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Sample records for c-mod motional stark

  1. Design of a New Optical System for Alcator C-Mod Motional Stark Effect Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jinseok; Scott, Steve; Manfred, Bitter; Lerner, Lerner

    2009-11-12

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod uses an in-vessel optical system (five lenses and three mirrors) to relay polarized light to an external polarimeter because port access limitations on Alcator C-Mod preclude a direct view of the diagnostic beam. The system experiences unacceptable, spurious drifts of order several degrees in measured pitch angle over the course of a run day. Recent experiments illuminated the MSE diagnostic with polarized light of fixed orientation as heat was applied to various optical elements. A large change in measured angle was observed as two particular lenses were heated, indicating that thermal-stress-induced birefringence is a likely cause of the spurious variability. Several new optical designs have been evaluated to eliminate the affected in-vessel lenses and to replace the focusing they provide with curved mirrors; however, ray tracing calculations imply that this method is not feasible. A new approach is under consideration that utilizes in situ calibrations with in-vessel reference polarized light sources. 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Design of a new optical system for Alcator C-Mod motional Stark effect diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jinseok; Scott, Steve; Bitter, Manfred; Lerner, Scott

    2008-10-15

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod uses an in-vessel optical system (five lenses and three mirrors) to relay polarized light to an external polarimeter because port access limitations on Alcator C-Mod preclude a direct view of the diagnostic beam. The system experiences unacceptable, spurious drifts of order several degrees in measured pitch angle over the course of a run day. Recent experiments illuminated the MSE diagnostic with polarized light of fixed orientation as heat was applied to various optical elements. A large change in measured angle was observed as two particular lenses were heated, indicating that thermal-stress-induced birefringence is a likely cause of the spurious variability. Several new optical designs have been evaluated to eliminate the affected in-vessel lenses and to replace the focusing they provide with curved mirrors; however, ray tracing calculations imply that this method is not feasible. A new approach is under consideration that utilizes in situ calibrations with in-vessel reference polarized light sources.

  3. Robotic calibration of the motional Stark effect diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Mumgaard, Robert T; Scott, Steven D; Ko, Jinseok

    2014-05-01

    The capability to calibrate diagnostics, such as the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic, without using plasma or beam-into-gas discharges will become increasingly important on next step fusion facilities due to machine availability and operational constraints. A robotic calibration system consisting of a motorized three-axis positioning system and a polarization light source capable of generating arbitrary polarization states with a linear polarization angle accuracy of <0.05° has been constructed and has been used to calibrate the MSE diagnostic deployed on Alcator C-Mod. The polarization response of the complex diagnostic is shown to be fully captured using a Fourier expansion of the detector signals in terms of even harmonics of the input polarization angle. The system's high precision robotic control of position and orientation allow it to be used also to calibrate the geometry of the instrument's view. Combined with careful measurements of the narrow bandpass spectral filters, this system fully calibrates the diagnostic without any plasma discharges. The system's high repeatability, flexibility, and speed has been exploited to quantify several systematics in the MSE diagnostic response, providing a more complete understanding of the diagnostic performance.

  4. Robotic calibration of the motional Stark effect diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumgaard, Robert T.; Scott, Steven D.; Ko, Jinseok

    2014-05-01

    The capability to calibrate diagnostics, such as the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic, without using plasma or beam-into-gas discharges will become increasingly important on next step fusion facilities due to machine availability and operational constraints. A robotic calibration system consisting of a motorized three-axis positioning system and a polarization light source capable of generating arbitrary polarization states with a linear polarization angle accuracy of <0.05° has been constructed and has been used to calibrate the MSE diagnostic deployed on Alcator C-Mod. The polarization response of the complex diagnostic is shown to be fully captured using a Fourier expansion of the detector signals in terms of even harmonics of the input polarization angle. The system's high precision robotic control of position and orientation allow it to be used also to calibrate the geometry of the instrument's view. Combined with careful measurements of the narrow bandpass spectral filters, this system fully calibrates the diagnostic without any plasma discharges. The system's high repeatability, flexibility, and speed has been exploited to quantify several systematics in the MSE diagnostic response, providing a more complete understanding of the diagnostic performance.

  5. Robotic calibration of the motional Stark effect diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Mumgaard, Robert T.; Scott, Steven D.; Ko, Jinseok

    2014-05-15

    The capability to calibrate diagnostics, such as the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic, without using plasma or beam-into-gas discharges will become increasingly important on next step fusion facilities due to machine availability and operational constraints. A robotic calibration system consisting of a motorized three-axis positioning system and a polarization light source capable of generating arbitrary polarization states with a linear polarization angle accuracy of <0.05° has been constructed and has been used to calibrate the MSE diagnostic deployed on Alcator C-Mod. The polarization response of the complex diagnostic is shown to be fully captured using a Fourier expansion of the detector signals in terms of even harmonics of the input polarization angle. The system's high precision robotic control of position and orientation allow it to be used also to calibrate the geometry of the instrument's view. Combined with careful measurements of the narrow bandpass spectral filters, this system fully calibrates the diagnostic without any plasma discharges. The system's high repeatability, flexibility, and speed has been exploited to quantify several systematics in the MSE diagnostic response, providing a more complete understanding of the diagnostic performance.

  6. Study on the Characteristics of Wire Grid Polarizer for Alcator C-Mod Motional Stark Effect Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jinseok; Scott, Steve

    2005-10-01

    A wire grid polarizer (WGP) has been installed on the in-vessel optics module of the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic system in Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The polarized light produced by this WGP can be utilized to measure the change in polarization angle by Faraday rotation through the diagnostic system when the tokamak is operated in its normal condition. Intensive WGP tests on the off-site optical table have been done to investigate the effect of non-normal incidence on the WGP which is indeed the situation inside the tokamak. A model has been developed to understand and simulate various effects of the WGP structure such as changes in angle-of-incidence and reflection/transmission coefficients due to the anti-reflection coating layer and the glass substrate. These analytic predictions and test results are compared with the tests in the tokamak where the in-vessel WGP is used.

  7. Motional Stark effect diagnostic on TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowska, K.; De Bock, M.; Jaspers, R.; von Hellermann, M.; Shmaenok, L.

    2004-10-01

    A motional Stark effect diagnostic at the tokamak TEXTOR has been constructed and brought recently into operation. In contrast to diagnostics used on other tokamaks, this diagnostic reveals the direction of the magnetic field from the intensity ratio of the π and σ components of the emitted Balmer-α and not from a polarization measurement of a single line. Moreover, the complete spectrum is measured which allows determining the radial position of the measurement, and in principle the radial electric field.

  8. Atomic Models for Motional Stark Effects Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, M F; Holcomb, C; Jayakuma, J; Allen, S; Pablant, N A; Burrell, K

    2007-07-26

    We present detailed atomic physics models for motional Stark effects (MSE) diagnostic on magnetic fusion devices. Excitation and ionization cross sections of the hydrogen or deuterium beam traveling in a magnetic field in collisions with electrons, ions, and neutral gas are calculated in the first Born approximation. The density matrices and polarization states of individual Stark-Zeeman components of the Balmer {alpha} line are obtained for both beam into plasma and beam into gas models. A detailed comparison of the model calculations and the MSE polarimetry and spectral intensity measurements obtained at the DIII-D tokamak is carried out. Although our beam into gas models provide a qualitative explanation for the larger {pi}/{sigma} intensity ratios and represent significant improvements over the statistical population models, empirical adjustment factors ranging from 1.0-2.0 must still be applied to individual line intensities to bring the calculations into full agreement with the observations. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that beam into gas measurements can be used successfully as calibration procedures for measuring the magnetic pitch angle through {pi}/{sigma} intensity ratios. The analyses of the filter-scan polarization spectra from the DIII-D MSE polarimetry system indicate unknown channel and time dependent light contaminations in the beam into gas measurements. Such contaminations may be the main reason for the failure of beam into gas calibration on MSE polarimetry systems.

  9. Preparations for the motional Stark effect diagnostic on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, J.; Li, Y. Y.; Lyu, B. Sheng, P.; Wan, B. N.; Zhang, Y.; Yin, X. H.; Yu, Y.; Ye, M. Y.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    Measurement and control of the current profile is essential for high performance and steady state operation of Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). For this purpose, a conventional Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostics utilizing photoelastic modulators is proposed and investigated. The pilot experiment includes one channel to verify the feasibility of MSE, whose sightline intersects with Neutral Beam Injection at major radius of R = 2.12 m. A beam splitter is adopted for simultaneous measurements of Stark multiplets and their polarization directions. A simplified simulation code was also developed to explore the Stark splitting spectra. Finally, the filter is optimized based on the viewing geometry and neutral beam parameters.

  10. Imaging motional Stark effect measurements at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, O. P.; Burckhart, A.; McDermott, R.; Pütterich, T.; Wolf, R. C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of results from the Imaging Motional Stark Effect (IMSE) diagnostic obtained during its first measurement campaign at ASDEX Upgrade since installation as a permanent diagnostic. A brief overview of the IMSE technique is given, followed by measurements of a standard H-mode discharge, which are compared to equilibrium reconstructions showing good agreement where expected. The development of special discharges for the calibration of pitch angle is reported and safety factor profile changes during sawteeth crashes are shown, which can be resolved to a few percent due to the high sensitivity at good time resolution of the new IMSE system.

  11. Instrumentation for a multichord motional Stark effect diagnostic in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, J.; Ko, J.; De Bock, M. F. M.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2014-11-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is used to measure the radial magnetic pitch angle profile in neutral beam heated plasmas. This information is used to calculate the safety factor, q, with magnetic equilibrium reconstruction codes such as EFIT. The MSE diagnostic is important during active shaping of the q profile to optimize confinement and stability, and it has become a key diagnostic in high performance tokamaks. A multichord photo-elastic modulator (PEM) based MSE system is being developed for a real-time plasma current profile control in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The PEM-based approach is a standard method that measures the polarization direction of a single Stark line with narrow tunable bandpass filters. A tangential view of the heating beam provides good spatial resolution of 1-3 cm, which provides an opportunity to install 25 spatial channels spanning the major radius from 1.74 m to 2.84 m. Application of real-time control is a long-term technical goal after commissioning the diagnostic in KSTAR, which is expected in 2015. In this paper, we describe the design of this newly-constructed multichord MSE diagnostic in KSTAR.

  12. Improved spectral analysis for the motional Stark effect diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Klabacha, J.

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic pitch angle and the magnitude from reversed field pinch plasmas in the Madison symmetric torus (MST) have been routinely obtained from fully resolved motional Stark effect (MSE) spectrum analyses. Recently, the spectrum fit procedure has been improved by initializing and constraining the fit parameters based on the MSE model in the atomic data and analysis structure. A collisional-radiative model with level populations nlm-resolved up to n = 4 and a simple Born approximation for ion-impact cross sections is used for this analysis. Measurement uncertainty is quantified by making MSE measurements with multiple views of a single spatial location, ranging 5%-15% for typical MST operation conditions. A multi-view fit improves the goodness of fit of MSE spectral features and background.

  13. The motional stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is the worldwide standard technique for internal magnetic field pitch angle measurements in magnetized plasmas. Traditionally, it is based on using polarimetry to measure the polarization direction of light emitted from a hydrogenic species in a neutral beam. As the beam passes through the magnetized plasma at a high velocity, in its rest frame it perceives a Lorentz electric field. This field causes the H-alpha emission to be split and polarized. A new technique under development adds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for an MSE measurement that will enable radially resolved magnetic field magnitude as well as pitch angle measurements in even low-field (<1 T) experiments. An MSE-LIF system will be installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It will enable reconstructions of the plasma pressure, q-profile and current as well as, in conjunction with the existing MSE system, measurements of radial electric fields.

  14. Asymmetries in the motional Stark effect emission on the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, B. S.; Holcomb, C. T.; Allen, S. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Makowski, M. A.; Thorman, A.

    2016-11-01

    Spectrometer measurements and filter upgrades to a motional Stark effect polarimeter measuring the outer half-radius of the DIII-D tokamak helped to identify asymmetries in the polarization angle of Stark-split emission. The measured polarization angle of the π components differs and is not orthogonal to the σ component. These differences persist over a range of densities and with low levels of background light. It is suggested that the difference in the polarization angle between components is from a change in the ellipticity of the emitted light across the Stark components coupled with imperfect polarization preservation from an in-vessel mirror.

  15. A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2013-06-01

    We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components. PMID:23822345

  16. A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2013-06-15

    We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components.

  17. Spatial heterodyne Stokes vector imaging of the motional Stark-Zeeman multiplet.

    PubMed

    Howard, John; Chung, Jinil

    2012-10-01

    We present a general Stokes interferometer/polarimeter suitable for polarimetric imaging the elliptically polarized motional Stark-Zeeman multiplet. We also introduce a fully phase-heterodyne spatial multiplex variant of the system that has been used for imaging of Balmer alpha emission from the heating neutral beam in the KSTAR super-conducting tokamak in Korea. The polarimeter performance is illustrated using various polarization test targets. PMID:23126853

  18. Initial operation of a newly developed multichord motional Stark effect diagnostic in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, J.; Ko, J.; Wi, H.; Messmer, M.; Schenkelaars, S.; Scheffer, M.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2016-11-01

    A photo-elastic modulator based 25-chord motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic has been successfully developed and commissioned in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. The diagnostic measures the radial magnetic pitch angle profile of the Stark splitting of a D-alpha line at 656.1 nm by the electric field associated with the neutral deuterium heating beam. A tangential view of the neutral beam provides a good spatial resolution of 1-3 cm for covering the major radius from 1.74 m to 2.28 m, and the time resolution is achieved at 10 ms. An in-vessel calibration before the vacuum closing as well as an in situ calibration during the tokamak operation was performed by means of specially designed polarized lighting sources. In this work, we present the final design of the installed MSE diagnostic and the first results of the commissioning.

  19. Observation of a motional Stark effect to determine the second-order Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Hagel, G; Battesti, R; Nez, F; Julien, L; Biraben, F

    2002-11-11

    The high resolution two-photon spectroscopy of hydrogen is often limited by the second-order Doppler effect. To determine this effect, we apply a magnetic field perpendicular to the atomic beam. This field induces a quadratic motional Stark shift proportional, as the second-order Doppler effect, to v(2) (v atomic velocity). For some magnetic field, these two effects are opposite and the total shift due to the atomic velocity is reduced. We present the first observation of this effect for the 1S-3S transition in hydrogen.

  20. The motional Stark effect polarimeter in the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Yu, D L; Wei, Y L; Xia, F; Cao, J Y; Chen, C Y; Liu, L; Chen, W J; Ji, X Q; Liu, Y; Yan, L W; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R

    2014-05-01

    A 7-channel motional Stark effect polarimeter based on four polarizers and a spectrometer has been developed in the HL-2A tokamak, which is the first time successful utilizing this kind of polarimeter on a tokamak. The accuracy of the angle can reach ±0.25° in the calibration experiments. Pilot experiments of measuring the magnetic pitch angle have been successfully carried out in the weak motional Stark effect plasma discharge with toroidal magnetic field of ~1.3 T and beam energy of ~25 keV/amu. The pitch angles of magnetic field are obtained for 7 spatial points covering 24 cm along major radius with time resolution of 40 ms; the profiles of safety factor are obtained by combining with the Equilibrium and Reconstruction Fitting Code. The core value of safety factor (q) is less than 1 during the sawtooth oscillation and the position of q = 1 surface is well consistent with the results measured by soft X-ray array.

  1. The motional Stark effect polarimeter in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D. L. Wei, Y. L.; Xia, F.; Cao, J. Y.; Chen, C. Y.; Liu, L.; Chen, W. J.; Ji, X. Q.; Liu, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2014-05-15

    A 7-channel motional Stark effect polarimeter based on four polarizers and a spectrometer has been developed in the HL-2A tokamak, which is the first time successful utilizing this kind of polarimeter on a tokamak. The accuracy of the angle can reach ±0.25° in the calibration experiments. Pilot experiments of measuring the magnetic pitch angle have been successfully carried out in the weak motional Stark effect plasma discharge with toroidal magnetic field of ∼1.3 T and beam energy of ∼25 keV/amu. The pitch angles of magnetic field are obtained for 7 spatial points covering 24 cm along major radius with time resolution of 40 ms; the profiles of safety factor are obtained by combining with the Equilibrium and Reconstruction Fitting Code. The core value of safety factor (q) is less than 1 during the sawtooth oscillation and the position of q = 1 surface is well consistent with the results measured by soft X-ray array.

  2. Motional, isotope and quadratic Stark effects in Rydberg-Stark deceleration and electric trapping of H and D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, S. D.; Seiler, Ch; Merkt, F.

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium Rydberg atoms, initially moving at velocities of 600 and 560 m s-1, respectively, in pulsed supersonic beams, have been decelerated and electrostatically trapped following adiabatic 90° deflection from their initial axis of propagation to minimize collisions with the trailing edge of the gas pulses. The time evolution of the potential energy surfaces, over which the atoms undergoing deceleration travel during the trap-loading process, is analogous to that of a moving electrodynamic trap. It has been studied in the laboratory-fixed frame of reference and in the continuously moving frame of reference defined by the instantaneous position of the electric-field minimum around which the atoms are located. The importance of the quadratic Stark effect in the deceleration of samples in Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers above 35 has also been investigated by comparison of experimental results with predictions resulting from the numerical calculation of particle trajectories. The data presented for deuterium atoms represent the first application of Rydberg-Stark deceleration and trapping for this atom. Comparison of the rate of loss of n = 30 H and D atoms from the trap enables one to conclude that it is not affected by the particle dynamics during deceleration and trap loading.

  3. Status of motional Stark effect and Zeeman effect diagnostics for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jinseok; Chung, Jinil; de Bock, Maarten; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic system is under development aiming at commissioning in 2015. The design and fabrication of the polarization preserving front optics has been complete, including the multi-layer dielectric coated mirror and beam splitter, the latter being required to split the incident light into that above 600 nm for MSE and that below 600 nm for the Charge Exchange Spectroscopy (CES) that shares the front optics with MSE. The bandpass filters with a sharp transmission function and a minimum distortion against tilting have been procured. Both the analog lock-in and the post-processing numerical Fourier transform will be exploited. The Li-beam based Zeeman effect (ZE) diagnostic system is under conceptual design. Its details on the design are introduced in this work including the radial resolution and sensitivity to the change of the magnetic field pitch near the pedestal region. Work supported by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Korea.

  4. First mirror contamination studies for polarimetry motional Stark effect measurements for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Kuldkepp, M.; Rachlew, E.; Hawkes, N.C.; Schunke, B.

    2004-10-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will need to guide the light through a labyrinth of mirrors to provide neutron shielding. Knowledge of how the mirrors change the polarization is essential for accurate determination of the q profile. The optical properties of the plasma facing mirror are also expected to change with time due to deposition/erosion. For the purpose of examining this experimentally a detector system, identical to the JET MSE system, using twin photoelastic modulators was constructed. Measurements have been performed on freshly prepared mirrors, on mirrors after exposure to plasmas in Tore Supra, and labyrinth designs. The result shows a significant effect on the optical properties and demonstrate the need for in situ monitoring. The measured properties of the labyrinth closely follow the Mueller matrix formalism. With a correct choice of material the angle change introduced by the four mirrors furthest away from the plasma will be below 1 deg.

  5. The multi-spectral line-polarization MSE system on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Scott, S. D.; Khoury, M.

    2016-11-01

    A multi-spectral line-polarization motional Stark effect (MSE-MSLP) diagnostic has been developed for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak wherein the Stokes vector is measured in multiple wavelength bands simultaneously on the same sightline to enable better polarized background subtraction. A ten-sightline, four wavelength MSE-MSLP detector system was designed, constructed, and qualified. This system consists of a high-throughput polychromator for each sightline designed to provide large étendue and precise spectral filtering in a cost-effective manner. Each polychromator utilizes four narrow bandpass interference filters and four custom large diameter avalanche photodiode detectors. Two filters collect light to the red and blue of the MSE emission spectrum while the remaining two filters collect the beam pi and sigma emission generated at the same viewing volume. The filter wavelengths are temperature tuned using custom ovens in an automated manner. All system functions are remote controllable and the system can be easily retrofitted to existing single-wavelength line-polarization MSE systems.

  6. Note: Spectral motional Stark effect diagnostic for measurement of magnetic fields below 0.3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Donin, A.; Savkin, V.

    2013-08-01

    The paper reports on development of the spectral motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic in the midplane of the gas dynamic trap (GDT) linear system for magnetic confinement of anisotropic hot-ion plasma. The axially symmetric GDT vacuum magnetic field has a minimum value in the midplane, which varies from 0.2 to 0.35 T in different regimes of operation. Buildup of 15 keV ion population generates a diamagnetic reduction of magnetic field in the plasma core of up to 30% in the maximum density region, as measured by the existing eight-line MSE diagnostic. Commissioning of the midplane MSE provided first direct measurements of diamagnetic modifications in the minimum magnetic field GDT section, a necessary complement to the understanding of equilibrium and self-organization of high-β plasmas in GDT. Making use of the stable short-pulse diagnostic beam and calibration of the apparent spectral width of beam emission lines allow for the measurement of the plasma magnetic field of 0.29 ± 0.007 T with the integration time of 200 μs.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic interference with the edge pedestal motional Stark effect diagnostic on DIII-D.

    PubMed

    King, J D; Makowski, M A; Holcomb, C T; Allen, S L; Hill, D N; La Haye, R J; Turco, F; Petty, C C; Van Zeeland, M A; Rhodes, T L; Meyer, W H; Geer, R; Morse, E C

    2011-03-01

    Accurate measurement of internal magnetic field direction using motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry in the edge pedestal is desired for nearly all tokamak scenario work. A newly installed 500 kHz 32-channel digitizer on the MSE diagnostic of DIII-D allows full spectral information of the polarimeter signal to be recovered for the first time. Fourier analysis of this data has revealed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the plasma edge pedestal at ρ ≥ 0.92. By correlating edge localized mode fluctuations seen on lock-in amplifier outputs with MSE spectrograms, it has been shown that edge pedestal tearing mode fluctuations cause interference with MSE second harmonic instrument frequencies. This interference results in unrecoverable errors in the real-time polarization angle measurement that are more than an order of magnitude larger than typical polarimeter uncertainties. These errors can cause as much as a 38% difference in local q. By using a redundant measure of the linear polarization found at the fourth harmonic photo-elastic modulator (PEM) frequency, MHD interference can be avoided. However, because of poorer signal-to-noise the fourth harmonic signal computed polarization angle shows no improvement over the MHD polluted second harmonics. MHD interference could be avoided in future edge pedestal tokamak polarimeters by utilizing PEMs with higher fundamental frequencies and a greater separation between their frequencies.

  8. The motional Stark effect diagnostic for ITER using a line-shift approach.

    PubMed

    Foley, E L; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H Y; Zakharov, L E

    2008-10-01

    The United States has been tasked with the development and implementation of a motional Stark effect (MSE) system on ITER. In the harsh ITER environment, MSE is particularly susceptible to degradation, as it depends on polarimetry, and the polarization reflection properties of surfaces are highly sensitive to thin film effects due to plasma deposition and erosion of a first mirror. Here we present the results of a comprehensive study considering a new MSE-based approach to internal plasma magnetic field measurements for ITER. The proposed method uses the line shifts in the MSE spectrum (MSE-LS) to provide a radial profile of the magnetic field magnitude. To determine the utility of MSE-LS for equilibrium reconstruction, studies were performed using the ESC-ERV code system. A near-term opportunity to test the use of MSE-LS for equilibrium reconstruction is being pursued in the implementation of MSE with laser-induced fluorescence on NSTX. Though the field values and beam energies are very different from ITER, the use of a laser allows precision spectroscopy with a similar ratio of linewidth to line spacing on NSTX as would be achievable with a passive system on ITER. Simulation results for ITER and NSTX are presented, and the relative merits of the traditional line polarization approach and the new line-shift approach are discussed.

  9. A photoelastic-modulator-based motional Stark effect polarimeter for ITER that is insensitive to polarized broadband background reflections.

    PubMed

    Thorman, A; Michael, C; De Bock, M; Howard, J

    2016-07-01

    A motional Stark effect polarimeter insensitive to polarized broadband light is proposed. Partially polarized background light is anticipated to be a significant source of systematic error for the ITER polarimeter. The proposed polarimeter is based on the standard dual photoelastic modulator approach, but with the introduction of a birefringent delay plate, it generates a sinusoidal spectral filter instead of the usual narrowband filter. The period of the filter is chosen to match the spacing of the orthogonally polarized Stark effect components, thereby increasing the effective signal level, but resulting in the destructive interference of the broadband polarized light. The theoretical response of the system to an ITER like spectrum is calculated and the broadband polarization tolerance is verified experimentally.

  10. A photoelastic-modulator-based motional Stark effect polarimeter for ITER that is insensitive to polarized broadband background reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorman, A.; Michael, C.; De Bock, M.; Howard, J.

    2016-07-01

    A motional Stark effect polarimeter insensitive to polarized broadband light is proposed. Partially polarized background light is anticipated to be a significant source of systematic error for the ITER polarimeter. The proposed polarimeter is based on the standard dual photoelastic modulator approach, but with the introduction of a birefringent delay plate, it generates a sinusoidal spectral filter instead of the usual narrowband filter. The period of the filter is chosen to match the spacing of the orthogonally polarized Stark effect components, thereby increasing the effective signal level, but resulting in the destructive interference of the broadband polarized light. The theoretical response of the system to an ITER like spectrum is calculated and the broadband polarization tolerance is verified experimentally.

  11. Measurements of LHCD current profile and efficiency for simulation validation on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumgaard, Robert T.

    2014-10-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is an effective tool to significantly modify the magnetic equilibrium by driving off-axis, non-inductive current. On Alcator C-Mod, an upgraded Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic enables the current profile to be accurately reconstructed during plasmas with strong LHCD and a hard X-ray camera measures the fast electron Bremsstrahlung profile. LHCD is applied for >4 current relaxation times, producing fully-relaxed magnetic equilibria in plasmas with non-inductive current fraction up to unity at currents up to 1.0 MA. C-Mod has developed an extensive database of LHCD performance, spanning a wide range in plasma current, launched n||, LHCD power, Te and plasma density. This dataset provides a unique platform for validation of LHCD current drive simulations with the plasma shape, density, field and LH frequency range envisioned for ITER and future reactors. In these conditions the measured current drive efficiencies are similar to that assumed for ITER with values up to 0.4*1020A/Wm2 despite being in a weak single-pass absorption regime. The driven current is observed to be off-axis, broadening the current profile, raising q0 above 1, suppressing sawteeth, decreasing/reversing the magnetic shear and sometimes destabilizing MHD modes and/or triggering internal transport barriers. Measurements indicate increased efficiency at increased temperature and plasma current but with a complicated dependence on launched n||. The MSE-constrained reconstructions show a loss in current drive efficiency as the plasma density is increased above =1.0×1020 m-3 consistent with previous observations of a precipitous drop in hard x-ray emission. Additionally, the measured driven current profile moves radially outward as the density is increased. Ray tracing simulations using GENRAY-CQL3D qualitatively reproduce these trends showing the rays make many passes through the plasma at high density and predicting a narrower current and HXR profile

  12. An Overview Of The Motional Stark Effect Diagnostic On DIII-D And Design Work For An ITER MSE

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C T; Allen, S L; Makowski, M A; Jayakumar, R J; Gu, M F; Lerner, S; Morris, K L; Latkowski, J; Moller, J M; Meyer, W; Ellis, R; Geer, R; Behne, D; Chipman, R; Smith, P; McClain, S

    2007-09-20

    The advanced tokamak research program at DIII-D relies critically on the measurement of the current density profile. This was made possible by the development of a Motional Stark Effect (MSE) polarimeter that was first installed in 1992. Three major upgrades have since occurred, and improvements in our understanding of critical performance issues and calibration techniques are ongoing. In parallel with these improvements, we have drawn on our DIII-D experience to begin studies and design work for MSE on burning plasmas and ITER. This paper first reviews how Motional Stark Effect polarimetry (MSE) is used to determine the tokamak current profile. It uses the DIII-D MSE system as an example, and shows results from the latest upgrade that incorporates an array of channels from a new counter-Ip injected neutral beam. The various calibration techniques presently used are reviewed. High-leverage or unresolved issues affecting MSE performance and reliability in ITER are discussed. Next, we show a four-mirror collection optics design for the two ITER MSE views. Finally, we discuss measurements of the polarization properties of a few candidate mirrors for the ITER MSE.

  13. Non-resonant dynamic stark control of vibrational motion with optimized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Esben F; Henriksen, Niels E

    2016-06-28

    The term dynamic Stark control (DSC) has been used to describe methods of quantum control related to the dynamic Stark effect, i.e., a time-dependent distortion of energy levels. Here, we employ analytical models that present clear and concise interpretations of the principles behind DSC. Within a linearly forced harmonic oscillator model of vibrational excitation, we show how the vibrational amplitude is related to the pulse envelope, and independent of the carrier frequency of the laser pulse, in the DSC regime. Furthermore, we shed light on the DSC regarding the construction of optimal pulse envelopes - from a time-domain as well as a frequency-domain perspective. Finally, in a numerical study beyond the linearly forced harmonic oscillator model, we show that a pulse envelope can be constructed such that a vibrational excitation into a specific excited vibrational eigenstate is accomplished. The pulse envelope is constructed such that high intensities are avoided in order to eliminate the process of ionization.

  14. Non-resonant dynamic stark control of vibrational motion with optimized laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Esben F.; Henriksen, Niels E.

    2016-06-01

    The term dynamic Stark control (DSC) has been used to describe methods of quantum control related to the dynamic Stark effect, i.e., a time-dependent distortion of energy levels. Here, we employ analytical models that present clear and concise interpretations of the principles behind DSC. Within a linearly forced harmonic oscillator model of vibrational excitation, we show how the vibrational amplitude is related to the pulse envelope, and independent of the carrier frequency of the laser pulse, in the DSC regime. Furthermore, we shed light on the DSC regarding the construction of optimal pulse envelopes - from a time-domain as well as a frequency-domain perspective. Finally, in a numerical study beyond the linearly forced harmonic oscillator model, we show that a pulse envelope can be constructed such that a vibrational excitation into a specific excited vibrational eigenstate is accomplished. The pulse envelope is constructed such that high intensities are avoided in order to eliminate the process of ionization.

  15. Non-resonant dynamic stark control of vibrational motion with optimized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Esben F; Henriksen, Niels E

    2016-06-28

    The term dynamic Stark control (DSC) has been used to describe methods of quantum control related to the dynamic Stark effect, i.e., a time-dependent distortion of energy levels. Here, we employ analytical models that present clear and concise interpretations of the principles behind DSC. Within a linearly forced harmonic oscillator model of vibrational excitation, we show how the vibrational amplitude is related to the pulse envelope, and independent of the carrier frequency of the laser pulse, in the DSC regime. Furthermore, we shed light on the DSC regarding the construction of optimal pulse envelopes - from a time-domain as well as a frequency-domain perspective. Finally, in a numerical study beyond the linearly forced harmonic oscillator model, we show that a pulse envelope can be constructed such that a vibrational excitation into a specific excited vibrational eigenstate is accomplished. The pulse envelope is constructed such that high intensities are avoided in order to eliminate the process of ionization. PMID:27369515

  16. Alcator C-Mod predictive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankin, Alexei; Bateman, Glenn; Kritz, Arnold; Greenwald, Martin; Snipes, Joseph; Fredian, Thomas

    2001-10-01

    Predictive simulations for the Alcator C-mod tokamak [I. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] are carried out using the BALDUR integrated modeling code [C. E. Singer et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 275 (1988)]. The results are obtained for temperature and density profiles using the Multi-Mode transport model [G. Bateman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1793 (1998)] as well as the mixed-Bohm/gyro-Bohm transport model [M. Erba et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 39, 261 (1997)]. The simulated discharges are characterized by very high plasma density in both low and high modes of confinement. The predicted profiles for each of the transport models match the experimental data about equally well in spite of the fact that the two models have different dimensionless scalings. Average relative rms deviations are less than 8% for the electron density profiles and 16% for the electron and ion temperature profiles.

  17. Real-time Magnetic Field Pitch Angle Estimation With a Motional Stark Effect Diagnostic Using Kalman Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, R.; Alves, D.

    2008-03-12

    The real-time amplitude estimation of selective harmonics from an Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) signal of a Motion Stark Effect diagnostic is addressed using a Kalman filter. The proposed technique is shown to be much more robust and provide less noisy estimates than a lock-in amplifier scheme. In addition, the negative impact of Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) is minimized, reducing significantly the biasing in the amplitude estimation and ultimately allowing for the pitch angle estimation in the vicinity of the ELM. The inherent biasing in the amplitude estimation due to the 50Hz modulation in the NBI power grid is also easily circumvented with such a technique, rendering dispensable any further filtering of the data.

  18. First results from Alcator-C-MOD*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Boivin, R.; Bombarda, F.; Bonoli, P.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Goetz, J.; Golovato, S.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Horne, S.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E.; McCracken, G.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J.; Snipes, J.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Wolfe, S.; Christensen, C.; Garnier, D.; Graf, M.; Hsu, T.; Luke, T.; May, M.; Niemczewski, A.; Tinios, G.; Schachter, J.; Urbahn, J.

    1994-05-01

    Early operation of the Alcator-C-MOD tokamak [I.H. Hutchinson, Proceedings of IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Knoxville, TN, edited by M. Lubell, M. Nestor, and S. Vaughan (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, New York, 1990), Vol. 1, p. 13] is surveyed. Reliable operation, with plasma current up to 1 MA, has been obtained, despite the massive conducting superstructure and the associated error fields. However, vertical disruptions are not slowed by the long vessel time constant. With pellet fueling, peak densities up to 9×1020 m-3 have been attained and ``snakes'' are often seen. Initial characterization of divertor and scrape-off layer is presented and indicates approximately Bohm diffusion. The edge plasma shows a wealth of marfe-like phenomena, including a transition to detachment from the divertor plates with accompanying radiative divertor regions. Energy confinement generally appears to exceed the expectations of neo-Alcator scaling. A transition to Ohmic H mode has been observed. Ion cyclotron heating experiments have demonstrated good power coupling, in agreement with theory.

  19. Stark Spectroscopy on Photoactive Yellow Protein, E46Q, and a Nonisomerizing Derivative, Probes Photo-Induced Charge Motion

    PubMed Central

    Premvardhan, L. L.; van der Horst, M. A.; Hellingwerf, K. J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2003-01-01

    The change in the electrostatic properties on excitation of the cofactor of wild-type photoactive yellow protein (WT-PYP) have been directly determined using Stark-effect spectroscopy. We find that, instantaneously on photon absorption, there is a large change in the permanent dipole moment, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\vert}{\\Delta}{\\vec{{\\mu}}}{\\vert},\\end{equation*}\\end{document} (26 Debye) and in the polarizability, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\Delta}{\\alpha}},\\end{equation*}\\end{document} (1000 Å3). We expect such a large degree of charge motion to have a significant impact on the photocycle that is associated with the important blue-light negative phototactic response of Halorhodospira halophila. Furthermore, changing E46 to Q in WT-PYP does not significantly alter its electrostatic properties, whereas, altering the chromophore to prevent it from undergoing trans-cis isomerization results in a significant diminution of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\vert}{\\Delta}{\\vec{{\\mu}}}{\\vert}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\Delta}{\\alpha}}.\\end{equation*}\\end{document} We

  20. Real-time data processing and magnetic field pitch angle estimation of the JET motional Stark effect diagnostic based on Kalman filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, R.; Alves, D. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Associacao Euratom Hawkes, N.; Brix, M. [Euratom Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-15

    A novel technique for the real-time measurement of the magnetic field pitch angle in JET discharges using the motional Stark effect diagnostic is presented. Kalman filtering techniques are adopted to estimate the amplitude of the avalanche photodiode signals' harmonics that are relevant for the pitch angle calculation. The proposed technique {l_brace}for extended technical details of the generic algorithm see [R. Coelho and D. Alves, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 37, 164 (2009)]{r_brace} is shown to be much more robust and provides less noisy estimates than an equivalent lock-in amplifier scheme, in particular when dealing with edge localized modes.

  1. Benchmarking Nonlinear Turbulence Simulations on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; C.L. Fiore; W. Dorland; M.J. Greenwald; G.W. Hammett; K. Hill; D. McCune; D.R. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt; J.E. Rice

    2004-06-22

    Linear simulations of plasma microturbulence are used with recent radial profiles of toroidal velocity from similar plasmas to consider nonlinear microturbulence simulations and observed transport analysis on Alcator C-Mod. We focus on internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in fully equilibrated H-mode plasmas with nearly flat velocity profiles. Velocity profile data, transport analysis and linear growth rates are combined to integrate data and simulation, and explore the effects of toroidal velocity on benchmarking simulations. Areas of interest for future nonlinear simulations are identified. A good gyrokinetic benchmark is found in the plasma core, without extensive nonlinear simulations. RF-heated C-Mod H-mode experiments, which exhibit an ITB, have been studied with the massively parallel code GS2 towards validation of gyrokinetic microturbulence models. New, linear, gyrokinetic calculations are reported and discussed in connection with transport analysis near the ITB trigger time of shot No.1001220016.

  2. Assessment of ICRF Antenna Performance in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    G. Schilling; S.J. Wukitch; Y. Lin; N. Basse; P.T. Bonoli; E. Edlund; L. Lin; A. Parisot; M. Porkolab

    2004-08-10

    The Alcator C-Mod has presented a challenge to install high-power ICRF antennas in a tight space. Modifications have been made to the antenna plasma-facing surfaces and the internal current-carrying structure in order to overcome performance limitations. At the present time, the antennas have exceeded 5 MW into plasma with heating phasing, up to 2.7 MW with current-drive phasing, with good efficiency and no deleterious effects

  3. Edge Zonal Flows and Blob Propagation in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S; Agostini, M; Davis, B; Grulke, O; Hager, R; Hughes, J; LaBombard, B; D'Ippolito, D A; Myra, J R; Russell, D A

    2011-07-25

    Here we describe recent measurements of the 2-D motion of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This data was taken using the outer midplane gas puff imaging (GPI) camera, which views a 6 cm radial by 6 cm poloidal region near the separatrix just below the outer midplane [1]. The data were taken in Ohmic or RF heated L-mode plasmas at 400,000 frames/sec for {approx}50 msec/shot using a Phantom 710 camera in a 64 x 64 pixel format. The resulting 2-D vs. time movies [2] can resolve the structure and motion of the turbulence on a spatial scale covering 0.3-6 cm. The images were analyzed using either a 2-D cross-correlation code (Sec. 2) or a 2-D blob tracking code (Sec. 3).

  4. Edge Turbulence Imaging on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; R.A. Maqueda; J.L. Terry; B. Bai; C.J. Boswell; C.E. Bush; D. D'Ippolito; E.D. Fredrickson; M. Greenwald; K. Hallatschek; S. Kaye; B. LaBombard; R. Maingi; J. Myra; W.M. Nevins; B.N. Rogers; D.P. Stotler; J. Wilgen; and X.Q. Xu

    2002-07-10

    Edge turbulence images have been made using an ultra-high speed CCD camera on both NSTX and Alcator C-Mod. In both cases, the D-alpha or HeI (587.6 nm) line emission from localized deuterium or helium gas puffs was viewed along a local magnetic field line near the outer midplane. Fluctuations in this line emission reflect fluctuations in electron density and/or electron temperature through the atomic excitation rates, which can be modeled using the DEGAS-2 code. The 2-D structure of the measured turbulence can be compared with theoretical simulations based on 3-D fluid models.

  5. Correlation ECE diagnostic in Alcator C-Mod

    DOE PAGES

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Mikkelsen, D.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Vieira, R.; Oi, C.; Rice, J.; Reinke, M.; et al

    2015-03-12

    Correlation ECE (CECE) is a diagnostic technique that allows measurement of small amplitude electron temperature, Te, fluctuations through standard cross-correlation analysis methods. In Alcator C-Mod, a new CECE diagnostic has been installed[Sung RSI 2012], and interesting phenomena have been observed in various plasma conditions. We find that local Te fluctuations near the edge (ρ ~ 0:8) decrease across the linearto- saturated ohmic confinement transition, with fluctuations decreasing with increasing plasma density[Sung NF 2013], which occurs simultaneously with rotation reversals[Rice NF 2011]. Te fluctuations are also reduced across core rotation reversals with an increase of plasma density in RF heated L-modemore » plasmas, which implies that the same physics related to the reduction of Te fluctuations may be applied to both ohmic and RF heated L-mode plasmas. In I-mode plasmas, we observe the reduction of core Te fluctuations, which indicates changes of turbulence occur not only in the pedestal region but also in the core across the L/I transition[White NF 2014]. The present CECE diagnostic system in C-Mod and these experimental results are described in this paper.« less

  6. Correlation ECE diagnostic in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Mikkelsen, D.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Vieira, R.; Oi, C.; Rice, J.; Reinke, M.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Churchill, R.; Theiler, C.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J.; Hubbard, A.; Greenwald, M.

    2015-03-12

    Correlation ECE (CECE) is a diagnostic technique that allows measurement of small amplitude electron temperature, Te, fluctuations through standard cross-correlation analysis methods. In Alcator C-Mod, a new CECE diagnostic has been installed[Sung RSI 2012], and interesting phenomena have been observed in various plasma conditions. We find that local Te fluctuations near the edge (ρ ~ 0:8) decrease across the linearto- saturated ohmic confinement transition, with fluctuations decreasing with increasing plasma density[Sung NF 2013], which occurs simultaneously with rotation reversals[Rice NF 2011]. Te fluctuations are also reduced across core rotation reversals with an increase of plasma density in RF heated L-mode plasmas, which implies that the same physics related to the reduction of Te fluctuations may be applied to both ohmic and RF heated L-mode plasmas. In I-mode plasmas, we observe the reduction of core Te fluctuations, which indicates changes of turbulence occur not only in the pedestal region but also in the core across the L/I transition[White NF 2014]. The present CECE diagnostic system in C-Mod and these experimental results are described in this paper.

  7. Non-axisymmetric Field Effects on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, S.; Hutchinson, I.; Granetz, R.; Rice, J.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Vieira, R.; Cochran, W.; Gwinn, D.; Rosati, J.; Lynn, A.

    2003-10-01

    A set of coils capable of producing non-axisymmetric, predominantly n=1, fields with different toroidal phase and a range of poloidal mode (m) spectra has been installed on Alcator C-Mod. This coilset has been used to suppress locked modes during low density or high current operation and also to induce locked modes in normally stable configurations in order to study error field effects. Locked modes are observed to result in braking of core toroidal rotation, modification of sawtooth activity, and significant reduction in energy and particle confinement. The inferred value of the threshold perturbation for producing a locked mode is of order B_21/B_T ˜ 10-4, where B_21 is the helically resonant m/n=2/1 field evaluated at the q=2 surface. This value is comparable to extrapolations based on experiments on JET and DIII-D, but is inconsistent with stronger BT and size scaling inferred from Compass-D results(R. J. Buttery, et al., 17th Fusion Energy Conference, Oct. 1998, Yokohama (IAEA-CN-69) EX8/5). The C-Mod result therefore has favorable implications for the locked mode threshold in ITER.

  8. Testing Gyrokinetics on C-Mod and NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; W. Dorland; C.L. Fiore; D. Stutman; J.A. Baumgaertel; B. Davis; S.M. Kaye; D.C. McCune; J. Menard; G. Rewoldt

    2005-06-20

    Quantitative benchmarks of computational physics codes against experiment are essential for the credible application of such codes. Fluctuation measurements can provide necessary critical tests of nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations, but such require extraordinary computational resources. Linear micro-stability calculations with the GS2 [1] gyrokinetic code have been carried out for tokamak and ST experiments which exhibit internal transport barriers (ITB) and good plasma confinement. Qualitative correlation is found for improved confinement before and during ITB plasmas on Alcator C-Mod [2] and NSTX [3], with weaker long wavelength micro-instabilities in the plasma core regions. Mixing length transport models are discussed. The NSTX L-mode is found to be near marginal stability for kinetic ballooning modes. Fully electromagnetic, linear, gyrokinetic calculations of the Alcator C-Mod ITB during off-axis rf heating, following four plasma species and including the complete electron response show ITG/TEM microturbulence is suppressed in the plasma core and in the barrier region before barrier formation, without recourse to the usual requirements of velocity shear or reversed magnetic shear [4-5]. No strongly growing long or short wavelength drift modes are found in the plasma core but strong ITG/TEM and ETG drift wave turbulence is found outside the barrier region. Linear microstability analysis is qualitatively consistent with the experimental transport analysis, showing low transport inside and high transport outside the ITB region before barrier formation, without consideration of ExB shear stabilization.

  9. Modeling of Alcator C-Mod Divertor Baffling Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D. P. Stotler; C. S. Pitcher; C. J. Boswell; T. K. Chung; B. LaBombard; B. Lipschultz; J. L. Terry; R. J. Kanzleiter

    2000-11-29

    A specific Alcator C-Mod discharge from the series of divertor baffling experiments is simulated with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. A simple two-point plasma model is used to describe the plasma variation between Langmuir probe locations. A range of conductances for the bypass between the divertor plenum and the main chamber are considered. The experimentally observed insensitivity of the neutral current flowing through the bypass and of the D alpha emissions to the magnitude of the conductance is reproduced. The current of atoms in this regime is being limited by atomic physics processes and not the bypass conductance. The simulated trends in the divertor pressure, bypass current, and D alpha emission agree only qualitatively with the experimental measurements, however. Possible explanations for the quantitative differences are discussed.

  10. Edge Minority Heating Experiment in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; J.L. Terry; P. Bonoli; R. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Fiore; G. Schilling; S. Wukitch; J. Hughes; Y. Lin; R. Perkins; M. Porkolab; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2005-03-25

    An attempt was made to control global plasma confinement in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak by applying ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to the plasma edge in order to deliberately create a minority ion tail loss. In theory, an edge fast ion loss could modify the edge electric field and so stabilize the edge turbulence, which might then reduce the H-mode power threshold or improve the H-mode barrier. However, the experimental result was that edge minority heating resulted in no improvement in the edge plasma parameters or global stored energy, at least at power levels of radio-frequency power is less than or equal to 5.5 MW. A preliminary analysis of these results is presented and some ideas for improvement are discussed.

  11. Neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczewski, A.P.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The primary diagnostic used is a set of six neutral pressure gauges, including special-purpose gauges built for in situ tokamak operation. While a low main chamber neutral pressure coincides with high plasma confinement regimes, high divertor pressure is required for heat and particle flux dispersion in future devices such as ITER. Thus we examine conditions that optimize divertor compression, defined here as a divertor-to-midplane pressure ratio. We find both pressures depend primarily on the edge plasma regimes defined by the scrape-off-layer heat transport. While the maximum divertor pressure is achieved at high core plasma densities corresponding to the detached divertor state, the maximum compression is achieved in the high-recycling regime. Variations in the divertor geometry have a weaker effect on the neutral pressures. For otherwise similar plasmas the divertor pressure and compression are maximum when the strike point is at the bottom of the vertical target plate. We introduce a simple flux balance model, which allows us to explain the divertor neutral pressure across a wide range of plasma densities. In particular, high pressure sustained in the detached divertor (despite a considerable drop in the recycling source) can be explained by scattering of neutrals off the cold plasma plugging the divertor throat. Because neutrals are confined in the divertor through scattering and ionization processes (provided the mean-free-paths are much shorter than a typical escape distance) tight mechanical baffling is unnecessary. The analysis suggests that two simple structural modifications may increase the divertor compression in Alcator C-Mod by a factor of about 5. Widening the divertor throat would increase the divertor recycling source, while closing leaks in the divertor structure would eliminate a significant neutral loss mechanism. 146 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. FIR polarimetry diagnostic for the C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irby, J. H.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Marmar, E. S.; Xu, P.

    2012-02-01

    A three-chord polarimeter on Alcator C-Mod will make measurements of the poloidal magnetic field and plasma fluctuations. The beams from two frequency-offset, 200 mW, FIR lasers operating at 117.73 μm are combined to produce collinear, counter-rotating, circularly polarized beams. The beams are divided into three chords which are directed into the plasma at one toroidal location. Corner cube retro-reflectors mounted on the inside wall return the beam for a double pass. The mixing product of the two beams is detected both before (reference) and after (signal) the plasma using polarization sensitive detectors that produce a beat signal at ~ 4 MHz. During the plasma discharge, the phase delay of the signal mixer, which depends on the Faraday effect, is evaluated with respect to the reference and produces line-integrated information on the poloidal magnetic field. Measurements on C-Mod require the phase error to be at the 0.1 degree level, and great care in the design of optical mounts, polarizers, beam-splitters, focusing optics, and acoustic and magnetic shielding was required. Development of new planar diode Schottky detectors was necessary to provide high sensitivity for a diagnostic that will eventually have at least six chords. Absorption of the FIR laser light by water vapor requires that the entire beam path be purged with dry air. Six retro-reflectors on the inner wall arranged in an ITER-like configuration provide poloidally viewing chords from near the mid-plane to well into the plasma scrape off layer. A pneumatically controlled shutter protects the in-vessel optics during boronizations and during limited discharges that might accelerate damage to the retro-reflector surfaces. Tests indicate there is no measurable signal contamination from the toroidal magnetic field due to the Cotton-Mouton effect. Polarization sensitivity of the wire mesh beamsplitters necessitated system calibration. Good agreement to EFIT reconstructions has been observed along with

  13. Integrated modeling of LHCD experiment on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P.; Parker, R.; Wallace, G.

    2014-02-12

    Recent progress in integrating the latest LHCD model based on ray-tracing into the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) is reported. IPS, a python based framework for time dependent tokamak simulation, was expanded recently to incorporate LHCD simulation using GENRAY/CQL3D (ray-tracing/3D Fokker-Planck package). Using GENRAY/CQL3D in the IPS framework, it becomes possible to include parasitic LHCD power loss near the plasma edge, which was found to be important in experiments particularly at high density as expected on reactors. Moreover, it allows for evolving the velocity distribution function in 4 D (ν{sub ∥}, ν⊥, r/a, t) space self-consistently. In order to validate the code, IPS is applied to LHCD experiments on Alctor C-Mod. In this paper, a LHCD experiment performed at the density of n{sub e}∼0.5×10{sup 20}m{sup −3} where good LHCD efficiency and the development of internal transport barrier (ITB) was reported, is modelled in a predictive mode and the result is compared with experiment.

  14. Integrated modeling of LHCD experiment on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P.; Parker, R.; Wallace, G.

    2014-02-01

    Recent progress in integrating the latest LHCD model based on ray-tracing into the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) is reported. IPS, a python based framework for time dependent tokamak simulation, was expanded recently to incorporate LHCD simulation using GENRAY/CQL3D (ray-tracing/3D Fokker-Planck package). Using GENRAY/CQL3D in the IPS framework, it becomes possible to include parasitic LHCD power loss near the plasma edge, which was found to be important in experiments particularly at high density as expected on reactors. Moreover, it allows for evolving the velocity distribution function in 4 D (ν∥, ν⊥, r/a, t) space self-consistently. In order to validate the code, IPS is applied to LHCD experiments on Alctor C-Mod. In this paper, a LHCD experiment performed at the density of ne˜0.5×1020m-3 where good LHCD efficiency and the development of internal transport barrier (ITB) was reported, is modelled in a predictive mode and the result is compared with experiment.

  15. Lower Hybrid Current Drive on Alcator C-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. R.; Bernabei, S.; Hosea, J.; Phillips, C. K.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Liptac, J.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wallace, G.

    2006-10-01

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokomak at MIT. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This should allow tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Initial results from this system will be presented. Power levels up to 800 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n||˜ 2-4. Driven currents up to ˜280 kA have been inferred from magnetic measurements, in reasonable agreement with modeling. Sawtooth oscillations vanish and central q is inferred to rise above unity, indicating off-axis CD as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electrons population that varies with phase and plasma density. This variation will be compared to that predicted by detailed propagation and absorption codes.

  16. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson, S. Bernabei, P. Bonoli, A. Hubbard, R. Parker, A. Schmidt, G. Wallace, J. Wright, and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2007-10-09

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4x22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n|| ~ 1.6–4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n20IR/P ~ 0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (Te0 rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects).

  17. The LHCD Launcher for Alcator C-Mod - Design, Construction, Calibration and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hosea; D. Beals; W. Beck; S. Bernabei; W. Burke; R. Childs; R. Ellis; E. Fredd; N. Greenough; M. Grimes; D. Gwinn; J. Irby; S. Jurczynski; P. Koert; C.C. Kung; G.D. Loesser; E. Marmar; R. Parker; J. Rushinski; G. Schilling; D. Terry; R. Vieira; J.R. Wilson; J. Zaks

    2005-06-27

    MIT and PPPL have joined together to fabricate a high-power lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system for supporting steady-state AT regime research on Alcator C-Mod. The goal of the first step of this project is to provide 1.5 MW of 4.6 GHz rf [radio frequency] power to the plasma with a compact launcher which has excellent spectral selectivity and fits into a single C-Mod port. Some of the important design, construction, calibration and testing considerations for the launcher leading up to its installation on C-Mod are presented here.

