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Sample records for c-type lectin surface

  1. Scavenger Receptor C-Type Lectin Binds to the Leukocyte Cell Surface Glycan Lewis By a Novel Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Taylor, M.E.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-10

    The scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL) is unique in the family of class A scavenger receptors, because in addition to binding sites for oxidized lipoproteins it also contains a C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) that interacts with specific glycans. Both human and mouse SRCL are highly specific for the Lewis(x) trisaccharide, which is commonly found on the surfaces of leukocytes and some tumor cells. Structural analysis of the CRD of mouse SRCL in complex with Lewis(x) and mutagenesis show the basis for this specificity. The interaction between mouse SRCL and Lewis(x) is analogous to the way that selectins and DC-SIGN bind to related fucosylated glycans, but the mechanism of the interaction is novel, because it is based on a primary galactose-binding site similar to the binding site in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Crystals of the human receptor lacking bound calcium ions reveal an alternative conformation in which a glycan ligand would be released during receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  2. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  3. Mosquito C-type lectins maintain gut microbiome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Rudian; Liu, Jianying; Liu, Qiyong; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    The long-term evolutionary interaction between the host immune system and symbiotic bacteria determines their cooperative rather than antagonistic relationship. It is known that commensal bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms to manipulate the mammalian host immune system and maintain homeostasis. However, the strategies employed by the microbiome to overcome host immune responses in invertebrates still remain to be understood. Here, we report that the gut microbiome in mosquitoes utilizes C-type lectins (mosGCTLs) to evade the bactericidal capacity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Aedes aegypti mosGCTLs facilitate colonization by multiple bacterial strains. Furthermore, maintenance of the gut microbial flora relies on the expression of mosGCTLs in A. aegypti. Silencing the orthologues of mosGCTL in another major mosquito vector (Culex pipiens pallens) also impairs the survival of gut commensal bacteria. The gut microbiome stimulates the expression of mosGCTLs, which coat the bacterial surface and counteract AMP activity. Our study describes a mechanism by which the insect symbiotic microbiome offsets gut immunity to achieve homeostasis. PMID:27572642

  4. Mosquito C-type lectins maintain gut microbiome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Rudian; Liu, Jianying; Liu, Qiyong; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    The long-term evolutionary interaction between the host immune system and symbiotic bacteria determines their cooperative rather than antagonistic relationship. It is known that commensal bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms to manipulate the mammalian host immune system and maintain homeostasis. However, the strategies employed by the microbiome to overcome host immune responses in invertebrates still remain to be understood. Here, we report that the gut microbiome in mosquitoes utilizes C-type lectins (mosGCTLs) to evade the bactericidal capacity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Aedes aegypti mosGCTLs facilitate colonization by multiple bacterial strains. Furthermore, maintenance of the gut microbial flora relies on the expression of mosGCTLs in A. aegypti. Silencing the orthologues of mosGCTL in another major mosquito vector (Culex pipiens pallens) also impairs the survival of gut commensal bacteria. The gut microbiome stimulates the expression of mosGCTLs, which coat the bacterial surface and counteract AMP activity. Our study describes a mechanism by which the insect symbiotic microbiome offsets gut immunity to achieve homeostasis. PMID:27170846

  5. Structural analysis for glycolipid recognition by the C-type lectins Mincle and MCL

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Atsushi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Mori, Daiki; Toyonaga, Kenji; Okabe, Yuki; Toji, Aya; Kanda, Ryo; Miyake, Yasunobu; Ose, Toyoyuki; Yamasaki, Sho; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Mincle [macrophage inducible Ca2+-dependent (C-type) lectin; CLEC4E] and MCL (macrophage C-type lectin; CLEC4D) are receptors for the cord factor TDM (trehalose-6,6′-dimycolate), a unique glycolipid of mycobacterial cell-surface components, and activate immune cells to confer adjuvant activity. Although it is known that receptor–TDM interactions require both sugar and lipid moieties of TDM, the mechanisms of glycolipid recognition by Mincle and MCL remain unclear. We here report the crystal structures of Mincle, MCL, and the Mincle–citric acid complex. The structures revealed that these receptors are capable of interacting with sugar in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as observed in other C-type lectins. However, Mincle and MCL uniquely possess shallow hydrophobic regions found adjacent to their putative sugar binding sites, which reasonably locate for recognition of fatty acid moieties of glycolipids. Functional studies using mutant receptors as well as glycolipid ligands support this deduced binding mode. These results give insight into the molecular mechanism of glycolipid recognition through C-type lectin receptors, which may provide clues to rational design for effective adjuvants. PMID:24101491

  6. Transmission-blocking antibodies against mosquito C-type lectins for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Fuchun; Liu, Jianying; Xiao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Siyin; Qin, Chengfeng; Xiang, Ye; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2014-02-01

    C-type lectins are a family of proteins with carbohydrate-binding activity. Several C-type lectins in mammals or arthropods are employed as receptors or attachment factors to facilitate flavivirus invasion. We previously identified a C-type lectin in Aedes aegypti, designated as mosquito galactose specific C-type lectin-1 (mosGCTL-1), facilitating the attachment of West Nile virus (WNV) on the cell membrane. Here, we first identified that 9 A. aegypti mosGCTL genes were key susceptibility factors facilitating DENV-2 infection, of which mosGCTL-3 exhibited the most significant effect. We found that mosGCTL-3 was induced in mosquito tissues with DENV-2 infection, and that the protein interacted with DENV-2 surface envelop (E) protein and virions in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the other identified mosGCTLs interacted with the DENV-2 E protein, indicating that DENV may employ multiple mosGCTLs as ligands to promote the infection of vectors. The vectorial susceptibility factors that facilitate pathogen invasion may potentially be explored as a target to disrupt the acquisition of microbes from the vertebrate host. Indeed, membrane blood feeding of antisera against mosGCTLs dramatically reduced mosquito infective ratio. Hence, the immunization against mosGCTLs is a feasible approach for preventing dengue infection. Our study provides a future avenue for developing a transmission-blocking vaccine that interrupts the life cycle of dengue virus and reduces disease burden. PMID:24550728

  7. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  8. Targeting C-Type Lectin Receptors for Cancer Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huimin; Kamiya, Tomomori; Suabjakyong, Papawee; Tsuji, Noriko M.

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are a large family of soluble and trans-membrane pattern recognition receptors that are widely and primarily expressed on myeloid cells. CLRs are important for cell–cell communication and host defense against pathogens through the recognition of specific carbohydrate structures. Similar to a family of Toll-like receptors, CLRs signaling are involved in the various steps for initiation of innate immune responses and promote secretion of soluble factors such as cytokines and interferons. Moreover, CLRs contribute to endocytosis and antigen presentation, thereby fine-tune adaptive immune responses. In addition, there may also be a direct activation of acquired immunity. On the other hand, glycans, such as mannose structures, Lewis-type antigens, or GalNAc are components of tumor antigens and ligate CLRs, leading to immunoregulation. Therefore, agonists or antagonists of CLRs signaling are potential therapeutic reagents for cancer immunotherapy. We aim to overview the current knowledge of CLRs signaling and the application of their ligands on tumor-associating immune response. PMID:26379663

  9. Antibacterial membrane attack by a pore-forming intestinal C-type lectin

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Zheng, Hui; Derebe, Mehabaw; Callenberg, Keith; Partch, Carrie L.; Rollins, Darcy; Propheter, Daniel C.; Rizo, Josep; Grabe, Michael; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Hooper, Lora V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human body surface epithelia coexist in close association with complex bacterial communities and are protected by a variety of antibacterial proteins. C-type lectins of the RegIII family are bactericidal proteins that limit direct contact between bacteria and the intestinal epithelium and thus promote tolerance to the intestinal microbiota1,2. RegIII lectins recognize their bacterial targets by binding peptidoglycan carbohydrate1,3 but the mechanism by which they kill bacteria is unknown. Here we elucidate the mechanistic basis for RegIII bactericidal activity. Here we show that human RegIIIα (hRegIIIα, also known as HIP/PAP) binds membrane phospholipids and kills bacteria by forming a hexameric membrane-permeabilizing oligomeric pore. We derive a three-dimensional model of the hRegIIIα pore by docking the hRegIIIα crystal structure into a cryo-electron microscopic map of the pore complex, and show that the model accords with experimentally determined properties of the pore. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits hRegIIIα pore-forming activity, explaining why hRegIIIα is bactericidal for Gram-positive but not Gram-negative bacteria. Our findings identify C-type lectins as mediators of membrane attack in the mucosal immune system, and provide detailed insight into an antibacterial mechanism that promotes mutualism with the resident microbiota. PMID:24256734

  10. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-surface glycoprotein apa as a potential adhesin to colonize target cells via the innate immune system pulmonary C-type lectin surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Ragas, Aude; Roussel, Lucie; Puzo, Germain; Rivière, Michel

    2007-02-23

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem, and understanding the mechanism by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) invades and colonizes its host target cells remains an important issue for the control of infection. The innate immune system C-type lectins (C-TLs), including the human pulmonary surfactant protein A (PSP-A), have been recently identified as determinant players in the early recognition of the invading pathogen and in mounting the host defense response. Although the antigenic lipoglycan mannosylated lipoarabinomannan is currently considered to be the major C-TL target on the mycobacterial surface, the recognition by some C-TLs of the only mycobacterial species composing the "Mtb complex" indicates that mannosylated lipoarabinomannan cannot account alone for this specificity. Thus, we searched for the mycobacterial molecules targeted by human PSP-A, focusing our attention on the Mtb surface glycoproteins. We developed an original functional proteomic approach based on a lectin blot assay using crude human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as a source of physiological PSP-A. Combined with selective cell-surface protein extraction and mass spectrometry peptide mapping, this strategy allowed us to identify the Apa (alanine- and proline-rich antigenic) glycoprotein as new potential target for PSP-A. This result was supported by direct binding of PSP-A to purified Apa. Moreover, EDTA addition or deglycosylation of purified Apa samples completely abolished the interaction, demonstrating that the interaction is calcium- and mannose-dependent, as expected. Finally, we provide convincing evidence that Apa, formerly considered as mainly secreted, is associated with the cell wall for a sufficiently long time to aid in the attachment of PSP-A. Because, to date, Apa seems to be restricted to the Mtb complex strains, we propose that it may account for the selective recognition of those strains by PSP-A and other immune system C-TLs containing homologous functional

  11. Participation of a galactose-specific C-type lectin in Drosophila immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tanji, Takahiro; Ohashi-Kobayashi, Ayako; Natori, Shunji

    2006-01-01

    A galactose-specific C-type lectin has been purified from a pupal extract of Drosophila melanogaster. This lectin gene, named DL1 (Drosophila lectin 1), is part of a gene cluster with the other two galactose-specific C-type lectin genes, named DL2 (Drosophila lectin 2) and DL3 (Drosophila lectin 3). These three genes are expressed differentially in fruit fly, but show similar haemagglutinating activities. The present study characterized the biochemical and biological properties of the DL1 protein. The recombinant DL1 protein bound to Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi, but not to other Gram-negative or any other kinds of microbial strains that have been investigated. In addition, DL1 agglutinated E. coli and markedly intensified the association of a Drosophila haemocytes-derived cell line with E. coli. For in vivo genetic analysis of the lectin genes, we also established a null-mutant Drosophila. The induction of inducible antibacterial peptide genes was not impaired in the DL1 mutant, suggesting that the galactose-specific C-type lectin does not participate in the induction of antibacterial peptides, but possibly participates in the immune response via the haemocyte-mediated mechanism. PMID:16475980

  12. A C-type lectin from Bothrops jararacussu venom disrupts Staphylococcal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Klein, Raphael Contelli; Fabres-Klein, Mary Hellen; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Feio, Renato Neves; Malouin, François; Ribon, Andréa de Oliveira Barros

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16) showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model.

  13. A C-Type Lectin from Bothrops jararacussu Venom Disrupts Staphylococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Raphael Contelli; Fabres-Klein, Mary Hellen; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Feio, Renato Neves; Malouin, François; Ribon, Andréa de Oliveira Barros

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16) showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model. PMID:25811661

  14. A C-type lectin from Bothrops jararacussu venom disrupts Staphylococcal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Klein, Raphael Contelli; Fabres-Klein, Mary Hellen; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Feio, Renato Neves; Malouin, François; Ribon, Andréa de Oliveira Barros

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16) showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model. PMID:25811661

  15. Overexpression of a C-type lectin enhances bacterial resistance in red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Liu, Ying-Ying; Mu, Yi; Ren, Qian; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-05-01

    C-type lectins play important roles in the innate immune system of crustaceans. In this study, a novel C-type lectin gene, designated as PcLec4, was obtained from the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that PcLec4 is mainly expressed in the crayfish hepatopancreas and intestine, and the PcLec4 mRNA expression is upregulated after challenged with the bacteria Vibrio anguillarum. PcLec4 was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and anti-PcLec4 polyclonal antiserum was prepared. Binding experiments revealed that the recombinant PcLec4 binds to various bacteria and polysaccharides on the bacterial surface, which suggests that PcLec4 recognizes bacterial pathogens. Overexpression of PcLec4 in crayfish using the pIeLec4 vector was performed. The results show that the crayfish overexpressing PcLec4 eliminate injected V. anguillarum more quickly than the control, which suggests that PcLec4 elicits further immune response for removing invading bacteria. The results of the survival experiment confirmed the function of PcLec4 in resisting V. anguillarum because PcLec4 overexpression in crayfish significantly increased the crayfish survival rate. These results reveal that PcLec4 has an important role in the antibacterial immunity of crayfish, and in vivo PcLec4 overexpression might be used as a disease control strategy in aquiculture.

  16. Identification of a C-type lectin from the bay scallop Argopecten irradians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Song, Linsheng; Xu, Wei; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2009-05-01

    C-type lectins are Ca(2+) dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins that play crucial roles in the invertebrate innate immunity, such as nonself recognition, activation of proPO system, antibacterial activity, promotion of phagocytosis and nodule formation. In this study, a novel C-type lectin of bay scallops Argopecten irradians (Ai Lec) was identified using expressed sequence tag (EST) and RACE techniques. The Ai Lec cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 171 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 21 amino acid residues and a mature protein of 150 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ai Lec was highly similar to those of the C-type lectins from other animals and contained a typical carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of 131 residues, which has four conserved disulfide-bonded cysteine residues that define the CRD and two additional cysteine residues at the amino terminus. The expression of Ai Lec transcript was dominantly detected in the hepatopancreas and slightly detected in the haemocytes of normal scallops. 6 h after Vibrio anguillarum-challenge and 8 h after Micrococcus luteus-challenge, the temporal expression of Ai Lec mRNA in hemocytes was increased by 4.4- and 3.6-folds, respectively. The results suggested that Ai Lec was a constitutive and inducible acute-phase protein and might be involved in immune response to Gram-negative and Gram-positive microbial infection in bay scallop A. irradians.

  17. Computational and Experimental Prediction of Human C-Type Lectin Receptor Druggability

    PubMed Central

    Aretz, Jonas; Wamhoff, Eike-Christian; Hanske, Jonas; Heymann, Dario; Rademacher, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian C-type lectin receptors (CTLRS) are involved in many aspects of immune cell regulation such as pathogen recognition, clearance of apoptotic bodies, and lymphocyte homing. Despite a great interest in modulating CTLR recognition of carbohydrates, the number of specific molecular probes is limited. To this end, we predicted the druggability of a panel of 22 CTLRs using DoGSiteScorer. The computed druggability scores of most structures were low, characterizing this family as either challenging or even undruggable. To further explore these findings, we employed a fluorine-based nuclear magnetic resonance screening of fragment mixtures against DC-SIGN, a receptor of pharmacological interest. To our surprise, we found many fragment hits associated with the carbohydrate recognition site (hit rate = 13.5%). A surface plasmon resonance-based follow-up assay confirmed 18 of these fragments (47%) and equilibrium dissociation constants were determined. Encouraged by these findings we expanded our experimental druggability prediction to Langerin and MCL and found medium to high hit rates as well, being 15.7 and 10.0%, respectively. Our results highlight limitations of current in silico approaches to druggability assessment, in particular, with regard to carbohydrate-binding proteins. In sum, our data indicate that small molecule ligands for a larger panel of CTLRs can be developed. PMID:25071783

  18. Two antibacterial C-type lectins from crustacean, Eriocheir sinensis, stimulated cellular encapsulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xing-Kun; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiao-Nv; Cheng, Lin; Wu, Min-Hao; Tan, Shang-Jian; Zhu, You-Ting; Yu, Ai-Qing; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Qun

    2013-12-01

    The first step of host fighting against pathogens is that pattern recognition receptors recognized pathogen-associated molecular patterns. However, the specificity of recognition within the innate immune molecular of invertebrates remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated how invertebrate pattern recognition receptor (PRR) C-type lectins might be involved in the antimicrobial response in crustacean. Based on our previously obtained completed coding regions of EsLecA and EsLecG in Eriocheir sinensis, the recombinant EsLectin proteins were produced via prokaryotic expression system and affinity chromatography. Subsequently, both rEsLecA and rEsLecG were discovered to have wide spectrum binding activities towards microorganisms, and their microbial-binding was calcium-independent. Moreover, the binding activities of both rEsLecA and rEsLecG induced the aggregation against microbial pathogens. Both microorganism growth inhibitory activities assays and antibacterial activities assays revealed their capabilities of suppressing microorganisms growth and directly killing microorganisms respectively. Furthermore, the encapsulation assays signified that both rEsLecA and rEsLecG could stimulate the cellular encapsulation in vitro. Collectively, data presented here demonstrated the successful expression and purification of two C-type lectins proteins in the Chinese mitten crab, and their critical role in the innate immune system of an invertebrate.

  19. A single-CRD C-type lectin is important for bacterial clearance in the silkworm.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Yue; Shahzad, Toufeeq; Yang, Pei-Jin; Liu, Su; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Rao, Xiang-Jun

    2016-12-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) depend on the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) to recognize carbohydrates by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. In animals, CTLs play critical roles in pathogen recognition, activation of the complement system and signaling pathways. Immulectins (Dual-CRD CTLs) in lepidopteran are involved in recognizing pathogens. However, little is known about the immune-related functions of insect single-CRD CTLs. Here, we reported the characterization of C-type lectin-S3 (CTL-S3), a single-CRD CTL from the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae). The ORF of CTL-S3 gene is 672 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 223 amino acids. CTL-S3 gene was expressed in a variety of tissues. Levels of CTL-S3 mRNA in fertilized eggs and whole larvae were elevated upon bacterial challenges. CTL-S3 was secreted to larval hemolymph. The recombinant protein (rCTL-S3) binds to bacterial cell wall components and bacteria. CTL-S3 inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis and caused agglutination of Staphylococcus aureus. More importantly, CTL-S3 facilitated the rapid clearance of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus from the body cavity of larvae. Taken together, our results suggested that CTL-S3 may function as an opsonin in larval hemolymph to enhance the clearance of pathogens. PMID:27519466

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of a C-type lectin in yellow catfish Tachysurus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Ke, F; Zhang, H B; Wang, Y; Hou, L F; Dong, H J; Wang, Z F; Pan, G W; Cao, X Y

    2016-09-01

    This study represents the first report of a C-type lectin (ctl) in yellow catfish Tachysurus fulvidraco. The complete sequence of ctl complementary (c)DNA consisted of 685 nucleotides. The open reading frame potentially encoded a protein of 177 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of c.y 20.204 kDa. The deduced amino-acid sequence contained a signal peptide and a single carbohydrate recognition domain with four cysteine residues and GlnProAsp (QPD) and TrpAsnAsp (WND) motifs. Ctl showed the highest identity (56.0%) to the predicted lactose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Quantitative real-time (qrt)-PCR analysis showed that ctl messenger (m)RNA was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues in normal fish, with high expression in trunk kidney and head kidney, which was increased following Aeromonas hydrophila challenge in a duration-dependent manner. Purified recombinant Ctl (rCtl) from Escherichia coli BL21 was able to bind and agglutinate Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in a calcium-dependent manner. These results suggested that Ctl might be a C-type lectin of T. fulvidraco involved in innate immune responses as receptors (PRR). PMID:27418461

  1. The evolution of HIV-1 interactions with coreceptors and mannose C-type lectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Borggren, Marie; Jansson, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) commonly evolves between and within infected individuals, at virus transmission, and during disease progression. This evolution includes altered interactions between the virus and its coreceptors, i.e., chemokine receptors, as well as mannose C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Transmitted/founder viruses are predominantly restricted to CCR5, whereas the subsequent intrapatient evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor use during progressive disease can be subdivided into two distinct pathways. Accordingly, the CCR5-restricted virus population is either gradually replaced by virus variants able to use CXCR4 or evolves toward an altered, more flexible use of CCR5. Despite a strong dependency on these coreceptors for host cell entry, HIV-1 also interacts with other cell surface molecules during target cell attachment, including the CLRs. The virus interaction with the CLRs may result either in the efficient transfer of virus to CD4(+) T cells or in the degradation of the virus in endosomal compartments. The determinants of the diverse outcomes depend on which CLR is engaged and also on the glycan makeup of the envelope glycoproteins, which may evolve with the strength of the immune pressure during the disease course. With the current clinical introduction of CCR5 antagonists and the development of additional entry inhibitors, knowledge on the evolution and baseline characteristics of HIV-1 interactions with coreceptor and CLR interactions may play important roles for individualized and optimized treatment strategies. This review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of HIV-1 interactions with these receptors. PMID:25595802

  2. A C-type lectin is involved in the innate immune response of Chinese white shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Xu, Wen-Teng; Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2009-10-01

    C-type lectins may function as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and play important roles in immune responses. In this work, a cDNA for a new C-type lectin, FcLec3, was obtained from Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis using expressed sequence tag analysis and rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. FcLec3 contains an N-terminal signal peptide and a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). RT-PCR analysis showed that FcLec3 was mainly expressed in hepatopancreas and that the expression of FcLec3 was obviously up-regulated by Vibrio anguillarum or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. Recombinant FcLec3 could agglutinate Gram-negative and -positive bacteria with the presence of calcium. A following agglutination inhibitory test indicated that FcLec3 could recognize muramic acid and peptidoglycan. Besides, pull-down assay showed that the recombinant protein could interact with VP28, one major envelope protein of WSSV. These results suggested that FcLec3 might function in the recognition of bacterial and viral pathogens in shrimp. PMID:19647083

  3. The Dectin-2 family of C-type lectins in immunity and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Lisa M.; Brown, Gordon D.

    2009-01-01

    C-type lectins are a diverse family of proteins which recognize a wide range of ligands. This review focuses on the Dectin-2 family of C-type lectins that includes Dectin-2, BDCA-2, DCIR, DCAR, Clecsf8 and Mincle whose genes are clustered in the telomeric region of the NK-gene cluster on mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 12. These type II receptors are expressed on myeloid and non-myeloid cells and contain a single extracellular carbohydrate recognition domain and have diverse functions in both immunity and homeostasis. DCIR is the only member of the family which contains a cytoplasmic signalling motif and has been shown to act as an inhibitory receptor, while BDCA-2, Dectin-2, DCAR and Mincle all associate with FcRγ chain to induce cellular activation, including phagocytosis and cytokine production. Dectin-2 and Mincle have been shown to act as pattern recognition receptors for fungi, while DCIR acts as an attachment factor for HIV. In addition to pathogen recognition, DCIR has been shown to be pivotal in preventing autoimmune disease by controlling dendritic cell proliferation, whereas Mincle recognizes a nuclear protein released by necrotic cells. Here we review each of these receptors in detail describing their expression, ligand recognition, signalling and known physiological functions. PMID:19665392

  4. Evolutionary analysis reveals collective properties and specificity in the C-type lectin and lectin-like domain superfamily.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Sharon; Sharon, Nathan; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2003-10-01

    Members of the C-type lectin/C-type lectin-like domain (CTL/CTLD) superfamily share a common fold and are involved in a variety of functions, such as generalized defense mechanisms against foreign agents, discrimination between healthy and pathogen-infected cells, and endocytosis and blood coagulation. In this work we used ConSurf, a computer program recently developed in our lab, to perform an evolutionary analysis of this superfamily in order to further identify characteristics of all or part of its members. Given a set of homologous proteins in the form of multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and an inferred phylogenetic tree, ConSurf calculates the conservation score in every alignment position, taking into account the relationships between the sequences and the physicochemical similarity between the amino acids. The scores are then color-coded onto the three-dimensional structure of one of the homologous proteins. We provide here and at http://ashtoret.tau.ac.il/ approximately sharon a detailed analysis of the conservation pattern obtained for the entire superfamily and for two subgroups of proteins: (a) 21 CTLs and (b) 11 heterodimeric CTLD toxins. We show that, in general, proteins of the superfamily have one face that is constructed mostly of conserved residues and another that is not, and we suggest that the former face is involved in binding to other proteins or domains. In the CTLs examined we detected a region of highly conserved residues, corresponding to the known calcium- and carbohydrate-binding site of the family, which is not conserved throughout the entire superfamily, and in the CTLD toxins we found a patch of highly conserved residues, corresponding to the known dimerization region of these proteins. Our analysis also detected patches of conserved residues with yet unknown function(s).

  5. Structural and biological characterization of Nattectin, a new C-type lectin from the venomous fish Thalassophryne nattereri.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica; Magalhães, Geraldo Santana; Fernandez, Jorge Hernandez; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio de Loiola M; Le Ho, Paulo; Lima, Carla; Valente, Richard H; Moura-da-Silva, Ana Maria

    2011-06-01

    Lectins are glycan-binding receptors that recognize glycan epitopes on foreign pathogens and in the host systems. They can be involved in functions that include innate immunity, development, immune regulation and homeostasis. Several lectins have been purified and characterized from fish species. In this work, using cation-exchange chromatography, a galactose-specific lectin belonging to the family of C-type lectins was isolated from the venom of the Brazilian venomous fish Thalassophryne nattereri. Nattectin is a basic, non-glycosilated, 15 kDa monomeric protein. It exhibits hemagglutination activity that is independent of Ca(2+). We also demonstrated a lectin activity for Nattectin in the innate immune system, especially in neutrophil mobilization in mice, indicating that marine organisms are source of immunomodulator agents.

  6. Signaling by myeloid C-type lectin receptors in immunity and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, David; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells are key drivers of physiological responses to pathogen invasion or tissue damage. Members of the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) family stand out among the specialized receptors utilized by myeloid cells to orchestrate these responses. CLR ligands include carbohydrate, protein and lipid components of both pathogens and self, which variably trigger endocytic, phagocytic, pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory reactions. These varied outcomes rely on a versatile system for CLR signaling that includes tyrosine based motifs that recruit kinases, phosphatases or endocytic adaptors, as well as non-tyrosine based signals that modulate the activation of other pathways or couple to the uptake machinery. Here, we review the signaling properties of myeloid CLRs and how they impact the role of myeloid cells in innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:22224766

  7. C-type lectin from red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii participates in cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Xian-Wei; Sun, Chen; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2011-03-01

    Lectins are potential immune recognition proteins. In this study, a novel C-type lectin (Pc-Lec1) is reported in freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Pc-Lec1 encodes a protein of 163 amino acids with a putative signal peptide and a single carbohydrate recognition domain. It was constitutively expressed in various tissues of a normal crayfish, especially in the hepatopancreas and gills. Expressions of Pc-Lec1 were up-regulated in the hepatopancreas and gills of crayfish challenged with Vibrio anguillarum, Staphylococcus aureus, or the white spot syndrome virus. Recombinant mature Pc-Lec1 bound bacteria and polysaccharides (peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, and lipopolysaccharide) but did not agglutinate bacteria. Pc-Lec1 enhanced hemocyte encapsulation of the sepharose beads in vitro, and the blocking of beads by a polyclonal antibody inhibited encapsulation. Pc-Lec1 promoted clearance of V. anguillarum in vivo. These results suggest that Pc-Lec1 is a pattern recognition receptor and participates in cellular immune response. Pc-Lec1 performs its function as an opsonin by enhancing the encapsulation or clearance of pathogenic bacteria.

  8. Efficient generation of a monoclonal antibody against the human C-type lectin receptor DCIR by targeting murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Heidkamp, Gordon F.; Neubert, Kirsten; Haertel, Eric; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Dudziak, Diana

    2010-01-01

    1. Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) are very important for the generation of long lasting immune responses against pathogens or the induction of anti-tumor responses. Targeting antigen to dendritic cells via monoclonal antibodies specific for DC cell surface receptors such as DEC205 was shown to elicit potent cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo. Therefore we investigated whether this novel strategy might also be useful for the generation of new monoclonal antibodies against molecules of choice. We show, that by targeting the extracellular domain of the human C-type lectin receptor ClecSF6/DCIR/LLIR (hDCIR) to DEC205 on DCs in vivo, we were able to generate highly specific monoclonal antibodies against hDCIR. PMID:20566350

  9. Characterization of Multisugar-Binding C-Type Lectin (SpliLec) from a Bacterial-Challenged Cotton Leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis

    PubMed Central

    Seufi, AlaaEddeen M.; Galal, Fatma H.; Hafez, Elsayed E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Various proteins that display carbohydrate-binding activity in a Ca2+-dependent manner are classified into the C-type lectin family. They have one or two C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) composed of 110–130 amino acid residues in common. C-type lectins mediate cell adhesion, non-self recognition, and immuno-protection processes in immune responses and thus play significant roles in clearance of invaders, either as cell surface receptors for microbial carbohydrates or as soluble proteins existing in tissue fluids. The lectin of Spodoptera littoralis is still uncharacterized. Methodology A single orf encoding a deduced polypeptide consisting of an 18-residue signal peptide and a 291-residue mature peptide, termed SpliLec, was isolated from the haemolymph of the cotton leafworm, S. littoralis, after bacterial challenge using RACE-PCR. Sequence analyses of the data revealed that SpliLec consists of two CRDs. Short-form CRD1 and long-form CRD2 are stabilized by two and three highly conserved disulfide bonds, respectively. SpliLec shares homology with some dipteran lectins suggesting possible common ancestor. The purified SpliLec exhibited a 140-kDa molecular mass with a subunit molecular mass of 35 kDa. The hemagglutination assays of the SpliLec confirmed a thermally stable, multisugar-binding C-type lectin that binds different erythrocytes. The purified SpliLec agglutinated microorganisms and exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity against gram (+) and gram (−) bacteria too. Conclusions Our results suggested an important role of the SpliLec gene in cell adhesion and non-self recognition. It may cooperate with other AMPs in clearance of invaders of Spodoptera littoralis. PMID:22916161

  10. Critical roles of sea cucumber C-type lectin in non-self recognition and bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Liu, Xiangquan; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Guohua; Yang, Jialong

    2015-08-01

    C-type lectin is one important pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that plays crucial roles in multiple immune responses. A C-type lectin from sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (AjCTL-1) was characterized in the present study. The amino acid sequence of AjCTL-1 shared high similarities with other C-type lectins from invertebrates and vertebrates. The C-type lectin domain (CTLD) of AjCTL-1 contained a Ca(2+)-binding site 2 and four conserved cysteine residues. AjCTL-1 mRNA expression patterns in tissues and after bacterial challenge were then analysed. Quantitative PCR revealed that AjCTL-1 mRNA was widely expressed in the tested tissues of healthy sea cucumber. The highest expression level occurred in gonad followed by body wall, coelomocytes, tentacle, intestinum and longitudinal muscle, and the lowest expression level was in respiratory tree. AjCTL-1 mRNA expression in coelomocytes was significantly induced by gram-negative Listonella anguillarum and gram-positive Micrococcus luteus, with different up-regulation patterns post-challenge. Recombinant AjCTL-1 exhibited the ability to bind peptidoglycan directly, agglutinate M. luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, in a Ca(2+)-dependant manner, and enhance the phagocytosis of coelomocytes against E. coli in vitro. The results indicated that AjCTL-1 could act as a PRR in Apostichopus japonicus and had critical roles in non-self recognition and bacterial clearance against invading microbes.

  11. Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin underlies obesity-induced adipose tissue fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miyako; Ikeda, Kenji; Suganami, Takayoshi; Komiya, Chikara; Ochi, Kozue; Shirakawa, Ibuki; Hamaguchi, Miho; Nishimura, Satoshi; Manabe, Ichiro; Matsuda, Takahisa; Kimura, Kumi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Inagaki, Yutaka; Aoe, Seiichiro; Yamasaki, Sho; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-19

    In obesity, a paracrine loop between adipocytes and macrophages augments chronic inflammation of adipose tissue, thereby inducing systemic insulin resistance and ectopic lipid accumulation. Obese adipose tissue contains a unique histological structure termed crown-like structure (CLS), where adipocyte-macrophage crosstalk is known to occur in close proximity. Here we show that Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle), a pathogen sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is localized to macrophages in CLS, the number of which correlates with the extent of interstitial fibrosis. Mincle induces obesity-induced adipose tissue fibrosis, thereby leading to steatosis and insulin resistance in liver. We further show that Mincle in macrophages is crucial for CLS formation, expression of fibrosis-related genes and myofibroblast activation. This study indicates that Mincle, when activated by an endogenous ligand released from dying adipocytes, is involved in adipose tissue remodelling, thereby suggesting that sustained interactions between adipocytes and macrophages within CLS could be a therapeutic target for obesity-induced ectopic lipid accumulation.

  12. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL) Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zizzari, Ilaria Grazia; Martufi, Paola; Battisti, Federico; Rahimi, Hassan; Caponnetto, Salvatore; Bellati, Filippo; Nuti, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the im-munosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines. PMID:26147970

  13. Signalling versatility following self and non-self sensing by myeloid C-type lectin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Iborra, Salvador; Sancho, David

    2015-01-01

    Among myeloid immune receptors, C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) have a remarkable capacity to sense a variety of self and non-self ligands. The coupling of CLRs to different signal transduction modules is influenced not only by the receptor, but also by the nature, density and architecture of the ligand, which can affect the rate of receptor internalization and trafficking to diverse intracellular compartments. Understanding how the variety of self and non-self ligands triggers differential CLR signalling and function presents a fascinating biological challenge. Non-self ligands usually promote inflammation and immunity, whereas self ligands are frequently involved in communication and tolerance. But pathogens can mimic self-inhibitory signals to escape immune surveillance, and endogenous ligands can contribute to the sensing of pathogens through CLRs. In this review, we survey the complexity and flexibility in functional outcome found in the myeloid CLRs, which is not only based on their differing intracellular motifs, but is also conditioned by the physical nature, affinity and avidity of the ligand. PMID:25269828

  14. A novel method for the purification of low soluble recombinant C-type lectin proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunhui; Jia, Ying; Garcia, Carlos A

    2012-08-31

    Snake venoms contain a complex mixture of many biological molecules including proteins. The purification of recombinant proteins is a key step in studying their function and structure with affinity chromatography as the common method used in their purification. In bacterial expression systems, hydrophobic recombinant proteins are usually precipitated into inclusion bodies, and contaminants are typically associated with tagged proteins after purification. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure to purify hydrophobic recombinant proteins without an affinity tag. Snake venom mature C-type lectin-like proteins (CLPs) with a tag were cloned, expressed, and purified by repeated sonication and wash steps. The effects of the signal peptide on the expression and solubility of the recombinant protein were investigated. The CLPs in washed inclusion bodies were solubilized and refolded by dialysis. The CLPs without a tag were successfully purified with a yield 38 times higher than the traditional method, and inhibited blood platelet aggregation with an IC(50) of 100.57 μM in whole blood. This novel procedure is a rapid, and inexpensive method to purify functional recombinant hydrophobic CLPs from snake venoms useful in the development of drug therapies. PMID:22867876

  15. Differential expression of skin mucus C-type lectin in two freshwater eel species, Anguilla marmorata and Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Komiya, Kaoru; Yamashita, Hiroka; Nakamura, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Two types of lactose-specific lectins, galectin (AJL-1) and C-type lectin (AJL-2), were previously identified in the mucus of adult Anguilla japonica. Here, we compared the expression profiles of these two homologous lectins at the adult and juvenile stages between the tropical eel Anguilla marmorata and the temperate eel A. japonica. Only one lectin, predicted to be an orthologue of AJL-1 by LC-MS/MS, was detected in the mucus of adult A. marmorata. We also found that an orthologous gene to AJL-2 was expressed at very low levels, or not at all, in the skin of adult A. marmorata. However, we detected the gene expression of an AJL-2-orthologue in the skin of juvenile A. marmorata, and a specific antibody also detected the lectin in the juvenile fish epidermis. These findings suggest that expression profiles of mucosal lectins vary during development as well as between species in the Anguilla genus.

