due to the turbine itself. Low frequency narrowband data and coherence function analysis are presented.

  4. Exhaust-Gas Pressure and Temperature Survey of F404-GE-400 Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An exhaust-gas pressure and temperature survey of the General Electric F404-GE-400 turbofan engine was conducted in the altitude test facility of the NASA Lewis Propulsion System Laboratory. Traversals by a survey rake were made across the exhaust-nozzle exit to measure the pitot pressure and total temperature. Tests were performed at Mach 0.87 and a 24,000-ft altitude and at Mach 0.30 and a 30,000-ft altitude with various power settings from intermediate to maximum afterburning. Data yielded smooth pressure and temperature profiles with maximum jet temperatures approximately 1.4 in. inside the nozzle edge and maximum jet temperatures from 1 to 3 in. inside the edge. A low-pressure region located exactly at engine center was noted. The maximum temperature encountered was 3800 R.

  5. Turbofan Noise Propagation and Radiation at High Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Danielle (Technical Monitor); Eversman, Walter

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes progress on NASA Glenn Research Center Grant NAG3-2718 to the University of Missouri at Rolla This grant was awarded on February 22, 2002 and this report covers the performance period to September 30, 2002. There is considerable overlap in research effort with previous NASA Glenn Grant NAG3-2340, as the current effort represents a continuation and extension of this previous grant, which with a no cost supplement terminated on January 31, 2002. This report outlines progress on each task in the original proposal. In addition to progress on several of the specifically proposed tasks, considerable progress has been made in FEM algorithm development with the intent of introducing computational efficiencies required to model high frequency propagation and radiation and to open the possibility of expanding the scope of the modeling capability to three dimensional duct and nacelle geometries. Appended to this document is a paper presented at the 8th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference in June 2002. This paper overlaps the present grant and the previous grant identified above, and it is noted that this paper has also been appended to the final report for NAG3-2304.

  6. Implementation of magnetohydrodynamic energy bypass process for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ying Ming; Czysz, Paul A.; Bruno, Claudio

    2004-08-01

    The global political structure has changed dramatically since the breakup of the former Soviet Union, and world changes have caused the United States to reprioritize its national hypersonic needs. The US Government has looked at the needs of the future, and the hypersonic aerospace plane is one of the systems included in alternative force structures. One hypersonic aerospace plane concept would involve magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) technology (i.e., the AJAX hypersonic flight vehicle concept) originally proposed by Russian scientist Vladimir Fraishtadt. This paper reports on the current progress and findings of an air-breathing horizontal takeoff and landing design concept using an MHD energy bypass injector ramjet engine being studied at MSE Technology Applications, Inc., HyperTech Concepts, and several universities for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center under a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research project. The areas that are addressed in this paper include: (1) ionization required to achieve the required energy bypass, (2) utilization of a nonequilibrium model to calculate nonequilibrium engine ionization conditions, (3) hydrocarbon fuel reforming, and (4) vehicle performance and sizing. A quasi-onedimensional electromagnetic code combined with a new scramjet model, as well as other tools, were used to examine total system performance.

  7. A real-time simulator of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Delaat, John C.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1989-01-01

    A real-time digital simulator of a Pratt and Whitney F100 engine has been developed for real-time code verification and for actuator diagnosis during full-scale engine testing. This self-contained unit can operate in an open-loop stand-alone mode or as part of closed-loop control system. It can also be used for control system design and development. Tests conducted in conjunction with the NASA Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation program show that the simulator is a valuable tool for real-time code verification and as a real-time actuator simulator for actuator fault diagnosis. Although currently a small perturbation model, advances in microprocessor hardware should allow the simulator to evolve into a real-time, full-envelope, full engine simulation.