  18. Overview of the Alcator C-MOD Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    S. Scott, A. Bader, M. Bakhtiari, N. Basse, W. Beck, T. Biewer, S. Bernabei, P. Bonoli, et al.

    2007-11-13

    Recent research on the high-field, high-density diverted Alcator C-MOD tokamak has focussed on the plasma physics and plasma engineering required for ITER and for attractive fusion reactors. Experimental campaigns over the past two years have focused on understanding the physical mechanisms that affect the plasma performance realized with all-molybdenum walls versus walls with low-Z coatings. RF sheath rectification along flux tubes that intersect the RF antenna is found to be a major cause of localized boron erosion and impurity generation. Initial lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments (PLH < 900 kW) have demonstrated fully noninductive current drive at Ιρ ~ 1.0 MA with good efficiency, Ιdrive = 0.4PLH/neoR (MA,MW,1020m-3,m). Disruption mitigation via massive gas-jet impurity puffing has proven successful at high plasma pressure, indicating this technique has promise for implementation on ITER. Pressure gradients in the near SOL of Ohmic L-mode plasmas are observed to scale consistently as Ι 2(over)ρ, and show a significant dependence on X-point topology. Modeling of H-mode edge fueling indicates high self-screening to neutrals in the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL), and reproduces experimental density pedestal response to changes in neutral source. Detailed measurements of the temperature and density profiles in the near sol and fast framing movies of the turbulent structures provide improved understanding of the mechanisms that control transport in the edge region.

  19. Measurement of particle transport coefficients on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, T.C.T.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the behavior of the plasma transport during the divertor detachment in order to explain the central electron density rise. The measurement of particle transport coefficients requires sophisticated diagnostic tools. A two color interferometer system was developed and installed on Alcator C-Mod to measure the electron density with high spatial ({approx} 2 cm) and high temporal ({le} 1.0 ms) resolution. The system consists of 10 CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) and 4 HeNe (.6328 {mu}m) chords that are used to measure the line integrated density to within 0.08 CO{sub 2} degrees or 2.3 {times} 10{sup 16}m{sup {minus}2} theoretically. Using the two color interferometer, a series of gas puffing experiments were conducted. The density was varied above and below the threshold density for detachment at a constant magnetic field and plasma current. Using a gas modulation technique, the particle diffusion, D, and the convective velocity, V, were determined. Profiles were inverted using a SVD inversion and the transport coefficients were extracted with a time regression analysis and a transport simulation analysis. Results from each analysis were in good agreement. Measured profiles of the coefficients increased with the radius and the values were consistent with measurements from other experiments. The values exceeded neoclassical predictions by a factor of 10. The profiles also exhibited an inverse dependence with plasma density. The scaling of both attached and detached plasmas agreed well with this inverse scaling. This result and the lack of change in the energy and impurity transport indicate that there was no change in the underlying transport processes after detachment.

  20. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. R.; Bernabei, S.; Bonoli, P.; Hubbard, A.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J.

    2007-09-01

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4×22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n∥˜1.6-4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n20IR/P˜0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (Te0 rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects).

  1. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J. R.; Bonoli, P.; Hubbard, A.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J.; Bernabei, S

    2007-09-28

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4x22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n{sub parallel}{approx}1.6-4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n{sub 20}IR/P{approx}0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (T{sub e0} rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects)

  2. Twenty Years of Research on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod is a compact, high-field tokamak, whose unique design and operating parameters have produced a wealth of new and important results since its start in 1993, contributing data that extended tests of critical physical models into new parameter ranges and into new regimes. Using only RF for heating and current drive with innovative launching structures, C-Mod operates routinely at very high power densities. Research highlights include direct experimental observation of ICRF mode-conversion, ICRF flow drive, demonstration of Lower-Hybrid current drive at ITER-like densities and fields and, using a set of powerful new diagnostics, extensive validation of advanced RF codes. C-Mod spearheaded the development of the vertical-target divertor and has always operated with high-Z metal plasma facing components--an approach adopted for ITER. C-Mod has made ground-breaking discoveries in divertor physics and plasma-material interactions at reactor-like power and particle fluxes and elucidated the critical role of cross-field transport in divertor operation, edge flows and the tokamak density limit. C-Mod developed the I-mode and EDA H-mode regimes which have high performance without large ELMs and with pedestal transport self-regulated by short-wavelength electromagnetic waves. C-Mod has carried out pioneering studies of intrinsic rotation and found that self-generated flow shear can be strong enough to significantly modify transport. C-Mod made the first quantitative link between pedestal temperature and H-mode performance, showing that the observed self-similar temperature profiles were consistent with critical-gradient-length theories and followed up with quantitative tests of nonlinear gyrokinetic models. Disruption studies on C-Mod provided the first observation of non-axisymmetric halo currents and non-axisymmetric radiation in mitigated disruptions. Work supported by U.S. DoE

  3. Three-dimensional Simulation of Gas Conductance Measurement Experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler; B. LaBombard

    2004-06-15

    Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutral transport simulations of gas flow through the Alcator C-Mod subdivertor yield conductances comparable to those found in dedicated experiments. All are significantly smaller than the conductance found with the previously used axisymmetric geometry. A benchmarking exercise of the code against known conductance values for gas flow through a simple pipe provides a physical basis for interpreting the comparison of the three-dimensional and experimental C-Mod conductances.

  4. Overview of the Alcator C-MOD research programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S.; Bader, A.; Bakhtiari, M.; Basse, N.; Beck, W.; Biewer, T.; Bernabei, S.; Bonoli, P.; Bose, B.; Bravenec, R.; Bespamyatnov, I.; Childs, R.; Cziegler, I.; Doerner, R.; Edlund, E.; Ernst, D.; Fasoli, A.; Ferrara, M.; Fiore, C.; Fredian, T.; Graf, A.; Graves, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenough, N.; Greenwald, M.; Grimes, M.; Grulke, O.; Gwinn, D.; Harvey, R.; Harrison, S.; Hender, T. C.; Hosea, J.; Howell, D. F.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Irby, J.; Jernigan, T.; Johnson, D.; Ko, J.; Koert, P.; La Bombard, B.; Kanojia, A.; Lin, L.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Liptac, J.; Lynn, A.; MacGibbon, P.; Marmar, E.; Marr, K.; May, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; McDermott, R.; Parisot, A.; Parker, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, P.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J.; Rowan, W.; Sampsell, M.; Schilling, G.; Schmidt, A.; Smick, N.; Smirnov, A.; Snipes, J.; Stotler, D.; Stillerman, J.; Tang, V.; Terry, D.; Terry, J.; Ulrickson, M.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Wright, J.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Wurden, G.; Yuh, H.; Zhurovich, K.; Zaks, J.; Zweben, S.

    2007-10-01

    Alcator C-MOD has compared plasma performance with plasma-facing components (PFCs) coated with boron to all-metal PFCs to assess projections of energy confinement from current experiments to next-generation burning tokamak plasmas. Low-Z coatings reduce metallic impurity influx and diminish radiative losses leading to higher H-mode pedestal pressure that improves global energy confinement through profile stiffness. RF sheath rectification along flux tubes that intersect the RF antenna is found to be a major cause of localized boron erosion and impurity generation. Initial lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments (PLH < 900 kW) in preparation for future advanced-tokamak studies have demonstrated fully non-inductive current drive at Ip ~ 1.0 MA with good efficiency, Idrive = 0.4 PLH/neoR (MA, MW, 1020 m-3,m). The potential to mitigate disruptions in ITER through massive gas-jet impurity puffing has been extended to significantly higher plasma pressures and shorter disruption times. The fraction of total plasma energy radiated increases with the Z of the impurity gas, reaching 90% for krypton. A positive major-radius scaling of the error field threshold for locked modes (Bth/B ~ R0.68±0.19) is inferred from its measured variation with BT that implies a favourable threshold value for ITER. A phase contrast imaging diagnostic has been used to study the structure of Alfvén cascades and turbulent density fluctuations in plasmas with an internal transport barrier. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for regulating the H-mode pedestal height is also crucial for projecting performance in ITER. Modelling of H-mode edge fuelling indicates high self-screening to neutrals in the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL), and reproduces experimental density pedestal response to changes in neutral source, including a weak variation of pedestal height and constant width. Pressure gradients in the near SOL of Ohmic L-mode plasmas are observed to scale consistently as I_p^2

  5. Transverse stability in a Stark decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-02-15

    The concept of phase stability in a Stark decelerator ensures that polar molecules can be accelerated, guided, or decelerated without loss; molecules within a certain position and velocity interval are kept together throughout the deceleration process. In this paper the influence of the transverse motion on phase stability in a Stark decelerator is investigated. For typical deceleration experiments--i.e., for high values of the phase angle {phi}{sub 0}--the transverse motion considerably enhances the region in phase space for which phase stable deceleration occurs. For low values of {phi}{sub 0}, however, the transverse motion reduces the acceptance of a Stark decelerator and unstable regions in phase space appear. These effects are quantitatively explained in terms of a coupling between the longitudinal and transverse motion. The predicted longitudinal acceptance of a Stark decelerator is verified by measurements on a beam of OH (X {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2},J=3/2) radicals passing through a Stark decelerator.

  6. 20 years of research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, M.; Baek, S.; Barnard, H.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Burke, W.; Ennever, P.; Ernst, D.; Faust, I.; Fiore, C.; Fredian, T.; Gao, C.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Hartwig, Z.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; and others

    2014-11-15

    The object of this review is to summarize the achievements of research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994) and Marmar, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51, 261 (2007)] and to place that research in the context of the quest for practical fusion energy. C-Mod is a compact, high-field tokamak, whose unique design and operating parameters have produced a wealth of new and important results since it began operation in 1993, contributing data that extends tests of critical physical models into new parameter ranges and into new regimes. Using only high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for heating and current drive with innovative launching structures, C-Mod operates routinely at reactor level power densities and achieves plasma pressures higher than any other toroidal confinement device. C-Mod spearheaded the development of the vertical-target divertor and has always operated with high-Z metal plasma facing components—approaches subsequently adopted for ITER. C-Mod has made ground-breaking discoveries in divertor physics and plasma-material interactions at reactor-like power and particle fluxes and elucidated the critical role of cross-field transport in divertor operation, edge flows and the tokamak density limit. C-Mod developed the I-mode and the Enhanced Dα H-mode regimes, which have high performance without large edge localized modes and with pedestal transport self-regulated by short-wavelength electromagnetic waves. C-Mod has carried out pioneering studies of intrinsic rotation and demonstrated that self-generated flow shear can be strong enough in some cases to significantly modify transport. C-Mod made the first quantitative link between the pedestal temperature and the H-mode's performance, showing that the observed self-similar temperature profiles were consistent with critical-gradient-length theories and followed up with quantitative tests of nonlinear gyrokinetic models. RF research highlights include direct experimental

  7. 20 years of research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamaka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, M.; Bader, A.; Baek, S.; Bakhtiari, M.; Barnard, H.; Beck, W.; Bergerson, W.; Bespamyatnov, I.; Bonoli, P.; Brower, D.; Brunner, D.; Burke, W.; Candy, J.; Churchill, M.; Cziegler, I.; Diallo, A.; Dominguez, A.; Duval, B.; Edlund, E.; Ennever, P.; Ernst, D.; Faust, I.; Fiore, C.; Fredian, T.; Garcia, O.; Gao, C.; Goetz, J.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Grulke, O.; Hartwig, Z.; Horne, S.; Howard, N.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; Izzo, V.; Kessel, C.; LaBombard, B.; Lau, C.; Li, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Loarte, A.; Marmar, E.; Mazurenko, A.; McCracken, G.; McDermott, R.; Meneghini, O.; Mikkelsen, D.; Mossessian, D.; Mumgaard, R.; Myra, J.; Nelson-Melby, E.; Ochoukov, R.; Olynyk, G.; Parker, R.; Pitcher, S.; Podpaly, Y.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J.; Rowan, W.; Schmidt, A.; Scott, S.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sierchio, J.; Smick, N.; Snipes, J. A.; Snyder, P.; Sorbom, B.; Stillerman, J.; Sung, C.; Takase, Y.; Tang, V.; Terry, J.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Tronchin-James, A.; Tsujii, N.; Vieira, R.; Walk, J.; Wallace, G.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wilson, J.; Wolfe, S.; Wright, G.; Wright, J.; Wukitch, S.; Zweben, S.

    2014-11-01

    The object of this review is to summarize the achievements of research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994) and Marmar, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51, 261 (2007)] and to place that research in the context of the quest for practical fusion energy. C-Mod is a compact, high-field tokamak, whose unique design and operating parameters have produced a wealth of new and important results since it began operation in 1993, contributing data that extends tests of critical physical models into new parameter ranges and into new regimes. Using only high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for heating and current drive with innovative launching structures, C-Mod operates routinely at reactor level power densities and achieves plasma pressures higher than any other toroidal confinement device. C-Mod spearheaded the development of the vertical-target divertor and has always operated with high-Z metal plasma facing components—approaches subsequently adopted for ITER. C-Mod has made ground-breaking discoveries in divertor physics and plasma-material interactions at reactor-like power and particle fluxes and elucidated the critical role of cross-field transport in divertor operation, edge flows and the tokamak density limit. C-Mod developed the I-mode and the Enhanced Dα H-mode regimes, which have high performance without large edge localized modes and with pedestal transport self-regulated by short-wavelength electromagnetic waves. C-Mod has carried out pioneering studies of intrinsic rotation and demonstrated that self-generated flow shear can be strong enough in some cases to significantly modify transport. C-Mod made the first quantitative link between the pedestal temperature and the H-mode's performance, showing that the observed self-similar temperature profiles were consistent with critical-gradient-length theories and followed up with quantitative tests of nonlinear gyrokinetic models. RF research highlights include direct experimental

  8. Overview of Alcator C-Mod Contribution to the 2015 JRT on Off Axis Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Shirawia, S.; Scott, S. D.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Ebrahimi, F.; Poli, F.; Gerhardt, S.; Podesta, M.; Solomon, W.; Wilson, J. R.; Holcomb, C.

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy FES 2015 Joint Research Target (JRT) is to conduct experiments and analysis to quantify the impact of broadened current and pressure profiles on tokamak plasma confinement and stability. Broadened current profiles are achieved on Alcator C-Mod through the use of Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). C-Mod experiments from the recent run campaign have focused on several areas, such as MHD stability of discharges with broad current profiles, energy transport barriers and high-Z impurity transport in non-inductive discharges, momentum transport in discharges with altered safety factor profiles, and validation of LHCD actuator models. This work was conducted on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DoE Office of Science user facility supported by US Department of Energy cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  9. Observation of Co and Counter Rotation Produced by Lower Hybrid Waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R. R.; Podpaly, Y.; Lee, J.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Bonoli, P. T.; Meneghini, O.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-12-23

    Lower hybrid waves launched uni-directionally into tokamak plasmas impart momentum to the electrons. This momentum can be transferred to the ions, leading to substantial counter current rotation. Observations of LH-induced counter rotation have been previously reported [1], and the initial rate of increase has been found to be consistent with the calculated rate of wave momentum injection [2]. However, in recent experiments in Alcator C-Mod it has been found that application of LH waves to relatively low current (I{sub p}{approx}0.4-0.6 MA) plasmas can result in a co-current change of rotation, which implies a different mechanism than that described above. This appears to be linked to the so-called intrinsic rotation commonly observed in Alcator C-Mod and other tokamaks [3]. In addition to the change in direction at low current, some dependence on the magnetic configuration (USL vs. LSN) has been observed.

  10. Near infrared spectroscopy of the divertor region in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furno, I.; Wurden, G. A.

    2004-10-01

    A new system for near infrared spectroscopic measurements (1.2-2.6 μm) is designed for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. These measurements will provide a new window into understanding the physics of detached and/or high radiating plasmas. The system, located on top of the Alcator C-Mod concrete igloo, will view a 30×30 cm2 region of the lower divertor by means of a re-entrant 5 m long ZnSe based periscope. A McPherson 218 spectrometer will disperse the light that will then be detected by a thermoelectrically cooled InGaAs, 256-element linear image sensor. The signals from each pixel will be digitized by a 16-bit, 333 kHz analog/digital board and then transmitted over optical link to a personal computer (PC) located in Alcator C-Mod control room. The PC will remotely control the system and store the data in the MDSplus database.

  11. Experiments and Simulations of ITER-like Plasmas in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    .R. Wilson, C.E. Kessel, S. Wolfe, I.H. Hutchinson, P. Bonoli, C. Fiore, A.E. Hubbard, J. Hughes, Y. Lin, Y. Ma, D. Mikkelsen, M. Reinke, S. Scott, A.C.C. Sips, S. Wukitch and the C-Mod Team

    2010-09-24

    Alcator C-Mod is performing ITER-like experiments to benchmark and verify projections to 15 MA ELMy H-mode Inductive ITER discharges. The main focus has been on the transient ramp phases. The plasma current in C-Mod is 1.3 MA and toroidal field is 5.4 T. Both Ohmic and ion cyclotron (ICRF) heated discharges are examined. Plasma current rampup experiments have demonstrated that (ICRF and LH) heating in the rise phase can save voltseconds (V-s), as was predicted for ITER by simulations, but showed that the ICRF had no effect on the current profile versus Ohmic discharges. Rampdown experiments show an overcurrent in the Ohmic coil (OH) at the H to L transition, which can be mitigated by remaining in H-mode into the rampdown. Experiments have shown that when the EDA H-mode is preserved well into the rampdown phase, the density and temperature pedestal heights decrease during the plasma current rampdown. Simulations of the full C-Mod discharges have been done with the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and the Coppi-Tang energy transport model is used with modified settings to provide the best fit to the experimental electron temperature profile. Other transport models have been examined also. __________________________________________________

  12. Long Term Retention of Deuterium and Tritium in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    FIORE,C.; LABOMBARD,B.; LIPSCHULTZ,B.; PITCHER,C.S.; SKINNER,C.H.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.

    1999-11-03

    We estimate the total in-vessel deuterium retention in Alcator C-Mod from a run campaign of about 1090 plasmas. The estimate is based on measurements of deuterium retained on 22 molybdenum tiles from the inner wall and divertor. The areal density of deuterium on the tiles was measured by nuclear reaction analysis. From these data, the in-vessel deuterium inventory is estimated to be about 0.1 gram, assuming the deuterium coverage is toroidally symmetric. Most of the retained deuterium is on the walls of the main plasma chamber, only about 2.5% of the deuterium is in the divertor. The D coverage is consistent with a layer saturated by implantation with ions and charge-exchange neutrals from the plasma. This contrasts with tokamaks with carbon plasma-facing components (PFC's) where long-term retention of tritium and deuterium is large and mainly in the divertor due to codeposition with carbon eroded by the plasma. The low deuterium retention in the C-Mod divertor is mainly due to the absence of carbon PFC's in C-Mod and the low erosion rate of Mo.

  13. Perturbative thermal diffusivity from partial sawtooth crashes in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creely, A. J.; White, A. E.; Edlund, E. M.; Howard, N. T.; Hubbard, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Perturbative thermal diffusivity has been measured on Alcator C-Mod via the use of the extended-time-to-peak method on heat pulses generated by partial sawtooth crashes. Perturbative thermal diffusivity governs the propagation of heat pulses through a plasma. It differs from power balance thermal diffusivity, which governs steady state thermal transport. Heat pulses generated by sawtooth crashes have been used extensively in the past to study heat pulse thermal diffusivity (Lopes Cardozo 1995 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37 799), but the details of the sawtooth event typically lead to non-diffusive ‘ballistic’ transport, making them an unreliable measure of perturbative diffusivity on many tokamaks (Fredrickson et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 5051). Partial sawteeth are common on numerous tokamaks, and generate a heat pulse without the ‘ballistic’ transport that often accompanies full sawteeth (Fredrickson et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 5051). This is the first application of the extended-time-to-peak method of diffusivity calculation (Tubbing et al 1987 Nucl. Fusion 27 1843) to partial sawtooth crashes. This analysis was applied to over 50 C-Mod shots containing both L- and I-Mode. Results indicate correlations between perturbative diffusivity and confinement regime (L- versus I-mode), as well as correlations with local temperature, density, the associated gradients, and gradient scale lengths (a/L Te and a/L n ). In addition, diffusivities calculated from partial sawteeth are compared to perturbative diffusivities calculated with the nonlinear gyrokinetic code GYRO. We find that standard ion-scale simulations (ITG/TEM turbulence) under-predict the perturbative thermal diffusivity, but new multi-scale (ITG/TEM coupled with ETG) simulations can match the experimental perturbative diffusivity within error bars for an Alcator C-Mod L-mode plasma. Perturbative diffusivities extracted from heat pulses due to partial sawteeth provide a new constraint that can be used to

  14. Multi-channel transport experiments at Alcator C-Mod and comparison with gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Sung, C.; Baek, S.; Barnes, M.; Dominguez, A.; Ernst, D.; Gao, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Parra, F.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J.; Wukitch, S. J.; Team, Alcator C-Mod; Candy, J.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Multi-channel transport experiments have been conducted in auxiliary heated (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [Marmar and Alcator C-Mod Group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. These plasmas provide good diagnostic coverage for measurements of kinetic profiles, impurity transport, and turbulence (electron temperature and density fluctuations). In the experiments, a steady sawtoothing L-mode plasma with 1.2 MW of on-axis RF heating is established and density is scanned by 20%. Measured rotation profiles change from peaked to hollow in shape as density is increased, but electron density and impurity profiles remain peaked. Ion or electron heat fluxes from the two plasmas are the same. The experimental results are compared directly to nonlinear gyrokinetic theory using synthetic diagnostics and the code GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. We find good agreement with experimental ion heat flux, impurity particle transport, and trends in the fluctuation level ratio (T(tilde sign){sub e}/T{sub e})/(ñ{sub e}/n{sub e}), but underprediction of electron heat flux. We find that changes in momentum transport (rotation profiles changing from peaked to hollow) do not correlate with changes in particle transport, and also do not correlate with changes in linear mode dominance, e.g., Ion Temperature Gradient versus Trapped Electron Mode. The new C-Mod results suggest that the drives for momentum transport differ from drives for heat and particle transport. The experimental results are inconsistent with present quasilinear models, and the strong sensitivity of core rotation to density remains unexplained.

  15. Multi-channel transport experiments at Alcator C-Mod and comparison with gyrokinetic simulationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Sung, C.; Baek, S.; Barnes, M.; Candy, J.; Dominguez, A.; Ernst, D.; Gao, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Mikkelsen, D.; Parra, F.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J.; Wukitch, S. J.; Team, Alcator C-Mod

    2013-05-01

    Multi-channel transport experiments have been conducted in auxiliary heated (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [Marmar and Alcator C-Mod Group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. These plasmas provide good diagnostic coverage for measurements of kinetic profiles, impurity transport, and turbulence (electron temperature and density fluctuations). In the experiments, a steady sawtoothing L-mode plasma with 1.2 MW of on-axis RF heating is established and density is scanned by 20%. Measured rotation profiles change from peaked to hollow in shape as density is increased, but electron density and impurity profiles remain peaked. Ion or electron heat fluxes from the two plasmas are the same. The experimental results are compared directly to nonlinear gyrokinetic theory using synthetic diagnostics and the code GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. We find good agreement with experimental ion heat flux, impurity particle transport, and trends in the fluctuation level ratio (T˜e/Te)/(n ˜e/ne), but underprediction of electron heat flux. We find that changes in momentum transport (rotation profiles changing from peaked to hollow) do not correlate with changes in particle transport, and also do not correlate with changes in linear mode dominance, e.g., Ion Temperature Gradient versus Trapped Electron Mode. The new C-Mod results suggest that the drives for momentum transport differ from drives for heat and particle transport. The experimental results are inconsistent with present quasilinear models, and the strong sensitivity of core rotation to density remains unexplained.

  16. High density LHRF experiments in Alcator C-Mod and implications for reactor scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S. G.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; LaBombard, B.; Faust, I. C.; Porkolab, M.; Whyte, D. G.

    2015-04-01

    Parametric decay instabilities (PDI) appear to be an ubiquitous feature of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments at high density. In density ramp experiments in Alcator C-Mod and other machines the onset of PDI activity has been well correlated with a decrease in current drive efficiency and production of fast electron bremsstrahlung. However whether PDI is the primary cause of the ‘density limit’, and if so by exactly what mechanism (beyond the obvious one of pump depletion) has not been clearly established. In order to further understand the connection, the frequency spectrum of PDI activity occurring during Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments has been explored in detail by means of a number of RF probes distributed around the periphery of the C-Mod tokamak including a probe imbedded in the inner wall. The results show that (i) the excited spectra consists mainly of a few discrete ion cyclotron (IC) quasi-modes, which have higher growth than the ion sound branch; (ii) PDI activity can begin either at the inner or outer wall, depending on magnetic configuration; (iii) the frequencies of the IC quasi-modes correspond to the magnetic field strength close to the low-field side (LFS) or high-field side separatrix; and (iv) although PDI activity may initiate near the inner separatrix, the loss in fast electron bremsstrahlung is best correlated with the appearance of IC quasi-modes characteristic of the magnetic field strength near the LFS separatrix. These data, supported by growth rate calculations, point to the importance of the LFS scrape-off layer (SOL) density in determining PDI onset and degradation in current drive efficiency. By minimizing the SOL density it is possible to extend the core density regime over which PDI can be avoided, thus potentially maximizing the effectiveness of LHCD at high density. Increased current drive efficiency at high density has been achieved in FTU and EAST through lithium coating and special fuelling methods, and in recent

  17. Wall scanning probe for high-field side plasma measurements on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Smick, Noah; LaBombard, Brian

    2009-02-01

    A new, high-field side scanning probe has been added to Alcator C-Mod's complement of edge diagnostics. The wall scanning probe is designed to provide all the benefits of a linear plunge, multielectrode scanning probe while working from the confined space of the inner tokamak wall. The drive mechanism is an embedded coil which produces a torque with the ambient toroidal magnetic field when energized, thus allowing the probe to plunge to different preprogramed depths at different times during a plasma discharge. The probe tip is designed for easy replacement and is presently configured to operate as a modified, high heat-flux "Gundestrup-type" probe with four tungsten electrodes. The probe has demonstrated the ability to obtain cross-field profiles for electron temperature, density, floating potential, and plasma flow information (parallel and perpendicular to B) up to a depth of a few millimiters inside the last-closed flux surface in standard C-Mod discharges. The tungsten-tipped probe has proved very robust and shows little or no damage though it routinely handles surface heat fluxes on the order of 100 MW/m(2) at peak insertion.

  18. Fuel retention measurements in Alcator C-Mod using accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Lanza, Richard C.; Lipschultz, Bruce; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the first in situ time- and space-resolved measurements of deuterium (D) fuel retention in plasma-facing component (PFC) surfaces using Accelerator-based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. AIMS is a novel in situ materials diagnostic technique based on the spectroscopic analysis of nuclear reaction products induced in PFC surfaces using an ∼MeV beam of deuterons from a compact linear accelerator in between plasma shots. AIMS measurements of D retention on inner wall PFCs were acquired during diverted and limited plasma operations and during wall conditioning experiments. Intershot measurements demonstrate the local erosion and codeposition of boron films on PFC surfaces with a constant D / B ratio. This is consistent with previous results suggesting that D codeposition with boron is insufficient to account for the net retention observed in Alcator C-Mod. Changes in deuterium concentration during boronization, electron cyclotron and glow cleanings were also measured.

  19. Novel energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Pablant, N A; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Bitter, M; Brandstetter, S; Eikenberry, E; Ellis, R; Hill, K W; Hofer, P; Schneebeli, M

    2012-10-01

    A new energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera has been recently installed on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic is capable of 1D or 2D imaging with a spatial resolution of ≈1 cm, an energy resolution of ≈1 keV in the range of 3.5-15 keV and a maximum time resolution of 5 ms. A novel use of a Pilatus 2 hybrid-pixel x-ray detector [P. Kraft et al., J. Synchrotron Rad. 16, 368 (2009)] is employed in which the lower energy threshold of individual pixels is adjusted, allowing regions of a single detector to be sensitive to different x-ray energy ranges. Development of this new detector calibration technique was done as a collaboration between PPPL and Dectris Ltd. The calibration procedure is described, and the energy resolution of the detector is characterized. Initial data from this installation on Alcator C-Mod is presented. This diagnostic provides line-integrated measurements of impurity emission which can be used to determine impurity concentrations as well as the electron energy distribution.

  20. Novel energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bitter, M.; Ellis, R.; Hill, K. W.; Brandstetter, S.; Eikenberry, E.; Hofer, P.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-10-15

    A new energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera has been recently installed on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic is capable of 1D or 2D imaging with a spatial resolution of Almost-Equal-To 1 cm, an energy resolution of Almost-Equal-To 1 keV in the range of 3.5-15 keV and a maximum time resolution of 5 ms. A novel use of a Pilatus 2 hybrid-pixel x-ray detector [P. Kraft et al., J. Synchrotron Rad. 16, 368 (2009)] is employed in which the lower energy threshold of individual pixels is adjusted, allowing regions of a single detector to be sensitive to different x-ray energy ranges. Development of this new detector calibration technique was done as a collaboration between PPPL and Dectris Ltd. The calibration procedure is described, and the energy resolution of the detector is characterized. Initial data from this installation on Alcator C-Mod is presented. This diagnostic provides line-integrated measurements of impurity emission which can be used to determine impurity concentrations as well as the electron energy distribution.

  1. ICRF antenna matching system with ferrite tuners for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Binus, A.; Wukitch, S. J.; Koert, P.; Murray, R.; Pfeiffer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time fast ferrite tuning (FFT) has been successfully implemented on the ICRF antennas on Alcator C-Mod. The former prototypical FFT system on the E-port 2-strap antenna has been upgraded using new ferrite tuners that have been designed specifically for the operational parameters of the Alcator C-Mod ICRF system (˜ 80 MHz). Another similar FFT system, with two ferrite tuners and one fixed-length stub, has been installed on the transmission line of the D-port 2-strap antenna. These two systems share a Linux-server-based real-time controller. These FFT systems are able to achieve and maintain the reflected power to the transmitters to less than 1% in real time during the plasma discharges under almost all plasma conditions, and help ensure reliable high power operation of the antennas. The innovative field-aligned (FA) 4-strap antenna on J-port has been found to have an interesting feature of loading insensitivity vs. plasma conditions. This feature allows us to significantly improve the matching for the FA J-port antenna by installing carefully designed stubs on the two transmission lines. The reduction of the RF voltages in the transmission lines has enabled the FA J-port antenna to deliver 3.7 MW RF power to plasmas out of the 4 MW source power in high performance I-mode plasmas.

  2. Demonstrating the Physics Basis for the ITER 15 MA Inductive Discharge on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, C. E.; Wolfe, S. M.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Ma, Y.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Poli, F.; Reinke, M. L.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2012-10-01

    Rampup discharges in C-Mod, matching ITE's current diffusion times show ICRF heating can save V-s but results in only weak effects on the current profile, despite strong modifications of the central electron temperature. Simulation of these discharges with TSC, and TORIC for ICRF, using multiple transport models, do not reproduce the temperature profile evolution, or the experimental internal self-inductance li, by sufficiently large amounts to be unacceptable for projections to ITER operation. For the flattop phase experiments EDA H-modes approach the ITER parameter targets of q95=3, H98=1, n/nGr=0.85, betaN=1.7, and k=1.8, and sustain them similar to a normalized ITER flattop time. The discharges show a degradation of energy confinement at higher densities, but increasing H98 with increasing net power to the plasma. For these discharges intrinsic impurities (B, Mo) provided radiated power fractions of 25-37%. Experiments show the plasma can remain in H-mode in rampdown with ICRF injection, the density will decrease with Ip while in the H-mode, and the back transition occurs when the net power reaches about half the L-H transition power. C-Mod indicates that faster rampdowns are preferable. Work supported by US Dept of Energy under DE-AC02-CH0911466 and DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  3. The Stark II reality.

    PubMed

    Memel, Sherwin L; Grosvenor, John C

    2003-02-01

    The long awaited final regulations in Phase I of a two-phase rulemaking process under the Stark II law were published on January 4, 2001. The Phase I final rules govern interpretation of the Stark law as it is applied to referrals by a physician for designated categories of health services to entities in which the referring physician has a financial interest. These new regulations are of particular concern to specialists, such as orthopaedic surgeons, whose practices are oriented to ancillary services that are considered designated health services, such as radiology, physical therapy and durable medical equipment, and where the availability of clear guidance is essential to ensure that medically necessary care is provided in a manner that complies with law. However, rather than the "brightline" guidance that the healthcare community sought, the new regulations create uncertainty in areas that had not existed before. The new regulations require physicians to evaluate the full range of their business and professional relationships to avoid the risk of nonpayment of claims, civil money penalties, or program exclusion after the effective date of the new regulations. PMID:12567126

  4. Design of a CO{sub 2}-laser Thomson scattering ion-tail diagnostic for Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.K.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Ma, C.H.

    1994-09-01

    A CO{sub 2}-laser Thomson scattering diagnostic has been designed for the measurement of the ICRH-produced ion tail on Alcator C-Mod. The plasma parameters and port access require that the detection of scattered radiation be made at small angles, typically one degree or less. The receiver system consists of five heterodyne detectors and the source laser produces an energy of 10 Joules per pulse with a 1 to 5 microsecond pulse length. The scattering system is currently being installed on the Alcator C-Mod experiment. Details of the diagnostic, calculations of the expected measurements, and application of the diagnostic for ITER are presented.

  5. Modification of Current Profile, Toroidal Rotation and Pedestal by Lower Hybrid Waves in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Meneghini, O.; Porkolab, M.; Schmidt, A. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Ko, J.-S.; McDermott, R. M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Scott, S.

    2009-11-01

    Recent results from the lower hybrid current drive experiments on Alcator C-Mod are presented. These include i) MSE measurements of broadened LHCD current profiles; ii) development of counter rotation comparable to the rate of injected wave momentum; iii) modification of pedestals and rotation in H-mode; and iv) development of a new FEM-based code that models LH wave propagation from the RF source to absorption in the plasma. An improved antenna concept that will be used in the upcoming C-Mod campaigns is also briefly described.

  6. Design of a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Irby, J. H.; Leccacorvi, R.; Vieira, R.; Oi, C. Y.; Peebles, W. A.; Nguyen, X.

    2012-10-15

    A correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic has been installed in Alcator C-Mod. In order to measure electron temperature fluctuations, this diagnostic uses a spectral decorrelation technique. Constraints obtained with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations guided the design of the optical system and receiver. The CECE diagnostic is designed to measure temperature fluctuations which have k{sub {theta}}{<=} 4.8 cm{sup -1} (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s} < 0.5) using a well-focused beam pattern. Because the CECE diagnostic is a dedicated turbulence diagnostic, the optical system is also flexible, which allows for various collimating lenses and antenna to be used. The system overview and the demonstration of its operability as designed are presented in this paper.

  7. Design of a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Sung, C; White, A E; Irby, J H; Leccacorvi, R; Vieira, R; Oi, C Y; Peebles, W A; Nguyen, X

    2012-10-01

    A correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic has been installed in Alcator C-Mod. In order to measure electron temperature fluctuations, this diagnostic uses a spectral decorrelation technique. Constraints obtained with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations guided the design of the optical system and receiver. The CECE diagnostic is designed to measure temperature fluctuations which have k(θ) ≤ 4.8 cm(-1) (k(θ)ρ(s) < 0.5) using a well-focused beam pattern. Because the CECE diagnostic is a dedicated turbulence diagnostic, the optical system is also flexible, which allows for various collimating lenses and antenna to be used. The system overview and the demonstration of its operability as designed are presented in this paper.

  8. Search for gyrokinetic dependencies in helium transport at Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kenneth; Rowan, William; Hatch, David; Bespamyatnov, Igor; Horton, Wendell

    2013-10-01

    Helium-3 and helium-4 impurity transport measurements and density profile measurements have been obtained on Alcator C-Mod in a variety of discharge conditions, using the core Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic. The helium concentrations range from trace (< 2 %) to large minority (~ 20 %). L-mode, H-mode, and I-mode results are included, with Ohmic heated, ICRF heated, and LH heated plasmas. Helium profiles are observed to vary with plasma current, and also change in time during ICRF shots. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations are performed for some shots using the GENE code. Sensitivity scans are done for magnetic shear, impurity density, and other plasma parameters and transport scalings are compared with experimental results. Simulated transport flux is compared with experimentally derived D and v parameters. Supported by USDoE awards DE-FG03-96ER-54373 and DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  9. Measurement of Fast Electron Transport by Lower Hybrid Modulation Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A. E.; Bonoli, P. T.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2009-11-26

    The Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system on Alcator C-Mod can produce spectra with a wide range of peak parallel refractive index (n{sub parallel}). An experiment in which LH power is square-wave modulated on a time scale much faster than the current relaxation time does not significantly alter the poloidal magnetic field inside the plasma and thus allows for realistic modeling and consistent plasma conditions for different ny spectra. Boxcar binning of hard x-rays during LH power modulation allows for time resolution sufficient to resolve the build-up, steady-state, and slowing-down of fast electrons. A transport model built in Matlab has been used to determine a fast electron pinch velocity for a high-n{sub parallel} case of 1-2 m/s.

  10. RF current profile control studies in the alcator C-mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Mikkelsen, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.

    1999-09-01

    Time dependent calculations of lower hybrid (LH) current profile control in Alcator C-Mod have been done using the TRANSP [1], FPPRF [2], and LSC [3] codes. Up to 3 MW of LH current drive power was applied in plasmas with high power ICRF minority heating (PICH=1.8-3 MW) and fast current ramp up. Using the experimentally measured temperature profiles, off-axis current generation resulted in nonmonotonic q-profiles with qmin~=1.6. Self-consistent effects of off-axis electron heating by the LH power were also included in the analysis and significant broadening of the electron temperature profile was found with qmin>~2 and a larger shear reversal radius.

  11. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulation of Alcator C-Mod tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T. White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.

    2014-03-15

    Alcator C-Mod tokamak discharges have been studied with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation simultaneously spanning both ion and electron spatiotemporal scales. These multi-scale simulations utilized the gyrokinetic model implemented by GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] and the approximation of reduced electron mass (μ = (m{sub D}/m{sub e}){sup .5} = 20.0) to qualitatively study a pair of Alcator C-Mod discharges: a low-power discharge, previously demonstrated (using realistic mass, ion-scale simulation) to display an under-prediction of the electron heat flux and a high-power discharge displaying agreement with both ion and electron heat flux channels [N. T. Howard et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 123011 (2013)]. These multi-scale simulations demonstrate the importance of electron-scale turbulence in the core of conventional tokamak discharges and suggest it is a viable candidate for explaining the observed under-prediction of electron heat flux. In this paper, we investigate the coupling of turbulence at the ion (k{sub θ}ρ{sub s}∼O(1.0)) and electron (k{sub θ}ρ{sub e}∼O(1.0)) scales for experimental plasma conditions both exhibiting strong (high-power) and marginally stable (low-power) low-k (k{sub θ}ρ{sub s} < 1.0) turbulence. It is found that reduced mass simulation of the plasma exhibiting marginally stable low-k turbulence fails to provide even qualitative insight into the turbulence present in the realistic plasma conditions. In contrast, multi-scale simulation of the plasma condition exhibiting strong turbulence provides valuable insight into the coupling of the ion and electron scales.

  12. Marginal Stability of Microturbulence near ITB Onset on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Baumgaertel; M.H. Redi; R.V. Budny; D.C. McCune; W. Dorland; C.L. Fiore

    2004-08-23

    Insight into microturbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas is being sought using linear simulations of drift waves near the onset time of an internal transport barrier (ITB) on Alcator C-Mod. Microturbulence is likely generated by instabilities of drift waves and causes transport of heat and particles. This transport is studied because the containment of heat and particles is important for the achievement of practical nuclear fusion. We investigate nearness to marginal stability of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) modes for conditions in the ITB region at the trigger time for ITB formation. Data from C-Mod, analyzed by TRANSP (a time-dependent transport analysis code), is read by the code TRXPL and made into input files for the parallel gyrokinetic model code GS2. Temperature and density gradients in these input files are modified to produce new input files. Results from these simulations show a weak ITG instability in the barrier region at the time of onset, above marginal stability; the normalized critical temperature gradient is 80% of the experimental temperature gradient. The growth rate increases linearly above the critical value, with the spectrum of ITG modes remaining parabolic up to a multiplicative factor of 2. The effect of varying density gradients is found to be much weaker and causes the fastest growing drift mode to change from ITG to trapped-electron mode character. Simulations were carried out on the NERSC [National Energy Research Supercomputer Center] IBM 6000 SP using 4 nodes, 16 processors per node. Predictive simulations were examined for converged instability after 10,000-50,000 time-steps in each case. Each simulation took approximately 30 minutes to complete on the IBM SP.

  13. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials in the SOL of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Wukitch, S. J.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-12

    We performed an extensive survey of the plasma potential in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of Ion Cyclotron Range-of Frequencies (ICRF)-heated discharges on Alcator C-Mod. Our results show that plasma potentials are enhanced in the presence of ICRF power and plasma potential values of >100 V are often observed. Such potentials are high enough to induce sputtering of high-Z molybdenum (Mo) plasma facing components by deuterium ions on C-Mod. For comparison, the plasma potential in Ohmic discharges is typically less than 10 V, well below the threshold needed to induce Mo sputtering by deuterium ions. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials are observed in the SOL regions that both magnetically map and do not map to active ICRF antennas. Regions that magnetically map to active ICRF antennas are accessible to slow waves directly launched by the antennas and these regions experience plasma potential enhancement that is partially consistent with the slow wave rectification mechanism. One of the most defining features of the slow wave rectification is a threshold appearance of significant plasma potentials (>100 V) when the dimensionless rectification parameter Λ{sub −o} is above unity and this trend is observed experimentally. We also observe ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials >100 V in regions that do not magnetically map to the active antennas and, hence, are not accessible for slow waves launched directly by the active antennas. However, unabsorbed fast waves can reach these regions. The general trend that we observe in these 'un-mapped' regions is that the plasma potential scales with the strength of the local RF wave fields with the fast wave polarization and the highest plasma potentials are observed in discharges with the highest levels of unabsorbed ICRF power. Similarly, we find that core Mo levels scale with the level of unabsorbed ICRF power suggesting a link between plasma potentials in the SOL and the strength of the impurity source.

  14. Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D. R. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Ma, Y.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2015-06-15

    Peaked density profiles in low-collisionality AUG and JET H-mode plasmas are probably caused by a turbulently driven particle pinch, and Alcator C-Mod experiments confirmed that collisionality is a critical parameter. Density peaking in reactors could produce a number of important effects, some beneficial, such as enhanced fusion power and transport of fuel ions from the edge to the core, while others are undesirable, such as lower beta limits, reduced radiation from the plasma edge, and consequently higher divertor heat loads. Fundamental understanding of the pinch will enable planning to optimize these impacts. We show that density peaking is predicted by nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations based on measured profile data from low collisionality H-mode plasma in Alcator C-Mod. Multiple ion species are included to determine whether hydrogenic density peaking has an isotope dependence or is influenced by typical levels of low-Z impurities, and whether impurity density peaking depends on the species. We find that the deuterium density profile is slightly more peaked than that of hydrogen, and that experimentally relevant levels of boron have no appreciable effect on hydrogenic density peaking. The ratio of density at r/a = 0.44 to that at r/a = 0.74 is 1.2 for the majority D and minority H ions (and for electrons), and increases with impurity Z: 1.1 for helium, 1.15 for boron, 1.3 for neon, 1.4 for argon, and 1.5 for molybdenum. The ion temperature profile is varied to match better the predicted heat flux with the experimental transport analysis, but the resulting factor of two change in heat transport has only a weak effect on the predicted density peaking.

  15. Marginal Stability Studies of Microturbulence Near ITB Onset on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J.; Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Dorland, W.; Fiore, C.L.

    2005-01-01

    Insight into microturbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas is being sought using linear simulations of drift waves near the onset time of an internal transport barrier (ITB) on Alcator C-Mod. Microturbulence is likely generated by instabilities of drift waves and causes transport of heat and particles. This transport is studied because the containment of heat and particles is important for the achievement of practical nuclear fusion. We investigate nearness to marginal stability of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes for conditions in the ITB region at the trigger time for ITB formation. Data from C-Mod, analyzed by TRANSP (a time dependent transport analysis code), is read by the code TRXPL and made into input files for the parallel gyrokinetic model code GS2. Temperature and density gradients in these input files are modified to produce new input files. Results from these simulations show a weak ITG instability in the barrier region at the time of onset, above marginal stability; the normalized critical temperature gradient is 80% of the experimental temperature gradient. The growth rate increases linearly above the critical value, with the spectrum of ITG modes remaining parabolic up to a multiplicative factor of 2. The effect of varying density gradients is found to be much weaker and causes the fastest growing drift mode to change from ITG to trapped electron mode character. Simulations were carried out on the NERSC IBM 6000 SP using 4 nodes, 16 processors per node. Predictive simulations were examined for converged instability after 10,000-50,000 timesteps in each case. Each simulation took approximately 30 minutes to complete on the IBM SP.

  16. Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wilson, R. Parker, M. Bitter, P.T. Bonoli, C. Fiore, R.W. Harvey, K. Hill, A.E. Hubbard, J.W. Hughes, A. Ince-Cushman, C. Kessel, J.S. Ko, O. Meneghini, C.K. Phillips, M. Porkolab, J. Rice, A.E. Schmidt, S. Scott,S. Shiraiwa, E. Valeo, G.Wallace, J.C. Wright and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2009-11-20

    On the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being used to modify the current profile with the aim of obtaining advanced tokamak (AT) performance in plasmas with parameters similar to those that would be required on ITER. To date, power levels in excess of 1 MW at a frequency of 4.6 GHz have been coupled into a variety of plasmas. Experiments have established that LHCD on C-Mod behaves globally as predicted by theory. Bulk current drive efficiencies, n20IlhR/Plh ~ 0.25, inferred from magnetics and MSE are in line with theory. Quantitative comparisons between local measurements, MSE, ECE and hard x-ray bremsstrahlung, and theory/simulation using the GENRAY, TORIC-LH CQL3D and TSC-LSC codes have been performed. These comparisons have demonstrated the off-axis localization of the current drive, its magnitude and location dependence on the launched n|| spectrum, and the use of LHCD during the current ramp to save volt-seconds and delay the peaking of the current profile. Broadening of the x-ray emission profile during ICRF heating indicates that the current drive location can be controlled by the electron temperature, as expected. In addition, an alteration in the plasma toroidal rotation profile during LHCD has been observed with a significant rotation in the counter current direction. Notably, the rotation is accompanied by peaking of the density and temperature profiles on a current diffusion time scale inside of the half radius where the LH absorption is taking place.

  17. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulation of Alcator C-Mod tokamak discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.

    2014-03-01

    Alcator C-Mod tokamak discharges have been studied with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation simultaneously spanning both ion and electron spatiotemporal scales. These multi-scale simulations utilized the gyrokinetic model implemented by GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] and the approximation of reduced electron mass (μ = (mD/me).5 = 20.0) to qualitatively study a pair of Alcator C-Mod discharges: a low-power discharge, previously demonstrated (using realistic mass, ion-scale simulation) to display an under-prediction of the electron heat flux and a high-power discharge displaying agreement with both ion and electron heat flux channels [N. T. Howard et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 123011 (2013)]. These multi-scale simulations demonstrate the importance of electron-scale turbulence in the core of conventional tokamak discharges and suggest it is a viable candidate for explaining the observed under-prediction of electron heat flux. In this paper, we investigate the coupling of turbulence at the ion (kθρs˜O(1.0)) and electron (kθρe˜O(1.0)) scales for experimental plasma conditions both exhibiting strong (high-power) and marginally stable (low-power) low-k (kθρs < 1.0) turbulence. It is found that reduced mass simulation of the plasma exhibiting marginally stable low-k turbulence fails to provide even qualitative insight into the turbulence present in the realistic plasma conditions. In contrast, multi-scale simulation of the plasma condition exhibiting strong turbulence provides valuable insight into the coupling of the ion and electron scales.

  18. Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Ma, Y.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2015-06-01

    Peaked density profiles in low-collisionality AUG and JET H-mode plasmas are probably caused by a turbulently driven particle pinch, and Alcator C-Mod experiments confirmed that collisionality is a critical parameter. Density peaking in reactors could produce a number of important effects, some beneficial, such as enhanced fusion power and transport of fuel ions from the edge to the core, while others are undesirable, such as lower beta limits, reduced radiation from the plasma edge, and consequently higher divertor heat loads. Fundamental understanding of the pinch will enable planning to optimize these impacts. We show that density peaking is predicted by nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations based on measured profile data from low collisionality H-mode plasma in Alcator C-Mod. Multiple ion species are included to determine whether hydrogenic density peaking has an isotope dependence or is influenced by typical levels of low-Z impurities, and whether impurity density peaking depends on the species. We find that the deuterium density profile is slightly more peaked than that of hydrogen, and that experimentally relevant levels of boron have no appreciable effect on hydrogenic density peaking. The ratio of density at r/a = 0.44 to that at r/a = 0.74 is 1.2 for the majority D and minority H ions (and for electrons), and increases with impurity Z: 1.1 for helium, 1.15 for boron, 1.3 for neon, 1.4 for argon, and 1.5 for molybdenum. The ion temperature profile is varied to match better the predicted heat flux with the experimental transport analysis, but the resulting factor of two change in heat transport has only a weak effect on the predicted density peaking.

  19. Analytic wave model of Stark deceleration dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, Koos; Meijer, Gerard; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2006-06-15

    Stark deceleration relies on time-dependent inhomogeneous electric fields which repetitively exert a decelerating force on polar molecules. Fourier analysis reveals that such fields, generated by an array of field stages, consist of a superposition of partial waves with well-defined phase velocities. Molecules whose velocities come close to the phase velocity of a given wave get a ride from that wave. For a square-wave temporal dependence of the Stark field, the phase velocities of the waves are found to be odd-fraction multiples of a fundamental phase velocity {lambda}/{tau}, with {lambda} and {tau} the spatial and temporal periods of the field. Here we study explicitly the dynamics due to any of the waves as well as due to their mutual perturbations. We first solve the equations of motion for the case of single-wave interactions and exploit their isomorphism with those for the biased pendulum. Next we analyze the perturbations of the single-wave dynamics by other waves and find that these have no net effect on the phase stability of the acceleration or deceleration process. Finally, we find that a packet of molecules can also ride a wave which results from an interference of adjacent waves. In this case, small phase stability areas form around phase velocities that are even-fraction multiples of the fundamental velocity. A detailed comparison with classical trajectory simulations and with experiment demonstrates that the analytic 'wave model' encompasses all the longitudinal physics encountered in a Stark decelerator.

  20. Experimental and numerical characterization of ion-cyclotron heated protons on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, V.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Granetz, R. S.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Liptac, J.; Fiore, C. L.; Greenwald, M.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2007-06-01

    Energetic minority protons with ~100 keV effective temperature are routinely created in Alcator C-Mod plasmas with the application of ion-cyclotron-range-of-frequency (ICRF) heating. A multichannel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) is used to make measurements of these distributions in Alcator C-Mod's unique and reactor-relevant operating space via active and passive charge-exchange techniques. A radially injected 50 keV diagnostic hydrogen neutral beam is used for active analysis. Using a detailed model that accounts for beam, halo and impurity electron donors, core proton temperatures of ~30-120 keV are directly measured for the first time in lower density (ne0 ~ (0.8-1.5) × 1020 m-3) Alcator C-Mod plasmas with up to only ~0.5 MW of ICRF power. The model found that the minority proton temperatures are peaked spatially away from r/a = 0, even for an on-axis resonance. Additionally, noticeable phase-space anisotropy is seen as expected for ICRF heating. The measured effective temperatures also scale approximately with the Stix parameter. The CNPA temperature measurements are compared with several leading simulation packages such as the TORIC/FPPRF and AORSA/CQL3D full-wave/Fokker-Planck (FW/FP) solvers. Preliminary comparisons with the AORSA/CQL3D code which include results from a new synthetic diagnostic show good agreement and demonstrate that accurate tracking of the minority distribution during iterations of the FW and FP solvers is required to simulate Alcator C-Mod's energetic minority populations with accuracy. Physically, poor wave focusing and preferential heating of trapped energetic protons are found to move the fast proton temperature profiles off-axis. These FW/FP analyses represent the first comparison between predictions of these detailed codes and core minority tail experimental measurements on Alcator C-Mod.