  16. Differential expression of skin mucus C-type lectin in two freshwater eel species, Anguilla marmorata and Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Komiya, Kaoru; Yamashita, Hiroka; Nakamura, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Two types of lactose-specific lectins, galectin (AJL-1) and C-type lectin (AJL-2), were previously identified in the mucus of adult Anguilla japonica. Here, we compared the expression profiles of these two homologous lectins at the adult and juvenile stages between the tropical eel Anguilla marmorata and the temperate eel A. japonica. Only one lectin, predicted to be an orthologue of AJL-1 by LC-MS/MS, was detected in the mucus of adult A. marmorata. We also found that an orthologous gene to AJL-2 was expressed at very low levels, or not at all, in the skin of adult A. marmorata. However, we detected the gene expression of an AJL-2-orthologue in the skin of juvenile A. marmorata, and a specific antibody also detected the lectin in the juvenile fish epidermis. These findings suggest that expression profiles of mucosal lectins vary during development as well as between species in the Anguilla genus. PMID:27026508

  17. Lectin-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection via soluble and transmembrane C-type lectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Brudner, Matthew; Karpel, Marshall; Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M Reza; Eisen, Damon P; Mungall, Bruce A; Kotton, Darrell N; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L; Ezekowitz, Alan B; Spear, Gregory T; Olinger, Gene G; Schmidt, Emmett V; Michelow, Ian C

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  18. Identification of C-type lectin-domain proteins (CTLDPs) in silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiang-Jun; Shahzad, Toufeeq; Liu, Su; Wu, Peng; He, Yan-Ting; Sun, Wei-Jia; Fan, Xiang-Yun; Yang, Yun-Fan; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Xiao-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) represent a large family of proteins that can bind carbohydrate moieties normally in a calcium-dependent manner. CTLs play important roles in mediating cell adhesion and the recognition of pathogens in the immune system. In the present study, we have identified 23 CTL genes in domestic silkworm Bombyx mori. CTL-domain proteins (CTLDPs) are classified into three groups based on the number of carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and the domain architectures. These include twelve CTL-S (Single-CRD), six immulectins (Dual-CRD) and five CTL-X (CRD with other domains). We studied their phylogenetic features, analyzed the conserved residues, predicted tertiary structures, and examined the tissue expression profile and immune inducibility. Through bioinformatics analysis, we have putatively identified ten secretory and two cytoplasmic CTL-S; four secretory and two cytoplasmic immulectins; one secretory, one cytoplasmic and three transmembrane forms of CTL-X. Most B. mori CTLDPs form monophyletic groups with orthologs from Lepidoptera, Diptera, Coleoptera and Hymenoptera species. Immulectins of B. mori and Manduca sexta evolved from common ancestor genes perhaps due to gene duplication events of CTL-S ancestor genes. Homology modeling revealed that the overall structures of B. mori CTL domains are analogous to those of humans with a variable loop region. We examined the expression profile of CTLDP genes in naïve and immune-stimulated tissues. The expression and induction of CTLDP genes were related to the tissues and microorganisms. Together, our gene identification, sequence comparison, phylogenetic analysis, homology modeling and expression analysis laid a good foundation for the further studies of B. mori CTLDPs and comparative genomics.

  19. Identification of C-type lectin-domain proteins (CTLDPs) in silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiang-Jun; Shahzad, Toufeeq; Liu, Su; Wu, Peng; He, Yan-Ting; Sun, Wei-Jia; Fan, Xiang-Yun; Yang, Yun-Fan; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Xiao-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) represent a large family of proteins that can bind carbohydrate moieties normally in a calcium-dependent manner. CTLs play important roles in mediating cell adhesion and the recognition of pathogens in the immune system. In the present study, we have identified 23 CTL genes in domestic silkworm Bombyx mori. CTL-domain proteins (CTLDPs) are classified into three groups based on the number of carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and the domain architectures. These include twelve CTL-S (Single-CRD), six immulectins (Dual-CRD) and five CTL-X (CRD with other domains). We studied their phylogenetic features, analyzed the conserved residues, predicted tertiary structures, and examined the tissue expression profile and immune inducibility. Through bioinformatics analysis, we have putatively identified ten secretory and two cytoplasmic CTL-S; four secretory and two cytoplasmic immulectins; one secretory, one cytoplasmic and three transmembrane forms of CTL-X. Most B. mori CTLDPs form monophyletic groups with orthologs from Lepidoptera, Diptera, Coleoptera and Hymenoptera species. Immulectins of B. mori and Manduca sexta evolved from common ancestor genes perhaps due to gene duplication events of CTL-S ancestor genes. Homology modeling revealed that the overall structures of B. mori CTL domains are analogous to those of humans with a variable loop region. We examined the expression profile of CTLDP genes in naïve and immune-stimulated tissues. The expression and induction of CTLDP genes were related to the tissues and microorganisms. Together, our gene identification, sequence comparison, phylogenetic analysis, homology modeling and expression analysis laid a good foundation for the further studies of B. mori CTLDPs and comparative genomics. PMID:26187302

  20. C-type Lectin Receptor Expression on Human Basophils and Effects of Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, K; Rydnert, F; Broos, S; Andersson, M; Greiff, L; Lindstedt, M

    2016-09-01

    Basophils are emerging as immunoregulatory cells capable of interacting with their environment not only via their characteristic IgE-mediated activation, but also in an IgE-independent manner. Basophils are known to express and respond to stimulation via TLR2, TLR4, DC-SIGN and DCIR, but whether basophils also express other C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the CLR expression profile of human basophils using multicolour flow cytometry. As FcRs as well as some CLRs are associated with allergen recognition and shown to be involved in subsequent immune responses, the expression of CLRs and FcRs on peripheral blood basophils, as well as their frequency, was monitored for 1 year in subjects undergoing subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). Here, we show that human basophils express CLECSF14, DEC205, Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and MRC2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequencies of basophils expressing the allergy-associated CLRs Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 were significantly reduced after 1 year and 8 weeks of AIT, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of basophils positive for FcγRII, as well as the fraction of total basophils, significantly increased after 1 year of AIT. The herein demonstrated expression of various CLRs on basophils, and their altered CLR and FcR expression profile upon AIT, suggest yet unexplored ways by which basophils can interact with antigens and may point to novel immunoregulatory functions targeted through AIT. PMID:27354239

  1. Functions of Armigeres subalbatus C-type lectins in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Kang, Cui-Jie; Wang, Song-Jie; Zhong, Xue; Beerntsen, Brenda T.; Yu, Xiao-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are a superfamily of calcium-dependent carbohydrate binding proteins containing at least one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) and they are present in almost all metazoans. Insect CTLs may function as pattern-recognition receptors and play important roles in innate immunity. In this study, we selected five AsCTLs from the mosquito Armigeres subalbatus, a natural vector of filarial nematodes, and performed both in vitro and in vivo studies to elucidate their functions in innate immunity. AsCTLMA15, AsCTLGA5 and AsCTL15 were mainly expressed in hemocytes, AsCTL16 was expressed in fat body, while AsCTLMA11 was expressed in both hemocytes and fat body, and only AsCTLMA11 and AsCTL16 were expressed at high levels in adult females. In vitro binding assays showed that all five recombinant AsCTLs could bind to different microbial cell wall components, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipid A, peptidoglycan (PG), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), zymosan and laminarin (beta-1,3-glucan). Recombinant AsCTLs also bound to several Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and could agglutinate bacterial cells. Injection of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) could significantly reduce expression of the five AsCTL mRNAs, and the survival of mosquitoes treated with dsRNA to AsCTLGA5 was significantly decreased after Escherichia coli infection, but did not change significantly after Micrococcus luteus infection compared to the control groups, suggesting that Ar. subalbatus AsCTLGA5 may participate in innate immunity against E. coli. PMID:25014898

  2. Functions of Armigeres subalbatus C-type lectins in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Kang, Cui-Jie; Wang, Song-Jie; Zhong, Xue; Beerntsen, Brenda T; Yu, Xiao-Qiang

    2014-09-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are a superfamily of calcium-dependent carbohydrate binding proteins containing at least one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) and they are present in almost all metazoans. Insect CTLs may function as pattern-recognition receptors and play important roles in innate immunity. In this study, we selected five AsCTLs from the mosquito Armigeres subalbatus, a natural vector of filarial nematodes, and performed both in vitro and in vivo studies to elucidate their functions in innate immunity. AsCTLMA15, AsCTLGA5 and AsCTL15 were mainly expressed in hemocytes, AsCTL16 was expressed in fat body, while AsCTLMA11 was expressed in both hemocytes and fat body, and only AsCTLMA11 and AsCTL16 were expressed at high levels in adult females. In vitro binding assays showed that all five recombinant AsCTLs could bind to different microbial cell wall components, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipid A, peptidoglycan (PG), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), zymosan and laminarin (beta-1,3-glucan). Recombinant AsCTLs also bound to several Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and could agglutinate bacterial cells. Injection of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) could significantly reduce expression of the five AsCTL mRNAs, and the survival of mosquitoes treated with dsRNA to AsCTLGA5 was significantly decreased after Escherichia coli infection, but did not change significantly after Micrococcus luteus infection compared to the control groups, suggesting that Ar. subalbatus AsCTLGA5 may participate in innate immunity against E. coli.

  3. A shrimp C-type lectin inhibits proliferation of the hemolymph microbiota by maintaining the expression of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Xu, Ji-Dong; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Vasta, Gerardo Raul; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-04-25

    Some aquatic invertebrates such as shrimp contain low albeit stable numbers of bacteria in the circulating hemolymph. The proliferation of this hemolymph microbiota in such a nutrient-rich environment is tightly controlled in healthy animals, but the mechanisms responsible had remained elusive. In the present study, we report a C-type lectin (MjHeCL) from the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) that participates in restraining the hemolymph microbiota. Although the expression of MjHeCL did not seem to be modulated by bacterial challenge, the down-regulation of its expression by RNA interference led to proliferation of the hemolymph microbiota, ultimately resulting in shrimp death. This phenotype was rescued by the injection of recombinant MjHeCL, which restored the healthy status of the knockdown shrimp. A mechanistic analysis revealed that MjHeCL inhibited bacterial proliferation by modulating the expression of antimicrobial peptides. The key function of MjHeCL in the shrimp immune homeostasis might be related to its broader recognition spectrum of the hemolymph microbiota components than other lectins. Our study demonstrates the role of MjHeCL in maintaining the healthy status of shrimp and provides new insight into the biological significance of C-type lectins, a diversified and abundant lectin family in invertebrate species.

  4. Collaboration between a soluble C-type lectin and calreticulin facilitates white spot syndrome virus infection in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Xu, Yi-Hui; Xu, Ji-Dong; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-09-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) mainly infects crustaceans through the digestive tract. Whether C-type lectins (CLs), which are important receptors for many viruses, participate in WSSV infection in the shrimp stomach remains unknown. In this study, we orally infected kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus to model the natural transmission of WSSV and identified a CL (designated as M. japonicus stomach virus-associated CL [MjsvCL]) that was significantly induced by virus infection in the stomach. Knockdown of MjsvCL expression by RNA interference suppressed the virus replication, whereas exogenous MjsvCL enhanced it. Further analysis by GST pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation showed that MjsvCL could bind to viral protein 28, the most abundant and functionally relevant envelope protein of WSSV. Furthermore, cell-surface calreticulin was identified as a receptor of MjsvCL, and the interaction between these proteins was a determinant for the viral infection-promoting activity of MjsvCL. The MjsvCL-calreticulin pathway facilitated virus entry likely in a cholesterol-dependent manner. This study provides insights into a mechanism by which soluble CLs capture and present virions to the cell-surface receptor to facilitate viral infection. PMID:25070855

  5. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea)

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Jingqun; Ding, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Mu, Yinnan; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR) from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD), an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1–C6), a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp) and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp). Ca2+ binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and guppy (Poecilia retitculata) CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR) protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca2+-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish. PMID:26690423

  6. A four-CRD C-type lectin from Chlamys farreri mediating nonself-recognition with broader spectrum and opsonization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengmeng; Wang, Lingling; Yang, Jialong; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Leilei; Song, Linsheng

    2013-04-01

    C-type lectins are a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins consisting of at least one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), which participate in nonself-recognition and clearance of invaders. In invertebrate, some multidomain C-type lectins have been identified, but their relative functions and binding mechanism are still meager. In the present study, A C-type lectin (CfLec-4) with four CRDs from Chlamys farreri was selected to investigate its possible function in innate immunity. The mRNA expression of CfLec-4 in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) after the stimulations of β-glucan, LPS or PGN, and reached the highest expression level at 3, 6, 12 h post-stimulation, which was 27.9-, 22.6- or 47.9-fold of that in blank group, respectively. Immunohistochemistry assay with polyclonal antibody specific for CfLec-4 revealed that the endogenous CfLec-4 was mainly located in the hepatopancreas, kidney and gonad of the scallops. The recombinant CfLec-4 (rCflec-4) could bind LPS, PGN, glucan and mannose in vitro, but could not bind LTA. Furthermore, rCflec-4 displayed a broader bacteria binding spectrum towards Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus as well as Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Vibrio anguillarum and fungi Pichia pastoris. Meanwhile, rCfLec-4 could significantly (P<0.01) enhance the phagocytosis of hemocytes in vitro. The results clearly suggested that four-CRD containing CfLec-4 not only served as PRR with wider recognition spectrum, but also functioned as an opsonin participating in the clearance of invaders in scallops. It could be inferred that the diversity and complexity of CRDs in C-type lectins endowed these receptors with comprehensive recognition spectrum and multiple immune functions against complex living environment. PMID:23276881

  7. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Ao, Jingqun; Ding, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Mu, Yinnan; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR) from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD), an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1-C6), a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp) and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp). Ca(2+) binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and guppy (Poecilia retitculata) CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR) protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish. PMID:26690423

  8. A C-type lectin with an immunoglobulin-like domain promotes phagocytosis of hemocytes in crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Mu, Yi; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-01-01

    C-type lectins are important immune molecules that participate in host defense response. The present work reports a novel C-type lectin (PcLec3) from the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Sequence analysis found that PcLec3 encodes a polypeptide with252 amino acid residues, which contains an immunoglobulin-like domain (IG) and a C-type lectin domain (CTLD) arranged in tandem. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that PcLec3 is enriched expressed in hemocytes and hepatopancreas cells, in which PcLec3 was up-regulated following bacterial challenge by Vibrio anguillarum. Function analysis using recombinant full-length PcLec3, IG, and CTLD proteins revealed that these recombinant proteins had the capacity to bind carbohydrates and bacteria, while IG determined the cell binding activity. However, only full-length PcLec3 promotes the phagocytic activity of hemocytes and subsequent clearance of invasive bacteria. Taken together, these results manifest that PcLec3 acts as a hemocyte adhesion molecule to promote hemocyte phagocytosis against invasive V. anguillarum. PMID:27411341

  9. A C-type lectin fold gene from Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis, involved with immunity and metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Bao, X B; He, C B; Fu, C D; Wang, B; Zhao, X M; Gao, X G; Liu, W D

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins that are well known for their participation in pathogen recognition and clearance. In this study, a putative C-type lectin fold (MyCLF) gene was identified from the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis. The full-length of MyCLF was 645 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 167 amino acids. MyCLF carried a signal peptide of 20 amino acid residues, and a single carbohydrate recognition domain, having relatively high amino acid sequence conservation with C-type lectins reported for other bivalves. The expression of MyCLF mRNA transcripts in adult tissues, after bacterial challenge and during different developmental stages was determined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. MyCLF was mainly distributed in the mantle, gill, and kidney. The expression of MyCLF clearly increased 3 h after Vibrio anguillarum challenge, and dropped to a minimum level after 9 h compared to the control group. During embryonic development, the expression level increased in the gastrulae, trochophore and early D-shaped larvae, decreased in D-shaped larvae, and then increased hundreds of times in metamorphosing larvae. The results suggested that MyCLF was involved in an immune response and it may play important roles during the metamorphosis phase of M. yessoensis. PMID:25867372

  10. A C-type lectin with an immunoglobulin-like domain promotes phagocytosis of hemocytes in crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Mu, Yi; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-01-01

    C-type lectins are important immune molecules that participate in host defense response. The present work reports a novel C-type lectin (PcLec3) from the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Sequence analysis found that PcLec3 encodes a polypeptide with252 amino acid residues, which contains an immunoglobulin-like domain (IG) and a C-type lectin domain (CTLD) arranged in tandem. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that PcLec3 is enriched expressed in hemocytes and hepatopancreas cells, in which PcLec3 was up-regulated following bacterial challenge by Vibrio anguillarum. Function analysis using recombinant full-length PcLec3, IG, and CTLD proteins revealed that these recombinant proteins had the capacity to bind carbohydrates and bacteria, while IG determined the cell binding activity. However, only full-length PcLec3 promotes the phagocytic activity of hemocytes and subsequent clearance of invasive bacteria. Taken together, these results manifest that PcLec3 acts as a hemocyte adhesion molecule to promote hemocyte phagocytosis against invasive V. anguillarum. PMID:27411341

  11. Differential Use of the C-Type Lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN for Phlebovirus Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Léger, Psylvia; Tetard, Marilou; Youness, Berthe; Cordes, Nicole; Rouxel, Ronan N; Flamand, Marie; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2016-06-01

    Bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to humans and livestock globally. The receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely unidentified and poorly characterized. DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin highly expressed on dermal dendritic cells that has been found to act as an authentic entry receptor for many phleboviruses (Bunyaviridae), including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Toscana virus (TOSV) and Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). We found that these phleboviruses can exploit another C-type lectin, L-SIGN, for infection. L-SIGN shares 77% sequence homology with DC-SIGN and is expressed on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. L-SIGN is required for UUKV binding but not for virus internalization. An endocytosis-defective mutant of L-SIGN was still able to mediate virus uptake and infection, indicating that L-SIGN acts as an attachment receptor for phleboviruses rather than an endocytic receptor. Our results point out a fundamental difference in the use of the C-type lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN by UUKV to enter cells, although both proteins are closely related in terms of molecular structure and biological function. This study sheds new light on the molecular mechanisms by which phleboviruses target the liver and also highlights the added complexity in virus-receptor interactions beyond attachment. PMID:26990254

  12. Venom of Parasitoid, Pteromalus puparum, Suppresses Host, Pieris rapae, Immune Promotion by Decreasing Host C-Type Lectin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qi; Wang, Fei; Gatehouse, John A.; Gatehouse, Angharad M. R.; Chen, Xue-xin; Hu, Cui; Ye, Gong-yin

    2011-01-01

    Background Insect hosts have evolved immunity against invasion by parasitoids, and in co-evolutionary response parasitoids have also developed strategies to overcome host immune systems. The mechanisms through which parasitoid venoms disrupt the promotion of host immunity are still unclear. We report here a new mechanism evolved by parasitoid Pteromalus puparum, whose venom inhibited the promotion of immunity in its host Pieris rapae (cabbage white butterfly). Methodology/Principal Findings A full-length cDNA encoding a C-type lectin (Pr-CTL) was isolated from P. rapae. Quantitative PCR and immunoblotting showed that injection of bacterial and inert beads induced expression of Pr-CTL, with peaks of mRNA and Pr-CTL protein levels at 4 and 8 h post beads challenge, respectively. In contrast, parasitoid venom suppressed Pr-CTL expression when co-injected with beads, in a time and dose-dependent manner. Immunolocalization and immunoblotting results showed that Pr-CTL was first detectable in vesicles present in cytoplasm of granulocytes in host hemolymph, and was then secreted from cells into circulatory fluid. Finally, the secreted Pr-CTL bound to cellular membranes of both granulocytes and plasmatocytes. Injection of double-stranded RNA specific for target gene decreased expression of Pr-CTL, and a few other host immune-related genes. Suppression of Pr-CTL expression also down-regulated antimicrobial and phenoloxidase activities, and reducing phagocytotic and encapsulation rates in host. The inhibitory effect of parasitoid venom on host encapsulation is consistent with its effect in suppressing Pr-CTL expression. Binding assay results showed that recombinant Pr-CTL directly attached to the surface of P. puparum egges. We infer that Pr-CTL may serve as an immune signalling co-effector, first binding to parasitoid eggs, regulating expression of a set of immune-related genes and promoting host immunity. Conclusions/Significance P. puparum venom inhibits promotion of host

  13. The dendritic cell subtype-restricted C-type lectin Clec9A is a target for vaccine enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Proietto, Anna I.; Ahmet, Fatma; Kitsoulis, Susie; Shin Teh, Joo; Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Wu, Li; Vremec, David; van Dommelen, Serani L. H.; Campbell, Ian K.; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Braley, Hal; Davey, Gayle M.; Mottram, Patricia; van de Velde, Nicholas; Jensen, Kent; Lew, Andrew M.; Wright, Mark D.; Heath, William R.; Shortman, Ken

    2008-01-01

    A novel dendritic cell (DC)–restricted molecule, Clec9A, was identified by gene expression profiling of mouse DC subtypes. Based on sequence similarity, a human ortholog was identified. Clec9A encodes a type II membrane protein with a single extracellular C-type lectin domain. Both the mouse Clec9A and human CLEC9A were cloned and expressed, and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each were generated. Surface staining revealed that Clec9A was selective for mouse DCs and was restricted to the CD8+ conventional DC and plasmacytoid DC subtypes. A subset of human blood DCs also expressed CLEC9A. A single injection of mice with a mAb against Clec9A, which targets antigens (Ags) to the DCs, produced a striking enhancement of antibody responses in the absence of added adjuvants or danger signals, even in mice lacking Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Such targeting also enhanced CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses. Thus, Clec9A serves as a new marker to distinguish subtypes of both mouse and human DCs. Furthermore, targeting Ags to DCs with antibodies to Clec9A is a promising strategy to enhance the efficiency of vaccines, even in the absence of adjuvants. PMID:18669894

  14. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  15. Mechanistic Insights into the Role of C-Type Lectin Receptor/CARD9 Signaling in Human Antifungal Immunity.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Rebecca A; Lionakis, Michail S

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous development of persistent and severe fungal infections that primarily localize to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, mucosal surfaces and/or central nervous system (CNS). In the last 3 years, more than 15 missense and nonsense CARD9 mutations have been reported which associate with the development of a wide spectrum of fungal infections caused by a variety of fungal organisms. The mechanisms by which CARD9 provides organ-specific protection against these fungal infections are now emerging. In this review, we summarize recent immunological and clinical advances that have provided significant mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human CARD9 deficiency. We also discuss how genetic mutations in CARD9-coupled receptors (Dectin-1, Dectin-2) and CARD9-binding partners (MALT1, BCL10) affect human antifungal immunity relative to CARD9 deficiency, and we highlight major understudied research questions which merit future investigation. PMID:27092298

  16. Mechanistic Insights into the Role of C-Type Lectin Receptor/CARD9 Signaling in Human Antifungal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous development of persistent and severe fungal infections that primarily localize to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, mucosal surfaces and/or central nervous system (CNS). In the last 3 years, more than 15 missense and nonsense CARD9 mutations have been reported which associate with the development of a wide spectrum of fungal infections caused by a variety of fungal organisms. The mechanisms by which CARD9 provides organ-specific protection against these fungal infections are now emerging. In this review, we summarize recent immunological and clinical advances that have provided significant mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human CARD9 deficiency. We also discuss how genetic mutations in CARD9-coupled receptors (Dectin-1, Dectin-2) and CARD9-binding partners (MALT1, BCL10) affect human antifungal immunity relative to CARD9 deficiency, and we highlight major understudied research questions which merit future investigation. PMID:27092298

  17. Cloning and characterization of a mannose binding C-type lectin gene from salivary gland of Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The studies on sialomes have shown that hematophagous mosquito saliva consists of a lot of pharmacologically active proteins, in which C-type lectins have been identified and regarded as an important component of saliva. The previous studies showed that C-type lectins play crucial roles not only in innate immunity but also in promoting disease transmission in mammals. However, the function and mechanism of C-type lectins from the mosquito sialome is still elusive. Methods A putative C-type lectin gene (Aalb_CTL1) was cloned and expressed from Aedes albopictus by RT-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence was analyzed by bioinformatic methods. The gene expression profiles in different tissues and various blood-fed stages of Ae. albopictus were examined by Real-Time qRT-PCR and the biological functions of the recombined mature Aalb_CTL1 were tested by hemagglutination and sugar inhibitory agglutination assays. Moreover, the capabilities of rAalb_CTL1 against microorganisms were measured by microbial-agglutination assay. Results The full-length Open reading frame (ORF) of Aalb_CTL1 consisted of 462 bp, encoding 153 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids. It also contained a CRD domain with a WND (Trp137-Asn138-Asp-139) motif that needed calcium for the hemagglutinating activity and an imperfect EPS (Glu128-Pro129-Ser130) motif that had a predicted ligand binding specificity for mannose. The mRNA level of Aalb_CTL1 was much higher in female mosquito salivary gland than those in fat body and midgut which was down-regulated in salivary gland after blood feeding. The rAalb_CTL1 contained not only hemagglutinating activity and a high affinity with mannose but also agglutinating activity against yeast C. albicans and Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus in Ca2+ dependent manner. Conclusion Aalb_CTL1 was a mannose-binding C-type lectin and constituted one of the important components in saliva of Ae

  18. Ophioluxin, a convulxin-like C-type lectin from Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is a powerful platelet activator via glycoprotein VI.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Yan; Clemetson, Jeannine M; Navdaev, Alexei; Magnenat, Edith M; Wells, Timothy N C; Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2002-09-20

    Ophioluxin, a potent platelet agonist, was purified from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra). Under nonreducing conditions it has a mass of 85 kDa, similar to convulxin, and on reduction gives two subunits with masses of 16 and 17 kDa, slightly larger than those of convulxin. The N-terminal sequences of both subunits are very similar to those of convulxin and other C-type lectins. Ophioluxin induces a pattern of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in platelets like that caused by convulxin, when using appropriate concentrations based on aggregation response, because it is about 2-4 times more powerful as agonist than the latter. Ophioluxin and convulxin induce [Ca(2+)](i) elevation both in platelets and in Dami megakaryocytic cells, and each of these C-type lectins desensitizes responses to the other. Convulxin agglutinates fixed platelets at 2 microg/ml, whereas ophioluxin does not, even at 80 microg/ml. Ophioluxin resembles convulxin more than echicetin or alboaggregin B because polyclonal anti-ophioluxin antibodies recognize both ophioluxin and convulxin, but not echicetin, and platelets adhere to and spread on ophioluxin- or convulxin-precoated surfaces in the same way that is clearly different from their behavior on an alboaggregin B surface. Immobilized ophioluxin was used to isolate the glycoprotein VI-Fcgamma complex from resting platelets, which also contained Fyn, Lyn, Syk, LAT, and SLP76. Ophioluxin is the first multiheterodimeric, convulxin-like snake C-type lectin, as well as the first platelet agonist, to be described from the Elapidae snake family. PMID:12130642

  19. Ophioluxin, a convulxin-like C-type lectin from Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is a powerful platelet activator via glycoprotein VI.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Yan; Clemetson, Jeannine M; Navdaev, Alexei; Magnenat, Edith M; Wells, Timothy N C; Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2002-09-20

    Ophioluxin, a potent platelet agonist, was purified from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra). Under nonreducing conditions it has a mass of 85 kDa, similar to convulxin, and on reduction gives two subunits with masses of 16 and 17 kDa, slightly larger than those of convulxin. The N-terminal sequences of both subunits are very similar to those of convulxin and other C-type lectins. Ophioluxin induces a pattern of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in platelets like that caused by convulxin, when using appropriate concentrations based on aggregation response, because it is about 2-4 times more powerful as agonist than the latter. Ophioluxin and convulxin induce [Ca(2+)](i) elevation both in platelets and in Dami megakaryocytic cells, and each of these C-type lectins desensitizes responses to the other. Convulxin agglutinates fixed platelets at 2 microg/ml, whereas ophioluxin does not, even at 80 microg/ml. Ophioluxin resembles convulxin more than echicetin or alboaggregin B because polyclonal anti-ophioluxin antibodies recognize both ophioluxin and convulxin, but not echicetin, and platelets adhere to and spread on ophioluxin- or convulxin-precoated surfaces in the same way that is clearly different from their behavior on an alboaggregin B surface. Immobilized ophioluxin was used to isolate the glycoprotein VI-Fcgamma complex from resting platelets, which also contained Fyn, Lyn, Syk, LAT, and SLP76. Ophioluxin is the first multiheterodimeric, convulxin-like snake C-type lectin, as well as the first platelet agonist, to be described from the Elapidae snake family.

  20. Molecular cloning and immune responsive expression of a novel C-type lectin gene from bay scallop Argopecten irradians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Song, Linsheng; Xu, Wei; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2008-09-01

    C-type lectins are Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins that play crucial roles in innate immunity. The cDNA of C-type lectin (AiCTL1) in the bay scallop Argopecten irradians was cloned by expressed sequence tag (EST) and RACE techniques. The full-length cDNA of AiCTL1 was 660 bp, consisting of a 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 30 bp and a 3' UTR of 132 bp with a polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA and a poly(A) tail. The AiCTL1 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 166 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 20 amino acid residues and a mature protein of 146 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of AiCTL1 was highly similar to those of the C-type lectins from other animals and contained a typical carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of 121 residues, which has four conserved disulfide-bonded cysteine residues that define the CRD and two additional cysteine residues at the amino terminus. AiCTL1 mRNA was dominantly expressed in the hemocytes of the bay scallop. The temporal expression of AiCTL1 mRNA in hemocytes was increased by 5.7- and 4.9-fold at 6h after injury and 8h after injection of bacteria, respectively. The structural features, high similarity and expression pattern of AiCTL1 indicate that the gene may be involved in injury healing and the immune response in A. irradians.

  1. Function of a novel C-type lectin with two CRD domains from Macrobrachium rosenbergii in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Huang, Ying; Shi, Yan-Ru; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2015-03-01

    C-type lectins play crucial roles in innate immunity. In the present study, a novel C-type lectin gene, designated as MrCTL, was identified from Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrCTL contains 2 carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs), namely MrCRD1 and MrCRD2. The MrCRD1 contains a QEP motif and MrCRD2 contains a motif of EPD. MrCTL was mainly expressed in the hepatopancreas. The expression level of MrCTL in hepatopancreas was significantly upregulated after a challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus or White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The recombinant MrCTL, MrCRD1 and MrCRD2 have an ability to agglutinate both Gram-negative (V. parahaemolyticus) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) in a calcium dependent manner. The recombinant MrCTL, MrCRD1 and MrCRD2 bind directly to all tested microorganisms. All these results suggested that MrCTL may have important roles in immune defense against invading pathogens in prawns.

  2. Abundant expression of HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in the foreskin tissue of young Kenyan men.

    PubMed

    Hirbod, Taha; Bailey, Robert C; Agot, Kawango; Moses, Stephen; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah; Murugu, Ruth; Andersson, Jan; Nilsson, Jakob; Broliden, Kristina

    2010-06-01

    A biological explanation for the reduction in HIV-1 (HIV) acquisition after male circumcision may be that removal of the foreskin reduces the number of target cells for HIV. The expression of potential HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in foreskin tissue of men at risk of HIV infection were thus analyzed. Thirty-three foreskin tissue samples, stratified by Herpes simplex virus type 2 status, were obtained from a randomized, controlled trial conducted in Kenya. The samples were analyzed by confocal in situ imaging microscopy and mRNA quantification by quantitative RT-qPCR. The presence and location of T cells (CD3(+)CD4(+)), Langerhans cells (CD1a(+)Langerin/CD207(+)), macrophages (CD68(+) or CD14(+)), and submucosal dendritic cells (CD123(+)BDCA-2(+) or CD11c(+)DC-SIGN(+)) were defined. C-type lectin receptor expressing cells were detected in both the epithelium and submucosa, and distinct lymphoid aggregates densely populated with CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells were identified in the submucosa. Although the presence of lymphoid aggregates and mRNA expression of selected markers varied between study subjects, Herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus was not the major determinant for the detected differences. The detection of abundant and superficially present potential HIV target cells and submucosal lymphoid aggregates in foreskin mucosa from a highly relevant HIV risk group demonstrate a possible anatomical explanation that may contribute to the protective effect of male circumcision on HIV transmission. PMID:20395432

  3. Cloning of cDNAs and molecular characterisation of C-type lectin-like proteins from snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian; Chen, Tianbao; Zhou, Mei; Shaw, Chris

    2012-12-15

    C-type lectin-like proteins (CTLPs) isolated from snake venoms are the largest and most complex non-mammalian vertebrate C-type lectin-like domain family. In the present study, we simultaneously amplified four cDNAs encoding different types of CTLP subunits from the venoms of two different species of snakes by RT-PCR with a single sense primer and a nested universal primer - two CTLP subunit-encoding cDNAs were cloned from Deinagkistrodon acutus venom and two from Agkistrodon halys Pallas venom. All four cloned CTLP subunits exhibited typical motifs in their corresponding domain regions but with relatively-low sequence similarities to each other. Compared with previously-published CTLPs, the four cloned CTLPs subunits showed slight variations in the calcium-binding sites and the disulphide bonding patterns. To our knowledge, these data constitute the first example of co-expression of CTLP platelet glycoprotein Ib-binding subunits and coagulation factors in Agkistrodon halys Pallas venom. PMID:23010162

  4. Molecular cloning and expression of a C-type lectin-like protein from orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Ji, H; Wei, J; Wei, S; Yan, Y; Huang, Y; Huang, X; Zhou, S; Zhou, Y; Qin, Q

    2014-02-01

    A C-type lectin-like protein (Ec-CTLP) was cloned from the grouper Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA of Ec-CTLP was composed of 905 bp with a 522 bp open reading frame that encodes a 174-residue protein. The putative amino acid sequence of Ec-CTLP contains a signal peptide of 19 residues at the N-terminus and a CLECT domain from Cys43 to Arg169 and a conserved imperfect WND (Trp-Asn-Asp) motif. The homologous identity of deduced amino acid sequences is from 32 to 42% with other fishes. The expression of Ec-CTLP was differently upregulated in E. coioides spleen (germline stem) cells after being challenged at 16 and 4° C. Intracellular localization revealed that Ec-CTLP was distributed only in the cytoplasm. Recombinant Ec-CTLP (rEc-CTLP) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified for mouse Mus musculus anti-Ec-CTLP serum preparation. The rEc-CTLP fusion protein does not possess haemagglutinating activity, but improves survival from frozen bacteria. The survival of bacteria (including gram-negative E. coli and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus) was positively correlated with the concentration of the rEc-CTLP. These findings can provide clues to help understand the probable C-type lectin in marine fish innate immunity.

  5. C-type lectin Mermaid inhibits dendritic cell mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Nabatov, Alexey A; de Jong, Marein A W P; de Witte, Lot; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2008-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in HIV-1 transmission; DCs capture invading HIV-1 through the interaction of the gp120 oligosaccharides with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and migrate to the lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is transmitted to T cells. Thus, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is an attractive target to prevent interactions with DCs and subsequent viral transmission. Here, we have investigated whether the structural homologue of DC-SIGN, the nematode C-type lectin Mermaid can be used to prevent HIV-1 transmission by DCs. Our data demonstrate that Mermaid interacts with high mannose structures present on HIV-1 gp120 and thereby inhibits HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN on DCs. Moreover, Mermaid inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission from DC to T cells. We have identified Mermaid as a non-cytotoxic agent that shares the glycan specificity with DC-SIGN and inhibits DC-SIGN-gp120 interaction. The results are important for the anti-HIV-1 microbicide development directed at preventing DC-HIV-1 interactions. PMID:18597806

  6. SHP-2 Mediates C-type Lectin Receptors-induced Syk Activation and Anti-fungal TH17 Responses

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zihou; Ma, Shixin; Zhou, Hao; Zang, Aiping; Fang, Yiyuan; Li, Tiantian; Shi, Huanjing; Liu, Mei; Du, Min; Taylor, Patricia R.; Zhu, Helen H.; Chen, Jiangye; Meng, Guangxun; Li, Fubin; Chen, Changbin; Zhang, Yan; Jia, Xin-Ming; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoming; Pearlman, Eric; Li, Xiaoxia; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Xiao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fungal infection stimulates the canonical C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) signaling pathway via Syk activation. Here we show that SHP-2 plays a crucial role in mediating CLRs-induced Syk activation. Genetic ablation of Shp-2 (Ptpn11) in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages impaired Syk-mediated signaling and abrogated pro-inflammatory gene expression following fungal stimulation. Mechanistically, SHP-2 operates as a scaffold facilitating the recruitment of Syk to dectin-1 or FcRγ, through its N-SH2 domain and a previously unrecognized C-terminal ITAM motif. We demonstrate that DC-derived SHP-2 is crucial for the induction of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23, and anti-fungal TH17 cell responses to control Candida albicans infection. Together, these data reveal a mechanism by which SHP-2 mediates Syk activation in response to fungal infections PMID:25915733

  7. On the quaternary structure of a C-type lectin from Bothrops jararacussu venom--BJ-32 (BjcuL).

    PubMed

    Silva, F P; Alexandre, G M C; Ramos, C H I; De-Simone, S G

    2008-12-15

    BJ-32 (also known as BjcuL) is a C-type lectin from the venom of Bothrops jararacussu with specificity for beta-galactosides and a remarkable ability to agglutinate several species of trypanosomatids. Our objective was to study the oligomerization state of native BJ-32 by using different biophysical and computational methods. Small-angle X-ray light scattering (SAXS) experiments disclosed a compact, globular protein with a radius of gyration of 36.72+/-0.04A and molecular weight calculated as 147.5+/-2.0kDa. From analytical ultracentrifugation analysis, it was determined that the BJ-32 sedimentation profile fits nicely to a decamer model. The analysis of the intrinsic emitted fluorescence spectra for BJ-32 solutions indicated that association of subunits in the decamer is accompanied by changes in the environment of Tryptophan residues. Both ab initio and comparative models of BJ-32 supported the resemblance of the decamer in the crystallographic structure from a close homologue, the rattlesnake venom lectin (RSL) from Crotalus atrox. PMID:18948130

  8. Involvement of viral envelope GP2 in Ebola virus entry into cells expressing the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, Katsuaki; Matsuno, Keita; Igarashi, Manabu; Denda-Nagai, Kaori; Takada, Ayato; Irimura, Tatsuro

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} Ebola virus infection is mediated by binding to and fusion with the target cells. {yields} Structural feature of the viral glycoprotein determines the infectivity. {yields} Surface C-type lectin, MGL, of macrophages and dendritic cells mediate the infection. {yields} GP2, one of glycoprotein subunits, plays an essential role in MGL-mediated infection. {yields} There is a critical amino acid residue involved in high infectivity. -- Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is initiated by the interaction of the viral surface envelope glycoprotein (GP) with the binding sites on target cells. Differences in the mortality among different species of the Ebola viruses, i.e., Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Reston ebolavirus (REBOV), correspond to the in vitro infectivity of the pseudo-typed virus constructed with the GPs in cells expressing macrophage galactose-type calcium-type lectin (MGL/CD301). Through mutagenesis of GP2, the transmembrane-anchored subunit of GP, we found that residues 502-527 of the GP2 sequence determined the different infectivity between VSV-ZEBOV GP and -REBOV GP in MGL/CD301-expressing cells and a histidine residue at position 516 of ZEBOV GP2 appeared essential in the differential infectivity. These findings may provide a clue to clarify a molecular basis of different pathogenicity among EBOV species.