  8. EFFECTS OF GRAPHITE SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON BYPASS FLOW COMPUTATIONS FOR AN HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Johnson; Yu-Hsin Tung; Hiroyuki Sato

    2011-07-01

    Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow, which has been estimated to be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors on three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U. S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for flow in a single tube that is representative of a coolant channel in the prismatic HTGR core. The results are compared to published correlations for wall shear stress and Nusselt number in turbulent pipe flow. Turbulence models that perform well are then used to make bypass flow calculations in a symmetric onetwelfth sector of a prismatic block that includes bypass flow. The comparison of shear stress and Nusselt number results with published correlations constitutes a partial validation of the CFD model. Calculations are also compared to ones made previously using a different CFD code. Results indicate that

  9. Acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan jet noise simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Stringas, E. J.; Brausch, J. F.; Staid, P. S.; Heck, P. H.; Latham, D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a static acoustic and aerodynamic performance, model-scale test program on coannular unsuppressed and multielement fan suppressed nozzle configurations are summarized. The results of the static acoustic tests show a very beneficial interaction effect. When the measured noise levels were compared with the predicted noise levels of two independent but equivalent conical nozzle flow streams, noise reductions for the unsuppressed coannular nozzles were of the order of 10 PNdB; high levels of suppression (8 PNdB) were still maintained even when only a small amount of core stream flow was used. The multielement fan suppressed coannular nozzle tests showed 15 PNdB noise reductions and up to 18 PNdB noise reductions when a treated ejector was added. The static aerodynamic performance tests showed that the unsuppressed coannular plug nozzles obtained gross thrust coefficients of 0.972, with 1.2 to 1.7 percent lower levels for the multielement fan-suppressed coannular flow nozzles. For the first time anywhere, laser velocimeter velocity profile measurements were made on these types of nozzle configurations and with supersonic heated flow conditions. Measurements showed that a very rapid decay in the mean velocity occurs for the nozzle tested.

  10. Inlet Shape Effects on the Far-Field Sound of a Model Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Dougherty, R. P.; Farassat, F.; Gerhold, C. H.

    1997-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the effects of inlet shape on fan radiated noise. Four inlet geometries, which included a long standard flight type inlet, a short, aggressive flight inlet a scarf inlet, and an elliptical inlet were investigated in the study. The fan model used in the study was a 0.1 scale of the Pratt and Whitney Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP), an ultra high bypass ratio turbofan engine. Acoustic data are presented for a fan speed of 70% (12,000 rpm) and a tunnel speed of 0.10 Mach number, The fan was configured with a 16-bladed rotor and a 40 stator vane set that were separated by 2.0 chord lengths. The radiated noise was measured with 15 microphones on a boom that traversed the length of the tunnel test section. Data from these microphones are presented in the form of sideline angle directivity plots. Noise associated with the test inlets was also predicted using a ray acoustics code. Inlet shape has been found to have a significant effect on both tone and broadband noise, and the non-axisymmetric inlet shape can be used for a noise reduction method.

  11. 75 FR 801 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 500, 700, and 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... requires replacing the fuel-to-oil heat exchanger (FOHE). This proposed AD would require replacing the FOHE..., 553A2-61, 556A2-61, 556B2-61, and 560A2-61 turbofan engines with fuel-to-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs... through Friday, except Federal holidays. Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31,...

  12. Noise Reduction Potential of Large, Over-the-Wing Mounted, Advanced Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    As we look to the future, increasingly stringent civilian aviation noise regulations will require the design and manufacture of extremely quiet commercial aircraft. Indeed, the noise goal for NASA's Aeronautics Enterprise calls for technologies that will help to provide a 20 EPNdB reduction relative to today's levels by the year 2022. Further, the large fan diameters of modem, increasingly higher bypass ratio engines pose a significant packaging and aircraft installation challenge. One design approach that addresses both of these challenges is to mount the engines above the wing. In addition to allowing the performance trend towards large, ultra high bypass ratio cycles to continue, this over-the-wing design is believed to offer noise shielding benefits to observers on the ground. This paper describes the analytical certification noise predictions of a notional, long haul, commercial quadjet transport with advanced, high bypass engines mounted above the wing.

  13. [Cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery].

    PubMed

    Dayan, Victor; Ricca, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide with an increase in the incidence in younger populations. Today revascularization strategies are capable of alleviating acute ischemia and/or chronic ischemia. These can be performed percutaneously or through surgery. Even if we improve myocardial perfusion by these methods, the main determinant in maintaining patency of coronary arteries and bypass is a correctly instituted secondary prevention. This is the main focus of cardiac rehabilitation proposals. Although much has been published about the role of cardiac rehabilitation after percutaneous revascularization, there is little work able to synthesize the current state of cardiac rehabilitation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. The aim of this paper is to review the effect of rehabilitation in the return to work, survival, functional capacity, depression and anxiety, as well as compare centralized vs. home rehabilitation in this patient population.