  1. The development of an Omegratron plasma ion mass spectrometer for Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    A new diagnostic device, the Omegatron Probe, has been developed to investigate relative impurity levels and impurity charge state distribution in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak edge plasma. The Omegatron probe consists of two principal components, a ``front-end`` of independently biased grids, arranged in a gridded energy analyzer fashion and a large collection cavity. Particles enter the probe in a thin ``ribbon`` through a knife-edge slit. The grids provide a means to measure and control the parallel energy distribution of the ions. In the collection cavity, an oscillating electric field is applied perpendicularly to the ambient magnetic field. Ions whose cyclotron frequencies are resonant with this electric field oscillation will gain perpendicular energy and be collected. In this way, the probe can be operated in two modes: first, by fixing the potentials on the grids and sweeping frequencies to obtain a `` Z/m spectrum`` of ion species and second, by fixing the frequency and sweeping the grid potentials to obtain the distribution function of an individual impurity species. The Omegatron probe performed successfully in tests on a Hollow Cathode Discharge (HCD) linear plasma column. It obtained measurements of T{sub e} {approx} 5 eV, T{sub i} (H{sup +}) {approx} 2.0 {plus_minus} 0.2 eV, n{sub 0} {approx} 9 {times} 10{sup 15} m{sup {minus}3}, RMS potential fluctuation levels of {approximately} 0.5 {plus_minus} 0.05 {plus_minus} T{sub e}, and obtained ``Z/m`` spectra for the plasma ions (H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, He{sup +}). Additional experiments confirmed the theoretical scalings of the f/{delta}f resolution with the applied electric field and magnetic field strengths. The instrument yielded an absolute level of resolution, f/{delta}f, of approximately 2.5 to 3 times the theoretical values. Finally, the results from the HCD are used to project operation on Alcator C-Mod.

  2. Measurement of LHCD edge power deposition through modulation techniques on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, I. C.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Baek, S. G.; Chilenksi, M. A.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Edlund, E.

    2015-12-10

    The efficiency of LHCD on Alcator C-Mod drops exponentially with line average density. At reactor relevant densities (> 1 · 1020 [m{sup −3}]) no measurable current is driven. While a number of causes have been suggested, no specific mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the loss of current drive at high density. Fast modulation of the LH power was used to isolate and quantify the LHCD deposition within the plasma. Measurements from these plasmas provide unique evidence for determining a root cause. Modulation of LH power in steady plasmas exhibited no correlated change in the core temperature. A correlated, prompt response in the edge suggests that the loss in efficiency is related to a edge absorption mechanism. This follows previous results which found the generation of n{sub ||}-independent SOL currents. Multiple Langmuir probe array measurements of the conducted heat conclude that the lost power is deposited near the last closed flux surface. The heat flux induced by LH waves onto the outer divertor is calculated. Changes in the neutral pressure, ionization and hard X-ray emission at high density highlight the importance of the active divertor in the loss of efficiency. Results of this study implicate a mechanism which may occur over multiple passes, leading to power absorption near the LCFS.

  3. Investigation of the transport shortfall in Alcator C-Mod L-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Walk, J.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.; Goerler, T.

    2013-03-15

    A so-called 'transport shortfall,' where ion and electron heat fluxes and turbulence are underpredicted by gyrokinetic codes, has been robustly identified in DIII-D L-mode plasmas for {rho}>0.55[T. L. Rhodes et al., Nucl. Fusion 51(6), 063022 (2011); and C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 052301 (2009)]. To probe the existence of a transport shortfall across different tokamaks, a dedicated scan of auxiliary heated L-mode discharges in Alcator C-Mod are studied in detail with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations for the first time. Two discharges, only differing by the amount of auxiliary heating are investigated using both linear and nonlinear simulation of the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation of the low and high input power discharges reveals a discrepancy between simulation and experiment in only the electron heat flux channel of the low input power discharge. However, both discharges demonstrate excellent agreement in the ion heat flux channel, and the high input power discharge demonstrates simultaneous agreement with experiment in both the electron and ion heat flux channels. A summary of linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic results and a discussion of possible explanations for the agreement/disagreement in each heat flux channel is presented.

  4. Effects of the q profile on toroidal rotation in Alcator C-Mod LHCD plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Rice, J. E.; Gao, C.; Mumgaard, R.; Parker, R. R.; Scott, S. D.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Fenzi, C.; et al

    2016-02-09

    Changes in the core toroidal rotation profiles following injection of lower hybrid (LH) waves have been documented in Alcator C-Mod plasmas. Shot by shot scans of LH input power have been performed at fixed magnetic field and electron density for several plasma currents. For sawtoothing target plasmas, if the input power is low enough that the central safety factor q0 remains below 1, the change in the core rotation is in the counter-current direction, consistent in sign, magnitude and LH power scaling with direct momentum input from the LH waves. If the power level is high enough that there aremore » significant changes to the q profile, including the termination of sawtooth oscillations, the change in the toroidal rotation is in the co-current direction, consistent with changes in the momentum flux through its dependence on the current density profile. Furthermore, the direction of the rotation changes depends on whether q0 is below or above unity, and seemingly not on the magnetic shear, nor the Ohmic confinement regime of the target plasma.« less

  5. Neutral gas compression in the Alcator C-Mod divertor, experimental observations

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczewski, A.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; McCracken, G.

    1994-11-01

    One of the high heat flux solutions envisioned for ITER is the gas target divertor. This scheme requires high neutral pressure to be sustained in the divertor chamber with a minimal effect on the pressure in the main tokamak chamber (i.e. high gas compression). The neutral gas compression has been studied in the Alcator C-Mod closed divertor under various central and edge plasma conditions. The neutral pressure measured by a fast, in-situ, ionization gauge, installed behind the divertor target plate was compared with the midplane pressure, measured by a shielded Bayard-Alpert gauge. Divertor pressures up to 30 mTorr with compression factors p{sub div}/p{sub mid} {le} 70 have been observed. It has been found that the neutral pressure in the divertor does not depend strongly on the fueling location but rather on the core plasma density and the resulting divertor plasma regime. Divertor detachment leads to a considerable drop in the compression ratio, suggesting a partial {open_quotes}unplugging{close_quotes} of the divertor volume. An examination of the local particle flux balance in the divertor indicates that the single most important factor determining divertor pressure and compression is the private-flux plasma channel opacity to neutrals.

  6. Alcator C-Mod Experiments in Support of the ITER Baseline 15 MA Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    C Kessel, et al

    2013-05-07

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod have addressed several issues for the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario from 2009-2012. Rampup studies show ICRF can save significant V-s, and that an H-mode in the ramp can be utilized to save 50% more. ICRF modifications to li(1) are minimal, although the Te profile is peaked relative to ohmic in the plasma center, and alter sawtooth onset times. Rampdown studies show H-modes can be routinely sustained, avoiding an OH coil over-current associated with the H-L transition, that fast rampdowns are preferred, the density drops with Ip, and that the H-L transition occurs at Ploss/Pthr,LH ~ 1.0-1.3 at n/nGr ~ 0.85. Flattop plasmas targeting ITER baseline parameters have been sustained for 20 τE or 8-13 τCR, but only reach H98 ~ 0.6 at n/nGr = 0.85, rising to 0.9 at n/nGr = 0.65.

  7. Edge turbulence flows at two different poloidal angles in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweben, Stewart; Terry, James; Agostini, Matteo; Davis, William; Grulke, Olaf; Hughes, Jerry; Labombard, Brian; Landreman, Matt; Ma, Yunxing; Pace, David; Scott, Bruce

    2012-10-01

    High resolution edge turbulence movies have been obtained simultaneously at both the outer midplane and near the lower X-point region of C-Mod, using gas puff imaging (GPI) with two high speed cameras at 400,000 frames/sec. The time-resolved turbulence flow speeds at the outer midplane GPI view was previously estimated using a time-resolved cross-correlation technique [1], but previous results also showed a significantly different turbulence structure in these two regions [2]. Preliminary results indicate that the poloidal turbulence flows are not necessarily the same at these two poloidal angles. For instance, in one shot there is a strong time-averaged poloidal flow near the X-region toward the outer midplane, but mainly poloidally-fluctuating flows at the outer midplane. Examples of these flow measurements will be shown for plasmas with and without ICRH and in L-mode and H-mode plasmas. Evidence for fluctuating zonal flows preceding the L-H transition will be assessed. This work is supported in part by DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-99ER5412.[4pt] [1] S.J. Zweben, J.L. Terry et al, Plasma Phys. Cont. Fusion 54 (2012) 025008[0pt] [2] J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben et al, J. Nucl. Mat. 390-291 (2009) 339

  8. Measurements of plasma sheath heat flux in the Alcator C-Mod divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Dan; Labombard, Brian; Terry, Jim; Reinke, Matt

    2010-11-01

    Heat flux is one of the most important parameters controlling the lifetime of first-wall components in fusion experiments and reactors. The sheath heat flux coefficient (γ) is a parameter relating heat flux (from a plasma to a material surface) to the electron temperature and ion saturation current. Being such a simple expression for a kinetic process, it is of great interest to plasma edge fluid modelers. Under the assumptions of equal ion and electron temperatures, no secondary electron emission, and no net current to the surface the value of γ is approximately 7 [1]. Alcator C-Mod provides a unique opportunity among today's experiments to measure reactor-relevant heat fluxes (100's of MW/m^2 parallel to the magnetic field) in reactor-like divertor geometry. Motivated by the DoE 2010 joint milestone to measure heat flux footprints, the lower outer divertor of Alcator has been instrumented with a suite of Langmuir probes, novel surface thermocouples, and calorimeters in tiles purposefully ramped to eliminate shadowing; all within view of an IR camera. Initial results indicate that the experimentally inferred values of γ are found to agree with simple theory in the sheath limited regime and diverges to lower values as the density increases.

  9. Analysis of 4-strap ICRF Antenna Performance in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    G. Schilling; S.J. Wukitch; R.L. Boivin; J.A. Goetz; J.C. Hosea; J.H. Irby; Y. Lin; A. Parisot; M. Porkolab; J.R. Wilson; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2003-07-31

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna was designed and fabricated for plasma heating and current drive in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial upgrades were carried out in 2000 and 2001, which eliminated surface arcing between the metallic protection tiles and reduced plasma-wall interactions at the antenna front surface. A boron nitride septum was added at the antenna midplane to intersect electric fields resulting from radio-frequency sheath rectification, which eliminated antenna corner heating at high power levels. The current feeds to the radiating straps were reoriented from an E||B to E parallel B geometry, avoiding the empirically observed {approx}15 kV/cm field limit and raising antenna voltage holding capability. Further modifications were carried out in 2002 and 2003. These included changes to the antenna current strap, the boron nitride tile mounting geometry, and shielding the BN-metal interface from the plasma. The antenna heating efficiency, power, and voltage characteristics under these various configurations will be presented.

  10. Tomography of Light Emission from the Plasma Edge of Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christian

    1995-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of a tomographic technique used on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to reconstruct local emissivity profiles from line-of-sight integrated brightness measurements of H_{alpha } and low-Z plasma impurities. The knowledge of H_{alpha} emissivity profiles in particular opens up the possibility to calculate important plasma parameters such as the particle confinement time, parallel plasma flow velocities in the edge, and local neutral densities. These calculations depend on the knowledge of plasma temperature and density in the respective regions. A simple plasma model for the edge region is developed to interpolate between measurement data of Langmuir probes at the divertor target and upstream. The neutral density profile along the outer divertor target plate is examined during attached and detached divertor plasma conditions. The neutral densities found in the divertor are consistent with neutral pressure data from pressure gauges at the midplane and at the bottom of the divertor. Application of the inversion algorithm to CII and CIII impurity radiation is successfully demonstrated. Total radiation profiles measured by bolometers are examined during methane impurity gas puffing and plasma detachment, and found to agree well with reconstructed CIII profiles. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253 -1690.).

  11. Effect on plasma rotation of lower hybrid (LH) waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. P.; Barnes, M.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Parra, F. I.; Bonoli, P. T.; Reinke, M. L.

    2014-02-12

    The injection of LH waves for current drive into a tokamak changes the ion toroidal rotation. In Alcator C-Mod, the direction of the steady state rotation change due to LH waves depends on the plasma current and the density. The change in rotation can be estimated by balancing the external torque of lower hybrid waves with the turbulent radial transport of the momentum. For high plasma current, the turbulent pinch and diffusion of the injected counter-current momentum are sufficient to explain the rotation change. However, for low plasma current, the change in the the intrinsic momentum transport (residual stress) for a non-rotating state is required to explain the co-current rotation change. Accordingly, we investigate the intrinsic momentum transport for the non-rotating state when diamagnetic flow and ExB flow cancel each other. The change in the intrinsic momentum transport due to lower hybrid waves is significant when the plasma current is low, which may explain the rotation reversal for low plasma current. The effect of changed q (safety factor) profile by lower hybrid on the intrinsic momentum transport is estimated by gyrokinetics.

  12. Scaling and transport analysis of divertor conditions on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Goetz, J.; Kurz, C.; Jablonski, D.; Lipschultz, B.; McCracken, G.; Niemczewski, A.; Boivin, R. L.; Bombarda, F.; Christensen, C.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Garnier, D.; Graf, M.; Golovato, S.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Horne, S.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; Kesner, J.; Luke, T.; Marmar, E.; May, M.; O'Shea, P.; Porkolab, M.; Reardon, J.; Rice, J.; Schachter, J.; Snipes, J.; Stek, P.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Tinios, G.; Watterson, R.; Welch, B.; Wolfe, S.

    1995-06-01

    Detailed measurements and transport analysis of divertor conditions in Alcator C-Mod [Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] are presented for a range of line-averaged densities, 0.7

  13. Measurement of LHCD edge power deposition through modulation techniques on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, I. C.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Baek, S. G.; Chilenksi, M. A.; Edlund, E.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Whyte, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency of LHCD on Alcator C-Mod drops exponentially with line average density. At reactor relevant densities (> 1 . 1020 [m-3]) no measurable current is driven. While a number of causes have been suggested, no specific mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the loss of current drive at high density. Fast modulation of the LH power was used to isolate and quantify the LHCD deposition within the plasma. Measurements from these plasmas provide unique evidence for determining a root cause. Modulation of LH power in steady plasmas exhibited no correlated change in the core temperature. A correlated, prompt response in the edge suggests that the loss in efficiency is related to a edge absorption mechanism. This follows previous results which found the generation of n||-independent SOL currents. Multiple Langmuir probe array measurements of the conducted heat conclude that the lost power is deposited near the last closed flux surface. The heat flux induced by LH waves onto the outer divertor is calculated. Changes in the neutral pressure, ionization and hard X-ray emission at high density highlight the importance of the active divertor in the loss of efficiency. Results of this study implicate a mechanism which may occur over multiple passes, leading to power absorption near the LCFS.

  14. First ion temperature profiles in the boundary of Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Dan; Labombard, Brian; Churchill, Michael; Lipschultz, Bruce; Ochoukov, Roman; Theiler, Christian; Whyte, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    The ion temperature is an important parameter in the boundary of magnetic fusion devices, playing a role in the sheath heat flux, total plasma pressure, plasma potential, and sound speed. High spatial resolution measurements of Ti and Te profiles are needed to evaluate these quantities and to unfold the rates of cross-field heat transport in each species. To this end, we have developed two specialized scanning probes: an Ion Sensitive Probe (ISP) and a Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA). Alcator C-Mod is a challenging environment for probes, with parallel heat fluxes comparable to that expected in reactors, 100's MW/m^2, necessitating the use of refractory materials in compact, optimized geometries. The two probes, along with Charge-eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) measurements of B^5+ ions, allow important cross-checks to be performed. Preliminary results indicate good agreement between the ISP and RFA. Comparison with B^5+ CXRS is also favorable. In ohmic-heated, sheath-limited plasmas the ratio of Ti/Te is ˜3 (150 and 50 eV) at the seperatrix and increases to ˜5 (50 and 10 eV) at the limiter boundary. Experiments with conduction-limited plasma conditions are planned and will be reported. Implications for boundary electron and ion heat transport will also be discussed.

  15. Upgrade of the Edge Charge Exchange Diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Rachael; Lipschultz, Bruce; Marr, Kenneth

    2006-10-01

    The current edge Charge Exchange Spectroscopy system is being upgraded to include both a beam viewing and a background viewing toroidal periscope. The beam viewing periscope will be focused on the center of the DNB and will cover a 4cm radial region at the edge of the plasma starting a few centimeters in from and extending up to 1centimeter outside of the last closed flux surface. The background periscope will view the same radial region but will be displaced toroidally by 36 degrees. Each periscope has 20 chordal views with a radial resolution of 2.5-3mm. The presence of a background periscope obviates the need for a chopped DNB by providing time synchronized background B^+4 spectral data that can be subtracted directly from the active beam-derived B^+4 line-shapes. This system has been designed to work in conjunction with the current poloidal Charge Exchange periscope which has 25 fibers focused in the same region with equivalent radial resolution. The new toroidal system will enable concurrent measurements of the poloidal and toroidal velocity as well as the temperature and density of the B^+5 ions in the edge pedestal region; a measurement that currently does not exist on C-Mod. This information will then be used to calculate radial electric field profiles and study edge physics phenomena.

  16. Investigation of the transport shortfall in Alcator C-Mod L-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Walk, J.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.; Görler, T.

    2013-03-01

    A so-called "transport shortfall," where ion and electron heat fluxes and turbulence are underpredicted by gyrokinetic codes, has been robustly identified in DIII-D L-mode plasmas for ρ >0.55 [T. L. Rhodes et al., Nucl. Fusion 51(6), 063022 (2011); and C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 052301 (2009)]. To probe the existence of a transport shortfall across different tokamaks, a dedicated scan of auxiliary heated L-mode discharges in Alcator C-Mod are studied in detail with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations for the first time. Two discharges, only differing by the amount of auxiliary heating are investigated using both linear and nonlinear simulation of the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation of the low and high input power discharges reveals a discrepancy between simulation and experiment in only the electron heat flux channel of the low input power discharge. However, both discharges demonstrate excellent agreement in the ion heat flux channel, and the high input power discharge demonstrates simultaneous agreement with experiment in both the electron and ion heat flux channels. A summary of linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic results and a discussion of possible explanations for the agreement/disagreement in each heat flux channel is presented.

  17. Effects of the q profile on toroidal rotation in Alcator C-Mod LHCD plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J. E.; Mumgaard, R.; Parker, R.; Scott, S.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Fenzi, C.; Granetz, R. S.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J.; Lee, J. P.; Marmar, E. S.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the core toroidal rotation profiles following injection of lower hybrid (LH) waves have been documented in Alcator C-Mod plasmas. Shot by shot scans of LH input power have been performed at fixed magnetic field and electron density for several plasma currents. For sawtoothing target plasmas, if the input power is low enough that the central safety factor q0 remains below 1, the change in the core rotation is in the counter-current direction, consistent in sign, magnitude and LH power scaling with direct momentum input from the LH waves. If the power level is high enough that there are significant changes to the q profile, including the termination of sawtooth oscillations, the change in the toroidal rotation is in the co-current direction, consistent with changes in the momentum flux through its dependence on the current density profile. The direction of the rotation changes depends on whether q0 is below or above unity, and seemingly not on the magnetic shear, nor the Ohmic confinement regime of the target plasma.

  18. Upgrades to the 4-strap ICRF Antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    G. Schilling; J.C. Hosea; J.R. Wilson; W. Beck; R.L. Boivin; P.T. Bonoli; D. Gwinn; W.E. Lee; E. Nelson-Melby; M. Porkolab; R. Vieira; S.J. Wukitch; and J.A. Goetz

    2001-06-12

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna suitable for plasma heating and current drive has been designed and fabricated for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial operation in plasma was limited by high metallic impurity injection resulting from front surface arcing between protection tiles and from current straps to Faraday shields. Antenna modifications were made in February 2000, resulting in impurity reduction, but low-heating efficiency was observed when the antenna was operated in its 4-strap rather than a 2-strap configuration. Further modifications were made in July 2000, with the installation of BN plasma-facing tiles and radio- frequency bypassing of the antenna backplane edges and ends to reduce potential leakage coupling to plasma surface modes. Good heating efficiency was now observed in both heating configurations, but coupled power was limited to 2.5 MW in H-mode, 3 MW in L-mode, by plasma-wall interactions. Additional modifications were started in February 2001 and will be completed by this meeting. All the above upgrades and their effect on antenna performance will be presented.

  19. First Measurements of Edge Transport Driven by the Shoelace Antenna on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, T.; Labombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Burke, W. M.; Hughes, J. W.; Brunner, D. F.; Davis, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Granetz, R. S.; Greenwald, M. J.; Irby, J. H.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E. S.; Parkin, W. C.; Porkolab, M.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R. F.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S. J.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2015-11-01

    The Shoelace antenna is a unique device designed to couple to the Quasi-Coherent Mode (QCM, k⊥ ~ 1 . 5 cm-1, 50 < f < 200 kHz) and Weakly-Coherent Mode (WCM, k⊥ ~ 1 . 5 cm-1, 200 < f < 500 kHz), continuous edge fluctuations that sustain high-performance confinement regimes by exhausting impurities. The antenna is used to explore whether modes like the QCM and WCM may be exploited to actively regulate edge transport. In initial experiments, the antenna excited a resonance at the QCM frequency and phase velocity, but transport measurements were unavailable. A subsequent redesign of the winding pitch allows the antenna to be field-aligned while mapping magnetically to the Mirror Langmuir Probe (MLP) on the last-closed flux surface. This has enabled the first measurements of edge transport induced by the antenna-driven fluctuation, which has been further enhanced by quadrupling the antenna source power. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy award DE-FC02-99ER54512, using Alcator C-Mod, a DOE SC User Facility.

  20. Higher-order resonances in a Stark decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y.T. van de; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard

    2005-05-15

    The motion of polar molecules can be controlled by time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields. In a Stark decelerator, this is exploited to select a fraction of a molecular beam that is accelerated, transported, or decelerated. Phase stability ensures that the selected bunch of molecules is kept together throughout the deceleration process. In this paper an extended description of phase stability in a Stark decelerator is given, including higher-order effects. This analysis predicts a wide variety of resonances that originate from the spatial and temporal periodicity of the electric fields. These resonances are experimentally observed using a beam of OH ({sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2},v=0,J=3/2) radicals passing through a Stark decelerator.

  1. A CO{sub 2} laser polarimeter for measurement of plasma current profile in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.H.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Irby, J.; Luke, T.

    1994-06-01

    A multichannel infrared polarimeter system for measurement of the plasma current profile in Alcator C-Mod has been designed, constructed, and tested. The system utilizes a cw CO{sub 2}, laser at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m. An electro-optic polarization-modulation technique has been used to achieve the high sensitivity required for the measurement. The recent results of the measurements as well as the feasibility of its application on ITER are presented.

  2. Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address high priority research and development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Loarte, A.; Polevoi, A. R.; Hosokawa, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Chilenski, M.; Howard, N.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J.; Köchl, F.; Pütterich, T.; Dux, R.; Zhogolev, V. E.

    2015-05-15

    Experiments in Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasmas in the Enhanced D-alpha H-mode regime with ITER-like mid-radius plasma density peaking and Ion Cyclotron Resonant heating, in which tungsten is introduced by the laser blow-off technique, have demonstrated that accumulation of tungsten in the central region of the plasma does not take place in these conditions. The measurements obtained are consistent with anomalous transport dominating tungsten transport except in the central region of the plasma where tungsten transport is neoclassical, as previously observed in other devices with dominant neutral beam injection heating, such as JET and ASDEX Upgrade. In contrast to such results, however, the measured scale lengths for plasma temperature and density in the central region of these Alcator C-Mod plasmas, with density profiles relatively flat in the core region due to the lack of core fuelling, are favourable to prevent inter and intra sawtooth tungsten accumulation in this region under dominance of neoclassical transport. Simulations of ITER H-mode plasmas, including both anomalous (modelled by the Gyro-Landau-Fluid code GLF23) and neoclassical transport for main ions and tungsten and with density profiles of similar peaking to those obtained in Alcator C-Mod show that accumulation of tungsten in the central plasma region is also unlikely to occur in stationary ITER H-mode plasmas due to the low fuelling source by the neutral beam injection (injection energy ∼ 1 MeV), which is in good agreement with findings in the Alcator C-Mod experiments.

  3. Molybdenum emission from impurity-induced m= 1 snake-modes on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bitter, M.; Gates, D.; Hill, K.; Pablant, N.; Granetz, R.; Reinke, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Sugiyama, L.

    2012-10-15

    A suite of novel high-resolution spectroscopic imaging diagnostics has facilitated the identification and localization of molybdenum impurities as the main species during the formation and lifetime of m= 1 impurity-induced snake-modes on Alcator C-Mod. Such measurements made it possible to infer, for the first time, the perturbed radiated power density profiles from which the impurity density can be deduced.

  4. Compact multichannel neutral particle analyzer for measurement of energetic charge-exchanged neutrals in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V.; Liptac, J.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Fiore, C. L.; Granetz, R. S.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Leiter, R.; Mcduffee, S.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2006-08-15

    A four-channel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) based on operating small Si diode detectors in pulse-height analysis (PHA) mode is used to measure energetic hydrogen minority ions with energies between {approx}50 and 350 keV stemming from ion-cyclotron range-of-frequency heated D(H) Alcator C-Mod plasmas with both active and passive charge exchange (CX). First core minority ion distribution results from Alcator C-Mod discharges and a detailed description of the diagnostic are presented. The diagnostic employs integrated electronics and fast digitization of the shaping amplifier voltage. The digitized data are stored for postshot PHA, which removes the constraints of real-time PHA and allows for improved performance via elimination of base line shift effects and potentially relieving pileup through Gaussian fitting routines. The CNPA is insensitive to the large gamma and neutron background in Alcator C-Mod discharges but is susceptible to the plasma's soft x-ray flux. The soft x-ray flux limits the CNPA energy resolution to {approx}15-20 keV. A simple model is used to interpret the active CNPA data which permits rapid estimates of the core hydrogen minority temperatures and anisotropy with a time resolution of {approx}100 ms. Hydrogenlike boron is identified as an important electron donor for the CX signal.

  5. First operation of a high-heat flux, flush mounted ``rail'' Langmuir probe array on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Adam Q.; Brunner, Dan; Labombard, Brian; Leccacorvi, Rick; Vieira, Rui

    2015-11-01

    Divertor Langmuir probes are typically built proud of the divertor surface for an accurate measurement of the plasma flux. However, under the high heat flux conditions seen in Alcator C-Mod, proud tungsten probes that present a 10 degree attack angle to the incident heat flux can experience melt damage with less then 1 second plasma exposure time. A similar situation is anticipated for ITER. It is therefore desirable to develop a flush probe system that can both survive reactor-level fluxes and take accurate measurements. A poloidal array of 21 flush-mounted ``rail'' probes have been installed in the C-Mod outer divertor plate, which are toroidally-extended and field-aligned to minimize sheath expansion effects. Initial results indicate that the ``rail'' probes have a well-defined ion saturation current, reporting similar density and temperature measurements as proud probes. However, uncertainty in the projected area becomes significant when the incident magnetic field angle becomes less than ~0.5 degrees. Additionally, because the flush probes are conformal to the divertor surface, they are ideally suited to measure the poloidal distribution of halo currents during disruptions. Supported by USDoE C-Mod award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  6. Lithium pellet injection experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, D.T.

    1996-06-01

    A pellet enhanced performance mode, showing significantly reduced core transport, is regularly obtained after the injection of deeply penetrating lithium pellets into Alcator C-Mod discharges. These transient modes, which typically persist about two energy confinement times, are characterized by a steep pressure gradient ({ell}{sub p} {le} a/5) in the inner third of the plasma, indicating the presence of an internal transport barrier. Inside this barrier, particle and energy diffusivities are greatly reduced, with ion thermal diffusivity dropping to near neoclassical values. Meanwhile, the global energy confinement time shows a 30% improvement over ITER89-P L-mode scaling. The addition of ICRF auxiliary heating shortly after the pellet injection leads to high fusion reactivity with neutron rates enhanced by an order of magnitude over L-mode discharges with similar input powers. A diagnostic system for measuring equilibrium current density profiles of tokamak plasmas, employing high speed lithium pellets, is also presented. Because ions are confined to move along field lines, imaging the Li{sup +} emission from the toroidally extended pellet ablation cloud gives the direction of the magnetic field. To convert from temporal to radial measurements, the 3-D trajectory of the pellet is determined using a stereoscopic tracking system. These measurements, along with external magnetic measurements, are used to solve the Grad-Shafranov equation for the magnetic equilibrium of the plasma. This diagnostic is used to determine the current density profile of PEP modes by injection of a second pellet during the period of good confinement. This measurement indicates that a region of reversed magnetic shear exists at the plasma core. This current density profile is consistent with TRANSP calculations for the bootstrap current created by the pressure gradient. MHD stability analysis indicates that these plasmas are near the n = {infinity} and the n = 1 marginal stability limits.

  7. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials in the SOL of Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Brunner, D.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Myra, J. R.; Terry, J. L.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    An extensive experimental survey of plasma potentials induced by ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) heating was carried out in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasmas on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Enhanced plasma potentials >100 V are observed at locations where local magnetic fields map to active ICRF antennas. In these cases, the enhanced potential appears only when a local plasma density threshold is surpassed—a threshold that is quantitatively consistent with slow wave (SW) RF rectification theory. However, in many cases large potential enhancements are found in locations that do not map along magnetic field lines to active antennas without obstruction, i.e. locations that are inaccessible to SWs launched by the active antennas. Enhanced potentials in these ‘unmapped’ locations are correlated with local plasma parameters, ICRF electromagnetic fields associated with the fast wave (FW) and SW, launched wave spectra, and the boundary surface geometry. It is found that enhanced plasma potentials in unmapped locations correlate with the FW field strength. These observations are qualitatively consistent with a model that accounts for the conversion of FWs to SWs at conducting surfaces oriented at an oblique angle with respect to the magnetic field, with the SW leading to sheath rectification. In addition, enhanced plasma potentials are found far into the shadow of passive limiter structures. These are correlated with the magnitude of the local FW field strength, yet the effect does not follow any present model. Overall, ICRF-induced plasma potentials may appear in regions far removed from the active antennas, yet due to the complex response of the SOL potentials at a variety of boundary surfaces, it remains unclear what part of the plasma-facing wall should be targeted to mitigate ICRF-induced impurities. The results also suggest that operating active ICRF antennas in a high single pass absorption regime is crucial in minimizing the effects of the FW fields on

  8. Fluctuation statistics in the scrape-off layer of Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kube, R.; Theodorsen, A.; Garcia, O. E.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    We study long time series of the ion saturation current and floating potential, sampled by Langmuir probes dwelled in the outboard mid-plane scrape-off layer and embedded in the lower divertor baffle of Alcator C-Mod. A series of ohmically heated L-mode plasma discharges is investigated with line-averaged plasma density ranging from {{\\bar{n}}\\text{e}}/{{n}\\text{G}}=0.15 to 0.42, where n G is the Greenwald density. All ion saturation current time series that are sampled in the far scrape-off layer are characterized by large-amplitude burst events. Coefficients of skewness and excess kurtosis of the time series obey a quadratic relationship and their histograms coincide partially upon proper normalization. Histograms of the ion saturation current time series are found to agree well with a prediction of a stochastic model for the particle density fluctuations in scrape-off layer plasmas. The distribution of the waiting times between successive large-amplitude burst events and of the burst amplitudes are approximately described by exponential distributions. The average waiting time and burst amplitude are found to vary weakly with the line-averaged plasma density. Conditional averaging reveals that the radial blob velocity, estimated from floating potential measurements, increases with the normalized burst amplitude in the outboard mid-plane scrape-off layer. For low density discharges, the conditionally averaged waveform of the floating potential associated with large amplitude bursts at the divertor probes has a dipolar shape. In detached divertor conditions the average waveform is random, indicating electrical disconnection of blobs from the sheaths at the divertor targets.

  9. The design and performance of a twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector for Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    A twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector has been designed, built and tested both in the laboratory and on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak at MIT. The injector functions by firing pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium deep into the plasma discharge for the purpose of fueling the plasma, modifying the density profile and increasing the global energy confinement time. The design goals of the injector are: (1) Operational flexibility, (2) High reliability, (3) Remote operation with minimal maintenance. These requirements have lead to a single stage, pipe gun design with twenty barrels. Pellets are formed by in- situ condensation of the fuel gas, thus avoiding moving parts at cryogenic temperatures. The injector is the first to dispense with the need for cryogenic fluids and instead uses a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the thermal system components. The twenty barrels of the injector produce pellets of four different size groups and allow for a high degree of flexibility in fueling experiments. Operation of the injector is under PLC control allowing for remote operation, interlocked safety features and automated pellet manufacturing. The injector has been extrusively tested and shown to produce pellets reliably with velocities up to 1400 m/sec. During the period from September to November of 1993, the injector was successfully used to fire pellets into over fifty plasma discharges. Experimental results include data on the pellet penetration into the plasma using an advanced pellet tracking diagnostic with improved time and spatial response. Data from the tracker indicates pellet penetrations were between 30 and 86 percent of the plasma minor radius.

  10. Lower hybrid wave edge power loss quantification on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, I. C.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Baek, S. G.; Edlund, E.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Kuang, A. Q.; Reinke, M. L.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Walk, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    For the first time, the power deposition of lower hybrid RF waves into the edge plasma of a diverted tokamak has been systematically quantified. Edge deposition represents a parasitic loss of power that can greatly impact the use and efficiency of Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) at reactor-relevant densities. Through the use of a unique set of fast time resolution edge diagnostics, including innovative fast-thermocouples, an extensive set of Langmuir probes, and a Lyα ionization camera, the toroidal, poloidal, and radial structure of the power deposition has been simultaneously determined. Power modulation was used to directly isolate the RF effects due to the prompt ( t < τ E ) response of the scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma to Lower Hybrid Radiofrequency (LHRF) power. LHRF power was found to absorb more strongly in the edge at higher densities. It is found that a majority of this edge-deposited power is promptly conducted to the divertor. This correlates with the loss of current drive efficiency at high density previously observed on Alcator C-Mod, and displaying characteristics that contrast with the local RF edge absorption seen on other tokamaks. Measurements of ionization in the active divertor show dramatic changes due to LHRF power, implying that divertor region can be a key for the LHRF edge power deposition physics. These observations support the existence of a loss mechanism near the edge for LHRF at high density ( n e > 1.0 × 10 20 (m-3)). Results will be shown addressing the distribution of power within the SOL, including the toroidal symmetry and radial distribution. These characteristics are important for deducing the cause of the reduced LHCD efficiency at high density and motivate the tailoring of wave propagation to minimize SOL interaction, for example, through the use of high-field-side launch.

  11. Impurity Screening in Ohmic and H-Mode Plasmas in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, G. M.

    1996-11-01

    The impurity density in the confined plasma is determined not only by the impurity production rate but also by screening, i.e. the balance between the perpendicular and parallel transport in the SOL. The relative importance of screening has been studied by injecting gaseous recycling (Ne, Ar) and non-recycling impurities (N, C) into various poloidal positions of the SOL and divertor in C-Mod. The density of the non-recycling impurities in the core is a function of the poloidal position of injection, while the screening of recycling impurities is not. In both cases screening is significantly worse ( ~3x) during divertor detachment. For a given injection rate of N2 gas into H-mode discharges, the number of impurities in the core is typically a factor of 3 greater than for ohmic discharges. Optical imaging of low charge states of the injected non-recycling impurities using a camera and spectral filters shows a directed plume, indicating flow of impurities towards the divertor target at all positions studied, even at the inboard midplane. This implies that the friction force due to plasma flow dominates the parallel ion temperature gradient force. The spatial distribution of low charge states in the divertor has been studied using a multichord visible spectrometer, and the distribution of the nitrogen radiation has been been studied using a 20 chord bolometer array. The results show that for attached discharges the nitrogen radiation is predominantly in the SOL below the X-point. The position of the radiation is not strongly dependent on the position of nitrogen injection. The screening has been compared with calculations using the DIVIMP Monte Carlo code [1] and with an analytical model of the impurity transport. Work supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-78ET51013. În collaboration with B Lipschultz, B LaBombard, J A Goetz, R Granetz, D Jablonski, H Ohkawa, J Terry, MIT, S Lisgo, P C Stangeby, University of Toronto, ^1P.C. Stangeby and D. Elder, J. Nucl. Mater

  12. Kinetic modeling of divertor heat load fluxes in the Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pankin, A. Y.; Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Park, G. Y.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Brunner, D.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.; Groebner, R. J.

    2015-09-15

    The guiding-center kinetic neoclassical transport code, XGC0 [Chang et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2649 (2004)], is used to compute the heat fluxes and the heat-load width in the outer divertor plates of Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D tokamaks. The dependence of the width of heat-load fluxes on neoclassical effects, neutral collisions, and anomalous transport is investigated using the XGC0 code. The XGC0 code includes realistic X-point geometry, a neutral source model, the effects of collisions, and a diffusion model for anomalous transport. It is observed that the width of the XGC0 neoclassical heat-load is approximately inversely proportional to the total plasma current I{sub p.} The scaling of the width of the divertor heat-load with plasma current is examined for an Alcator C-Mod discharge and four DIII-D discharges. The scaling of the divertor heat-load width with plasma current is found to be weaker in the Alcator C-Mod discharge compared to scaling found in the DIII-D discharges. The effect of neutral collisions on the 1/I{sub p} scaling of heat-load width is shown not to be significant. Although inclusion of poloidally uniform anomalous transport results in a deviation from the 1/I{sub p} scaling, the inclusion of the anomalous transport that is driven by ballooning-type instabilities results in recovering the neoclassical 1/I{sub p} scaling. The Bohm or gyro-Bohm scalings of anomalous transport do not strongly affect the dependence of the heat-load width on plasma current. The inclusion of anomalous transport, in general, results in widening the width of neoclassical divertor heat-load and enhances the neoclassical heat-load fluxes on the divertor plates. Understanding heat transport in the tokamak scrape-off layer plasmas is important for strengthening the basis for predicting divertor conditions in ITER.

  13. Scanning ion sensitive probe for plasma profile measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D.

    2013-05-01

    A new Ion Sensitive Probe head has been created for the outer-midplane scanning probe system on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The new probe head contains three elements: an ion sensitive probe to measure ion temperature and plasma potential, a Langmuir probe to measure electron temperature, density, and floating potential, and a second Langmuir probe to measure ion saturation current and the density fluctuations arising from ``blob'' events. The ion sensitive probe current is normalized to this measurement to reduced deleterious effects of the strong fluctuations. Design of the high heat flux probe (>100 MW/m2) and initial results are presented.

  14. Scanning ion sensitive probe for plasma profile measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D.

    2013-05-15

    A new Ion Sensitive Probe head has been created for the outer-midplane scanning probe system on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The new probe head contains three elements: an ion sensitive probe to measure ion temperature and plasma potential, a Langmuir probe to measure electron temperature, density, and floating potential, and a second Langmuir probe to measure ion saturation current and the density fluctuations arising from ''blob'' events. The ion sensitive probe current is normalized to this measurement to reduced deleterious effects of the strong fluctuations. Design of the high heat flux probe (>100 MW/m{sup 2}) and initial results are presented.

  15. Scanning ion sensitive probe for plasma profile measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    PubMed

    Brunner, D; LaBombard, B; Ochoukov, R; Whyte, D

    2013-05-01

    A new Ion Sensitive Probe head has been created for the outer-midplane scanning probe system on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The new probe head contains three elements: an ion sensitive probe to measure ion temperature and plasma potential, a Langmuir probe to measure electron temperature, density, and floating potential, and a second Langmuir probe to measure ion saturation current and the density fluctuations arising from ''blob'' events. The ion sensitive probe current is normalized to this measurement to reduced deleterious effects of the strong fluctuations. Design of the high heat flux probe (>100 MW/m(2)) and initial results are presented.

  16. Current Profile Measurements from Moderate to Strong Lower Hybrid Single-Pass Damping on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Wallace, G. M.; Scott, S. D.; Shiraiwa, S.; Faust, I.; Parker, R. R.

    2015-11-01

    Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) is an effective tool to non-inductively drive up to 100% of the plasma current on Alcator C-Mod. Measurements with an upgraded MSE diagnostic show that the fast-electron current profile is broader than the Ohmic current profile but still located the plasma core in agreement with strongly centrally peaked fast electron bremsstrahlung (FEB) measurements. Scans in a regime of high current drive efficiency across a range of density, LHCD power, launched n||, and plasma current show the driven current profile, FEB profile shapes, and current drive efficiency are sensitive only to total plasma current. Simulations using ray-tracing Fokker Planck codes show that the rays make 1-3 bounces through the plasma edge to bridge the spectral gap. Although in agreement with the total current, the simulations qualitatively disagree with experiment regarding current and FEB profiles as well as sensitivity to power and density. Simulations at higher plasma temperature and current predict stronger single-pass damping and preliminary experiments show increased current drive efficiency. Experiments to determine if the profile discrepancies persist when the ray bounces play a reduced role are planned, including companion experiments in D and He resulting in different edge plasma conditions. This work was performed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DoE Office of Science user facility, and is supported by USDoE awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Study of toroidal flow generation by ion cyclotron range of frequency minority heating in the Alcator C-Mod plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Itoh, K.; Zheng, L. J.; Van Dam, J. W.; Bonoli, P.; Rice, J. E.; Fiore, C. L.; Gao, C.; Fukuyama, A.

    2016-01-01

    The averaged toroidal flow of energetic minority ions during ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating is investigated in the Alcator C-Mod plasma by applying the GNET code, which can solve the drift kinetic equation with complicated orbits of accelerated energetic particles. It is found that a co-directional toroidal flow of the minority ions is generated in the region outside of the resonance location, and that the toroidal velocity reaches more than 40% of the central ion thermal velocity (Vtor ˜ 300 km/s with PICRF ˜ 2 MW). When we shift the resonance location to the outside of |r /a |˜0.5 , the toroidal flow immediately inside of the resonance location is reduced to 0 or changes to the opposite direction, and the toroidal velocity shear is enhanced at r/a ˜ 0.5. A radial diffusion equation for toroidal flow is solved by assuming a torque profile for the minority ion mean flow, and good agreements with experimental radial toroidal flow profiles are obtained. This suggests that the ICRF driven minority ion flow is related to the experimentally observed toroidal rotation during ICRF heating in the Alcator C-Mod plasma.

  18. Comparison of GS2 Turbulence Simulations with Phase Contrast Imaging in Alcator C-Mod Internal Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Andrew; Ernst, Darin

    2005-10-01

    Trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence arises in gyrokinetic simulations of internal transport barriers in Alcator C-mod experiments [1]. C-mod is equipped with a PCI (phase contrast imaging) diagnostic which measures density fluctuations along 32 vertical chords passing near the magnetic axis. The GS2 density fluctuations are output as an integral along field lines. The GS2 poloidal wavelength spectrum is upshifted relative to the PCI spectrum [1]. To make the comparison more direct, we have modified GS2 [2] to calculate electron density fluctuations at the poloidal angles observed by PCI. The longer wavelength modes are more extended along field lines, so that when viewed off the midplane, they are weighted more strongly. Nonlinear simulations are underway, and results will be presented. [1] D. R. Ernst et al., 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conf. IAEA-CN-116/TH/4-1. also Phys. Plasmas 11(5) 2637 (2004). http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/physics/fec/fec2004/datasets/TH4-1.html [2] W. Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85(26) 5579 (2000). funding: Contract number DE-AC02-76CH03073.

  19. Stark effect induced microcavity polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W L; Wu, X M; Wang, F; Ma, R; Li, X F; Rao, Y J

    2015-06-15

    This paper proposes a way of generating polariton solitons (PSs) in a semiconductor microcavity using Stark effect as the trigger mechanism. A Stark pulse performing as the writing beam is used to excite non-resonant fluctuations of polariton, which finally evolves into bright PSs. It is found that a branch of PS solutions versus pump parameters could be found through optimizing parameters of the Stark pulse, and polarization of the generated PS is dependent on the writing beam. PMID:26193554

  20. Stability of Microturbulent Drift Modes during Internal Transport Barrier Formation in the Alcator C-Mod Radio Frequency Heated H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; C.L. Fiore; W. Dorland; D.R. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt; P.T. Bonoli; D.R. Ernst; J.E. Rice; S.J. Wukitch

    2003-11-20

    Recent H-mode experiments on Alcator C-Mod [I.H. Hutchinson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 1 (1994) 1511] which exhibit an internal transport barrier (ITB), have been examined with flux tube geometry gyrokinetic simulations, using the massively parallel code GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88 (1995) 128]. The simulations support the picture of ion/electron temperature gradient (ITG/ETG) microturbulence driving high xi/ xe and that suppressed ITG causes reduced particle transport and improved ci on C-Mod. Nonlinear calculations for C-Mod confirm initial linear simulations, which predicted ITG stability in the barrier region just before ITB formation, without invoking E x B shear suppression of turbulence. Nonlinear fluxes are compared to experiment, which both show low heat transport in the ITB and higher transport within and outside of the barrier region.

  1. Visible Spectrometer at the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment, the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment and the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak for Doppler Width and Shift Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A; Howard, S; Horton, R; Hwang, D; May, M; Beiersdorfer, P; McLean, H; Terry, J

    2006-05-15

    A novel Doppler spectrometer is currently being used for ion or neutral velocity and temperature measurements on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. The spectrometer has an f/No. of {approx}3.1 and is appropriate for visible light (3500-6700 {angstrom}). The full width at half maximum from a line emitting calibration source has been measured to be as small as 0.4 {angstrom}. The ultimate time resolution is line brightness light limited and on the order of ms. A new photon efficient detector is being used for the setup at C-Mod. Time resolution is achieved by moving the camera during a plasma discharge in a perpendicular direction through the dispersion plane of the spectrometer causing a vertical streaking across the camera face. Initial results from C-Mod as well as previous measurements from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) and the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) are presented.

  2. In-situ erosion and deposition measurements of plasma-facing surfaces in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Harold S.

    2014-10-01

    The Accelerator Based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) diagnostic was recently developed to demonstrate the novel application of ion beam analysis (IBA) to in-vessel studies of plasma materials interactions in Alcator C-Mod. The AIMS diagnostic injects a 900 keV deuterium ion beam into the tokamak's vacuum vessel between plasma discharges while magnetic fields are used to steer the ion beam to plasma facing component (PFC) surfaces. Spectroscopic analysis of neutrons and gamma rays from the induced nuclear reactions provides a quantitative, spatially resolved map of the PFC surface composition that includes boron (B) and deuterium (D) content. Since AIMS is sensitive to low-Z elements and C-Mod regularly boronizes PFCs, the evolution of B and D on PFCs can be used to directly study erosion, deposition, and fuel retention in response to plasma operations and wall conditioning processes. AIMS analysis of 18 lower single null I-mode discharges show a net boron deposition rate of 6 +/- 2 nm/s on the inner wall while subsequent inner wall limited discharges and a disruption did not show significant changes in B. Measurements of D content showed relative changes of >2.5 following a similar trend. This suggests high D retention rates and net B deposition rates of ~18 cm/year of plasma exposure are possible and depend strongly on the plasma conditions. Ex-situ IBA was also performed on the same PFCs after removal from C-Mod, successfully validating the AIMS technique. These IBA measurements also show that the B content on the inner wall varied toroidally and poloidally from 0 to 3000 nm, demonstrating the importance of the spatial resolution provided by AIMS and the sensitivity of PFCs to B-field alignment. AIMS upgrades are underway for operation in 2014 and we anticipate new measurements correlating the evolution of PFC surfaces to plasma configuration, RF heating, and current drive scenarios. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER54235 and

  3. EMC3-EIRENE modelling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; LaBombard, Brian; Lipschultz, B.; Churchill, R. M.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2014-09-30

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ~50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modelling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Finally, toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  4. First Results From The New High Resolution Imaging X-ray Crystal Spectrometer On Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince-Cushman, Alexander; Rice, John; Bitter, Manfred; Reinke, Mathew; Hill, Kenneth; Scott, Steven

    2007-11-01

    In an effort to improve the diagnostic capabilities for measuring plasma rotation on Alcator C-Mod, an imaging x-ray spectrometer has been designed and installed. This instrument utilizes a spherically bent quartz crystal and a set of 2D x-ray detectors to image the entire plasma cross section with a spectral resolving power of approximately 10,000 with vertical spatial resolution of about 1cm. Line emission from highly ionized states of argon and molybdenum are measured at frame rates up to 200Hz. Using spectral tomographic techniques the line integrated spectra can be inverted to determine impurity density, velocity and temperature profiles. An overview of the instrument, analysis and example profiles are presented. Work supported by USDoE Coop. Agree. No. DE-FC02-99ER54512 & DE-AC02-76CH03073.

  5. Nonlinear transfer in heated L-modes approaching the L-H transition threshold in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cziegler, I.; Tynan, G. R.; Diamond, P. H.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Nonlinear transfer processes between large-scale edge flows and the ambient broadband fluctuations have been shown to play a significant role in the dynamics of edge turbulence, including spreading power from coherent modes and suppressing turbulence at the formation of edge transport barriers. In order to predict thresholds of confinement regimes, both the transition dynamics and the parametric dependence of the nonlinear energy transfer must be studied. Since the expected flow damping terms depend on ion collision rates and local safety factors, recent experiments aimed also to explore the nonlinear drive at various values of the plasma current, density and amount of auxiliary heating. Nonlinear interactions between zonal flows and turbulence in L-mode are estimated using bispectral as well as time-resolved methods based on gas-puff-imaging in Alcator C-Mod [1].

  6. Experimental Study of Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes During The Current Ramp In The Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, E. M.; Porkolab, M.; Kramer, G. J.; Lin, L.; Lin, Y.; Tsuji, N.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2010-08-27

    Experiments conducted in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT have explored the physics of reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs) during the current ramp. The frequency evolution of the RSAEs throughout the current ramp provides a constraint on the evolution of qmin, a result which is important in transport modeling and for comparison with other diagnostics which directly measure the magnetic field line structure. Additionally, a scaling of the RSAE minimum frequency with the sound speed is used to derive a measure of the adiabatic index, a measure of the plasma compressibility. This scaling bounds the adiabatic index at 1.40 ± 0:15 used in MHD models and supports the kinetic calculation of separate electron and ion compressibilities with an ion adiabatic index close to 7~4.

  7. Estimation of the ion toroidal rotation source due to momentum transfer from Lower Hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. P.; Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Parker, R. R.; Catto, P. J.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.

    2011-12-23

    Significant ion toroidal rotation (50km/s) has been measured by X-Ray spectroscopy for impurities in Alcator C-Mod during lower hybrid (LH) RF power injection. We investigate the relation between the computed toroidal momentum input from LH waves and the measured INITIAL change of ion toroidal rotation when the LH power is turned on. The relation may depend on the plasma current and magnetic configuration. Because of the fast build up time of the electron quasilinear plateau (<1 millisecond), the electron distribution function rapidly reaches steady state in which the electrons transfer momentum to the ions. The LH wave momentum input is computed from the self consistent steady state electron distribution function and a bounce-averaged quasilinear diffusion coefficient that are obtained by iterating a full wave code (TORLH) with a Fokker Plank code (CQL3D)

  8. Stark broadening of B IV spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Christova, Magdalena; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Stark broadening parameters for 157 multiplets of helium-like boron (B IV) have been calculated using the impact semiclassical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series. An example of the influence of Stark broadening on B IV lines in DO white dwarfs is given.

  9. Stark broadening data for stellar plasma research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Results of an effort to provide to astrophysicists and physicists an as much as possible complete set of Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar opacity calculations, stellar atmosphere modelling, abundance determinations and diagnostics of different plasmas in astrophysics, physics and plasma technology, are presented. Stark broadening has been considered within the semiclassical perturbation, and the modified semiempirical approaches.

  10. Quantitative comparison of electron temperature fluctuations to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Greenwald, M.; Holland, C.; Howard, N. T.; Churchill, R.; Theiler, C.

    2016-04-01

    Long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations (kyρs < 0.3) are measured in the outer core region (r/a > 0.8) of Ohmic L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [E. S. Marmar et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104014 (2009)] with a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. The relative amplitude and frequency spectrum of the fluctuations are compared quantitatively with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] in two different confinement regimes: linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) regime and saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regime. When comparing experiment with nonlinear simulations, it is found that local, electrostatic ion-scale simulations (kyρs ≲ 1.7) performed at r/a ˜ 0.85 reproduce the experimental ion heat flux levels, electron temperature fluctuation levels, and frequency spectra within experimental error bars. In contrast, the electron heat flux is robustly under-predicted and cannot be recovered by using scans of the simulation inputs within error bars or by using global simulations. If both the ion heat flux and the measured temperature fluctuations are attributed predominantly to long-wavelength turbulence, then under-prediction of electron heat flux strongly suggests that electron scale turbulence is important for transport in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges. In addition, no evidence is found from linear or nonlinear simulations for a clear transition from trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient turbulence across the LOC/SOC transition, and also there is no evidence in these Ohmic L-mode plasmas of the "Transport Shortfall" [C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)].