  9. The C-Type Lectin Receptor MCL Mediates Vaccine-Induced Immunity against Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huafeng; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Klein, Bruce; Wüthrich, Marcel

    2015-12-14

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are essential in shaping the immune response to fungal pathogens. Vaccine-induced resistance requires Dectin-2 to promote differentiation of antifungal Th1 and Th17 cells. Since Dectin-2 and MCL heterodimerize and both CLRs use FcRγ as the signaling adaptor, we investigated the role of MCL in vaccine immunity to the fungal pathogen Blastomyces dermatitidis. MCL(-/-) mice showed impaired vaccine resistance against B. dermatitidis infection compared to that of wild-type animals. The lack of resistance correlated with the reduced recruitment of Th17 cells to the lung upon recall following experimental challenge and impaired interleukin-17 (IL-17) production by vaccine antigen-stimulated splenocytes in vitro. Soluble MCL fusion protein recognized and bound a water-soluble ligand from the cell wall of vaccine yeast, but the addition of soluble Dectin-2 fusion protein did not augment ligand recognition by MCL. Taken together, our data indicate that MCL regulates the development of vaccine-induced Th17 cells and protective immunity against lethal experimental infection with B. dermatitidis.

  10. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement.

    PubMed

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2011-08-30

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd (∼16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10(20) potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  11. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  12. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    PubMed Central

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2011-01-01

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd (∼16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 1020 potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation. PMID:21873231

  13. The C-Type Lectin Receptor MCL Mediates Vaccine-Induced Immunity against Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are essential in shaping the immune response to fungal pathogens. Vaccine-induced resistance requires Dectin-2 to promote differentiation of antifungal Th1 and Th17 cells. Since Dectin-2 and MCL heterodimerize and both CLRs use FcRγ as the signaling adaptor, we investigated the role of MCL in vaccine immunity to the fungal pathogen Blastomyces dermatitidis. MCL−/− mice showed impaired vaccine resistance against B. dermatitidis infection compared to that of wild-type animals. The lack of resistance correlated with the reduced recruitment of Th17 cells to the lung upon recall following experimental challenge and impaired interleukin-17 (IL-17) production by vaccine antigen-stimulated splenocytes in vitro. Soluble MCL fusion protein recognized and bound a water-soluble ligand from the cell wall of vaccine yeast, but the addition of soluble Dectin-2 fusion protein did not augment ligand recognition by MCL. Taken together, our data indicate that MCL regulates the development of vaccine-induced Th17 cells and protective immunity against lethal experimental infection with B. dermatitidis. PMID:26667836

  14. Biochemical and functional characterization of a C-type lectin (BpLec) from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Letícia Eulálio; Nunes, Débora Cristina de Oliveira; Cardoso, Thomaz Monteiro; Santos, Paula de Souza; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Renata Santos; Richardson, Michael; Borges, Márcia Helena; Yoneyama, Kelly Aparecida Geraldo; Rodrigues, Veridiana M

    2013-03-01

    In the present work, we report the isolation and partial biochemical characterization of BpLec, a C-type lectin purified from Bothrops pauloensis venom by one chromatographic step on an affinity agarose column immobilized with d-galactose. This protein was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE under reducing and nonreducing conditions, and was shown to be a 33.6 kDa homodimer by MALDI TOF analysis. BpLec presented an isoeletric point of 5.36. Its partial sequence of 132 amino acids for each subunit, determined by Edman degradation, revealed high identity (between 86% and 95%) when aligned with sequences of other related proteins. BpLec was capable of agglutinating native dog and cat erythrocytes and this activity was inhibited by β-galactosides and EDTA. Its hemagglutinating activity was abolished at high temperatures and stable in any pH range. BpLec was effective in inhibiting Gram-positive but not Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, BpLec agglutinated promastigote forms of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis. PMID:23178369

  15. Identification and molecular characterization of a C-type lectin-like protein from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis).

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaofang; Kong, Jie; Wang, Qingyin; Wang, Weiji; Meng, Xianhong

    2013-03-01

    A C-type lectin-like protein was cloned and characterized from the Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis, and named as FcCTL. The results indicated that the full length cDNA of 859 bp had an open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 220 amino acids with one carbohydrate-recognition domain, six conserved Cys and one key motif EPGD. The theoretical molecular weight and pI of mature protein was 25.3 kDa and 5.4. Sequence comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of FcCTL showed varied identity of 26-34, 34, 31 and 30 % with those of F. chinensis, Portunus trituberculatus, Tetraodon nigroviridis, Penaeus monodon, respectively. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that FcCTL was expressed highest in hepatopancreas of normal shrimp, and it's expression was up-regulated in hepatopancreas and gills post white spot syndrome virus challenge. The purified recombinant FcCTL showed higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. And the hemagglutinating activity of rFcCTL could be completely inhibited by GlcNAc (5 μg/ml), LPS (2.5 μg/ml), D-galactose (100 mM) and maltose (100 mM). These data suggested that FcCTL might play an important role in shrimp immune and would be helpful to better understand the innate immunity mechanism of shrimp. PMID:23192616

  16. C-type lectin like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) signals independently of lipid raft microdomains in platelets.

    PubMed

    Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Dangelmaier, Carol A; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-15

    C-type lectin like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) has been reported to activate platelets through a lipid raft-dependent manner. Secreted ADP potentiates CLEC-2-mediated platelet aggregation. We have investigated whether the decrease in CLEC-2-mediated platelet aggregation, previously reported in platelets with disrupted rafts, is a result of the loss of agonist potentiation by ADP. We disrupted platelet lipid rafts with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and measured signaling events downstream of CLEC-2 activation. Lipid raft disruption decreases platelet aggregation induced by CLEC-2 agonists. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by the disruption of lipid rafts was rescued by the exogenous addition of epinephrine but not 2-methylthioadenosine diphosphate (2MeSADP), which suggests that lipid raft disruption effects P2Y12-mediated Gi activation but not Gz. Phosphorylation of Syk (Y525/526) and PLCγ2 (Y759), were not affected by raft disruption in CLEC-2 agonist-stimulated platelets. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of the CLEC-2 hemi-ITAM was not effected when MβCD disrupts lipid rafts. Lipid rafts do not directly contribute to CLEC-2 receptor activation in platelets. The effects of disruption of lipid rafts in in vitro assays can be attributed to inhibition of ADP feedback that potentiates CLEC-2 signaling.

  17. Insights into anti-parasitism induced by a C-type lectin from Bothrops pauloensis venom on Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Letícia; Naves de Souza, Dayane Lorena; Silva, Rafaela José; Barbosa, Bellisa; Mineo, José Roberto; Tudini, Kelly Aparecida; Rodrigues, Renata; Ferro, Eloísa Vieira; de Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana

    2015-03-01

    Here we evaluate the effects of BpLec, a C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom, on Toxoplasma gondii parasitism. BpLec (0.195-12.5 μg/mL) did not interfere with HeLa (host cell) viability by MTT assay, whereas higher doses decreased viability and changed HeLa morphology. In addition, the host cell treatment before infection did not influence adhesion and proliferation indexes. BpLec did not alter T. gondii tachyzoite viability, as carried out by trypan blue exclusion, but decreased both adhesion and parasite replication, when tachyzoites were treated before infection. Galactose (0.4 M) inhibited the BpLec effect on adhesion assays, suggesting that BpLec probably recognize some glycoconjugate from T. gondii membrane. Additionally, we performed cytokine measurements from supernatants collected from HeLa cells infected with T. gondii tachyzoites previously treated with RPMI or BpLec. MIF and IL-6 productions by HeLa cells were increased by BpLec treatment. Also, TGF-β1 secretion was diminished post-infection, although this effect was not dependent on BpLec treatment. Taken together, our results show that BpLec is capable of reducing T. gondii parasitism after tachyzoite treatment and may represent an interesting tool in the search for parasite antigens involved in these processes. PMID:25541358

  18. Novel sequences encoding venom C-type lectins are conserved in phylogenetically and geographically distinct Echis and Bitis viper species.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R A; Oliver, J; Hasson, S S; Bharati, K; Theakston, R D G

    2003-10-01

    Envenoming by Echis saw scaled vipers and Bitis arietans puff adders is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite their medical importance, the composition and constituent functionality of venoms from these vipers remains poorly understood. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding seven clusters or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive C-type lectin (CTL) proteins from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus, E. pyramidum leakeyi, E. carinatus sochureki and B. arietans. All these CTL sequences encoded the cysteine scaffold that defines the carbohydrate-recognition domain of mammalian CTLs. All but one of the Echis and Bitis CTL sequences showed greater sequence similarity to the beta than alpha CTL subunits in venoms of related Asian and American vipers. Four of the new CTL clusters showed marked inter-cluster sequence conservation across all four viper species which were significantly different from that of previously published viper CTLs. The other three Echis and Bitis CTL clusters showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom CTLs. Because viper venom CTLs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis and Bitis CTLs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of inter-specific and inter-generic sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis and Bitis CTLs leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. PMID:14557069

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-type lectin domain of the spicule matrix protein SM50 from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Puneet; Rao, Ashit; Cölfen, Helmut; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    Sea urchin spicules have a calcitic mesocrystalline architecture that is closely associated with a matrix of proteins and amorphous minerals. The mechanism underlying spicule formation involves complex processes encompassing spatio-temporally regulated organic–inorganic interactions. C-type lectin domains are present in several spicule matrix proteins in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, implying their role in spiculogenesis. In this study, the C-type lectin domain of SM50 was overexpressed, purified and crystallized using a vapour-diffusion method. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.85 Å and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 100.6, b = 115.4, c = 130.6 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Assuming 50% solvent content, six chains are expected to be present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24637770

  20. Specificity analysis of the C-type lectin from rattlesnake venom, and its selectivity towards Gal- or GalNAc-terminated glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Young, N Martin; van Faassen, Henk; Watson, David C; Mackenzie, C Roger

    2011-08-01

    The rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) venom lectin is a readily-prepared decameric C-type lectin, specific for Gal and GalNAc. Glycan microarray analysis showed it reacted with a wide range of glycans, chiefly recognizing sets of compounds with Galβ1-4GlcNAc (LacNAc), α-Gal or α-GalNAc non-reducing termini. Its array profile was therefore distinctly different from those of four previously studied mammalian C-type lectins with the same Gal/GalNAc monosaccharide specificity, and it was more broadly reactive than several Gal- or GalNAc-specific plant lectins commonly used for glycan blotting. Though a general reactivity towards glycoproteins might be expected from the avidity conferred by its high valence, it showed a marked preference for glycoproteins with multiple glycans, terminated by Gal or GalNAc. Thus its ten closely-spaced sites each with a K(D) for GalNAc of ~2 mM appeared to make RSVL more selective than the four more widely-spaced sites of soybean agglutinin, with a ten-fold better K(D) for GalNAc.

  1. Human antibodies targeting the C-type lectin-like domain of the tumor endothelial cell marker clec14a regulate angiogenic properties in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ki, M K; Jeoung, M H; Choi, J R; Rho, S-S; Kwon, Y-G; Shim, H; Chung, J; Hong, H J; Song, B D; Lee, S

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that clec14a may be involved in tumor angiogenesis. However, a molecular mechanism has not been clearly identified. In this study, we show for the first time that C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) of clec14a may be important for regulating cell migration and filopodia formation. Using phage display technology, recombinant human antibodies specific to the CTLDs of human and mouse clec14a (clec14a-CTLD (immunoglobulin G) IgG) were selected. Functional assays using the antibodies showed that clec14a-CTLD IgGs specifically blocked endothelial cell migration and tube formation without affecting cell viability or activation. Further, clec14a-CTLD IgGs inhibited clec14a-mediated cell–cell contact by blocking interaction between CTLDs. Finally, clec14a cross-linking by the clec14a-CTLD IgGs significantly downregulated clec14a expression on the surface of endothelial cells. These results strongly suggest that the clec14a-CTLD may be a key domain in angiogenesis, and that clec14a-CTLD IgGs specifically inhibit angiogenesis by modulating CTLD-mediated cell interactions and clec14a expression on the surface of endothelial cells. PMID:23644659

  2. Lebecin, a new C-type lectin like protein from Macrovipera lebetina venom with anti-tumor activity against the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Jed; Fakhfekh, Emna; Morgen, Maram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Majdoub, Hafedh; Gargouri, Ali; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Luis, José; Marrakchi, Naziha; Sarray, Sameh

    2014-08-01

    C-type lectins like proteins display various biological activities and are known to affect especially platelet aggregation. Few of them have been reported to have anti-tumor effects. In this study, we have identified and characterized a new C-type lectin like protein, named lebecin. Lebecin is a heterodimeric protein of 30 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of both subunits were determined by Edman degradation and the entire amino acid sequences were deduced from cDNAs. The precursors of both lebecin subunits contain a 23-amino acid residue signal peptide and the mature α and β subunits are composed of 129 and 131 amino acids, respectively. Lebecin is shown to be a potent inhibitor of MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cells proliferation. Furthermore, lebecin dose-dependently inhibited the integrin-mediated attachment of these cells to different adhesion substrata. This novel C-type lectin also completely blocked MDA-MB231 cells migration towards fibronectin and fibrinogen in haptotaxis assays.

  3. C-type lectin receptors Dectin-3 and Dectin-2 form a heterodimeric pattern-recognition receptor for host defense against fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Le-Le; Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Jiang, Changying; You, Yun; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Jia, Xin-Ming; Lin, Xin

    2013-08-22

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) play critical roles as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) for sensing Candida albicans infection, which can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals. Here we have shown that Dectin-3 (also called CLECSF8, MCL, or Clec4d), a previously uncharacterized CLR, recognized α-mannans on the surfaces of C. albicans hyphae and induced NF-κB activation. Mice with either blockade or genetically deleted Dectin-3 were highly susceptible to C. albicans infection. Dectin-3 constantly formed heterodimers with Dectin-2, a well-characterized CLR, for recognizing C. albicans hyphae. Compared to their respective homodimers, Dectin-3 and Dectin-2 heterodimers bound α-mannans more effectively, leading to potent inflammatory responses against fungal infections. Together, our study demonstrates that Dectin-3 forms a heterodimeric PRR with Dectin-2 for sensing fungal infection and suggests that different CLRs may form different hetero- and homodimers, which provide different sensitivity and diversity for host cells to detect various microbial infections.

  4. PmLT, a C-type lectin specific to hepatopancreas is involved in the innate defense of the shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tracy Hoi-Tung; Benzie, John A H; He, Jian-Guo; Chan, Siu-Ming

    2008-11-01

    A diverse class of proteins called lectins plays a major role in shrimp innate immunity. In this study, the cDNA encoding a C-type lectin of Penaeus monodon (PmLT) was cloned, and its potential role examined. Despite the low overall amino acid sequence identity with other animal lectins, PmLT includes conserved carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) characteristic of animal C-type lectins. Unlike the other two P. monodon lectin-like proteins described to date that have one CRD, PmLT has two CRDs. The first CRD contains a QPD motif with specificity for binding galactose, while the second CRD contains a EPN motif for binding mannose. PmLT transcripts can be detected in the hepatopancreas but not in other tissues. Expression studies showed that PmLT mRNA transcript level decreased initially and then gradually increased after whole shrimp or hepatopancreas tissue fragments were treated with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) extract but were not affected by bacteria. Using anti-rPmLT antibody, PmLT was detected only in the hepatopancreas specific F cells (Hpf). In vitro encapsulation assay showed that agarose beads coated with rPmLT were encapsulated by hemocytes indicating a role in innate immune response. In summary, PmLT is produced in the hepatopancreas and may act as a pattern recognition protein for viral pathogens and also activates the innate immune responses of the shrimp to bacteria. The dual-CRD structure of PmLT may assist the recognition of diverse pathogens.

  5. A novel C-type lectin with four CRDs is involved in the regulation of antimicrobial peptide gene expression in Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling-Ling; Wang, Yu-Qing; Dai, Yun-Jia; Zhao, Li-Juan; Qin, Qiwei; Lin, Li; Ren, Qian; Lan, Jiang-Feng

    2016-08-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are found in a wide number of invertebrates, and have been reported to participate in immune responses, such as the activation of prophenoloxidase, cell adhesion, bacterial clearance and phagocytosis. Previous studies on CTLs focused on the function of their carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). Currently, studies on lectins with multi-CRDs are limited. In this study, a lectin with four CRDs was cloned from Hyriopsis cumingii, and called HcLec4. HcLec4 was widely distributed in several tissues and was significantly down-regulated at the early stage (2 h) of bacterial infection. We further analyzed the bacteria and carbohydrate binding activities of HcLec4. The results showed that HcLec4 could bind to several bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN). In HcLec4 knockdown mussels, the bacterial clearance rate was increased, and the expression level of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) was up-regulated. This study reveals that HcLec4 exerts its antibacterial effect by regulating the expression of AMPs at the early stage of bacterial infection. PMID:27288254

  6. The Cryptosporidium parvum C-Type Lectin CpClec Mediates Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Interactions with Sulfated Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, Jacob G.

    2016-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium causes significant diarrheal disease worldwide. Effective anticryptosporidial agents are lacking, in part because the molecular mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are poorly understood. Previously, we identified and characterized a novel Cryptosporidium parvum C-type lectin domain-containing mucin-like glycoprotein, CpClec. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms underlying interactions of CpClec with intestinal epithelial cells by using an Fc-tagged recombinant protein. CpClec-Fc displayed Ca2+-dependent, saturable binding to HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells and competitively inhibited C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells. Binding of CpClec-Fc was specifically inhibited by sulfated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparin and heparan sulfate. Binding was reduced after the removal of heparan sulfate and following the inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation in HCT-8 cells. Like CpClec-Fc binding, C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells were inhibited by glycosaminoglycans and were reduced after heparan sulfate removal or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation. Lastly, CpClec-Fc binding and C. parvum sporozoite attachment were significantly decreased in CHO cell mutants defective in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Together, these results indicate that CpClec is a novel C-type lectin that mediates C. parvum attachment and infection via Ca2+-dependent binding to sulfated proteoglycans on intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26975991

  7. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP interacts with C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 and promotes its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Miaomiao; Li, Lili; Song, Shushu; Wu, Weicheng; Peng, Peike; Yang, Caiting; Zhang, Mingming; Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Ran; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was originally identified as a member of non-classical C-type lectin-like receptors in platelets and immune cells. Activation of CLEC-2 is involved in thrombus formation, lymphatic/blood vessel separation, platelet-mediated tumor metastasis and immune response. Nevertheless, the regulation of CLEC-2 expression is little understood. In this study, we identified that the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) interacted with CLEC-2 by mass spectrometry analysis, and CHIP decreased the protein expression of CLEC-2 through lysine-48-linked ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Deleted and point mutation also revealed that CHIP controlled CLEC-2 protein expression via both tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) domain and Ubox domain in a HSP70/90-independent manner. Moreover, reduced CHIP expression was associated with decreased CLEC-2 polyubiquitination and increased CLEC-2 protein levels in PMA-induced differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages. These results indicate that CLEC-2 is the target substrate of E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP, and suggest that the CHIP/CLEC-2 axis may play an important role in the modulation of immune response.

  8. HdhCTL1 is a novel C-type lectin of abalone Haliotis discus hannai that agglutinates Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Qiu, Reng; Hu, Yong-hua

    2014-12-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate recognition proteins, which play important roles in the innate immunity of both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we identified and characterized a C-type lectin (named HdhCTL1) from Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai. HdhCTL1 is composed of 176 amino acid residues and shares low (23.9%) identity with the known CTL of abalone. HdhCTL1 possesses a putative signal peptide and a carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) typical of CTLs. The CRD of HdhCTL1 contains four disulfide bond-forming cysteine residues that are highly conserved in CTLs. HdhCTL1 mRNA was detected in a wide range of tissues and expressed abundantly in the digestive gland. Experimental infection with the bacterial pathogen Vibrio anguillarum significantly upregulated HdhCTL1 expression in a time-dependent manner. Recombinant HdhCTL1 (rHdhCTL1) purified from Escherichia coli was able to agglutinate Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The agglutinating ability of rHdhCTL1 was abolished in the presence of mannose. These results suggest that HdhCTL1 is a novel CTL which is likely to be involved in host defense against bacterial infection. PMID:25301718

  9. HdhCTL1 is a novel C-type lectin of abalone Haliotis discus hannai that agglutinates Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Qiu, Reng; Hu, Yong-hua

    2014-12-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate recognition proteins, which play important roles in the innate immunity of both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we identified and characterized a C-type lectin (named HdhCTL1) from Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai. HdhCTL1 is composed of 176 amino acid residues and shares low (23.9%) identity with the known CTL of abalone. HdhCTL1 possesses a putative signal peptide and a carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) typical of CTLs. The CRD of HdhCTL1 contains four disulfide bond-forming cysteine residues that are highly conserved in CTLs. HdhCTL1 mRNA was detected in a wide range of tissues and expressed abundantly in the digestive gland. Experimental infection with the bacterial pathogen Vibrio anguillarum significantly upregulated HdhCTL1 expression in a time-dependent manner. Recombinant HdhCTL1 (rHdhCTL1) purified from Escherichia coli was able to agglutinate Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The agglutinating ability of rHdhCTL1 was abolished in the presence of mannose. These results suggest that HdhCTL1 is a novel CTL which is likely to be involved in host defense against bacterial infection.

  10. The Cryptosporidium parvum C-Type Lectin CpClec Mediates Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Interactions with Sulfated Proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Ludington, Jacob G; Ward, Honorine D

    2016-05-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium causes significant diarrheal disease worldwide. Effective anticryptosporidial agents are lacking, in part because the molecular mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are poorly understood. Previously, we identified and characterized a novel Cryptosporidium parvum C-type lectin domain-containing mucin-like glycoprotein, CpClec. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms underlying interactions of CpClec with intestinal epithelial cells by using an Fc-tagged recombinant protein. CpClec-Fc displayed Ca(2+)-dependent, saturable binding to HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells and competitively inhibited C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells. Binding of CpClec-Fc was specifically inhibited by sulfated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparin and heparan sulfate. Binding was reduced after the removal of heparan sulfate and following the inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation in HCT-8 cells. Like CpClec-Fc binding, C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells were inhibited by glycosaminoglycans and were reduced after heparan sulfate removal or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation. Lastly, CpClec-Fc binding and C. parvum sporozoite attachment were significantly decreased in CHO cell mutants defective in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Together, these results indicate that CpClec is a novel C-type lectin that mediates C. parvum attachment and infection via Ca(2+)-dependent binding to sulfated proteoglycans on intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26975991

  11. Fishing for lectins from diverse sequence libraries by yeast surface display - an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Stefan; Callewaert, Nico; Jacobs, Pieter P; Dewaele, Sylviane; Dewerte, Isabelle; Contreras, Roland

    2008-02-01

    The establishment of a robust technology platform for the expression cloning of carbohydrate-binding proteins remains a key challenge in glycomics. Here we explore the utility of using yeast surface display (YSD) technology in the interaction-based lectin cloning from complete cDNA libraries. This should pave the way for more detailed studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions. To evaluate the performance of this system, lectins representing three different subfamilies (galectins, siglecs, and C-type lectins) were successfully displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris as a-agglutinin and/or alpha-agglutinin fusions. The predicted carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected for three out of five lectins tested (galectin-1, galectin-3, and siaoadhesin). For galectin-4 and E-selectin, no specific carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected. We also demonstrate that proteins with carbohydrate affinity can be specifically isolated from complex metazoan cDNA libraries through multiple rounds of FACS sorting, employing multivalent, fluorescent-labeled polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

  12. Fishing for lectins from diverse sequence libraries by yeast surface display - an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Stefan; Callewaert, Nico; Jacobs, Pieter P; Dewaele, Sylviane; Dewerte, Isabelle; Contreras, Roland

    2008-02-01

    The establishment of a robust technology platform for the expression cloning of carbohydrate-binding proteins remains a key challenge in glycomics. Here we explore the utility of using yeast surface display (YSD) technology in the interaction-based lectin cloning from complete cDNA libraries. This should pave the way for more detailed studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions. To evaluate the performance of this system, lectins representing three different subfamilies (galectins, siglecs, and C-type lectins) were successfully displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris as a-agglutinin and/or alpha-agglutinin fusions. The predicted carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected for three out of five lectins tested (galectin-1, galectin-3, and siaoadhesin). For galectin-4 and E-selectin, no specific carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected. We also demonstrate that proteins with carbohydrate affinity can be specifically isolated from complex metazoan cDNA libraries through multiple rounds of FACS sorting, employing multivalent, fluorescent-labeled polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates. PMID:18086821

  13. Cell surface lectin-binding glycoconjugates on marine planktonic protists.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Emily C; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Martin-Cereceda, Mercedes; Novarino, Gianfranco; Wootton, Emma C

    2006-12-01

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions appear to play an important role in the phagocytosis of microbial prey by free-living protozoa. The present study utilizes FITC-labelled plant lectins to investigate the presence and localization of cell surface glycoconjugates on live and fixed planktonic protists (Dunaliella primolecta, Oxyrrhis marina, Goniomonas amphinema, Paraphysomonas vestita and Euplotes vannus). With live flagellate preparations, lectins primarily bound to external cell surfaces, with minimal internal staining observed. In contrast, cell fixation permeabilized cell membranes, allowing lectins to bind to internal structures, such as nuclear membranes and food vacuoles, interfering with the characterization of cell surface glycoconjugates. The method developed to label cell surface sugar moieties of live planktonic protists successfully overcomes the problems associated with fixation, and thus provides a useful protocol for future studies on protistan cell surface carbohydrate characterization.

  14. C-type lectin-like domain and fibronectin-like type II domain of phospholipase A(2) receptor 1 modulate binding and migratory responses to collagen.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Soichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Obata, Jun-ei; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-24

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) mediates collagen-dependent migration. The mechanisms by which PLA2R interacts with collagen remain unclear. We produced HEK293 cells expressing full-length wild-type PLA2R or a truncated PLA2R that lacks fibronectin-like type II (FNII) domains or several regions of C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). We show that the CTLD1-2 as well as the FNII domain of PLA2R are responsible for binding to collagen and for collagen-dependent migration. Thus, multiple regions and domains of the extracellular portion of PLA2R participate in the responses to collagen. These data suggest a potentially new mechanism for PLA2R-mediated biological response beyond that of a receptor for secretory PLA2.

  15. Identification and expression modulation of a C-type lectin domain family 4 homologue that is highly expressed in monocytes/macrophages in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Johansson, Petronella; Wang, Tiehui; Collet, Bertrand; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Monte, Milena M; Secombes, Christopher J; Zou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The C-type lectin domain containing (CLEC) receptors including CD209 are expressed in vivo by monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells and by in vitro generated monocyte-derived cells. This paper reports the cloning and sequencing of a lectin molecule, CLEC4T1, in rainbow trout that is a homologue of the CLEC4 family. The expression pattern of the CLEC4T1 was investigated in vivo after infection with a bacterial pathogen and in cultured macrophages after modulation with microbial mimics. Trout CLEC4T1 was highly expressed in spleen and head kidney following infection with Yersinia ruckeri. Expression could also be induced in macrophage cultures by LPS but not by Poly I:C, and suggests that the regulation of CLEC4T1 expression in trout varies according to the nature of the stimulant. A polyclonal CLEC4T1 antibody was generated and validated by Western blotting for use in evaluation of CLEC4T1(+) cells by flow cytometry analysis. Freshly isolated adherent trout head kidney cultures, potentially containing macrophages and dendritic cell precursors, showed an increase of CLEC4T1(+) cells (assessed by flow cytometry) upon stimulation with recombinant interleukin-4/13A. The results suggest that CLEC4T1 is a useful marker for further characterisation of monocyte derived antigen presenting cells in fish.

  16. Lectin binding and surface glycoprotein pattern of human macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H; Radzun, H J; Schumacher, U; Parwaresch, M R

    1986-01-01

    In the present study unstimulated and stimulated human blood monocytes, untreated and phorbol ester treated U-937 cells, as well as human peritoneal and alveolar macrophages were studied with respect to their surface membrane properties. Binding of different lectins and electrophoretic patterns of tritium labeled surface glycoproteins were compared. The analysis of surface glycoproteins could be interpreted as evidence for a common origin of the analysed cell populations. Furthermore, banding patterns of glycoproteins might be useful to define certain activation states within monocyte/macrophage differentiation. In contrast, lectin binding pattern did not clearly discriminate macrophage subpopulations. PMID:3102412

  17. C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor LOX-1 Promotes Dendritic Cell-Mediated Class-Switched B Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Joo, HyeMee; Li, Dapeng; Dullaers, Melissa; Kim, Tae-Whan; Duluc, Dorothee; Upchurch, Katherine; Xue, Yaming; Zurawski, Sandy; Le Grand, Roger; Liu, Yong-Jun; Kuroda, Marcelo; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern recognition receptor for a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. However, LOX-1 function in the host immune response is not fully understood. Here, we report that LOX-1 expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells promotes humoral responses. On B cells LOX-1 signaling upregulated CCR7, promoting cellular migration towards lymphoid tissues. LOX-1 signaling on DCs licensed the cells to promote B cell differentiation into class-switched plasmablasts, and led to downregulation of chemokine receptor CXCR5 and upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 on plasmablasts, which enabled their exit from germinal centers and migration towards local mucosa and skin. Finally, we found that targeting influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) subunit to LOX-1 elicited HA1-specific protective antibody responses in rhesus macaques. Thus, LOX-1 expressed on B cells and DC cells has complementary functions to promote humoral immune responses. PMID:25308333

  18. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  19. Structure of the complex of F-actin and DNGR-1, a C-type lectin receptor involved in dendritic cell crosspresentation of dead cell-associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Iborra, Salvador; Yamada, Yurika; Huotari, Jatta; Schulz, Oliver; Ahrens, Susan; Kjær, Svend; Way, Michael; Sancho, David; Namba, Keiichi; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNGR-1 is a C-type lectin receptor that binds F-actin exposed by dying cells and facilitates cross-presentation of dead cell-associated antigens by dendritic cells. Here we present the structure of DNGR-1 bound to F-actin at 7.7 Å resolution. Unusually for F-actin binding proteins, the DNGR-1 ligand binding domain contacts three actin subunits helically arranged in the actin filament, bridging over two protofilaments, as well as two neighboring actin subunits along one protofilament. Mutation of residues predicted to mediate ligand binding led to loss of DNGR-1-dependent cross-presentation of dead cell-associated antigens, formally demonstrating that the latter depends on F-actin recognition. Notably, DNGR-1 has relatively modest affinity for F-actin but multivalent interactions allow a marked increase in binding strength. Our findings shed light on modes of actin binding by cellular proteins and reveal how extracellular detection of cytoskeletal components by dedicated receptors allows immune monitoring of loss of cellular integrity. PMID:25979418

  20. The C-type lectin-like domain containing proteins Clec-39 and Clec-49 are crucial for Caenorhabditis elegans immunity against Serratia marcescens infection.

    PubMed

    Miltsch, S M; Seeberger, P H; Lepenies, B

    2014-07-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits protective immunity against a variety of fungal and bacterial pathogens. Since C. elegans lacks an adaptive immune system, pathogen recognition is mediated entirely by innate immunity. To date, little is known about the involvement of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in pathogen sensing as part of the C. elegans immunity. C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) containing proteins represent a superfamily of PRRs. A large number of genes encoding for CTLD proteins are present in the C. elegans genome, however the role of CTLD proteins in bacterial recognition and antibacterial immunity has not yet been determined. In this study, we investigated the function of selected C. elegans CTLD proteins during infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. Wild-type and CTLD gene-deficient C. elegans strains were compared in their susceptibility to S. marcescens infection. Interestingly, survival and egg laying were significantly reduced in strains deficient for clec-39 and clec-49 indicating a role for both CTLD proteins in C. elegans immune defense against bacteria as evidenced by using S. marcescens infection. Binding studies with recombinantly expressed Clec-39-Fc and Clec-49-Fc fusion proteins revealed that both CTLD proteins recognized live bacteria in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This study provides insight into the role of CTLD proteins in C. elegans immunity and demonstrates their function during bacterial infection.