  14. The Golden bypass landslide, Golden, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Highland, L.M.; Brown, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Slope instability along a new highway bypass in Golden, Colorado, became a major concern in 1993. Rains and snowmelt accelerated movement of a landslide that had begun to develop before the bypass was opened to traffic in July of 1991. The downslope movement of earth materials increased significantly in 1993. During the first few months of the year, the landslide pushed onto the west shoulder of the road and crumpled the pavement beneath the south-bound lane. As we prepare this article (September, 1993), the slide continues to encroach onto the highway, posing a persistent problem despite repeated efforts to slow or stop its movement. As this article will show, permanent solutions to landslide problems of this kind are difficult to obtain. 

  15. Temporary extracorporeal bypass modalities during aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bassin, Levi; Bell, David

    2016-09-01

    The key to aortic surgery is protection of the brain, heart, spinal cord, and viscera. For operations involving the aortic arch, the focus is on cerebral protection, while for pathology involving the descending thoracic aorta, the focus is on spinal protection. Optimal cerebral and spinal protection requires an extensive knowledge of the operative steps and an understanding of the cardiopulmonary bypass modalities that are possible. A bloodless field is required when operating on the aorta. As a result, periods of ischemia to the central nervous system and end-organ viscera are often unavoidable. The main techniques to mitigate ischemia include hypothermia and selective perfusion of the ischemic organ in question. This chapter will first briefly review bypass modalities and then describe how they can be used for various aortic scenarios. PMID:27650344

  16. TRAS principles blight arterial bypass and plasty.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M V; Mehta, L A; Kothari, V M

    1997-01-01

    A new concept--Tissue Requisitions (Principle I)/Relinquishes (Principle II) Arterial Supply--of TRAS principles is introduced to help appreciate the failures/successes of modern medicine's attempts at restoring arterial flow in luminally compromised coronary/carotid fields, an invasive branch rightly called vascular ReRheology, which comprises diagnosing/treating arterial blocks. The technical wizardry of arterial reconstruction (bypass) or lumen--restoration (plasty) has to reckon with the TRAS principles all the time. PMID:10740714

  17. [ECG-gated bypass CT angiography--application in imaging arterial bypasses].

    PubMed

    Wintersperger, B J; Bastarrika, G; Nikolaou, K; Rist, C; Huber, A; Knez, A; Reiser, M F; Becker, C R; Vicol, C

    2004-02-01

    Nowadays coronary artery bypass grafting is increasingly performed using arterial grafts. Purpose of the study was the evaluation of a appropriate 16 detector-row CT angiography protocol in patients after predominantly arterial bypass grafting. Fourteen patients after bypass grafting were including into the study and CT angiography carried out in the early postoperative period using a 16 detector-row CT system. To reduce cardiac pulsation artifacts data acquisition was implemented using ECG-gating algorithms. Overall 43 grafts (37 arterial, 6 venous) were examined. In 13 patients surgery had been performed using composite grafts with T or TY configuration. The mean heart rate was 74.1 bpm and showed a negative correlation to the image quality (r=-0.65; p=0.01). However, all data sets were diagnostic. Contrast injection protocol allowed for a homogeneous opacification throughout the vessels of interest. All non-delineationable grafts (5) showed a close proximity to the heart (T or Y grafts). Cardiac surgery is increasingly focusing on arterial revascularisation in bypass grafting and therefore leading to new demands for non-invasive bypass graft imaging. 16 detector-row CT allows a reliable visualization of even composite arterial grafts. However, for detection of grafts in the proximity of the heart a reduction of the heart rate (<65-70) still seems to be necessary. PMID:14991132

  18. Estimation of signal coherence threshold and concealed spectral lines applied to detection of turbofan engine combustion noise.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-05-01

    Combustion noise from turbofan engines has become important, as the noise from sources like the fan and jet are reduced. An aligned and un-aligned coherence technique has been developed to determine a threshold level for the coherence and thereby help to separate the coherent combustion noise source from other noise sources measured with far-field microphones. This method is compared with a statistics based coherence threshold estimation method. In addition, the un-aligned coherence procedure at the same time also reveals periodicities, spectral lines, and undamped sinusoids hidden by broadband turbofan engine noise. In calculating the coherence threshold using a statistical method, one may use either the number of independent records or a larger number corresponding to the number of overlapped records used to create the average. Using data from a turbofan engine and a simulation this paper shows that applying the Fisher z-transform to the un-aligned coherence can aid in making the proper selection of samples and produce a reasonable statistics based coherence threshold. Examples are presented showing that the underlying tonal and coherent broad band structure which is buried under random broadband noise and jet noise can be determined. The method also shows the possible presence of indirect combustion noise. PMID:21568410