  11. Validation of MMM7.1 and TGLF anomalous transport models for predicting the evolution of Alcator C-Mod temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritz, A. H.; Rafiq, T.; Pankin, A. Y.; Hughes, J.; Greenwald, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Multi-Mode MMM7.1 [T. Rafiq, et al. Phys. Plasmas, 20, 032506, 2013] and the Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF)[G.M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 055909, 2007] anomalous transport models are validated employing experimental data for Alcator C-Mod discharges that represent a plasma density scan. The MMM7.1 and the TGLF models compute the anomalous transport driven by the ITG, TEM, ETG, KBM and collisional drift modes. The validation study is carried out with simulations that employ the new numerical solver PT-SOLVER in the PTRANSP code and that utilize Alcator C-Mod experimental boundary and initial conditions. The predicted evolving temperature profiles are compared with corresponding Alcator C-Mod experimental data. The comparison is quantified by calculating the RMS deviations and Offsets. Supported by USDoE FES grants DE-FG02-92ER54141, DE-SC0012174 and C-Mod award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Anticrossing effects in Stark spectra of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windholz, L.; Drozdowski, R.; Wasowicz, T. J.; Kwela, J.

    2005-06-01

    In the spectral range between 480 nm and 630 nm the Stark effect of the transitions n 1Q-2 1S, n 1Q-2 1P and n 3Q-2 3P (n=3-10, Q=S, P,...) was studied using electric field up to 1500 kV/cm. For such a high field the Stark splitting becomes greater than the simple structure of the atom. Hence anticrossings of the Stark components of the same magnetic quantum number occur. The experimental results have been compared with the theoretically determined shifts. The results of calculations show good agreement with observation.

  13. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  14. Parallel transport studies of high-Z impurities in the core of Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, M. L.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Rice, J. E.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2013-05-15

    Measurements of poloidal variation, ñ{sub z}/, in high-Z impurity density have been made using photodiode arrays sensitive to vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission in Alcator C-Mod plasmas. In/out asymmetries in the range of −0.2<0.3 are observed for r/a<0.8, and accumulation on both the high-field side, n{sub z,cos}<0, and low-field side, n{sub z,cos}>0, of a flux surface is found to be well described by a combination of centrifugal, poloidal electric field, and ion-impurity friction effects. Up/down asymmetries, −0.05<0.10, are observed over 0.50 corresponding to accumulation opposite the ion ∇B drift direction. Measurements of the up/down asymmetry of molybdenum are found to disagree with predictions from recent neoclassical theory in the trace limit, n{sub z}Z{sup 2}/n{sub i}≪1. Non-trace levels of impurities are expected to modify the main-ion poloidal flow and thus change friction-driven impurity density asymmetries and impurity poloidal rotation, v{sub θ,z}. Artificially modifying main-ion flow in parallel transport simulations is shown to impact both ñ{sub z}/ and v{sub θ,z}, but simultaneous agreement between measured and predicted up/down and in/out asymmetry as well as impurity poloidal rotation is not possible for these C-Mod data. This link between poloidal flow and poloidal impurity density variation outlines a more stringent test for parallel neoclassical transport theory than has previously been performed. Measurement and computational techniques specific to the study of poloidal impurity asymmetry physics are discussed as well.

  15. High-performance finite-difference time-domain simulations of C-Mod and ITER RF antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Smithe, David N.

    2015-12-01

    Finite-difference time-domain methods have, in recent years, developed powerful capabilities for modeling realistic ICRF behavior in fusion plasmas [1, 2, 3, 4]. When coupled with the power of modern high-performance computing platforms, such techniques allow the behavior of antenna near and far fields, and the flow of RF power, to be studied in realistic experimental scenarios at previously inaccessible levels of resolution. In this talk, we present results and 3D animations from high-performance FDTD simulations on the Titan Cray XK7 supercomputer, modeling both Alcator C-Mod's field-aligned ICRF antenna and the ITER antenna module. Much of this work focuses on scans over edge density, and tailored edge density profiles, to study dispersion and the physics of slow wave excitation in the immediate vicinity of the antenna hardware and SOL. An understanding of the role of the lower-hybrid resonance in low-density scenarios is emerging, and possible implications of this for the NSTX launcher and power balance are also discussed. In addition, we discuss ongoing work centered on using these simulations to estimate sputtering and impurity production, as driven by the self-consistent sheath potentials at antenna surfaces.

  16. EMC3-EIRENE modelling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    DOE PAGES

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; LaBombard, Brian; Lipschultz, B.; Churchill, R. M.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2014-09-30

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ~50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modelling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outermore » strike point. Finally, toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.« less

  17. Measurement of electron temperature fluctuations using a tunable correlation electron cyclotron emission system on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; Sung, C.; White, A. E.

    2014-11-15

    A tunable correlation electron cyclotron (CECE) system was recently installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to provide local, quantitative measurement of electron temperature fluctuations in the tokamak core. This system represents a significant upgrade from the original CECE system, expanding the measurement capabilities from 4 to 8 total channels, including 2 remotely tunable YIG filters (6–18 GHz; 200 MHz bandwidth). Additional upgrades were made to the optical system to provide enhanced poloidal resolution and allow for measurement of turbulent fluctuations below k{sub θ}ρ{sub s} < 0.3. These expanded capabilities allow for single shot measurement of partial temperature fluctuation profiles in the region ρ = 0.7 − 0.9 (square root of normalized toroidal flux) in a wide variety of plasma conditions. These measurements are currently being used to provide stringent tests of the gyrokinetic model in ongoing model validation efforts. Details of the hardware upgrades, turbulent fluctuation measurements, and ongoing comparisons with simulations are presented.

  18. Helium-3 transport experiments in the scrape-off layer with the Alcator C-Mod omegatron ion mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtrieb, R.; LaBombard, B.

    2000-11-01

    {sup 3}He gas was puffed from the wall into Ohmic low confinement-mode discharges of the Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson , Phys. Plasmas 1, 1551 (1994)] tokamak and the charged states were measured near the wall with the omegatron ion mass spectrometer. Analysis of the data shows that the concentrations of singly- and doubly-ionized helium near the wall are approximately equal. The electron temperature and density at the omegatron are too low to account for ionization of helium in the local flux tube, therefore the helium is ionized in a hotter region of the edge plasma and is transported to the omegatron. A simple one-dimensional radial transport model reproduces the observed values of charge state flux and density, but only if rapid cross-field transport is included, increasing with distance from the separatrix. A constant cross-field diffusion coefficient of order 2m{sup 2}/s and an outward convection velocity profile increasing to of order 100 m/s in the far scrape-off layer is implied.

  19. Changes in core electron temperature fluctuations across the ohmic energy confinement transition in Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Oi, C. Y.; Rice, J. E.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Parra, F.; Mikkelsen, D.; Ernst, D.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J.; Kasten, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Greenwald, M. J.; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of long wavelength (kyρs < 0.3) electron temperature fluctuations in Alcator C-Mod made with a new correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic support a long-standing hypothesis regarding the confinement transition from linear ohmic confinement (LOC) to saturated ohmic confinement (SOC). Electron temperature fluctuations decrease significantly (∼40%) crossing from LOC to SOC, consistent with a change from trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence domination to ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence as the density is increased. Linear stability analysis performed with the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) shows that TEMs are dominant for long wavelength turbulence in the LOC regime and ITG modes are dominant in the SOC regime at the radial location (ρ ∼ 0.8) where the changes in electron temperature fluctuations are measured. In contrast, deeper in the core (ρ < 0.8), linear stability analysis indicates that ITG modes remain dominant across the LOC/SOC transition. This radial variation suggests that the robust global changes in confinement of energy and momentum occurring across the LOC/SOC transition are correlated to local changes in the dominant turbulent mode near the edge.

  20. Quantitative comparison of experimental impurity transport with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an Alcator C-Mod L-mode plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Reinke, M. L.; White, A. E.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Candy, J.

    2012-06-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of impurity transport are compared to experimental impurity transport for the first time. The GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) was used to perform global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of impurity transport for a standard Alcator C-Mod, L-mode discharge. The laser blow-off technique was combined with soft x-ray measurements of a single charge state of calcium to provide time-evolving profiles of this non-intrinsic, non-recycling impurity over a radial range of 0.0 ⩽ r/a ⩽ 0.6. Experimental transport coefficient profiles and their uncertainties were extracted from the measurements using the impurity transport code STRAHL and rigorous Monte Carlo error analysis. To best assess the agreement of gyrokinetic simulations with the experimental profiles, the sensitivity of the GYRO predicted impurity transport to a wide range of turbulence-relevant plasma parameters was investigated. A direct comparison of nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation and experiment is presented with an in depth discussion of error sources and a new data analysis methodology.

  1. Surface thermocouples for measurement of pulsed heat flux in the divertor of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.

    2012-03-15

    A novel set of thermocouple sensors has been developed to measure heat fluxes arriving at divertor surfaces in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a magnetic confinement fusion experiment. These sensors operate in direct contact with the divertor plasma, which deposits heat fluxes in excess of {approx}10 MW/m{sup 2} over an {approx}1 s pulse. Thermoelectric EMF signals are produced across a non-standard bimetallic junction: a 50 {mu}m thick 74% tungsten-26% rhenium ribbon embedded in a 6.35 mm diameter molybdenum cylinder. The unique coaxial geometry of the sensor combined with its single-point electrical ground contact minimizes interference from the plasma/magnetic environment. Incident heat fluxes are inferred from surface temperature evolution via a 1D thermal heat transport model. For an incident heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}, surface temperatures rise {approx}1000 deg. C/s, corresponding to a heat flux flowing along the local magnetic field of {approx}200 MW/m{sup 2}. Separate calorimeter sensors are used to independently confirm the derived heat fluxes by comparing total energies deposited during a plasma pulse. Langmuir probes in close proximity to the surface thermocouples are used to test plasma-sheath heat transmission theory and to identify potential sources of discrepancies among physical models.

  2. Experimental Investigation of RF Sheath Rectification in ICRF and LH Heated Plasmas on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Faust, I.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Meneghini, O.; Wallace, G.; Wukitch, S.; Myra, J.

    2011-12-23

    Radio frequency (RF) rectification of the plasma sheath is being actively studied on C-Mod as a likely mechanism that leads to prohibitively high molybdenum levels in the plasma core of ion cyclotron RF (ICRF) heated discharges. We installed emissive, ion sensitive, Langmuir, and 3-D B-dot probes to quantify the plasma potentials ({Phi}{sub P}) in ICRF and lower hybrid (LH) heated discharges. Two probe sets were mounted on fixed limiter surfaces and one set of probes was mounted on a reciprocating (along the major radius) probe. Initial results showed that RF rectification is strongly dependent on the local plasma density and not on the local RF fields. The RF sheaths had a threshold-like appearance at the local density of {approx}10{sup 16} m-{sup 3}. Radial probe scans revealed that the RF sheaths peaked in the vicinity of the ICRF limiter surface, agreeing with a recent theory. The highest {Phi}{sub P}'s were observed on magnetic field lines directly mapped to the active ICRF antenna. Measurements in LH heated plasmas showed a strong {Phi}{sub P} dependence on the parallel index of refraction n{sub ||} of the launched LH waves: {Phi}{sub P} is greater at lower n{sub ||}. Little dependence was observed on the local plasma density.

  3. Microturbulent Drift Mode Stability before Internal Transport Barrier Formation in the Alcator C-Mod Radio Frequency Heated H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; W. Dorland; C.L. Fiore; P.T. Bonoli; M.J. Greenwald; J.E. Rice; J.A. Baumgaertel; T.S. Hahm; G.W. Hammett; K. Hill; D.C. McCune; D.R. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt

    2004-09-01

    H-mode experiments on Alcator C-Mod [I.H. Hutchinson, et al., Phys. Plasma 1 (1994) 1511] which exhibit an internal transport barrier (ITB), have been examined with gyrokinetic simulations, near the ITB onset time. Linear simulations support the picture of ion and electron temperature gradient (ITG, ETG) microturbulence driving high {chi}{sub i} and {chi}{sub e}, respectively, and that stable ITG correlates with reduced particle transport and improved ion thermal confinement on C-Mod. In the barrier region ITG is weakly unstable, with a critical temperature gradient higher than expected from standard models. Nonlinear calculations and the role of E x B shear suppression of turbulence outside the plasma core are discussed in light of recent profile measurements for the toroidal velocity. The gyrokinetic model benchmarks successfully against experiment in the plasma core.

  4. Feedback system for divertor impurity seeding based on real-time measurements of surface heat flux in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, D.; Burke, W.; Kuang, A. Q.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Wolfe, S.

    2016-02-01

    Mitigation of the intense heat flux to the divertor is one of the outstanding problems in fusion energy. One technique that has shown promise is impurity seeding, i.e., the injection of low-Z gaseous impurities (typically N2 or Ne) to radiate and dissipate the power before it arrives to the divertor target plate. To this end, the Alcator C-Mod team has created a first-of-its-kind feedback system to control the injection of seed gas based on real-time surface heat flux measurements. Surface thermocouples provide real-time measurements of the surface temperature response to the plasma heat flux. The surface temperature measurements are inputted into an analog computer that "solves" the 1-D heat transport equation to deliver accurate, real-time signals of the surface heat flux. The surface heat flux signals are sent to the C-Mod digital plasma control system, which uses a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm to control the duty cycle demand to a pulse width modulated piezo valve, which in turn controls the injection of gas into the private flux region of the C-Mod divertor. This paper presents the design and implementation of this new feedback system as well as initial results using it to control divertor heat flux.

  5. Feedback system for divertor impurity seeding based on real-time measurements of surface heat flux in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    PubMed

    Brunner, D; Burke, W; Kuang, A Q; LaBombard, B; Lipschultz, B; Wolfe, S

    2016-02-01

    Mitigation of the intense heat flux to the divertor is one of the outstanding problems in fusion energy. One technique that has shown promise is impurity seeding, i.e., the injection of low-Z gaseous impurities (typically N2 or Ne) to radiate and dissipate the power before it arrives to the divertor target plate. To this end, the Alcator C-Mod team has created a first-of-its-kind feedback system to control the injection of seed gas based on real-time surface heat flux measurements. Surface thermocouples provide real-time measurements of the surface temperature response to the plasma heat flux. The surface temperature measurements are inputted into an analog computer that "solves" the 1-D heat transport equation to deliver accurate, real-time signals of the surface heat flux. The surface heat flux signals are sent to the C-Mod digital plasma control system, which uses a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm to control the duty cycle demand to a pulse width modulated piezo valve, which in turn controls the injection of gas into the private flux region of the C-Mod divertor. This paper presents the design and implementation of this new feedback system as well as initial results using it to control divertor heat flux.

  6. A study of hydrogenic retention in a tokamak with reactor-like plasma-facing surfaces; Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipschultz, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    Tritium retention is an important safety concern for ITER; Operation for 1000 discharges without a major stoppage will require the fraction of ion fluence to Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) that is retained, R, to be < 0.001%. One year operation of a reactor, where tungsten (W) PFCs are envisioned, requires R to be 100x smaller! Co-deposition of H with carbon projects to unacceptably high T retention in ITER. We present the results of the first in-depth study of fuel retention for high-Z PFCs with ITER divertor ne, Te, particle and heat fluxes. We utilize molybdenum (Mo, with a small fraction of W), which is very similar to tungsten in terms of hydrogenic retention. The retention observed in a series of disruption-free C-Mod discharges is high, R˜1%, 1000x than expected from inherent Mo properties. These retention characteristics are exhibited regardless if the Mo surfaces are bare or partially covered by B films; D co-deposition with B is not contributing significantly to retention. Retention appears linear in fluence up to the limit of the discharge sequence, ˜20s, approaching one ITER discharge. Comparison of He- and D-fueled discharges gives support to a model of retention site creation in the lattice (`traps') due to D neutral buildup and accompanying lattice distortion driven by recombination-limited release (D->D2) from the front surface. Disruptions can be used to rapidly heat surfaces, releasing the H/D for recovery, potentially applicable to ITER. Naturally-occurring disruptions appear to balance single-discharge retention reducing the campaign-integrated retention by at least 100. Comparisons to laboratory-based retention studies indicate that the tokamak environment leads to additional enhancements of retention. This work is supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy Coop. Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  7. Local gas injection as a scrape-off layer diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, D.F.

    1996-05-01

    A capillary puffing array has been installed on Alcator C-Mod which allows localized introduction of gaseous species in the scrape-off layer. This system has been utilized in experiments to elucidate both global and local properties of edge transport. Deuterium fueling and recycling impurity screening are observed to be characterized by non-dimensional screening efficiencies which are independent of the location of introduction. In contrast, the behavior of non-recycling impurities is seen to be characterized by a screening time which is dependent on puff location. The work of this thesis has focused on the use of the capillary array with a camera system which can view impurity line emission plumes formed in the region of an injection location. The ionic plumes observed extend along the magnetic field line with a comet-like asymmetry, indicative of background plasma ion flow. The flow is observed to be towards the nearest strike-point, independent of x-point location, magnetic field direction, and other plasma parameters. While the axes of the plumes are generally along the field line, deviations are seen which indicate cross-field ion drifts. A quasi-two dimensional fluid model has been constructed to use the plume shapes of the first charge state impurity ions to extract information about the local background plasma, specifically the temperature, parallel flow velocity, and radial electric field. Through comparisons of model results with those of a three dimensional Monte Carlo code, and comparisons of plume extracted parameters with scanning probe measurements, the efficacy of the model is demonstrated. Plume analysis not only leads to understandings of local edge impurity transport, but also presents a novel diagnostic technique.

  8. Helium ELMy H-modes in Alcator C-Mod in Support of ITER Helium Operating Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, C. E.; Wolfe, S. M.; Chilenski, M. A.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Wukitch, S. J.; C-Mod Team

    2015-11-01

    ITER will operate helium majority plasmas in its earlier phases to shakedown the facility and provide plasmas in both L-mode and H-mode for commissioning and preparation for DT burning plasma operation. Part of this activity is to produce ELMy H-modes to test ELM mitigation schemes and observe the ELM impacts on the plasma facing components. It is of interest to characterize helium ELMy H-modes on present experiments to provide some basis to project to ITER and anticipate the plasma performance and ability to obtain H-modes with sufficient performance. ELMy H-mode is accessed in C-Mod by using LSN with an elongation of about 1.55, and with high lower triangularity and low upper triangularity. These regimes were produced with 1.5-4.0 MW of ICRF heating, and with H-mode line average densities of 2.0-3.2x1020 /m3, producing higher frequency repetitive to large infrequent ELMs, respectively. The infrequent ELM regime showed a cross between EDA and ELMy H-mode, with the EDA signature of a quasi-coherent mode at about 200 kHz. Tungsten laser blow-off was done. The pedestal features, energy confinement, ELM character, L-H threshold (1.7-2.5 MW) and W confinement will be discussed. Comparisons with deuterium ELMy H-modes will be made. Work supported by DOE DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  9. Status of diagnostic development to measure parallel wavenumber of lower hybrid waves on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S. G.; Wallace, G. M.; Shinya, T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Parker, R. R.; Takase, Y.; Brunner, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent lower hybrid (LH) current drive experiments on Alcator C-Mod have motivated measurement of the parallel wavenumber of LH waves with an aim to understand the significance of the k|| up-shift mechanisms such as scattering by turbulence or parametric decay instabilities. To this end, a new diagnostic system is under development, consisting of two rows of three RF magnetic loop probes (one row sensitive to B||, the other row B⊥) and three Langmuir probes. These will be mounted on a radially movable probe system on the low field side of the tokamak, which is magnetically mapped to the LH launcher but toroidally separated by about 110 deg from the launcher. This location is expected to be ideal for detecting the parallel wavenumber spectrum of the pump and sideband LH waves up to n|| of 6.5. The use of the loop probes will help unambiguously resolve the polarization of these waves. These loop probes have been developed under the collaboration with the University of Tokyo, and vacuum-compatible versions have recently been fabricated and tested on the bench. To evaluate the phase of the detected waves, the signals at 4.6 GHz will be frequency down-converted to 25 MHz in an intermediate frequency stage, and directly digitized at a sampling rate of 100 MS/sec. This system will output the dominant parallel wavenumber for each frequency, selected by controlling the frequency of a local oscillator in the IF stage. In addition to these loop probes, the Langmuir probes will be used to provide the density and temperature information at the measurement location to perform instability analyses. The Langmuir probes will be also used to examine the sensitivity of the radial measurement location on the strength of the sideband LH waves. Details of this proposed diagnostic system and the latest status will be presented.

  10. The Stark effect in linear potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z > 0 and V(z) = ∞ for z < 0) and the symmetric linear potential (given by V(z) = F|z|). We show how straightforward use of the most obvious properties of the Airy function solutions and simple Taylor expansions gives closed form results for the Stark shifts in both systems. These exact results are then compared to other approximation techniques, such as perturbation theory and WKB methods. These expressions add to the small number of closed-form descriptions available for the Stark effect in model quantum mechanical systems.

  11. Stark echo modulation for quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcangeli, A.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum memories for optical and microwave photons provide key functionalities in quantum processing and communications. Here we propose a protocol well adapted to solid-state ensemble-based memories coupled to cavities. It is called Stark echo modulation memory (SEMM) and allows large storage bandwidths and low noise. This is achieved in an echo-like sequence combined with phase shifts induced by small electric fields through the linear Stark effect. We investigated the protocol for rare-earth nuclear spins and found a high suppression of unwanted collective emissions that is compatible with single-photon-level operation. Broadband storage together with high fidelity for the Stark retrieval process is also demonstrated. SEMM could be used to store optical or microwave photons in ions and/or spins. This includes nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and rare-earth-doped crystals, which are among the most promising solid-state quantum memories.

  12. Stark broadening of Kr UV spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Cirisan, M.; Djurovic, S.; Pelaez, R. J.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar, S.

    2011-01-15

    This work reports new data for the Stark parameters of doubly ionized krypton spectral lines. Stark widths and shifts of Kr iii lines belonging to the UV region (245-300 nm) have been measured. A low-pressure pulsed arc, containing a mixture of 8% krypton and 92% helium, was used as a plasma source. Measured electron densities and electron temperatures were in the range (0.7-2.0)x10{sup 23} m{sup -3} and 16 000-20 000 K, respectively. Experimentally obtained data were compared to theoretical results calculated using simplified modified semiempirical formulas.

  13. Nominees Serve Up Stark Differences on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    During the recently concluded presidential nominating conventions, President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney offered stark choices on K-12 policy while downplaying areas of agreement between their two parties--and the tensions within each party on education issues. In Charlotte, North Carolina, last week, the Democrats put a…

  14. Probing the classical/quantal boundary using the Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugh, Joseph Frederick

    The boundary between classical physics and quantum physics is examined using the Stark effect on sodium atoms in a constant electric field. Coherent states composed of linear superpositions of the hydrogenic stationary states are created by applying a low amplitude, ˜5 V/cm, nanosecond electric field pulse. The pulse periodically drives the atoms to a realm where many stationary states lie within a very narrow energy range. These coherent superpositions exhibit localized electronic probability densities and therefore qualify as wave packets, time-dependent states for which constructive and destructive interference leads to a localized, moving probability density. Using a cw laser these wave packet states are excited and their attributes are probed in the frequency domain rather than the time domain. Computer simulations are used to show how coherent linear combinations of hydrogenic basis states emulate the orbital motion of a classical particle.

  15. Microwave Stark decelerator for polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Katsunari; Momose, Takamasa

    2005-12-15

    We propose a method to decelerate polar molecules from a beam using a microwave field. A moving standing wave of a microwave electric field causes an ac Stark shift to polar molecules and decelerates them. The method is applicable to polar molecules in rotational ground states and can be used to directly load a microwave trap. Numerical simulations are presented indicating large phase-space acceptance volume.

  16. Anisotropic exciton Stark shift in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, A.; Low, Tony; Avouris, P.; ćakır, D.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-04-01

    We calculate the excitonic spectrum of few-layer black phosphorus by direct diagonalization of the effective mass Hamiltonian in the presence of an applied in-plane electric field. The strong attractive interaction between electrons and holes in this system allows one to investigate the Stark effect up to very high ionizing fields, including also the excited states. Our results show that the band anisotropy in black phosphorus becomes evident in the direction-dependent field-induced polarizability of the exciton.

  17. The Stark Effect in Linear Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinett, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z greater than 0 and V(z) = [infinity] for z less than 0) and the symmetric linear potential…

  18. Vibrational Stark Effect Probes for Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Lisa N.; Pitzer, Michael E.; Ankomah, Peter O.; Boxer, Steven G.; Fenlon, Edward E.

    2008-01-01

    The vibrational Stark effect (VSE) has proven to be an effective method for the study of electric fields in proteins via the use of infrared probes. In order to explore the use of VSE in nucleic acids, the Stark spectroscopy of nine structurally diverse nucleosides was investigated. These nucleosides contained nitrile or azide probes in positions that correspond to both the major and minor grooves of DNA. The nitrile probes showed better characteristics and exhibited absorption frequencies over a broad range; i.e., from 2253 cm−1 for 2′-O-cyanoethyl ribonucleosides 8 and 9 to 2102 cm−1 for a 13C-labeled 5-thiocyanatomethyl-2’-deoxyuridine 3c. The largest Stark tuning rate observed was |Δµ| = 1.1 cm−1/(MV/cm) for both 5-cyano-2′-deoxyuridine 1 and N2-nitrile-2′-deoxyguanosine 7. The latter is a particularly attractive probe because of its high extinction coefficient (ε = 412 M−1cm−1) and ease of incorporation into oligomers. PMID:17877390

  19. Numerical investigation of edge plasma phenomena in an enhanced D-alpha discharge at Alcator C-Mod: Parallel heat flux and quasi-coherent edge oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D. A.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2012-08-15

    Reduced-model scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) simulations of an enhanced D-alpha (EDA) H-mode shot observed in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak were conducted to compare with observed variations in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) width of the parallel heat flux profile. In particular, the role of the competition between sheath- and conduction-limited parallel heat fluxes in determining that width was studied for the turbulent SOL plasma that emerged from the simulations. The SOL width decreases with increasing input power and with increasing separatrix temperature in both the experiment and the simulation, consistent with the strong temperature dependence of the parallel heat flux in balance with the perpendicular transport by turbulence and blobs. The particularly strong temperature dependence observed in the case analyzed is attributed to the fact that these simulations produce SOL plasmas which are in the conduction-limited regime for the parallel heat flux. A persistent quasi-coherent (QC) mode dominates the SOLT simulations and bears considerable resemblance to the QC mode observed in C-Mod EDA operation. The SOLT QC mode consists of nonlinearly saturated wave-fronts located just inside the separatrix that are convected poloidally by the mean flow, continuously transporting particles and energy and intermittently emitting blobs into the SOL.

  20. Multi-species particle transport in GYRO simulations of low-collisionality, peaked-density H-mode plasmas in C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Greenwald, M.; Waltz, R.; Candy, J.

    2009-11-01

    Experimental results from Alcator C-Mod have confirmed earlier AUG and JET findings that spontaneous peaking of the density profile in H-mode plasmas depends on collisionality. Previously reported nonlinear, 'full-radius' GYRO simulations [1] of low-collisionality, peaked-density H-mode plasmas in C-Mod generated a particle pinch that was produced exclusively by higher-k modes. Nonlinear simulations of AUG have a similar character [2], and recent detailed linear analyses [2,3] suggest that density peaking may be common in low collisionality plasmas. Here we increase the number of ion species in the simulations to determine whether impurity pinches are also expected, and whether the degree of density peaking is predicted to differ for the three hydrogen isotopes. These simulations include experimentally relevant levels of several impurities, and a range of H/D and D/T mixes.[4pt] [1] D.R. Mikkelsen, et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, (2007) No. 16, 221, NP8.71 [0pt] [2] C. Angioni, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16 (2009) 060702 [0pt] [3] M. Maslov, et al., Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 075037

  1. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-08-15

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-{sup 3}He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  2. Dielectric waveguide gas-filled stark shift modulator

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.

    2003-07-22

    An optical modulator includes a dielectric waveguide for receiving an optical beam and coupling energy of the optical beam into the waveguide. At least one Stark material is provided in the waveguide. A bias circuit generates a bias signal to produce an electrical field across the Stark material to shift at least one of the Stark absorption frequencies towards the frequency of the optical beam. A circuit for producing a time varying electric field across the Stark material modulates the optical beam. At least a portion of the bias field can be generated by an alternating bias signal, such as a square wave. A method of modulating optical signals includes the steps of providing a dielectric waveguide for receiving an optical beam and coupling energy of the optical beam into the waveguide, the waveguide having at least one Stark material disposed therein, and varying an electric field imposed across the Stark material.

  3. Science Translator: An Interview with Louisa Stark.

    PubMed

    Stark, Louisa A

    2015-07-01

    The Genetics Society of America's Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes significant and sustained impact on genetics education. The 2015 awardee, Louisa Stark, has made a major impact on global access to genetics education through her work as director of the University of Utah Genetic Science Learning Center. The Center's Learn.Genetics and Teach.Genetics websites are the most widely used online genetic education resources in the world. In 2014, they were visited by 18 million students, educators, scientists, and members of the public. With over 60 million page views annually, Learn.Genetics is among the most used sites on the Web. PMID:26170441

  4. Science Translator: An Interview with Louisa Stark.

    PubMed

    Stark, Louisa A

    2015-07-01

    The Genetics Society of America's Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes significant and sustained impact on genetics education. The 2015 awardee, Louisa Stark, has made a major impact on global access to genetics education through her work as director of the University of Utah Genetic Science Learning Center. The Center's Learn.Genetics and Teach.Genetics websites are the most widely used online genetic education resources in the world. In 2014, they were visited by 18 million students, educators, scientists, and members of the public. With over 60 million page views annually, Learn.Genetics is among the most used sites on the Web.

  5. Stark Broadening in Compact Stars: Xe VI Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Valjarević, Aleksandar; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2015-12-01

    We will consider Stark broadening of non hydrogenic spectral lines in the impact approximation in compact stars: pre-white dwarf and white dwarf atmospheres. In order to show an example, Stark broadening parameters have been calculated, using the impact semiclassical perturbation approach for four Xe VI spectral lines. Obtained results have been used to demonstrate the influence of Stark broadening in DA and DB white dwarf atmospheres.

  6. Optical Stark effect in 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sie, Edbert J.; McIver, James W.; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Fu, Liang; Kong, Jing; Gedik, Nuh

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductors that are atomically thin can exhibit novel optical properties beyond those encountered in the bulk compounds. Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are leading examples of such semiconductors that possess remarkable optical properties. They obey unique selection rules where light with different circular polarization can be used for selective photoexcitation at two different valleys in the momentum space. These valleys constitute bandgaps that are normally locked in the same energy. Selectively varying their energies is of great interest for applications because it unlocks the potential to control valley degree of freedom, and offers a new promising way to carry information in next-generation valleytronics. In this proceeding paper, we show that the energy gaps at the two valleys can be shifted relative to each other by means of the optical Stark effect in a controllable valley-selective manner. We discuss the physics of the optical Stark effect, and we describe the mechanism that leads to its valleyselectivity in monolayer TMD tungsten disulfide (WS2).

  7. Measurements of Mode Converted Ion Cyclotron Wave with Phase Contrast Imaging in Alcator C-Mod and Comparisons with Synthetic PCI Simulations in TORIC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Edlund, E. M.; Lin, L.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2009-11-26

    Mode converted ion cyclotron wave (ICW) has been observed with phase contrast imaging (PCI) in D-{sup 3}He plasmas in Alcator C-Mod. The measurements were carried out with the optical heterodyne technique using acousto-optic modulators which modulate the CO2 laser beam intensity near the ion cyclotron frequency. With recently improved calibration of the PCI system using a calibrated sound wave source, the measurements have been compared with the full-wave code TORIC, as interpreted by a synthetic diagnostic. Because of the line-integrated nature of the PCI signal, the predictions are sensitive to the exact wave field pattern. The simulations are found to be in qualitative agreement with the measurements.

  8. The effects of main-ion dilution on turbulence in low q95 C-Mod ohmic plasmas, and comparisons with nonlinear GYRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Candy, J.; Staebler, G.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Rost, J. C.; Ernst, D.; Hughes, J.; Baek, S. G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on C-mod seeding nitrogen into ohmic plasmas with q95 = 3.4 found that the seeding greatly reduced long-wavelength (ITG-scale) turbulence. The long-wavelength turbulence that was reduced by the nitrogen seeding was localized to the region of r /a ≈0.85 , where the turbulence is well above marginal stability (as evidenced by Qi/QGB≫1 ). The nonlinear gyrokinetic code GYRO was used to simulate the expected turbulence in these plasmas, and the simulated turbulent density fluctuations and turbulent energy fluxes quantitatively agreed with the experimental measurements both before and after the nitrogen seeding. Unexpectedly, the intrinsic rotation of the plasma was also found to be affected by the nitrogen seeding, in a manner apparently unrelated to a change in the electron-ion collisionality that was proposed by other experiments.

  9. Spatial structure of scrape-off-layer filaments near the midplane and X-point regions of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J L; Zweben, S J; Umansky, M V; Cziegler, I; Grulke, O; LaBombard, B; Stotler, D P

    2008-05-22

    Movies of edge turbulence at both the outboard midplane and the region outboard of the typical lower X-point location in C-Mod have been obtained using Gas-Puff-Imaging together with fast-framing cameras. Intermittent turbulent structures, typically referred to as blobs or filaments, are observed in both locations. Near the midplane the filaments are roughly circular in cross-section, while in the X-point region they are highly elongated. Filament velocities in this region are {approx}3x faster than the radial velocities at the midplane, in a direction roughly normal to the local flux surfaces. The observations are consistent with the picture that the filaments arise in outboard region and, as a consequence of the rapid parallel diffusion of the potential perturbations, map along field lines. A simulation using the 3D BOUT turbulence code has been made, with the result that reproduces many of the spatial features observed in the experiment.

  10. Pedestal and Transport Properties of Steady-state I-mode Plasmas over Expanded Operational Space in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmar, Earl

    2011-10-01

    I-mode operation on Alcator C-Mod combines a strong edge thermal transport barrier with L-mode levels of particle and impurity transport, allowing access to very high performance discharges with low pedestal collisionality and central temperatures up to 8 keV, and without large ELMs or other intermittent edge instabilities. In recent campaigns, C-Mod I-modes have been extended to quasi-steady-state, with access in both favorable and unfavorable ion drift directions and typical normalized energy confinement quality factor H98 ~ 1.0 to 1.2. Adding ICRF mode-conversion flow-drive enhances toroidal flow shear near the plasma edge and confinement is further enhanced. I-mode has been maintained with input power up to nearly 2x the I-mode threshold power, with the largest accessible range in closed divertor geometry at modest triangularity. Simple extrapolations at fixed field imply that ITER in unfavorable drift could access I-mode with available power, and stay in I-mode with alpha-dominant heating. Detailed pedestal fluctuation measurements reveal changes in the turbulence, with decreases in the power at some frequencies and size scales, and growth of a weakly coherent mode (WCM) (kθ ~ 1.5 cm-1, δf/f ~.3) which propagates in the electron diamagnetic direction in the plasma frame. The WCM, which has density, temperature and magnetic signatures, appears to play a key role in pedestal density and impurity regulation, and detailed experimental results and associated modeling are presented. The distribution of divertor exhaust power depends on ion drift direction; new measurements of I-mode heat flux footprints on the outer divertor are compared with those in H-mode. Pedestal stability analyses will be shown for I-modes, including some which exhibited small ELMs. Supported by USDOE Award DE-FC02-99-ER54512.

  11. 1. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT STARK MILL WAREHOUSES FROM ROOF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT STARK MILL WAREHOUSES FROM ROOF OF MILL. THE WAREHOUSES WERE BUILT USING SLOW-BURNING TIMBER AND BRICK CONSTRUCTION AND INCLUDED THE PICKER ROOM. NOTE ORIGINAL WATER TANK ON LEFT AND BOILER STACK IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Stark Mill, Warehouses, 117 Corinth Road, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

  12. 1. VIEW FROM ROOF OF MILL LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT STARK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM ROOF OF MILL LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT STARK MILL HOUSING ON CORINTH ROAD. THESE FRONT GABLE BUNGALOWS WERE BUILT AS OVERSEERS HOUSES FOR NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN MILLS IN HOGANSVILLE IN 1923-1924. THE MILL ENGINEERS FOR STARK MILL, LOCKWOOD GREENE COMPANY, ALSO BUILT THE NEW WORKER HOUSING. - 110 Corinth Road (House), 110 Corinth Road, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

  13. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.; Kempf, James G.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2ω0). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C14 (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both 69Ga and 75As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2ω0 amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2ω0 circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2ω0 excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C14 = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 1012 m-1 for 69Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For 75As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 1012 m-1. Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2ω0 field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|.

  14. A classical examination of the Stark effect in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Andrew; Greene, Chris H.; Clark, William

    1997-04-01

    The response of a hydrogen atom to a perturbative electric field (the Stark effect) is presented from a classical viewpoint. In previous studies Hezel et al. (T. P. Hezel, C. E. Burkhardt, M. Ciocca, and J. J. Leventhal, Am. J. Phys. 60), 324 (1992). examined the linear Stark effect classically and found that the linear Stark splitting of the degenerate hydrogenic energy levels (n-states) corresponds to a rotation of the plane of the electron orbit about the electric field vector. In the present work we find classical energy shifts (not just precession frequencies) in the hydrogen atom in situations that correspond to both the linear and quadratic Stark effects. We then compare these classical energy shifts to the exact quantum mechanical values for the Stark effect. We find that the linear Stark effect can be accurately reproduced classically (given the correct initial conditions). In contrast, quantum mechanical results for the quadratic Stark effect cannot be accurately reproduced classically, except in the correspondence principle limit of large principal quantum numbers n. A paper based on this work has been recently submitted to Phys. Rev. A(Preprints of this paper are avaliable on the internet at ftp://fermion.colorado.edu/pub/preprints/Sta rk/ .). This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  15. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Valjarević, Aleksandar; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2015-12-01

    In order to complete Stark broadening data for Ne I spectral lines which are needed for analysis of stellar atmospheres, collisional widths and shifts (the so-called Stark broadening parameters) of 29 isolated spectral lines of neutral neon have been determined within the impact semiclassical perturbation method. Calculations have been performed for the broadening by collisions with electrons, protons and ionized helium for astrophysical applications, and for collisions with ionized neon and argon for laboratory plasma diagnostics. The shifts have been compared with existing experimental values. The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center - VAMDC.

  16. Measurements of ion cyclotron parametric decay of lower hybrid waves at the high-field side of Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S. G.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brunner, D.; Faust, I. C.; Hubbard, A. E.; LaBombard, B.; Porkolab, M.

    2013-05-01

    Ion cyclotron parametric decay instability (PDI) of lower hybrid (LH) waves is surveyed using edge Langmuir probes on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurement is carried out simultaneously at the high-field side (HFS) and low-field side (LFS) mid-plane of the tokamak, as well as in the outer divertor region. Different LH spectra are observed depending on the location of the probes and magnetic configuration in L-mode plasmas, with \\overrightarrow{B}\\times\\bigtriangledown B drift direction downward. In lower single null (LSN) plasmas, strong ion cyclotron PDI occurring at the HFS is observed for the first time. This instability is characterized by a frequency separation in sidebands corresponding to the ion cyclotron frequency (ωci) near the HFS scrape-off layer and develops with threshold-like behavior as density increases. In inner wall limited (IWL) plasmas, this HFS instability shows a higher density threshold compared with that in LSN plasmas. The pump width becomes broadened even in the absence of the sidebands. In upper single null plasmas with similar plasma parameters, ion cyclotron PDI sidebands have a frequency separation corresponding to ωci near the LFS and are weaker than those observed in the LSN and IWL plasmas. Correlation between the onset of ion cyclotron PDI and the observed loss of lower hybrid current drive efficiency (Wallace et al 2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 062505) is discussed.

  17. New insights on boundary plasma turbulence and the quasi-coherent mode in Alcator C-Mod using a Mirror Langmuir Probea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Terry, J. L.; Brunner, D.; Davis, E.; Greenwald, M.; Hughes, J. W.

    2014-05-01

    A new "Mirror Langmuir Probe" diagnostic, combined with a double-coil scanning magnetic probe, is used to interrogate Alcator C-Mod's quasi-coherent mode (QCM) with unprecedented detail. In ohmic EDA H-modes, the QCM is found to reside in a region of positive radial electric field, with a radial width (˜3 mm) that spans open and closed field line regions. Large amplitude, in-phase sinusoidal bursts (˜100 kHz) in density, electron temperature, and plasma potential are observed, with potential lagging density by ˜16°, producing an outward radial transport velocity of ˜10 m/s. Mode propagation corresponds to the sum of local E × B and electron diamagnetic drift velocities. Poloidal magnetic field fluctuations project to current filaments carrying peak current densities of ˜25 A/cm2. An evaluation of parallel electron force balance (Ohm's law) over a fluctuation cycle indicates a significant electromotive component. Interchange drive is also a contributor in the current continuity (vorticity) equation. Thus, the QCM is primarily a separatrix-spanning electron drift-wave with interchange and electromagnetic contributions.

  18. Comparison of Edge Turbulence Imaging at Two Different Poloidal Locations in the Scrape-off Layer of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben, et. al.

    2013-03-29

    This paper describes 2-D imaging measurements of plasma turbulence made in the scrape-off layer of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak simultaneously at two different poloidal locations, one near the outer midplane and the other near the divertor X-point region. These images were made with radial and poloidal resolution using two gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostics, which were not directly connected along a B field line. The turbulence correlation structure has a significantly different tilt angle with respect to the local flux surfaces for the midplane and X-regions, and a slightly different ellipticity and size. The time-averaged turbulence velocities can be different in the midplane and Xregions, even within the same flux surface in the same shot, and in most cases the fluctuations in poloidal velocity in these two regions were not correlated. These structures are partially consistent with a magnetic flux tube mapping model, and the velocities are compared with various poloidal flow models.

  19. Three-dimensional simulation of H-mode plasmas with localized divertor impurity injection on Alcator C-Mod using the edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B. A.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2015-04-28

    We study experiments in Alcator C-Mod to assess the level of toroidal asymmetry in divertor conditions resulting from poloidally and toroidally localized extrinsic impurity gas seeding show a weak toroidal peaking (~1.1) in divertor electron temperatures for high-power enhanced D-alpha H-modeplasmas. This is in contrast to similar experiments in Ohmically heated L-modeplasmas, which showed a clear toroidal modulation in the divertor electron temperature. Modeling of these experiments using the 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE [Y. Feng et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 241, 930 (1997)] qualitatively reproduces these trends, and indicates that the different response in the simulations is due to the ionization location of the injected nitrogen. Low electron temperatures in the private flux region (PFR) in L-mode result in a PFR plasma that is nearly transparent to neutral nitrogen, while in H-mode the impurities are ionized in close proximity to the injection location, with this latter case yielding a largely axisymmetric radiation pattern in the scrape-off-layer. In conclusion, the consequences for the ITER gas injection system are discussed. Quantitative agreement with the experiment is lacking in some areas, suggesting potential areas for improving the physics model in EMC3-EIRENE.

  20. Three-dimensional simulation of H-mode plasmas with localized divertor impurity injection on Alcator C-Mod using the edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE

    DOE PAGES

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B. A.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2015-04-28

    We study experiments in Alcator C-Mod to assess the level of toroidal asymmetry in divertor conditions resulting from poloidally and toroidally localized extrinsic impurity gas seeding show a weak toroidal peaking (~1.1) in divertor electron temperatures for high-power enhanced D-alpha H-modeplasmas. This is in contrast to similar experiments in Ohmically heated L-modeplasmas, which showed a clear toroidal modulation in the divertor electron temperature. Modeling of these experiments using the 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE [Y. Feng et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 241, 930 (1997)] qualitatively reproduces these trends, and indicates that the different response in the simulations is due tomore » the ionization location of the injected nitrogen. Low electron temperatures in the private flux region (PFR) in L-mode result in a PFR plasma that is nearly transparent to neutral nitrogen, while in H-mode the impurities are ionized in close proximity to the injection location, with this latter case yielding a largely axisymmetric radiation pattern in the scrape-off-layer. In conclusion, the consequences for the ITER gas injection system are discussed. Quantitative agreement with the experiment is lacking in some areas, suggesting potential areas for improving the physics model in EMC3-EIRENE.« less

  1. Mean flows and blob velocities in scrape-off layer (SOLT) simulations of an L-mode discharge on Alcator C-Mod

    DOE PAGES

    Russell, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; LaBombard, B.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2016-06-10

    Two-dimensional scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) code simulations are compared with an L-mode discharge on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [M. Greenwald, et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 110501 (2014)]. Density and temperature profiles for the simulations were obtained by smoothly fitting Thomson scattering and mirror Langmuir probe (MLP) data from the shot. Simulations differing in turbulence intensity were obtained by varying a dissipation parameter. Mean flow profiles and density fluctuation amplitudes are consistent with those measured by MLP in the experiment and with a Fourier space diagnostic designed to measure poloidal phase velocity. Blob velocities in the simulations were determined from themore » correlation function for density fluctuations, as in the analysis of gas-puff-imaging (GPI) blobs in the experiment. In the simulations, it was found that larger blobs moved poloidally with the ExB flow velocity, vE , in the near-SOL, while smaller fluctuations moved with the group velocity of the dominant linear (interchange) mode, vE + 1/2 vdi, where vdi is the ion diamagnetic drift velocity. Comparisons are made with the measured GPI correlation velocity for the discharge. The saturation mechanisms operative in the simulation of the discharge are also discussed. In conclusion, it is found that neither sheared flow nor pressure gradient modification can be excluded as saturation mechanisms.« less

  2. Time-Dependent Distribution Functions in C-Mod Calculated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA Full-Wave, and DC Lorentz Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W. (Bob); Petrov, Yu. V.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.

    2015-11-01

    A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed ICRF power is made calculating minority hydrogen ion distribution functions with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. ICRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full wave code, and RF diffusion coefficients are obtained from these fields using the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL3D/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, in general agreement with experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these effects on the the NPA synthetic diagnostic time-dependence. The new NPA results give increased agreement with experiment, particularly in the ramp-down time after the ICRF pulse. Funded, through subcontract with Massachusetts Institute of Technology, by USDOE sponsored SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions.

  3. New insights on boundary plasma turbulence and the quasi-coherent mode in Alcator C-Mod using a Mirror Langmuir Probe

    SciTech Connect

    LaBombard, B.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Terry, J. L.; Brunner, D.; Davis, E.; Greenwald, M.; Hughes, J. W.

    2014-05-15

    A new “Mirror Langmuir Probe” diagnostic, combined with a double-coil scanning magnetic probe, is used to interrogate Alcator C-Mod's quasi-coherent mode (QCM) with unprecedented detail. In ohmic EDA H-modes, the QCM is found to reside in a region of positive radial electric field, with a radial width (∼3 mm) that spans open and closed field line regions. Large amplitude, in-phase sinusoidal bursts (∼100 kHz) in density, electron temperature, and plasma potential are observed, with potential lagging density by ∼16°, producing an outward radial transport velocity of ∼10 m/s. Mode propagation corresponds to the sum of local E × B and electron diamagnetic drift velocities. Poloidal magnetic field fluctuations project to current filaments carrying peak current densities of ∼25 A/cm{sup 2}. An evaluation of parallel electron force balance (Ohm's law) over a fluctuation cycle indicates a significant electromotive component. Interchange drive is also a contributor in the current continuity (vorticity) equation. Thus, the QCM is primarily a separatrix-spanning electron drift-wave with interchange and electromagnetic contributions.

  4. Mean flows and blob velocities in scrape-off layer (SOLT) simulations of an L-mode discharge on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; LaBombard, B.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) code simulations are compared with an L-mode discharge on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Greenwald et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 110501 (2014)]. Density and temperature profiles for the simulations were obtained by smoothly fitting Thomson scattering and mirror Langmuir probe (MLP) data from the shot. Simulations differing in turbulence intensity were obtained by varying a dissipation parameter. Mean flow profiles and density fluctuation amplitudes are consistent with those measured by MLP in the experiment and with a Fourier space diagnostic designed to measure poloidal phase velocity. Blob velocities in the simulations were determined from the correlation function for density fluctuations, as in the analysis of gas-puff-imaging (GPI) blobs in the experiment. In the simulations, it was found that larger blobs moved poloidally with the E × B flow velocity, vE, in the near-SOL, while smaller fluctuations moved with the group velocity of the dominant linear (interchange) mode, vE + 1/2 vdi, where vdi is the ion diamagnetic drift velocity. Comparisons are made with the measured GPI correlation velocity for the discharge. The saturation mechanisms operative in the simulation of the discharge are also discussed. It is found that neither sheared flow nor pressure gradient modification can be excluded as saturation mechanisms.

  5. Measurements of some ZnII Stark widths

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, R.; Ortiz, M.

    2008-10-22

    The Stark broadening parameters of six lines of Zn II (4 measured for the first time) have been measured in a plasma produced by ablation of a Cd-Zn alloy with a Nd:YAG laser. The broadening parameters were obtained in molecular Argon at 6 Torr. A Boltzmann plot was used to obtain the plasma temperature and published values of the Stark broadening in Cd II and Saha's equation to obtain the electron density. The Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium condition was checked. Contributions to broadening arising from a mechanism different from the Stark broadening as well as self-absorption influence were estimated for every studied line. A comparison is made with previous experimental values and recent theoretical estimates of the Stark broadening where possible.

  6. 1. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT MAIN ELEVATION OF STARK MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT MAIN ELEVATION OF STARK MILL, A REINFORCED CONCRETE MILL BUILT BY NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN MILLS IN 1923-24. THE MILL WAS DESIGNED BY LOCKWOOD GREENE ENGINEERS, AND CONTAINED 35,000 SPINDLES FOR MAKING TIRE FABRICS. PART OF THE WEAVING WOULD TAKE PLACE AT HOGANSVILLE MILL (BUILT c. 1900), ANOTHER NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN MILL NEARBY, UNTIL THE DEMOLITION OF THAT MILL IN THE 1970s. - Stark Mill, 117 Corinth Road, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

  7. Diffusive suppression of AC-Stark shifts in atomic magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Sulai, I. A.; Wyllie, R.; Kauer, M.; Smetana, G. S.; Wakai, R. T.; Walker, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    In atomic magnetometers, the vector AC-Stark shift associated with circularly polarized light generates spatially varying effective magnetic fields, which limit the magnetometer response and serve as sources of noise. We describe a scheme whereby optically pumping a small subvolume of the magnetometer cell and relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms allows a magnetometer to be operated with minimal sensitivity to the AC-Stark field. © 2013 Optical Society of America PMID:23503278

  8. Wide-frequency range, dynamic matching network and power system for the “Shoelace” radio frequency antenna on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore LaBombard, Brian; Burke, William; Parker, Ronald R.; Parkin, William; Woskov, Paul

    2014-04-15

    A wide-frequency range (50–300 kHz) power system has been implemented for use with a new RF antenna – the “Shoelace” antenna – built to drive coherent plasma fluctuations in the edge of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. A custom, dynamically tunable matching network allows two commercial 1 kW, 50-Ω RF amplifiers to drive the low-impedance, inductive load presented by the antenna. This is accomplished by a discretely variable L-match network, with 81 independently selected steps available for each of the series and parallel legs of the matching configuration. A compact programmable logic device provides a control system that measures the frequency with better than 1 kHz accuracy and transitions to the correct tuning state in less than 1 ms. At least 85% of source power is dissipated in the antenna across the operational frequency range, with a minimum frequency slew rate of 1 MHz/s; the best performance is achieved in the narrower band from 80 to 150 kHz which is of interest in typical experiments. The RF frequency can be run with open-loop control, following a pre-programmed analog waveform, or phase-locked to track a plasma fluctuation diagnostic signal in real time with programmable phase delay; the amplitude control is always open-loop. The control waveforms and phase delay are programmed remotely. These tools have enabled first-of-a-kind measurements of the tokamak edge plasma system response in the frequency range and at the wave number at which coherent fluctuations regulate heat and particle transport through the plasma boundary.

  9. Studies of turbulence and transport in Alcator C-Mod H-mode plasmas with phase contrast imaging and comparisons with GYRO

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.; Edlund, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Fiore, C. L.; Greenwald, M.; Lin, Y.; Tsujii, N.; Wukitch, S. J.; Mikkelsen, D. R.

    2009-01-15

    Recent advances in gyrokinetic simulation of core turbulence and associated transport requires an intensified experimental effort to validate these codes using state of the art synthetic diagnostics to compare simulations with experimental data. A phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic [M. Porkolab, J. C. Rost, N. Basse et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 34, 229 (2006)] is used to study H-mode plasmas in Alcator C-Mod [M. Greenwald, D. Andelin, N. Basse et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S109 (2005)]. The PCI system is capable of measuring density fluctuations with high temporal (2 kHz-5 MHz) and wavenumber (0.5-55 cm{sup -1}) resolution. Recent upgrades have enabled PCI to localize the short wavelength turbulence in the electron temperature gradient range and resolve the direction of propagation (i.e., electron versus ion diamagnetic direction) of the longer wavelength turbulence in the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron mode range. The studies focus on plasmas before and during internal transport barrier formation in an enhanced D{sub {alpha}} H-mode plasma assisted with ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating. Nonlinear GYRO simulations have also been performed [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 045001 (2003)] and the predicted fluctuation is compared against experimental measurements through a synthetic PCI diagnostic method. The simulated fluctuations from GYRO agree with experimental measurements in the ITG regime. GYRO also shows good agreement in transport predictions with experimental measurements after reducing the ion temperature gradient ({approx}15%) and adding ExB shear suppression, all within the experimental uncertainty.