  1. COMMON CELL SURFACE ANTIGEN ASSOCIATED WITH MAMMALIAN C-TYPE RNA VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiki, Takashi; Mellors, Robert C.; Hardy, William D.; Fleissner, Erwin

    1974-01-01

    The indirect membrane immunofluorescence test and the absorption analysis of rabbit anti-FeLV, rabbit anti-FeLVp 30, and rabbit anti-MuLVp 30 antisera yielded the following conclusions. An antigen shared by mammalian (murine and feline) C-type RNA leukemia and sarcoma viruses was detected on the surface of cells infected or transformed by C-type viruses. The antigen was characterized as membrane-bound gs antigen bearing two determinants, membrane-bound gs-1, intraspecies-specific antigenic determinant, and membrane-bound gs-3, interspecies-specific antigenic determinant. Membrane-bound gs antigen was located on the cell surface, frequently near the site of virus budding but not on the envelope of murine C-type RNA virus. PMID:4131513

  2. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Michelle; Graus, Matthew; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith; Thompson, Nancy; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  3. A single-CRD C-type lectin from oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates immune recognition and pathogen elimination with a potential role in the activation of complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Huan; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-06-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs), serving as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins that participate in nonself-recognition and pathogen elimination. In the present study, a single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) CTL was identified from oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated as CgCLec-2). There was only one CRD within the deduced amino acid sequence of CgCLec-2 consisting of 129 amino acid residues. A conserved EPN (Glu246-Pro247-Asn248) motif was found in Ca(2+)-binding site 2 of CgCLec-2. The CgCLec-2 mRNA could be detected in all the examined tissues at different expression levels in oysters. The mRNA expression of CgCLec-2 in hemocytes was up-regulated significantly at 6 h post Vibrio splendidus challenge. The recombinant CgCLec-2 (rCgCLec-2) could bind various Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs), including lipopolysaccharide, mannan and peptidoglycan, and displayed strong binding abilities to Vibrio anguillarum, V. splendidus and Yarrowiali polytica and week binding ability to Staphylococcus aureus. It could also enhance the phagocytic activity of oyster hemocytes to V. splendidus and exhibited growth suppression activity against gram-positive bacteria S. aureus but no effect on gram-negative bacteria V. splendidus. Furthermore, the interaction between rCgCLec-2 and rCgMASPL-1 was confirmed by GST Pull down. The results suggested that CgCLec-2 served as not only a PRR in immune recognition but also a regulatory factor in pathogen elimination, and played a potential role in the activation of complement system. PMID:25800112

  4. Preferential induction of CD4+ T cell responses through in vivo targeting of antigen to dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-1.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert W; Thompson, Clare; Reid, Delyth M; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F

    2006-08-15

    Targeting of Ags and therapeutics to dendritic cells (DCs) has immense potential for immunotherapy and vaccination. Because DCs are heterogeneous, optimal targeting strategies will require knowledge about functional specialization among DC subpopulations and identification of molecules for targeting appropriate DCs. We characterized the expression of a fungal recognition receptor, DC-associated C-type lectin-1 (Dectin-1), on mouse DC subpopulations and investigated the ability of an anti-Dectin-1 Ab to deliver Ag for the stimulation of immune responses. Dectin-1 was shown to be expressed on CD8alpha-CD4-CD11b+ DCs found in spleen and lymph nodes and dermal DCs present in skin and s.c. lymph nodes. Injection of Ag-anti-Dectin-1 conjugates induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell and Ab responses at low doses where free Ag failed to elicit a response. Notably, qualitatively different immune responses were generated by targeting Ag to Dectin-1 vs CD205, a molecule expressed on CD8alpha+CD4-CD11b- DCs, dermal DCs, and Langerhans cells. Unlike anti-Dectin-1, anti-CD205 conjugates failed to elicit an Ab response. Moreover, when conjugates were injected i.v., anti-Dectin-1 stimulated a much stronger CD4+ T cell response and a much weaker CD8+ T cell response than anti-CD205. The results reveal Dectin-1 as a potential targeting molecule for immunization and have implications for the specialization of DC subpopulations. PMID:16887988

  5. Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin Mincle-expressing dendritic cells contribute to control of splenic Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Behler, Friederike; Maus, Regina; Bohling, Jennifer; Knippenberg, Sarah; Kirchhof, Gabriele; Nagata, Masahiro; Jonigk, Danny; Izykowski, Nicole; Mägel, Lavinia; Welte, Tobias; Yamasaki, Sho; Maus, Ulrich A

    2015-01-01

    The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin Mincle has recently been identified to be a pattern recognition receptor sensing mycobacterial infection via recognition of the mycobacterial cell wall component trehalose-6',6-dimycolate (TDM). However, its role in systemic mycobacterial infections has not been examined so far. Mincle-knockout (KO) mice were infected intravenously with Mycobacterium bovis BCG to mimic the systemic spread of mycobacteria under defined experimental conditions. After intravenous infection with M. bovis BCG, Mincle-KO mice responded with significantly higher numbers of mycobacterial CFU in spleen and liver, while reduced granuloma formation was observed only in the spleen. At the same time, reduced Th1 cytokine production and decreased numbers of gamma interferon-producing T cells were observed in the spleens of Mincle-KO mice relative to the numbers in the spleens of wild-type (WT) mice. The effect of adoptive transfer of defined WT leukocyte subsets generated from bone marrow cells of zDC(+/DTR) mice (which bear the human diphtheria toxin receptor [DTR] under the control of the classical dendritic cell-specific zinc finger transcription factor zDC) to specifically deplete Mincle-expressing classical dendritic cells (cDCs) but not macrophages after diphtheria toxin application on the numbers of splenic and hepatic CFU and T cell subsets was then determined. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that Mincle-expressing splenic cDCs rather than Mincle-expressing macrophages contributed to the reconstitution of attenuated splenic antimycobacterial immune responses in Mincle-KO mice after intravenous challenge with BCG. Collectively, we show that expression of Mincle, particularly by cDCs, contributes to the control of splenic M. bovis BCG infection in mice.

  6. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Itano, Michelle S.; Graus, Matthew S.; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael J.; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith A.; Thompson, Nancy L.; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron K.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (∼80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to 4 h. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150–175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal recognition, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of <30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen. PMID:25506589

  7. A single-CRD C-type lectin from oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates immune recognition and pathogen elimination with a potential role in the activation of complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Huan; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-06-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs), serving as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins that participate in nonself-recognition and pathogen elimination. In the present study, a single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) CTL was identified from oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated as CgCLec-2). There was only one CRD within the deduced amino acid sequence of CgCLec-2 consisting of 129 amino acid residues. A conserved EPN (Glu246-Pro247-Asn248) motif was found in Ca(2+)-binding site 2 of CgCLec-2. The CgCLec-2 mRNA could be detected in all the examined tissues at different expression levels in oysters. The mRNA expression of CgCLec-2 in hemocytes was up-regulated significantly at 6 h post Vibrio splendidus challenge. The recombinant CgCLec-2 (rCgCLec-2) could bind various Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs), including lipopolysaccharide, mannan and peptidoglycan, and displayed strong binding abilities to Vibrio anguillarum, V. splendidus and Yarrowiali polytica and week binding ability to Staphylococcus aureus. It could also enhance the phagocytic activity of oyster hemocytes to V. splendidus and exhibited growth suppression activity against gram-positive bacteria S. aureus but no effect on gram-negative bacteria V. splendidus. Furthermore, the interaction between rCgCLec-2 and rCgMASPL-1 was confirmed by GST Pull down. The results suggested that CgCLec-2 served as not only a PRR in immune recognition but also a regulatory factor in pathogen elimination, and played a potential role in the activation of complement system.

  8. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  9. Development of gastrointestinal surface. VIII. Lectin identification of carbohydrate differences

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, K.Y.; Bresson, J.L.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-05-01

    Binding of microvillus membranes (MVM) from newborn and adult rats by concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus (UEA I), Dolichos bifluorus (DBA), and Triticum vulgaris (WGA) was examined to determine the availability of carbohydrate-containing sites for these lectins on the intestinal surface during development. Consistent patterns of differences in the reaction of MVM with these lectins were found. Con A and UEA had much higher reactivities to MVM of adult than newborn rats. /sup 125/I-labeled-UEA gel overlay experiments revealed the abundance of UEA-binding sites in MVM of adult rat in contrast to the two binding sites in MVM of a newborn rat. DBA bound only to MVM of the adults, and very few binding sites were found in immature MVM. In contrast to these lectins, WGA binding was much higher in MVM of the newborns and decreased with maturation. Additional experiments on the age dependence of UEA and DBA reactivities revealed that the most striking changes occur in animals from 2 to 2 wk of age. In MVM from 2-wk-old rats, there were only 13.9% and < 0.2% of the adult binding capacities for UEA and DBA, respectively. By the time the animals were 4 wk old, the binding capacity for UEA had attained close to the level of the adults, whereas for DBA it reached 71.3% of the adult value. These results provide definite evidence of changes in the intestinal surface during perinatal development.

  10. Molecular characterization of the reniform nematode C-type lectin gene family reveals a likely role in mitigating environmental stresses during plant parasitism.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Satish; Jenkins, Johnie N; Wubben, Martin J

    2014-03-10

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a damaging semi-endoparasitic pathogen of more than 300 plant species. Transcriptome sequencing of R. reniformis parasitic females revealed an enrichment for sequences homologous to C-type lectins (CTLs), an evolutionarily ancient family of Ca(+2)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins that are involved in the innate immune response. To gain further insight as to the potential role of CTLs in facilitating plant parasitism by R. reniformis, we performed a comprehensive assessment of the CTL gene family. 5'- and 3'-RACE experiments identified a total of 11 R. reniformis CTL transcripts (Rr-ctl-1 through Rr-ctl-11) that ranged in length from 1083 to 1,194 bp and showed 93-99% identity with one another. An alignment of cDNA and genomic sequences revealed three introns with the first intron residing within the 5'-untranslated region. BLAST analyses showed the closest homologs belonging to the parasitic nematodes Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Heterodera glycines. Rr-ctl-1, -2, and -3 were expressed throughout the R. reniformis life cycle; whereas, the remaining Rr-ctl genes showed life stage-specific expression. Quantitative real time RT-PCR determined that Rr-ctl transcripts were 839-fold higher in sedentary female nematodes than the next most abundant life stage. Predicted Rr-CTL peptides ranged from 301 to 338 amino acids long, possessed an N-terminal signal peptide for secretion, and contained a conserved CLECT domain, including the mannose-binding motifs EPN and EPD and the conserved WND motif that is required for binding Ca(+2). In addition, Rr-CTL peptides harbored repeats of a novel 17-mer motif within their C-terminus that showed similarity to motifs associated with bacterial ice nucleation proteins. In situ hybridization of Rr-ctl transcripts within sedentary females showed specific accumulation within the hypodermis of the body regions exposed to the soil environment; those structures embedded within the

  11. U(VI) reduction by diverse outer surface c-type cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Roberto; Leavitt, Janet J; Comolli, Luis R; Csencsits, Roseann; Janot, Noemie; Flanagan, Kelly A; Gray, Arianna S; Leang, Ching; Izallalen, Mounir; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-10-01

    Early studies with Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested that outer-surface c-type cytochromes might play a role in U(VI) reduction, but it has recently been suggested that there is substantial U(VI) reduction at the surface of the electrically conductive pili known as microbial nanowires. This phenomenon was further investigated. A strain of G. sulfurreducens, known as Aro-5, which produces pili with substantially reduced conductivity reduced U(VI) nearly as well as the wild type, as did a strain in which the gene for PilA, the structural pilin protein, was deleted. In order to reduce rates of U(VI) reduction to levels less than 20% of the wild-type rates, it was necessary to delete the genes for the five most abundant outer surface c-type cytochromes of G. sulfurreducens. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy demonstrated that whereas 83% ± 10% of the uranium associated with wild-type cells correspond to U(IV) after 4 h of incubation, with the quintuple mutant, 89% ± 10% of uranium was U(VI). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy revealed that wild-type cells did not precipitate uranium along pili as previously reported, but U(IV) was precipitated at the outer cell surface. These findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have suggested that G. sulfurreducens requires outer-surface c-type cytochromes but not pili for the reduction of soluble extracellular electron acceptors.

  12. Comprehensive profiling of accessible surface glycans of mammalian sperm using a lectin microarray

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that cell surface glycans or glycocalyx play important roles in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of the sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic research (sperm glycobiology) and clinical studies, such as diagnostics of infertility. As a group of natural glycan binders, lectin is an ideal tool for cell surface glycan profiling. However, because of the lack of effective technology, only a few lectins have been tested for lectin-sperm binding profiles. To address this challenge, we have developed a procedure for high-throughput probing of mammalian sperm with 91 lectins on lectin microarrays. Normal sperm from human, boar, bull, goat and rabbit were collected and analyzed on the lectin microarrays. Positive bindings of a set of ~50 lectins were observed for all the sperm of 5 species, which indicated a wide range of glycans are on the surface of mammalian sperm. Species specific lectin bindings were also observed. Clustering analysis revealed that the distances of the five species according to the lectin binding profiles are consistent with that of the genome sequence based phylogenetic tree except for rabbit. The procedure that we established in this study could be generally applicable for sperm from other species or defect sperm from the same species. We believe the lectin binding profiles of the mammalian sperm that we established in this study are valuable for both basic research and clinical studies. PMID:24629138

  13. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein participating in hemocyte nodule formation in the silkworm Bombyx mori is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with two different tandem carbohydrate-recognition domains.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, N; Imamura, M; Kadotani, T; Yaoi, K; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-25

    We recently isolated and characterized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, BmLBP, from the larval hemolymph of the silkworm Bombyx mori. BmLBP is a pattern recognition molecule that recognizes the lipid A portion of LPS and participates in a cellular defense reaction. This paper describes the cDNA cloning of BmLBP. The deduced amino acid sequence of BmLBP revealed that BmLBP is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with a unique structural feature that consists of two different carbohydrate-recognition domains in tandem, a short and a long form. PMID:9989592

  14. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25569520

  15. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Hayabusa's follow-on mission for surface and sub-surface sample return from a C-type NEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hajime; Yoshikawa, M.; Yano, H.; Tsuda, Y.; Nakazawa, S.; Mimamino, H.; Terui, F.; Saiki, T.; Nishiyama, K.; Kubota, T.; Okada, T.; Morimoto, M. Y.; Ogawa, N.; Okamoto, C.; Takagi, Y.; Tachibana, S.; Nakamura, R.; Hirata, N.; Demura, H.

    n JAXA's Long-term Vision 2005-2025, acquiring the capability of deep space round trip be-yond the Earth-Moon system is one of key elements for the future space exploration and that has been Hayabusa's primary engineering goal. According to the solar system exploration sci-ence roadmap set by ISAS and JSPEC in 2007, a programmatic approach to small body sample returns from S-type, C-type and then P/D-type asteroids as well as dormant comets, i.e., 'the further, the smaller, the more primitive strategy', is recommended for strengthening Japan's unique position in the field of space exploration. In a more recent international context, NEOs and Martian satellites have been identified as critical targets for the future human space explo-ration en route to Mars; thus their robotic precursor missions with the round trip capability have become more important than ever. Thus, Hayabusa's immediate follow-on mission, nicknamed so far as 'Hayabusa-2', is to aim establishing round trip exploration capability with both technical and operational heritage and lessons leaerned from the original Haybusa mission. It will also conduct in-situ observation and surface and sub-surface sample returns of a C-type NEO after Hayabusa's investigation and sampling attempt at Itokawa, a sub-km, S-type NEO. Important to be reminded is that C-type asteroid exploration is not just matching with carbona-ceous chondrites and interplanetary dust but also enhancing chances to discover new extrater-restrial materials unknown to us today that may become clues to decode interactions among organic, inorganic compounds and "water" kept in various forms inside the object. These three groups of asteroidal materials are basic constituents of the planet Earth, its ocean and its life. Also physical probing inside solid planetary bodies has been recognized as an effective tool to open new scientific insights. By excavating sub-surface materials with artificial physical in-teractions such as an impactor

  17. Lectin binding studies on a glycopolymer brush flow-through biosensor by localized surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Rosencrantz, Ruben R; Nguyen, Vu Hoa; Park, Hyunji; Schulte, Christine; Böker, Alexander; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Elling, Lothar

    2016-08-01

    A localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor in a flow-through configuration was applied for investigating kinetics of lectin binding to surface-grafted glycopolymer brushes. Polycarbonate filter membranes with pore sizes of 400 nm were coated with a 114-nm thick gold layer and used as substrate for surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of a glycomonomer. These grafted from glycopolymer brushes were further modified with two subsequent enzymatic reactions on the surface to yield an immobilized trisaccharide presenting brush. Specific binding of lectins including Clostridium difficile toxin A receptor domain to the glycopolymer brush surface could be investigated in a microfluidic setup with flow-through of the analytes and transmission surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Graphical abstract Glycopolymer brushes serve as high affinity ligands for lectin and toxin interactions in a sensitive, disposable flow-through LSPR biosensor. PMID:27277814

  18. Surface array proteins of Campylobacter fetus block lectin-mediated binding to type A lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, G C; Yang, L Y; Wang, E; Blaser, M J

    1990-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus strains with type A lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a surface array protein layer (S+) have been found to be pathogenic in humans and animals. Spontaneous laboratory mutants that lack surface array proteins (S-) are sensitive to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum. The ability of lectins to determine the presence of the S-layer and differentiate LPS type was assessed. We screened 14 lectins and found 3 (wheat germ agglutinin, Bandeiraea simplicifolia II, and Helix pomatia agglutinin) that agglutinated S- C. fetus strains with type A LPS but not S- strains with type B or type C LPS or S+ strains. However, the S+ type A strains were agglutinated after sequential water extraction, heat, or pronase treatment, all of which remove the S-layer, whereas there was no effect on the control strains. Specific carbohydrates for each lectin and purified LPS from a type A C. fetus strain specifically inhibited agglutination of an S- type A strain. In a direct enzyme-linked lectin assay, binding to the S- type A LPS strain was significantly greater than binding to the S+ strain (P = 0.01) or to a Campylobacter jejuni strain (P = 0.008). Consequently, these results indicate that the three lectins bind to the O side chains of C. fetus type A LPS but that the presence of the S-layer on intact cells blocks binding. Images PMID:2387622

  19. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  20. Vimentin and desmin possess GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Goto, Mitsuaki; Sato, Takao; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2010-07-01

    Vimentin and desmin are intermediate filament proteins found in various mesenchymal and skeletal muscle cells, respectively. These proteins play an important role in the stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture. Here, we found, using artificial biomimicking glycopolymers, that vimentin and desmin possess N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectin-like properties on the cell surfaces of various vimentin- and desmin-expressing cells such as cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The rod II domain of these proteins was demonstrated to be localized to the cell surface and to directly bind to the artificial biomimicking GlcNAc-bearing polymer, by confocal laser microscopy and surface plasmon resonance analysis. These glycopolymers strongly interact with lectins and are useful tools for the analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions, since glycopolymers binding to lectins can induce the clustering of lectins due to multivalent glycoside ligand binding. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and pull-down assay with His-tagged vimentin-rod II domain protein showed that the vimentin-rod II domain interacts with O-GlcNAc proteins. These results suggest that O-GlcNAc proteins might be one candidate for physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands with which vimentin and desmin interact. These findings demonstrate a novel function of vimentin and desmin that does not involve stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture by which these proteins interact with physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands such as O-GlcNAc proteins on the cell surface through their GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties. PMID:20332081

  1. Generation and characterization of β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharide probes from Brucella abortus cyclic β-glucan and their recognition by C-type lectins of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongtao; Palma, Angelina S; Zhang, Yibing; Childs, Robert A; Liu, Yan; Mitchell, Daniel A; Guidolin, Leticia S; Weigel, Wilfried; Mulloy, Barbara; Ciocchini, Andrés E; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2016-01-01

    The β1,2-glucans produced by bacteria are important in invasion, survival and immunomodulation in infected hosts be they mammals or plants. However, there has been a lack of information on proteins which recognize these molecules. This is partly due to the extremely limited availability of the sequence-defined oligosaccharides and derived probes for use in the study of their interactions. Here we have used the cyclic β1,2-glucan (CβG) of the bacterial pathogen Brucella abortus, after removal of succinyl side chains, to prepare linearized oligosaccharides which were used to generate microarrays. We describe optimized conditions for partial depolymerization of the cyclic glucan by acid hydrolysis and conversion of the β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharides, with degrees of polymerization 2–13, to neoglycolipids for the purpose of generating microarrays. By microarray analyses, we show that the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGNR, like the closely related DC-SIGN we investigated earlier, binds to the β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharides, as does the soluble immune effector serum mannose-binding protein. Exploratory studies with DC-SIGN are suggestive of the recognition also of the intact CβG by this receptor. These findings open the way to unravelling mechanisms of immunomodulation mediated by β1,2-glucans in mammalian systems. PMID:27053576

  2. An African swine fever virus ORF with similarity to C-type lectins is non-essential for growth in swine macrophages in vitro and for virus virulence in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Neilan, J G; Borca, M V; Lu, Z; Kutish, G F; Kleiboeker, S B; Carrillo, C; Zsak, L; Rock, D L

    1999-10-01

    An African swine fever virus (ASFV) ORF, 8CR, with similarity to the C-type lectin family of adhesion proteins has been described in the pathogenic isolate Malawi Lil-20/1. The similarity of 8CR to cellular and poxvirus genes associated with cell adhesion, cell recognition and virus infectivity suggested that 8CR may be of significance to ASFV-host cell interactions. Sequence analysis of the 8CR ORF from additional pathogenic ASFV isolates demonstrated conservation among isolates from both pig and tick sources. Northern blot analysis demonstrated 8CR mRNA transcription late in the virus replication cycle. A Malawi Lil-20/1 8CR deletion mutant (delta8CR) was constructed to analyse 8CR function further. The growth characteristics in vitro of delta8CR in porcine macrophage cell cultures were identical to those observed for parental virus. In domestic swine, delta8CR exhibited an unaltered parental Malawi Lil-20/1 disease and virulence phenotype. Thus, although well conserved among pathogenic ASFV field isolates, 8CR is non-essential for growth in porcine macrophages in vitro and for virus virulence in domestic swine.

  3. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Lectin Analysis of the Surface of the Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Yagoda-Shagam, Janet; Barton, Larry L.; Reed, William P.; Chiovetti, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface of Azospirillum brasilense was probed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectins, with binding determined by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. Cells from nitrogen-fixing or ammonium-assimilating cultures reacted similarly to FITC-labeled lectins, with lectin binding in the following order: Griffonia simplicifolia II agglutinin > Griffonia simplicifolia I agglutinin > Triticum vulgaris agglutinin > Glycine max agglutinin > Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin > Limax flavus agglutinin > Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin. The fluorescence intensity of cells labeled with FITC-labeled G. simplicifolia I, C. ensiformis, T. vulgaris, and G. max agglutinins was influenced by lectin concentration. Flow cytometry measurements of lectin binding to cells was consistent with measurements of agglutination resulting from lectin-cell interaction. Capsules surrounding nitrogen-fixing and ammonium-assimilating cells were readily demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopies. Images PMID:16347693

  4. Destabilization of pea lectin by substitution of a single amino acid in a surface loop.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaeker, F J; van Eijsden, R R; Díaz, C L; de Pater, B S; Kijne, J W

    1993-09-01

    Legume lectins are considered to be antinutritional factors (ANF) in the animal feeding industry. Inactivation of ANF is an important element in processing of food. In our study on the stability of Pisum sativum L. lectin (PSL), a conserved hydrophobic amino acid (Val103) in a surface loop was replaced with alanine. The mutant lectin, PSL V103A, showed a decrease in unfolding temperature (Tm) by some 10 degrees C in comparison with wild-type (wt) PSL, and the denaturation energy (delta H) is only about 55% of that of wt PSL. Replacement of an adjacent amino acid (Phe104) with alanine did not result in a significant difference in stability in comparison with wt PSL. Both mutations did not change the sugar-binding properties of the lectin, as compared with wt PSL and with PSL from pea seeds, at ambient temperatures. The double mutant, PSL V103A/F104A, was produced in Escherichia coli, but could not be isolated in an active (i.e. sugar-binding) form. Interestingly, the mutation in PSL V103A reversibly affected sugar-binding at 37 degrees C, as judged from haemagglutination assays. These results open the possibility of production of lectins that are active in planta at ambient temperatures, but are inactive and possibly non-toxic at 37 degrees C in the intestines of mammals. PMID:8400124

  5. Recombinant expression, in vitro refolding and characterizing disulfide bonds of a mouse inhibitory C-type lectin-like receptor Nkrp1b.

    PubMed

    Hernychová, L; Mrázek, H; Ivanova, L; Kukačka, Z; Chmelík, J; Novák, P

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the innate immunity, NK (Natural Killer) cells provide an early immune response to different stimuli, e.g. viral infections and tumor growths. However, their functions are more complex; they play an important role in reproduction, alloimmunity, autoimmunity and allergic diseases. NK cell activities require an intricate system of regulation that is ensured by many different receptors on a cell surface which integrate signals from interacting cells and soluble factors. One way to understand NK cell biology is through the structure of NK receptors, which can reveal ligand binding conditions. We present a modified protocol for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli and in vitro refolding of the ligand-binding domain of the inhibitory Nkrp1b (SJL/J) protein. Nkrp1b identity and folding was confirmed using mass spectrometry (accurate mass of the intact protein and evaluation of disulfide bonds) and one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The intention is to provide the basis for conducting structural studies of the inhibitory Nkrp1b protein, since only the activating Nkrp1a receptor structure is known. PMID:26447598

  6. Enhanced cell adhesion on silk fibroin via lectin surface modification.

    PubMed

    Teuschl, Andreas H; Neutsch, Lukas; Monforte, Xavier; Rünzler, Dominik; van Griensven, Martijn; Gabor, Franz; Redl, Heinz

    2014-06-01

    Various tissue engineering (TE) approaches are based on silk fibroin (SF) as scaffold material because of its superior mechanical and biological properties compared to other materials. The translation of one-step TE approaches to clinical application has generally failed so far due to the requirement of a prolonged cell seeding step before implantation. Here, we propose that the plant lectin WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), covalently bound to SF, will mediate cell adhesion in a time frame acceptable to be part of a one-step surgical intervention. After the establishment of a modification protocol utilizing carbodiimide chemistry, we examined the attachment of cells, with a special focus on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC), on WGA-SF compared to pure native SF. After a limited time frame of 20min the attachment of ASCs to WGA-SF showed an increase of about 17-fold, as compared to pure native SF. The lectin-mediated cell adhesion further showed an enhanced resistance to trypsin (as a protease model) and to applied fluid shear stress (mechanical stability). Moreover, we could demonstrate that the adhesion of ASCs on the WGA-SF does not negatively influence proliferation or differentiation potential into the osteogenic lineage. To test for in vitro immune response, the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in contact with the WGA-SF was determined, showing no alterations compared to plain SF. All these findings suggest that the WGA modification of SF offers important benefits for translation of SF scaffolds into clinical applications. PMID:24530561

  7. The Snake Venom Rhodocytin from Calloselasma rhodostoma—A Clinically Important Toxin and a Useful Experimental Tool for Studies of C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor 2 (CLEC-2)

    PubMed Central

    Bruserud, Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    The snake venom, rhodocytin, from the Malayan viper, Calloselasma rhodostoma, and the endogenous podoplanin are identified as ligands for the C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The snakebites caused by Calloselasma rhodostoma cause a local reaction with swelling, bleeding and eventually necrosis, together with a systemic effect on blood coagulation with distant bleedings that can occur in many different organs. This clinical picture suggests that toxins in the venom have effects on endothelial cells and vessel permeability, extravasation and, possibly, activation of immunocompetent cells, as well as effects on platelets and the coagulation cascade. Based on the available biological studies, it seems likely that ligation of CLEC-2 contributes to local extravasation, inflammation and, possibly, local necrosis, due to microthrombi and ischemia, whereas other toxins may be more important for the distant hemorrhagic complications. However, the venom contains several toxins and both local, as well as distant, symptoms are probably complex reactions that cannot be explained by the effects of rhodocytin and CLEC-2 alone. The in vivo reactions to rhodocytin are thus examples of toxin-induced crosstalk between coagulation (platelets), endothelium and inflammation (immunocompetent cells). Very few studies have addressed this crosstalk as a part of the pathogenesis behind local and systemic reactions to Calloselasma rhodostoma bites. The author suggests that detailed biological studies based on an up-to-date methodology of local and systemic reactions to Calloselasma rhodostoma bites should be used as a hypothesis-generating basis for future functional studies of the CLEC-2 receptor. It will not be possible to study the effects of purified toxins in humans, but the development of animal models (e.g., cutaneous injections of rhodocytin to mimic snakebites) would supplement studies in humans. PMID:23594438

  8. The snake venom rhodocytin from Calloselasma rhodostoma- a clinically important toxin and a useful experimental tool for studies of C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2).

    PubMed

    Bruserud, Øyvind

    2013-04-17

    The snake venom, rhodocytin, from the Malayan viper, Calloselasma rhodostoma, and the endogenous podoplanin are identified as ligands for the C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The snakebites caused by Calloselasma rhodostoma cause a local reaction with swelling, bleeding and eventually necrosis, together with a systemic effect on blood coagulation with distant bleedings that can occur in many different organs. This clinical picture suggests that toxins in the venom have effects on endothelial cells and vessel permeability, extravasation and, possibly, activation of immunocompetent cells, as well as effects on platelets and the coagulation cascade. Based on the available biological studies, it seems likely that ligation of CLEC-2 contributes to local extravasation, inflammation and, possibly, local necrosis, due to microthrombi and ischemia, whereas other toxins may be more important for the distant hemorrhagic complications. However, the venom contains several toxins and both local, as well as distant, symptoms are probably complex reactions that cannot be explained by the effects of rhodocytin and CLEC-2 alone. The in vivo reactions to rhodocytin are thus examples of toxin-induced crosstalk between coagulation (platelets), endothelium and inflammation (immunocompetent cells). Very few studies have addressed this crosstalk as a part of the pathogenesis behind local and systemic reactions to Calloselasma rhodostoma bites. The author suggests that detailed biological studies based on an up-to-date methodology of local and systemic reactions to Calloselasma rhodostoma bites should be used as a hypothesis-generating basis for future functional studies of the CLEC-2 receptor. It will not be possible to study the effects of purified toxins in humans, but the development of animal models (e.g., cutaneous injections of rhodocytin to mimic snakebites) would supplement studies in humans.

  9. Thermal Inertia Determination of C-type Asteroid Ryugu from in-situ Surface Brightness Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Maximilian; Grott, Matthias; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kührt, Ekkehard; Pelivan, Ivanka

    2016-10-01

    The Japanese Hayabusa-2 mission is a sample-return mission currently on its way to the C-type asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa-2 carries the small lander MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout), whose scientific payload includes the infrared radiometer MARA. The primary science goal of MARA is to determine Ryugu's surface brightness temperatures at the landing site for a full asteroid rotation, which will be measured using a long-pass filter, an 8 to 12 µm bandpass, as well as four narrow bandpasses centered at wavelengths between 5 and 15 µm. From these measurements, surface thermal inertia will be derived, but because MARA performs single pixel measurements, heterogeneity in the field of view cannot be resolved. Yet, the surface will likely exhibit different surface textures, and thermal inertia in the field of view could vary from 600 (small rocks) to 50 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 (fine regolith grains). Sub-pixel heterogeneity is a common problem when interpreting radiometer data, since the associated ambiguities cannot be resolved without additional information on surface texture. For MARA, this information will be provided by the MASCOT camera, and in the present paper we have investigated to what extent different thermal inertias can be retrieved from MARA data. To test the applied approach, we generated synthetic MARA data using a thermal model of Ryugu, assuming different thermal inertias for sections of the field of view. We find that sub-pixel heterogeneity systematically deforms the diurnal temperature curve so that it is not possible to fit the data using a single thermal inertia value. However, including the area fractions of the different surface sections enables us to reconstruct the different thermal inertias to within 10% assuming appropriate measurement noise. The presented approach will increase robustness of the Ryugu thermal inertia determination and results will serve as a ground truth for the global measurements performed by the thermal infrared mapper (TIR) on

  10. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens: Implications for dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Iavarone, A. T.; Gorur, A.; Yeo, B. S.; Tran, R.; Melnyk, R. A.; Mathies, R. A.; Auer, M.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they have been shown to be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or the humic substances analog, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface of T. potens. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results are the first direct evidence for cell-wall associated cytochromes and MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium.

  11. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens and implications for respiratory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Gorur, Amita; Yeo, Boon Siang; Tran, Rosalie; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Mathies, Richard A.; Auer, Manfred; Coates, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they may be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an analog of the redox active components of humic substances. The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin-shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS, and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants, suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results provide unique direct evidence for cell wall-associated cytochromes and support MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:22307634

  12. Lectin-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-poly(vinyldimethyl azlactone) surface supports for high avidity microbial capture

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ryan R; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan P; Shubert, Katherine R; Morrell, Jennifer L.; Pelletier, Dale A; Messman, Jamie M; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S; Retterer, Scott T

    2013-01-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPS) play a critical and dynamic role in shaping the interactions between microbial community members and their local environment. The capture of targeted microbes using surface immobilized lectins that recognize specific extracellular oligosaccharide moieties offers a non-destructive method for functional characterization based on EPS content. In this report, we evaluate the use of the block co-polymer, poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-4,4-dimethyl-2-vinylazlactone (PGMA-b-PVDMA), as a surface support for lectin-specific microbial capture. Arrays of circular polymer supports ten micron in diameter were generated on silicon substrates to provide discrete, covalent coupling sites for Triticum vulgare and Lens culinaris lectins. These supports promoted microbe adhesion and colony formation in a lectin-specific manner. Silicon posts with similar topography containing only physisorbed lectins showed significantly less activity. These results demonstrate that micropatterned PGMA-b-PVDMA supports provide a unique platform for microbial capture and screening based on EPS content by combining high avidity lectin surfaces with three-dimensional topography.

  13. A lectin-based cell microarray approach to analyze the mammalian granulosa cell surface glycosylation profile.

    PubMed

    Accogli, Gianluca; Desantis, Salvatore; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena; Gemeiner, Peter; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-10-01

    The high complexity of glycome, the repertoire of glycans expressed in a cell or in an organism, is difficult to analyze and the use of new technologies has accelerated the progress of glycomics analysis. In the last decade, the microarray approaches, and in particular glycan and lectin microarrays, have provided new insights into evaluation of cell glycosylation status. Here we present a cell microarray method based on cell printing on microarray slides for the analysis of the glycosylation pattern of the cell glycocalyx. In order to demonstrate the reliability of the developed method, the glycome profiles of equine native uncultured mural granulosa cells (uGCs) and in vitro cultured mural granulosa cells (cGCs) were determined and compared. The method consists in the isolation of GCs, cell printing into arrays on microarray slide, incubation with a panel of biotinylated lectins, reaction with fluorescent streptavidin and signal intensity detection by a microarray scanner. Cell microarray technology revealed that glycocalyx of both uGCs and cGCs contains N-glycans, sialic acid terminating glycans, N-acetylglucosamine and O-glycans. The comparison of uGCs and cGCs glycan signals indicated an increase in the expression of sialic acids, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-glycans in cGCs. Glycan profiles determined by cell microarray agreed with those revealed by lectin histochemistry. The described cell microarray method represents a simple and sensitive procedure to analyze cell surface glycome in mammalian cells.

  14. Carbohydrate specificity of sea urchin sperm bindin: a cell surface lectin mediating sperm-egg adhesion.

    PubMed

    Glabe, C G; Grabel, L B; Vacquier, V D; Rosen, S D

    1982-07-01

    We have examined the carbohydrate specificity of bindin, a sperm protein responsible for the adhesion of sea urchin sperm to eggs, by investigating the interaction of a number of polysaccharides and glycoconjugates with isolated bindin. Several of these polysaccharides inhibit the agglutination of eggs by bindin particles. An egg surface polysaccharide was found to be the most potent inhibitor of bindin-mediated egg agglutination. Fucoidin, a sulfated fucose heteropolysaccharide, was the next most potent inhibitor, followed by the egg jelly fucan, a sulfated fucose homopolysaccharide, and xylan, a beta(1 leads to 4) linked xylose polysaccharide. A wide variety of other polysaccharides and glycoconjugates were found to have no effect on egg agglutination. We also report that isolated bindin has a soluble lectinlike activity which is assayed by agglutination of erythrocytes. The bindin lectin activity is inhibited by the same polysaccharides that inhibit egg agglutination by particulate bindin. This suggests that the egg adhesion activity of bindin is directly related to its lectin activity. We have established that fucoidin binds specifically to bindin particles with a high apparent affinity (Kd = 5.5 X 10(-8) M). The other polysaccharides that inhibit egg agglutination also inhibit the binding of 125I-fucoidin to bindin particles, suggesting that they compete for the same site on bindin. The observation that polysaccharides of different composition and linkage type interact with bindin suggests that the critical structural features required for binding may reside at a higher level of organization. Together, these findings strengthen the hypothesis that sperm-egg adhesion in sea urchins is mediated by a lectin-polysaccharide type of interaction.

  15. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin.

    PubMed

    Rauschenberg, Melanie; Fritz, Eva-Corrina; Schulz, Christian; Kaufmann, Tobias; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors ("synthetic lectins") constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  16. Lectin histochemistry for sugars on the mucosal surface of the uterus in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Youhei; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Matsuu, Aya; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Expression patterns of sugars on the mucosal surface of the uterus in pregnant mice were investigated by using 21 kinds of lectins. In the uterine mucosa, the GlcNAc group tended to express a positive reaction before pregnant day 10, but the glucose/mannose group generally expressed a positive reaction after pregnant day 10. On the other hand, the fucose group expressed a negative reaction during all periods in pregnancy. These findings were almost the same on both the mesometrial side and anti-mesometrial side of the uterus. These differences of sugar expression probably reflect the functional change of the mucosa during pregnancy and the alteration of sugar expression may give a chance for pathogens to infect in the uterus with limited periods.

  17. Mammalian Cell Surface Display as a Novel Method for Developing Engineered Lectins with Novel Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Keisuke; Abo, Hirohito; Qin, Sheng-Ying; Kyoutou, Takuya; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Leguminous lectins have a conserved carbohydrate recognition site comprising four loops (A–D). Here, we randomly mutated the sequence and length of loops C and D of peanut agglutinin (PNA) and expressed the proteins on the surface of mouse green fluorescent protein (GFP)-reporter cells. Flow cytometry, limiting dilution, and cDNA cloning were used to screen for several mutated PNAs with distinct properties. The mutated PNA clones obtained using NeuAcα2-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc as a ligand showed preference for NeuAcα2-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc rather than non-sialylated Galβ1-3GlcNAc, whereas wild-type PNA binds to Galβ1-3GlcNAc but not sialylated Galβ1-3GalNAc. Sequence analyses revealed that for all of the glycan-reactive mutated PNA clones, (i) loop C was eight amino acids in length, (ii) loop D was identical to that of wild-type PNA, (iii) residue 127 was asparagine, (iv) residue 125 was tryptophan, and (v) residue 130 was hydrophobic tyrosine, phenylalanine, or histidine. The sugar-binding ability of wild-type PNA was increased nine-fold when Tyr125 was mutated to tryptophan, and that of mutated clone C was increased more than 30-fold after His130 was changed to tyrosine. These results provide an insight into the relationship between the amino acid sequences of the carbohydrate recognition site and sugar-binding abilities of leguminous lectins. PMID:26287256

  18. Analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression patterns in normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines using lectin arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Zheng, Ting; Shortreed, Michael R; Alexander, Caroline; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes including cell adhesion, fertilization, differentiation, development, and tumor cell metastasis. Lectins are proteins of nonimmune origin which recognize and bind to specific carbohydrate structural epitopes. We have recently described the development and use of lectin arrays as tools for the elucidation of the carbohydrate structures expressed on cell surfaces. In the present work this technology is employed for the characterization of differences in carbohydrate expression patterns on normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines, as well as on sublines differing in their tendency to "home" to different tissues during metastasis. Significant differences were observed, including changes that correlate with metastatic potential as well as with tissue-specific homing of metastatic cells.