  19. Estimation of Signal Coherence Threshold and Concealed Spectral Lines Applied to Detection of Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2010-01-01

    Combustion noise from turbofan engines has become important, as the noise from sources like the fan and jet are reduced. An aligned and un-aligned coherence technique has been developed to determine a threshold level for the coherence and thereby help to separate the coherent combustion noise source from other noise sources measured with far-field microphones. This method is compared with a statistics based coherence threshold estimation method. In addition, the un-aligned coherence procedure at the same time also reveals periodicities, spectral lines, and undamped sinusoids hidden by broadband turbofan engine noise. In calculating the coherence threshold using a statistical method, one may use either the number of independent records or a larger number corresponding to the number of overlapped records used to create the average. Using data from a turbofan engine and a simulation this paper shows that applying the Fisher z-transform to the un-aligned coherence can aid in making the proper selection of samples and produce a reasonable statistics based coherence threshold. Examples are presented showing that the underlying tonal and coherent broad band structure which is buried under random broadband noise and jet noise can be determined. The method also shows the possible presence of indirect combustion noise. Copyright 2011 Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

  20. [Robot-assisted Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2016-07-01

    The application for robot-assisted coronary surgery ranges from internal thoracic artery (ITA) harvesting with hand-sewn anastomoses to totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting (TECAB), either on- or off-pump. The bilateral IMA can be harvested with the aid of a surgical robot and then multivessel bypass grafting can follow. Such robot-assisted minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting is called "ThoraCAB". Surgical robots cannot only endoscopically harvest the ITA but they can also anastomose the coronary artery in TECAB. But TECAB still has the difficulties, such as narrow surgical field in Japanese patients. Both procedures have the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma, such as reduced comlications, faster return back to normal activities and being improved cosmesis, and which have resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgery. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery for structural heart disease has been approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) since December 2015, however, robot-assisted cardiac surgery for TECAB has not been approved yet in Japan. PMID:27440015

  1. Hemodynamic Conditions in a Failing Peripheral Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    McGah, Patrick M.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Beach, Kirk W.; Zierler, R. Eugene; Riley, James J.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms of restenosis in autogenous vein bypass grafts placed for peripheral artery disease are not completely understood. We seek to investigate the role of hemodynamic stress in a case study of a revised bypass graft that failed due to restenosis. Methods The morphology of the lumen is reconstructed from a custom 3D ultrasound system. Scans were taken at one, six, and sixteen months after a patch angioplasty procedure. Computational hemodynamic simulations of the patient-specific model provide the blood flow features and the hemodynamic stresses on the vessel wall at the three time points studied. Results The vessel was initially free of any detectable lesions, but a 60% diameter reducing stenosis developed over the 16 month interval of study. As determined from the simulations, chaotic and recirculating flow occurred downstream of the stenosis due to the sudden widening of the lumen at the patch location. Curvature and a sudden increase in the lumen cross-sectional area induce these flow features that are hypothesized to be conducive to intimal hyperplasia. Favorable agreement was found between simulation results and in vivo Doppler ultrasound velocity measurements. Conclusions Transitional and chaotic flow occurs at the site of the revision, inducing a complex pattern of wall shear are computed with the hemodynamic simulations. This supports the hypothesis that the hemodynamic stresses in the revised segment, produced by the coupling of vessel geometry and chaotic flow, led to the intimal hyperplasia and restenosis of the graft. PMID:22551907

  2. Meta-analysis of effect of single versus dual antiplatelet therapy on early patency of bypass conduits after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Nocerino, Angelica G; Achenbach, Stephan; Taylor, Allen J