  10. Wide-frequency range, dynamic matching network and power system for the "Shoelace" radio frequency antenna on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    PubMed

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore; LaBombard, Brian; Burke, William; Parker, Ronald R; Parkin, William; Woskov, Paul

    2014-04-01

    A wide-frequency range (50-300 kHz) power system has been implemented for use with a new RF antenna - the "Shoelace" antenna - built to drive coherent plasma fluctuations in the edge of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. A custom, dynamically tunable matching network allows two commercial 1 kW, 50-Ω RF amplifiers to drive the low-impedance, inductive load presented by the antenna. This is accomplished by a discretely variable L-match network, with 81 independently selected steps available for each of the series and parallel legs of the matching configuration. A compact programmable logic device provides a control system that measures the frequency with better than 1 kHz accuracy and transitions to the correct tuning state in less than 1 ms. At least 85% of source power is dissipated in the antenna across the operational frequency range, with a minimum frequency slew rate of 1 MHz/s; the best performance is achieved in the narrower band from 80 to 150 kHz which is of interest in typical experiments. The RF frequency can be run with open-loop control, following a pre-programmed analog waveform, or phase-locked to track a plasma fluctuation diagnostic signal in real time with programmable phase delay; the amplitude control is always open-loop. The control waveforms and phase delay are programmed remotely. These tools have enabled first-of-a-kind measurements of the tokamak edge plasma system response in the frequency range and at the wave number at which coherent fluctuations regulate heat and particle transport through the plasma boundary.

  11. Wide-frequency range, dynamic matching network and power system for the "Shoelace" radio frequency antenna on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore; LaBombard, Brian; Burke, William; Parker, Ronald R.; Parkin, William; Woskov, Paul

    2014-04-01

    A wide-frequency range (50-300 kHz) power system has been implemented for use with a new RF antenna - the "Shoelace" antenna - built to drive coherent plasma fluctuations in the edge of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. A custom, dynamically tunable matching network allows two commercial 1 kW, 50-Ω RF amplifiers to drive the low-impedance, inductive load presented by the antenna. This is accomplished by a discretely variable L-match network, with 81 independently selected steps available for each of the series and parallel legs of the matching configuration. A compact programmable logic device provides a control system that measures the frequency with better than 1 kHz accuracy and transitions to the correct tuning state in less than 1 ms. At least 85% of source power is dissipated in the antenna across the operational frequency range, with a minimum frequency slew rate of 1 MHz/s; the best performance is achieved in the narrower band from 80 to 150 kHz which is of interest in typical experiments. The RF frequency can be run with open-loop control, following a pre-programmed analog waveform, or phase-locked to track a plasma fluctuation diagnostic signal in real time with programmable phase delay; the amplitude control is always open-loop. The control waveforms and phase delay are programmed remotely. These tools have enabled first-of-a-kind measurements of the tokamak edge plasma system response in the frequency range and at the wave number at which coherent fluctuations regulate heat and particle transport through the plasma boundary.

  12. Characterization of neo-classical tearing modes in high-performance I-mode plasmas with ICRF mode conversion flow drive on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yijun; Granetz, R.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neo-classical tearing modes (NTM's) have been observed on Alcator C-Mod in high performance I-mode plasmas (Bt0˜5.2 T) that are heated by a combination of ICRF D(H) minority heating at 80 MHz and D(He3) mode conversion (MC) heating at 50 MHz. Due to the stabilizing effect by the energetic minority hydrogen ions, long sawtooth (>=40 ms) and large sawtooth crashes (δTe0>=3 keV) are produced in these hot (Te0<=9 keV) plasmas. NTMs with (m=4, n=3), (5, 4), (3, 2) and (2, 1) have been observed. The onset criteria of the (3, 2) NTMs, βp˜0.4-0.7, βN˜1.0-1.4, βN/ρi^*˜200-350, ν NTM (q=3/2)˜0.04-0.25, approximately follow the trend that obtained from DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade. For the (3, 2) mode, the saturated width Wsat˜0.8-1 cm, which is 3-4 times the ion banana width. Although the NTMs have a small effect on confinement degradation (δβ/β˜ a few percent), they have significant effect on plasma rotation. MC flow drive generates large toroidal rotation above 100 km/sec in L-mode, and when the plasma enters I-mode, plasma rotation is expected to increase significantly due to the additional intrinsic rotation torque from the edge Te pedestal. The appearance of the (3, 2) mode usually rapidly reduces the rotation speed, and the (2, 1) mode, if it occurs, would completely halt the rotation.

  13. External excitation of a short-wavelength fluctuation in the Alcator C-Mod edge plasma and its relationship to the quasi-coherent mode

    SciTech Connect

    Golfinopoulos, T.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Burke, W.; Davis, E.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E.; Parkin, W.; Porkolab, M.; Terry, J.; Vieira, R.; Wolfe, S.

    2014-05-15

    A novel “Shoelace” antenna has been used to inductively excite a short-wavelength edge fluctuation in a tokamak boundary layer for the first time. The principal design parameters, k{sub ⊥}=1.5±0.1 cm{sup −1} and 45C-Mod, responsible for exhausting impurities in the steady-state, ELM-free Enhanced D{sub α} H-mode. In H-mode, whether or not there is a QCM, the antenna drives coherent, field-aligned perturbations in density, n{sup ~}{sub e}, and field, B{sup ~}{sub θ}, which are guided by field lines, propagate in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, and exhibit a weakly damped (γ/ω{sub 0}∼5%−10%) resonance near the natural QCM frequency. This result is significant, offering the possibility that externally driven modes may be used to enhance particle transport. In L-mode, the antenna drives only a non-resonant B{sup ~}{sub θ} response. The facts that the driven mode has the same wave number and propagation direction as the QCM, and is resonant at the QCM frequency, suggest the antenna may couple to this mode, which we have shown elsewhere to be predominantly drift-mode-like [B. LaBombard et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056108 (2014)].

  14. "Stark" reality: self-referral rule holds risk and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Lebowitz, P H

    2001-01-01

    On January 4, 2001, the Health Care Financing Administration (now the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services or CMS) issued Phase I of the final Stark II regulations (Final Rule). The Final Rule implements the Ethics in Patient Referral Act of 1989 (Stark I), as amended by the Omnibus Budget and Reconciliation Act of 1993 (Stark II), collectively the Stark Law. It is intended to provide more flexibility to providers by interpreting the prohibitions narrowly and the exceptions broadly. Generally, the Stark Law prohibits physicians from referring Medicare or Medicaid patients to an entity for the provision of "designated health services (DHS)" if the physician (or a member of the physician's immediate family) has a direct or indirect financial relationship with the entity. The Final Rule establishes two principal exceptions to the referral prohibition that apply to both ownership/investment interests and compensation arrangements. The physician service exception permits referrals for DHS that are furnished by a member or physician in the same group practice as the referring physician, or under their supervision. The in-office ancillary services exception permits referral for provision of DHS in the same building in which the referring physician or his group routinely provides the full range of the group's or physician's medical services. The final regulations redefine the prior description of radiology and radiation therapy services subject to Stark II. The principal change is to segregate radiation therapy and supplies from radiology and other imaging services. It is uncertain whether Stark Law enforcement will be a priority under the Bush Administration. Nonetheless, because the Final Rule offers more flexibility than the proposed rule, providers and suppliers should revisit proposed and abandoned arrangements that they believed to be prohibited.

  15. Surfing Stark II: prohibition against self-referrals.

    PubMed

    Swibel, H J; Zaremski, M J

    1995-02-01

    In 1989, the Chairman of the House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Health, Fortney (Pete) Stark (D.-Calif.), turned the health care industry on its ear by introducing the "Ethics in Patient Referrals Act" to Congress. The bill, commonly known as "Stark I," prohibited physician referrals to entities in which they held a financial interest. As Stark's bill made its way through Congress, its substance was dramatically reduced by the legislative process. Ultimately, the law was incorporated as part of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990. Stark I's main thrust is that it bars physicians from referring Medicare patients to clinical laboratories with which they have a financial relationship. Furthermore, laboratories providing those services must report information concerning any ownership arrangements between the referring physician and the laboratory. Now, to complicate the picture, providers must contend with amendments to the original law that extend the reach of its prohibitions. Called "Stark II," these amendments took effect on January 1, 1995. In this article, guidelines for dealing successfully with the requirements of the law are outlined.

  16. Dynamic Stark effect and forbidden-transition spectrallineshapes

    SciTech Connect

    Stalnaker, Jason E.; Budker, D.; Freedman, S.J.; Guzman, J.S.; Rochester, S.M.; Yashchuk, V.V.

    2005-12-15

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of thedynamic (ac) Stark effect on a for bidden transition. A general frameworkfor parameterizing and describing off-resonant ac-Stark shifts ispresented. A model is developed to calculate spectral line shapesresulting from resonant excitation of atoms in an intense standinglight-wave in the presence of off-resonant ac-Stark shifts. The model isused in the analysis and interpretation of a measurement of the ac-Starkshifts of the static-electric-field-induced 6s2 1S0 -->5d6s 3D1transition at 408 nm in atomic Yb. The results are in agreement withestimates of the ac-Stark shift of the transition under the assumptionthat the shift is dominated by that of the 6s2 1S0 ground state. Adetailed description of the experiment and analysis is presented. Abi-product of this work is an ind ependent determination (from thesaturation behavior of the 408-nm transition) of the Stark transitionpolarizability, which is found to be in agreement with our earliermeasurement. This work is part of the ongoing effort aimed at a precisionmeasurement of atomic parity-violation effects in Yb.

  17. Simple Analytic Formula for the Stark Recurrence Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Rueda, Heric; Jensen, R. V.; Wright, J. D.; Morgan, T. J.

    2001-05-01

    Characterization of the structure of the recurrence spectrum in a strong electric field has attracted recent experimental and theoretical attention [1, 2]. Theoretical approaches have included a purely quantum mechanical explanation based on the regularities in the Stark photoabsorption spectrum, a semiquantal approach focusing on quantized energy levels and semiclassical ideas using closed orbit theory. In the present work we have used the results of our previous study [2] to find simple analytic formula that can be used to obtain the structure of the Stark recurrence spectrum. Both peak locations and amplitudes for Stark recurrences are found to be in good agreement when compared with experimental data for Rydberg Helium m = 1 states. Work supported by the National Science Foundation. [1] V. Kondratovich and J. Delos, Phys. Rev. A 57, 4604 (1998) [2] R. V. Jensen, H. Flores-Rueda, J. D. Wright, M. L. Keeler and T. J. Morgan, Phys. Rev. A 62, 53410 (2000)

  18. Experimental Stark Shift of Some Xe II UV Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Djurovic, S.; Cirisan, M.; Pelaez, R. J.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar, S.

    2008-10-22

    Stark broadening and shift of Xe II lines have been the subject of many experimental and theoretical studie. Here, the results of Stark shift measurements for six Xe II lines are presented. All given results are here reported for the first time. Two lines belong to 5d-6p, two to 5d-7p and one to 5d-4f transition. In this experiment pulsed arc plasma made of mixture of 95% helium and 5% xenon was used. Measured electron densities and temperatures were in the range of (0.2-1.8)10{sup 23}m{sup -3} and 18300-25500 K respectively.

  19. Experimental Stark widths and shifts of Ti II spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, J.; Aguilera, J. A.; Aragón, C.

    2016-10-01

    Stark widths and shifts of Ti II lines with wavelengths in the range 2500-4600 Å have been determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The temperature and electron density of the plasma vary in the ranges 11 970-15 520 K and (2.0-7.2) × 1017 cm-3, respectively, for the different measurement instants from 0.6 to 1.8 μs. The samples used are fused glass discs with different titanium concentrations, selected to control the self-absorption of the lines. The Stark widths and shifts are compared with the experimental and theoretical data available in the literature.

  20. Existence of the Stark-Wannier quantum resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchetti, Andrea

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we prove the existence of the Stark-Wannier quantum resonances for one-dimensional Schrödinger operators with smooth periodic potential and small external homogeneous electric field. Such a result extends the existence result previously obtained in the case of periodic potentials with a finite number of open gaps.

  1. Robust Algorithm for Computing Statistical Stark Broadening of Spectral Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C A; Sonnad, V

    2010-02-10

    A method previously developed to solve large-scale linear systems is applied to statistical Stark broadened line shape calculations. The method is formally exact, numerically stable, and allows optimization of the integration over the quasi-static field to assure numerical accuracy. Furthermore, the method does not increase the computational effort and often can decrease it compared to the conventional approach.

  2. West Orange Collaborative STARK Program, 2002-2003 Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowther, Deborah L.; Ross, Steven M.; McDonald, Aaron; Wang, Weiping; Thompson, Laura

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the Year 2 evaluation study results of the Students and Teachers Accessing Real-time Knowledge (STARK) Program in the West Orange Consolidated Independent School District (CSID). The overall purpose of the evaluation was twofold: (a) to provide formative evaluation data to the participant schools to serve as a basis for…

  3. West Orange Collaborative STARK Program. 2003-2004 Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowther, Deborah L.; Thompson, Laura; Ross, Steven M.; McDonald, Aaron; Wang, Weiping

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Year 3 evaluation study of the Students and Teachers Accessing Real-time Knowledge (STARK) Program in the West Orange Consolidated Independent School District (CSID). The overall purpose of the evaluation was twofold: (a) to provide formative evaluation data to the participant schools to serve as a basis…

  4. The Stark truth: what your physician clients should know about Stark Law and the Anti-Kickback Statute.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes key features of Stark Law and the Anti-Kickback Statute, statutes used to fight health care fraud and abuse within Medicare and Medicaid, and explains how attorneys can help health care providers comply with these laws. PMID:23614270

  5. VAMDC FP7 project and STARK-B database: C II Stark broadening parameters for white dwarf atmospheres research

    SciTech Connect

    Larbi-Terzi, Neila; Ben Nessib, Nebil; Sahal-Brechot, Sylvie; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2010-11-23

    Stark broadening parameters of C II lines were determined within 3s-np spectral series within the semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic energy levels needed for calculations were taken from TOPBASE as well as the oscillator strengths, calculated additionally using the Coulomb approximation (the method of Bates and Damgaard). The both results were compared and the disagreement is found only in one case where the configuration mixing allows a forbidden transition to a close perturbing energy level. Calculations were performed for plasma conditions relevant for atmospheres of DQ white dwarfs and for a new type of white dwarfs, with surface composed mostly of carbon, discovered in 2007 by Dufour et al.. The aim of this work is to provide accurate C II Stark broadening data, which are crucial for this type of white dwarf atmosphere modellisation. Obtained results will be included in STARK-B database (http://stark-b.obspm.fr/), entering in the FP7 project of European Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center VAMDC aiming at building an interoperable e-Infrastructure for the exchange of atomic and molecular data (http://www.vamdc.org/).

  6. Stark Shift Measurement of Some Xe III Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Djurovic, S.; Cirisaif, M.; Pelaez, R. J.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar, S.

    2008-10-22

    Examination of ionized xenon spectrum is of a great interest for plasma diagnostic purposes, theory testing and different applications. In this paper, we present Stark shift data for one blue and five UV Xe III lines. One line belongs to the 5d-6p transition, while all other lines belong to 6s-6p transition. Most of the existing papers are devoted to Stark width measurements and only one paper deals with shift data of the lines studied herein. A low-pressure pulsed arc with 95% of helium and 5% of xenon was used as a plasma source. All measurements were performed under following plasma conditions: electron density (0.2-1.4)10{sup 23}m{sup -3} and electron temperature 18000-23000 K.

  7. Stark Spectroscopy of Rubrene. I. Electroabsorption Spectroscopy and Molecular Parameters.

    PubMed

    Iimori, Toshifumi; Ito, Ryuichi; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Nakano, Hideyuki

    2016-06-30

    Electroabsorption spectroscopy investigation and the determination of molecular parameters for rubrene dispersed in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix are reported. The features of the band system in the absorption spectrum in PMMA are analogous to those in solutions. The changes in the electric dipole moment and the polarizability between the excited and ground states are determined from analysis of the Stark effect in the absorption band. The change in the transition dipole moment in the presence of an external electric field is also observed. Although rubrene is predicted to be classified as a nonpolar molecule, there is a contribution of the difference in the electric dipole moment between the excited and ground states to the electroabsorption spectrum. The origin of the nonzero difference in the electric dipole moment is argued. Stark fluorescence spectroscopy investigation is reported in Part II of this series. PMID:27257765

  8. Hydrogen Stark broadening by different kinds of model microfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, J.

    1980-07-01

    A new model microfield is defined (the theta process) which in conjunction with the kangaroo process, is used to demonstrate the effects of different model microfields on hydrogen line profiles. The differences in the statistical features of the models give an estimate of the uncertainties associated with the method of model microfields. Stark broadening of hydrogen Lyman lines by either electrons or ions is investigated specifically.

  9. On the Absolutely Continuous Spectrum of Stark Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelman, Galina

    The stability of the absolutely continuous spectrum of the one-dimensional Stark operator under perturbations of the potential is discussed. The focus is on proving this stability under minimal assumptions on smoothness of the perturbation. A general criterion is presented together with some applications. These include the case of periodic perturbations where we show that any perturbation vL1()∩H-1/2() preserves the a.c. spectrum.

  10. Molecular Beam Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Magnesium Deuteride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimle, Timothy; Zhang, Ruohan; Wang, Hailing

    2014-06-01

    Light polar, paramagnetic molecules, such as magnesium hydride, MgH, are attractive for slowing and trapping experiments because these molecules have both non-zero permanent electric dipole, μel, and magnetic dipole, μm moments. The permanent electric dipole moment is particularly relevant to Stark deceleration which depends on the ratio of the Stark shift to molecular mass. Here we report on the Stark effect in the (0,0) A2Π - X 2Σ+ band system of a cold molecular beam sample of magnesium deuteride, MgD. The lines associated with the lowest rotational levels are detected for the first time. The field-free spectrum was analyzed to produce an improved set of fine structure parameters for the A2Π(v = 0) state. The observed electric field induced splittings and shifts were analyzed to produce permanent electric dipole moments, μel,of 2.561(10)D and 1.34(8)D for A2Π(v = 0) and X2Σ+(v=0)states, respectively. This is the first molecular beam study of MgD.

  11. Stark widths and shifts for spectral lines of Sn IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés-García, I.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Colón, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present theoretical Stark widths and shifts calculated corresponding to 66 spectral lines of Sn IV. We use the Griem semi-empirical approach and the COWAN computer code. For the intermediate coupling calculations, the standard method of least-squares fitting from experimental energy levels was used. Data are presented for an electron density of 1017 cm-3 and temperatures T = 1.1-5.0 (104 K). The matrix elements used in these calculations have been determined from 34 configurations of Sn IV: 4d10ns(n = 5-10), 4d10nd(n = 5-8), 4d95s2, 4d95p2, 4d95s5d, 4d85s5p2 and 4d105g for even parity and 4d10np(n = 5-8), 4d10nf (n = 4-6), 4d95snp(n = 5-8), 4d85s25p and 4d95snf (n = 4-10) for odd parity. Also, in order to test the matrix elements used in our calculations, we present calculated values of radiative lifetimes of 14 levels of Sn IV. There is good agreement between our calculations and the experimental radiative lifetimes obtained from the bibliography. The spectral lines of Sn IV are observed in UV spectra of HD 149499 B obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph and the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Theoretical trends of the Stark broadening parameter versus the temperature for relevant lines are presented. Also our values of Stark broadening parameters have been compared with the data available in the bibliography.

  12. Anisotropic stark effect and electric-field noise suppression for phosphorus donor qubits in silicon.

    PubMed

    Sigillito, A J; Tyryshkin, A M; Lyon, S A

    2015-05-29

    We report the use of novel, capacitively terminated coplanar waveguide resonators to measure the quadratic Stark shift of phosphorus donor qubits in Si. We confirm that valley repopulation leads to an anisotropic spin-orbit Stark shift depending on electric and magnetic field orientations relative to the Si crystal. By measuring the linear Stark effect, we estimate the effective electric field due to strain in our samples. We show that in the presence of this strain, electric-field sources of decoherence can be non-negligible. Using our measured values for the Stark shift, we predict magnetic fields for which the spin-orbit Stark effect cancels the hyperfine Stark effect, suppressing decoherence from electric-field noise. We discuss the limitations of these noise-suppression points due to random distributions of strain and propose a method for overcoming them. PMID:26066457

  13. Anisotropic stark effect and electric-field noise suppression for phosphorus donor qubits in silicon.

    PubMed

    Sigillito, A J; Tyryshkin, A M; Lyon, S A

    2015-05-29

    We report the use of novel, capacitively terminated coplanar waveguide resonators to measure the quadratic Stark shift of phosphorus donor qubits in Si. We confirm that valley repopulation leads to an anisotropic spin-orbit Stark shift depending on electric and magnetic field orientations relative to the Si crystal. By measuring the linear Stark effect, we estimate the effective electric field due to strain in our samples. We show that in the presence of this strain, electric-field sources of decoherence can be non-negligible. Using our measured values for the Stark shift, we predict magnetic fields for which the spin-orbit Stark effect cancels the hyperfine Stark effect, suppressing decoherence from electric-field noise. We discuss the limitations of these noise-suppression points due to random distributions of strain and propose a method for overcoming them.

  14. Stark cell optoacoustic detection of constituent gases in sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, J. S.; Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An optoacoustic detector for gas analysis is implemented with Stark effect cell modulation for switching a beam in and out of coincidence with a spectral line of a constituent gas in order to eliminate the heating effect of laser energy in the cell as a source of background noise. By using a multiline laser, and linearly sweeping the DC bias voltage while exciting the cell with a multiline laser, it is possible to obtain a spectrum from which to determine the combinations of excited constituents and determine their concentrations in parts per million.

  15. Modeling of Stark-Zeeman Lines in Magnetized Hydrogen Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Bufferand, H.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2015-12-01

    The action of electric and magnetic fields on atomic species results in a perturbation of the energy level structure, which alters the shape of spectral lines. In this work, we present the Zeeman-Stark line shape simulation method and perform new calculations of hydrogen Lyman and Balmer lines, in the framework of magnetic fusion research. The role of the Zeeman effect, fine structure and the plasma's non-homogeneity along the line-of-sight are investigated. Under specific conditions, our results are applicable to DA white dwarf atmospheres.

  16. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadeninga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.; Howard, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; König, R.

    2010-10-01

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the Hγ line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  17. Influence of Stark shift and atomic coherence on entanglement of two qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, Eugene K.; Mastuygin, Michail

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we have investigated the atom-atom entanglement for degenerate two-photon Tavis-Cummings model with taking into account Stark shift and initial atomic coherence. Considering different initial coherent states we have derived that the atom-atom entanglement can be greatly increased or decreased due to the presence of the Stark shift. In addition, we have derived that the entanglement sudden death effect vanishes due to the presence of Stark shift for some initial states.

  18. Influence of the Stark Shift on Entanglement Sudden Death and Birth in Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Song; Chen, Ai-Xi; Wu, Kun-Hua

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement dynamics of two two-level atoms interacting with two vacuum fields of two spatially separated cavities with the Stark effects by employing the concurrence. It is shown that the entanglement sudden death (ESD) and birth (ESB) could be controlled by adjusting the Stark-shift parameters. If the Stark-shift parameters are chosen appropriately, then ESD and ESB phenomena will appear. In addition, the appearance of ESD before or after ESB depends on the Stark-shift values.

  19. Rydberg-Stark states in oscillating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkova, V.; Hogan, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of the effects of weak radio-frequency electric fields on Rydberg-Stark states with electric dipole moments as large as 10,000 D are reported. High-resolution laser spectroscopic studies of Rydberg states with principal quantum number n = 52 and 53 were performed in pulsed supersonic beams of metastable helium with the excited atoms detected by pulsed electric field ionisation. Experiments were carried out in the presence of sinusoidally oscillating electric fields with frequencies of 20 MHz, amplitudes of up to 120 mV/cm, and dc offsets of up to 4.4 V/cm. In weak fields, the experimentally recorded spectra are in excellent agreement with the results of calculations carried out using Floquet methods to account for electric dipole couplings in the oscillating fields. This highlights the validity of these techniques for the accurate calculation of the Stark energy level structure in such fields, and the limitations of the calculations in stronger fields where n-mixing and higher order contributions become important.

  20. Individual Optical Addressing of Atomic Clock Qubits With Stark Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Aaron; Smith, Jacob; Richerme, Phillip; Neyenhuis, Brian; Hess, Paul; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Chris

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, trapped ions have proven to be a versatile quantum information platform, enabled by their long lifetimes and high gate fidelities. Some of the most promising trapped ion systems take advantage of groundstate hyperfine ``clock'' qubits, which are insensitive to background fields to first order. This same insensitivity also makes σz manipulations of the qubit impractical, eliminating whole classes of operations. We prove there exists a fourth-order light shift, or four-photon Stark shift, of the clock states derived from two coherent laser beams whose beatnote is close to the qubit splitting. Using a mode-locked source generates a large light shift with only modest laser powers, making it a practical σz operation on a clock qubit. We experimentally verify and measure the four-photon Stark shift and demonstrate its use to coherently individually address qubits in a chain of 10 Yb 171 ions with low crosstalk. We use this individual addressing to prepare arbitrary product states with high fidelity and also to apply independent σz terms transverse to an Ising Hamiltonian. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  1. Stark Spectroscopy of Rubrene. II. Stark Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Quenching Induced by an External Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Iimori, Toshifumi; Ito, Ryuichi; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-21

    We report Stark fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of rubrene dispersed in a poly(methyl methacrylate) film. The features of the fluorescence spectrum are analogous to those in solutions. In the Stark fluorescence spectrum, the decrease of the fluorescence quantum yield in the presence of an external electric field is observed. This result shows that the yield of nonradiative decay processes is increased by the application of an external electric field. It is known that the fluorescence quantum yield for rubrene, which is nearly unity at room temperature, depends on temperature, and a major nonradiative decay process in photoexcited rubrene is ascribed to a thermally activated intersystem crossing (ISC). Equations that express the field-induced fluorescence quenching in terms of the molecular parameters are derived from the ensemble average of electric field effects on the activation energy of the reaction rate constant in random orientation systems. The molecular parameters are then extracted from the observed data. It is inferred that the field-induced increase in the yield of other intramolecular and intermolecular photophysical processes in addition to the ISC should be taken into account. PMID:27341859

  2. Measurement of Linear Stark Interference in {sup 199}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, T. H.; Swallows, M. D.; Griffith, W. C.; Romalis, M. V.; Heckel, B. R.; Fortson, E. N.

    2011-06-24

    We present measurements of Stark interference in the 6{sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6{sup 3}P{sub 1} transition in {sup 199}Hg, a process whereby a static electric field E mixes magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole couplings into an electric dipole transition, leading to E-linear energy shifts similar to those produced by a permanent atomic electric dipole moment (EDM). The measured interference amplitude, a{sub SI}=(a{sub M1}+a{sub E2})=(5.8{+-}1.5)x10{sup -9} (kV/cm){sup -1}, agrees with relativistic, many-body predictions and confirms that earlier central-field estimates are a factor of 10 too large. More importantly, this study validates the capability of the {sup 199}Hg EDM search apparatus to resolve nontrivial, controlled, and sub-nHz Larmor frequency shifts with EDM-like characteristics.

  3. Atom-interferometric measurement of Stark level splittings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianming; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are highly sensitive to external electric fields due to their large polarizability, scaling as n7 (n is the principal quantum number). In cesium, nS Rydberg levels mix with nearby (n-4) high- l states, forming sequences of avoided crossings. Mixed adiabatic/diabatic passages through these crossings are employed as beam splitters and recombiners in an atom-interferometric measurement of energy level splittings. We subject cold cesium atoms to laser-excitation, electric-field and detection sequences that constitute an (internal-state) atom interferometer. For the read-out of the interferometer we utilize state-dependent collisions, which selectively remove atoms of one kind from the detected signal. We investigate the dependence of the interferometric signal on timing and field parameters, and find good agreement with quantum simulations of the interferometer. Fourier analysis of the interferometric signals yield coherence frequencies that agree with corresponding energy-level differences in calculated Stark maps.

  4. Valley-selective optical Stark effect in monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedik, Nuh

    Monolayer semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have a pair of valleys that, by time-reversal symmetry, are energetically degenerate. Lifting the valley degeneracy in these materials is of great interest because it would allow for valley specific band engineering and offer additional control in valleytronic applications. In this talk, I will show that circularly polarized light, which breaks time-reversal symmetry, can be used to lift the valley degeneracy by means of the optical Stark effect. We demonstrate that this effect is capable of raising the exciton level in monolayer TMD WS2 by as much as 18 meV in a controllable valley-selective manner. The resulting energy shift is extremely large, comparable to the shift that would be obtained using a very high magnetic field (approximately 100 Tesla). These results offer a novel way to control valley degree of freedom, and may provide a means to realize new valley-selective Floquet topological state of matter.

  5. Valley selective optical Stark effect in monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sie, Edbert J.; McIver, James W.; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Fu, Liang; Kong, Jing; Gedik, Nuh

    2015-03-01

    Monolayer semiconductors, such as WS2, have a pair of valleys that, by time-reversal symmetry, are energetically degenerate. Lifting the valley degeneracy in these materials is of great interest because it would allow for valley specific band engineering and offer additional control in valleytronic applications. Here we show that circularly polarized light, which breaks time-reversal symmetry, can be used to lift the valley degeneracy by means of the optical Stark effect. We demonstrate that this effect is capable of raising the exciton level in monolayer WS2 by as much as 18 meV in a controllable valley selective manner. The resulting energy shift is extremely large, comparable to the shift that would be obtained using a very high magnetic field (200 Tesla). These results offer a novel way to control valley degree of freedom, and may provide a means to realize new valley-selective Floquet topological state of matter.

  6. Electron Stark Broadening Database for Atomic N, O, and C Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Yao, Winifred M.; Wray, Alan A.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2012-01-01

    A database for efficiently computing the electron Stark broadening line widths for atomic N, O, and C lines is constructed. The line width is expressed in terms of the electron number density and electronatom scattering cross sections based on the Baranger impact theory. The state-to-state cross sections are computed using the semiclassical approximation, in which the atom is treated quantum mechanically whereas the motion of the free electron follows a classical trajectory. These state-to-state cross sections are calculated based on newly compiled line lists. Each atomic line list consists of a careful merger of NIST, Vanderbilt, and TOPbase line datasets from wavelength 50 nm to 50 micrometers covering the VUV to IR spectral regions. There are over 10,000 lines in each atomic line list. The widths for each line are computed at 13 electron temperatures between 1,000 K 50,000 K. A linear least squares method using a four-term fractional power series is then employed to obtain an analytical fit for each line-width variation as a function of the electron temperature. The maximum L2 error of the analytic fits for all lines in our line lists is about 5%.

  7. Static Properties and Stark Effect of the Ground State of the HD Molecular Ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Drachman, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated static properties of the ground state of the HD(+) ion and its lowest-lying P-state without making use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, as was done in the case of H2(+) and D2(+) [Phys. Rev. A 58, 2787 (1998)]. The ion is treated as a three-body system whose ground state is spherically symmetric. The wavefunction is of generalized Hylleraas type, but it is necessary to include high powers of the internuclear distance to localize the nuclear motion. We obtain good values of the energies of the ground S-state and lowest P-state and compare them with earlier calculations. Expectation values are obtained for various operators, the Fermi contact parameters, and the permanent quadrupole moment. The cusp conditions are also calculated. The polarizability was then calculated using second-order perturbation theory with intermediate P pseudostates. Since the nuclei in HD(+) are not of equal mass there is dipole coupling between the lowest two rotational states, which are almost degenerate. This situation is carefully analyzed, and the Stark shift is calculated variationally as a function of the applied electric field.

  8. Observation and Measurement of MHD Activity Using Motional Stark Effect (MSE) Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, R; Makowski, M; Allen, S; Moller, J; Rhodes, T

    2004-06-25

    In a new mode of measurement, the amplitude of a tearing mode rotating at frequencies of up to tens of KHz has been obtained using the spectral features of high frequency MSE data. A formulation has been developed to calculate the pitch angle oscillations associated with these instabilities, from the MSE spectrum. Density fluctuations can be simultaneously obtained from MSE measurements if the intensity response to density variation can be calibrated. Examples of observations are given and detection limits are explored.

  9. Time-dependent distribution functions and resulting synthetic NPA spectra in C-Mod calculated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA full-wave, and DC Lorentz codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.

    2015-12-01

    A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed TCRF power is made obtaining minority hydrogen ion distributions with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. Cyclotron-resonant TCRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full wave code. The RF diffusion coefficients used in CQL3D are obtained with the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code for perturbed particle trajectories in the combined equilibrium and TCRF electromagnetic fields. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL3D/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, and this substantially increased the rampup rate of the observed vertically-viewed neutral particle analyzer (NPA) flux, in general agreement with experiment. However, ramp down of the NPA flux after the pulse, remained long compared to the experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these new effects on the the NPA time-dependence.

  10. Observation and cancellation of a perturbing dc stark shift in strontium optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Zawada, Michal; Lorini, Luca; Gurov, Mikhail; Lemonde, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    We report on the observation of a dc Stark frequency shift at the 10-(13) level by comparing two strontium optical lattice clocks. This frequency shift arises from the presence of electric charges trapped on dielectric surfaces placed under vacuum close to the atomic sample. We show that these charges can be eliminated by shining UV light on the dielectric surfaces, and characterize the residual dc Stark frequency shift on the clock transition at the 10-(18) level by applying an external electric field. This study shows that the dc Stark shift can play an important role in the accuracy budget of lattice clocks, and should be duly taken into account.

  11. Electrostatically Shielded Quantum Confined Stark Effect Inside Polar Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The effect of electrostatic shielding of the polarization fields in nanostructures at high carrier densities is studied. A simplified analytical model, employing screened, exponentially decaying polarization potentials, localized at the edges of a QW, is introduced for the ES-shielded quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE). Wave function trapping within the Debye-length edge-potential causes blue shifting of energy levels and gradual elimination of the QCSE red-shifting with increasing carrier density. The increase in the e−h wave function overlap and the decrease of the radiative emission time are, however, delayed until the “edge-localization” energy exceeds the peak-voltage of the charged layer. Then the wave function center shifts to the middle of the QW, and behavior becomes similar to that of an unbiased square QW. Our theoretical estimates of the radiative emission time show a complete elimination of the QCSE at doping densities ≥1020 cm−3, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:20596407

  12. Molecular beam optical Stark study of rhodium mononitride.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tongmei; Gengler, Jamie; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Hailing; Steimle, Timothy C

    2007-06-28

    The optical Stark effect in the Q(1) and R(0) lines of the [15.1]1-X (1)Sigma+ (1,0) band of rhodium mononitride (RhN) were recorded and analyzed to determine the permanent electric dipole moments mu for the X (1)Sigma+(upsilon=0) and [15.1]1(upsilon=1) states to be 2.43(5) and 1.75(1) D, respectively. The determined dipole moments are compared to predicted values obtained from density functional theory [Stevens et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 421, 281 (2006)] and an all-electron ab initio calculation [Shim et al., J. Mol. Struct. THEOCHEM 393, 127 (1997)]. A simple single configuration molecular orbital correlation diagram is used to rationalize the relative values of mu for the 4d mononitrides and RhO. An electronic configuration for the [15.1]1 state is proposed based on the interpretation of the (103)Rh and (14)N magnetic hyperfine interactions.

  13. DC and subcycle-resolved AC Stark shifts in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aihua; Thumm, Uwe

    2012-06-01

    We are developing a finite element discrete variable representation (FE-DVR) code to model the response of two-electron atoms to ultra-short pulses of EM radiation. Our first numerical results for the DC stark shift of helium deviate significantly from previous [1] single-active-electron (SAE), but are in close agreement with improved SAE calculations that include the effect of core polarization in the external field. For 3x10^14 W/cm^2 infra red fields, we calculate sub-IR-cycle- resolved instantaneous (AC) level shifts of low-lying bound He states that also strongly deviate from the SAE prediction [1]. We plan to apply our code to model recently measured subcycle time-resolved absorption spectra [2].[4pt] [1] F. He, C. Ruiz, A. Becker, and U. Thumm, J. Phys. B 44, 211001 (2011).[0pt] [2] H. Wang, M. Chini, S. Chen, C.-H. Zhang, F. He, Y. Cheng, Y. Wu, U. Thumm, and Z. Chang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 143002 (2010); M. Chini, Z. Chang et al., to be published.

  14. Examining the impact of the new Stark rules on joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Washlick, John R

    2008-11-01

    The new Stark rules will affect joint ventures involving physicians and hospitals in four primary areas: Services provided "under arrangement". "Per click" lease arrangements. Percentage-based compensation. "Stand-in-the-shoes" provisions.

  15. Photonic Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders in exponentially chirped Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, P B

    2002-05-01

    The formation of photonic Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders is demonstrated in an exponentially chirped one-dimensional Bragg grating. The photonic Bloch oscillations are investigated using Hamiltonian optics, and direct analogies are made with electron dynamics in periodic potentials. The results of transfer matrix calculations are presented, which show the existence of a photonic Wannier-Stark ladder that should be detectable in experiments.

  16. Optimizing the Stark-decelerator beamline for the trapping of cold molecules using evolutionary strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilijamse, Joop J.; Kuepper, Jochen; Hoekstra, Steven; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    We demonstrate feedback control optimization for the Stark deceleration and trapping of neutral polar molecules using evolutionary strategies. In a Stark-decelerator beamline, pulsed electric fields are used to decelerate OH radicals and subsequently store them in an electrostatic trap. The efficiency of the deceleration and trapping process is determined by the exact timings of the applied electric field pulses. Automated optimization of these timings yields an increase of 40% of the number of trapped OH radicals.

  17. Vibrational Stark effects calibrate the sensitivity of vibrational probes for electric fields in proteins.

    PubMed

    Suydam, Ian T; Boxer, Steven G

    2003-10-21

    Infrared spectroscopy is widely used to probe local environments and dynamics in proteins. The introduction of a unique vibration at a specific site of a protein or more complex assembly offers many advantages over observing the spectra of an unmodified protein. We have previously shown that infrared frequency shifts in proteins can arise from differences in the local electric field at the probe vibration. Thus, vibrational frequencies can be used to map electric fields in proteins at many sites or to measure the change in electric field due to a perturbation. The Stark tuning rate gives the sensitivity of a vibrational frequency to an electric field, and for it to be useful, the Stark tuning rate should be as large as possible. Vibrational Stark effect spectroscopy provides a direct measurement of the Stark tuning rate and allows a quantitative interpretation of frequency shifts. We present vibrational Stark spectra of several bond types, extending our work on nitriles and carbonyls and characterizing four additional bond types (carbon-fluorine, carbon-deuterium, azide, and nitro bonds) that are potential probes for electric fields in proteins. The measured Stark tuning rates, peak positions, and extinction coefficients provide the primary information needed to design amino acid analogues or labels to act as probes of local environments in proteins.

  18. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... people traveling by car, train, airplanes and especially boats. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy ... motion sickness. For example, down below on a boat, your inner ear senses motion, but your eyes ...

  19. Influence of Stark Shift on Entanglement of Two Qubits in the Two-Photon Tavis-Cummings Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastyugin, M. S.; Bashkirov, E. K.

    2015-09-01

    Considering two-atom degenerate two-photon Tavis-Cummings model, we investigate the entanglement between two atoms prepared initially in the coherent disentangled states and cavity field prepared in few-photon Fock state, and study the effect of the Stark shift on entanglement. The results show that the atom-atom negativity evolve periodically with time and the periods are affected by the Stark shift and initial coherent atomic state and that the atom-atom entanglement can be greatly enhanced due to the presence of Stark shift. We also have shown that entanglement sudden death effect vanishes for some parameters of the considered system due to the presence of Stark shift. In addition, the entanglement sudden death effect vanishes due to the presence of Stark shift. We have derived that the dynamic Stark shift can be used to control entanglement between two initially disentangled atoms.

  20. Higher-order motion sensitivity in fly visual circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Jen; Nordström, Karin

    2012-01-01

    In higher-order motion stimuli, the direction of object motion does not follow the direction of luminance change. Such stimuli could be generated by the wing movements of a flying butterfly and further complicated by its motion in and out of shadows. Human subjects readily perceive the direction of higher-order motion, although this stands in stark contrast to prevailing motion vision models. Flies and humans compute motion in similar ways, and because flies behaviorally track bars containing higher-order motion cues, they become an attractive model system for investigating the neurophysiology underlying higher-order motion sensitivity. We here use intracellular electrophysiology of motion-vision–sensitive neurons in the hoverfly lobula plate to quantify responses to stimuli containing higher-order motion. We show that motion sensitivity can be broken down into two separate streams, directionally coding for elementary motion and figure motion, respectively, and that responses to Fourier and theta motion can be predicted from these. The sensitivity is affected both by the stimulus’ time course and by the neuron’s underlying receptive field. Responses to preferred-direction theta motion are sexually dimorphic and particularly robust along the visual midline. PMID:22586123

  1. Laser-assisted Stark deceleration of polar diatomic molecules in the Χ1Σ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunxia; Xu, Shuwu; Yang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-01

    The traditional Stark deceleration method is difficult to apply in chemically stable polar diatomic molecules in their ground (Χ1Σ) state because the Χ1Σ state normally experiences little Stark shift and the rovibronic ground level is mostly high-field-seeking. To solve this problem, we propose a laser-assisted Stark deceleration scheme to decelerate such molecules in the present paper. Our results show that, owing to the transverse bunching effect of the applied red-detuning laser beam, the molecules of the high-field-seeking level |J = 0, M = 0> in the Χ1Σ state can be effectively decelerated. Furthermore, the present scheme is more effective because the interaction between the molecules and the combined fields can produce the pseudo-first-order Stark effect, and thus increase the depth of the effective potential. Compared to those molecules in the low-field-seeking state |J = 1, MΩ = ‑1> in the usual electrostatic Stark deceleration, a higher molecular density and lower velocity can be achieved under an equivalent initial phase angle.

  2. Laser-assisted Stark deceleration of polar diatomic molecules in the Χ1Σ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunxia; Xu, Shuwu; Yang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-01

    The traditional Stark deceleration method is difficult to apply in chemically stable polar diatomic molecules in their ground (Χ1Σ) state because the Χ1Σ state normally experiences little Stark shift and the rovibronic ground level is mostly high-field-seeking. To solve this problem, we propose a laser-assisted Stark deceleration scheme to decelerate such molecules in the present paper. Our results show that, owing to the transverse bunching effect of the applied red-detuning laser beam, the molecules of the high-field-seeking level |J = 0, M = 0> in the Χ1Σ state can be effectively decelerated. Furthermore, the present scheme is more effective because the interaction between the molecules and the combined fields can produce the pseudo-first-order Stark effect, and thus increase the depth of the effective potential. Compared to those molecules in the low-field-seeking state |J = 1, MΩ = -1> in the usual electrostatic Stark deceleration, a higher molecular density and lower velocity can be achieved under an equivalent initial phase angle.

  3. Wannier-Stark localization in InAs/(GaIn)Sb superlattice diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürkle, L.; Fuchs, F.; Ahlswede, E.; Pletschen, W.; Schmitz, J.

    2001-07-01

    We present experimental evidence for the formation of localized Wannier-Stark states in the depletion region of low band-gap InAs/(GaIn)Sb superlattice (SL) infrared photodiodes. In the photocurrent spectra of reverse-biased photodiodes, maxima are observed, that spectrally shift when the strength of the electric field in the depletion region of the diode is changed. Taking into account the spatially indirect type-II nature of interband transitions in InAs/(GaIn)Sb SL's, the spectral positions of the observed maxima can be explained in the framework of localized Wannier-Stark states. Besides photocurrent spectra, the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the diodes were investigated. In the reverse-bias regime dominated by Zener tunneling the differential resistance of the diodes reveals an oscillatory behavior. These oscillations are due to a resonant enhancement of the Zener tunneling current by Wannier-Stark states in the depletion region of the SL diode. A model is presented that quantitatively describes the occurrence of the oscillations in the I-V curves. In addition, the influence of a magnetic field on the Wannier-Stark oscillations in the Zener current was investigated. While the period of the oscillations in the I-V curves is conserved, the resonances are shifted, reflecting the energy shift introduced in the Wannier-Stark states by the magnetic field. This voltage shift exhibits a strong dependence on the magnetic-field orientation.

  4. Experimental Stark halfwidths of the ionized oxygen and silicon spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavanski, L.; Belmonte, M. T.; Savić, I.; Djurović, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present experimental Stark halfwidths of spectral lines of singly ionized oxygen and singly and double ionized silicon. The observed spectral lines were emitted from plasma produced in a small electromagnetically driven T-tube. The plasma electron density was 1.45 × 1023 m-3 and the electron temperature was 15 000 K. The obtained results were compared with the available experimental results of other authors, as well as with some theoretical Stark halfwidth values. The obtained results, the analysis of experimental results and the comparison with theoretical results might be of interest in astrophysics. For example, the obtained Stark halfwidths can be useful for abundance determination, the calculation of stellar opacities, the interpretation and modelling of stellar spectra, the estimation of the relative transfer through the stellar plasma, etc.

  5. Large polarization-dependent exciton optical Stark effect in lead iodide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai; Johnson, Justin C; Berry, Joseph J; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Beard, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    A strong interaction of a semiconductor with a below-bandgap laser pulse causes a blue-shift of the bandgap transition energy, known as the optical Stark effect. The energy shift persists only during the pulse duration with an instantaneous response time. The optical Stark effect has practical relevance for applications, including quantum information processing and communication, and passively mode-locked femtosecond lasers. Here we demonstrate that solution-processable lead-halide perovskites exhibit a large optical Stark effect that is easily resolved at room temperature resulting from the sharp excitonic feature near the bandedge. We also demonstrate that a polarized pump pulse selectively shifts one spin state producing a spin splitting of the degenerate excitonic states. Such selective spin manipulation is an important prerequisite for spintronic applications. Our result implies that such hybrid semiconductors may have great potential for optoelectronic applications beyond photovoltaics. PMID:27577007

  6. Imaging Electric Fields in SERS and TERS Using the Vibrational Stark Effect

    PubMed Central

    Marr, James M.; Schultz, Zachary D.

    2013-01-01

    Electric fields associated with Raman enhancements are typically inferred from changes in the observed scattering intensity. Here we use the vibrational Stark effect from a nitrile reporter to determine the electric field dependent frequency shift of cyanide (CN) on a gold (Au) surface. Electroplated Au surfaces with surface enhanced Raman (SERS) activity exhibit larger Stark shifts near the edge and in areas with large roughness. The Stark shift is observed to correlate with intensity of a co-adsorbed thiophenol molecule. Gap-mode Tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS), using a Au nanoparticle tip, show dramatic shifts in the CN stretch that correlate to enhancement factors of 1013 in the gap region. The observed peak widths indicate the largest fields are highly localized. Changes in the nitrile stretch frequency provide a direct measurement of the electric fields in SERS and TERS experiments. PMID:24273634

  7. Large polarization-dependent exciton optical Stark effect in lead iodide perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Ye; Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai; Johnson, Justin C.; Berry, Joseph J.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-08-31

    A strong interaction of a semiconductor with a below-bandgap laser pulse causes a blue-shift of the bandgap transition energy, known as the optical Stark effect. The energy shift persists only during the pulse duration with an instantaneous response time. The optical Stark effect has practical relevance for applications, including quantum information processing and communication, and passively mode-locked femtosecond lasers. Here we demonstrate that solution-processable lead-halide perovskites exhibit a large optical Stark effect that is easily resolved at room temperature resulting from the sharp excitonic feature near the bandedge. We also demonstrate that a polarized pump pulse selectively shifts one spinmore » state producing a spin splitting of the degenerate excitonic states. Such selective spin manipulation is an important prerequisite for spintronic applications. Lastly, our result implies that such hybrid semiconductors may have great potential for optoelectronic applications beyond photovoltaics.« less

  8. Large polarization-dependent exciton optical Stark effect in lead iodide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye; Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai; Johnson, Justin C.; Berry, Joseph J.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-08-01

    A strong interaction of a semiconductor with a below-bandgap laser pulse causes a blue-shift of the bandgap transition energy, known as the optical Stark effect. The energy shift persists only during the pulse duration with an instantaneous response time. The optical Stark effect has practical relevance for applications, including quantum information processing and communication, and passively mode-locked femtosecond lasers. Here we demonstrate that solution-processable lead-halide perovskites exhibit a large optical Stark effect that is easily resolved at room temperature resulting from the sharp excitonic feature near the bandedge. We also demonstrate that a polarized pump pulse selectively shifts one spin state producing a spin splitting of the degenerate excitonic states. Such selective spin manipulation is an important prerequisite for spintronic applications. Our result implies that such hybrid semiconductors may have great potential for optoelectronic applications beyond photovoltaics.

  9. Large polarization-dependent exciton optical Stark effect in lead iodide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ye; Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai; Johnson, Justin C.; Berry, Joseph J.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    A strong interaction of a semiconductor with a below-bandgap laser pulse causes a blue-shift of the bandgap transition energy, known as the optical Stark effect. The energy shift persists only during the pulse duration with an instantaneous response time. The optical Stark effect has practical relevance for applications, including quantum information processing and communication, and passively mode-locked femtosecond lasers. Here we demonstrate that solution-processable lead-halide perovskites exhibit a large optical Stark effect that is easily resolved at room temperature resulting from the sharp excitonic feature near the bandedge. We also demonstrate that a polarized pump pulse selectively shifts one spin state producing a spin splitting of the degenerate excitonic states. Such selective spin manipulation is an important prerequisite for spintronic applications. Our result implies that such hybrid semiconductors may have great potential for optoelectronic applications beyond photovoltaics. PMID:27577007

  10. Observation and cancellation of a perturbing dc stark shift in strontium optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Zawada, Michal; Lorini, Luca; Gurov, Mikhail; Lemonde, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    We report on the observation of a dc Stark frequency shift at the 10-(13) level by comparing two strontium optical lattice clocks. This frequency shift arises from the presence of electric charges trapped on dielectric surfaces placed under vacuum close to the atomic sample. We show that these charges can be eliminated by shining UV light on the dielectric surfaces, and characterize the residual dc Stark frequency shift on the clock transition at the 10-(18) level by applying an external electric field. This study shows that the dc Stark shift can play an important role in the accuracy budget of lattice clocks, and should be duly taken into account. PMID:22481773

  11. Dynamic Stark control: model studies based on the photodissociation of IBr.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Richings, Gareth W; Worth, Graham A

    2011-01-01

    The Stark effect is produced when a static field alters molecular states. When the field applied is time dependent, the process is known as the dynamic Stark effect. Of particular interest for the control of molecular dynamics is the Non-Resonant Dynamic Stark Effect (NRDSE), in which the time dependent field is unable to effect a one-photon excitation. The intermediate strength laser pulse instead shapes the potential energy surfaces (PES) and so guides the evolution of the system. A prototype control scheme uses the NRDSE to change the topography of PES in regions where they intersect, thus providing control over photochemistry. Following earlier experimental work, in this paper we study the NRDSE on a new 3 state model of the IBr molecule to gain insight into the mechanism of control at the avoided crossing that governs the branching ratio of the photodissociation.

  12. Sub-Doppler Stark Spectroscopy in the A−X (1,0) Band of CN

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.; Hause, M.L.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-11-26

    The effect of external electric fields has been measured in hyperfine-resolved sub-Doppler transitions in the A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma} (1,0) band of the CN radical near 10900 cm{sup -1}. Static electric fields less than 1 kV/cm are sufficient to mix the most closely spaced {Lambda}-dpublets in the A state, leading to Stark spectra with both new and shifted resonances. Simulations of the saturation-dip Stark spectral line profiles allow extraction of the A-state permanent electric dipole moment with a magnitude of 0.06 {+-} 0.02 D.

  13. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  14. On the Stark Widths and Shifts of Ar II 472.68 nm Spectral Line

    SciTech Connect

    Mijatovic, Z.; Gajo, T.; Vujicic, B.; Djurovic, S.; Kobilarov, R.

    2008-10-22

    Stark widths and shifts of Ar II 472.68 nm spectral line were measured from T-tube plasmas. Plasma electron density ranged 1.8-2.210{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, while temperature ranged 20000-43000 K. Obtained results of widths and shifts were compared with measured results of other authors.

  15. On the Road to Expansion: Canton Public/Stark County District Library 1929-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croston, Kendel R.