  19. Lectin-mediated agglutination of murine lymphoma cells. Cell surface deformability and reversibility of agglutination by saccharides.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, G L; Poste, G

    1979-07-01

    Agglutination of S49 mouse lymphoma cells by Ricinus communis I agglutinin can be reversed by the competing haptenic saccharide, lactose, soon after agglutination, but after further incubation in the absence of lectin the agglutination reaction could not be reversed by lactose and the cells remained as multicell aggregates. The irreversibility of S49 cell agglutination was time, temperature and lectin concentration dependent and its onset correlated with ultrastructurally observed deformation of adjacent cell surfaces and an increase in the proportion of adjacent cell surface areas in close apposition within multicell aggregates. Pretreatment of S49 cells with cytochalasin B or cytochalasin B plus vinblastine enhanced R. communis I agglutinin-mediated agglutination, while vinblastine alone and fluoride plus azide had essentially no effect. When drug-treated cells were agglutinated and then incubated in lectin-free drug-containing media for various times prior to lactose addition, the drug effects were more pronounced. Cytochalasin B alone or with vinblastine inhibited lactose reversal of S49 cell agglutination compared to the drug-free controls, while fluoride plus azide enhanced hapten reversibility. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the onset of agglutination irreversibility correlated with cell surface deformation in the drug-treated cells. Cell aggregates that were more readily reversible by lactose (fluoride plus azide) were unchanged or less deformed, while S49 aggregates treated with cytochalasin B plus vinblastine were more deformed compared to controls without drugs. These experiments suggest a role for cell surface deformability as an important secondary effect during lectin-mediated cell agglutination of S49 lymphoma cells.

  20. Diversity of lectins in Macrobrachium rosenbergii and their expression patterns under spiroplasma MR-1008 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huanxi; Du, Jie; Hui, Kai-Min; Liu, Peng; Chen, Jing; Xiu, Yunji; Yao, Wei; Wu, Ting; Meng, Qingguo; Gu, Wei; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2013-08-01

    Lectins play important roles in crustacean innate immunity through recognition of foreign pathogens. In this study, 20 lectins including C-type lectins [dual-carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) type and single-CRD type], L-type lectin, and lectin with low-density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) domain were identified from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The tissue distribution and expression patterns of these lectins under spiroplasma strain MR-1008 challenge were investigated. Most of the lectins were found to be mainly distributed in the hepatopancreas. Lectin5, Lectin14, Lectin17, and Lectin18 exhibited the highest expression level in the hemocytes, nerve, intestine, and heart, respectively. MrLec1 to MrLec6 (dual-CRD lectins) in the hepatopancreas were up-regulated by spiroplasma challenge. Single-CRD lectins reached the highest level at 72 h after spiroplasma challenge. Lectin9 and Lectin15 both belong to L-type lectins. At post-spiroplasma challenge, Lectin9 expression was up-regulated, whereas Lectin15 expression was down-regulated. Lectin11 with LDLa domain showed the highest level after 12 h Lectin18 and Lectin20, namely, CD209, were also up-regulated by spiroplasma challenge. Lectin14, a C-type lectin, quickly reached the highest level after 2 h Lectin16 showed the highest level after 72 h Lectin5 reached the highest level in cultured hemocytes after 6 h Lectin17 in the intestine and Lectin14 in the nerve were slightly up-regulated after 6 and 2 h, respectively. Our research results indicate that lectins may play important roles in early or late immune responses against spiroplasma challenge.

  1. Surface modifications evoked by antidiuretic hormone in isolated epithelial cells: evidence from lectin probes.

    PubMed

    Pietras, R J; Naujokaitis, P J; Szego, C M

    1975-01-01

    Epithelial cells (80-90% "granular" type) were isolated from urinary bladders of Bufo marinus and Rana catesbiana. The inhibitory effect of alpha-methyl-D-mannoside on fluorescein-labeled concanavalin A (Con A) binding to these cells indicates that they possess specific binding sites for Con A. The lectin also mediates adsorption of erythrocytes to these cells. Both Con A binding and Con A-mediated hemadsorption to epithelial cells are depressed at 4 degrees C, as compared with cells maintained at 22 degrees C. Elevation of temperature to 37 degrees C, however, enhances hemadsorption independently of alterations in lectin binding. Treatment of cells with antidiuretic hormone (ADH) at 22 degrees C followed by 15 min of incubation at 22 degrees or 37 degrees C before exposure of cells to Con A promotes increments in Con A-mediated hemadsorption, but not in lectin binding, at 22 degrees or 37 degrees C. These hormonal effects are not significant when hemadsorption is assayed at 4 degrees C. Treatment of cells with another octapeptide, angiotensin, elicits a small, but significant, increment in hemadsorption to epithelial cells which is likewise uninfluenced by quantitative changes in lectin binding. Collectively, these data and other independent observations suggest that treatment with octapeptide hormones acts to enhance the redistribution and aggregation of lectin-binding proteins in the membranes of granular epithelial cells from amphibian urinary bladder. Such changes, in turn, may contribute to the alterations in membrane transport properties which characterize the hormonal response. PMID:813065

  2. Identification of a porcine DC-SIGN-related C-type lectin, porcine CLEC4G (LSECtin), and its order of intron removal during splicing: comparative genomic analyses of the cluster of genes CD23/CLEC4G/DC-SIGN among mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y W; Meng, X J

    2009-06-01

    Human CLEC4G (previously named LSECtin), DC-SIGN, and L-SIGN are three important C-type lectins capable of mediating viral and bacterial pathogen recognitions. These three genes, together with CD23, form a lectin gene cluster at chromosome 19p13.3. In this study, we have experimentally identified the cDNA and the gene encoding porcine CLEC4G (pCLEC4G). Full-length pCLEC4G cDNA encodes a type II transmembrane protein of 290 amino acids. pCLEC4G gene has the same gene structure as the human and the predicted bovine, canis, mouse and rat CLEC4G genes with nine exons. A multi-species-conserved site at the extreme 3'-untranslated region of CLEC4G mRNAs was predicted to be targeted by microRNA miR-350 in domesticated animals and by miR-145 in primates, respectively. We detected pCLEC4G mRNA expression in liver, lymph node and spleen tissues. We also identified a series of sequential intermediate products of pCLEC4G pre-mRNA during splicing from pig liver. The previously unidentified porcine CD23 cDNA containing the complete coding region was subsequently cloned and found to express in spleen, thymus and lymph node. Furthermore, we compared the chromosomal regions syntenic to the human cluster of genes CD23/CLEC4G/DC-SIGN/L-SIGN in representative mammalian species including primates, domesticated animal, rodents and opossum. The L-SIGN homologues do not exist in non-primates mammals. The evolutionary processes of the gene cluster, from marsupials to primates, were proposed based upon their genomic structures and phylogenetic relationships.

  3. Reverse micellar extraction of lectin from black turtle bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): optimisation of extraction conditions by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    He, Shudong; Shi, John; Walid, Elfalleh; Zhang, Hongwei; Ma, Ying; Xue, Sophia Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lectin from black turtle bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was extracted and purified by reverse micellar extraction (RME) method. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise the processing parameters for both forward and backward extraction. Hemagglutinating activity analysis, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC and FTIR techniques were used to characterise the lectin. The optimum extraction conditions were determined as 77.59 mM NaCl, pH 5.65, AOT 127.44 mM sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) for the forward extraction; and 592.97 mM KCl, pH 8.01 for the backward extraction. The yield was 63.21 ± 2.35 mg protein/g bean meal with a purification factor of 8.81 ± 0.17. The efficiency of RME was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, respectively. FTIR analysis indicated there were no significant changes in the secondary protein structure. Comparison with conventional chromatographic method confirmed that the RME method could be used for the purification of lectin from the crude extract.

  4. Reverse micellar extraction of lectin from black turtle bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): optimisation of extraction conditions by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    He, Shudong; Shi, John; Walid, Elfalleh; Zhang, Hongwei; Ma, Ying; Xue, Sophia Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lectin from black turtle bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was extracted and purified by reverse micellar extraction (RME) method. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise the processing parameters for both forward and backward extraction. Hemagglutinating activity analysis, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC and FTIR techniques were used to characterise the lectin. The optimum extraction conditions were determined as 77.59 mM NaCl, pH 5.65, AOT 127.44 mM sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) for the forward extraction; and 592.97 mM KCl, pH 8.01 for the backward extraction. The yield was 63.21 ± 2.35 mg protein/g bean meal with a purification factor of 8.81 ± 0.17. The efficiency of RME was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, respectively. FTIR analysis indicated there were no significant changes in the secondary protein structure. Comparison with conventional chromatographic method confirmed that the RME method could be used for the purification of lectin from the crude extract. PMID:25053033

  5. A quantitative method to discriminate between non-specific and specific lectin-glycan interactions on silicon-modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Boukherroub, Rabah; Ozanam, François; Szunerits, Sabine; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal

    2016-02-15

    Essential to the success of any surface-based carbohydrate biochip technology is that interactions of the particular interface with the target protein be reliable and reproducible and not susceptible to unwanted nonspecific adsorption events. This condition is particularly important when the technology is intended for the evaluation of low-affinity interactions such as those typically encountered between lectins and their monomeric glycan ligands. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of glycan (mannoside and lactoside) monolayers immobilized on hydrogenated crystalline silicon (111) surfaces. An efficient conjugation protocol featuring a key "click"-based coupling step has been developed which ensures the obtention of interfaces with controlled glycan density. The adsorption behavior of these newly developed interfaces with the lectins, Lens culinaris and Peanut agglutinin, has been probed using quantitative IR-ATR and the data interpreted using various isothermal models. The analysis reveals that protein physisorption to the interface is more prevalent than specific chemisorption for the majority of washing protocols investigated. Physisorption can be greatly suppressed through application of a strong surfactinated rinse. The coexistence of chemisorption and physisorption processes is further demonstrated by quantification of the amounts of adsorbed proteins distributed on the surface, in correlation with the results obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Taken together, the data demonstrates that the nonspecific adsorption of proteins to these glycan-terminated surfaces can be effectively eliminated through the proper control of the chemical structure of the surface monolayer combined with the implementation of an appropriate surface-rinse protocol.

  6. Lectins in the investigation of receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtin, V. M.; Yamskov, Igor A.

    1991-08-01

    Problems of the purification and characterisation are considered for approximately 270 receptors (including cell surface and organelle enzymes), which are glycoconjugates (mainly glycoproteins) from animals, plants and microorganisms, using various lectins (mainly lectin sorbents). An analysis has been carried out of the stages of lectin affinity chromatography of receptors (choice of detergent, use of organic solvents, elution with carbohydrates, etc.). Examples are given of procedures for the purification of receptors, including the use of paired columns and combination chromatography on lectins. The possibility of separating sub-populations of receptors using lectins has been demonstrated. Examples are given of the use of lectins in the analysis of the oligosaccharide structure of receptors. Cases are recorded of the interaction of receptors with endogenous lectins and of receptor lectins with endogenous glycoconjugates. It has been shown that lectins, in combination with glycosidases and antibodies, may be useful in the investigation of receptors. The bibliography contains 406 references.

  7. Visualization of an extracellular mucoid layer of Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 and surface sugar lectin analysis of some Treponema species.

    PubMed

    Scott, D; Klitorinos, A; Chan, E C; Siboo, R

    1997-04-01

    Slime layers and capsules are common amongst medically relevant bacteria. We herein report that Treponema denticola, which has been associated with periodontitis, synthesizes or acquires an extracellular polysaccharide layer that we have observed through electron microscopy using the polysaccharide-specific dye Alcian blue and phosphotungstate. We have also visualized this extracellular layer by dark-field microscopy of Alcian blue-stained spirochete cells. A representative strain of each of the oral spirochete species T. denticola, Treponema vincentii and Treponema socranskii were differentiated by concanavalin A, phaseolus, lotus A and arachis lectins in a microtiter plate immunoassay for the detection of surface sugars.

  8. Lectin mapping reveals stage-specific display of surface carbohydrates in in vitro and haemolymph-derived cells of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Wanchoo, Arun; Lewis, Michael W; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2009-09-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and its insect host target represent a model system with which to examine host-pathogen interactions. Carbohydrate epitopes on the surfaces of fungal cells play diverse roles in processes that include adhesion, non-self recognition and immune invasion with respect to invertebrate hosts. B. bassiana produces a number of distinct cell types that include aerial conidia, submerged conidia, blastospores and haemolymph-derived cells termed in vivo blastospores or hyphal bodies. In order to characterize variations in the surface carbohydrate epitopes among these cells, a series of fluorescently labelled lectins, combined with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to quantify the response, was used. Aerial conidia displayed the most diverse lectin binding characteristics, showing reactivity against concanavalin A (ConA), Galanthus nivalis (GNL), Griffonia simplicifolia (GSII), Helix pomatia (HPA), Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin (GSI), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI) and wheatgerm agglutinin (WGA), and weak reactivity against Ricinus communis I (RCA), Sambucus nigra (SNA), Limax flavus (LFA) and Sophora japonica (SJA) lectins. Lectin binding to submerged conidia was similar to that to aerial conidia, except that no reactivity against UEAI, HPA and SJA was noted, and WGA appeared to bind strongly at specific polar spots. In contrast, the majority of in vitro blastospores were not bound by ConA, GNL, GSII, GSI, SNA, UEAI, LFA or SJA, with PNA binding in large patches, and some polarity in WGA binding noted. Significant changes in lectin binding also occurred after aerial conidial germination and in cells grown on either lactose or trehalose. For germinated conidia, differential lectin binding was noted between the conidial base, the germ tube and the hyphal tip. Fungal cells isolated from the haemolymph of the infected insect hosts Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens appeared to shed most

  9. Biological Modulation by Lectins and Their Ligands in Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Susumu; Raz, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are a group of specific proteins that preferentially bind to carbohydrates inside and outside cells. To date, an increasing number of animal lectins have been found and categorized into several families in terms of the significant primary structural homology, while the classification is not always straightforward. These lectins can exert immense biological functions mainly through their specific carbohydrate-protein interactions in a variety of situations. In cancer biology, aberrant glycosylation changes on many glycoproteins and glycolipids are often observed and numerous experimental evidences have revealed that these structural changes are related to tumor malignancy. Galectins, which are broadly expressed animal lectins, can play crucial biological roles in tumor cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions through their binding activities to the tumor cell surface carbohydrate determinants. Certain galectin family proteins have also shown to affect tumor cell survival, signal transduction, and proliferation mainly inside the cell. Selectins, which are one of the C-type lectins and expressed leukocytes and/or vascular endothelium, can also play an immense role in tumor cell adhesion and invasion. In addition, certain annexin family proteins, which are originally known as phospholipid binding proteins, have been revealed to possess the carbohydrate binding activity, and these novel functions in tumors are being unveiled. Understanding how carbohydrate-protein interactions function in tumor cells will be one of the important goals in cancer research. This review focuses on the role of these lectins and their ligands in cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:18220503

  10. Cell-surface changes in cadmium-resistant Euglena: Studies using lectin-binding techniques and flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaly, J.; Brochiero, E.

    1994-01-01

    Most in vitro studies on contaminants focus on the short-term effects of pollutants on cells, without regard to long-term effects and the ability of cells or microorganisms to develop a specific resistance to a pollutant. Cadmium is ubiquitous environmental contaminant. This heavy metal enters the aquatic environment mainly through vapor emissions and fallout during smelting operations. Diverse mechanisms of algal resistance to toxic metals are known. Among these, the most general mechanism is the development of metal-binding proteins. In cadmium-resistant unicellular Euglena gracilis Z algae cells, the metal did not appear to be sequestered on soluble metal-binding ligands. Previous experiments have shown that resistance development is related to a diminution of cadmium penetration into cells, implicating cell surface or membrane alteration. This research investigates the mechanisms of development of cadmium resistance in Euglena cells at the cell-surface level. Sugar chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids are a predominant feature of the surface of cells. Moreover, the cell-response to environmental changes is often orchestrated through surface macromolecules such as glycoproteins. In this study, we applied this lectin method to investigate surface carbohydrate expression during and after resistance development. Our interest was twofold: (1) to learn more about the carbohydrate composition of the cell-surface of Euglena; and (2) to determine whether transition from wild cells to Cd-resistant cells changes the expression of cell-surface carbohydrates. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Homologous overexpression of omcZ, a gene for an outer surface c-type cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens by single-step gene replacement.

    PubMed

    Park, Insoon; Kim, Byoung-Chan

    2011-10-01

    The electron transfer pathway of Geobacter sulfurreducens has been intensively studied because of its ability of electron transfer to extracellular electron acceptors, such as Fe(III) and on electrode. However, the absence of overexpression system of G. sulfurreducens is one of the main obstacles for studying the physiology of G. sulfurreducens. OmcZ, an outer membrane-related c-type cytochrome of G. sulfurrducens, was homologously overexpressed via genomic integration. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the omcZ transcript in the knock-in strain was sixfold more abundant than in the wild type. Notably, omcZ expression appears to downregulate the expression level of OmcS, another outer membrane-related c-type cytochrome of G. sulfurreducens, based on the comparisons of total protein and transcript levels. This is the first report of the successful genetic overexpression system for studying functional genomics of G. sulfurreducens.

  12. MytiLec, a Mussel R-Type Lectin, Interacts with Surface Glycan Gb3 on Burkitt’s Lymphoma Cells to Trigger Apoptosis through Multiple Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Sugawara, Shigeki; Fujii, Yuki; Koide, Yasuhiro; Terada, Daiki; Iimura, Naoya; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Keisuke G.; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Kanaly, Robert A.; Uchiyama, Hideho; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujita, Hideaki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    MytiLec; a novel lectin isolated from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis); shows strong binding affinity to globotriose (Gb3: Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc). MytiLec revealed β-trefoil folding as also found in the ricin B-subunit type (R-type) lectin family, although the amino acid sequences were quite different. Classification of R-type lectin family members therefore needs to be based on conformation as well as on primary structure. MytiLec specifically killed Burkitt's lymphoma Ramos cells, which express Gb3. Fluorescein-labeling assay revealed that MytiLec was incorporated inside the cells. MytiLec treatment of Ramos cells resulted in activation of both classical MAPK/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-ERK) and stress-activated (p38 kinase and JNK) Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. In the cells, MytiLec treatment triggered expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (a ligand of death receptor-dependent apoptosis) and activation of mitochondria-controlling caspase-9 (initiator caspase) and caspase-3 (activator caspase). Experiments using the specific MEK inhibitor U0126 showed that MytiLec-induced phosphorylation of the MEK-ERK pathway up-regulated expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, leading to cell cycle arrest and TNF-α production. Activation of caspase-3 by MytiLec appeared to be regulated by multiple different pathways. Our findings, taken together, indicate that the novel R-type lectin MytiLec initiates programmed cell death of Burkitt’s lymphoma cells through multiple pathways (MAPK cascade, death receptor signaling; caspase activation) based on interaction of the lectin with Gb3-containing glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains on the cell surface. PMID:26694420

  13. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  14. Human neutrophil migration and activation by BJcuL, a galactose binding lectin purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutrophil migration to an inflamed site constitutes the first line of the innate immune response against invading microorganisms. Given the crucial role of endogenous lectins in neutrophil mobilization and activation, lectins from exogenous sources have often been considered as putative modulators of leukocyte function. Lectins purified from snake venom have been described as galactoside ligands that induce erythrocyte agglutination and platelet aggregation. This study evaluated human neutrophil migration and activation by C-type lectin BJcuL purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom. Results Utilizing fluorescence microscopy, we observed that biotinylated-BJcuL was evenly distributed on the neutrophil surface, selectively inhibited by D-galactose. Lectin was able to induce modification in the neutrophil morphology in a spherical shape for a polarized observed by optical microscopy and exposure to BJcuL in a Boyden chamber assay resulted in cell migration. After 30 minutes of incubation with BJcuL we found enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst, zymozan phagocytosis and an increase in lissosomal volume. In addition, BJcuL delays late apoptosis neutrophils. Conclusion These results demonstrate that BJcuL can be implicated in a wide variety of immunological functions including first-line defense against pathogens, cell trafficking and induction of the innate immune response since lectin was capable of inducing potent neutrophil activation. PMID:21266049

  15. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  16. Use of lectins in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review.

  17. Lectins as markers for blood grouping.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fauzia; Khan, Rizwan H; Sherwani, Asma; Mohmood, Sameena; Azfer, Md A

    2002-12-01

    Lectins are unique proteins of varying biological importance. They are characterized by specific binding to carbohydrate residues, whether monosaccharides, disaccharides or polysaccharides. The sugar heads on the surface of the erythrocyte specify the different blood groups. Lectins, as an antigenic determinant of blood group, have come to be an important tool in the identification of different blood groups. A handful of lectins may be considered excellent reagents for anti-A, anti-B, anti-N etc, but the anti-A and anti-M are not yet regarded as commercially suitable antisera. Lectin from Vicia cracca has been proved to be a good anti-A, lectin from Dolichus biflorus can be used as anti-A1, and lectin from Griffonia simplicifolia as anti-B. Lectin from Vicia graminea is said to be a good typing reagent as Anti-N. On the other hand, the lectins involved in polyagglutination are absolutely essential as the reagent of choice and these cannot as yet be replaced by antibodies of any kind. Erythrocytes with exposed cryptantigens are significantly more sensitive to agglutination by certain lectins than by polyclonal antibodies. Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Polybrene, and Glycine max lectins are frequently used for the identification of different cryptantigens. The application of lectins as an anti-B reagent has proven to be as useful as human polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies. Besides their specificity, lectins are excellent reagents because of their lower cost and indigenous production. The importance of various lectins used as markers for blood grouping is discussed.

  18. Discrimination between lectins with similar specificities by ratiometric profiling of binding to glycosylated surfaces; a chemical ‘tongue’ approach† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) is available: This includes protein preparation, surface functionalisation and LDA analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ra08857g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, L.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate–lectin interactions dictate a range of signalling and recognition processes in biological systems. The exploitation of these, particularly for diagnostic applications, is complicated by the inherent promiscuity of lectins along with their low affinity for individual glycans which themselves are challenging to access (bio)synthetically. Inspired by how a ‘tongue’ can discriminate between hundreds of flavours using a minimal set of multiplexed sensors and a training algorithm, here individual lectins are ‘profiled’ based on their unique binding profile (barcode) to a range of monosaccharides. By comparing the relative binding of a panel of 5 lectins to 3 monosaccharide-coated surfaces, it was possible to generate a training algorithm that enables correct identification of lectins, even those with similar glycan preferences. This is demonstrated to be useful for discrimination between the cholera and ricin toxin lectins showing the potential of this minimalist approach for exploiting glycan complexity. PMID:27019703

  19. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  20. SEM visualization of glycosylated surface molecules using lectin-coated microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J.; Janer, L.; Campbell, M.

    1985-01-01

    There are several techniques currently used to localize glycosylated surface molecules by scanning electron microscopy (Grinnell, 1980; Molday, 1976; Linthicum and Sell, 1975; Nicolson, 1974; Lo Buglio, et al, 1972). A simple and rapid method, using a modification of Grinnell's technique is reported here. Essentially, microspheres coated with Concavalin A are used to bind to glycosylated regions of the palatal shelf epithelium and are visualized in the scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  1. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, William J.; Kirby, Jonathan M.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism.

  2. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K.; Veelken, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25784678

  3. Lectin staining and flow cytometry reveals female-induced sperm acrosome reaction and surface carbohydrate reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Kekäläinen, Jukka; Larma, Irma; Linden, Matthew; Evans, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    All cells are covered by glycans, an individually unique layer of oligo- and polysaccharides that are critical moderators of self-recognition and other cellular-level interactions (e.g. fertilization). The functional similarity between these processes suggests that gamete surface glycans may also have an important, but currently overlooked, role in sexual selection. Here we develop a user-friendly methodological approach designed to facilitate future tests of this possibility. Our proposed method is based on flow cytometric quantification of female-induced sperm acrosome reaction and sperm surface glycan modifications in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this species, as with many other taxa, eggs release water-soluble factors that attract conspecific sperm (chemoattraction) and promote potentially measurable changes in sperm behavior and physiology. We demonstrate that flow cytometry is able to identify sperm from other seawater particles as well as accurately measure both acrosome reaction and structural modifications in sperm glycans. This methodological approach can increase our understanding of chemically-moderated gamete-level interactions and individual-specific gamete recognition in Mytilus sp. and other taxa with similar, easily identifiable acrosome structure. Our approach is also likely to be applicable to several other species, since carbohydrate-mediated cellular-level interactions between gametes are universal among externally and internally fertilizing species. PMID:26470849

  4. Role of the lectin complement pathway in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    In the last 15 years two major advances in the role of complement in the kidney transplant have come about. The first is that ischaemia reperfusion injury and its profound effect on transplant outcome is dependent on the terminal product of complement activation, C5b-9. The second key observation relates to the function of the small biologically active fragments C3a and C5a released by complement activation in increasing antigen presentation and priming the T cell response that results in transplant rejection. In both cases local synthesis of C3 principally by the renal tubule cells plays an essential role that overshadows the role of the circulating pool of C3 generated largely by hepatocyte synthesis. More recent efforts have investigated the molecules expressed by renal tissue that can trigger complement activation. These have revealed a prominent effect of collectin-11 (CL-11), a soluble C-type lectin that is expressed in renal tissue and aligns with its major ligand L-fucose at sites of complement activation following ischaemic stress. Biochemical studies have shown that interaction between CL-11 and L-fucose results in complement activation by the lectin complement pathway, precisely targeting the innate immune response to the ischaemic tubule surface. Therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammatory and immune stimulation in ischaemic kidney have so far targeted C3 or its activation products and several are in clinical trials. The finding that lectin-fucose interaction is an important trigger of lectin pathway complement activation within the donor organ opens up further therapeutic targets where intervention could protect the donor kidney against complement. PMID:27286717

  5. Oviduct fluid and heparin induce similar surface changes in bovine sperm during capacitation: a flow cytometric study using lectins.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A I; Parrish, J J

    1996-04-01

    Eight different lectins conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used to screen for sperm plasma membrane changes during in vitro capacitation of bovine sperm. Analysis of lectin binding to sperm was done using flow cytometry. Of the eight lectins, only Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin, WGA) binding to sperm was altered with capacitation. Capacitation of bovine sperm by heparin was found to decrease WGA binding to sperm by 78% (P < 0.05). The effect of capacitation by oviduct fluid was next compared with capacitation by heparin for changes in WGA binding to sperm. The effect of inhibiting capacitation with glucose on WGA binding was also determined. WGA-bound sperm were detected by flow cytometry as being present in two fluorescence peaks defined as low fluorescence (A) or high fluorescence (B) intensity. The percentage of sperm in peak A was greater for heparin and oviduct fluid-treated sperm compared to sperm incubated under noncapacitating conditions in only culture medium (P < 0.001). Capacitation with either heparin or oviduct fluid was inhibited by glucose as assessed by the ability of lysophosphatidylcholine (100 micrograms/ml) to induce acrosome reactions. Glucose also reduced the percentage of sperm in peak A for both heparin- and oviduct fluid-treated sperm (P < 0.01). We conclude that heparin or oviduct fluid induced changes on the sperm plasma membrane during capacitation. Binding sites for WGA on sperm were either structurally altered or lost during capacitation. PMID:9052948

  6. Oviduct fluid and heparin induce similar surface changes in bovine sperm during capacitation: a flow cytometric study using lectins.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A I; Parrish, J J

    1996-04-01

    Eight different lectins conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used to screen for sperm plasma membrane changes during in vitro capacitation of bovine sperm. Analysis of lectin binding to sperm was done using flow cytometry. Of the eight lectins, only Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin, WGA) binding to sperm was altered with capacitation. Capacitation of bovine sperm by heparin was found to decrease WGA binding to sperm by 78% (P < 0.05). The effect of capacitation by oviduct fluid was next compared with capacitation by heparin for changes in WGA binding to sperm. The effect of inhibiting capacitation with glucose on WGA binding was also determined. WGA-bound sperm were detected by flow cytometry as being present in two fluorescence peaks defined as low fluorescence (A) or high fluorescence (B) intensity. The percentage of sperm in peak A was greater for heparin and oviduct fluid-treated sperm compared to sperm incubated under noncapacitating conditions in only culture medium (P < 0.001). Capacitation with either heparin or oviduct fluid was inhibited by glucose as assessed by the ability of lysophosphatidylcholine (100 micrograms/ml) to induce acrosome reactions. Glucose also reduced the percentage of sperm in peak A for both heparin- and oviduct fluid-treated sperm (P < 0.01). We conclude that heparin or oviduct fluid induced changes on the sperm plasma membrane during capacitation. Binding sites for WGA on sperm were either structurally altered or lost during capacitation.

  7. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8(+) and CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4(+) T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  8. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4+ T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8+ or CD4+ T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  9. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  10. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557: A receptor for lectin-mediated interbacterial adherence

    SciTech Connect

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A. ); Cisar, J.O. )

    1991-07-02

    Lectin-carbohydrate binding is known to play an important role in a number of different cell-cell interactions including those between certain species of oral streptococci and actinomyces that colonize teeth. The cell wall polysaccharides of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557, S. oralis 34, and Streptococcus mitis J22, although not identical antigenically, each function as a receptor molecule for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii. Carbohydrate analysis of the receptor polysaccharide isolated from S. oralis ATCC 10557 shows galactose (3 mol), glucose (1 mol), GalNAc (1 mol), and rhamnose (1 mol). {sup 1}H NMR spectra of the polysaccharide show that is partially O-acetylated. Analysis of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the de-O-acetylated polysaccharide shows that it is composed of repeating subunits containing six monosaccharides and that the subunits are joined by a phosphodiester linkage. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra were completely assigned by two-dimensional homonuclear correlation methods and by {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation ({sup 1}H({sup 13}C)HMQC). The complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C assignment of the native polysaccharide was carried out by the same techniques augmented by a {sup 13}C-coupled hybrid HMQC-COSY method, which is shown to be especially useful for carbohydrates in which strong coupling and overlapping peaks in the {sup 1}H spectrum pose difficulties.

  11. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, William J.; Kirby, Jonathan M.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism. PMID:25004975

  12. Differentiation of Bacillus anthracis and other Bacillus species by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, H B; Ezzell, J W; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1984-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis was agglutinated by several lectins, including those from Griffonia simplicifolia, Glycine max, Abrus precatorius, and Ricinus communis. Some strains of Bacillus cereus var. mycoides (B. mycoides) were strongly reactive with the lectin from Helix pomatia and weakly reactive with the G. max lectin. The differential interactions between Bacillus species and lectins afforded a means of distinguishing B. anthracis from other bacilli. B. cereus strains exhibited heterogeneity with respect to agglutination patterns by lectins but could readily be differentiated from B. anthracis and the related B. mycoides. Spores of B. anthracis and B. mycoides retained lectin receptors, although the heating of spores or vegetative cells at 100 degrees C resulted in a decrease in their ability to be specifically agglutinated. Fluorescein-conjugated lectin of G. max stained vegetative cells of B. anthracis uniformly, suggesting that the distribution of lectin receptors was continuous over the entire cellular surface. B. anthracis cells grown under conditions to promote the production of capsular poly(D-glutamyl peptide) were also readily agglutinated by the lectins, suggesting that the lectin reactive sites penetrate the polypeptide layer. Trypsin, subtilisin, lysozyme, and mutanolysin did not modify the reactivity of B. anthracis with the G. max agglutinin, although the same enzymes markedly diminished the interaction between the lectin and B. mycoides. Because the lectins which interact with B. anthracis are specific for alpha-D-galactose or 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-galactose residues, it is likely that the bacteria possess cell surface polymers which contain these sugars. Lectins may prove useful in the laboratory identification of B. anthracis and possibly other pathogenic Bacillus species, such as B. cereus. Images PMID:6418761

  13. ON VASCULAR STENOSIS, RESTENOSIS AND MANNOSE BINDING LECTIN

    PubMed Central

    KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; SKARE, Thelma L; RIBAS, Carmen Australia Paredes Marcondes; RAMOS, Gabriela Piovezani; PETISCO, Roberta Dombroski

    2016-01-01

    Mannose binding lectin is a lectin instrumental in the innate immunity. It recognizes carbohydrate patterns found on the surface of a large number of pathogenic micro-organisms, activating the complement system. However, this protein seems to increase the tissue damage after ischemia. In this paper is reviewed some aspects of harmful role of the mannose binding lectin in ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27120743

  14. Lectins from edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Singh, Senjam Sunil; Wang, Hexiang; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Dan, Xiuli; Yin, Cui Ming; Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-12-31

    Mushrooms are famous for their nutritional and medicinal values and also for the diversity of bioactive compounds they contain including lectins. The present review is an attempt to summarize and discuss data available on molecular weights, structures, biological properties, N-terminal sequences and possible applications of lectins from edible mushrooms. It further aims to update and discuss/examine the recent advancements in the study of these lectins regarding their structures, functions, and exploitable properties. A detailed tabling of all the available data for N-terminal sequences of these lectins is also presented here.

  15. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  16. Cytokine production by human epithelial and endothelial cells following exposure to oral viridans streptococci involves lectin interactions between bacteria and cell surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Vernier, A; Diab, M; Soell, M; Haan-Archipoff, G; Beretz, A; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the possible implication of human epithelial and endothelial cells in the pathogenesis of various diseases associated with oral viridans streptococci, we tested the immunomodulatory effects of 11 representative strains of oral viridans streptococci on human epithelial KB cells and endothelial cells. We then examined the possible role of two major adhesins from oral viridans streptococci, protein I/II and rhamnose-glucose polymers (RGPs), in this process. In this study we demonstrate that oral viridans streptococci are potent stimulators of interleukin-8 (IL-8) production from KB cells and of IL-6 and IL-8 production from endothelial cells. The ability of protein I/II and RGPs to contribute to these effects was then examined. Using biotinylated protein I/IIf and RGPs from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175, we showed that these adhesins bind to KB and endothelial cells through specific interactions and that the binding of these molecules initiates the release of IL-8 from KB cells and of IL-6 and IL-8 from endothelial cells. These results suggest that protein I/IIf and RGPs play an important role in the interactions between bacteria and KB and endothelial cells in that similar cytokine profiles are obtained when cells are stimulated with bacteria or surface components. We also provide evidence that protein I/IIf binds to and stimulates KB and endothelial cells through lectin interactions and that N-acetyl neuraminic acid (NANA) and fucose present on cell surface glycoproteins may form the recognition site since binding and cytokine release can be inhibited by dispase and periodate treatment of cells and by NANA and fucose. These results demonstrate that oral viridans streptococci, probably by engaging two cell surface adhesins, exert immunomodulatory effects on human KB and endothelial cells. PMID:8757828

  17. Determination of hyperglycosylated human chorionic gonadotropin produced by malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasias and male germ cell tumors using a lectin-based immunoassay and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lisa S.; Birken, Steven; Puett, David

    2007-01-01

    The ability to reliably detect aberrant glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) may have profound implications for the diagnosis and monitoring of malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, germ cell tumors, other malignancies, and pregnancy complications. To become a clinically useful assay, however, this discrimination of glycoforms should be possible on minimally treated biological specimens. Towards this end, we have developed a lectin-based sandwich-type immunoassay to compare the glycosylation patterns of hCG among urine specimens from patients presenting with a normal pregnancy, invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, and male germ cell tumors using carbohydrate-free antibody fragments as capture reagents and a panel of eight lectins, five recognizing neutral sugars and three recognizing sialic acid. There was no significant difference in the binding of any of the lectins to hCG in the urine of women over the gestational range of 6 – 38 weeks. Three lectins, however, exhibited differential binding to urinary hCG derived from these normal pregnant controls and that from patients with malignant forms of gestational trophoblastic disease and male germ cell tumors. Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin, which bind terminal mannose and α(2–3)sialic acid, respectively, preferentially bound pregnancy-derived hCG, whereas the lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, which binds sialic acid and β(1–4)N-acetylglucosamine, exhibited decreased binding to pregnancy-derived hCG compared to that from patients with male germ cell tumors and malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. The differential binding observed with these three promising lectins is most encouraging and warrants further examination. The experimental paradigm also holds promise for the development of comparable assays for other glycosylated tumor markers. PMID:17081681

  18. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  19. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  20. Cloning and characterization of a monocot mannose-binding lectin from Crocus vernus (family Iridaceae).