    2013-11-15

    Aspirin monotherapy represents a standard therapy for preserving patency after coronary artery bypass grafting. Randomized trials addressing whether dual antiplatelet therapy is superior to single antiplatelet therapy to achieve graft patency early after coronary surgery have shown inconsistent results. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing single versus dual antiplatelet therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting. In a systematic published works search, 5 randomized controlled trials meeting inclusion criteria were identified. Pooled efficacy and safety data were abstracted and analyzed using a fixed-effects model. The 5 trials included 958 patients and a total of 2,919 grafts with treatment up to 1 year after coronary bypass surgery. Early occlusion was identified in 165 (6.5%) of 2,526 bypass grafts. Early occlusion occurred in a greater proportion of grafts among patients treated with single therapy (105 of 1,369; 7.7%) compared with dual antiplatelet therapy (69 of 1,386; 5.0%; p = 0.005). The odds ratio for graft occlusion with single versus dual therapy was 1.59 (95% confidence interval 1.16 to 2.17). For vein grafts, single antiplatelet therapy was associated with a significantly increased graft loss rate (91 of 846; 10.8%) versus dual antiplatelet therapy (57 of 860; 6.6%; odds ratio 1.70 [1.20 to 2.40]; p = 0.003). There was no effect on arterial graft patency. Bleeding was noted in 3.3% and 4.9% of single and dual therapy treated patients, respectively, with only 3 trials reporting bleeding outcomes. In conclusion, among 958 patients randomly assigned to either single or dual antiplatelet therapy for up to 1 year after coronary bypass surgery, single antiplatelet therapy significantly increased the risk for graft occlusion, an effect isolated to vein grafts, not arterial grafts.

  3. Numerical analysis of non-Newtonian blood flow and wall shear stress in realistic single, double and triple aorto-coronary bypasses.

    PubMed

    Vimmr, J; Jonášová, A; Bublík, O

    2013-10-01

    Considering the fact that hemodynamics plays an important role in the patency and overall performance of implanted bypass grafts, this work presents a numerical investigation of pulsatile non-Newtonian blood flow in three different patient-specific aorto-coronary bypasses. The three bypass models are distinguished from each other by the number of distal side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses and denoted as single, double and triple bypasses. The mathematical model in the form of time-dependent nonlinear system of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is coupled with the Carreau-Yasuda model describing the shear-thinning property of human blood and numerically solved using the principle of the SIMPLE algorithm and cell-centred finite volume method formulated for hybrid unstructured tetrahedral grids. The numerical results computed for non-Newtonian and Newtonian blood flow in the three aorto-coronary bypasses are compared and analysed with emphasis placed on the distribution of cycle-averaged wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. As shown in this study, the non-Newtonian blood flow in all of the considered bypass models does not significantly differ from the Newtonian one. Our observations further suggest that, especially in the case of sequential grafts, the resulting flow field and shear stimulation are strongly influenced by the diameter of the vessels involved in the bypassing. PMID:23733715

  4. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass... cardiopulmonary bypass circuit during bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  5. 75 FR 27491 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW617F-E Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    .... Investigation showed that the Fuel Filter Bypass Valve poppet in the Fuel Oil Heat Exchanger (FOHE) on that... fuel/oil heat exchanger (FOHE) part number (P/ N) 35C4540-01 installed. These engines are installed on... holidays. Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp., 1000 Marie-Victorin, Longueuil,...

  6. Heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The bypass system operates to pass strong solution from the generator around the heat exchanger to the absorber of the absorption refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator above a selected level indicative of solidification of strong solution in the heat exchanger or other such blockage. The bypass system includes a bypass line with a gooseneck located in the generator for controlling flow of strong solution into the bypass line and for preventing refrigerant vapor in the generator from entering the bypass line during normal operation of the refrigeration system. Also, the bypass line includes a trap section filled with liquid for providing a barrier to maintain the normal pressure difference between the generator and the absorber even when the gooseneck of the bypass line is exposed to refrigerant vapor in the generator. Strong solution, which may accumulate in the trap section of the bypass line, is diluted, to prevent solidification, by supplying weak solution to the trap section from a purge system for the absorption refrigeration system.