    This paper covers the history of the Canton Public/Stark County District Library (CPL), focusing on the years 1929-1997. The paper focuses on the broadening of the library's services, including the development of reference services, service to young adults, and a variety of outreach activities. A literature review discusses the history of the…

  16. Stark broadening measurements in plasmas produced by laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Miloš; Hermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for the measurement of Stark broadening parameters of atomic and ionic spectral lines based on laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds. Therefore, plume emission spectra, recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector, were compared to the spectral radiance of a plasma in local thermal equilibrium. Producing material ablation with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses in argon at near atmospheric pressure, the recordings take advantage of the spatially uniform distributions of electron density and temperature within the ablated vapor. By changing the delay between laser pulse and detector gate, the electron density could be varied by more than two orders of magnitude while the temperature was altered in the range from 6,000 to 14,000 K. The Stark broadening parameters of transitions were derived from their simultaneous observation with the hydrogen Balmer alpha line. In addition, assuming a linear increase of Stark widths and shifts with electron density for non-hydrogenic lines, our measurements indicate a change of the Stark broadening-dependence of Hα over the considered electron density range. The presented results obtained for hydrated calcium sulfate (CaSO4ṡ2H2O) can be extended to any kind of hydrogen containing compounds.

  17. Experimental measurements of Stark widths for Mn I lines in long laser spark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Andrey M.; Akhmetzhanov, Timur F.; Labutin, Timur A.; Zaytsev, Sergey M.; Zorov, Nikita B.; Chekalin, Nikolay V.

    2016-11-01

    We report the experimental Stark widths of Mn I lines belonging to multiplets z6P° → a6S and z6D° → a6D in long spark induced by laser. We have used aluminum alloy containing 80 ppm of manganese as a target to avoid strong self-absorption of Mn I lines. Its absence was proved by the comparison of observed intensities with relative strengths of lines within multiplets. Electron density of plasma estimated by Mg I (5172.68 Å) and Al II (2816.18 Å) lines was within the range of (4-30) × 1016 cm- 3. The shortest possible gate allowed the observation of symmetric atomic and ionic lines. The spatial profiles of plasma temperature and electron density along the axis of long spark demonstrated that both values were lower than for spherical plasma. Measured Stark widths of resonance multiplet z6P° → a6S decrease from 0.075 Å for its first component to 0.055 Å for the last one, while Stark widths of components of multiplet z6D° → a6D increase from 0.095 Å to 0.125 Å. No Stark shifting was observed for the studied multiplets.

  18. Infrared Stark and Zeeman spectroscopy of OH-CO: The entrance channel complex along the OH + CO → trans-HOCO reaction pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brice, Joseph T.; Liang, Tao; Raston, Paul L.; McCoy, Anne B.; Douberly, Gary E.

    2016-09-01

    Sequential capture of OH and CO by superfluid helium droplets leads exclusively to the formation of the linear, entrance-channel complex, OH-CO. This species is characterized by infrared laser Stark and Zeeman spectroscopy via measurements of the fundamental OH stretching vibration. Experimental dipole moments are in disagreement with ab initio calculations at the equilibrium geometry, indicating large-amplitude motion on the ground state potential energy surface. Vibrational averaging along the hydroxyl bending coordinate recovers 80% of the observed deviation from the equilibrium dipole moment. Inhomogeneous line broadening in the zero-field spectrum is modeled with an effective Hamiltonian approach that aims to account for the anisotropic molecule-helium interaction potential that arises as the OH-CO complex is displaced from the center of the droplet.

  19. Motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Golding, J F

    2016-01-01

    Over 2000 years ago the Greek physician Hippocrates wrote, "sailing on the sea proves that motion disorders the body." Indeed, the word "nausea" derives from the Greek root word naus, hence "nautical," meaning a ship. The primary signs and symptoms of motion sickness are nausea and vomiting. Motion sickness can be provoked by a wide variety of transport environments, including land, sea, air, and space. The recent introduction of new visual technologies may expose more of the population to visually induced motion sickness. This chapter describes the signs and symptoms of motion sickness and different types of provocative stimuli. The "how" of motion sickness (i.e., the mechanism) is generally accepted to involve sensory conflict, for which the evidence is reviewed. New observations concern the identification of putative "sensory conflict" neurons and the underlying brain mechanisms. But what reason or purpose does motion sickness serve, if any? This is the "why" of motion sickness, which is analyzed from both evolutionary and nonfunctional maladaptive theoretic perspectives. Individual differences in susceptibility are great in the normal population and predictors are reviewed. Motion sickness susceptibility also varies dramatically between special groups of patients, including those with different types of vestibular disease and in migraineurs. Finally, the efficacy and relative advantages and disadvantages of various behavioral and pharmacologic countermeasures are evaluated. PMID:27638085

  20. Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1985-02-01

    Brownian motion, the doubly random motion of small particles suspended in a liquid due to molecular collisions, and its implications and applications in the history of modern science are discussed. Topics examined include probabilistic phenomena, the kinetic theory of gases, Einstein's atomic theory of Brownian motion, particle displacement, diffusion measurements, the determination of the mass of the atom and of Avogadro's number, the statistical mechanics of thermodynamics, nonequilibrium systems, Langevin's equation of motion, time-reversed evolution, mathematical analogies, and applications in economics and radio navigation. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  1. Stark Widths and Shifts Dependence on the Rest Core Charge of the Emitters within ns-np Transition Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Scepanovic, Mara; Puric, Jagos

    2010-01-21

    Stark width and shift simultaneous dependence on the upper level ionization potential and rest core charge of the emitter has been evaluated and discussed. It has been verified that the found relations, connecting Stark broadening parameters with upper level ionization potential and rest core charge of the emitters for particular electron temperature and density, can be used for prediction of Stark line width and shift data in case of ions for which observed data, or more detailed calculations, are not yet available. Stark widths and shifts published data are used to demonstrate the existence of other kinds of regularities within similar spectra of different elements and their ionization stages. The emphasis is on the Stark parameter dependence on the upper level ionization potential and on the rest core charge for the lines from similar spectra of multiply charged ions. The found relations connecting Stark widths and shift parameters with upper level ionization potential, rest core charge and electron temperature were used for a prediction of new Stark broadening data, thus avoiding much more complicated procedures.

  2. Measurement of atomic Stark parameters of many Mn I and Fe I spectral lines using GMAW process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinska, S.; Pellerin, S.; Dzierzega, K.; Valensi, F.; Musiol, K.; Briand, F.

    2010-11-01

    The particular character of the welding arc working in pure argon, whose emission spectrum consists of many spectral lines strongly broadened by the Stark effect, has allowed measurement, sometimes for the first time, of the Stark parameters of 15 Mn I and 10 Fe I atomic spectral lines, and determination of the dependence on temperature of normalized Stark broadening in Ne = 1023 m-3 of the 542.4 nm atomic iron line. These results show that special properties of the MIG plasma may be useful in this domain because composition of the wire-electrode may be easily adapted to the needs of an experiment.

  3. Reactive intermediates in 4He nanodroplets: Infrared laser Stark spectroscopy of dihydroxycarbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Bernadette M.; McCaslin, Laura; Moradi, Christopher P.; Stanton, John F.; Douberly, Gary E.

    2015-04-01

    Singlet dihydroxycarbene ( HO C ̈ OH ) is produced via pyrolytic decomposition of oxalic acid, captured by helium nanodroplets, and probed with infrared laser Stark spectroscopy. Rovibrational bands in the OH stretch region are assigned to either trans,trans- or trans,cis-rotamers on the basis of symmetry type, nuclear spin statistical weights, and comparisons to electronic structure theory calculations. Stark spectroscopy provides the inertial components of the permanent electric dipole moments for these rotamers. The dipole components for trans, trans- and trans, cis-rotamers are (μa, μb) = (0.00, 0.68(6)) and (1.63(3), 1.50(5)), respectively. The infrared spectra lack evidence for the higher energy cis,cis-rotamer, which is consistent with a previously proposed pyrolytic decomposition mechanism of oxalic acid and computations of HO C ̈ OH torsional interconversion and tautomerization barriers.

  4. Trapped ion 88Sr+ optical clock systematic uncertainties - AC Stark shift determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwood, GP; Huang, G.; King, SA; Klein, HA; Gill, P.

    2016-06-01

    A recent comparison between two trapped-ion 88Sr+ optical clocks at the UK. National Physical Laboratory demonstrated agreement to 4 parts in 1017. One of the uncertainty contributions to the optical clock absolute frequency arises from the blackbody radiation shift which in turn depends on uncertainty in the knowledge of the differential polarisability between the two clocks states. Whilst a recent NRC measurement has determined the DC differential polarisability to high accuracy, there has been no experimental verification to date of the dynamic correction to the DC Stark shift. We report a measurement of the scalar AC Stark shift at 1064 nm with measurements planned at other wavelengths. Our preliminary result using a fibre laser at 1064 nm agrees with calculated values to within ∼3%.

  5. Significance of decay mechanism into continuum in dynamical Wannier-Stark ladder

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Yuya; Maeshima, Nobuya; Hino, Ken-ichi

    2013-12-04

    We examine the resonance structure of photodressed electron states of laser-driven Wannier-Stark ladder, namely, dynamic Wannier-Stark ladder, in terms of the excess density of states (DOS) closely related to a lifetime of the state of concern. It is revealed that the resonance structure in the strong laser-field region shows clear dependence on the ratio, η, of a Bloch-frequency to a laser frequency. As the laser strength increases, for η = 1, the excess DOS becomes involved with a lot of newly-growing resonance peaks. This result would be understood from the viewpoint of a Fano-like decay-mechanism caused by a multichannel continuum effect, in marked contrast to the cases of larger η’s; for η = 3, the excess DOS just is found to show a pronounced red-shift of a single dominant peak caused by a single-channel continuum effect.

  6. Can the Stark-Einstein law resolve the measurement problem from an animate perspective?

    PubMed

    Thaheld, Fred H

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of the Stark-Einstein law as it applies to the retinal molecule, which is part of the rhodopsin molecule within the rod cells of the retina, reveals that it may provide the solution to the measurement problem from an animate perspective. That it represents a natural boundary where the Schrödinger equation or wave function automatically goes from linear to nonlinear while remaining in a deterministic state. It will be possible in the near future to subject this theory to empirical tests as has been previously proposed. This analysis provides a contrast to the many decades well studied and debated inanimate measurement problem and would represent an addition to the Stark-Einstein law involving information carried by the photon.

  7. Reactive intermediates in {sup 4}He nanodroplets: Infrared laser Stark spectroscopy of dihydroxycarbene

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Bernadette M.; Moradi, Christopher P.; Douberly, Gary E.; McCaslin, Laura; Stanton, John F.

    2015-04-14

    Singlet dihydroxycarbene (HOC{sup ¨}OH) is produced via pyrolytic decomposition of oxalic acid, captured by helium nanodroplets, and probed with infrared laser Stark spectroscopy. Rovibrational bands in the OH stretch region are assigned to either trans,trans- or trans,cis-rotamers on the basis of symmetry type, nuclear spin statistical weights, and comparisons to electronic structure theory calculations. Stark spectroscopy provides the inertial components of the permanent electric dipole moments for these rotamers. The dipole components for trans, trans- and trans, cis-rotamers are (μ{sub a}, μ{sub b}) = (0.00, 0.68(6)) and (1.63(3), 1.50(5)), respectively. The infrared spectra lack evidence for the higher energy cis,cis-rotamer, which is consistent with a previously proposed pyrolytic decomposition mechanism of oxalic acid and computations of HOC{sup ¨}OH torsional interconversion and tautomerization barriers.

  8. Full color modulation of firefly luciferase through engineering with unified Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Cai, Duanjun; Marques, Miguel A L; Nogueira, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    The firefly luciferase has been a unique marking tool used in various bioimaging techniques. Extensive color modulation is strongly required to meet special marking demands; however, intentional and accurate wavelength tuning has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate that the color shift of the firefly chromophore (OxyLH2-1) by internal and external fields can be described as a unified Stark shift. Electrostatic microenvironmental effects on fluorescent spectroscopy are modeled in vacuo through effective electric fields by using time-dependent density functional theory. A complete visible fluorescence spectrum of firefly chromophore is depicted, which enables one to control the emission in a specific color. As an application, the widely observed pH-correlated color shift is proved to be associated with the local Stark field generated by the trace water-ions (vicinal hydronium and hydroxide ions) at active sites close to the OxyLH2-1.

  9. Femtosecond laser detection of Stark-decelerated and trapped methylfluoride molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Congsen; van der Poel, Aernout P. P.; Cheng, Cunfeng; Bethlem, Hendrick L.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate deceleration and trapping of methylfluoride (CH3F ) molecules in the low-field-seeking component of the J =1 ,K =1 state using a combination of a conventional Stark decelerator and a traveling wave decelerator. The methylfluoride molecules are detected by nonresonant multiphoton ionization using a femtosecond laser. Subsequent mass and velocity selection of the produced ions enables us to eliminate most background signal resulting from thermal gas in our vacuum chamber. This detection method can be applied to virtually any molecule, thereby enhancing the scope of molecules that can be Stark decelerated. Methylfluoride is so far the heaviest and most complex molecule that has been decelerated to rest. Typically we trap 2 ×104 CH3F molecules at a peak density of 4.5 ×107 cm-3 and a temperature of 40 mK.

  10. Engineering large Stark shifts for control of individual clock state qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. C.; Smith, J.; Richerme, P.; Neyenhuis, B.; Hess, P. W.; Zhang, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-10-01

    In quantum information science, the external control of qubits must be balanced with the extreme isolation of the qubits from the environment. Atomic qubit systems typically mitigate this balance through the use of gated laser fields that can create superpositions and entanglement between qubits. Here we propose the use of high-order optical Stark shifts from optical fields to manipulate the splitting of atomic qubits that are insensitive to other types of fields. We demonstrate a fourth-order ac Stark shift in a trapped atomic ion system that does not require extra laser power beyond that needed for other control fields. We individually address a chain of tightly spaced trapped ions and show how these controlled shifts can produce an arbitrary product state of 10 ions as well as generate site-specific magnetic field terms in a simulated spin Hamiltonian.

  11. Kickbacks, stark violations, client billing, and joint ventures: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Mannava, Kathleen A; Bercovitch, Lionel; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    Many current business trends in the field of dermatopathology deserve ethical scrutiny. An important point to consider in these analyses is that which is legal is not necessarily ethical. We examine the topics of client billing, contractual joint ventures, and health information technology donations, including both the legal implications as pertaining to the Stark Law and Anti-Kickback Statute, and the ethical ramifications of these practices. PMID:24160283

  12. Static multipole polarisabilities and second-order Stark shift in francium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The multipole polarizability of the ground state of francium is calculated by utilizing both the variational technique of Davison and the quantum defect theory underlying the Bates-Damgaard method. This approach is also shown to yield reasonable results for other alkali atoms. Second-order Stark shift for the ground state of francium is presented as a function of field strength for possible future experimental comparison.

  13. Static multipole polarisabilities and second-order Stark shift in francium.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Khandelwal, G S; Wilson, J W

    1988-01-01

    The multipole polarisability of the ground state of francium is calculated by utilising both the variational technique of Davison and the quantum defect theory underlying the Bates-Damgaard method. This approach is also shown to yield reasonable results for other alkali atoms. Second-order Stark shift for the ground state of francium is presented as a function of field strength for possible future experimental comparison. PMID:11539071

  14. Engineering Stark Potentials for Precision Measurements: Optical Lattice Clock and Electrodynamic Surface Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Takamoto, Masao; Hachisu, Hidekazu; Fujiki, Jun; Higashi, Ryoichi; Yasuda, Masami; Kishimoto, Tetsuo

    2005-05-05

    Employing the engineered electric fields, we demonstrate novel platforms for precision measurements with neutral atoms. (1) Applying the light shift cancellation technique, atoms trapped in an optical lattice reveal 50-Hz-narrow optical spectrum, yielding nearly an order of magnitude improvement over existing neutral-atom-based clocks. (2) Surface Stark trap has been developed to manipulate scalar atoms that are intrinsically robust to decoherence.

  15. Kickbacks, stark violations, client billing, and joint ventures: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Mannava, Kathleen A; Bercovitch, Lionel; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    Many current business trends in the field of dermatopathology deserve ethical scrutiny. An important point to consider in these analyses is that which is legal is not necessarily ethical. We examine the topics of client billing, contractual joint ventures, and health information technology donations, including both the legal implications as pertaining to the Stark Law and Anti-Kickback Statute, and the ethical ramifications of these practices.

  16. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  17. Stark effect modeling in the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, J.-C.; Gilleron, F.; Gilles, D.

    2016-05-01

    The broadening of lines by Stark effect is an important tool for inferring electron density and temperature in plasmas. Stark-effect calculations often rely on atomic data (transition rates, energy levels,...) not always exhaustive and/or valid for isolated atoms. We present a recent development in the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG for K-shell spectroscopy (hydrogen- and helium-like ions). This approach is adapted from the work of Gilles and Peyrusse. Neglecting non-diagonal terms in dipolar and collision operators, the line profile is expressed as a sum of Voigt functions associated to the Stark components. The formalism relies on the use of parabolic coordinates within SO(4) symmetry. The relativistic fine-structure of Lyman lines is included by diagonalizing the hamiltonian matrix associated to quantum states having the same principal quantum number n. The resulting code enables one to investigate plasma environment effects, the impact of the microfield distribution, the decoupling between electron and ion temperatures and the role of satellite lines (such as Li-like 1snℓn'ℓ' — 1s 2 nℓ, Be-like, etc.). Comparisons with simpler and widely-used semi-empirical models are presented.

  18. Stark effect spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis reaction centers

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, David J.; Boxer, Steven G.

    1988-01-01

    The nature of the initially excited state of the primary electron donor or special pair has been investigated by Stark effect spectroscopy for reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides at 77 K. The data provide values for the magnitude of the difference in permanent dipole moment between the ground and excited state, [unk]Δμ[unk], and the angle [unk] between Δμ and the transition dipole moment for the electronic transition. [unk]Δμ[unk] and [unk] for the lowest-energy singlet electronic transition associated with the special pair primary electron donor were found to be very similar for the two species. [unk]Δμ[unk] for this transition is substantially larger than for the Qy transitions of the monomeric pigments in the reaction center or for pure monomeric bacteriochlorophylls, for which Stark data are also reported. We conclude that the excited state of the special pair has substantial charge-transfer character, and we suggest that charge separation in bacterial photosynthesis is initiated immediately upon photoexcitation of the special pair. Data for Rhodobacter sphaeroides between 340 and 1340 nm are presented and discussed in the context of the detection of charge-transfer states by Stark effect spectroscopy. PMID:16578825

  19. Stark Profiles In Plasmas Interacting With A Strong Oscillatory Quasi-Monochromatic Electric Field

    SciTech Connect

    Sauvan, P.; Oks, E.; Renner, O.; Weber, S.

    2010-10-29

    This paper presents an advanced analysis of the spectroscopic signatures of the interaction of a strong oscillating Quasi-monochromatic Electric Field (QEF), generated by a high-power short-pulse laser, with a preformed laser-produced plasma. The computation of a synthetic spectrum emitted by such plasmas requires the calculation of the Stark line shape in the presence of a QEF and the evaluation of the QEF intensity profile throughout the line of sight in the plasma. As for the Stark profiles in hot dense plasmas submitted to a strong QEF, they are calculated using the so-called Floquet-Liouville formalism. In this formalism, the Liouville space, usually used for the calculation of Stark profiles in dense plasmas, and the Floquet theory, developed to solve time-periodic problems, have been joined together to solve the time-dependent Liouville equation. A second kind of simulations involving Particle-In-Cell PIC kinetic simulations is required for the calculation of the QEF inhomogeneous intensity and the exotic features exhibited in the spectroscopic diagnostic. The global synthetic profile is obtained integrating all individual contributions for every time and location in the plasma. Finally, a spectroscopic analysis of the experimental Al He {beta} line is performed using the tools presented in this work. The spectroscopic signatures of the QEF show up as prominent satellites, non symmetrical with respect to the unperturbed line and distinguishable from the di-electronic satellites.

  20. Stark-shift-chirped rapid-adiabatic-passage technique among three states

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Yatsenko, L. P.; Shore, B. W.; Halfmann, T.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    We show that the technique of Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP), hitherto used for complete population transfer between two quantum states, offers a simple and robust method for complete population transfer amongst three states in atoms and molecules. In this case SCRAP uses three laser pulses: a strong far-off-resonant pulse modifies the transition frequencies by inducing dynamic Stark shifts and thereby creating time-dependent level crossings amongst the three diabatic states, while near-resonant and moderately strong pump and Stokes pulses, appropriately offset in time, drive the population between the initial and final states via adiabatic passage. The population transfer efficiency is robust to variations in the intensities of the lasers, as long as these intensities are sufficiently large to enforce adiabatic evolution. With suitable pulse timings the population in the (possibly decaying) intermediate state can be minimized, as with stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). This technique applies to one-photon as well as multiphoton transitions and it is also applicable to media exhibiting inhomogeneous broadening; these features represent clear advantages over STIRAP by overcoming the inevitable dynamical Stark shifts that accompany multiphoton transitions as well as unwanted detunings, e.g., induced by Doppler shifts.

  1. A Simultaneous Discovery: The Case of Johannes Stark and Antonino Lo Surdo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Matteo; Paoletti, Alessandro; Robotti, Nadia

    2004-09-01

    In 1913 the German physicist Johannes Stark (1874 1957) and the Italian physicist Antonino Lo Surdo (1880 1949)discovered virtually simultaneously and independently that hydrogen spectral lines are split into components by an external electric field. Both of their discoveries ensued from studies on the same phenomenon, the Doppler effect in canal rays, but they arose in different theoretical contexts. Stark had been working within the context of the emerging quantum theory, following a research program aimed at studying the effect of an electric field on spectral lines. Lo Surdo had been working within the context of the classical theory, and his was an accidental discovery. Both discoveries, however, played important roles in the history of physics: Stark’s discovery contributed to the establishment of both the old and the new quantum theories; Lo Surdo’s discovery led Antonio Garbasso (1871 1933)to introduce research on the quantum theory into Italian physics. Ironically, soon after their discoveries, both Stark and Lo Surdo rejected developments in modern physics and allied themselves with the political and racial programs of Hitler and Mussolini.

  2. Stark broadening of impurity absorption lines by inhomogeneous electric fields in highly compensated germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Fujii, K.; Ohyama, T.; Itoh, K. M.; Haller, E. E.

    1996-06-01

    Stark broadening of Zeeman absorption lines caused by inhomogeneous electric fields in highly compensated Ge has been studied by means of far-infrared magneto-optical absorption spectroscopy measurements. A number of transmutation-doped Ge single crystals with a systematically varying compensation ratio were employed. The broadening of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of an absorption line of the Ga acceptor is studied as a function of excitation light intensity with above-band-gap energy. The FWHM increases with decreasing intensity of the band-edge light excitation. Observation of the theoretically predicted 4/3-power law of Stark broadening, due to ionized impurities, is reported. The line broadening originates in the Stark effect, due to inhomogeneous electric fields caused by the random distribution of ionized impurities. In order to understand the mechanism for the line broadening in detail, a numerical approach based on a Monte Carlo simulation has been performed. The results of this simulation show that the inhomogeneity of the field distribution becomes larger with increasing concentration of ionized impurities. The simulation based on a perfectly random distribution for an initial impurity arrangement gives a fairly good agreement with the experimental results. We conclude that the distribution of impurities in transmutation-doped Ge samples is close to random.

  3. [Calculating the stark broadening of welding arc spectra by Fourier transform method].

    PubMed

    Pan, Cheng-Gang; Hua, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Wang; Li, Fang; Xiao, Xiao

    2012-07-01

    It's the most effective and accurate method to calculate the electronic density of plasma by using the Stark width of the plasma spectrum. However, it's difficult to separate Stark width from the composite spectrum linear produced by several mechanisms. In the present paper, Fourier transform was used to separate the Lorentz linear from the spectrum observed, thus to get the accurate Stark width. And we calculated the distribution of the TIG welding arc plasma. This method does not need to measure arc temperature accurately, to measure the width of the plasma spectrum broadened by instrument, and has the function to reject the noise data. The results show that, on the axis, the electron density of TIG welding arc decreases with the distance from tungsten increasing, and changes from 1.21 X 10(17) cm(-3) to 1.58 x 10(17) cm(-3); in the radial, the electron density decreases with the distance from axis increasing, and near the tungsten zone the biggest electronic density is off axis. PMID:23016315

  4. Measurements of the edge current evolution and comparison with neoclassical calculations during MAST H-modes using motional Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, M. F. M.; Citrin, J.; Saarelma, S.; Temple, D.; Conway, N. J.; Kirk, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C. A.; MAST Team

    2012-02-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs), that are present in most tokamak H- (high confinement) modes, can cause significant damage to plasma facing components in fusion reactors. Controlling ELMs is considered necessary and hence it is vital to understand the underlying physics. The stability of ELMs is typically expressed in terms of the pressure gradient ∇p in the edge and the edge current density jphi. Both ∇p and jphi are usually derived from profiles fitted to the measured edge density and temperature profiles, where for the calculation of jphi neoclassical theory is used. This paper presents direct measurements of the magnetic pitch angle γm evolution in the edge and the derived jphi. These provide a method to validate the jphi as derived with neoclassical theory and they open up the possibility to find a complete, self-consistent set of edge profiles, that fit density, temperature and γm measurements, hence allowing for a more accurate stability analysis.

  5. A non-statistical atomic model for beam emission and motional Stark effect diagnostics in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ralchenko, Yu; Marchuk, O; Biel, W; Schlummer, T; Schultz, D R; Stambulchik, E

    2012-10-01

    In this work we analyze magnetic sublevel populations in a neutral beam penetrating a fusion plasma. The collisional-radiative model NOMAD was extended to include magnetic parabolic sublevels with principal quantum numbers n ≤ 10. The collisional parameters were calculated with the advanced atomic-orbital close coupling method and the Glauber approximation. The ionization by the induced electric field was also included in the model. The results of our calculations show significant deviations of the sublevel populations and, accordingly, line intensities of the σ and π components, from the statistical approximation. It is shown, for instance, that for a number of experimental conditions the total intensity of σ components is not equal to the total intensity of π components, which has a strong effect on determination of magnetic field and pitch angle in fusion devices. The results are presented for a wide range of plasma and beam parameters. The most significant deviations are observed for strong magnetic fields and high beam energies typical for the ITER plasma, where component intensity ratios may deviate by more than 20% from the statistical values.

  6. What's Motion Sickness?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Motion Sickness? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Motion Sickness? Print ... motion sickness might get even worse. continue Avoiding Motion Sickness To avoid motion sickness: Put your best ...

  7. Ge/SiGe quantum well for photonic applications: modelling of the quantum confined Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isella, Giovanni; Ballabio, Andrea; Frigerio, Jacopo

    2016-05-01

    Ge quantum wells are emerging as a relevant material system for enabling fast and power-efficient optical modulation in the framework of Si-photonics. The need for reliable designs of QW structures, matching given operating wavelengths and bias voltages, calls for the implementation of modelling tools capturing the optical properties of SiGe heterostructures. Here we report on the calculation of the quantum confined Stark effect based on an eight-band k×p model. The obtained spectra are analysed and compared with experimental data showing a good agreement between calculation and measurements.

  8. Stark Effect Spectroscopy of Mono- and Few-Layer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Wierzbowski, J; Regler, A; Becker, J; Heimbach, F; Müller, K; Kaniber, M; Finley, J J

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate electrical control of the A-exciton interband transition in mono- and few-layer MoS2 crystals embedded into photocapacitor devices via the DC Stark effect. Electric field-dependent low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals a significant tuneability of the A-exciton transition energy up to ∼ 16 meV from which we extract the mean DC exciton polarizability ⟨β̅N⟩ = (0.58 ± 0.25) × 10(-8) Dm V(-1). The exciton polarizability is shown to be layer-independent, indicating a strong localization of both electron and hole wave functions in each individual layer.

  9. Revisiting the Stark Broadening by fluctuating electric fields using the Continuous Time Random Walk Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capes, H.; Christova, M.; Boland, D.; Catoire, F.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Mekkaoui, A.; Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2010-10-01

    Stark broadening of atomic lines in plasmas is calculated by modelling the plasma stochastic electric field using the CTRW approach [1,2]. This allows retaining non Markovian terms in the Schrödinger equation averaged over the electric field fluctuations. As an application we consider a special case of a non separable CTRW process, the so called Kangaroo process [3]. An analytic expression for the line profile is presented for arbitrary waiting time distribution functions. A preliminary application to the hydrogen Lyman α line is discussed.

  10. Application of Stark Tuned Laser for Interferometry and Polarimetry in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    H.K. Park; K.C. Lee; B. Deng; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; B. Nathan; and N.C. Luhmann, Jr.

    2001-09-07

    A Stark-tuned optically pumped far-infrared CH(subscript ''3'')OH laser at 119 mm has been successfully applied in the Far Infrared Tangential Interferometer/Polarimeter (FIReTIP) system for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The system will provide temporally and radially resolved 2-D electron density profile [n(subscript ''e'')(r,t)] and toroidal field profile [B(subscript ''T'')(r,t)] data. In the 2001 campaign, a single channel interferometer system has been operated and tested for the Faraday rotation measurement. A plan for improvement and upgrading of the FIReTIP is discussed.

  11. Supersymmetric factorization yields exact solutions to the molecular Stark-effect problem for stretched states

    SciTech Connect

    Lemeshko, Mikhail; Mustafa, Mustafa; Kais, Sabre; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2011-04-15

    By invoking supersymmetry, we found a condition under which the Stark-effect problem for a polar and polarizable molecule subject to nonresonant electric fields becomes exactly solvable for the |J-tilde=m,m> family of stretched states. The analytic expressions for the wave function and eigenenergy and other expectation values allow one to readily reverse-engineer the problem of finding the values of the interaction parameters required for creating quantum states with preordained characteristics. The method also allows the construction of families of isospectral potentials, realizable with combined fields.

  12. Stark Effect Spectroscopy of Mono- and Few-Layer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Wierzbowski, J; Regler, A; Becker, J; Heimbach, F; Müller, K; Kaniber, M; Finley, J J

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate electrical control of the A-exciton interband transition in mono- and few-layer MoS2 crystals embedded into photocapacitor devices via the DC Stark effect. Electric field-dependent low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals a significant tuneability of the A-exciton transition energy up to ∼ 16 meV from which we extract the mean DC exciton polarizability ⟨β̅N⟩ = (0.58 ± 0.25) × 10(-8) Dm V(-1). The exciton polarizability is shown to be layer-independent, indicating a strong localization of both electron and hole wave functions in each individual layer. PMID:26845085

  13. From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Wu, Guorong; Lausten, Rune; Townsend, Dave; Walmsley, Lan A; Stolow, Albert; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2011-01-01

    The non-resonant dynamic Stark effect is a powerful and general way of manipulating ultrafast processes in atoms, molecules, and solids with exquisite precision. We discuss the physics behind this effect, and demonstrate its efficacy as a method of control in a variety of systems. These applications range from the control of molecular rotational dynamics to the manipulation of chemical reaction dynamics, and from the suppression of vacuum fluctuation effects in coherent preparation of matter, to the dynamic generation of bandwidth for storage of broadband quantum states of light. PMID:22452088

  14. From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Wu, Guorong; Lausten, Rune; Townsend, Dave; Walmsley, Lan A; Stolow, Albert; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2011-01-01

    The non-resonant dynamic Stark effect is a powerful and general way of manipulating ultrafast processes in atoms, molecules, and solids with exquisite precision. We discuss the physics behind this effect, and demonstrate its efficacy as a method of control in a variety of systems. These applications range from the control of molecular rotational dynamics to the manipulation of chemical reaction dynamics, and from the suppression of vacuum fluctuation effects in coherent preparation of matter, to the dynamic generation of bandwidth for storage of broadband quantum states of light.

  15. Passive stabilization of a hole spin qubit using the optical Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    The extrinsic dephasing of a hole spin confined to a self-assembled quantum dot is dominated by charge noise acting on an electric-field-dependent g -factor. Here we propose the use of the optical Stark effect to reduce the sensitivity of the effective hole Zeeman energy to fluctuations in the local electric field. Calculations using measured quantum dot parameters are presented, and they demonstrate a factor of 10-100 reduction in the extrinsic dephasing. Compared to active stabilization methods, this technique should benefit from reduced experimental complexity.

  16. Two attosecond pulse transient absorption spectroscopy and extraction of the instantaneous AC Stark shift in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bækhøj, Jens E.; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    In two attosecond pulse absorption spectroscopy (TAPAS) the use of two attosecond XUV pulses allows the extraction of atomic and molecular quantum mechanical dipole phases from spectroscopic measurements. TAPAS relies on interference between processes that individually only include a single XUV photon, and therefore does not rely on high intensity attosecond pulses. To show the usefulness and limitations of the TAPAS method we investigate its capability of capturing the instantaneous AC Stark shift induced by a midinfrared 3200 nm pulse in the | 1{{s}}2{{p}}> state of helium.

  17. [The reconstruction of welding arc 3D electron density distribution based on Stark broadening].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xue-Ming; Pan, Cheng-Gang; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2012-10-01

    The three-dimensional electron density is very important for welding arc quality control. In the present paper, Side-on characteristic line profile was collected by a spectrometer, and the lateral experimental data were approximated by a polynomial fitting. By applying an Abel inversion technique, the authors obtained the radial intensity distribution at each wavelength and thus constructed a profile for the radial positions. The Fourier transform was used to separate the Lorentz linear from the spectrum reconstructed, thus got the accurate Stark width. And we calculated the electronic density three-dimensional distribution of the TIG welding are plasma. PMID:23285847

  18. [Determination of electron density in atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharges by Stark broadening].

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Liu, Zhong-wei; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fu-ping; Wang, Zheng-duo; Yang, Li-zhen

    2012-01-01

    The use of high frequency power to generate plasma at atmospheric pressure is a relatively new development. An apparatus of atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge was constructed. Plasma emission based measurement of electron density in discharge columns from Stark broadening Ar is discribed. The spacial profile of electron density was studied. In the middle of the discharge column, as the input power increases from 138 to 248 W, the electron density rises from 4.038 x 10(21) m(-3) to 4.75 x 10(21) m(-3). PMID:22497121

  19. Structure and motion of edge turbulence in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweben, S. J.; Maqueda, R. J.; Terry, J. L.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D.; Russell, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; LeBlanc, B.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D. P.; Williams, K. M.; Bush, C. E.; Maingi, R.; Grulke, O.; Sabbagh, S. A.; White, A. E.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we compare the structure and motion of edge turbulence observed in L-mode vs. H-mode plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, M. G. Bell, R. E. Bell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 45, A335 (2003)]. The radial and poloidal correlation lengths are not significantly different between the L-mode and the H-mode in the cases examined. The poloidal velocity fluctuations are lower and the radial profiles of the poloidal turbulence velocity are somewhat flatter in the H-mode compared with the L-mode plasmas. These results are compared with similar measurements Alcator C-Mod [E. Marmar, B. Bai, R. L. Boivin et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1610 (2003)], and with theoretical models.

  20. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  1. Effects of the Stark Shift on the Evolution of the Field Entropy and Entanglement in the Two-Photon Jaynes-Cummings Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Mao Fa

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of the field entropy in the two-photon JCM in the presence of the Stark shift is investigated, and the effects of the dynamic Stark shift on the evolution of the field entropy and entanglement between the atom and field, are examined. The results show that the dynamic Stark shift plays an important role in the evolution of the field entropy in two-photon processes.

  2. High-precision Stark shift measurements in excited states of indium using an atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, P. K.; Carter, A. L.; Augenbraun, B. L.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; Vilas, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    A recent precision measurement in our group of the indium scalar polarizability within the 410 nm 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 transition showed excellent agreement with ab initio atomic theory. We are now completing a measurement of the polarizability within the 6s1 / 2 --> 6p1 / 2 excited-state transition. In our experiment, two external cavity semiconductor diode lasers interact transversely with a collimated indium atomic beam. We tune the 410 nm laser to the 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 transition, keeping the laser locked to the exact Stark-shifted resonance frequency. We overlap a 1343 nm infrared laser to reach the 6p1 / 2 state. The very small infrared absorption in our atomic beam is detected using two-tone FM spectroscopy. Monitoring the two-step excitation signal in a field-free supplemental vapor cell provides frequency reference and calibration. Precisely calibrated electric fields of 5 - 15 kV/cm produce Stark shifts of order 100 MHz for this excited state. Experimental details, latest results, and comparison to theory will be discussed. In the near future, The same infrared laser will be tuned to 1291 nm to study the scalar and tensor polarizability of the 6p3 / 2 excited state providing a distinct test of atomic theory. Work supported by NSF Grant # 1404206.

  3. Theoretical study of the Stark broadening for Mg IV spectral lines of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés-García, I.; You, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Colón, C.

    2016-08-01

    Emission lines of Mg IV have been detected in the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum of LS V +46º21 star and in the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectrum of BD +28º4211 star. This fact justifies our interest in providing spectroscopic parameters of Mg IV. Stark broadening parameters for 169 spectral lines of Mg IV have been calculated by using the Griem semi-empirical approach. The matrix elements used in these calculations has been determined from 13 configurations of Mg IV: 2s12p6, 2s22p4ns (n = 3-5), 2s22p4nd (n = 3-5) and 2s22p45g for even parity and 2s22p5, 2s22p4np (n = 3, 4) and 2s22p4nf (n = 4, 5) for odd parity. Our calculations were made by using the Cowan code. Data are presented for an electron density of 1017 cm-3 and temperatures T = 1.0-10.0 (104 K). Also we present calculated values of transition probabilities for 30 spectral lines and radiative lifetimes corresponding to its upper levels. These values were analyzed using the data found in the literature. Theoretical trends of the Stark broadening parameters versus the temperature for several lines of astrophysical interest are presented.

  4. Theoretical study of the Stark broadening for Mg IV spectral lines of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés-García, I.; You, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Colón, C.

    2016-11-01

    Emission lines of Mg IV have been detected in the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum of LS V +46°21 star and in the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectrum of BD +28°4211 star. This fact justifies our interest in providing spectroscopic parameters of Mg IV. Stark broadening parameters for 169 spectral lines of Mg IV have been calculated by using the Griem semi-empirical approach. The matrix elements used in these calculations has been determined from 13 configurations of Mg IV: 2s12p6, 2s22p4ns (n = 3-5), 2s22p4nd (n = 3-5) and 2s22p45g for even parity and 2s22p5, 2s22p4np (n = 3, 4) and 2s22p4nf (n = 4, 5) for odd parity. Our calculations were made by using the Cowan code. Data are presented for an electron density of 1017 cm-3 and temperatures T = 1.0-10.0 (104 K). Also we present calculated values of transition probabilities for 30 spectral lines and radiative lifetimes corresponding to its upper levels. These values were analysed using the data found in the literature. Theoretical trends of the Stark broadening parameters versus the temperature for several lines of astrophysical interest are presented.

  5. High-accuracy time- and space-resolved Stark shift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.E.; Adams, R.; Carlson, A.L.; Ching, C.H.; Filuk, A.B.; Lake, P.

    1996-07-01

    Stark-shift measurements using emission spectroscopy are a powerful tool for advancing understanding in many plasma physics experiments. The authors use simultaneous 2-D-spatial and time-resolved spectra to study the electric field evolution in the 20 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II ion diode acceleration gap. Fiber optic arrays transport light from the gap to remote streaked spectrographs operated in a multiplexed mode that enables recording time-resolved spectra from eight spatial locations on a single instrument. Design optimization and characterization measurements of the multiplexed spectrograph properties include the astigmatism, resolution, dispersion variation, and sensitivity. A semi-automated line-fitting procedure determines the Stark shift and the related uncertainties. Fields up to 10 MV/cm are measured with an accuracy {+-}2--4%. Detailed tests of the fitting procedure confirm that the wavelength shift uncertainties are accurate to better than {+-}20%. Development of an active spectroscopy probe technique that uses laser-induced fluorescence from an injected atomic beam to obtain 3-D space- and time-resolved measurements of the electric and magnetic fields is in progress.

  6. Precise dipole moment of methanol by microwave Stark spectroscopy III: Parent 12CH316OH species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indra; Sastry, K. V. L. N.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, precise Stark effect measurements have been carried out on several transitions in the first four torsional states of methanol. The Stark shifted transition frequencies for a wide range of steady electric field have been measured with an accuracy of approximately ±10 kHz. Detailed analysis of the data allowed for the determination of the dipole moment components in the first four torsional states of the ground vibrational state. The extrapolated zero field frequencies of the transitions studied have been determined and found to be in perfect agreement with known values. For the torsional ground state the values of μa = 0.8961(2) and μb = 1.4201(9) have been obtained, whereas for the first excited torsional state the corresponding values obtained are 0.9035(1) and 1.4317(5) (These values are in Debye, denoted by D). These values confirm the fact that the dipole moment values increase at a considerable rate as one move toward higher torsional states as seen in previous studies. To our knowledge, this is the first time the most accurate and elaborate dipole moment values of methanol are being reported.

  7. Reply to "Comment on `Test of the Stark-effect theory using photoionization microscopy' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. B.; Fabrikant, I. I.; Du, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    The frame-transformation (FT) theory which describes the dynamics of nonhydrogenic atoms in an external uniform electric field was tested for the process of photoionization in a Stark field by Zhao et al. [Phys. Rev. A 86, 053413 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.053413]. Differential cross sections from the FT theory were found to be inconsistent with those from the fully quantum-mechanical coupled-channel theory. The discrepancy was attributed to the frame transformation of irregular wave functions. In a recent investigation, Giannakeas et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 067401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.067401] draw a different conclusion. They show that the FT theory generates irregular wave functions in good agreement with exact solutions for low angular momenta, although an obvious disagreement is seen for high angular momenta. We performed test calculations for numerous Stark states and found that our original conclusion remains valid, namely, the Fano-Harmin frame transformation for the irregular wave function is inaccurate.

  8. Full-dimensional control of the radiationless decay in pyrazine using the dynamic Stark effect

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, Mohamad Lasorne, Benjamin Gatti, Fabien; Sala, Matthieu; Guérin, Stéphane

    2014-10-07

    We present a full quantum-mechanical study of the laser control of the radiationless decay between the B{sub 3u}(nπ{sup *}) and B{sub 2u}(ππ{sup *}) states of pyrazine using the dynamic Stark effect. In contrast to our previous study [Sala et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 194309 (2014)], where a four-dimensional model was used, all the 24 degrees of freedom are now included in order to test the robustness of the strategy of control. Using a vibronic coupling Hamiltonian model in a diabatic representation, the multi-layer version of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method is exploited to propagate the corresponding wave packets. We still observe a trapping of the wavepacket on the B{sub 2u}(ππ{sup *}) potential energy surface due to the Stark effect for a longer time than the “non-resonant field-free” B{sub 2u}(ππ{sup *}) lifetime.

  9. Collective electronic excitations in a semiconductor superlattice in the Landau and Wannier-Stark ladder regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Piterimova, T. V.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2003-05-01

    Using a mean-field approximation, we have developed a systematic treatment of collective electronic modes in a semiconductor superlattice (SL) in the presence of strong electric and magnetic fields parallel to the SL axis. The spectrum of collective modes with zero wavevector along the SL axis is shown to consist of a principle magnetoplasmon mode and an infinite set of Bernstein-like modes. For non-zero wavevector along the SL axis, in addition to the cyclotron modes, extra collective modes are found at the frequencies \\vert Nω_c± Mω_s\\vert, which we call cyclotron-Stark modes (ω_c and ω_s are respectively the cyclotron and Stark frequencies, N and M are integer numbers). The frequencies of the modes propagating in “oblique” direction with respect to the SL axis show oscillatory behavior as a function of electric field strength. All the modes considered have very weak spatial dispersion and they are not Landau damped. The specific predictions made for the dispersion relations of the collective excitations should be observable in resonant Raman scattering experiments.

  10. [Motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Taillemite, J P; Devaulx, P; Bousquet, F

    1997-01-01

    Motion sickness is a general term covering sea-sickness, car-sickness, air-sickness, and space-sickness. Symptoms can occur when a person is exposed to unfamiliar movement whether real or simulated. Despite progress in the technology and comfort of modern transportation (planes, boats, and overland vehicles), a great number of travelers still experience motion sickness. Bouts are characterized by an initial phase of mild discomfort followed by neurologic and gastro-intestinal manifestations. The delay in onset depends on specific circumstances and individual susceptibility. Attacks are precipitated by conflicting sensory, visual, and vestibular signals but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Most medications used for prevention and treatment (e.g. anticholinergics and antihistamines) induce unwanted sedation. Furthermore no one drug is completely effective or preventive under all conditions.

  11. Stark parameters irregularities of Xe II lines obtained by transitions from ({sup 3}P{sub 1})6plevels

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, S.; Pelaez, R. J.; Rodriguez, F.; Aparicio, J. A.

    2008-10-22

    Stark widths and shifts of some Xe II lines belonging to the supermultiplets with upper levels ({sup 3}P{sub 1})6p were measured using a pulsed discharge lamp. Plasma parameters, i.e. electron density and temperature, in this experiment were in the range from 0.2 to 1.4x10{sup 23} m{sup -3} and from 18000 to 23000 K, respectively. Lines obtained by transitions from levels ({sup 3}P{sub 1})6p show some strong intra-supermultiplet irregularities in their Stark widths and shifts. These results and the measurements obtained in previous works were used here to analyse the main irregularities that can appear in the case of Xe II. This study may be very useful for obtaining Stark parameters of non-measured lines, using the known parameters of other lines belonging to similar transitions.

  12. Enhanced Stark Tuning of Single InAs (211 )B Quantum Dots due to Nonlinear Piezoelectric Effect in Zincblende Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanis, S.; Katsidis, C.; Tsintzos, S.; Stavrinidis, A.; Konstantinidis, G.; Florini, N.; Kioseoglou, J.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Kehagias, Th.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Pelekanos, N. T.

    2016-07-01

    We report enhanced Stark tuning of single exciton lines in self-assembled (211 )B InAs quantum dots (QDs) as a consequence of pronounced piezoelectric effects in polar orientations, making this QD system particularly sensitive to relatively "small" applied external fields. The Stark shifts in the first hundreds of kilovolts per centimeter of applied external field are at least 2.5 times larger, compared to those observed in nonpiezoelectric (100) InAs QDs of similar size. To account quantitatively for the observed transition energies and Stark shifts, we utilize a graded In-composition potential profile, as deduced from local strain analysis performed on high-resolution transmission microscopy images of the QDs. Our results provide a direct demonstration of the importance of nonlinear piezoelectric effects in zincblende semiconductors.

  13. Islam and the "universal" gender difference in religious commitment: a brief report in response to Stark (2002).

    PubMed

    Schumm, Walter R

    2004-06-01

    Stark (2002) demonstrated across 57 nations that men were less likely to report being religiously oriented than were women. He concluded that a physiological difference in risk-taking among younger males might account for disinterest in religion among such males, although he would prefer to explain the gender difference as a consequence of socialization. One socialization hypothesis overlooked by Stark was that Islam as a religion might have been developed, in a small part, as a response to the gender differential observed in earlier religions. Reanalysis of Stark's 2002 data indicates that Islamic nations were more likely to yield smaller gender differences on religious questions, although the effect ranged from p<.06 to a significant p<.005, depending on the method of analysis.

  14. The application of weak electric field pulses to measure the pseudo-Stark split by photon echo beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisin, V. N.; Shegeda, A. M.; Samartsev, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    A novel scheme for determining the pseudo-Stark splitting of optical lines has been suggested and tested in experiment. The scheme allows one to observe the beating of a photon echo waveform under conditions of overlap in time between a weak electric pulse and its echo-pulse. The pseudo-Stark splitting is equal to the inverse average modulation period of the echo waveform. The photon echo beating of the R1-line in Ruby has been observed. The dependence of the inverse average modulation period of the echo waveform on the average value of the electric field over the optically excited volume has been found. The obtained values of the pseudo-Stark parameter are in good agreement with known literature data.

  15. Surface acoustic BLOCH oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling in a solid.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M M; Kosevich, Yu A; Santos, P V; Cantarero, A

    2010-04-23

    We present the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling of surface acoustic waves in perturbed grating structures on a solid substrate. A model providing a quantitative description of our experimental observations, including multiple Landau-Zener transitions of the anticrossed surface acoustic Wannier-Stark states, is developed. The use of a planar geometry for the realization of the Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling allows a direct access to the elastic field distribution. The vertical surface displacement has been measured by interferometry.

  16. Observation of the Stark effect in υ+ = 0 Rydberg states of NO: a comparison between predissociating and bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N. J. A.; Minns, R. S.; Patel, R.; Fielding, H. H.

    2008-09-01

    The Stark spectra of Rydberg states of NO below the υ+ = 0 ionization limit, with principal quantum numbers n = 25-30, have been investigated in the presence of dc electric fields in the range 0-150 V cm-1. The Stark states were accessed by two-colour, double-resonance excitation via the υ' = 0, N' = 0 rovibrational state of the A2Σ+ state. The N(2D) atoms produced by predissociation were measured by (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization, and compared with pulsed-field ionization spectra of the bound Rydberg state population (Patel et al 2007 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 40 1369).

  17. Generation of Stark spectral components in Nd:YAP and Nd:YAG lasers by using volume Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai S; Glebov, L B

    2009-01-31

    Generation of Stark spectral components in free-running Q-switched Nd:YAP (1064 nm and 1073 nm) and Nd:YAG (1062 nm) lasers is obtained. For this purpose reflecting volume Bragg gratings placed into the laser resonator and permitting to tune the laser emission spectrum were used. Stable generation of Stark components in both lasers is obtained. The possibility of obtaining two-frequency generation in an Nd-glass laser with the help of these gratings is shown. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  18. Vibrational anharmonicity and vibrational Stark effect of sulfate ions trapped in potassium, rubidium and cesium chromate.

    PubMed

    Pejov, L; Petrusevski, V M

    2000-04-01

    Room and low temperature (approximately 100 K) FT-IR and Raman spectra of the sulfate doped K2CrO4, Rb2CrO4 and Cs2CrO4 were recorded. The positions of the nu1, nu3, and nu4 fundamental mode components of the dopant anions were measured. Nine (out of possible ten) second-order stretch-stretch vibrational transitions of the dopant anions were detected. On the basis of these data, the anharmonicity constants and the corresponding harmonic eigenvalues were calculated for several vibrational transitions using second-order perturbation theory expressions. The anharmonicity of the studied second-order transitions of the type nu1 + nu3i increases in the order (SO4/K2CrO4) < (SO4/Rb2CrO4) < (SO4/Cs2CrO4), while for those of the type nu3j + nu3i it basically follows the trend: (SO4/K2CrO4) > (SO4/Rb2CrO4) < (SO4/Cs2CrO4). The measured relative Stark splittings of the nu3 and nu4 mode components of the dopant SO4(2-) anions, as well as the average X13i/3i3j values decrease in the order (SO4/K2CrO4) > (SO4/Rb2CrO4) > (SO4/Cs2CrO4). In all cases, the splitting is larger for nu3 than for nu4 modes, indicating a smaller angular than the bond length distortion. The theory of vibrational Stark effect suggests that the observed frequency shifts of the nu1, nu3 and nu4 mode components may be attributed to the increase of the field strength at the doped anion site going from K2CrO4 to Cs2CrO4. The Stark splitting of these modes, on the other hand, implies that the internal crystalline field vector is almost parallel to the (hypothetical) C2 axis of the slightly distorted dopant tetrahedral anions.

  19. Vibrational solvatochromism of nitrile infrared probes: beyond the vibrational Stark dipole approach.

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Ritchie, Andrew W; Webb, Lauren J; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-07-21

    Systematic probing of local environments around biopolymers is important for understanding their functions. Therefore, there has been growing interest in in situ measurements of molecular granularity and heterogeneity through the systematic analysis of vibrational frequency shifts of carbonyl and nitrile infrared probes by vibrational Stark dipole theory. However, here we show that the nitrile vibrational frequency shift induced by its interaction with the surrounding molecules cannot be solely described by electric field-based theory because of the exchange-repulsion and dispersion interaction contributions. Considering a variety of molecular environments ranging from bulk solutions to protein environments, we explore the distinct scenarios of solute-environment contacts and their traces in vibrational frequency shifts. We believe that the present work could provide a set of clues that could be potentially used to design a rigorous theoretical model linking vibrational solvatochromism and molecular topology in complex heterogeneous environments. PMID:27326899

  20. Stark spectroscopy of CuPc organic semiconductor with a submicron metal-electrode grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, L. M.; Lazarev, V. V.; Yudin, S. G.; Palto, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    The optical and electro-optical properties of organic copper phthalocyanine semiconductor (α- CuPc) have been investigated by Stark (electroabsorption) spectroscopy using a metal electrode grating with a submicron (0.88 μm) interelectrode distance. Differences between dipole moments (Δμ) and polarizabilities (Δα) in the excited and ground states of α-CuPc are measured for a nanoscale semiconductor film. It is concluded that the extremely high values of Δμ and Δα are in principle not parameters of individual α-CuPc molecules: they are determined by exciton effects specifically in the polycrystalline medium with a characteristic morphology of hyperfine films, which depends on the structure of the samples and their fabrication technology.

  1. Plasma density characterization at SPARC_LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC_LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC_LAB is presented.