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Astoul, C H; Barre, A; Rougé, P; Peumans, W J

    2000-08-01

    The molecular structure and carbohydrate-binding activity of the lectin from bulbs of spring crocus (Crocus vernus) has been determined unambiguously using a combination of protein analysis and cDNA cloning. Molecular cloning revealed that the lectin called C. vernus agglutinin (CVA) is encoded by a precursor consisting of two tandemly arrayed lectin domains with a reasonable sequence similarity to the monocot mannose-binding lectins. Post-translational cleavage of the precursor yields two equally sized polypeptides. Mature CVA consists of two pairs of polypeptides and hence is a heterotetrameric protein. Surface plasmon resonance studies of the interaction of the crocus lectin with high mannose-type glycans showed that the lectin interacts specifically with exposed alpha-1,3-dimannosyl motifs. Molecular modelling studies confirmed further the close relationships in overall fold and three-dimensional structure of the mannose-binding sites of the crocus lectin and other monocot mannose-binding lectins. However, docking experiments indicate that only one of the six putative mannose-binding sites of the CVA protomer is active. These results can explain the weak carbohydrate-binding activity and low specific agglutination activity of the lectin. As the cloning and characterization of the spring crocus lectin demonstrate that the monocot mannose-binding lectins occur also within the family Iridaceae a refined model of the molecular evolution of this lectin family is proposed.

  1. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively. PMID:24200894

  2. Lectins: production and practical applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lectins are proteins found in a diversity of organisms. They possess the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes with known carbohydrate specificity since they have at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. This articles aims to review the production and practical applications of lectins. Lectins are isolated from their natural sources by chromatographic procedures or produced by recombinant DNA technology. The yields of animal lectins are usually low compared with the yields of plant lectins such as legume lectins. Lectins manifest a diversity of activities including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory, and anti-insect activities, which may find practical applications. A small number of lectins demonstrate antibacterial and anti-nematode activities. PMID:20890754

  3. Enhancement of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance polymer based biosensor chips using well-defined glycopolymers for lectin detection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Wong, Kok Hou; Granville, Anthony Michael

    2016-01-15

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer based Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensor chips were successfully fabricated using glycopolymer brushes carrying glucose moieties for the detection of concanavalin A. Poly(pentafluorostyrene), with pre-determined polymer chain lengths, were synthesized via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization technique. The synthesized poly(pentafluorostyrene), was subsequently converted into glycopolymers via a para-fluoro-thiol "click" reaction and grafted onto the surface of sensor chips. The "glycocluster effect" induced by pendent carbohydrate moieties enabled a stronger affinity for concanavalin A binding, which resulted in a dramatic expansion of the sensors' response range. It was discovered that the longer polymer brushes did not guarantee additional enhancements for the sensor chips. Instead, they could lead to higher detection limits. In this study, the limit of detection for the sensor chips was discovered to be 1.3nmolL(-1) with a saturated response at 1054.2nmolL(-1). In addition to the superior performance, the capabilities of the reported sensor chips can be easily manipulated to detect a diverse range of analytes by "clicking" various sensing elements onto the polymer brushes. PMID:26433474

  4. Enhancement of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance polymer based biosensor chips using well-defined glycopolymers for lectin detection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Wong, Kok Hou; Granville, Anthony Michael

    2016-01-15

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer based Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensor chips were successfully fabricated using glycopolymer brushes carrying glucose moieties for the detection of concanavalin A. Poly(pentafluorostyrene), with pre-determined polymer chain lengths, were synthesized via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization technique. The synthesized poly(pentafluorostyrene), was subsequently converted into glycopolymers via a para-fluoro-thiol "click" reaction and grafted onto the surface of sensor chips. The "glycocluster effect" induced by pendent carbohydrate moieties enabled a stronger affinity for concanavalin A binding, which resulted in a dramatic expansion of the sensors' response range. It was discovered that the longer polymer brushes did not guarantee additional enhancements for the sensor chips. Instead, they could lead to higher detection limits. In this study, the limit of detection for the sensor chips was discovered to be 1.3nmolL(-1) with a saturated response at 1054.2nmolL(-1). In addition to the superior performance, the capabilities of the reported sensor chips can be easily manipulated to detect a diverse range of analytes by "clicking" various sensing elements onto the polymer brushes.

  5. Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with C-Type Lectin Dendritic Cell-Specific ICAM Grabbing Nonintegrin

    PubMed Central

    Miszczyk, Eliza; Rudnicka, Karolina; Moran, Anthony P.; Fol, Marek; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Matusiak, Agnieszka; Walencka, Maria; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    In this study we asked whether Helicobacter pylori whole cells and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) utilize sugar moieties of Lewis (Le) antigenic determinants to interact with DC-SIGN (dendritic cell specific ICAM grabbing nonintegrin) receptor on dendritic cells (DCs). For this purpose the soluble DC-SIGN/Fc adhesion assay and the THP-1 leukemia cells with induced expression of DC-SIGN were used. We showed that the binding specificity of DC-SIGN with H. pylori LeX/Y positive whole cells and H. pylori LPS of LeX/Y type was fucose dependent, whereas in LeXY negative H. pylori strains and LPS preparations without Lewis determinants, this binding was galactose dependent. The binding of soluble synthetic LeX and LeY to the DC-SIGN-like receptor on THP-1 cells was also observed. In conclusion, the LeXY dependent as well as independent binding of H. pylori whole cells and H. pylori LPS to DC-SIGN was described. Moreover, we demonstrated that THP-1 cells may serve as an in vitro model for the assessment of H. pylori-DC-SIGN interactions mediated by LeX and LeY determinants. PMID:22550396

  6. Animal lectins as self/non-self recognition molecules. Biochemical and genetic approaches to understanding their biological roles and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vasta, G R; Ahmed, H; Fink, N E; Elola, M T; Marsh, A G; Snowden, A; Odom, E W

    1994-04-15

    In recent years, the significant contributions from molecular research studies on animal lectins have elucidated structural aspects and provided clues not only to their evolution but also to their multiple biological functions. The experimental evidence has suggested that distinct, and probably unrelated, groups of molecules are included under the term "lectin." Within the invertebrate taxa, major groups of lectins can be identified: One group would include lectins that show significant homology to membrane-integrated or soluble vertebrate C-type lectins. The second would include those beta-galactosyl-specific lectins homologous to the S-type vertebrate lectins. The third group would be constituted by lectins that show homology to vertebrate pentraxins that exhibit lectin-like properties, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P. Finally, there are examples that do not exhibit similarities to any of the aforementioned categories. Moreover, the vast majority of invertebrate lectins described so far cannot yet be placed in one or another group because of the lack of information regarding their primary structure. (See Table 1.) Animal lectins do not express a recombinatorial diversity like that of antibodies, but a limited diversity in recognition capabilities would be accomplished by the occurrence of multiple lectins with distinct specificities, the presence of more than one binding site, specific for different carbohydrates in a single molecule, and by certain "flexibility" of the binding sites that would allow the recognition of a range of structurally related carbohydrates. In order to identify the lectins' "natural" ligands, we have investigated the interactions between those proteins and the putative endogenous or exogenous glycosylated substances or cells that may be relevant to their biological function. Results from these studies, together with information on the biochemical properties of invertebrate and vertebrate lectins, including their structural

  7. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs. PMID:26407233

  8. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs. PMID:26407233

  9. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs.

  10. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  11. Lectin-binding properties of different Leishmania species.

    PubMed

    Andrade, A F; Saraiva, E M

    1999-07-01

    Carbohydrate cell-surface residues on stationary promastigotes of 19 isolates of Leishmania were studied with a panel of 27 highly purified lectins, which were specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, and sialic acid. The specificity of the cell-surface carbohydrates was analyzed by agglutination and radioiodinated lectin-binding assays. L. (L.) amazonensis and L. (L.) donovani were agglutinated by 12 and 10 of the 27 lectins used, respectively. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (Jacalin) was incapable of agglutinating the tested species of the donovani complex, and this result was confirmed by radioiodinated Jacalin-binding assays. Jacalin had an average of 3.8 x 10(6) receptors/L. (L) amazonensis promastigote and bound with an association constant of 5 x 10(6) M(-1).

  12. Regulation of adherence and virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica lectin cytoplasmic domain, which contains a beta2 integrin motif.

    PubMed

    Vines, R R; Ramakrishnan, G; Rogers, J B; Lockhart, L A; Mann, B J; Petri, W A

    1998-08-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the beta2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediated cell adherence. Mutation of the integrin-like sequence abrogates the dominant negative effect. Amebae expressing the dominant negative mutant are less virulent in an animal model of amebiasis. These results suggest that inside-out signaling via the lectin cytoplasmic domain may control the extracellular adhesive activity of the amebic lectin and provide in vivo demonstration of the lectin's role in virulence.

  13. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  14. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  15. Effects of lectin ingestion on animal growth and internal organs.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A

    1998-01-01

    Lectins are essential and omnipresent plant constituents. As many foods are of plant origin, the daily ingestion of lectins by both humans and animals is appreciable. For example, in an ad hoc survey, 53 edible plants were shown to contain lectins and approx 30% of fresh and processed food regularly consumed by humans had significant hemagglutinating activity (1). The situation is potentially even more acute in animal nutrition because animal diet is less diverse than that of humans, and in most instances foodstuffs are not thoroughly heat-treated. This is particularly significant in the light of our finding a correlation between lectin activity and antinutritional effects (2). As in evolution, the mammalian gut has been regularly exposed to lectins, they must have played an important part in the development of the digestive system. Although based on experience, most overtly toxic plants have been eliminated from the diet, many plants with appreciable lectin content are still consumed because it has not been easy to relate growth retardation and antinutritional, mild allergic or other subclinical symptoms to the food consumed or a particular component of it. As some lectins are at least partially heat stable and most survive the passage through the gut in functionally and immunologically intact form, their interaction with the gut surface epithelium (3) can damage the gut at high dietary intakes and this may lead to digestive disorders/diseases in some instances. However, it is not generally appreciated that not all lectins are antinutrients and indeed some may have beneficial effects and be of potential value in nutritional practice. Accordingly, it is of considerable importance to establish whether a lectin has deleterious or potentially beneficial effects for mammals. Unfortunately at present there are no adequate in vitro methods to do this reliably and it is usually necessary to carry out in vivo animal feeding studies, despite their relatively cumbersome

  16. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  17. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  18. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270074

  19. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  20. Glycan and lectin biosensors.

    PubMed

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Tkáč, Ján

    2016-06-30

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  1. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  2. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata.

    PubMed

    Work, Thierry M; Farah, Yael

    2014-03-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis. PMID:24518620

  3. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes. PMID:23176516

  4. Synthesis of mannoheptose derivatives and their evaluation as inhibitors of the lectin LecB from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Anna; Sommer, Roman; Hauck, Dirk; Stifel, Julia; Göttker-Schnetmann, Inigo; Titz, Alexander

    2015-08-14

    Biofilm formation and chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa depend on lectins produced by the bacterium. The bacterial C-type lectin LecB binds to the two monosaccharides l-fucose and d-mannose and conjugates thereof. Previously, d-mannose derivatives with amide and sulfonamide substituents at C6 were reported as potent inhibitors of the bacterial lectin LecB and LecB-mediated bacterial surface adhesion. Because d-mannose establishes a hydrogen bond via its 6-OH group with Ser23 of LecB in the crystal structure and may be beneficial for binding affinity, we extended d-mannose and synthesized mannoheptoses bearing the free 6-OH group as well as amido and sulfonamido-substituents at C7. Two series of diastereomeric mannoheptoses were synthesized and the stereochemistry was determined by X-ray crystallography. The potency of the mannoheptoses as LecB inhibitors was assessed in a competitive binding assay. The data reveal a diastereoselectivity of LecB for (6S)-mannoheptose derivatives with increased activity over methyl α-d-mannoside.

  5. Identification of lectin binding proteins in human tears.

    PubMed

    Kuizenga, A; van Haeringen, N J; Kijlstra, A

    1991-12-01

    The identity of glycoproteins in stimulated normal human tears was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of tears onto minigels, blotting, and subsequent incubation with different biotinylated lectins (concanavalin A [Con A], peanut agglutinin [PNA], glycine max agglutinin [SBA], Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin [WGA, native form], Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin [Jacalin], and Pisum sativum agglutinin). Control proteins included purified secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) from human colostrum, human milk lactoferrin, and chicken-egg lysozyme. All samples were prepared in a denaturing (SDS) buffer under nonreducing and reducing conditions. The sIgA in tears and IgA (alpha) heavy chain fragments (reduced sample) were identified with most of the lectins tested. A particular high molecular weight (greater than 200 kD) protein fraction in tears that just entered the separation gel on SDS-PAGE was detected with WGA and Jacalin. This fraction stain poorly with silver. Tear lactoferrin was identified with all lectins used, although binding was low with SBA. Purified milk lactoferrin showed a poor reaction with Jacalin, but a protein in tears of similar mobility bound this lectin (nonreduced samples). Under both nonreducing and reducing conditions, tear-specific prealbumin in tears did not bind any of the lectins tested. Tear lysozyme only reacted with lectin after reduction. The techniques described may provide additional valuable information in addition to commonly used methods for tear protein analysis and further knowledge concerning the role of glycoproteins on the ocular surface.

  6. Prevention of intestinal amebiasis by vaccination with the Entamoeba histolytica Gal/GalNac lectin.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Eric; Barroso, Lisa; Lockhart, Lauren; Wright, Rhonda; Cramer, Carole; Lyerly, David; Petri, William A

    2004-01-26

    Prevention of intestinal infection by Entamoeba histolytica would block both invasive disease and parasite transmission. The amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin mediates parasite adherence to the colonic surface and fecal anti-lectin IgA is associated with protection from intestinal reinfection in children. We tested if vaccination with the E. histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin could prevent cecal infection in a C3H mouse model of amebic colitis. Two trials using native lectin purified from the parasite and two trials using a 64 kDa recombinant fragment ("LecA") were performed with a combined intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization regimen using cholera toxin and Freund's adjuvants, respectively. Two weeks after immunization mice were challenged intracecally with trophozoites, and 4-12 weeks after challenge mice were sacrificed for histopathologic evaluation of infection. Vaccination prevented intestinal infection with efficacies of 84 and 100% in the two native lectin trials and 91 and 34% in the two LecA trials. Mice with detectable pre-challenge fecal anti-lectin IgA responses were significantly more resistant to infection than mice without fecal anti-lectin IgA responses. These results show for the first time that immunization with the Gal/GalNAc lectin can prevent intestinal amebiasis in mice and suggest a protective role for fecal anti-lectin IgA in vivo.

  7. Activation of dendritic cells by the Gal-lectin of Entamoeba histolytica drives Th1 responses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Catherine P A; Chadee, Kris

    2007-02-01

    Amebiasis is a human disease caused by the protozoan intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Vaccine development has focused on the parasite's surface galactose-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine inhibitable lectin (Gal-lectin) as a protective antigen. The Gal-lectin is immunogenic and has been shown to induce Th1 cytokines in vitro and in vivo. The immunological basis of the protective immune response elicited by the Gal-lectin is unknown. In this study, we investigated the response of BALB/c bone marrow-derived DC to E. histolytica Gal-lectin. Incubation of immature DC with Gal-lectin resulted in activation and maturation after 24 h. FACS analysis demonstrated an up-regulation of DC maturation markers CD80, CD86, CD40 and MHC class II upon exposure to Gal-lectin. The Gal-lectin also induced DC production of IL-12, indicating a Th1 response. Gal-lectin-activated DC were able to stimulate T cell proliferation in an allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction and adoptive transfer of Gal-lectin-treated DC into naïve mice resulted in IFN-gamma-producing Gal-lectin-sensitized T cells. The activation of DC by Gal-lectin was mediated by MAPK and NF-kappaB. These findings indicate that E. histolytica Gal-lectin is a potent vaccine antigen capable of directly initiating DC maturation and activation characterized by Th1 cytokine production.

  8. A review of fish lectins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Fai Cheung, Randy Chi; Wing Ng, Charlene Cheuk; Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Lectins have been reported from various tissues of a diversity of fish species including Japanese eel, conger eel, electric eel, bighead carp, gibel carp, grass carp, Arabian Gulf catfish, channel catfish, blue catfish, catfish, pike perch, perch, powan, zebrafish, toxic moray, cobia fish, steelhead trout, Japanese trout, Atlantic salmon, chinook salmon, olive rainbow smelt, rainbow smelt, white-spotted charr, tilapia, blue gourami, ayu, Potca fish, Spanish mackerel, gilt head bream, tench, roach, rudd, common skate, and sea lamprey. The tissues from which the lectins were isolated comprise gills, eggs, electric organ, stomach, intestine, and liver. Lectins have also been isolated from skin, mucus serum, and plasma. The lectins differ in molecular weight, number of subunits, glycosylation, sugar binding specificity and amino acid sequence. Their activities include antimicrobial, antitumor, immunoregulatory and a role in development. PMID:25929869

  9. Characterisation of Jack fruit lectin.

    PubMed

    Arslan, M I; Chulavatnatol, M

    2000-04-01

    Jack fruit (Artocarpus Heterophyllus) seed extract contains a lectin termed Jack fruit lectin (JFL) which possesses diversed biological properties. A detailed analysis of its properties has been lacking. The present investigation was initiated to study the detail properties of JFL. After extraction and purification on affigel galactosamine-agarose column, JFL was subjected to ND-PAGE. Several different charged species from ND-PAGE upon SDS-PAGE gave rise to two dissimilar trimeric subunit at 12.5 and 15.0 KDa and retain biological activity. It was possible to elute the subunit bands separately from polyacrylamide gel to investigate their biological activity. Each subunit was found to be retained the lectin activity. Agglutinating activity of smaller subunit was found to be more, may be due to the greater amount of the subunit. This also suggests that each unit of trimeric JFL have similar lectin activity.

  10. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  11. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  12. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function. PMID:25534591

  13. Characterization of quail intestinal mucin as a ligand for endogenous quail lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, R; Mantle, M; Ceri, H

    1993-01-01

    The S-type lectins have been shown to be components of mucosal scrapings, and in avian systems these lectins have been localized immunohistochemically to the mucosal surface and goblet cells of the intestine. The interaction of lectin specifically with purified mucin has not, however, been established. Quail intestinal mucin was purified by two subsequent isopycnic density-gradient centrifugations in CsCl and chromatography on Sepharose Cl-2B. Purified mucin, obtained from the void volume of the Sepharose column, was characterized by SDS/PAGE, amino acid and carbohydrate analyses, sensitivity to thiol reduction, and cross-reactivity with antibody preparations to rat and human intestinal mucins on Western blots. Antibody raised against purified quail mucin partially cross-reacts with purified rat, rabbit and human intestinal mucins, and specifically labels the mucosal surface and goblet cells of quail intestine by the immunoperoxidase technique. Protein eluted by lactose from an affinity matrix composed of quail intestinal mucin possessed the same molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as intestinal lectin and reacted on Western blots with a lectin-specific antibody. The data clearly demonstrate the co-localization of lectin and mucin in the quail intestine and also the ability of the lectin to specifically interact with the purified mucin, raising the question of the role of endogenous lectins in secretions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8352754

  14. Effect of lectins from Diocleinae subtribe against oral Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Theodora Thays Arruda; Anderson Matias da Rocha, Bruno; Alves Carneiro, Victor; Vassiliepe Sousa Arruda, Francisco; Fernandes do Nascimento, Antônia Sâmia; Cardoso Sá, Nairley; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Holanda Teixeira, Edson

    2011-01-01

    Surface colonization is an essential step in biofilm development. The ability of oral pathogens to adhere to tooth surfaces is directly linked with the presence of specific molecules at the bacterial surface that can interact with enamel acquired pellicle ligands. In light of this, the aim of this study was to verify inhibitory and antibiofilm action of lectins from the Diocleinaesubtribe against Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus oralis. The inhibitory action against planctonic cells was assessed using lectins from Canavaliaensi formis (ConA), Canavalia brasiliensis (ConBr), Canavalia maritima (ConM), Canavalia gladiata (CGL) and Canavalia boliviana (ConBol). ConBol, ConBr and ConM showed inhibitory activity on S. mutans growth. All lectins, except ConA, stimulated significantly the growth of S. oralis. To evaluate the effect on biofilm formation, clarified saliva was added to 96-well, flat-bottomed polystyrene plates, followed by the addition of solutions containing 100 or 200 µg/mL of the selected lectins. ConBol, ConM and ConA inhibited the S. mutans biofilms. No effects were found on S. oralis biofilms. Structure/function analysis were carried out using bioinformatics tools. The aperture and deepness of the CRD (Carbohydrate Recognition Domain) permit us to distinguish the two groups of Canavalia lectins in accordance to their actions against S. mutans and S. oralis. The results found provide a basis for encouraging the use of plant lectins as biotechnological tools in ecological control and prevention of caries disease. PMID:21525793

  15. The specificity of frutalin lectin using biomembrane models.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Thatyane M; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Cominetti, Márcia R; Selistre de-Araújo, Heloísa S; Zaniquelli, Maria E D; Beltramini, Leila M

    2010-08-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric alpha-d-galactose (d-Gal)-binding lectin that activates natural killer cells in vitro and promotes leukocyte migration in vivo. Because lectins are potent lymphocyte stimulators, understanding the interactions that occur between them and cell surfaces can help to the action mechanisms involved in this process. In this paper, we present a detailed investigation of the interactions of frutalin with phospho- and glycolipids using Langmuir monolayers as biomembrane models. The results confirm the specificity of frutalin for d-Gal attached to a biomembrane. Adsorption of frutalin was more efficient for the galactose polar head lipids, in contrast to the one for sulfated galactose, in which a lag time is observed, indicating a rearrangement of the monolayer to incorporate the protein. Regarding ganglioside GM1 monolayers, lower quantities of the protein were adsorbed, probably due to the farther apart position of d-galactose from the interface. Binary mixtures containing galactocerebroside revealed small domains formed at high lipid packing in the presence of frutalin, suggesting that lectin induces the clusterization and the forming of domains in vitro, which may be a form of receptor internalization. This is the first experimental evidence of such lectin effect, and it may be useful to understand the mechanism of action of lectins at the molecular level.

  16. BSA-boronic acid conjugate as lectin mimetics.

    PubMed

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Pinnamaneni, Poornima; Nie, Huan; Li, Yu; Sun, Xue-Long

    2014-01-10

    We report bovine serum albumin (BSA)-boronic acid (BA) conjugates as lectin mimetics and their glyco-capturing capacity. The BSA-BA conjugates were synthesized by amidation of carboxylic acid groups in BSA with aminophenyl boronic acid in the presence of EDC, and were characterized by Alizarin Red S (ARS) assay and SDS-PAGE gel. The BSA-BA conjugates were immobilized onto maleimide-functionalized silica beads and their sugar capturing capacity and specificity were confirmed by ARS displacement assay. Further, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis of the glyco-capturing activity of the BSA-BA conjugates was conducted by immobilizing BSA-BA onto SPR gold chip. Overall, we demonstrated a BSA-BA-based lectin mimetics for glyco-capturing applications. These lectin mimetics are expected to provide an important tool for glycomics and biosensor research and applications.

  17. Evaluating the Thickness of Multivalent Glycopolymer Brushes for Lectin Binding.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Jaroslav; Park, Hyunji; Rosencrantz, Ruben R; Böker, Alexander; Elling, Lothar; Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is applied for investigating binding of lectins to multivalent glycopolymer brushes grafted from interdigital gold microelectrodes. By variation of the measuring frequency, EIS allows simultaneous analysis of binding at different subnanometer distances from the sensor surfaces. In this way, the binding dynamics along the brushes are quantified, giving an idea about the motion of the lectin through the brush layer. Two different brush lengths are investigated, revealing distinct dynamics of lectin binding due to changing topology of the brushes. Moreover, very low K D values in the nanomolar range are obtained. This unique platform may be used as sophisticated biosensor for detailed investigation of high-affinity protein binding to poly-mer layers. PMID:26096302

  18. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of mannose receptor C type 1 in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Lichun; Zhou, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoheng; Xi, Mingjun; Wei, Shun; Fang, Rui; Ji, Wei; Chen, Nan; Gu, Zemao; Liu, Xueqin; Wang, Weimin; Asim, Muhammad; Liu, Xiaoling; Lin, Li

    2014-03-01

    Mannose receptor C type 1 (MRC1) is a pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) which plays a significant role in immune responses. Much work on MRC1 has been done in mammals and birds while little in fish. In this study, we cloned and characterized MRC1 in grass carp (gcMR). The full-length gcMR contained 5291bp encoding a putative protein of 1432 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed that gcMR contained a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich (CR) domain, a fibronectin type II (FN II) domain, eight C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs), a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic domain. gcMR were constitutively expressed in different organs with the higher expression in spleen and head kidney. During embryonic development, gcMR transcript levels were highest at cleavage stage. The up-regulation expression of gcMR, IL-1β and TNF-α in liver, spleen, head kidney and intestine after Aeromonas hydrophila infection indicating it involved in innate immune regulation during bacterial infections. PMID:24184700

  19. Lectin binding in the anterior segment of the bovine eye.

    PubMed

    Tuori, A; Virtanen, I; Uusitalo, H

    1994-10-01

    Eleven different fluorescent lectin-conjugates were used to reveal the location of carbohydrate residues in frozen sections of the anterior segment of bovine eyes. The lectins were specific for the following five major carbohydrate groups: (1) glucose/mannose group (Concanavalin A (Con A)); (2) N-acetylglucosamine group (wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)); (3) galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine group (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA), Psophocarpus tetragonolobus agglutinin (PTA), Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I-B4 (GSA-I-B4), Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (JAC), peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA-I)); (4) L-fucose group (Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I)); (5) sialic acid group (wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)). All the studied lectins except UEA-I reacted widely with different structures and the results suggest that there are distinct patterns of expression of carbohydrate residues in the anterior segment of the bovine eye. UEA-I bound only to epithelial structures. Some of the lectins reacted very intensely with apical cell surfaces of conjunctival and corneal epithelia suggesting a different glycosylation at the glycocalyx of the epithelia. Also, the binding patterns of conjunctival and corneal epithelia differed with some of the lectins: PNA and RCA-I did not bind at all, and GSA-I-B4 bound only very weakly to the epithelium of the cornea, whereas they bound to the epithelium of the conjunctiva. In addition, HPA, HAA, PNA and WGA did not bind to the corneal basement membrane, but bound to the conjunctiva and vascular basement membranes. This suggests that corneal basement membrane is somehow different from other basement membranes. Lectins with the same carbohydrate specificity (DBA, HPA, HAA and PTA) reacted with the sections almost identically, but some differences were noticed: DBA did not bind to the basement membrane of the conjunctiva and the sclera and did bind to

  20. Differential lectin binding to cellular membranes in the epidermis of the newborn rat.

    PubMed Central

    Brabec, R K; Peters, B P; Bernstein, I A; Gray, R H; Goldstein, I J

    1980-01-01

    Three fluorescein-labeled lectins have been shown to exhibit specificity for the surface of cells in different layers of the epidermis in the newborn rat. An isolectin from seeds of Bandeiraea simplicifolia with specificity for alpha-D-galactosyl end groups labeled the basal and lower spinous cells; a lectin from Ulex europaeus exhibiting specificity for alpha-L-fucosyl units outlines the surface of spinous cells, and a second lectin from B. simplicifolia, with specificity for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, labels the cornified cells. Appropriate blocking experiments have confirmed the specific nature of the binding. Images PMID:6928640

  1. Artocarpin is a polyspecific jacalin-related lectin with a monosaccharide preference for mannose.

    PubMed

    Barre, Annick; Peumans, Willy J; Rossignol, Michel; Borderies, Gisèle; Culerrier, Raphaël; Van Damme, Els J M; Rougé, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    A reinvestigation of the carbohydrate-binding properties revealed that artocarpin, a previously described mannose-specific lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds, behaves as a polyspecific lectin. Surface plasmon resonance hapten inhibition experiments demonstrated that artocarpin readily interacted with a wide range of monosaccharides covering galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, mannose, glucose, sialic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Molecular docking confirmed this unexpected ability of artocarpin to interact with structurally different sugars. The biological significance of the polyspecificity of the lectin is discussed in terms of the broadening of the range of potential target glycans present on the surface of plant phytopathogens or predators.

  2. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research. PMID:23828036

  3. A Novel Bifunctional Hybrid with Marine Bacterium Alkaline Phosphatase and Far Eastern Holothurian Mannan-Binding Lectin Activities

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasily; Kovalchuk, Svetlana; Bulgakov, Alexander; Likhatskaya, Galina; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP) and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ) was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa. The CmAP/MBL-AJ dimer model showed the two-subunit lectin part that is associated with two molecules of alkaline phosphatase functioning independently from each other. The highly active CmAP label genetically linked to MBL-AJ has advantaged the lectin-binding assay in its sensitivity and time. The double substitution A156N/F159K in the lectin domain of CmAP/MBL-AJ has enhanced its lectin activity by 25±5%. The bifunctional hybrid holothurian's lectin could be promising tool for developing non-invasive methods for biological markers assessment, particularly for improving the MBL-AJ-based method for early detection of a malignant condition in cervical specimens. PMID:25397876

  4. Antinutritional properties of plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José Tadeu A

    2004-09-15

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding (glyco)proteins which are ubiquitous in nature. In plants, they are distributed in various families and hence ingested daily in appreciable amounts by both humans and animals. One of the most nutritionally important features of plant lectins is their ability to survive digestion by the gastrointestinal tract of consumers. This allows the lectins to bind to membrane glycosyl groups of the cells lining the digestive tract. As a result of this interaction a series of harmful local and systemic reactions are triggered placing this class of molecules as antinutritive and/or toxic substances. Locally, they can affect the turnover and loss of gut epithelial cells, damage the luminal membranes of the epithelium, interfere with nutrient digestion and absorption, stimulate shifts in the bacterial flora and modulate the immune state of the digestive tract. Systemically, they can disrupt lipid, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, promote enlargement and/or atrophy of key internal organs and tissues and alter the hormonal and immunological status. At high intakes, lectins can seriously threaten the growth and health of consuming animals. They are also detrimental to numerous insect pests of crop plants although less is presently known about their insecticidal mechanisms of action. This current review surveys the recent knowledge on the antinutritional/toxic effects of plant lectins on higher animals and insects. PMID:15302522

  5. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins. PMID:20726799

  6. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins.

  7. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Lectin Extracted from Fruiting Bodies of the Korean Cauliflower Medicinal Mushroom, Sparassis latifolia (Agaricomycetes).

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Lee, Young-Chul; Park, Hyun; Wu, Yuanzheng; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In this article we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel lectin from fruiting bodies of the mushroom Sparassis latifolia. The antibacterial activity of the purified lectin against Escherichia coli and resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as the antifungal activity against Candida and Fusarium species were determined. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and the tryptophan blue shift assay indicated that the lectin interacts with microbial surfaces. This suggests the potential of the lectin isolated from S. latifolia, a valuable source of bioactive constituents, as a therapeutic in pharmaceutical agent. PMID:27481295

  8. Interaction of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli with lectins and blood group antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K H; Skelton, S K; Feeley, J C

    1985-01-01

    Lectins and blood group antibodies were used to probe the surface structures of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Of the 29 strains tested, there were distinct reaction patterns. The lectin-reactive and blood group antibody-reactive sites on the bacterial surface were distinguishable from the heat-stable (lipopolysaccharide) antigenic determinants. The interactions were strain specific. The reactive sites were stable with respect to culture media and passage and may be useful as additional markers for strain characterization. PMID:2410445

  9. Binding of FITC-labelled lectins to the gastrointestinal epithelium of the rat.

    PubMed

    Baintner, K; Jakab, G; Gyôri, Z; Kiss, P

    2000-01-01

    Biotechnology uses lectin genes to transfect into crop plants for protection against insects and nematodes. On the other hand, the information is limited on lectin-binding properties of cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, binding of a panel of FITC-labelled plant lectins to gastrointestinal cells of the rat was studied. In the stomach, cytoplasmic staining of parietal cells by PHA appeared to be due to glycoproteins attached to the tubulovesicles. PNA also stained the parietal cells, but only in the isthmus and neck regions, reacting with desialylated glycoproteins. WGA bound to the mucous neck cells with higher affinity than to the surface and foveolar mucous cells. The mucous cells were also stained by SNA-I, UEA-I and, less intensively, by LCA. Chief cells did not show detectable reaction with any of the applied lectins. Binding of PHA to gastric cells showed differences when compared with the results of in vivostudies. Small intestinal brush border was stained with UEA-I and SNA-I, the latter lectin also strongly stained the surface of small intestinal crypts. Both lectins reacted with the mucus of goblet cells. In the large intestine UEA-I and SNA-I stained the goblet cells at the base and upper part of the crypts, respectively. Accordingly, we provided evidences for the unique lectin-binding phenotype of the various segments of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:11033457

  10. Isolation, functional, and partial biochemical characterization of galatrox, an acidic lectin from Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Franqueiro, Elaine de Paula; Alves-Paiva, Raquel de Melo; Sartim, Marco Aurélio; Callejon, Daniel Roberto; Paiva, Helder Henrique; Antonucci, Gilmara Ausech; Rosa, José César; Cintra, Adélia Cristina Oliveira; Franco, João José; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Sampaio, Suely Vilela

    2011-03-01

    Snake venom lectins have been studied in regard to their chemical structure and biological functions. However, little is known about lectins isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom. We report here the isolation and partial functional and biochemical characterization of an acidic glycan-binding protein called galatrox from this venom. This lectin was purified by affinity chromatography using a lactosyl-sepharose column, and its homogeneity and molecular mass were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The purified galatrox was homogeneous and characterized as an acidic protein (pI 5.2) with a monomeric and dimeric molecular mass of 16.2 and 32.5 kDa, respectively. Alignment of N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of galatrox indicated that this protein exhibits high homology to other C-type snake venom lectins. Galatrox showed optimal hemagglutinating activity at a concentration of 100 μg/ml and this effect was drastically inhibited by lactose, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and heating, which confirmed galatrox's lectin activity. While galatrox failed to induce the same level of paw edema or mast cell degranulation as B. atrox crude venom, galatrox did alter cellular viability, which suggested that galatrox might contribute to venom toxicity by directly inducing cell death. PMID:21297119

  11. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-01-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery. PMID:26832966

  12. Rapid identification of lectin receptors and their possible function in sea urchin cell systems.

    PubMed

    Latham, V H; Herrera, S; Rostamiani, K; Chun, H H; Oppenheimer, S B

    1995-10-01

    An assay using lectin derivatized agarose beads to rapidly and inexpensively identify cell surface lectin receptors was recently described by Latham et al. (1995). In this earlier study, the assay was tested on large, early stage sea urchin embryo cells. In this study this assay was used to examine lectin receptors on small, later stage sea urchin embryo cells that are more typical of cells that most investigators deal with, to ascertain if cell size is a determining factor in the assay's validity. The results indicated that the assay is a valid method to identify lectin receptors on small as well as large cells. Twenty-three hour Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo cells strongly bound Triticum vulgaris, concanavalin A, Artocarpus integrifolia and Vicia villosa using both the agarose bead and fluorescence assays, while three other lectins, Ulex europaeus I, Lotus tetragonolobus and Lens culinaris did not strongly bind to the cells using these two assays. As in earlier studies agglutinability results did not correlate well with results using the two other assays. In all cases where lectin bead binding, fluorescent lectin binding or lectin-mediated agglutination occurred, specific sugars reduced the observed binding. The second part of this study examined the putative role of concanavilin A receptors in a specific cellular interaction: sperm-egg binding. Concanavalin A inhibited fertilization of dejellied sea urchin eggs when their vitelline layers were intact and to a lesser extent when their vitelline layers were removed. This effect was counteracted by alpha methyl glucose. The major differences between these studies and previous work is that here concanavalin A was washed out after incubation with eggs, making it more likely that results reflect binding to cell surface lectin receptors rather than toxicity. In addition, performing the experiments on eggs with or without vitelline layers provided information on the location of concanavalin A receptors that may

  13. Changes in glycoconjugate expression during early chick embryo development: a lectin-binding study.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C M; Sanders, E J

    1991-10-01

    A selection of lectins was used to investigate developmentally regulated changes in the distribution of cell surface oligosaccharides during the gastrulation and neurulation stages of early chick embryo development. Lectins from three specificity classes were used: glucose/mannose specificity (concanavalin A [Con A], Lens culinaris agglutinin [LCA], Pisum sativum agglutinin [PSA]); N-acetylglucosamine specificity (Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin [LEA], wheat germ agglutinin [WGA], succinylated WGA [sWGA]); N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose specificity (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin [DBA], soybean agglutinin [SBA], Sophora japonica agglutinin [SJA], Bandeiraea (Griffonia) simplicifolia lectin I [BSL I], peanut agglutinin [PNA], Artocarpus integrifolia lectin [Jacalin], Ricinus communis agglutinin-1 [RCA-1], Erythrina cristagalli lectin [ECL]). At gastrulation stages, patterns of lectin binding could be distinguished in the epiblast, mesoderm, and endoderm cell layers. The primitive streak failed to bind any of the lectins, but LEA and WGA bound to the epiblast in regions lateral to the streak, indicating the loss of some glucosamine residues medially in preparation for the ingression movements of gastrulation. Several lectins showed marked binding to the mesoderm cells after their passage through the primitive streak; these were LCA, PSA, WGA, sWGA, BSL, and most particularly PNA. Therefore, the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation from epiblast to mesoderm at the primitive streak is accompanied by cell surface oligosaccharide changes in the epiblast and mesoderm that involve all classes of lectins including the PNA-binding sequence Gal beta 1-3GalNAc. Ultrastructurally, PNA was shown to bind extracellularly to matrix fibrils. Jacalin, having the same sugar specificity as PNA, but binding to serine/threonine linked chains rather than asparagine linked chains showed no binding to the mesoderm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Lectindb: a plant lectin database.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Nagasuma R; Kumar, Nirmal; Jeyakani, Justin; Singh, Desh Deepak; Gowda, Sharan B; Prathima, M N

    2006-10-01

    Lectins, a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins, are now widely recognized to play a range of crucial roles in many cell-cell recognition events triggering several important cellular processes. They encompass different members that are diverse in their sequences, structures, binding site architectures, quaternary structures, carbohydrate affinities, and specificities as well as their larger biological roles and potential applications. It is not surprising, therefore, that the vast amount of experimental data on lectins available in the literature is so diverse, that it becomes difficult and time consuming, if not impossible to comprehend the advances in various areas and obtain the maximum benefit. To achieve an effective use of all the data toward understanding the function and their possible applications, an organization of these seemingly independent data into a common framework is essential. An integrated knowledge base ( Lectindb, http://nscdb.bic.physics.iisc.ernet.in ) together with appropriate analytical tools has therefore been developed initially for plant lectins by collating and integrating diverse data. The database has been implemented using MySQL on a Linux platform and web-enabled using PERL-CGI and Java tools. Data for each lectin pertain to taxonomic, biochemical, domain architecture, molecular sequence, and structural details as well as carbohydrate and hence blood group specificities. Extensive links have also been provided for relevant bioinformatics resources and analytical tools. Availability of diverse data integrated into a common framework is expected to be of high value not only for basic studies in lectin biology but also for basic studies in pursuing several applications in biotechnology, immunology, and clinical practice, using these molecules.