  7. Endovascular exclusion of aortoesophageal fistula after coarctation extraanatomical bypass.

    PubMed

    Myers, Patrick O; Gemayel, Gino; Mugnai, Damiano; Murith, Nicolas; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2014-07-01

    Extraanatomical bypass has been advocated as the primary technique in adolescents or adults presenting with aortic coarctation. This approach carries significant morbidity, and graft-related complications may be more important in the young patient population. A 52-year-old man who had previously undergone extraanatomical bypass of aortic coarctation was diagnosed with a distal anastomotic pseudoaneurysm and aortoesophageal fistula. This was managed by proximal bypass plugging with an occluder, endovascular exclusion with a stent-graft in the thoracic descending aorta covering the pseudoaneurysm, and coarctation balloon dilation. Aortoesophageal fistula is a late complication observed after extraanatomical bypass for coarctation. This case illustrates this rare complication.

  8. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4230 Cardiopulmonary... with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  9. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4420... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4230 Cardiopulmonary... with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  11. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4230 Cardiopulmonary... with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  12. Preoperative graft assessment in aortocoronary bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tinica, Grigore; Vartic, Cristina Luca; Mocanu, Veronica; Baran, Dana; Butcovan, Doina

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a surgical procedure able to improve the blood supply to the myocardium. In the present study, the distal segments of grafts taken from the internal thoracic artery (ITA), radial artery (RA) and saphenous vein (SV) for use in aortocoronary bypass surgery were examined. The morphologies of the grafts were investigated in order to draw conclusions concerning their patency and viability. In addition, clinical and laboratory risk factors considered to be significant predictors of lesion severity in graft vessels used in CABGs were investigated. In total, 54 distal graft segments of ITAs, RAs and SVs from 20 men and 6 women aged between 42 and 78 years, were evaluated. Histological analyses were used to visualize graft lesions. Morphometrically, the intimal thickness index (ITI) and luminal narrowing were assessed as an indication of graft patency. The histological changes observed in the graft vessel walls included the presence of distinct atheromatous plaques (fatty streaks in 2 cases) or thickening of the intima (20 cases) and media (17 cases). Morphometric analysis showed that the mean ITI of the vessel conduits was 0.37 in the SVs, 0.95 in the RAs, and 1.66 in the ITAs. No patient had >50% conduit stenosis. By assessing the association between risk factors and graft lesions, it was found that all the patients showed risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as age (61.54%), arterial hypertension (65.38%), hyperlipidemia (65.38%), smoking (34.61%), diabetes mellitus (38.46%) and obesity (15.38%). The presence of pre-existing lesions in bypass grafts may contribute to a reduction in their viability, particularly in the case of venous grafts. Further long-term follow-ups are mandatory to evaluate the consequences of such lesions upon the patency of the grafts. PMID:27446279

  13. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D; Cousins, Peter J

    2013-11-12

    Methods of fabricating bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In once embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed on the first conductive region. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed within, and surrounded by, an uppermost portion of the first conductive region but is not formed in a lowermost portion of the first conductive region.

  14. Bypass and monitoring circuit for refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Kyzer, G.; Smollon, J.

    1987-05-19

    A bypass and monitoring circuit is described for use with a refrigeration system having means to sense a need to initiate a defrost cycle and means to reset the defrost cycle upon sensing the defrosting of the refrigeration system. The circuit comprises: first means to sense whether the duration of each defrost cycle exceeds a certain period; and second means, responsive to the first means sensing that the duration of a given cycle exceeded the certain period, for electrically decoupling the reset means from the refrigeration system, for resetting the given defrost cycle and for enabling the occurrence of and controlling the duration of subsequent defrost cycle.

  15. Flow characteristics in narrowed coronary bypass graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Bosioc, A.; Bernad, E. S.; Petre, I.; Totorean, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    Tortuous saphenous vein graft (SVG) hemodynamics was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Computed tomography (CT) technology is used for non-invasive bypass graft assessment 7 days after surgery. CT investigation shown two regions with severe shape remodelling first is an elbow type contortion and second is a severe curvature with tortuous area reduction. In conclusion, the helical flow induced by vessel torsion may stabilize the blood flow in the distal part of the SVG, reducing the flow disturbance and suppressing the flow separation, but in the distal end of the graft, promote the inflammatory processes in the vessels.