  2. A switched ring Stark decelerator for both light and heavy polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shunyong; Wang, Qin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in cold heavy polar molecular species for their applications in fundamental physics, such as the tests of the electron’s electric dipole moment. Here we propose a switched ring Stark decelerator suitable for slowing both light and heavy polar molecules. Two typical polar molecular species, ND3 and 205TlF, are employed to test the feasibility of our scheme with the help of trajectory calculation. Our proposed scheme is found to share many advantages with the state-of-the-art traveling wave decelerator, yet with relatively simple electronics and flexible operation modes. Sub-millikelvin molecular samples can be conveniently obtained in our decelerator using a combined operation mode. These monochromatic beams are ideal starting points for precise studies of molecular collision, cold chemistry and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  3. Single Molecule Quantum-Confined Stark Effect Measurements of Semiconductor Nanoparticles at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We measured the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) of several types of fluorescent colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and nanorods at the single molecule level at room temperature. These measurements demonstrate the possible utility of these nanoparticles for local electric field (voltage) sensing on the nanoscale. Here we show that charge separation across one (or more) heterostructure interface(s) with type-II band alignment (and the associated induced dipole) is crucial for an enhanced QCSE. To further gain insight into the experimental results, we numerically solved the Schrödinger and Poisson equations under self-consistent field approximation, including dielectric inhomogeneities. Both calculations and experiments suggest that the degree of initial charge separation (and the associated exciton binding energy) determines the magnitude of the QCSE in these structures. PMID:23075136

  4. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE PAGES

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ν(C≡N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of moleculesmore » to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.« less

  5. Communication: Induced photoemission from nonadiabatic dynamics assisted by dynamical Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Arasaki, Yasuki; Scheit, Simona; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2013-04-28

    Through nonadiabatic interaction due to electron transfer as that in alkali halides, vibrational dynamics on the ionic potential energy surface (large dipole moment) is coupled to that on the covalent surface (small dipole moment). Thus, population transfer between the states should cause long-range electron jump between two remote sites, which thereby leads to a sudden change of the large molecular dipole moment. Therefore, by making repeated use of the dynamical Stark effect, one may expect emission of photons from it. We show with coupled quantum wavepacket dynamics calculation that such photoemission can indeed occur and can be controlled by an external field. The present photoemission can offer an alternative scheme to study femtosecond and subfemtosecond vibrational and electronic dynamics and may serve as a unique optical source. PMID:23635103

  6. A simple formula for estimating Stark widths of neutral lines. [of stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudenstein, S. A.; Cooper, J.

    1978-01-01

    A simple formula for the prediction of Stark widths of neutral lines similar to the semiempirical method of Griem (1968) for ion lines is presented. This formula is a simplification of the quantum-mechanical classical path impact theory and can be used for complicated atoms for which detailed calculations are not readily available, provided that the effective position of the closest interacting level is known. The expression does not require the use of a computer. The formula has been applied to a limited number of neutral lines of interest, and the width obtained is compared with the much more complete calculations of Bennett and Griem (1971). The agreement generally is well within 50% of the published value for the lines investigated. Comparisons with other formulas are also made. In addition, a simple estimate for the ion-broadening parameter is given.

  7. Computation of the Stark effect in P impurity states in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debernardi, A.; Baldereschi, A.; Fanciulli, M.

    2006-07-01

    We compute within the effective-mass theory and without adjustable parameters the Stark effect for shallow P donors in Si with anisotropic band structure. Valley-orbit coupling is taken into account in a nonperturbative way and scattering effects of the impurity core are included to properly describe low-lying impurity states. The ground-state energy slightly decreases with increasing electric field up to a critical value Ecr˜25keV/cm , at which the donor can be ionized by tunneling due to a field-induced mixing of the “ 1s -like” singlet ground state with a “ 2p0 -like” excited state in zero field. The resulting ground-state wave function at high field extends significantly outside the potential barrier surrounding the impurity. Calculations of the hyperfine splitting and of the A -shell superhyperfine coupling constants as a function of the electric field complete the work.

  8. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ν(C≡N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.

  9. Influence of the ac Stark effect on multiphoton transitions in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerts, W. Leo; Ozier, Irving; Hougen, Jon T.

    1989-05-01

    A multiphoton mechanism for molecular beam transitions is presented which relies on a large first-order ac Stark effect to modulate the energy separation of the initial and final states of the multiphoton transition, but which does not require the presence of any intermediate level(s). The theoretical formalism uses ideas from the laser multiphoton literature for a two-level system interacting with a monochromatic electromagnetic radiation field, together with a close analog of the rotating wave approximation. The diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian operator corresponding to the large ac Stark effect are removed by a mathematical substitution which in effect transforms appropriate differences of these diagonal elements into transition moments involving higher harmonics of the frequency of the monochromatic radiation field. The electric field strength of the true monochromatic radiation field is ``distributed'' among the higher harmonics of the effective field according to an expression involving Bessel functions. Because these Bessel functions are bounded, there exists for a given time t of exposure to the radiation, a threshold for the magnitude of the transition dipole matrix element coupling the two levels: Below this threshold, the transition probability in a traditional one-photon molecular beam electric resonance experiment cannot be made unity simply by increasing the amplitude of the radiation field. In fact, if the coupling matrix element is small enough, the molecular beam electric resonance signal cannot be detected within exposure time t. The algebraic formalism described above is checked by computer solution of an initial value problem involving four real coupled linear differential equations. It is then used to explain the multiphoton transitions previously observed in molecular beam electric resonance studies on the two symmetric top molecules OPF3 and CH3 CF3, where the number of photons involved in a given transition varies from 1

  10. The trouble with orbits: The Stark effect in the old and the new quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Anthony; Janssen, Michel

    2014-11-01

    The old quantum theory and Schrödinger's wave mechanics (and other forms of quantum mechanics) give the same results for the line splittings in the first-order Stark effect in hydrogen, the leading terms in the splitting of the spectral lines emitted by a hydrogen atom in an external electric field. We examine the account of the effect in the old quantum theory, which was hailed as a major success of that theory, from the point of view of wave mechanics. First, we show how the new quantum mechanics solves a fundamental problem that one runs into in the old quantum theory with the Stark effect. It turns out that, even without an external field, it depends on the coordinates in which the quantum conditions are imposed which electron orbits are allowed in a hydrogen atom. The allowed energy levels and hence the line splittings are independent of the coordinates used but the size and eccentricity of the orbits are not. In the new quantum theory, this worrisome non-uniqueness of orbits turns into the perfectly innocuous non-uniqueness of bases in Hilbert space. Second, we review how the so-called WKB (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) approximation method for solving the Schrödinger equation reproduces the quantum conditions of the old quantum theory amended by some additional half-integer terms. These extra terms remove the need for some arbitrary extra restrictions on the allowed orbits that the old quantum theory required over and above the basic quantum conditions.

  11. The chemical bond in external electric fields: energies, geometries, and vibrational Stark shifts of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Sowlati-Hashjin, Shahin; Matta, Chérif F

    2013-10-14

    It is shown that the response of molecular properties of diatomics such as the total energy, the bond length, and the vibrational Stark shift to an external homogenous electric field (EF) can be predicted from field-free observable properties such as the equilibrium bond length, the bond dissociation energy, the polarizability and dipole moment functions, and the vibrational frequency. Delley [J. Mol. Struct.: THEOCHEM 434, 229 (1998)] suggested to approximate the potential energy surface under an EF by a Morse function augmented with a EF term proportional to the internuclear separation. In this work, this term is replaced by the expression of the field-induced energy change which yields a field-perturbed Morse potential that tends to a constant asymptotic limit when the EF term itself become proportional to the sum of the polarizabilities of the separated atoms. The model is validated by comparison with direct calculations on nine diatomics, five homo-nuclear (H2, N2, O2, F2, and Cl2) and four hetero-nuclear (HF, HCl, CO, and NO), covering a range and combinations of dipole moments and polarizabilities. Calculations were conducted at the quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitations (QCISD) and density functional theory (DFT)-B3LYP levels of theory using the 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set. All results agree closely at the two levels of theory except for the Stark effect of NO which is not correctly predicted by QCISD calculations as further calculations, including at the coupled cluster with single and double excitation (CCSD) level of theory, demonstrate.

  12. Reaching for 80%: How Post Secondary Opportunities in High Schools Are Changing the College Going Culture in Stark County, Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochford, Joseph A.; O'Neill, Adrienne; Gelb, Adele; Ross, Kimberly J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, the Stark County Preschool through College (P-16) Compact set the goal of achieving an 80% college going rate. Such a goal seemed both audacious and daunting for a community where in 2001 only 17.9% of the adults held a Bachelor's Degree, or higher, and where only 49% of all high school graduates went directly to college. Nine years have…

  13. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein’s internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  14. Expanding College Opportunity: An Annual Report on Dual Credit and Other Post Secondary Opportunities for Stark County High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochford, Joseph A.; O'Neill, Adrienne; Gelb, Adele; Ross, Kimberly J.; Ughrin, Tina

    2014-01-01

    This is the eighth annual report by the Stark Education Partnership on dual enrollment and other post secondary opportunities (PSOs) for the county's high school students. In addition to dual enrollment, this report looks at a portfolio of the county's PSOs that includes Canton Early College High School, and the opportunity to bank future college…

  15. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  16. Auditory motion affects visual biological motion processing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A; van der Zwan, R; Billard, A; Petreska, B; Clarke, S; Blanke, O

    2007-02-01

    The processing of biological motion is a critical, everyday task performed with remarkable efficiency by human sensory systems. Interest in this ability has focused to a large extent on biological motion processing in the visual modality (see, for example, Cutting, J. E., Moore, C., & Morrison, R. (1988). Masking the motions of human gait. Perception and Psychophysics, 44(4), 339-347). In naturalistic settings, however, it is often the case that biological motion is defined by input to more than one sensory modality. For this reason, here in a series of experiments we investigate behavioural correlates of multisensory, in particular audiovisual, integration in the processing of biological motion cues. More specifically, using a new psychophysical paradigm we investigate the effect of suprathreshold auditory motion on perceptions of visually defined biological motion. Unlike data from previous studies investigating audiovisual integration in linear motion processing [Meyer, G. F. & Wuerger, S. M. (2001). Cross-modal integration of auditory and visual motion signals. Neuroreport, 12(11), 2557-2560; Wuerger, S. M., Hofbauer, M., & Meyer, G. F. (2003). The integration of auditory and motion signals at threshold. Perception and Psychophysics, 65(8), 1188-1196; Alais, D. & Burr, D. (2004). No direction-specific bimodal facilitation for audiovisual motion detection. Cognitive Brain Research, 19, 185-194], we report the existence of direction-selective effects: relative to control (stationary) auditory conditions, auditory motion in the same direction as the visually defined biological motion target increased its detectability, whereas auditory motion in the opposite direction had the inverse effect. Our data suggest these effects do not arise through general shifts in visuo-spatial attention, but instead are a consequence of motion-sensitive, direction-tuned integration mechanisms that are, if not unique to biological visual motion, at least not common to all types of

  17. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  18. Asymmetry of Drosophila ON and OFF motion detectors enhances real-world velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Aljoscha; Ammer, Georg; Meier, Matthias; Serbe, Etienne; Bahl, Armin; Borst, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The reliable estimation of motion across varied surroundings represents a survival-critical task for sighted animals. How neural circuits have adapted to the particular demands of natural environments, however, is not well understood. We explored this question in the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, as in many mammalian retinas, motion is computed in parallel streams for brightness increments (ON) and decrements (OFF). When genetically isolated, ON and OFF pathways proved equally capable of accurately matching walking responses to realistic motion. To our surprise, detailed characterization of their functional tuning properties through in vivo calcium imaging and electrophysiology revealed stark differences in temporal tuning between ON and OFF channels. We trained an in silico motion estimation model on natural scenes and discovered that our optimized detector exhibited differences similar to those of the biological system. Thus, functional ON-OFF asymmetries in fly visual circuitry may reflect ON-OFF asymmetries in natural environments.

  19. Comment on "Test of the Stark-effect theory using photoionization microscopy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakeas, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-06-01

    An article by Zhao et al. [Phys. Rev. A 86, 053413 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.053413] tests the local frame transformation (LFT) theory by comparing it with benchmark coupled-channel calculations. The system under consideration is an alkali-metal atom that is two-photon ionized in the presence of a static external electric field. Zhao et al. state that the differential cross sections computed in the LFT theory disagree with their supposedly more accurate coupled-channel calculations. They went on to diagnose the discrepancy and claimed that it originates in an inaccurate correspondence between the irregular functions in spherical and parabolic-cylindrical coordinates, a correspondence that lies at the heart of LFT theory. We have repeated the same tests and find that our calculations rule out the discrepancies that were claimed in Zhao et al. [Phys. Rev. A 86, 053413 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.053413] to exist between the LFT approximation and the exact calculations. This Comment thus helps to clarify the accuracy of the Harmin-Fano theory and demonstrates that it is in fact remarkably accurate not only for the total photoionization cross section in the Stark effect, but also for the differential cross section in photoionization microscopy.

  20. Excited electronic state mixing in 7-azaindole. Quantitative measurements using the Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Young, Justin W; Pozun, Zachary D; Jordan, Kenneth D; Pratt, David W

    2013-12-12

    Stark effect measurements of the +280 cm(-1) vibronic band at ∼286 nm in the high resolution S1-S0 fluorescence excitation spectrum of 7-azaindole (7AI) in a molecular beam show that the permanent (electric) dipole moment (PDM) of the upper state vibrational level reached in this transition is 4.6 D, twice as large as the PDM of the zero-point level of the S1 state. This large difference is attributed to state mixing with a more polar state. EOM-CSSD calculations suggest that this more polar state is σπ* in nature and that it crosses the ππ* state in energy along the coordinate connecting the two potential energy minima. Such state mixing apparently provides more facile access to conical intersections with the ground state, and subsequent hydrogen atom detachment reactions, since independent studies by Sakota and Sekiya have shown that the N-H stretching frequency of 7AI is significantly reduced when it is excited to the +280 cm(-1) vibrational level of the S1 state.

  1. Stark Broadening Analysis Using Optical Spectroscopy of the Dense Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Patrick; Bennett, Nikki; Dutra, Eric; Hagen, E. Chris; Hsu, Scott; Hunt, Gene; Koch, Jeff; Waltman, Tom; NSTec DPF Team

    2015-11-01

    To aid in validating numerical modeling of MA-class dense plasma focus (DPF) devices, spectroscopic measurements of the Gemini Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) were performed using deuterium and deuterium/dopant (argon/krypton) gas. The spectroscopic measurements were made using a fiber-coupled spectrometer and streak camera. Stark line-broadening analysis was applied to the deuterium beta emission (486 nm) in the region near the breakdown of the plasma and during the run-down and run-in phases of the plasma evolution. Densities in the range of 1e17 to low 1e18 cm-3 were obtained. These values are in agreement with models of the DPF performed using the LSP code. The spectra also show a rise and fall with time, indicative of the plasma sheath passing by the view port. Impurity features were also identified in the spectra which grew in intensity as the gas inside the DPF was discharged repeatedly without cycling. Implications of this impurity increase for D-T discharges (without fresh gas fills between every discharge) will be discussed. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946, and by Los Alamos National Laboratory, under Contract no. DE-AC52-06NA25396 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946-2515.

  2. State-to-state inelastic scattering of Stark-decelerated OH radicals with Ar atoms.

    PubMed

    Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Kłos, Jacek; Dagdigian, Paul J; Alexander, Millard H; Meijer, Gerard; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2010-09-28

    The Stark deceleration method exploits the concepts of charged particle accelerator physics to produce molecular beams with a tunable velocity. These tamed molecular beams offer interesting perspectives for precise crossed beam scattering studies as a function of the collision energy. The method has advanced sufficiently to compete with state-of-the-art beam methods that are used for scattering studies throughout. This is demonstrated here for the scattering of OH radicals (X(2)Pi(3/2), J = 3/2, f) with Ar atoms, a benchmark system for the scattering of open-shell molecules with atoms. Parity-resolved integral state-to-state inelastic scattering cross sections are measured at collision energies between 80 and 800 cm(-1). The threshold behavior and collision energy dependence of 13 inelastic scattering channels is accurately determined. Excellent agreement is obtained with the cross sections predicted by close-coupling scattering calculations based on the most accurate ab initio OH + Ar potential energy surfaces to date. PMID:20657906

  3. Stark sexual display divergence among jumping spider populations in the face of gene flow.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Gwylim S; Maddison, Wayne P

    2014-11-01

    Gene flow can inhibit evolutionary divergence by eroding genetic differences between populations. A current aim in speciation research is to identify conditions in which selection overcomes this process. We focused on a state of limited differentiation, asking whether selection enables divergence with gene flow in a set of Habronattus americanus jumping spider populations that exhibit three distinct male sexual display morphs. We found that each population is at high frequency or fixed for a single morph. These strong phenotypic differences contrast with low divergence at 210 AFLP markers, suggesting selection has driven or maintains morph divergence. Coinciding patterns of isolation by distance and 'isolation by phenotype' (i.e. increased genetic divergence among phenotypically contrasting populations) across the study area support several alternative demographic hypotheses for display divergence, each of which entails gene flow. Display-associated structure appears broadly distributed across the genome and the markers producing this pattern do not stand out from background levels of differentiation. Overall, the results suggest selection can promote stark sexual display divergence in the face of gene flow among closely related populations. PMID:25266277

  4. Dipole moment of methanol by microwave stark spectroscopy IV: 13CD316OH species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indra; Sastry, K. V. L. N.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, Stark effect measurements have been carried out on several transitions C-13 substituted species of triply-deuterated (D3) methanol. The analysis of the data allowed the determination of the dipole moment components in the first two torsional states of the ground vibrational state of this species. The extrapolated zero field frequencies of the transitions studied have been determined and found to be in excellent agreement with known values. For the torsional ground state the values {in Debye (D)} of μa = 0.9080(9) and μb = 1.4378(10) have been obtained for this species. These values increase for the first excited state as was observed for other species. The dipole moment values are considerably higher than the non-deuterated species. To our knowledge the present study represents the measurement of the most accurate dipole moment values of 13CD3OH for the first time. The results obtained will prove useful for radio astronomy and in understanding of large amplitude internal energy pathways in polyatomic molecules.

  5. Beyond Zeeman spectroscopy: Magnetic-field diagnostics with Stark-dominated line shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Tessarin, S.; Mikitchuk, D.; Doron, R.; Stambulchik, E.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Hammer, D. A.; Jacobs, V. L.; Seely, J. F.; Oliver, B. V.; Fisher, A.

    2011-09-15

    A recently suggested spectroscopic approach for magnetic-field determination in plasma is employed to measure magnetic fields in an expanding laser-produced plasma plume in an externally applied magnetic field. The approach enables the field determination in a diagnostically difficult regime for which the Zeeman-split patterns are not resolvable, as is often encountered under the conditions characteristic of high-energy-density plasmas. Here, such conditions occur in the high-density plasma near the laser target, due to the dominance of Stark broadening. A pulsed-power system is used to generate magnetic fields with a peak magnitude of 25 T at the inner-electrode surface in a coaxial configuration. An aluminum target attached to the inner electrode surface is then irradiated by a laser beam to produce the expanding plasma that interacts with the applied azimuthal magnetic field. A line-shape analysis of the Al III 4s-4p doublet (5696 and 5722 A) enables the simultaneous determination of the magnetic field and the electron density. The measured magnetic fields are generally found to agree with those expected in a vacuum based on the pulsed-power system current. Examples of other transitions that can be used to diagnose a wide range of plasma and magnetic field parameters are presented.

  6. Stark Broadening of High-order Radio Recombination Lines toward the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J.; Gulyaev, S.

    2016-09-01

    We report the results of observations and analyses of 41 {{Δ }}n=1,\\ldots ,5 hydrogen radio recombination lines from the Orion nebula (M42) at 5.5 to 6.5 GHz, with a spectral sensitivity (channel-to-channel standard deviation) of ≈ 2 {mJy}. Observations were conducted at the Australia Telescope Compact Array. A 1 GHz bandwidth allowed simultaneous detection of up to 11 spectral lines of equal {{Δ }}n that were stacked to enable accurate measurement of line widths. Collisional widths in the range of principal quantum numbers n from 100 to 179 are found to be consistent with predictions of electron impact Stark broadening theory. An Orion nebula model with density inhomogeneities (clumps) and gradients of temperature and density is consistent with our data. We reanalyze the data of Smirnov et al. and Bell et al. and find excellent agreement between all statistically significant measurements and theory. Our findings confirm the absence of line narrowing for n = 100...179.

  7. Supersymmetry identifies molecular Stark states whose eigenproperties can be obtained analytically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemeshko, Mikhail; Mustafa, Mustafa; Kais, Sabre; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2011-06-01

    We made use of supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanics to find the condition under which the Stark effect problem for a polar and polarizable closed-shell diatomic molecule subjected to collinear electrostatic and nonresonant radiative fields becomes exactly solvable. The condition \\Delta \\omega = \\frac{\\omega^2}{4 (m+1)^2 } connects values of the dimensionless parameters ω and Δω that characterize the strengths of the permanent and induced dipole interactions of the molecule with the respective fields. The exact solutions are obtained for the \\vert \\skew5\\tilde{J}=m,m;\\omega,\\Delta \\omega\\rangle family of 'stretched' states. The field-free and strong-field limits of the combined-fields problem were found to exhibit supersymmetry and shape invariance, which is indeed the reason why they are analytically solvable. By making use of the analytic form of the \\vert \\skew5\\tilde{J}=m,m;\\omega,\\Delta \\omega\\rangle wavefunctions, we obtained simple formulae for the expectation values of the space-fixed electric dipole moment, the alignment cosine and the angular momentum squared, and derived a 'sum rule' that combines the above expectation values into a formula for the eigenenergy. The analytic expressions for the characteristics of the strongly oriented and aligned states provide direct access to the values of the interaction parameters required for creating such states in the laboratory.

  8. Shift measurements of the stark-broadened ionized helium lines at 1640 and 1215 angstrom. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements were made of the shifts of the ionized helium lines at 1,640 A (n = 3 approaches 2) and 1,215 A (n = 4 approaches 2), and of the Stark profile of the 1,215 A wavelength line. An electromagnetic shock tube was used as a light source. The plasma conditions corresponded to electron temperatures of approximately 3.5 eV and electron densities of 0.8 to 1.8 x 10 to the 17th power/cubic cm. The measured shifts fell between two previous estimates of plasma polarization shifts. The measured Stark width of the 1,215 A wavelength line was up to 30% greater than the theoretical width.

  9. Topology of surfaces for molecular Stark energy, alignment, and orientation generated by combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Burkhard; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2014-02-14

    We show that combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions of linear polar and polarizable molecules with collinear electric fields lead to a sui generis topology of the corresponding Stark energy surfaces and of other observables – such as alignment and orientation cosines – in the plane spanned by the permanent and induced dipole interaction parameters. We find that the loci of the intersections of the surfaces can be traced analytically and that the eigenstates as well as the number of their intersections can be characterized by a single integer index. The value of the index, distinctive for a particular ratio of the interaction parameters, brings out a close kinship with the eigenproperties obtained previously for a class of Stark states via the apparatus of supersymmetric quantum mechanics.

  10. Measurement and compensation of optical Stark shifts for manipulating the terahertz-separated qubit in C40a+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haze, Shinsuke; Yamazaki, Rekishu; Toyoda, Kenji; Urabe, Shinji

    2009-11-01

    We describe the measurement and compensation of optical Stark shifts induced by an off-resonant pulse for manipulating the terahertz-separated states 3D23/2-3D25/2 , in a single trapped C40a+ ion. These states can be used as a quantum bit and are coupled by a two-photon stimulated Raman transition with phase-locked light sources bridged by an optical comb generator. The induced optical Stark shift is measured by Ramsey interferometry. We estimate the power ratio of Raman beams that cancel the level shift with an uncertainty of 170 Hz. A shift of the same amount as this uncertainty is estimated to give rise to an infidelity of approximately 7.6×10-4 during a π/2 rotation operation.

  11. The AC-Stark Effect in Nitric Oxide Induced by Rapidly Swept Continuous Wave Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F.; Blake, Thomas A.; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-07

    A large AC Stark effect has been observed when nitric oxide, at low pressure in a long optical path (100 m) Herriot cell, is subjected to infrared radiation from a rapidly swept, continuous wave infrared quantum cascade laser. As the frequency sweep rate of the laser is increased, an emission signal induced by rapid passage, occurs after the laser frequency has passed through the resonance of a molecular absorption line. At very high sweep rates a laser field-induced splitting of the absorptive part of the signal is observed, due to the AC Stark effect. This splitting is related to the Autler-Townes mixing of the hyperfine transitions, which lie within the lambda doublet components of the transition, under the Doppler broadened envelope.

  12. Dependence of the time of the appearance of a Stark echo response on irreversible relaxation of a system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedshina, E. N.; Nefed'ev, L. A.; Garnaeva, G. I.

    2016-09-01

    The dependence of the time of the appearance of a Stark (gradient) echo response on the irreversible transverse relaxation time of a system in the nanosecond range and on the width of the excitation region of an inhomogeneously broadened line has been investigated. It has been shown that the use of nonresonant laser pulses with an artificially created spatial inhomogeneity makes it possible to determine the relaxation time in the nanosecond range from the time of the appearance of a Stark (gradient) echo response, which is a more accurate method than the method of determining the relaxation time from the decay of the intensity by varying time intervals of the exposure to inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields.

  13. Topology of surfaces for molecular Stark energy, alignment, and orientation generated by combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Burkhard; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2014-02-14

    We show that combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions of linear polar and polarizable molecules with collinear electric fields lead to a sui generis topology of the corresponding Stark energy surfaces and of other observables - such as alignment and orientation cosines - in the plane spanned by the permanent and induced dipole interaction parameters. We find that the loci of the intersections of the surfaces can be traced analytically and that the eigenstates as well as the number of their intersections can be characterized by a single integer index. The value of the index, distinctive for a particular ratio of the interaction parameters, brings out a close kinship with the eigenproperties obtained previously for a class of Stark states via the apparatus of supersymmetric quantum mechanics.

  14. Electron density determination in the divertor volume of ASDEX Upgrade via Stark broadening of the Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potzel, S.; Dux, R.; Müller, H. W.; Scarabosio, A.; Wischmeier, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present the development of a new diagnostic capable of determining the electron density in the divertor volume of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). It is based on the spectroscopic measurement of the Stark broadening of the Balmer lines. In this work two approaches of calculating the Stark broadening, i.e. the unified theory and the model microfield method, are compared. It will be shown that both approaches yield similar results in the case of Balmer lines with high upper principal quantum numbers n. In addition, for typical AUG parameters the influence of the Zeeman splitting on the high n Balmer lines is found to be negligible. Moreover, an assumption for the Doppler broadening of Tn = 5 eV, which is the maximum Frank-Condon dissociation energy of recycled neutrals, is sufficient. The initial electron density measurements performed using this method are found to be consistent with both Langmuir probe and pressure gauge data.

  15. Nanocathodoluminescence Reveals Mitigation of the Stark Shift in InGaN Quantum Wells by Si Doping.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, James T; Zhang, Siyuan; Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; Fu, Wai Yuen; Bao, An; Zhu, Dandan; Wallis, David J; Howkins, Ashley; Boyd, Ian; Stowe, David; Kappers, Menno J; Humphreys, Colin J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2015-11-11

    Nanocathodoluminescence reveals the spectral properties of individual InGaN quantum wells in high efficiency light emitting diodes. We observe a variation in the emission wavelength of each quantum well, in correlation with the Si dopant concentration in the quantum barriers. This is reproduced by band profile simulations, which reveal the reduction of the Stark shift in the quantum wells by Si doping. We demonstrate nanocathodoluminescence is a powerful technique to optimize doping in optoelectronic devices.

  16. Nanocathodoluminescence Reveals Mitigation of the Stark Shift in InGaN Quantum Wells by Si Doping.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, James T; Zhang, Siyuan; Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; Fu, Wai Yuen; Bao, An; Zhu, Dandan; Wallis, David J; Howkins, Ashley; Boyd, Ian; Stowe, David; Kappers, Menno J; Humphreys, Colin J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2015-11-11

    Nanocathodoluminescence reveals the spectral properties of individual InGaN quantum wells in high efficiency light emitting diodes. We observe a variation in the emission wavelength of each quantum well, in correlation with the Si dopant concentration in the quantum barriers. This is reproduced by band profile simulations, which reveal the reduction of the Stark shift in the quantum wells by Si doping. We demonstrate nanocathodoluminescence is a powerful technique to optimize doping in optoelectronic devices. PMID:26488912

  17. Nanocathodoluminescence Reveals Mitigation of the Stark Shift in InGaN Quantum Wells by Si Doping

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanocathodoluminescence reveals the spectral properties of individual InGaN quantum wells in high efficiency light emitting diodes. We observe a variation in the emission wavelength of each quantum well, in correlation with the Si dopant concentration in the quantum barriers. This is reproduced by band profile simulations, which reveal the reduction of the Stark shift in the quantum wells by Si doping. We demonstrate nanocathodoluminescence is a powerful technique to optimize doping in optoelectronic devices. PMID:26488912

  18. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  19. Stark shift and field ionization of arsenic donors in {sup 28}Si-silicon-on-insulator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C. C. Morton, J. J. L.; Simmons, S.; Lo Nardo, R.; Weis, C. D.; Schenkel, T.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.; Meijer, J.; Rogalla, D.; Bokor, J.

    2014-05-12

    We develop an efficient back gate for silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices operating at cryogenic temperatures and measure the quadratic hyperfine Stark shift parameter of arsenic donors in isotopically purified {sup 28}Si-SOI layers using such structures. The back gate is implemented using MeV ion implantation through the SOI layer forming a metallic electrode in the handle wafer, enabling large and uniform electric fields up to 2 V/μm to be applied across the SOI layer. Utilizing this structure, we measure the Stark shift parameters of arsenic donors embedded in the {sup 28}Si-SOI layer and find a contact hyperfine Stark parameter of η{sub a} = −1.9 ± 0.7 × 10{sup −3} μm{sup 2}/V{sup 2}. We also demonstrate electric-field driven dopant ionization in the SOI device layer, measured by electron spin resonance.

  20. Determination of Stark parameters by cross-calibration in a multi-element laser-induced plasma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Truscott, Benjamin S.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2016-01-01

    We illustrate a Stark broadening analysis of the electron density Ne and temperature Te in a laser-induced plasma (LIP), using a model free of assumptions regarding local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The method relies on Stark parameters determined also without assuming LTE, which are often unknown and unavailable in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that the necessary values can be obtained in situ by cross-calibration between the spectral lines of different charge states, and even different elements, given determinations of Ne and Te based on appropriate parameters for at least one observed transition. This approach enables essentially free choice between species on which to base the analysis, extending the range over which these properties can be measured and giving improved access to low-density plasmas out of LTE. Because of the availability of suitable tabulated values for several charge states of both Si and C, the example of a SiC LIP is taken to illustrate the consistency and accuracy of the procedure. The cross-calibrated Stark parameters are at least as reliable as values obtained by other means, offering a straightforward route to extending the literature in this area. PMID:27170026

  1. Determination of Stark parameters by cross-calibration in a multi-element laser-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Truscott, Benjamin S; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2016-05-12

    We illustrate a Stark broadening analysis of the electron density Ne and temperature Te in a laser-induced plasma (LIP), using a model free of assumptions regarding local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The method relies on Stark parameters determined also without assuming LTE, which are often unknown and unavailable in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that the necessary values can be obtained in situ by cross-calibration between the spectral lines of different charge states, and even different elements, given determinations of Ne and Te based on appropriate parameters for at least one observed transition. This approach enables essentially free choice between species on which to base the analysis, extending the range over which these properties can be measured and giving improved access to low-density plasmas out of LTE. Because of the availability of suitable tabulated values for several charge states of both Si and C, the example of a SiC LIP is taken to illustrate the consistency and accuracy of the procedure. The cross-calibrated Stark parameters are at least as reliable as values obtained by other means, offering a straightforward route to extending the literature in this area.

  2. Deconvolution of Stark broadened spectra for multi-point density measurements in a flow Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Vogman, G. V.; Shumlak, U.

    2011-10-13

    Stark broadened emission spectra, once separated from other broadening effects, provide a convenient non-perturbing means of making plasma density measurements. A deconvolution technique has been developed to measure plasma densities in the ZaP flow Z-pinch experiment. The ZaP experiment uses sheared flow to mitigate MHD instabilities. The pinches exhibit Stark broadened emission spectra, which are captured at 20 locations using a multi-chord spectroscopic system. Spectra that are time- and chord-integrated are well approximated by a Voigt function. The proposed method simultaneously resolves plasma electron density and ion temperature by deconvolving the spectral Voigt profile into constituent functions: a Gaussian function associated with instrument effects and Doppler broadening by temperature; and a Lorentzian function associated with Stark broadening by electron density. The method uses analytic Fourier transforms of the constituent functions to fit the Voigt profile in the Fourier domain. The method is discussed and compared to a basic least-squares fit. The Fourier transform fitting routine requires fewer fitting parameters and shows promise in being less susceptible to instrumental noise and to contamination from neighboring spectral lines. The method is evaluated and tested using simulated lines and is applied to experimental data for the 229.69 nm C III line from multiple chords to determine plasma density and temperature across the diameter of the pinch. As a result, these measurements are used to gain a better understanding of Z-pinch equilibria.

  3. Deconvolution of Stark broadened spectra for multi-point density measurements in a flow Z-pinch

    DOE PAGES

    Vogman, G. V.; Shumlak, U.

    2011-10-13

    Stark broadened emission spectra, once separated from other broadening effects, provide a convenient non-perturbing means of making plasma density measurements. A deconvolution technique has been developed to measure plasma densities in the ZaP flow Z-pinch experiment. The ZaP experiment uses sheared flow to mitigate MHD instabilities. The pinches exhibit Stark broadened emission spectra, which are captured at 20 locations using a multi-chord spectroscopic system. Spectra that are time- and chord-integrated are well approximated by a Voigt function. The proposed method simultaneously resolves plasma electron density and ion temperature by deconvolving the spectral Voigt profile into constituent functions: a Gaussian functionmore » associated with instrument effects and Doppler broadening by temperature; and a Lorentzian function associated with Stark broadening by electron density. The method uses analytic Fourier transforms of the constituent functions to fit the Voigt profile in the Fourier domain. The method is discussed and compared to a basic least-squares fit. The Fourier transform fitting routine requires fewer fitting parameters and shows promise in being less susceptible to instrumental noise and to contamination from neighboring spectral lines. The method is evaluated and tested using simulated lines and is applied to experimental data for the 229.69 nm C III line from multiple chords to determine plasma density and temperature across the diameter of the pinch. As a result, these measurements are used to gain a better understanding of Z-pinch equilibria.« less

  4. Determination of Stark parameters by cross-calibration in a multi-element laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Truscott, Benjamin S.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2016-05-01

    We illustrate a Stark broadening analysis of the electron density Ne and temperature Te in a laser-induced plasma (LIP), using a model free of assumptions regarding local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The method relies on Stark parameters determined also without assuming LTE, which are often unknown and unavailable in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that the necessary values can be obtained in situ by cross-calibration between the spectral lines of different charge states, and even different elements, given determinations of Ne and Te based on appropriate parameters for at least one observed transition. This approach enables essentially free choice between species on which to base the analysis, extending the range over which these properties can be measured and giving improved access to low-density plasmas out of LTE. Because of the availability of suitable tabulated values for several charge states of both Si and C, the example of a SiC LIP is taken to illustrate the consistency and accuracy of the procedure. The cross-calibrated Stark parameters are at least as reliable as values obtained by other means, offering a straightforward route to extending the literature in this area.

  5. Identification of ion-pair structures in solution by vibrational stark effects

    DOE PAGES

    Hack, John; Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2016-01-25

    Here, ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N)more » infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent.« less

  6. Refinement of the semiclassical theory of the Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    Stark broadening (SB) of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium lines (H-lines) is an important diagnostic tool for many applications. The most "user-friendly" are semiclassical theories of the SB of H-lines: their results can be expressed analytically in a relatively simple form for any H-line. The simplest semiclassical theory is the so-called Conventional Theory (CT), which is frequently referred to as Griem's theory. While by now there are several significantly more advanced semiclassical "non-CT" theories of the SB, Griem's CT is still used by a number of groups performing laboratory experiments or astrophysical observations for the comparison with their experimental or observational results. In the present study we engage unexplored capabilities of the CT for creating analytically a more accurate CT. First, we take into account that the perturbing electrons actually do not move as free particles: rather they move in a dipole potential V=·r/r3, where r is the radius-vector of the perturbing electrons and is the mean value of the radius vector of the atomic electron. Second, Griem's definition of the so-called Weisskopf radius was not quite accurate. Third, in his book of year 1974, Griem suggested changing so-called strong collision constant without changing the Weisskopf radius, while in reality the choices of the Weisskopf radius and of the strong collision constant are interrelated. We show that the above refinements of the CT increase the electron broadening - especially for warm dense plasmas emitting H-lines. By comparison with benchmark experiments concerning the Hα line we demonstrate that the effect of the ion dynamics (neglected in any CT) might be slightly smaller than previously thought, while the effect of the acceleration of perturbing electrons by the ion field in the vicinity of the radiating atom (neglected in any CT) might be greater than previously thought.

  7. Effect of higher-order multipole moments on the Stark line shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, T. A.; Nagayama, T.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral line shapes are sensitive to plasma conditions and are often used to diagnose electron density of laboratory plasmas as well as astrophysical plasmas. Stark line-shape models take into account the perturbation of the radiator's energy structure due to the Coulomb interaction with the surrounding charged particles. Solving this Coulomb interaction is challenging and is commonly approximated via a multipole expansion. However, most models include only up to the second term of the expansion (the dipole term). While there have been studies on the higher-order terms due to one of the species (i.e., either ions or electrons), there is no model that includes the terms beyond dipole from both species. Here, we investigate the importance of the higher-order multipole terms from both species on the Hβ line shape. First, we find that it is important to include higher-order terms consistently from both ions and electrons to reproduce measured line-shape asymmetry. Next, we find that the line shape calculated with the dipole-only approximation becomes inaccurate as density increases. It is necessary to include up to the third (quadrupole) term to compute the line shape accurately within 2%. Since most existing models include only up to the dipole terms, the densities inferred with such models are in question. We find that the model without the quadrupole term slightly underestimates the density, and the discrepancy becomes as large as 12% at high densities. While the case of study is limited to Hβ, we expect similar impact on other lines.

  8. Identification of Ion-Pair Structures in Solution by Vibrational Stark Effects.

    PubMed

    Hack, John; Grills, David C; Miller, John R; Mani, Tomoyasu

    2016-02-18

    Ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N) infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent. PMID:26807492

  9. Measuring electric fields and noncovalent interactions using the vibrational stark effect.

    PubMed

    Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G

    2015-04-21

    Over the past decade, we have developed a spectroscopic approach to measure electric fields inside matter with high spatial (<1 Å) and field (<1 MV/cm) resolution. The approach hinges on exploiting a physical phenomenon known as the vibrational Stark effect (VSE), which ultimately provides a direct mapping between observed vibrational frequencies and electric fields. Therefore, the frequency of a vibrational probe encodes information about the local electric field in the vicinity around the probe. The VSE method has enabled us to understand in great detail the underlying physical nature of several important biomolecular phenomena, such as drug-receptor selectivity in tyrosine kinases, catalysis by the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase, and unidirectional electron transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center. Beyond these specific examples, the VSE has provided a conceptual foundation for how to model intermolecular (noncovalent) interactions in a quantitative, consistent, and general manner. The starting point for research in this area is to choose (or design) a vibrational probe to interrogate the particular system of interest. Vibrational probes are sometimes intrinsic to the system in question, but we have also devised ways to build them into the system (extrinsic probes), often with minimal perturbation. With modern instruments, vibrational frequencies can increasingly be recorded with very high spatial, temporal, and frequency resolution, affording electric field maps correspondingly resolved in space, time, and field magnitude. In this Account, we set out to explain the VSE in broad strokes to make its relevance accessible to chemists of all specialties. Our intention is not to provide an encyclopedic review of published work but rather to motivate the underlying framework of the methodology and to describe how we make and interpret the measurements. Using certain vibrational probes, benchmarked against computer models, it is possible to use the VSE to measure

  10. Identification of Ion-Pair Structures in Solution by Vibrational Stark Effects.

    PubMed

    Hack, John; Grills, David C; Miller, John R; Mani, Tomoyasu

    2016-02-18

    Ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N) infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent.

  11. Photophysics of fulvene under the non-resonant stark effect. Shaping the conical intersection seam.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Barragan, Sergi; Blancafort, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a mechanistic strategy to control the excited state lifetime of fulvene based on shaping the topography of an extended seam of intersection with the non-resonant dynamic Stark effect. Fulvene has a very short excited state lifetime due to an energetically accessible seam of intersection which lies along the methylene torsion coordinate, and the initial decay occurs at the seam segment around the planar conical intersection structure. We have followed a three-step approach to simulate the control. First, we have calculated the effect of a non-resonant electric field on the potential energy surface at the ab initio level, including the field in a self-consistent way. The relative energy of the planar segment of the seam is increased by the non-resonant field. In the second step we simulate the control carrying out MCTDH quantum dynamics propagations under a static non-resonant field to derive the main control mechanisms. At moderately intense fields (epsilon < or = 0.03 a.u.) the decay is faster as compared to the field free case because the vibrational overlap between the excited and ground state vibrational functions is increased. However, at more intense fields (epsilon = 0.04 a.u.) the planar conical intersection is energetically inaccessible and the decay occurs at a slower time scale, at the segment of the seam with more twisted geometries. In the third step, the control over the dynamics is exerted with a non-resonant dynamic field. The acceleration of the decay due to the improved vibrational overlap does not occur, but the decay can be made slower with a dynamic field of 0.08 a.u. The results show the viability of our approach to control the photophysics shaping the topology of the conical intersection seam, and they prove that the extended nature of the seam is crucial for simulating and understanding the control.

  12. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang; Li, Gongping

    2014-04-28

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500 ± 100 K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13 000 ± 400 K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM = FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, the reference reduced mass μ{sub 0} pair of (3.30 ± 0.82 and 1.65 ± 0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900 ± 1800 K.

  13. Paleomagnetism of the Zn-rich Pennsylvanian Stark black shale, Kansas City area, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, K.; Symons, D. T.; Coveney, R. M.

    2007-05-01

    Paleomagnetic results are reported from the metalliferous Stark black shale (Heebner-type) in the Upper Pennsylvanian Kansas City Group. Paleomagnetic analysis of 400 specimens from 28 sites gives a characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) in 17 sites that yields a Late Mississippian to Middle Pennsylvanian paleopole at 32.2 ° N 128.5 ° E (dp = 4.7° and dm = 8.8°). The fact that the observed age is slightly older than the host rock age indicates that the shale's mineralization has a syngenetic origin. The main remanence carrier in the Stark Shale is single or psudosingle domain magnetite or titanomagnetite. Trace hematite, which was generated during modern weathering, likely causes the slightly older age by steepening the primary ChRM by ~2°. The large oval of 95 % confidence is interpreted to be caused by the formation of clay-magnetite aggregates during sediment transport that are easily biased by the gentle paleocurrent at each site acting on their large flat surface. Therefore, the scattered distribution of the site mean remanence declinations found for the Stark Shale is evidence of a detrital remanent magnetization that is formed by primary sedimentary processes and not of remagnetization by secondary hydrothermal processes. The finding that the primary ChRM directions of Heebner-type black shales are so easily scattered by sedimentary processes implies that a highly clustered ChRM direction in a mineralized black shale, such as in Zn-Pb rich SEDEX deposits, is evidence of coeval or post-depositional hydrothermal fluids.

  14. Demonstration of photon Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders in dual-periodical multilayer structures based on porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Estevez, J Octavio; Arriaga, Jesús; Mendez-Blas, Antonio; Reyes-Ayona, Edgar; Escorcia, José; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2012-07-23

    : Theoretical demonstration and experimental evidence of photon Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders (WSLs) in dual-periodical (DP) multilayers, based on porous silicon, are presented. An introduction of the linear gradient in refractive indices in DP structure, which is composed by stacking two different periodic substructures N times, resulted in the appearance of WSLs. Theoretical time-resolved reflection spectrum shows the photon Bloch oscillations with a period of 130 fs. Depending on the values of the structural parameters, one can observe the WSLs in the near infrared or visible region which may allow the generation of terahertz radiation with a potential applications in several fields like imaging.

  15. A new species of Neoperla from China, with a redescription of the female of N. mnong Stark, 1987 (Plecoptera, Perlidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Teng; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the Neoperla clymene group (Plecoptera, Perlidae), Neoperla chebalinga sp. n. from Guangdong Province of southern China is described, illustrated, and compared with related taxa. The new species is characterized by the slender aedeagal tube, strongly sclerotized dorsally, and weakly sclerotized ventrally with an upcurved, medial, finger-like membranous lobe. Additionally the aedeagal sac gradually tapers to a blunt apex with a dorsoapical patch of spines. A supplementary description of the female of Neoperla mnong Stark, 1987 from Guangdong Province, China is also given. PMID:27667948

  16. A new species of Neoperla from China, with a redescription of the female of N. mnong Stark, 1987 (Plecoptera, Perlidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Teng; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the Neoperla clymene group (Plecoptera, Perlidae), Neoperla chebalinga sp. n. from Guangdong Province of southern China is described, illustrated, and compared with related taxa. The new species is characterized by the slender aedeagal tube, strongly sclerotized dorsally, and weakly sclerotized ventrally with an upcurved, medial, finger-like membranous lobe. Additionally the aedeagal sac gradually tapers to a blunt apex with a dorsoapical patch of spines. A supplementary description of the female of Neoperla mnong Stark, 1987 from Guangdong Province, China is also given.

  17. A new species of Neoperla from China, with a redescription of the female of N. mnong Stark, 1987 (Plecoptera, Perlidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Teng; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the Neoperla clymene group (Plecoptera, Perlidae), Neoperla chebalinga sp. n. from Guangdong Province of southern China is described, illustrated, and compared with related taxa. The new species is characterized by the slender aedeagal tube, strongly sclerotized dorsally, and weakly sclerotized ventrally with an upcurved, medial, finger-like membranous lobe. Additionally the aedeagal sac gradually tapers to a blunt apex with a dorsoapical patch of spines. A supplementary description of the female of Neoperla mnong Stark, 1987 from Guangdong Province, China is also given. PMID:27667948

  18. Demonstration of photon Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders in dual-periodical multilayer structures based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez, J. Octavio; Arriaga, Jesús; Mendez-Blas, Antonio; Reyes-Ayona, Edgar; Escorcia, José; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2012-07-01

    Theoretical demonstration and experimental evidence of photon Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders (WSLs) in dual-periodical (DP) multilayers, based on porous silicon, are presented. An introduction of the linear gradient in refractive indices in DP structure, which is composed by stacking two different periodic substructures N times, resulted in the appearance of WSLs. Theoretical time-resolved reflection spectrum shows the photon Bloch oscillations with a period of 130 fs. Depending on the values of the structural parameters, one can observe the WSLs in the near infrared or visible region which may allow the generation of terahertz radiation with a potential applications in several fields like imaging.

  19. Stark spectroscopy of CdTe and CdMnTe quantum dots embedded in n-i-p diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kłopotowski, Ł. Fronc, K.; Wojnar, P.; Wiater, M.; Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G.

    2014-05-28

    We investigate charging effects in CdTe and Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te quantum dots embedded in n-i-p diodes. The tunneling of holes out of the dots at reverse bias and hole injection at forward bias control the dot charge state and allow for its electric field tuning. Furthermore, we analyze the Stark shifts of the photoluminescence transitions and evaluate the effect of the electric field on the binding of the observed excitonic complexes. We find that the binding can be strengthened or weakened depending on the zero-field alignment of the electron and hole wavefunctions.

  20. Stark spectroscopy of CdTe and CdMnTe quantum dots embedded in n-i-p diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłopotowski, Ł.; Fronc, K.; Wojnar, P.; Wiater, M.; Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate charging effects in CdTe and Cd1-xMnxTe quantum dots embedded in n-i-p diodes. The tunneling of holes out of the dots at reverse bias and hole injection at forward bias control the dot charge state and allow for its electric field tuning. Furthermore, we analyze the Stark shifts of the photoluminescence transitions and evaluate the effect of the electric field on the binding of the observed excitonic complexes. We find that the binding can be strengthened or weakened depending on the zero-field alignment of the electron and hole wavefunctions.

  1. A new species of Neoperla from China, with a redescription of the female of N. mnong Stark, 1987 (Plecoptera, Perlidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Teng; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the Neoperla clymene group (Plecoptera, Perlidae), Neoperla chebalinga sp. n. from Guangdong Province of southern China is described, illustrated, and compared with related taxa. The new species is characterized by the slender aedeagal tube, strongly sclerotized dorsally, and weakly sclerotized ventrally with an upcurved, medial, finger-like membranous lobe. Additionally the aedeagal sac gradually tapers to a blunt apex with a dorsoapical patch of spines. A supplementary description of the female of Neoperla mnong Stark, 1987 from Guangdong Province, China is also given.

  2. Essay on Gyroscopic Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tea, Peter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Explains gyroscopic motions to college freshman or high school seniors who have learned about centripetal acceleration and the transformations of a couple. Contains several figures showing the direction of forces and motion. (YP)

  3. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  4. Molecular quantum mechanical gradients within the polarizable embedding approach--application to the internal vibrational Stark shift of acetophenone.

    PubMed

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Gao, Bin; Ruud, Kenneth; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-21

    We present an implementation of analytical quantum mechanical molecular gradients within the polarizable embedding (PE) model to allow for efficient geometry optimizations and vibrational analysis of molecules embedded in large, geometrically frozen environments. We consider a variational ansatz for the quantum region, covering (multiconfigurational) self-consistent-field and Kohn-Sham density functional theory. As the first application of the implementation, we consider the internal vibrational Stark effect of the C=O group of acetophenone in different solvents and derive its vibrational linear Stark tuning rate using harmonic frequencies calculated from analytical gradients and computed local electric fields. Comparisons to PE calculations employing an enlarged quantum region as well as to a non-polarizable embedding scheme show that the inclusion of mutual polarization between acetophenone and water is essential in order to capture the structural modifications and the associated frequency shifts observed in water. For more apolar solvents, a proper description of dispersion and exchange-repulsion becomes increasingly important, and the quality of the optimized structures relies to a larger extent on the quality of the Lennard-Jones parameters. PMID:25612701

  5. Optical Stark spectroscopy of the B̃(1)A('')(000)←X̃(1)A(')(000) system of copper hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Steimle, Timothy C

    2011-01-01

    The B̃(1)A('')(000)←X̃(1)A(')(000) band system of a cold beam of CuOH has been studied field-free and in the presence of a static electric field. The Stark tuning of the low-J levels of the X̃(1)A(')(000) state were analyzed to give a value of 3.968(32) D for the a-component of the permanent electric dipole moment, μ(a). An upper limit of 0.3 D for μ(a)(B̃(1)A('')) is established from the lack of observable Stark tuning for the low-J levels of the B̃(1)A('')(000) state. The experimental value for μ(a)(X̃(1)A(')) is compared to theoretical predictions and other Cu-containing molecules. A molecular orbital correlation diagram is used to rationalize the large change in μ(a) upon excitation. The electronegativity of OH was determined to be 2.81 from a comparison of the determined μ(a) with the experimental μ values for CuF, CuO, and CuS.

  6. Optical Stark spectroscopy of the B~1A''(000)<--X~1A'(000) system of copper hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Steimle, Timothy C.

    2011-01-01

    The tilde B{}^1A^' ' (000)←tilde X{}^1A^' (000) band system of a cold beam of CuOH has been studied field-free and in the presence of a static electric field. The Stark tuning of the low-J levels of the tilde X{}^1A^' (000) state were analyzed to give a value of 3.968(32) D for the a-component of the permanent electric dipole moment, μa. An upper limit of 0.3 D for μa(tilde B{}^1A^' ' ) is established from the lack of observable Stark tuning for the low-J levels of the tilde B{}^1A^' ' (000) state. The experimental value for μa(tilde X{}^1A^' ) is compared to theoretical predictions and other Cu-containing molecules. A molecular orbital correlation diagram is used to rationalize the large change in μa upon excitation. The electronegativity of OH was determined to be 2.81 from a comparison of the determined μa with the experimental μ values for CuF, CuO, and CuS.

  7. Molecular quantum mechanical gradients within the polarizable embedding approach—Application to the internal vibrational Stark shift of acetophenone

    SciTech Connect

    List, Nanna Holmgaard Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kongsted, Jacob; Beerepoot, Maarten T. P.; Gao, Bin; Ruud, Kenneth; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2015-01-21

    We present an implementation of analytical quantum mechanical molecular gradients within the polarizable embedding (PE) model to allow for efficient geometry optimizations and vibrational analysis of molecules embedded in large, geometrically frozen environments. We consider a variational ansatz for the quantum region, covering (multiconfigurational) self-consistent-field and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. As the first application of the implementation, we consider the internal vibrational Stark effect of the C=O group of acetophenone in different solvents and derive its vibrational linear Stark tuning rate using harmonic frequencies calculated from analytical gradients and computed local electric fields. Comparisons to PE calculations employing an enlarged quantum region as well as to a non-polarizable embedding scheme show that the inclusion of mutual polarization between acetophenone and water is essential in order to capture the structural modifications and the associated frequency shifts observed in water. For more apolar solvents, a proper description of dispersion and exchange–repulsion becomes increasingly important, and the quality of the optimized structures relies to a larger extent on the quality of the Lennard-Jones parameters.