  15. Purification and Characterization of a Mucin Specific Mycelial Lectin from Aspergillus gorakhpurensis: Application for Mitogenic and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Kaur, Hemant Preet; Singh, Jatinder

    2014-01-01

    Background Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins or glycoproteins that bind reversibly to specific carbohydrates present on the apposing cells, which are responsible for their ability to agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc. Interest in lectins has been intensified due to their carbohydrate specificity as they can be valuable reagents for the investigation of cell surface sugars, purification and characterization of glycoproteins. The present study reports the purification, characterization and evaluation of mitogenic and antimicrobial potential of a mycelial lectin from Aspergillus gorakhpurensis. Methods Affinity chromatography on mucin-sepharose column was carried out for purification of Aspergillus gorakhpurensis lectin. The lectin was characterized for physico-chemical parameters. Mitogenic potential of the lectin was evaluated against splenocytes of Swiss albino mice by MTT assay. Antimicrobial activity of the purified lectin has also been evaluated by disc diffusion assay. Results Single-step affinity purification resulted in 18.6-fold purification of the mycelial lectin. The molecular mass of the lectin was found to be 70 kDa and it was composed of two subunits of 34.8 kDa as determined by gel filtration chromatography, SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. pH optima of the lectin was found to be 6.5–9.5, while optimum temperature for lectin activity was 20–30°C. Lectin was stable within a pH range of 7.0–10.5 and showed fair thermostability. EDTA did not affect lectin activity whereas it was found susceptible to the denaturants tested. MTT assay revealed strong mitogenic potential of A. gorakhpurensis lectin at a concentration upto 150 µg/mL. Antimicrobial activity assay showed its potent antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcous aureus and Escherichia coli and marginal antifungal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion This is the first report on the mitogenic and antimicrobial potential of

  16. Lectin staining patterns in human gastric mucosae with and without exposure to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Junior, Mario R.; Cavalcanti, Carmelita L.B.; Pontes-Filho, Nicodemos T.; Carvalho Jr, Luiz B.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate qualitative changes in the glycoconjugate expression in human gastric tissue of positive and negative patients for Helicobacter pylori, through lectins: Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) and Concanavalin A (Con A). The lectins recognized differently the glycoconjugates in the superficial mucous layer at the gastric tissues. The results suggest a significant change in the carbohydrate moieties present on the surface of the gastric cells during infection. PMID:24031208

  17. Lectin cytochemistry in the exfoliative cytology of uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Remani, P; Pillai, K R; Haseenabeevi, V M; Ankathil, R; Bhattathiri, V N; Nair, M K; Vijayakumar, T

    1994-01-01

    A lectin was isolated from the seeds of jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and purified using a column of immobilized N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. This jack fruit lectin (JFL) was then conjugated to horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) type VI and used to study the cell surface carbohydrate profile of the cytological smears of the uterine cervix using diaminobenzidine as substrate. Cervical smears from 15 healthy individuals and 65 patients with dysplasia, carcinoma in situ and carcinoma of uterine cervix were used for the study. Normal cells showed weak binding in the membrane as well as cytoplasm, whereas carcinomatous cells showed strong binding towards JFL. Carcinoma in situ cells showed a binding pattern similar to that of carcinoma. Dysplastic cells showed difference in binding in mild, moderate and severe dysplasia. The intensity of binding increased with the severity of the dysplasia. The nature and intensity of binding of jack fruit lectin with cancer tissues suggest that this lectin may be of use as a diagnostic aid in exfoliative cytology.

  18. Allergy-Protective Arabinogalactan Modulates Human Dendritic Cells via C-Type Lectins and Inhibition of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Peters, Marcus; Guidato, Patrick M; Peters, Karin; Megger, Dominik A; Sitek, Barbara; Classen, Birgit; Heise, Esther M; Bufe, Albrecht

    2016-02-15

    Arabinogalactan (AG) isolated from dust of a traditional farm prevents disease in murine models of allergy. However, it is unclear whether this polysaccharide has immune regulatory properties in humans. The aim of this study was to test the influence of AG on the immune-stimulating properties of human dendritic cells (DCs). Moreover, we sought to identify the receptor to which AG binds. AG was produced from plant callus tissue under sterile conditions to avoid the influence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns in subsequent experiments. The influence of AG on the human immune system was investigated by analyzing its impact on monocyte-derived DCs. To analyze whether the T cell stimulatory capacity of AG-stimulated DCs is altered, an MLR with naive Th cells was performed. We revealed that AG reduced T cell proliferation in a human MLR. In the search for a molecular mechanism, we found that AG binds to the immune modulatory receptors DC-specific ICAM-3 -: grabbing non integrin (DC-SIGN) and macrophage mannose receptor 1 (MMR-1). Stimulation of these receptors with AG simultaneously with TLR4 stimulation with LPS increased the expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase tripartite motif -: containing protein 21 and decreased the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 in DCs. This led to a reduced activation profile with reduced costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokine production. Blocking of MMR-1 or DC-SIGN with neutralizing Abs partially inhibits this effect. We conclude that AG dampens the activation of human DCs by LPS via binding to DC-SIGN and MMR-1, leading to attenuated TLR signaling. This results in a reduced T cell activation capacity of DCs. PMID:26746190

  19. CD23 molecule acts as a galactose-binding lectin in the cell aggregation of EBV-transformed human B-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kijimoto-Ochiai, S; Uede, T

    1995-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B-cell lines, L-KT9 and DH3 cells express CD23 antigen, and grow in a mixture of single and aggregated cells. The CD23 molecule has high amino acid sequence homology with C-type lectin and recently we have shown that the solubilized CD23 molecule can really interact with galactose residues on glycoproteins. In this study, therefore, we tested whether CD23 antigen on the cell surface really acts as a galactose-binding lectin in the aggregation of these cells. The EBV-transformed cells (L-KT9) were separated into an aggregated-cell-rich fraction and a single-cell-rich fraction. Aggregated cells disaggregated after removal of galactose by beta-galactosidase treatment, whereas single cells made large aggregation on sialidase treatment, and this aggregation was inhibited in the presence of asialo-fetuin. On the other hand, naturally aggregated cells become single cells with anti-CD23 monoclonal antibody (mAB) as well as the soluble form of CD23, but not with anti-CD21 mAB. In addition, L-KT9 and DH3 cells bound to asialo-fetuin-coupled Sepharose (ASF-Sepharose) and this binding was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment of cells with anti-CD23, but not with anti-CD21 or other anti-adhesion molecules. From these results, we conclude that the naturally aggregated state of EBV-transformed cells occurs mainly through the interaction of CD23 as a lectin molecule and galactose residues as its ligand.

  20. Fasciola hepatica miracidia: lectin binding and stimulation of in vitro miracidium-to-sporocyst transformation.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Katya; Georgieva, Simona; Mizinska, Yana; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R

    2012-03-01

    The lectin binding properties of Fasciola hepatica miracidia were studied by a panel of fluorescein- and gold-conjugated lectins (ConA, LCA, WGA, LEA, SBA, HPA and UEA-I). The presence of mannose and/or glucose residues was demonstrated with ConA and LCA as weak diffuse fluorescence of the miracidial surface, which was more intense at the anterior part of the larva. The N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectins WGA and LEA reacted intensely with the whole miracidial surface. No labelling with N-acetylgalactosamine and/or galactose-specific (SBA and HPA) and fucose-specific UEA-I lectins was observed. The possibility that the specific recognition of the miracidial surface carbohydrates by lectins may initiate the process of transformation of the miracidia into sporocysts was examined in vitro in physiological saline for Galba truncatula. Incubation in the presence of ConA and WGA resulted in facilitation of the transformation process. Facilitation was absent in the presence of inhibitor sugars. Incubation in the presence of SBA or UEA-I had no effect. The results suggested a possible impact of carbohydrate-lectin interactions in transformation of miracidia of F. hepatica to sporocysts in vivo. PMID:22807013

  1. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  2. Lectin Binding to the Root and Root Hair Tips of the Tropical Legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, R. W.; Rolfe, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Ten fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins were tested on the roots of the tropical legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb. Four of these (concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Ricinis communis agglutinin I [RCA-I], wheat germ agglutinin) were found to bind to the exterior of root cap cells, the root cap slime, and the channels between epidermal cells in the root elongation zone. One of these lectins, RCA-I, bound to the root hair tips in the mature and emerging hair zones and also to sites at which root hairs were only just emerging. There was no RCA-I binding to immature trichoblasts. Preincubation of these lectins with their hapten sugars eliminated all types of root cell binding. By using a microinoculation technique, preincubation of the root surface with RCA-I lectin was found to inhibit infection and nodulation by Rhizobium spp. Preincubation of the root surface with the RCA-I hapten β-d-galactose or a mixture of RCA-I lectin and its hapten failed to inhibit nodulation. Application of RCA-I lectin to the root surface caused no apparent detrimental effects to the root hair cells and did not prevent the growth of root hairs. The lectin did not prevent Rhizobium sp. motility or viability even after 24 h of incubation. It was concluded that the RCA-I lectin-specific sugar β-d-galactose may be involved in the recognition or early infection stages, or both, in the Rhizobium sp. infection of M. atropurpureum. Images PMID:16346989

  3. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  4. Biophysical characterization of lectin-glycan interactions for therapeutics, vaccines and targeted drug-delivery.

    PubMed

    Christie, Michelle P; Toth, Istvan; Simerská, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-glycan interactions play a role in biological processes, host-pathogen interactions and in disease. A more detailed understanding of these interactions is not only useful for the elucidation of their biological function but can also be applied in immunology, drug development and delivery and diagnostics. We review some commonly used biophysical techniques for studying lectin-glycan interactions; namely: frontal affinity chromatography, glycan/lectin microarray, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescent assays, enzyme linked lectin sorbent assay and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Each method is evaluated on efficiency, cost and throughput. We also consider the advantages and limitations of each technique and provide examples of their application in biology, drug discovery and delivery, immunology, glycoprofiling and biosensing. PMID:25531972

  5. Bishydrazide glycoconjugates for lectin recognition and capture of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Adak, Avijit Kumar; Leonov, Alexei P; Ding, Ning; Thundimadathil, Jyothi; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S; Wei, Alexander

    2010-11-17

    Bishydrazides are versatile linkers for attaching glycans to substrates for lectin binding and pathogen detection schemes. The α,ω-bishydrazides of carboxymethylated hexa(ethylene glycol) (4) can be conjugated at one end to unprotected oligosaccharides, then attached onto carrier proteins, tethered onto activated carboxyl-terminated surfaces, or functionalized with a photoactive cross-linking agent for lithographic patterning. Glycoconjugates of bishydrazide 4 can also be converted into dithiocarbamates (DTCs) by treatment with CS(2) under mild conditions, for attachment onto gold substrates. The immobilized glycans serve as recognition elements for cell-surface lectins and enable the detection and capture of bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by their adsorption onto micropatterned substrates. A detection limit of 10³ cfu/mL is demonstrated, using a recently introduced method based on optical pattern recognition. PMID:20925370

  6. Bishydrazide Glycoconjugates for Lectin Recognition and Capture of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Adak, Avijit Kumar; Leonov, Alexei P.; Ding, Ning; Thundimadathil, Jyothi; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S.; Wei, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Bishydrazides are versatile linkers for attaching glycans to substrates for lectin binding and pathogen detection schemes. The α,ω-bishydrazides of carboxymethylated hexaethylene glycol (4) can be conjugated at one end to unprotected oligosaccharides, then attached onto carrier proteins, tethered onto activated carboxyl-terminated surfaces, or functionalized with a photoactive crosslinking agent for lithographic patterning. Glycoconjugates of bishydrazide 4 can also be converted into dithiocarbamates (DTCs) by treatment with CS2 under mild conditions, for attachment onto gold substrates. The immobilized glycans serve as recognition elements for cell-surface lectins and enable the detection and capture of bacterial pathogens such as Psuedomonas aeruginosa by their adsorption onto micropatterned substrates. A detection limit of 103 cfu/mL is demonstrated, using a recently introduced method based on optical pattern recognition. PMID:20925370

  7. Isolation, cloning, and characterization of a novel phosphomannan-binding lectin from porcine serum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bruce Yong; Nakamura, Natsuko; Dlabac, Vladimir; Naito, Haruna; Yamaguchi, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Makiko; Nonaka, Motohiro; Ishiguro, Masaji; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Oka, Shogo; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2007-04-27

    Mannan-binding protein (MBP) is a C-type serum lectin that is an important constituent of the innate immune defense because it activates the complement system via the lectin pathway. While the pig has been proposed to be an attractive source of xenotransplantable tissues and organs, little is known about porcine MBP. In our previous studies, phosphomannan, but not mannan, was found to be an effective inhibitor of the C1q-independent bactericidal activity of newborn piglet serum against some rough strains of Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast, the inhibitory activities of phosphomannan and mannan were very similar in the case of MBP-dependent bactericidal activity against rough strains of Escherichia coli K-12 and S-16. Based on these findings, we inferred that an MBP-like lectin with slightly or completely different carbohydrate binding specificity might exist in newborn piglet serum and be responsible for the C1q-independent bactericidal activity. Herein we report that a novel phosphomannan-binding lectin (PMBL) of 33 kDa under reducing conditions was isolated from both newborn and adult porcine serum and characterized. Porcine PMBL functionally activated the complement system via the lectin pathway triggered by binding with both phosphomannan (P-mannan) and mannan, which, unlike MBP, was effectively inhibited by mannose 6-phosphate- or galatose-containing oligosaccharides. Our observations suggest that porcine PMBL plays a critical role in the innate immune defense from the newborn stage to adult-hood, and the establishment of a newborn piglet experimental model for the innate immune system studies is a valuable step toward elucidation of the physiological function and molecular mechanism of lectin pathway. PMID:17324926

  8. Plasmon waveguide resonance for sensing glycan-lectin interactions.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isabel; Kurylo, Ievgen; Coffinier, Yannick; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Harté, Etienne; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-05-11

    Carbohydrate-modified interfaces have been shown to be valuable tools for the study of protein-glycan recognition events. Label-free approache such as plasmonic based techniques are particularly attractive. This paper describes a new analytical platform for the sensitive and selective screening of carbohydrate-lectin interactions using plasmon waveguide resonance. Planar optical waveguides (POW), consisting of glass prisms coated with silver (50 nm) and silica (460 nm) layers were derivatized with mannose or lactose moieties. The specific association of the resulting interface with selected lectins was assessed by following the changes in its plasmonic response. The immobilization strategy investigated in this work is based on the formation of a covalent bond between propargyl-functionalized glycans and surface-linked azide groups via a Cu(I) "click" chemistry. Optimization of the surface architecture through the introduction of an oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer between the plasmonic surface and the glycan ligands provided an interface which allowed screening of glycan-lectin interactions in a highly selective manner. The limit of detection (LOD) of this method for this particular application was found to be in the subnanomolar range (0.5 nM), showing it to constitute a promising analytical platform for future development and use in a pharmaceutical or biomedical setting.

  9. Opposite effects on human colon cancer cell proliferation of two dietary Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-binding lectins.

    PubMed

    Yu, L G; Milton, J D; Fernig, D G; Rhodes, J M

    2001-02-01

    Increased cell surface expression of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF antigen, Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha-) is a common feature in malignant and pre-malignant epithelia. Our previous studies have shown that dietary TF-binding lectins from peanut (Arachis hypogea) and edible mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) produce marked but different effects on human intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. This study investigates the proliferative effects of the other two known dietary TF-binding lectins: jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia, JAC) and amaranth lectin (Amaranthus caudatus, ACA). JAC produced dose-dependent and non-cytotoxic inhibition of proliferation in HT29 human colon cancer cells with maximal effects of 46 +/- 4% at 20 microg/ml, whereas ACA produced dose-dependent stimulation of proliferation with maximal effects of 22 +/- 3% at 20 microg/ml when assessed both by incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and by cell counting. The lectin-mediated effects were inhibitable by the presence of appropriate Galbeta1-3GalNAc-expressing glycoproteins but differences existed between JAC and ACA in their patterns of inhibition by such substances. Ligand binding equilibrium studies using iodinated lectins revealed different Kd of the two lectins for HT29 cell surface glycoproteins. Lectin blots of cell membrane extracts showed different binding patterns in all the four TF-binding lectins. These results provide further evidence that dietary TF-binding lectins can have marked effects on the proliferation of human malignant gastro-intestinal epithelial cells and hence may play a role in intestinal cancer development, and also show that the biological effects of dietary lectins cannot be predicted solely from their carbohydrate binding properties.

  10. Lectin engineering, a molecular evolutionary approach to expanding the lectin utilities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In the post genomic era, glycomics--the systematic study of all glycan structures of a given cell or organism--has emerged as an indispensable technology in various fields of biology and medicine. Lectins are regarded as "decipherers of glycans", being useful reagents for their structural analysis, and have been widely used in glycomic studies. However, the inconsistent activity and availability associated with the plant-derived lectins that comprise most of the commercially available lectins, and the limit in the range of glycan structures covered, have necessitated the development of innovative tools via engineering of lectins on existing scaffolds. This review will summarize the current state of the art of lectin engineering and highlight recent technological advances in this field. The key issues associated with the strategy of lectin engineering including selection of template lectin, construction of a mutagenesis library, and high-throughput screening methods are discussed.

  11. Phenotype-associated lectin-binding profiles of normal and transformed blood cells: a comparative analysis of mannose- and galactose-binding lectins from plants and human serum/placenta.

    PubMed

    Mann, K K; André, S; Gabius, H J; Sharp, J G

    1994-10-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of normal and transformed blood cells are commonly characterized by plant lectins. To infer physiological significance of protein-carbohydrate interactions, mammalian lectins are obviously preferable as research tools. So far, human serum lectins have not been used to assess their binding to immunophenotyped human normal or transformed blood cells. Thus, our study combines two groups of lectins with different specificity from plant and human sources. Besides concanavalin A (ConA) we have isolated the mannose-binding protein and serum amyloid P component from human serum. Especially the mannose-binding protein is believed to play a role in host defence against bacteria and yeast cells with unknown impact on normal and tumor cells. These three lectins establish the first group. In addition to the immunomodulatory mistletoe lectin, whose binding can elicit enhanced cytokine secretion from mononuclear blood cells, we included the beta-galactoside-binding lectin (14 kDa) from human placenta in the second group. The initial series of measurements was undertaken using two-color flow cytometry to determine the phenotype-associated binding (based on cluster designation; CD) of the lectins to blood and bone marrow cells from normal donors and the cell line CEM (T-lymphoblastoid), KG1-A (primitive myeloid leukemia) and Croco II (B-lymphoblastoid). Heterogeneity was apparent for each lectin in the CD-defined cell populations. Significant differences in binding were noted between Viscum album agglutinin (VAA) and other lectins for CD4+ cells from blood and between mannose-binding protein (MBP) and VAA versus 14 kDa, ConA and serum amyloid P component (SAP) for CD19+ cells from bone marrow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  13. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide. PMID:26022515

  14. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  15. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  16. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide.

  17. Functional environmental proteomics: elucidating the role of a c-type cytochrome abundant during uranium bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jiae; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-02-01

    Studies with pure cultures of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms have demonstrated that outer-surface c-type cytochromes are important electron transfer agents for the reduction of metals, but previous environmental proteomic studies have typically not recovered cytochrome sequences from subsurface environments in which metal reduction is important. Gel-separation, heme-staining and mass spectrometry of proteins in groundwater from in situ uranium bioremediation experiments identified a putative c-type cytochrome, designated Geobacter subsurface c-type cytochrome A (GscA), encoded within the genome of strain M18, a Geobacter isolate previously recovered from the site. Homologs of GscA were identified in the genomes of other Geobacter isolates in the phylogenetic cluster known as subsurface clade 1, which predominates in a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments. Most of the gscA sequences recovered from groundwater genomic DNA clustered in a tight phylogenetic group closely related to strain M18. GscA was most abundant in groundwater samples in which Geobacter sp. predominated. Expression of gscA in a strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens that lacked the gene for the c-type cytochrome OmcS, thought to facilitate electron transfer from conductive pili to Fe(III) oxide, restored the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Atomic force microscopy provided evidence that GscA was associated with the pili. These results demonstrate that a c-type cytochrome with an apparent function similar to that of OmcS is abundant when Geobacter sp. are abundant in the subsurface, providing insight into the mechanisms for the growth of subsurface Geobacter sp. on Fe(III) oxide and suggesting an approach for functional analysis of other Geobacter proteins found in the subsurface.

  18. Structural and functional properties of C-type starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinwen; Cai, Canhui; Man, Jianmin; Zhou, Weidong; Wei, Cunxu

    2014-01-30

    This study investigated the structural and functional properties of C-type starches from pea seeds, faba bean seeds, yam rhizomes and water chestnut corms. These starches were mostly oval in shape with significantly different sizes and contents of amylose, damaged starch and phosphorus. Pea, faba bean and water chestnut starches had central hila, and yam starch had eccentric hilum. Water chestnut and yam starches had higher amylopectin short and long chain, respectively. Water chestnut and faba bean starches showed CA-type crystallinities, and pea and yam starches had C-type crystallinities. Water chestnut starch had the highest swelling power, granule swelling and pasting viscosity, lowest gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy. Faba bean starch had the lowest pasting viscosity, whereas yam starch had the highest gelatinization temperatures. Water chestnut and yam starches possessed significantly higher and lower susceptibility to acid and enzyme hydrolysis, the highest and lowest RDS contents, and the lowest and highest RS contents, respectively.

  19. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, T. V.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of rhizosphere/rhizoplane culture conditions on the ability of various rhizobia to bind soybean seed lectin (SBL) was examined. Eleven strains of the soybean symbiont, Rhizobium japonicum, and six strains of various heterologous Rhizobium species were cultured in root exudate of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and in association with roots of soybean seedlings which were growing either hydroponically or in montmorillonite clay soil amendment (Turface). All 11 of the R. japonicum strains developed biochemically specific receptors for the lectin when cultured under these conditions, whereas six of the 11 did not develop such receptors when cultured in synthetic salts medium. Two cowpea strains also developed receptors for SBL. The other four heterologous strains of rhizobia gave no evidence of biochemically specific SBL binding in either synthetic salts media or rhizosphere/rhizoplane cultures. These results demonstrate that the environment provided by plant roots is an important factor in the development of specific lectin receptors on the cell surface of R. japonicum. PMID:16660472

  20. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  1. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling. PMID:1030938

  2. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  3. Differential binding properties of Gal/GalNAc specific lectins available for characterization of glycoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Song, S C; Sugii, S; Herp, A

    1997-01-01

    Differentiating the binding properties of applied lectins should facilitate the selection of lectins for characterization of glycoreceptors on the cell surface. Based on the binding specificities studied by inhibition assays of lectin-glycan interactions, over twenty Gal and/or GalNAc specific lectins have been divided into eight groups according to their specificity for structural units (lectin determinants), which are the disaccharide as all or part of the determinants and of GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the peptide chain. A scheme of codes for lectin determinants is illustrated as follows: (1) F (GalNAc alpha 1-->3GalNAc), Forssman specific disaccharide--Dolichos biflorus (DBL), Helix pomatia (HPL) and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (2) A (GalNAc alpha 1-->3 Gal), blood group A specific disaccharide--Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides (CFT), Soy bean (SBL), Vicia villosa-A4 (VVL-A4), and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (3) Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the protein core)--Vicia villosa B4 (VVL-B4), Salvia sclarea (SSL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL) and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin, AIL). (4) T (Gal beta 1-->3GalNAc), the mucin type sugar sequences on the human erythrocyte membrane(T alpha), T antigen or the disaccharides at the terminal nonreducing end of gangliosides (T beta)--Peanut (PNA), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Sophora japonica (SJL), Artocarpus lakoocha (Artocarpin) lectins and Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA).(5) I and II (Gal beta 1-->3(4)GlcNAc)--the disaccharide residue at the nonreducing end of the carbohydrate chains derived from either N- or O-glycosidic linkage--Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1), Datura stramonium (TAL, Thorn apple), Erythrina cristagalli (ECL, Coral tree), and Geodia cydonium (GCL). (6) B (Gal alpha 1-->3Gal), human blood group B specific disaccharide--Griffonia(Banderiaea) simplicifolia B4 (GSI-B4). (7) E (Gal alpha 1-->4Gal), receptors for pathogenic E

  4. Glycopolymer brushes for specific lectin binding by controlled multivalent presentation of N-acetyllactosamine glycan oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunji; Rosencrantz, Ruben R; Elling, Lothar; Böker, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A new multivalent glycopolymer platform for lectin recognition is introduced in this work by combining the controlled growth of glycopolymer brushes with highly specific glycosylation reactions. Glycopolymer brushes, synthetic polymers with pendant saccharides, are prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-O-(N-acetyl-β-d-glucosamine)ethyl methacrylate (GlcNAcEMA). Here, the fabrication of multivalent glycopolymers consisting of poly(GlcNAcEMA) is reported with additional biocatalytic elongation of the glycans directly on the silicon substrate by specific glycosylation using recombinant glycosyltransferases. The bioactivity of the surface-grafted glycans is investigated by fluorescence-linked lectin assay. Due to the multivalency of glycan ligands, the glycopolymer brushes show very selective, specific, and strong interactions with lectins. The multiarrays of the glycopolymer brushes have a large potential as a screening device to define optimal-binding environments of specific lectins or as new simplified diagnostic tools for the detection of cancer-related lectins in blood serum. PMID:25354386

  5. Glycan heterogeneity on gold nanoparticles increases lectin discrimination capacity in label-free multiplexed bioassays†

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Lucienne; Vlachou, Denise; Richards, Sarah-Jane; Gibson, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new analytical tools as point-of-care biosensors is crucial to combat the spread of infectious diseases, especially in the context of drug-resistant organisms, or to detect biological warfare agents. Glycan/lectin interactions drive a wide range of recognition and signal transduction processes within nature and are often the first site of adhesion/recognition during infection making them appealing targets for biosensors. Glycosylated gold nanoparticles have been developed that change colour from red to blue upon interaction with carbohydrate-binding proteins and may find use as biosensors, but are limited by the inherent promiscuity of some of these interactions. Here we mimic the natural heterogeneity of cell-surface glycans by displaying mixed monolayers of glycans on the surface of gold nanoparticles. These are then used in a multiplexed, label-free bioassay to create ‘barcodes’ which describe the lectin based on its binding profile. The increased information content encoded by using complex mixtures of a few sugars, rather than increased numbers of different sugars makes this approach both scalable and accessible. These nanoparticles show increased lectin identification power at a range of lectin concentrations, relative to single-channel sensors. It was also found that some information about the concentration of the lectins can be extracted, all from just a simple colour change, taking this technology closer to being a realistic biosensor. PMID:27181289

  6. Glycan heterogeneity on gold nanoparticles increases lectin discrimination capacity in label-free multiplexed bioassays.

    PubMed

    Otten, Lucienne; Vlachou, Denise; Richards, Sarah-Jane; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-07-21

    The development of new analytical tools as point-of-care biosensors is crucial to combat the spread of infectious diseases, especially in the context of drug-resistant organisms, or to detect biological warfare agents. Glycan/lectin interactions drive a wide range of recognition and signal transduction processes within nature and are often the first site of adhesion/recognition during infection making them appealing targets for biosensors. Glycosylated gold nanoparticles have been developed that change colour from red to blue upon interaction with carbohydrate-binding proteins and may find use as biosensors, but are limited by the inherent promiscuity of some of these interactions. Here we mimic the natural heterogeneity of cell-surface glycans by displaying mixed monolayers of glycans on the surface of gold nanoparticles. These are then used in a multiplexed, label-free bioassay to create 'barcodes' which describe the lectin based on its binding profile. The increased information content encoded by using complex mixtures of a few sugars, rather than increased numbers of different sugars makes this approach both scalable and accessible. These nanoparticles show increased lectin identification power at a range of lectin concentrations, relative to single-channel sensors. It was also found that some information about the concentration of the lectins can be extracted, all from just a simple colour change, taking this technology closer to being a realistic biosensor. PMID:27181289

  7. Lectin-like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor (LOX-1): A Chameleon Receptor for Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Zeya, Bushra; Arjuman, Albina; Chandra, Nimai Chand

    2016-08-16

    LOX-1, one of the main receptors for oxLDL, is found mainly on the surface of endothelial cells. It is a multifacet 52 kDa type II transmembrane protein that structurally belongs to the C-type lectin family. It exists with short intracellular N-terminal and long extracellular C-terminal hydrophilic domains separated by a hydrophobic domain of 26 amino acids. LOX-1 acts like a bifunctional receptor either showing pro-atherogenicity by activating the NFκB-mediated down signaling cascade for gene activation of pro-inflammatory molecules or playing an atheroprotective agent by receptor-mediated uptake of oxLDL in the presence of an anti-inflammatory molecule like IL-10. Mildly, moderately, and highly oxidized LDL show their characteristic features upon LOX-1 activation and its ligand binding indenture. The polymorphic LOX-1 genes are intensively associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial diseases. The splicing variant LOX IN dimerizes with the native form of LOX-1 and protects cells from damage by oxidized LDL. In the developing field of regenerating medicine, LOX-1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Lectin-like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor (LOX-1): A Chameleon Receptor for Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Zeya, Bushra; Arjuman, Albina; Chandra, Nimai Chand

    2016-08-16

    LOX-1, one of the main receptors for oxLDL, is found mainly on the surface of endothelial cells. It is a multifacet 52 kDa type II transmembrane protein that structurally belongs to the C-type lectin family. It exists with short intracellular N-terminal and long extracellular C-terminal hydrophilic domains separated by a hydrophobic domain of 26 amino acids. LOX-1 acts like a bifunctional receptor either showing pro-atherogenicity by activating the NFκB-mediated down signaling cascade for gene activation of pro-inflammatory molecules or playing an atheroprotective agent by receptor-mediated uptake of oxLDL in the presence of an anti-inflammatory molecule like IL-10. Mildly, moderately, and highly oxidized LDL show their characteristic features upon LOX-1 activation and its ligand binding indenture. The polymorphic LOX-1 genes are intensively associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial diseases. The splicing variant LOX IN dimerizes with the native form of LOX-1 and protects cells from damage by oxidized LDL. In the developing field of regenerating medicine, LOX-1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27419271

  9. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  10. CancerLectinDB: a database of lectins relevant to cancer.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Deepa; Jeyakani, Justin; Chauhan, Alok; Kumar, Nirmal; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-04-01

    The role of lectins in mediating cancer metastasis, apoptosis as well as various other signaling events has been well established in the past few years. Data on various aspects of the role of lectins in cancer is being accumulated at a rapid pace. The data on lectins available in the literature is so diverse, that it becomes difficult and time-consuming, if not impossible to comprehend the advances in various areas and obtain the maximum benefit. Not only do the lectins vary significantly in their individual functional roles, but they are also diverse in their sequences, structures, binding site architectures, quaternary structures, carbohydrate affinities and specificities as well as their potential applications. An organization of these seemingly independent data into a common framework is essential in order to achieve effective use of all the data towards understanding the roles of different lectins in different aspects of cancer and any resulting applications. An integrated knowledge base (CancerLectinDB) together with appropriate analytical tools has therefore been developed for lectins relevant for any aspect of cancer, by collating and integrating diverse data. This database is unique in terms of providing sequence, structural, and functional annotations for lectins from all known sources in cancer and is expected to be a useful addition to the number of glycan related resources now available to the community. The database has been implemented using MySQL on a Linux platform and web-enabled using Perl-CGI and Java tools. Data for individual lectins pertain to taxonomic, biochemical, domain architecture, molecular sequence and structural details as well as carbohydrate specificities. Extensive links have also been provided for relevant bioinformatics resources and analytical tools. Availability of diverse data integrated into a common framework is expected to be of high value for various studies on lectin cancer biology. CancerLectinDB can be accessed through

  11. Occurrence and transmission efficiencies of Borrelia burgdorferi ospC types in avian and mammalian wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Holly B.; Canham, Charles D.; Fonseca, Dina M.; Brisson, Dustin; Morin, Peter J.; Smouse, Peter E.; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., the bacterium that causes Lyme disease in North America, circulates among a suite of vertebrate hosts and their tick vector. The bacterium can be differentiated at the outer surface protein C (ospC) locus into 25 genotypes. Wildlife hosts can be infected with a suite of ospC types but knowledge on the transmission efficiencies of these naturally infected hosts to ticks is still lacking. To evaluate the occupancy and detection of ospC types in wildlife hosts, we adapted a likelihood-based species patch occupancy model to test for the occurrence probabilities (ψ – “occupancy”) and transmission efficiencies (ε – “detection”) of each ospC type. We detected differences in ospC occurrence and transmission efficiencies from the null models with HIS (human invasive strains) types A and K having the highest occurrence estimates, but both HIS and non-HIS types having high transmission efficiencies. We also examined ospC frequency patterns with respect to strains known to be invasive in humans across the host species and phylogenetic groups. We found that shrews and to a lesser extent, birds, were important host groups supporting relatively greater frequencies of HIS to non-HIS types. This novel method of simultaneously assessing occurrence and transmission of ospC types provides a powerful tool in assessing disease risk at the genotypic level in naturally infected wildlife hosts and offers the opportunity to examine disease risk at the community level. PMID:24382473

  12. [Bioengineering of symbiotic systems: creation of new associative symbiosis with the use of lectins on the example of tobacco and colza].

    PubMed

    Vershinina, Z P; Baĭmiev, An Kh; Blagova, D K; Kniazev, A V; Baĭmiev, Al Kh; Chemeris, A V

    2011-01-01

    "Barbate roots" in tobacco and colza transgenic on lectin gene were obtained with the use of a wild strain of Agrobacterium rhizogenes 15834 transformed with pCAMBIA1305.1 plasmid containing the full-size lectin gene (psl) from the Pisum sativum. Influence of expression oflectin gene on colonization oftransgenic roots with symbiont of pea (Rhizobium leguminosarum) was investigated. The number of adhered bacteria onto the roots transformed with lectin gene was 14-fold and 37-fold higher in comparison with the control; this confirms the interaction of R. leguminosarum with pea lectin at the surface of the transformed roots of tobacco and colza. The developed experimental approach, based on the simulation of recognition processes and early symbiotic interactions with lectins of pea plants, may, in perspective, be used for obtaining stable associations of economically valuable, nonsymbiotrophic plant species with rhizobia.

  13. [Effect of lectins from Azospirillum brasilense to peroxidase and oxalate oxidase activity regulation in wheat roots].