  16. Conduits for Coronary Bypass: Vein Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Emily A

    2012-01-01

    The saphenous vein has been the principal conduit for coronary bypass grafting from the beginning, circa 1970. This report briefly traces this history and concomitantly presents one surgeons experience and personal views on use of the vein graft. As such it is not exhaustive but meant to be practical with a modest number of references. The focus is that of providing guidance and perspective which may be at variance with that of others and recognizing that there may be many ways to accomplish the task at hand. Hopefully the surgeon in training/early career may find this instructive on the journey to surgical maturity. PMID:23130300

  17. Conduits for coronary bypass: vein grafts.

    PubMed

    Barner, Hendrick B; Farkas, Emily A

    2012-10-01

    The saphenous vein has been the principal conduit for coronary bypass grafting from the beginning, circa 1970. This report briefly traces this history and concomitantly presents one surgeons experience and personal views on use of the vein graft. As such it is not exhaustive but meant to be practical with a modest number of references. The focus is that of providing guidance and perspective which may be at variance with that of others and recognizing that there may be many ways to accomplish the task at hand. Hopefully the surgeon in training/early career may find this instructive on the journey to surgical maturity. PMID:23130300

  18. 3D Multistage Simulation of Each Component of the GE90 Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark; Topp, Dave; Veres, Joe

    1999-01-01

    A 3D multistage simulation of each component of the GE90 Turbofan engine has been made. This includes 49 blade rows. A coupled simulation of all blade rows will be made very soon. The simulation is running using two levels of parallelism. The first level is on a blade row basis with information shared using files. The second level is using a grid domain decomposition with information shared using MPI. Timings will be shown for running on the SP2, an SGI Origin and a distributed system of HP workstations. On the HP workstations, the CHIMP version of MPI is used, with queuing supplied by LSF (Load Sharing Facility). A script-based control system is used to ensure reliability. An MPEG movie illustrating the flow simulation of the engine has been created using PV3, a parallel visualization library created by Bob Haimes of MIT. PVM is used to create a virtual machine from 10 HP workstations and display on an SGI workstation. A representative component simulation will be compared to rig data to demonstrate its usefulness in turbomachinery design and analysis.

  19. Source Methodology for Turbofan Noise Prediction (SOURCE3D Technical Documentation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides the analytical documentation for the SOURCE3D Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. It derives the equations for the rotor scattering coefficients and stator source vector and scattering coefficients that are needed for use in the TFANS (Theoretical Fan Noise Design/Prediction System). SOURCE3D treats the rotor and stator as isolated source elements. TFANS uses this information, along with scattering coefficients for inlet and exit elements, and provides complete noise solutions for turbofan engines. SOURCE3D is composed of a collection of FORTRAN programs that have been obtained by extending the approach of the earlier V072 Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. Similar to V072, it treats the rotor and stator as a collection of blades and vanes having zero thickness and camber contained in an infinite, hardwall annular duct. SOURCE3D adds important features to the V072 capability-a rotor element, swirl flow and vorticity waves, actuator disks for flow turning, and combined rotor/actuator disk and stator/actuator disk elements. These items allow reflections from the rotor, frequency scattering, and mode trapping, thus providing more complete noise predictions than previously. The code has been thoroughly verified through comparison with D.B. Hanson's CUP2D two- dimensional code using a narrow annulus test case.

  20. A Demonstration of a Retrofit Architecture for Intelligent Control and Diagnostics of a Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Turso, James A.; Shah, Neerav; Sowers, T. Shane; Owen, A. Karl

    2005-01-01

    A retrofit architecture for intelligent turbofan engine control and diagnostics that changes the fan speed command to maintain thrust is proposed and its demonstration in a piloted flight simulator is described. The objective of the implementation is to increase the level of autonomy of the propulsion system, thereby reducing pilot workload in the presence of anomalies and engine degradation due to wear. The main functions of the architecture are to diagnose the cause of changes in the engine s operation, warning the pilot if necessary, and to adjust the outer loop control reference signal in response to the changes. This requires that the retrofit control architecture contain the capability to determine the changed relationship between fan speed and thrust, and the intelligence to recognize the cause of the change in order to correct it or warn the pilot. The proposed retrofit architecture is able to determine the fan speed setting through recognition of the degradation level of the engine, and it is able to identify specific faults and warn the pilot. In the flight simulator it was demonstrated that when degradation is introduced into an engine with standard fan speed control, the pilot needs to take corrective action to maintain heading. Utilizing the intelligent retrofit control architecture, the engine thrust is automatically adjusted to its expected value, eliminating yaw without pilot intervention.