  8. Multiple Temperature-Sensing Behavior of Green and Red Upconversion Emissions from Stark Sublevels of Er3+

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Baosheng; Wu, Jinlei; Wang, Xuehan; He, Yangyang; Feng, Zhiqing; Dong, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence properties from the emissions of Stark sublevels of Er3+ were investigated in Er3+-Yb3+-Mo6+-codoped TiO2 phosphors in this study. According to the energy levels split from Er3+, green and red emissions from the transitions of four coupled energy levels, 2H11/2(I)/2H11/2(II), 4S3/2(I)/4S3/2(II), 4F9/2(I)/4F9/2(II), and 2H11/2(I) + 2H11/2(II)/4S3/2(I) + 4S3/2(II), were observed under 976 nm laser diode excitation. By utilizing the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique, temperature-dependent upconversion emissions from these four coupled energy levels were analyzed at length. The optical temperature-sensing behaviors of sensing sensitivity, measurement error, and operating temperature for the four coupled energy levels are discussed, all of which are closely related to the energy gap of the coupled energy levels, FIR value, and luminescence intensity. Experimental results suggest that Er3+-Yb3+-Mo6+-codoped TiO2 phosphor with four pairs of energy levels coupled by Stark sublevels provides a new and effective route to realize multiple optical temperature-sensing through a wide range of temperatures in an independent system. PMID:26690431

  9. Stark level analysis of the spectral line shape of electronic transitions in rare earth ions embedded in host crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkemper, H.; Fischer, S.; Hermle, M.; Goldschmidt, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    Rare earth ions embedded in host crystals are of great interest for many applications. Due to the crystal field of the host material, the energy levels of the rare earth ions split into several Stark levels. The resulting broadening of the spectral line shapes of transitions between those levels determines the upconversion phenomena, especially under broad-spectrum illumination, which are relevant for photovoltaics for instance. In this paper, we present a method to determine the spectral line shape of energy level transitions of rare earth ions from the absorption spectrum of the investigated material. A parameter model is used to describe the structure of the individual energy levels based on a representation of the Stark splitting. The parameters of the model are then determined with an evolutionary optimization algorithm. The described method is applied to the model system of β-NaEr0.2Y0.8F4. The results indicate that for illumination with a wavelength around 1523 nm, simple upconversion processes such as two-step absorption or direct energy transfer are less efficient than commonly assumed. Hence a sequence of efficient processes is suggested as an explanation for the high upconversion quantum yield of β-NaEr0.2Y0.8F4, which has not yet been reported in the literature.

  10. Stark-shift measurement of the {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}, F=3{yields}F=4 hyperfine transition of {sup 133}Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Calosso, Claudio

    2005-06-15

    In this paper we report the measurement of the frequency Stark shift of the ground-state hyperfine transition of {sup 133}Cs observed in a vapor cell through a {lambda} excitation scheme. The measured value of the quadratic Stark coefficient is k=(-2.05{+-}0.04)x10{sup -10} Hz/(V/m){sup 2} when the electric field is perpendicular to the quantization axis. A comparison with the values previously reported in literature is given in view of its interest for the evaluation of the blackbody radiation shift in the primary frequency standards.

  11. Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N{sub 2} plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang; Cheng, Cheng E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-05-15

    An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy, Stark broadening, and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However, the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.

  12. Extensión del Formalismo de Orbitales de Defecto Cuántico al tratamiento del efecto Stark (SQDO).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, J. M.; Martín, I.; Velasco, A. M.

    El estudio experimental de las interacciones de átomos Rydberg altamente excitados con campos eléctricos ha experimentado un creciente interés durante las dos últimas décadas debido, en gran medida, al desarrollo de nuevas técnicas para crear y estudiar átomos Rydberg en el laboratorio. Acompañando a estas nuevas técnicas experimentales, es necesario el desarrollo de modelos teóricos que nos permitan contrastar sus medidas y conocer mejor los fundamentos de los mismos. Desde el punto de vista teórico el conocimiento del desdoblamiento de los niveles energéticos de un átomo en función de la magnitud del campo eléctrico aplicado (lo que se conoce como mapa Stark) es el mejor punto de partida para la descripción del sistema y un prerrequisito fundamental para el cálculo de distintas propiedades atómicas en presencia del campo eléctrico tales como intensidades de transición, umbrales de ionización de campo eléctrico, tiempos de vida, posición y anchura de cruces evitados, etc. En este trabajo presentamos la adaptación del método de orbitales de defecto cuántico [1,2,3] al tratamiento del efecto Stark (SQDO) [4] y su aplicación al cálculo de los desdoblamientos energéticos y fuerzas de oscilador de estados Rydberg en los átomos de Li, Na y K. El propósito de este estudio es, por un lado, desarrollar métodos fiables para la determinación de propiedades atómicas en presencia de campos eléctricos y, por otro, mostrar la fiabilidad de las funciones de onda QDO en la descripción del efecto Stark en sistemas atómicos.

  13. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  14. Stark broadening measurement of the electron density in an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet with double-power electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Muyang; Ren Chunsheng; Wang Dezhen; Zhang Jialiang; Wei Guodong

    2010-03-15

    Characteristics of a double-power electrode dielectric barrier discharge of an argon plasma jet generated at the atmospheric pressure are investigated in this paper. Time-averaged optical emission spectroscopy is used to measure the plasma parameters, of which the excitation electron temperature is determined by the Boltzmann's plot method whereas the gas temperature is estimated using a fiber thermometer. Furthermore, the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer H{sub {beta}} line is applied to measure the electron density, and the simultaneous presence of comparable Doppler, van der Waals, and instrumental broadenings is discussed. Besides, properties of the jet discharge are also studied by electrical diagnosis. It has been found that the electron densities in this argon plasma jet are on the order of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, and the excitation temperature, gas temperature, and electron density increase with the applied voltage. On the other hand, these parameters are inversely proportional to the argon gas flow rate.

  15. Quantum-confined Stark effect on spatially indirect excitons in CdTe/Cdx Zn1-x Te quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, H.; Magnea, N.; Dang, Le Si

    1997-01-01

    The quantum-confined Stark effect is studied in the mixed type-I/type-II CdTe/Cdx Zn1-x Te strained heterostructures. The type-II nature of the light-hole excitons is unambiguously confirmed by the blueshift observed under increasing electric field, in good agreement with calculations. On the other hand, the heavy-hole excitons are redshifted as expected for type-I excitons. The peculiar valence-band alignment, resulting from the sign reversal of the strain between the wells and the barriers, is used to detect the electric-field induced mixing of LH1 and HH2 confined hole states. An accurate value for the long-disputed chemical valence-band offset of CdTe/ZnTe system is extracted as ΔEV=(11+/-3)% of the band-gap difference between unstrained CdTe and ZnTe materials.

  16. Manifestation of anomalous Floquet states with longevity in dynamic fractional Stark ladder with high AC electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Yuya; Ohno, Fumitaka; Maeshima, Nobuya; Hino, Ken-ichi

    2016-09-01

    We examine a resonance structure of Floquet state in dynamic fractional Stark ladder (DFSL) realized in biased semiconductor superlattices driven by a terahertz cw laser on the basis of the R-matrix Floquet theory. To do this, we calculate an excess density of state ρ (ex)(E) corresponding to lifetime of the Floquet state with a fractional matching ratio η, where η is the ratio of a Bloch frequency ΩB to a laser frequency ω, namely, η =ΩB / ω. The results for η = 3 / 2 demonstrate the appearance of discernibly large peaks associated with Floquet states with longevity in a region of relatively high laser-intensity. The underlying physics is discussed in terms of an analytical expression of ρ (ex)(E) and the associated Green function in which ponderomotive couplings are included in a non-perturbative way.

  17. A new Stark decelerator based surface scattering instrument for studying energy transfer at the gas-surface interface

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Grätz, Fabian; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim; Haak, Henrik; Meijer, Gerard

    2015-04-15

    We report on the design and characterization of a new apparatus for performing quantum-state resolved surface scattering experiments. The apparatus combines optical state-specific molecule preparation with a compact hexapole and a Stark decelerator to prepare carrier gas-free pulses of quantum-state pure CO molecules with velocities controllable between 33 and 1000 m/s with extremely narrow velocity distributions. The ultrahigh vacuum surface scattering chamber includes homebuilt ion and electron detectors, a closed-cycle helium cooled single crystal sample mount capable of tuning surface temperature between 19 and 1337 K, a Kelvin probe for non-destructive work function measurements, a precision leak valve manifold for targeted adsorbate deposition, an inexpensive quadrupole mass spectrometer modified to perform high resolution temperature programmed desorption experiments and facilities to clean and characterize the surface.

  18. Dynamic Stark Spectroscopic Measurements of Microwave Electric Fields Inside the Plasma Near a High-Power Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepper, C. C.; Isler, R. C.; Hillairet, J.; Martin, E. H.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Harris, J. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourié, B.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Martin, V.; Tore Supra Lower Hybrid Systems Technical Team

    2013-05-01

    Fully dynamic Stark effect visible spectroscopy was used for the first time to directly measure the local rf electric field in the boundary plasma near a high-power antenna in high-performance, magnetically confined, fusion energy experiment. The measurement was performed in the superconducting tokamak Tore Supra, in the near field of a 1-3 MW, lower-hybrid, 3.7 GHz wave-launch antenna, and combined with modeling of neutral atom transport to estimate the local rf electric field amplitude (as low as 1-2kV/cm) and direction in this region. The measurement was then shown to be consistent with the predicted values from a 2D full-wave propagation model. Notably the measurement confirmed that the electric field direction deviates substantially from the direction in which it is launched by the waveguides as it penetrates only a few cm radially inward into the plasma from the waveguides, consistent with the model.

  19. Stark effect of atomic helium second triplet series in electric fields up to 1600 kV cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windholz, L.; Winklhofer, E.; Drozdowski, R.; Kwela, J.; Waşowicz, T. J.; Heldt, J.

    2008-12-01

    We present experimental and theoretical investigations of the spectral series 2 3P-n 3Q (n=3-10, Q=S, P, D, ..., n-1) in electric fields up to 1600 kV cm-1. Such fields cause—for n>6—shifts of the upper levels of the observed transitions which are larger than the separation between levels with different principal quantum numbers. The patterns belonging to a certain principal quantum number become similar to hydrogen patterns; they are nearly symmetric and show a nearly linear Stark shift in higher electric fields. The applied fields were high enough that patterns belonging to neighboring principal quantum numbers begin to overlap, which leads to interesting level-anticrossing effects. The experimental results are compared with numerical calculations taking into account mixing between states of different principal quantum numbers and also between singlet and triplet states. The agreement between experimental and theoretical line shifts is quite good.

  20. A temporally and spatially resolved electron density diagnostic method for the edge plasma based on Stark broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, A.; Martin, E. H.; Shannon, S. C.; Isler, R. C.; Caughman, J. B. O.

    2016-11-01

    An electron density diagnostic (≥1010 cm-3) capable of high temporal (ms) and spatial (mm) resolution is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The diagnostic is based on measuring the Stark broadened, Doppler-free spectral line profile of the n = 6-2 hydrogen Balmer series transition. The profile is then fit to a fully quantum mechanical model including the appropriate electric and magnetic field operators. The quasi-static approach used to calculate the Doppler-free spectral line profile is outlined here and the results from the model are presented for H-δ spectra for electron densities of 1010-1013 cm-3. The profile shows complex behavior due to the interaction between the magnetic substates of the atom.

  1. Influence of electric field on spectral positions of dislocation-related luminescence peaks in silicon: Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlidze, T.; Arguirov, T.; Kittler, M.; Hoang, T.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2007-11-01

    Spectral positions of dislocation-related luminescence (DRL) peaks from dislocation loops located close to a p-n junction in silicon were shifted by carrier injection level. We suppose that the excitonic transition energies of DRL were reduced by an effective electric field at dislocation sites due to quadratic Stark effect (QSE). The field results from built-in junction field reduced by carrier injection. A constant of the shift, obtained from fitting of the data with QSE equation, was 0.0186meV /(kV/cm)2. The effect can explain the diversity of DRL spectra in silicon and may allow tuning and modulation of DRL for future photonic applications.

  2. Donor hyperfine Stark shift and the role of central-cell corrections in tight-binding theory.

    PubMed

    Usman, Muhammad; Rahman, Rajib; Salfi, Joe; Bocquel, Juanita; Voisin, Benoit; Rogge, Sven; Klimeck, Gerhard; Hollenberg, Lloyd L C

    2015-04-22

    Atomistic tight-binding (TB) simulations are performed to calculate the Stark shift of the hyperfine coupling for a single arsenic (As) donor in silicon (Si). The role of the central-cell correction is studied by implementing both the static and the non-static dielectric screenings of the donor potential, and by including the effect of the lattice strain close to the donor site. The dielectric screening of the donor potential tunes the value of the quadratic Stark shift parameter (η2) from -1.3 × 10(-3) µm(2) V(-2) for the static dielectric screening to -1.72 × 10(-3) µm(2) V(-2) for the non-static dielectric screening. The effect of lattice strain, implemented by a 3.2% change in the As-Si nearest-neighbour bond length, further shifts the value of η2 to -1.87 × 10(-3) µm(2) V(-2), resulting in an excellent agreement of theory with the experimentally measured value of -1.9 ± 0.2 × 10(-3) µm(2) V(-2). Based on our direct comparison of the calculations with the experiment, we conclude that the previously ignored non-static dielectric screening of the donor potential and the lattice strain significantly influence the donor wave function charge density and thereby leads to a better agreement with the available experimental data sets. PMID:25783758

  3. The Ion Line Stark Parameters Dependence on the Emitter Rest Core Charge and the Electron Temperature within Ns-Np Transition Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Scepanovic, Mara; Puric, Jagos

    2007-04-23

    Recently published Stark widths and shifts measured and calculated data and their dependence on the upper level ionization potential {chi} are used here to demonstrate the existence of the other kinds of reularities within similar spectra of different elements and their ionization stage. The emphasis is on the Stark parameter dependence on the rest core charge and the electron temperatures for the lines from similar spectra. The found relations connecting Stark broadening and shift parameters and upper level ionization potential, rest core charge and electron temperature were used for a prediction of new Stark broadening data, avoiding much more comlicated procedures. For opacity calculations and investigation of stellar atmosphere, when a large number of line broadening data was required, present investigation are useful in enlarging the number of required data. This field of research remains largely open to other demonstrations of regularities and similarities, as long as one can relate the same kind of spectroscopic transition. Also, the attained dependencies can be used as an additional criteria for checking accuracy of the particular theoretical and experimental data from diferent sources.

  4. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  5. Seeing blur: 'motion sharpening' without motion.

    PubMed Central

    Georgeson, Mark A; Hammett, Stephen T

    2002-01-01

    It is widely supposed that things tend to look blurred when they are moving fast. Previous work has shown that this is true for sharp edges but, paradoxically, blurred edges look sharper when they are moving than when stationary. This is 'motion sharpening'. We show that blurred edges also look up to 50% sharper when they are presented briefly (8-24 ms) than at longer durations (100-500 ms) without motion. This argues strongly against high-level models of sharpening based specifically on compensation for motion blur. It also argues against a recent, low-level, linear filter model that requires motion to produce sharpening. No linear filter model can explain our finding that sharpening was similar for sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal gratings, since linear filters can never distort sine waves. We also conclude that the idea of a 'default' assumption of sharpness is not supported by experimental evidence. A possible source of sharpening is a nonlinearity in the contrast response of early visual mechanisms to fast or transient temporal changes, perhaps based on the magnocellular (M-cell) pathway. Our finding that sharpening is not diminished at low contrast sets strong constraints on the nature of the nonlinearity. PMID:12137571

  6. The rate of collisions due to Brownian or gravitational motion of small drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Davis, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of the collision rate of two spherical drops undergoing Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation are presented. The diffusion equation for relative Brownian motion of two drops is derived, and the relative motion of pairs of drops in gravitational sedimentation is traced via a trajectory analysis in order to develop theoretical models to determine the collision efficiencies, both with and without interparticle forces applied between the drops. It is concluded that finite collision rates between nondeforming fluid drops are possible for Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation in the absence of attractive forces, in stark contrast to the prediction that lubrication forces prevent rigid spheres from contacting each other unless an attractive force that becomes infinite as the separation approaches zero is applied. Collision rates are shown to increase as the viscosity of the drop-phase decreases. In general, hydrodynamic interactions reduce the collision rates more for gravitational collisions than for Brownian collisions.

  7. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  8. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  9. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  10. Motion through Syntactic Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Michele I.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of (Talmy, 1985), (Talmy, 1985) and (Talmy, 2000) typology sparked significant interest in linguistic relativity in the arena of motion language. Through careful analysis of the conflation patterns evident in the language of motion events, Talmy noted that one class of languages, V-languages, tends to encode path along with the…

  11. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  12. Aristotle, Motion, and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jane

    Aristotle rejects a world vision of changing reality as neither useful nor beneficial to human life, and instead he reaffirms both change and eternal reality, fuses motion and rest, and ends up with "well-behaved" changes. This concept of motion is foundational to his world view, and from it emerges his theory of knowledge, philosophy of nature,…

  13. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  14. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  15. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  16. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  17. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  18. Brownian motion goes ballistic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2012-02-01

    It is the randomness that is considered the hallmark of Brownian motion, but already in Einstein's seminal 1905 paper on Brownian motion it is implied that this randomness must break down at short time scales when the inertia of the particle kicks in. As a result, the particle's trajectories should lose its randomness and become smooth. The characteristic time scale for this transition is given by the ratio of the particle's mass to its viscous drag coefficient. For a 1 μm glass particle in water and at room temperature, this timescale is on the order of 100 ns. Early calculations, however, neglected the inertia of the liquid surrounding the particle which induces a transition from random diffusive to non-diffusive Brownian motion already at much larger timescales. In this first non-diffusive regime, particles of the same size but with different densities still move at almost the same rate as a result of hydrodynamic correlations. To observe Brownian motion that is dominated by the inertia of the particle, i.e. ballistic motion, one has to observe the particle at significantly shorter time scales on the order of nanoseconds. Due to the lack of sufficiently fast and precise detectors, such experiments were so far not possible on individual particles. I will describe how we were able to observe the transition from hydrodynamically dominated Brownian motion to ballistic Brownian motion in a liquid. I will compare our data with current theories for Brownian motion on fast timescales that take into account the inertia of both the liquid and the particle. The newly gained ability to measure the fast Brownian motion of an individual particle paves the way for detailed studies of confined Brownian motion and Brownian motion in heterogeneous media. [4pt] [1] Einstein, A. "Uber die von der molekularkinetischen Theorie der W"arme geforderte Bewegung von in ruhenden Fl"ussigkeiten suspendierten Teilchen. Ann. Phys. 322, 549--560 (1905). [0pt] [2] Lukic, B., S. Jeney, C

  19. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  20. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  1. Spontaneous motion in hierarchically assembled active matter

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Tim; Chen, Daniel T. N.; DeCamp, Stephen J.; Heymann, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-01-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication1. Besides their biological importance, such inherently non-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for developing biomimetic active materials from microscopic components that consume energy to generate continuous motion2–4. Being actively driven, these materials are not constrained by the laws of equilibrium statistical mechanics and can thus exhibit highly sought-after properties such as autonomous motility, internally generated flows and self-organized beating5–7. Starting from extensile microtubule bundles, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of conventional polymer gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubules form a percolating active network characterized by internally driven chaotic flows, hydrodynamic instabilities, enhanced transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, 3D networks spontaneously adsorb onto the droplet surfaces to produce highly active 2D nematic liquid crystals whose streaming flows are controlled by internally generated fractures and self-healing, as well as unbinding and annihilation of oppositely charged disclination defects. The resulting active emulsions exhibit unexpected properties, such as autonomous motility, which are not observed in their passive analogues. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblages of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are starkly different from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks, challenging us to develop a theoretical framework that would allow for a systematic engineering of their far-from-equilibrium material properties. PMID:23135402

  2. Visualizing motion in video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lisa M.; Crayne, Susan

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we present a visualization system and method for measuring, inspecting and analyzing motion in video. Starting from a simple motion video, the system creates a still image representation which we call a digital strobe photograph. Similar to visualization techniques used in conventional film photography to capture high-speed motion using strobe lamps or very fast shutters, and to capture time-lapse motion where the shutter is left open, this methodology creates a single image showing the motion of one or a small number of objects over time. Based on digital background subtraction, we assume that the background is stationary or at most slowing changing and that the camera position is fixed. The method is capable of displaying the motion based on a parameter indicating the time step between successive movements. It can also overcome problems of visualizing movement that is obscured by previous movements. The method is used in an educational software tool for children to measure and analyze various motions. Examples are given using simple physical objects such as balls and pendulums, astronomical events such as the path of the stars around the north pole at night, or the different types of locomotion used by snakes.

  3. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  4. Projectile Motion with Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alwis, Tilak

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use the computer algebra system (CAS) Mathematica to analyze projectile motion with and without air resistance. These experiments result in several conjectures leading to theorems. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/ASK)

  5. Motional EMF demonstration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingman, Robert; Popescu, Sabin

    2001-03-01

    A simple quantitative motional emf experiment. The induced voltage is recorded in this computer-based experiment as a coil is moved through the field of a permanent magnet. Results compare closely with predicted values.

  6. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  7. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  8. Dizziness and Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... special tests of eye motion after warm or cold water or air is used to stimulate the ... Get enough fluids Treat infections, including ear infections, colds, flu, sinus congestion, and other respiratory infections If ...

  9. Molecular Motion Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shourd, Melvin L.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the construction of an inexpensive apparatus which utilizes the oscillatory motion of 60 cycle AC current in conjunction with an electromagnetic to illustrate various principles and processes in geology. (SL)

  10. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  11. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  12. Motion Belts: Visualization of Human Motion Data on a Timeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Kaihara, Ryota; Saito, Suguru; Nakajima, Masayuki

    Because motion capture system enabled us to capture a number of human motions, the demand for a method to easily browse the captured motion database has been increasing. In this paper, we propose a method to generate simple visual outlines of motion clips, for the purpose of efficient motion data browsing. Our method unfolds a motion clip into a 2D stripe of keyframes along a timeline that is based on semantic keyframe extraction and the best view point selection for each keyframes. With our visualization, timing and order of actions in the motions are clearly visible and the contents of multiple motions are easily comparable. In addition, because our method is applicable for a wide variety of motions, it can generate outlines for a large amount of motions fully automatically.

  13. Tunable room-temperature spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed layered halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Giovanni, David; Chong, Wee Kiang; Dewi, Herlina Arianita; Thirumal, Krishnamoorthy; Neogi, Ishita; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast spin manipulation for opto–spin logic applications requires material systems that have strong spin-selective light-matter interaction. Conventional inorganic semiconductor nanostructures [for example, epitaxial II to VI quantum dots and III to V multiple quantum wells (MQWs)] are considered forerunners but encounter challenges such as lattice matching and cryogenic cooling requirements. Two-dimensional halide perovskite semiconductors, combining intrinsic tunable MQW structures and large oscillator strengths with facile solution processability, can offer breakthroughs in this area. We demonstrate novel room-temperature, strong ultrafast spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed (C6H4FC2H4NH3)2PbI4 perovskite thin films. Exciton spin states are selectively tuned by ~6.3 meV using circularly polarized optical pulses without any external photonic cavity (that is, corresponding to a Rabi energy of ~55 meV and equivalent to applying a 70 T magnetic field), which is much larger than any conventional system. The facile halide and organic replacement in these perovskites affords control of the dielectric confinement and thus presents a straightforward strategy for tuning light-matter coupling strength. PMID:27386583

  14. Self-screening of the quantum confined Stark effect by the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Wei Sun, Xiao E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org; Volkan Demir, Hilmi E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-06-16

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the polar orientations significantly suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) caused by the strong polarization induced electric field in the quantum wells, which is a fundamental problem intrinsic to the III-nitrides. Here, we show that the QCSE is self-screened by the polarization induced bulk charges enabled by designing quantum barriers. The InN composition of the InGaN quantum barrier graded along the growth orientation opportunely generates the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barrier, which well compensate the polarization induced interface charges, thus avoiding the electric field in the quantum wells. Consequently, the optical output power and the external quantum efficiency are substantially improved for the LEDs. The ability to self-screen the QCSE using polarization induced bulk charges opens up new possibilities for device engineering of III-nitrides not only in LEDs but also in other optoelectronic devices.

  15. Facultatively internal fertilization and anomalous embryonic development of a non-copulatory sculpin Hemilepidotus gilberti Jordan and Starks (Scorpaeniformes: Cottidae).

    PubMed

    Hayakawa; Munehara

    2001-01-01

    Fertilized residual eggs were observed in the ovaries of spent females of a non-copulatory sculpin Hemilepidotus gilberti Jordan and Starks. Fertilized eggs were present in 23 of 35 females, and approximately 38% of the total residual eggs (n=227) were fertilized. These eggs were thought to be fertilized facultatively with spermatozoa that entered the ovary through ovarian fluid during spawning. The high calcium concentration (1.42+/-0.21 mM kg(-1)) in ovarian fluid, which is beyond the threshold concentration required for fertilization, may allow internal fertilization to occur. Embryos at various developmental stages were observed, but all were deformed and surrounded by unhardened chorions. Since no larvae were observed, all the fertilized residual eggs would have degenerated in the ovary in accordance with other unfertilized residual eggs. These observations suggest that the ovary of the oviparous fish H. gilberti is an unsuitable environment for embryos to develop, possibly because it may be unable to supply developing embryos with needed elements, such as oxygen.

  16. Infrared Laser Stark Spectroscopy of the OH\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotCH3OH Complex Isolated in Superfluid Helium Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, Christopher M.; Brice, Joseph T.; Douberly, Gary E.; Hernandez, Federico J.; Pino, Gustavo A.

    2015-06-01

    The elimination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the atmosphere is initiated by reactions with OH, NO3 and O3. For oxygenated VOCs, such as alcohols, ketones, ethers, etc., reactions occur nearly exclusively with the hydroxyl radical. Furthermore, the potential energy surfaces associated with reactions between OH and oxygenated VOCs generally feature a pre-reactive complex, stabilized by hydrogen bonding, which results in rate constants that exhibit large negative temperature dependencies. This was explicitly demonstrated recently for the OH + methanol (MeOH) reaction, where the rate constant increased by nearly two orders of magnitude when the temperature decreased from 200 K to below 70 K, highlighting the potential impact of this reaction in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this study, we trap this postulated pre-reactive complex formed between OH and MeOH using He nanodroplet isolation (HENDI) techniques, and probe this species using a combination of mass spectrometry and infrared laser Stark spectroscopy. Atkinson, R.; Arey, J., Chem. Rev. 2003, 103, 4605-4638. Mellouki, A.; Le Bras, G.; Sidebottom, H., Chem. Rev. 2003, 103, 5077-5096. Smith, I. W. M.; Ravishankara, A. R., J. Phys. Chem. A 2002, 106, 4798-4807 Shannon, R. J.; Blitz, M. A.; Goddard, A.; Heard, D. E., Nat. Chem. 2013, 5, 745-749. Martin, J. C. G.; Caravan, R. L.; Blitz, M. A.; Heard, D. E.; Plane, J. M. C., J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 2693-2701.

  17. Tunable room-temperature spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed layered halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, David; Chong, Wee Kiang; Dewi, Herlina Arianita; Thirumal, Krishnamoorthy; Neogi, Ishita; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast spin manipulation for opto-spin logic applications requires material systems that have strong spin-selective light-matter interaction. Conventional inorganic semiconductor nanostructures [for example, epitaxial II to VI quantum dots and III to V multiple quantum wells (MQWs)] are considered forerunners but encounter challenges such as lattice matching and cryogenic cooling requirements. Two-dimensional halide perovskite semiconductors, combining intrinsic tunable MQW structures and large oscillator strengths with facile solution processability, can offer breakthroughs in this area. We demonstrate novel room-temperature, strong ultrafast spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed (C6H4FC2H4NH3)2PbI4 perovskite thin films. Exciton spin states are selectively tuned by ~6.3 meV using circularly polarized optical pulses without any external photonic cavity (that is, corresponding to a Rabi energy of ~55 meV and equivalent to applying a 70 T magnetic field), which is much larger than any conventional system. The facile halide and organic replacement in these perovskites affords control of the dielectric confinement and thus presents a straightforward strategy for tuning light-matter coupling strength. PMID:27386583

  18. Optical Stark Spectroscopy of the tilde{A}2Π- tilde{X}2Σ+ Band of BaOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Sarah E.; Steimle, Timothy C.

    2011-06-01

    Transitions of the tilde{A}2Π- tilde{X}2Σ+ band system of barium monohydroxide, BaOH, were observed and recorded from 11483-11485 Cm-1 and 12041-12044 Cm-1. The features were readily identified using the results of the Doppler-limited measurements. The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum was analyzed to give optimized field-free excited state parameters. The parameters for the tilde{X}2Σ+ state were constrained to the previously determined values. The permanent electric dipole moments for the tilde{X}2Σ+ and tilde{A}2Π states have been determined from the analysis of the optical Stark spectra for the R21(0.5), Q21(1.5), and R2(0.5) lines. The obtained values were μ(tilde{X}2Σ+)= 1.426(38)D and μ(tilde{A}2Π)= 0.477(7) D. The results are compared with predicted values from semi-empirical models and those for CaOH and SrOH. J. G. Wang, J. D. Tandy and P. F. Bernath J. Mol. Spectrosc. 252, 31 (2008) M. A. Anderson, M. D. Allen, W. L. Barclay, Jr, and L. M. Ziurys Chem. Phys. Lett 205, 415 (1993) T. C. Steimle, D. A. Fletcher, K. Y. Jung and C. T. Scurlock J. Chem. Phys. 96, 2556 (1992).

  19. Elimination of the Stark shift from the vibrational transition frequency of optically trapped {sup 174}Yb{sup 6}Li molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Masatoshi; Gopakumar, Geetha; Abe, Minori; Hada, Masahiko

    2011-08-15

    Transition frequencies of cold molecules must be accurately evaluated to test the variance in the proton-to-electron mass ratio. Measuring the X {sup 2}{Sigma}(v,N)=(0,0){yields}(1,0) transition frequency of optically trapped {sup 174}Yb{sup 6}Li molecules is a promising method for achieving this goal. The Stark shifts induced by trap and probe (for the Raman transition) lasers are eliminated by choosing appropriate frequencies (magic frequencies) during the construction of the optical lattice. In the far-off resonance region, the Stark shift is found to be less than 10{sup -16} even when the laser frequencies are detuned from the magic frequencies by {approx}1 MHz.

  20. Geologically current plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Argus, Donald F.

    2010-04-01

    We describe best-fitting angular velocities and MORVEL, a new closure-enforced set of angular velocities for the geologically current motions of 25 tectonic plates that collectively occupy 97 per cent of Earth's surface. Seafloor spreading rates and fault azimuths are used to determine the motions of 19 plates bordered by mid-ocean ridges, including all the major plates. Six smaller plates with little or no connection to the mid-ocean ridges are linked to MORVEL with GPS station velocities and azimuthal data. By design, almost no kinematic information is exchanged between the geologically determined and geodetically constrained subsets of the global circuit-MORVEL thus averages motion over geological intervals for all the major plates. Plate geometry changes relative to NUVEL-1A include the incorporation of Nubia, Lwandle and Somalia plates for the former Africa plate, Capricorn, Australia and Macquarie plates for the former Australia plate, and Sur and South America plates for the former South America plate. MORVEL also includes Amur, Philippine Sea, Sundaland and Yangtze plates, making it more useful than NUVEL-1A for studies of deformation in Asia and the western Pacific. Seafloor spreading rates are estimated over the past 0.78 Myr for intermediate and fast spreading centres and since 3.16 Ma for slow and ultraslow spreading centres. Rates are adjusted downward by 0.6-2.6mmyr-1 to compensate for the several kilometre width of magnetic reversal zones. Nearly all the NUVEL-1A angular velocities differ significantly from the MORVEL angular velocities. The many new data, revised plate geometries, and correction for outward displacement thus significantly modify our knowledge of geologically current plate motions. MORVEL indicates significantly slower 0.78-Myr-average motion across the Nazca-Antarctic and Nazca-Pacific boundaries than does NUVEL-1A, consistent with a progressive slowdown in the eastward component of Nazca plate motion since 3.16 Ma. It also

  1. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the etiology, prediction, treatment and prevention of space motion sickness, designed to minimize the impact of this syndrome which was experienced frequently and with severity by individuals on the Skylab missions, on Space Shuttle crews is reviewed. Theories of the cause of space motion sickness currently under investigation by NASA include sensory conflict, which argues that motion sickness symptoms result from a mismatch between the total pattern of information from the spatial senses and that stored from previous experiences, and fluid shift, based upon the redistribution of bodily fluids that occurs upon continued exposure to weightlessness. Attempts are underway to correlate space motion sickness susceptibility to different provocative environments, vestibular and nonvestibular responses, and the rate of acquisition and length of retention of sensory adaptation. Space motion sickness countermeasures under investigation include various drug combinations, of which the equal combination of promethazine and ephedrine has been found to be as effective as the scopolomine and dexedrine combination, and vestibular adaptation and biofeedback training and autogenic therapy.

  2. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  3. Local Electric Field Strength in a Hollow Cathode Determined by Stark Splitting of the 2S Level of Hydrogen Isotopes by Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.; Rosa, M. I. de la; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.; Gonzalo, A. B.

    2008-10-22

    In this work we present Doppler-free two-photon optogalvanic spectroscopy as a tool to measure the electric field strength in the cathode fall region of a hollow cathode discharge via the Stark splitting of the 2S level of atomic deuterium. The strong electric field strength present in the hollow cathode is determined for various discharge conditions which allows studying the corresponding variations of the cathode fall, and its changes with discharge operation time.

  4. Systematic experimental study of the Stark broadening of C II, C III, N II, N III, O II and O III spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, B.; Popovic, M. V.; Konjevic, N.

    1999-04-01

    We report the experimental Stark widths of plasma broadened lines belonging to 3s-3p and 3p-3d transitions of singly and doubly ionized C, N and O emitters. The light source was a low pressure pulsed arc. The plasma electron densities were determined from the width of the Hell P{sub {alpha}} line while the electron temperatures were measured from the relative line intensities of five N II spectral lines.

  5. Brownian motion of graphene.

    PubMed

    Maragó, Onofrio M; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Saija, Rosalba; Privitera, Giulia; Gucciardi, Pietro G; Iatì, Maria Antonia; Calogero, Giuseppe; Jones, Philip H; Borghese, Ferdinando; Denti, Paolo; Nicolosi, Valeria; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2010-12-28

    Brownian motion is a manifestation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of statistical mechanics. It regulates systems in physics, biology, chemistry, and finance. We use graphene as prototype material to unravel the consequences of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in two dimensions, by studying the Brownian motion of optically trapped graphene flakes. These orient orthogonal to the light polarization, due to the optical constants anisotropy. We explain the flake dynamics in the optical trap and measure force and torque constants from the correlation functions of the tracking signals, as well as comparing experiments with a full electromagnetic theory of optical trapping. The understanding of optical trapping of two-dimensional nanostructures gained through our Brownian motion analysis paves the way to light-controlled manipulation and all-optical sorting of biological membranes and anisotropic macromolecules. PMID:21133432

  6. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  7. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  8. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  9. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  10. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  11. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  12. Mechanics of amoeboid motion

    SciTech Connect

    Dembo, M.

    1986-01-01

    The reactive flow model is a putative description of amoeboid cytoplasm based on the formalism of multifield fluid mechanics. We show by direct numerical computations that the reactive flow model is able to account for various phenomena observed in dissociated cytoplasm and/or in vitro contractile networks. These phenomena include states of relaxation or mechanical equilibrium, as well as transitions between such states, by processes of expansion or contraction. Simulations also indicate the existence of states of chaotic or turbulent cytoplasmic streaming. Finally, simulations yield steady states of coherent motion similar to motions observed in cytoplasm dissociated from the giant amoeba, Chaos carolinensis.

  13. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  14. Marbles in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Helen; Meyers, Bernice; Schmidt, William

    1999-01-01

    Marbles were successfully used to help primary students develop concepts of motion. Marble-unit activities began with shaking and rattling inference bags and predicting by listening just how many marbles were in each bag. Students made qualitative and quantitative observations of the marbles, manipulated marbles with a partner, and observed…

  15. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  16. Introducing Simple Harmonic Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    2002-01-01

    Explains the origin and significance of harmonic motion which is an important topic that has wide application in the world. Describes the phenomenon by using an auxiliary circle to help illustrate the key relationships between acceleration, displacement, time, velocity, and phase. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  17. Theory of orthodontic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepe, S.; Pepe, W. D.; Strauss, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A general theory of orthodontic motion is developed that can be applied to determine the forces necessary to induce a given tooth to move to the predetermined desirable position. It is assumed that the natural (nonorthodontic) forces may be represented by a periodic function and the orthodontic forces may be superimposed upon the natural forces. A simple expression is derived for the applied stress.

  18. Linear motion valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The linear motion valve is described. The valve spool employs magnetically permeable rings, spaced apart axially, which engage a sealing assembly having magnetically permeable pole pieces in magnetic relationship with a magnet. The gap between the ring and the pole pieces is sealed with a ferrofluid. Depletion of the ferrofluid is minimized.

  19. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  20. Planets in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2005-01-01

    All the planets in the solar system revolve around the Sun in the same direction, clockwise when viewed from above the North Pole. This is referred to as direct motion. From the perspective on the Earth's surface, the planets travel east across the sky in relation to the background of stars. The Sun also moves eastward daily, but this is an…

  1. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-03-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a bicycle wheel.

  2. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  3. A world in motion

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A World in Motion is a physical science curriculum supplement for grades four, five, and six which responds to the need to promote and teach sound science and mathematics concepts. Using the A World in Motion kits, teachers work in partnership with practicing engineer or scientists volunteers to provide students with fun, exciting, and relevant hands-on science and math experiences. During the A World in Motion experience, students work together in {open_quotes}Engineering Design Teams{close_quotes} exploring physics concepts through a series of activities. Each student is assigned a role as either a facilities engineer, development engineer, test engineer, or project engineer and is given responsibilities paralleling those of engineers in industry. The program culminates in a {open_quotes}Design Review{close_quotes} where students can communicate their results, demonstrate their designs, and receive recognition for their efforts. They are given a chance to take on responsibility and build self-esteem. Since January 1991, over 12,000 volunteers engineers have been involved with the program, with a distribution of 20,000 A World in Motion kit throughout the U.S. and Canada.

  4. Solar Motion from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treschman, Keith

    2009-01-01

    At noon throughout the year the Sun has a north-south and east-west motion around the meridian. Earliest/latest sunrises and sunsets do not occur at the solstices and the effect is more pronounced with decreasing latitude. This phenomenon is calculated for 25 Australian cities and the following observations are recorded: (1) The latest sunrise…

  5. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  6. Do Fish Perceive Illusory Motion?

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Simone; Agrillo, Christian; Dadda, Marco; Bisazza, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Motion illusion refers to a perception of motion that is absent or different in the physical stimulus. These illusions are a powerful non-invasive tool for understanding the neurobiology of vision because they tell us, indirectly, how we process motion. There is general agreement in ascribing motion illusion to higher-level processing in the visual cortex, but debate remains about the exact role of eye movements and cortical networks in triggering it. Surprisingly, there have been no studies investigating global illusory motion evoked by static patterns in animal species other than humans. Herein, we show that fish perceive one of the most studied motion illusions, the Rotating Snakes. Fish responded similarly to real and illusory motion. The demonstration that complex global illusory motion is not restricted to humans and can be found even in species that do not have a cortex paves the way to develop animal models to study the neurobiological bases of motion perception. PMID:25246001

  7. Motion dominance in binocular rivalry depends on extraretinal motions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Ryohei; Motoyoshi, Isamu; Sato, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In binocular rivalry, moving stimulus is dominant over stationary stimulus. This is called motion dominance. The motion here is usually a motion defined on the retina (retinal motion). However, motion can be defined in several different coordinates. It can be defined with respect to objects in the background (object-based motion) or to observers' head or body (spatiotopic motion), as well as to the retinal coordinate. In this study, we examined the role of motions defined by these three coordinates. A dichoptic pair of gratings was presented to create a binocular rivalry, one of which was moving and the other stationary. A fixation point and a reference background were either moving with the grating or stationary, depending on the condition. Different combinations of the three types of motions were created by having the observer track the fixation point or the background when they are moving. It was found that the retinal motion does not necessarily yield motion dominance, and that the motion dominance is determined by the combination of motions defined by different coordinate systems.

  8. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Computational Motion Phantoms and Statistical Models of Respiratory Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian

    Breathing motion is not a robust and 100 % reproducible process, and inter- and intra-fractional motion variations form an important problem in radiotherapy of the thorax and upper abdomen. A widespread consensus nowadays exists that it would be useful to use prior knowledge about respiratory organ motion and its variability to improve radiotherapy planning and treatment delivery. This chapter discusses two different approaches to model the variability of respiratory motion. In the first part, we review computational motion phantoms, i.e. computerized anatomical and physiological models. Computational phantoms are excellent tools to simulate and investigate the effects of organ motion in radiation therapy and to gain insight into methods for motion management. The second part of this chapter discusses statistical modeling techniques to describe the breathing motion and its variability in a population of 4D images. Population-based models can be generated from repeatedly acquired 4D images of the same patient (intra-patient models) and from 4D images of different patients (inter-patient models). The generation of those models is explained and possible applications of those models for motion prediction in radiotherapy are exemplified. Computational models of respiratory motion and motion variability have numerous applications in radiation therapy, e.g. to understand motion effects in simulation studies, to develop and evaluate treatment strategies or to introduce prior knowledge into the patient-specific treatment planning.

  10. Motion of Rydberg atoms with strong permanent-electric-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Luís Felipe; Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Raithel, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Using classical trajectories simulations, we investigate the dynamics of a cold sample of Rydberg atoms with high permanent electric dipole moments. The dipolar state can be created using an adiabatic passage through an avoided crossing between an S-like state and a linear Stark state. The simulations yield the pair-correlation functions (PCF) of the atom samples, which allow us to extract the motion of Rydberg-atom pairs in the many-body system. The results reveal the strength and the anisotropic character of the underlying interaction. The simulation is employed to test the suitability of experimental methods designed to derive interaction parameters from PCF. Insight is obtained about the stability of the method against variation of experimentally relevant parameters. Transient correlations due to interaction-induced heating are observed.

  11. Visible Motion Blur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of measuring motion blur is disclosed comprising obtaining a moving edge temporal profile r(sub 1)(k) of an image of a high-contrast moving edge, calculating the masked local contrast m(sub1)(k) for r(sub 1)(k) and the masked local contrast m(sub 2)(k) for an ideal step edge waveform r(sub 2)(k) with the same amplitude as r(sub 1)(k), and calculating the measure or motion blur Psi as a difference function, The masked local contrasts are calculated using a set of convolution kernels scaled to simulate the performance of the human visual system, and Psi is measured in units of just-noticeable differences.

  12. Motion restraining device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, A. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A motion-restraining device for dissipating at a controlled rate the force of a moving body is discussed. The device is characterized by a drive shaft adapted to be driven in rotation by a moving body connected to a tape wound about a reel mounted on the drive shaft, and an elongated pitman link having one end pivotally connected to the crankshaft and the opposite end thereof connected with the mass through an energy dissipating linkage. A shuttle is disposed within a slot and guided by rectilinear motion between a pair of spaced impact surfaces. Reaction forces applied at impact of the shuttle with the impact surfaces include oppositely projected force components angularly related to the direction of the applied impact forces.

  13. Aging scaled Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Chechkin, Aleksei V; Jafari, Gholamreza R; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Scaled Brownian motion (SBM) is widely used to model anomalous diffusion of passive tracers in complex and biological systems. It is a highly nonstationary process governed by the Langevin equation for Brownian motion, however, with a power-law time dependence of the noise strength. Here we study the aging properties of SBM for both unconfined and confined motion. Specifically, we derive the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements and analyze their behavior in the regimes of weak, intermediate, and strong aging. A very rich behavior is revealed for confined aging SBM depending on different aging times and whether the process is sub- or superdiffusive. We demonstrate that the information on the aging factorizes with respect to the lag time and exhibits a functional form that is identical to the aging behavior of scale-free continuous time random walk processes. While SBM exhibits a disparity between ensemble and time averaged observables and is thus weakly nonergodic, strong aging is shown to effect a convergence of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacement. Finally, we derive the density of first passage times in the semi-infinite domain that features a crossover defined by the aging time. PMID:25974439

  14. Electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide: Saturation and Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ning; Lucht, Robert P.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2010-08-01

    A theoretical analysis of electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of NO is described. The time-dependent density-matrix equations for the nonlinear ERE-CARS process are derived and manipulated into a form suitable for direct numerical integration. In the ERE-CARS configuration considered in this paper, the pump and Stokes beams are far from electronic-resonance. The visible 532 and 591 nm laser beams are used to excite Q-branch Raman resonances in the vibrational bands of the X Π2 electronic state of NO. An ultraviolet probe beam at 236 nm is used to excite P-, Q-, or R-branch transitions in the (v '=0, v″=1) band of the A Σ2+-X Π2 electronic system of NO molecule. Experimental spectra are obtained either by scanning the ultraviolet probe beam while keeping the Stokes frequency fixed (probe scans) or by scanning the Stokes frequency while keeping the probe frequency fixed (Stokes scans). The calculated NO ERE-CARS spectra are compared with experimental spectra, and good agreement is observed between theory and experiment in terms of spectral peak locations and relative intensities. The effects of saturation of the two-photon Raman-resonant Q-branch transitions, the saturation of a one-photon electronic-resonant P-, Q-, or R-branch transitions in the A Σ2+-X Π2 electronic system, and the coupling of these saturation processes are investigated. The coupling of the saturation processes for the probe and Raman transitions is complex and exhibits behavior similar to that observed in the electromagnetic induced transparency process. The probe scan spectra are significantly affected by Stark broadening due to the interaction of the pump and Stokes radiation with single-photon resonances between the upper vibration-rotation probe level in the A Σ2+ electronic levels and vibration-rotation levels in higher lying electronic levels. The ERE-CARS signal intensity is found to be much less sensitive to variations in the

  15. ac Stark shift measurements of the clock transition in cold Cs atoms: Scalar and tensor light shifts of the D2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, G. A.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.; Camparo, J. C.; Levi, F.

    2016-06-01

    The ac Stark shift, or light shift, is a physical phenomenon that plays a fundamental role in many applications ranging from basic atomic physics to applied quantum electronics. Here, we discuss experiments testing light-shift theory in a cold-atom cesium fountain clock for the Cs D2 transition (i.e., 6 2S1 /2→6 2P3 /2 at 852 nm). Cold-atom fountains represent a nearly ideal system for the study of light shifts: (1) The atoms can be perturbed by a field of arbitrary character (e.g., coherent field or nonclassical field); (2) there are no trapping fields to complicate data interpretation; (3) the probed atoms are essentially motionless in their center-of-mass reference frame, T ˜ 1 μK; and (4) the atoms are in an essentially collisionless environment. Moreover, in the present work the resolution of the Cs excited-state hyperfine splittings implies that the D2 ac Stark shift contains a nonzero tensor polarizability contribution, which does not appear in vapor phase experiments due to Doppler broadening. Here, we test the linearity of the ac Stark shift with field intensity, and measure the light shift as a function of field frequency, generating a "light-shift curve." We have improved on the previous best test of theory by a factor of 2, and after subtracting the theoretical scalar light shift from the experimental light-shift curves, we have isolated and tested the tensor light shift for an alkali D2 transition.

  16. The origin of the unusual Qy red shift in LH1-RC complexes from purple bacteria Thermochromatium tepidum as revealed by Stark absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-01

    Native LH1-RC of photosynthetic purple bacteria Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum, B915, has an ultra-red BChl a Qy absorption. Two blue-shifted complexes obtained by chemical modification, B893 and B882, have increasing full widths at half maximum (FWHM) and decreasing transition dipole oscillator strength. 77K Stark absorption spectroscopy studies were employed for the three complexes, trying to understand the origin of the 915 nm absorption. We found that Tr(∆α) and |∆μ| of both Qy and carotenoid (Car) bands are larger than for other purple bacterial LH complexes reported previously. Moreover, the red shifts of the Qy bands are associated with (1) increasing Tr(∆α) and |∆μ| of the Qy band, (2) the red shift of the Car Stark signal and (3) the increasing |∆μ| of the Car band. Based on the results and the crystal structure, a combined effect of exciton-charge transfer (CT) states mixing, and inhomogeneous narrowing of the BChl a site energy is proposed to be the origin of the 915 nm absorption. CT-exciton state mixing has long been found to be the origin of strong Stark signal in LH1 and special pair, and the more extent of the mixing in Tch. tepidum LH1 is mainly the consequence of the shorter BChl-BChl distances. The less flexible protein structure results in a smaller site energy disorder (inhomogeneous narrowing), which was demonstrated to be able to influence |∆μ| and absorption.

  17. The STARK-B database VAMDC node: a repository for spectral line broadening and shifts due to collisions with charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Moreau, N.; Ben Nessib, N.

    2015-05-01

    Accurate spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling require the knowledge of numerous collisional line profiles. Access to such data via an online database has become indispensable. The STARK-B database is aimed at meeting these needs for widths and shifts of isolated lines of neutral and ionized elements due to electron and ion impacts. This database of the Paris Observatory is a result of scientific cooperation between S Sahal-Bréchot (LERMA) and M S Dimitrijević (AOB). Access to it is free, and it was opened online at the end of 2008. STARK-B is a node of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) and thus complies with VAMDC and Virtual Observatory standards. VAMDC is a European Union-funded collaboration among groups involved in the generation and use of interoperable atomic and molecular data. STARK-B now contains all our semiclassical-perturbation (SCP) calculated data for more than 123 neutral or ionized elements as published in international refereed journals. It is devoted to modeling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes, laboratory plasmas, laser equipment, and technological plasmas. Hence, the range of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is broad and depends on the ionization degree of the radiating atom. The modified semiempirical (MSE) results of calculations have begun to be implemented. In this paper, we highlight the key points of the method and the assumptions used in the calculations, which have lately been revisited. Then we present the database and its recent developments, as well as our ongoing work and our plans for the future.

  18. Theoretical Stark widths and shifts of spectral lines of 2p5nf and 2p55g configurations of Mg III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Díaz, Cristina; Alonso-Medina, Aurelia; Colón, Cristóbal

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we report theoretical Stark widths and shifts calculated using the Griem semi-empirical approach, which corresponds to 111 spectral lines of Mg III. The values of these Stark broadening parameters of spectral lines that arise from levels of 2p5nf and 2p55g configurations of Mg III are presented in the literature for the first time. The aim of this work is to provide values to estimate the electron density of plasma Mg III in astrophysics and industrial applications. The data are presented for the temperatures T = 0.5-10.0 (104 K) and for an electron density of 1017 cm-3. The matrix of elements used in these calculations has been determined from 23 configurations of Mg III: 2s22p6, 2s22p53p, 2s22p54p, 2s22p54f and 2s22p55f for the even parity and 2s22p5ns (n = 3-6), 2s22p5nd (n = 3-9), 2s22p55g and 2s2p6np (n = 3-8) for the odd parity. For the intermediate coupling calculations, we use the standard method of least square fitting from experimental energy levels by means of Cowan’s computer code. Lines with wavelengths of 134.6460, 135.2800, 189.0380, 190.0043, 192.8424, 408.2939 and 409.4375 nm have high probabilities and also have high values of broadening. Therefore, these lines can be used in some applications. A common regularity for the Stark width of the 189.038 nm spectral line of Mg III is discussed.

  19. A molecular beam-optical Stark study of the A sup 2. Pi. -- X sup 2. Sigma. band system of YO

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, T.C.; Shirley, J.E. )

    1990-03-15

    The permanent electric dipole moments of yttrium monoxide YO in its {ital X} {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}, {ital A} {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2}, and {ital A} {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} states have been experimentally determined from an analysis of the Stark shifts in the optical spectrum of a molecular beam sample. The determined values are 4.45(7), 3.68(2), and 3.22(8) D, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of bonding models for YO and are compared to recent theoretical predictions.

  20. Spectral diffusion of neutral and charged exciton transitions in single CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals due to quantum-confined Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshiyuki; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) fluctuations of single semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), such as PL blinking and spectral diffusion (SD), reflect the quantum nature of charges in the NCs. Through simultaneous measurements of PL spectra and lifetimes on single CdSe/ZnS NCs, PL of neutral excitons is found to exhibit a unique behavior of SD, which is accompanied by changes of radiative recombination lifetime. We find that the SD of neutral excitons originated from the quantum-confined Stark effect, which also affects the SD of charged excitons observed during PL blinking.