    PubMed

    Alen'kina, S A; Nikitina, V E

    2010-01-01

    Lectins were extracted from the surface of nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and from its mutant A. brasilense Sp7.2.3 defective in lectin activity. The ability oflectins to stimulate the rapid formation of hydrogen peroxide related to increase of oxalate oxidase and peroxidase activity in the roots of wheat seedlings has been demonstrated. The most rapid induced pathway of hydrogen peroxide formation in the roots of wheat seedlings was the oxalic acid oxidation by oxalate oxidase which is the effect oflectin in under 10 min in a concentration of 10 microg/ml. The obtained results show that lectins from Azospirillum are capable of inducing the adaptation processes in the roots of wheat seedlings.

  14. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  15. Sugared biomaterial binding lectins: achievements and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bojarová, P; Křen, V

    2016-07-19

    Lectins, a distinct group of glycan-binding proteins, play a prominent role in the immune system ranging from pathogen recognition and tuning of inflammation to cell adhesion or cellular signalling. The possibilities of their detailed study expanded along with the rapid development of biomaterials in the last decade. The immense knowledge of all aspects of glycan-lectin interactions both in vitro and in vivo may be efficiently used in bioimaging, targeted drug delivery, diagnostic and analytic biological methods. Practically applicable examples comprise photoluminescence and optical biosensors, ingenious three-dimensional carbohydrate microarrays for high-throughput screening, matrices for magnetic resonance imaging, targeted hyperthermal treatment of cancer tissues, selective inhibitors of bacterial toxins and pathogen-recognising lectin receptors, and many others. This review aims to present an up-to-date systematic overview of glycan-decorated biomaterials promising for interactions with lectins, especially those applicable in biology, biotechnology or medicine. The lectins of interest include galectin-1, -3 and -7 participating in tumour progression, bacterial lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IL), E. coli (Fim-H) and Clostridium botulinum (HA33) or DC-SIGN, receptors of macrophages and dendritic cells. The spectrum of lectin-binding biomaterials covered herein ranges from glycosylated organic structures, calixarene and fullerene cores over glycopeptides and glycoproteins, functionalised carbohydrate scaffolds of cyclodextrin or chitin to self-assembling glycopolymer clusters, gels, micelles and liposomes. Glyconanoparticles, glycan arrays, and other biomaterials with a solid core are described in detail, including inorganic matrices like hydroxyapatite or stainless steel for bioimplants. PMID:27075026

  16. Energetics of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-α-d-mannose binding to the Parkia platycephala seed lectin and its use for MAD phasing

    PubMed Central

    Gallego del Sol, Francisca; Gómez, Javier; Hoos, Sylviane; Nagano, Celso S.; Cavada, Benildo S.; England, Patrick; Calvete, Juan J.

    2005-01-01

    Parkia platycephala belongs to the most primitive group of Leguminosae plants. Its seed lectin is made up of three homologous β-prism repeats and exhibits binding specificity for mannose/glucose. The properties of the association between the lectin from P. platycephala seeds and monosaccharide ligands were analysed by isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. The results are consistent with the lectin bearing three thermodynamically identical binding sites for mannose/glucose per monomer with dissociation constants in the millimolar range. Binding of each ligand by the lectin is enthalpically driven. Crystals have been obtained of the lectin in complex with a brominated derivative of mannose (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-α-d-mannose), which were suitable for deriving an electron-density map by MAD phasing. In agreement with the thermodynamic data, six Br atoms were found in the asymmetric unit of the monoclinic P21 crystals, which contained two P. platycephala lectin molecules. The availability of other Br derivatives of monosaccharides (glucose, galactose, fucose) may make this strategy widely useful for structure elucidation of novel lectins or when (as in the case of the P. platycephala lectin) molecular-replacement methods fail. PMID:16511032

  17. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  18. Redox processes controlling the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Géraldine; Corvest, Vincent; Meyer, Etienne H; Hamel, Patrice P

    2010-11-01

    In mitochondria, two mono heme c-type cytochromes are essential electron shuttles of the respiratory chain. They are characterized by the covalent attachment of their heme C to a CXXCH motif in the apoproteins. This post-translational modification occurs in the intermembrane space compartment. Dedicated assembly pathways have evolved to achieve this chemical reaction that requires a strict reducing environment. In mitochondria, two unrelated machineries operate, the rather simple System III in yeast and animals and System I in plants and some protozoans. System I is also found in bacteria and shares some common features with System II that operates in bacteria and plastids. This review aims at presenting how different systems control the chemical requirements for the heme ligation in the compartments where cytochrome c maturation takes place. A special emphasis will be given on the redox processes that are required for the heme attachment reaction onto apocytochromes c.

  19. P2C-Type ATPases and Their Regulation.

    PubMed

    Retamales-Ortega, Rocío; Vio, Carlos P; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-03-01

    P2C-type ATPases are a subfamily of P-type ATPases comprising Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is ubiquitously expressed and has been implicated in several neurological diseases, whereas H(+)/K(+)-ATPase is found principally in the colon, stomach, and kidney. Both ATPases have two subunits, α and β, but Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase also has a regulatory subunit called FXYD, which has an important role in cancer. The most important functions of these ATPases are homeostasis, potassium regulation, and maintaining a gradient in different cell types, like epithelial cells. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has become a center of attention ever since it was proposed that it might play a crucial role in neurological disorders such as bipolar disorder, mania, depression, familial hemiplegic migraine, rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism, chronic stress, epileptogenesis, and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, it has been reported that lithium could have a neuroprotective effect against ouabain, which is the best known Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor, but and high concentrations of lithium could affect negatively H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, that has a key role in regulating acidosis and potassium deficiencies. Finally, potassium homeostasis regulation is composed of two main mechanisms, extrarenal and renal. Extrarenal mechanism controls plasma levels, shifting potassium from the extracellular to the intracellular, whereas renal mechanism concerns with body balance and is influenced by potassium intake and its urinary excretion. In this article, we discuss the functions, isoforms, and localization of P2C-type ATPases, describe some of their modulators, and discuss their implications in some diseases.

  20. P2C-Type ATPases and Their Regulation.

    PubMed

    Retamales-Ortega, Rocío; Vio, Carlos P; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-03-01

    P2C-type ATPases are a subfamily of P-type ATPases comprising Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is ubiquitously expressed and has been implicated in several neurological diseases, whereas H(+)/K(+)-ATPase is found principally in the colon, stomach, and kidney. Both ATPases have two subunits, α and β, but Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase also has a regulatory subunit called FXYD, which has an important role in cancer. The most important functions of these ATPases are homeostasis, potassium regulation, and maintaining a gradient in different cell types, like epithelial cells. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has become a center of attention ever since it was proposed that it might play a crucial role in neurological disorders such as bipolar disorder, mania, depression, familial hemiplegic migraine, rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism, chronic stress, epileptogenesis, and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, it has been reported that lithium could have a neuroprotective effect against ouabain, which is the best known Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor, but and high concentrations of lithium could affect negatively H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, that has a key role in regulating acidosis and potassium deficiencies. Finally, potassium homeostasis regulation is composed of two main mechanisms, extrarenal and renal. Extrarenal mechanism controls plasma levels, shifting potassium from the extracellular to the intracellular, whereas renal mechanism concerns with body balance and is influenced by potassium intake and its urinary excretion. In this article, we discuss the functions, isoforms, and localization of P2C-type ATPases, describe some of their modulators, and discuss their implications in some diseases. PMID:25631710

  1. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  2. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  3. Determination of sugar specificity of jackfruit lectin by a simple sugar-lectin binding assay using microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Wetprasit, N; Chulavatnatol, M

    1997-06-01

    Sugar-lectin binding assay was developed as a simple method which employed direct coating of microtiter plate with galactose-binding lectins. Biotin-galactose conjugate was used to bind to the immobilized lectins. The bound conjugate was then detected using streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase. Using the assay in conjunction with various competing carbohydrates, jackfruit lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus was found to be specific for alpha-anomer of galactoside with an aromatic residue.

  4. A unique epidermal mucus lectin identified from catfish (Silurus asotus): first evidence of intelectin in fish skin slime.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Komatsu, Yukie; Sugiura, Takaya; Araki, Kyosuke; Nakamura, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    The present study reports a new type of skin mucus lectin found in catfish Silurus asotus. The lectin exhibited calcium-dependent mannose-binding activity. When mannose eluate from chromatography with mannose-conjugated agarose was analysed by SDS-PAGE, the lectin appeared as a single 35-kDa band. Gel filtration showed that the lectin forms monomers and dimers. A 1216-bp cDNA sequence obtained by RACE-PCR from the skin encoded a 308 amino acid secretory protein with homology to mammalian and fish intelectins. RT-PCR demonstrated that the lectin gene was expressed in the gill, kidney and skin. Subsequent sequencing revealed the presence of an isoform in the gills. Antiserum detected the intelectin protein in club cells in the skin and gill, renal tubules and blood plasma. Although intelectin gene expression was not induced by in vivo bacterial stimulation, the intelectin showed agglutination activity against the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida, suggesting that the lectin plays an important role in self-defence against bacteria in the skin surface of the catfish. These findings represent one of the few examples of characterization and functional analysis of a fish intelectin protein.

  5. Morphological and biochemical changes in a hematopoietic cell line induced by jacalin, a lectin derived from Artocarpus integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Yagi, M; Campos-Neto, A; Gollahon, K

    1995-04-01

    Treatment of the human erythroleukemia cell line K562 with the galactose-binding lectin, jacalin, results in rapid and profound alterations in the morphology and biochemistry of the cells. Within minutes of lectin addition, the cells adhere to the plastic tissue culture surface, and within hours, the cells spread on the surface, acquiring a monocyte-like appearance. Jacalin treatment results in elevated expression of CD61 (integrin beta 3) and CD14, a monocyte-associated cell surface antigen. These results suggest that jacalin treatment of K562 cells triggers intracellular events that result in differentiation along the monocyte lineage.

  6. Combined Bacteria Microarray and Quartz Crystal Microbalance Approach for Exploring Glycosignatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Recognition by Host Lectins.

    PubMed

    Kalograiaki, Ioanna; Euba, Begoña; Proverbio, Davide; Campanero-Rhodes, María A; Aastrup, Teodor; Garmendia, Junkal; Solís, Dolores

    2016-06-01

    Recognition of bacterial surface epitopes by host receptors plays an important role in the infectious process and is intimately associated with bacterial virulence. Delineation of bacteria-host interactions commonly relies on the detection of binding events between purified bacteria- and host-target molecules. In this work, we describe a combined microarray and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach for the analysis of carbohydrate-mediated interactions directly on the bacterial surface, thus preserving the native environment of the bacterial targets. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) was selected as a model pathogenic species not displaying a polysaccharide capsule or O-antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide, a trait commonly found in several important respiratory pathogens. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of NTHi microarrays for exploring the presence of carbohydrate structures on the bacterial surface. Furthermore, the microarray approach is shown to be efficient for detecting strain-selective binding of three innate immune lectins, namely, surfactant protein D, human galectin-8, and Siglec-14, to different NTHi clinical isolates. In parallel, QCM bacteria-chips were developed for the analysis of lectin-binding kinetics and affinity. This novel QCM approach involves capture of NTHi on lectin-derivatized chips followed by formaldehyde fixation, rendering the bacteria an integrated part of the sensor chip, and subsequent binding assays with label-free lectins. The binding parameters obtained for selected NTHi-lectin pairs provide further insights into the interactions occurring at the bacterial surface.

  7. Combined Bacteria Microarray and Quartz Crystal Microbalance Approach for Exploring Glycosignatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Recognition by Host Lectins.

    PubMed

    Kalograiaki, Ioanna; Euba, Begoña; Proverbio, Davide; Campanero-Rhodes, María A; Aastrup, Teodor; Garmendia, Junkal; Solís, Dolores

    2016-06-01

    Recognition of bacterial surface epitopes by host receptors plays an important role in the infectious process and is intimately associated with bacterial virulence. Delineation of bacteria-host interactions commonly relies on the detection of binding events between purified bacteria- and host-target molecules. In this work, we describe a combined microarray and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach for the analysis of carbohydrate-mediated interactions directly on the bacterial surface, thus preserving the native environment of the bacterial targets. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) was selected as a model pathogenic species not displaying a polysaccharide capsule or O-antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide, a trait commonly found in several important respiratory pathogens. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of NTHi microarrays for exploring the presence of carbohydrate structures on the bacterial surface. Furthermore, the microarray approach is shown to be efficient for detecting strain-selective binding of three innate immune lectins, namely, surfactant protein D, human galectin-8, and Siglec-14, to different NTHi clinical isolates. In parallel, QCM bacteria-chips were developed for the analysis of lectin-binding kinetics and affinity. This novel QCM approach involves capture of NTHi on lectin-derivatized chips followed by formaldehyde fixation, rendering the bacteria an integrated part of the sensor chip, and subsequent binding assays with label-free lectins. The binding parameters obtained for selected NTHi-lectin pairs provide further insights into the interactions occurring at the bacterial surface. PMID:27176788

  8. Purification and characterization of Dolichos lablab lectin.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Meah, Y; Moore, J G; Goldstein, I J

    1999-02-01

    The mannose/glucose-binding Dolichos lablab lectin (designated DLL) has been purified from seeds of Dolichos lablab (hyacinth bean) to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography on an ovalbumin-Sepharose 4B column. The purified lectin gave a single symmetric protein peak with an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa on gel filtration chromatography, and five bands ranging from 10 kDa to 22 kDa upon SDS-PAGE. N-Terminal sequence analysis of these bands revealed subunit heterogeneity due to posttranslational proteolytic truncation at different sites mostly at the carboxyl terminus. The carbohydrate binding properties of the purified lectin were investigated by three different approaches: hemagglutination inhibition assay, quantitative precipitation inhibition assay, and ELISA. On the basis of these studies, it is concluded that the Dolichos lablab lectin has neither an extended carbohydrate combining site, nor a hydrophobic binding site adjacent to it. The carbohydrate combining site of DLL appears to most effectively accommodate a nonreducing terminal alpha-d-mannosyl unit, and to be complementary to the C-3, C-4, and C-6 equatorial hydroxyl groups of alpha-d-mannopyranosyl and alpha-d-glucopyranosyl residues. DLL strongly precipitates murine IgM but not IgG, and the recent finding that this lectin interacts specifically with NIH 3T3 fibroblasts transfected with the Flt3 tyrosine kinase receptor and preserves human cord blood stem cells and progenitors in a quiescent state for prolonged periods in culture, make this lectin a valuable tool in biomedical research. PMID:9949194

  9. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets with remarkably high sensitivity and specificity. A functional mannose self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in combination with lectin Con A was used as molecular recognition elements for the detection of E. coli W1485 using Quartz Crytsal Microbalance (QCM) as a transducer. The multivalent binding of Concanavalin A (Con A) to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface O-antigen favors the strong adhesion of E. coli to mannose modified QCM surface by forming bridges between these two. As a result, the contact area between cell and QCM surface increases that leads to rigid and strong attachment. Therefore it enhances the binding between E. coli and the mannose. Our results show a significant improvement of the sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate QCM biosensor with a experimental detection limit of a few hundred bacterial cells. The linear range is from 7.5 × 102 to 7.5 × 107 cells/mL that is four decade wider than the mannose alone QCM sensor. The change of damping resistances for E. coli adhesion experiments was no more than 1.4% suggesting that the bacterial attachment was rigid, rather than a viscoelastic behavior. Little non-specific binding was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and other proteins (Fetal Bovine serum, Erythrina cristagalli lectin). Our approach not only overcomes the challenges of applying QCM technology for bacterial detection but

  10. Lectin histochemistry of the gastric mucosa in normal and Helicobacter pylori infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Lueth, M; Sturegård, E; Sjunnesson, H; Wadström, T; Schumacher, U

    2005-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori attaches via lectins, carbohydrate binding proteins, to the carbohydrate residues of gastric mucins. Guinea-pigs are a suitable model for a H. pylori infection and thus the carbohydrate composition of normal and H. pylori infected gastric mucosa was investigated by lectin histochemistry. The stomach of all infected animals showed signs of an active chronic gastritis in their mucosa, whereas no inflammation was present in the control animals. The corpus-fundus regions of the controls showed heterogeneous WGA, SNA-I, UEA-I and HPA binding in almost all parts of the gastric glands. While these lectins labelled the superficial mucous cells and chief cells heterogeneously, the staining of the parietal cells was limited to WGA and PHA-L. Mucous neck cells reacted heterogeneously with UEA-I, HPA, WGA and PHA-L. In the antrum, the superficial mucous cells and glands were stained by WGA, UEA-I, HPA, SNA-I or PHA-L. WGA, UEA-I, SNA-I and HPA labelled the surface lining cells strongly. The mucoid glands reacted heterogeneously with WGA, UEA-I, HPA, SNA-I and PHA-L. In both regions, the H. pylori infected animals showed similar lectin binding pattern as the controls. No significant differences in the lectin binding pattern and thus in the carbohydrate composition between normal and H. pylori infected mucosa could be detected, hence H. pylori does not induce any changes in the glycosylation of the mucosa of the guinea-pig. This unaltered glycosylation is of particular relevance for the sialic acid binding lectin SNA-I as H. pylori uses sialic acid binding adhesin for its attachment to the mucosa. As sialic acid binding sites are already expressed in the normal mucosa H. pylori can immediately attach via its sialic acid binding adhesin to the mucosa making the guinea-pig particularly useful as a model organism.

  11. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Amie J; Khambata, Rayomand S; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J; Baliga, Reshma S; Lumsden, Natalie G; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J; Simone, Michela I; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J; MacAllister, Raymond J; Selwood, David L; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders.

  12. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Amie J.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Lumsden, Natalie G.; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J.; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J.; Simone, Michela I.; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F.; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J.; MacAllister, Raymond J.; Selwood, David L.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor–C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25105365

  13. Measurement of monovalent and polyvalent carbohydrate-lectin binding by back-scattering interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kussrow, Amanda; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Wolfenden, Mark L; Cloninger, Mary J; Finn, M G; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2009-06-15

    Carbohydrate-protein binding is important to many areas of biochemistry. Here, backscattering interferometry (BSI) has been shown to be a convenient and sensitive method for obtaining quantitative information about the strengths and selectivities of such interactions. The surfaces of glass microfluidic channels were covalently modified with extravidin, to which biotinylated lectins were subsequently attached by incubation and washing. The binding of unmodified carbohydrates to the resulting avidin-immobilized lectins was monitored by BSI. Dose-response curves that were generated within several minutes and were highly reproducible in multiple wash/measure cycles provided adsorption coefficients that showed mannose to bind to concanavalin A (conA) with 3.7 times greater affinity than glucose consistent with literature values. Galactose was observed to bind selectively and with similar affinity to the lectin BS-1. The avidities of polyvalent sugar-coated virus particles for immobilized conA were much higher than monovalent glycans, with increases of 60-200 fold per glycan when arrayed on the exterior surface of cowpea mosaic virus or bacteriophage Qbeta. Sugar-functionalized PAMAM dendrimers showed size-dependent adsorption, which was consistent with the expected density of lectins on the surface. The sensitivity of BSI matches or exceeds that of surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance techniques, and is sensitive to the number of binding events, rather than changes in mass. The operational simplicity and generality of BSI, along with the near-native conditions under which the target binding proteins are immobilized, make BSI an attractive method for the quantitative characterization of the binding functions of lectins and other proteins.

  14. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Ferguson, Ardene L.

    1978-01-01

    Three different assay procedures have been used to quantitate the levels of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lectin in various tissues of soybean plants. The assays used were a standard hemagglutination assay, a radioimmunoassay, and an isotope dilution assay. Most of the lectin in seeds was found in the cotyledons, but lectin was also detected in the embryo axis and the seed coat. Soybean lectin was present in all of the tissues of young seedlings, but decreased as the plants matured and was not detectable in plants older than 2 to 3 weeks. Soybean lectin isolated from seeds of several soybean varieties were identical when compared by several methods. PMID:16660384

  15. Electrochemical potential of Microgramma vaccinifolia rhizome lectin.

    PubMed

    Santana, Giselly Maria de Sá; Albuquerque, Lidiane Pereira de; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Souza, Sandra Rodrigues de; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2012-06-01

    This work reports the isolation of Microgramma vaccinifolia rhizome lectin (MvRL) and the determination of electrochemical potentials of MvRL in the presence of Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺ and human type O erythrocytes. MvRL showed the highest specific hemagglutinating activity with human type O erythrocytes and showed a single polypeptide band of 17 kDa on SDS-PAGE. MvRL hemagglutinating activity was neutralized after dialysis with EDTA, and addition of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ restored the activity. Electrochemical potentials of MvRL in the presence of 100 mM Ca²⁺ (882 mV) and 60 mM Mg²⁺ (1051 mV) were higher (p<0.05) than in the presence of only 0.15 M NaCl (247 mV), indicating that the electrochemical system was sensitive to structural and physico-chemical changes promoted by these ions. MvRL potential did not change in the presence of type O erythrocytes. The electrochemical system was able to detect changes in electrochemical potentials of MvRL promoted by Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺, even in a complex environment (human serum supplemented with 40 and 60mM of these ions). The study reveals that the stimulatory effect of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ on hemagglutinating activity may be linked to conformational change and/or alterations in surface charge distribution of MvRL. PMID:22197266

  16. Neutrophil haptotaxis induced by the lectin KM+.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, L; Martins, A R; Espreáfico, E M; Roque-Barreira, M C

    1998-05-01

    KM+ is a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces neutrophil migration in vitro and in vivo. This attractant activity was shown to be caused by haptotaxis rather than chemotaxis. The inhibition by D-mannose of the neutrophil attraction exerted by KM+, both in vitro and in vivo, supports the idea that haptotaxis is triggered in vivo by the sugar binding sites interacting with glycoconjugates located on the neutrophil surface and in the extracellular matrix. In the present study an in vivo haptotaxis assay was performed by intradermally (i.d.) injecting 125I-KM+ (200 ng), which led to a selective staining of loose connective tissue and vascular endothelium. The radiolabelled area exhibited a maximum increase (five-fold) in neutrophil infiltration 3 h after injection, relative to i.d. 200 ng 125I-BSA. We characterized the ex vivo binding of KM+ to tissue elements by immunohistochemistry, using paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded, untreated rat skin. Bound KM+ was detected with an affinity-purified rabbit IgG anti-KM+ and visualized with an alkaline phosphatase based system. KM+ binding to connective tissue and vascular endothelium was inhibited by preincubating KM+ with 0.4 mM D-mannose and was potentiated by heparan sulfate (100 microg ml(-1)). An in vitro assay carried out in a Boyden microchamber showed that heparan sulfate potentiated the attractant effect of 10 microg KM+ by 34%. The present data suggest that KM+ induces neutrophil migration in vivo by haptotaxis and that the haptotactic gradient could be provided by the interaction of the KM+ carbohydrate recognition site(s) with mannose-containing glycoconjugate(s) in vascular endothelium and connective tissue. Heparan sulfate would act as an accessory molecule, enhancing the KM+ tissue binding and potentiating the induced neutrophil haptotaxis.

  17. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  18. Use of lectins to in situ visualize glycoconjugates of extracellular polymeric substances in acidophilic archaeal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R Y; Neu, T R; Bellenberg, S; Kuhlicke, U; Sand, W; Vera, M

    2015-05-01

    Biofilm formation and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by meso- and thermoacidophilic metal-oxidizing archaea on relevant substrates have been studied to a limited extent. In order to investigate glycoconjugates, a major part of the EPS, during biofilm formation/bioleaching by archaea on pyrite, a screening with 75 commercially available lectins by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) has been performed. Three representative archaeal species, Ferroplasma acidiphilum DSM 28986, Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482(T) and a novel isolate Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 were used. In addition, Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur were studied. The results of FLBA indicate (i) 22 lectins bound to archaeal biofilms on pyrite and 21 lectins were binding to Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur; (ii) major binding patterns, e.g. tightly bound EPS and loosely bound EPS, were detected on both substrates; (iii) the three archaeal species produced various EPS glycoconjugates on pyrite surfaces. Additionally, the substratum induced different EPS glycoconjugates and biofilm structures of cells of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099. Our data provide new insights into interactions between acidophilic archaea on relevant surfaces and also indicate that FLBA is a valuable tool for in situ investigations on archaeal biofilms.

  19. Docking, synthesis, and NMR studies of mannosyl trisaccharide ligands for DC-SIGN lectin.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Díaz, Irene; Nieto, Pedro M; Campillo, Nuria E; Páez, Juan A; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2008-08-01

    DC-SIGN, a lectin, which presents at the surface of immature dendritic cells, constitutes nowadays a promising target for the design of new antiviral drugs. This lectin recognizes highly glycosylated proteins present at the surface of several pathogens such as HIV, Ebola virus, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, etc. Understanding the binding mode of this lectin is a topic of tremendous interest and will permit a rational design of new and more selective ligands. Here, we present computational and experimental tools to study the interaction of di- and trisaccharides with DC-SIGN. Docking analysis of complexes involving mannosyl di- and trisaccharides and the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN have been performed. Trisaccharides Manalpha1,2[Manalpha1,6]Man 1 and Manalpha1,3[Manalpha1,6]Man 2 were synthesized from an orthogonally protected mannose as a common intermediate. Using these ligands and the soluble extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN, NMR experiments based on STD and transfer-NOE were performed providing additional information. Conformational analysis of the mannosyl ligands in the free and bound states was done. These studies have demonstrated that terminal mannoses at positions 2 or 3 in the trisaccharides are the most important moiety and present the strongest contact with the binding site of the lectin. Multiple binding modes could be proposed and therefore should be considered in the design of new ligands. PMID:18633532

  20. Use of lectins to in situ visualize glycoconjugates of extracellular polymeric substances in acidophilic archaeal biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R Y; Neu, T R; Bellenberg, S; Kuhlicke, U; Sand, W; Vera, M

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by meso- and thermoacidophilic metal-oxidizing archaea on relevant substrates have been studied to a limited extent. In order to investigate glycoconjugates, a major part of the EPS, during biofilm formation/bioleaching by archaea on pyrite, a screening with 75 commercially available lectins by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) has been performed. Three representative archaeal species, Ferroplasma acidiphilum DSM 28986, Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482T and a novel isolate Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 were used. In addition, Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur were studied. The results of FLBA indicate (i) 22 lectins bound to archaeal biofilms on pyrite and 21 lectins were binding to Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur; (ii) major binding patterns, e.g. tightly bound EPS and loosely bound EPS, were detected on both substrates; (iii) the three archaeal species produced various EPS glycoconjugates on pyrite surfaces. Additionally, the substratum induced different EPS glycoconjugates and biofilm structures of cells of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099. Our data provide new insights into interactions between acidophilic archaea on relevant surfaces and also indicate that FLBA is a valuable tool for in situ investigations on archaeal biofilms. PMID:25488256

  1. Docking, synthesis, and NMR studies of mannosyl trisaccharide ligands for DC-SIGN lectin.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Díaz, Irene; Nieto, Pedro M; Campillo, Nuria E; Páez, Juan A; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2008-08-01

    DC-SIGN, a lectin, which presents at the surface of immature dendritic cells, constitutes nowadays a promising target for the design of new antiviral drugs. This lectin recognizes highly glycosylated proteins present at the surface of several pathogens such as HIV, Ebola virus, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, etc. Understanding the binding mode of this lectin is a topic of tremendous interest and will permit a rational design of new and more selective ligands. Here, we present computational and experimental tools to study the interaction of di- and trisaccharides with DC-SIGN. Docking analysis of complexes involving mannosyl di- and trisaccharides and the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN have been performed. Trisaccharides Manalpha1,2[Manalpha1,6]Man 1 and Manalpha1,3[Manalpha1,6]Man 2 were synthesized from an orthogonally protected mannose as a common intermediate. Using these ligands and the soluble extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN, NMR experiments based on STD and transfer-NOE were performed providing additional information. Conformational analysis of the mannosyl ligands in the free and bound states was done. These studies have demonstrated that terminal mannoses at positions 2 or 3 in the trisaccharides are the most important moiety and present the strongest contact with the binding site of the lectin. Multiple binding modes could be proposed and therefore should be considered in the design of new ligands.

  2. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  3. Comprehensive list of lectins: origins, natures, and carbohydrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Tateno, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Haruko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the first lectin ricin was discovered. Since then, a wide variety of lectins (lect means "select" in Latin) have been isolated from plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, as well as viruses, and their structures and properties have been characterized. At present, as many as 48 protein scaffolds have been identified as functional lectins from the viewpoint of three-dimensional structures as described in this chapter. In this chapter, representative 53 lectins are selected, and their major properties that include hemagglutinating activity, mitogen activity, blood group specificity, molecular weight, metal requirement, and sugar specificities are summarized as a comprehensive table. The list will provide a practically useful, comprehensive list for not only experienced lectin users but also many other non-expert researchers, who are not familiar to lectins and, therefore, have no access to advanced lectin biotechnologies described in other chapters. PMID:25117264

  4. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  5. The Consequences of Multiple Simultaneous C-Type Lectin–Ligand Interactions: DCIR Alters the Endo-Lysosomal Routing of DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallejo, Juan J.; Bloem, Karien; Knippels, Léon M. J.; Garssen, Johan; van Vliet, Sandra J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are equipped with multiple receptors to allow proper pathogen recognition and capture. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) recognize glycan structures on pathogens and endogenous glycoproteins for internalization and antigen processing and presentation. Often, the glycan specificity of these receptors is overlapping and/or pathogens are decorated with ligands for multiple CLRs, posing the question whether interference or cooperativity within the CLR family exists. Here, we used imaging flow cytometry to investigate the internalization properties of four different CLRs [mannose receptor, DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), macrophage galactose-type lectin, and dendritic cell immunoreceptor (DCIR)] on different APCs, as well as their intracellular routing. Although the internalization score of the investigated CLRs was similar on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs), DCIR internalization rates were lower compared to the other CLRs. Upon triggering, DCIR routed to intracellular compartments outside of the classical endo-lysosomal pathway, resulting in poor CD4+ T-cell stimulation. Although DC maturation reduced CLR expression levels, it did not affect their internalization rates. Although CLR internalization appeared to be independently regulated, DC-SIGN routing was affected when DCIR was triggered simultaneously. In conclusion, our results provide new insights for the design of DC-based immunotherapeutic strategies and suggest that DCIR is an inferior target in this respect. PMID:25806031

  6. Lectin genes in the Frankia alni genome.

    PubMed

    Pujic, Petar; Fournier, Pascale; Alloisio, Nicole; Hay, Anne-Emmanuelle; Maréchal, Joelle; Anchisi, Stéphanie; Normand, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Frankia alni strain ACN14a's genome was scanned for the presence of determinants involved in interactions with its host plant, Alnus spp. One such determinant type is lectin, proteins that bind specifically to sugar motifs. The genome of F. alni was found to contain 7 such lectin-coding genes, five of which were of the ricinB-type. The proteins coded by these genes contain either only the lectin domain, or also a heat shock protein or a serine-threonine kinase domain upstream. These lectins were found to have several homologs in Streptomyces spp., and a few in other bacterial genomes among which none in Frankia EAN1pec and CcI3 and two in strain EUN1f. One of these F. alni genes, FRAAL0616, was cloned in E. coli, fused with a reporter gene yielding a fusion protein that was found to bind to both root hairs and to bacterial hyphae. This protein was also found to modify the dynamics of nodule formation in A. glutinosa, resulting in a higher number of nodules per root. Its role could thus be to permit binding of microbial cells to root hairs and help symbiosis to occur under conditions of low Frankia cell counts such as in pioneer situations. PMID:22159868

  7. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  8. Jacalin: an IgA-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Roque-Barreira, M C; Campos-Neto, A

    1985-03-01

    We previously reported that seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit) contain a lectin, which we call jacalin, that is both a potent T cell mitogen and an apparently T cell-independent activator of human B cells for the secretion of immunoglobulins. During the above experiments we noted a massive precipitation in cell cultures stimulated with greater than or equal to 100 micrograms of lectin. In this paper, we show that the precipitate is formed after the interaction of jacalin and the serum protein added to the culture medium. More importantly, we demonstrate that IgA is probably the major serum constituent precipitated by the lectin and that no IgG or IgM can be detected in the precipitates. In secretions such as colostrum, IgA is the only protein precipitated by jacalin. On the basis of this specificity we describe a simple and reliable affinity chromatography procedure for the purification of both human serum and colostrum IgA. Jacalin is a D-Gal binding lectin and should be a useful tool for studying of serum and secretory IgA.

  9. A mushroom lectin from ascomycete Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eui Cha; Kim, Ki Don; Bae, Chan Hyung; Kim, Ju Cheol; Kim, Dae Kyong; Kim, Ha Hyung

    2007-05-01

    A mushroom lectin has been purified from ascomycete Cordyceps militaris, which is one of the most popular mushrooms in eastern Asia used as a nutraceutical and in traditional Chinese medicine. This lectin, designated CML, exhibited hemagglutination activity in mouse and rat erythrocytes, but not in human ABO erythrocytes. SDS-PAGE of CML revealed a single band with a molecular mass of 31.0 kDa under both nonreducing and reducing conditions that was stained by silver nitrate, and a 31.4 kDa peak in a Superdex-200 HR gel-filtration column. The hemagglutination activity was inhibited by sialoglycoproteins, but not in by mono- or disaccharides, asialoglycoproteins, or de-O-acetylated glycoprotein. The activity was maximal at pH 6.0-9.1 and at temperatures below 50 degrees C. Circular dichroism spectrum analysis revealed that CML comprises 27% alpha-helix, 12% beta-sheets, 29% beta-turns, and 32% random coils. Its binding specificity and secondary structure are similar to those of a fungal lectin from Arthrobotrys oligospora. However, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of CML differs greatly from those of other lectins. CML exhibits mitogenic activity against mouse splenocytes. PMID:17306462

  10. Jacalin: a lectin mitogenic for human CD4 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pineau, N; Aucouturier, P; Brugier, J C; Preud'homme, J L

    1990-01-01

    The major protein component of seeds from jackfruit is the lectin jacalin. Jackfruit crude extracts are known to stimulate human lymphocytes, but the mitogenic properties of purified jacalin have not been studied in detail so far. Study of the proliferative response of cell populations from normal human peripheral blood to purified jacalin showed it to be mitogenic through an interaction with lymphocytes by its lectin-binding site, as shown by inhibition by IgA. Jacalin failed to stimulate B cells to proliferate and to undergo plasma cell maturation. It induced a proliferation of CD4 (and not CD8) lymphocytes, as shown by phenotypic analysis of cells recovered after culture and by studies of the response of isolated T cell subpopulations. The proliferative response to jacalin was autologous monocyte-dependent. The kinetics of jacalin-induced DNA synthesis, expression of CD25 and interleukin-2 secretion was shifted by comparison with that induced by phytohaemagglutinin. The reason for the restricted responsiveness of CD4 T cells is presently unclear; jacalin bound to all blood cells and did not significantly co-cap with CD1, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD38, and jacalin response was neither enhanced nor inhibited by antibodies to these surface antigens. PMID:2372991

  11. Thermal/structural analyses of SiC/TiC type functionally gradient material

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaoka, Y.; Ninomiya, K.; Kosaka, K.; Saitou, T.; Wakamatsu, Y.; Niino, M.

    1993-12-31

    Functionally Gradient Material (FGM) is the material which is gradually changed composition rate of boundary layer of two different materials. And FGMs are developed for the candidate material of space plane, especially for hot structures. SiC/TiC type FGM is one of the heat resistant material and is planned to be tested in high-enthalpy gas flow condition. The purpose of this test is to estimate FGM under the real conditions where it will be exposed, so 2000 K of surface temperature and 1000 K of temperature difference in depth direction are required. In this paper two and/or three dimensional transient thermal/structural analyses of SiC/TiC type FGM are presented. At first analyses of cooling properties were performed to give thermal conditions for analyses. Consequently numerical analyses of temperature distribution and thermal stress were performed with ABAQUS, a finite-element code. The results of temperature distribution and stress distribution in FGM are presented and compared with test results.

  12. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  13. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators. PMID:12169094

  14. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators.

  15. The localization of lectin binding sites on photoreceptor outer segments and pigment epithelium of dystrophic retinas.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, B J; Wood, J G

    1980-07-01

    Carbohydrate-containing macromolecules on pigment epithelium (PE) and photoreceptor outer segment (OS) membranes of 14 to 16-day-old Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats and their genetic control (RCS-rdy+) have been localized with peroxidase-conjugated lectins from wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ricinus communis (RCA), Lens culinaris (LCA), and concanavalin A (Con A). All lectins stain the plasma membranes of photoreceptor inner segments and intact OSs of normal (RCS-rdy+) and dystrophic (RCS) retinas. In the normal retinas, all lectins stain also the plasma membranes of shed OSs, and WGA stains some intradisc membranes. In contrast, WGA, RCA, and Con A do not label the OS debris membranes in dystrophic retinas, but LCA labels some of them. In both normal and dystophic retinas, WGA uniformly labels both proximal and distal membrane surfaces of PE mcirovilli, whereas RCA labels primarily the distal regions. Con A labels both normal and dystrophic PE microvilli sparsely, and LCA stains the PE microvilli in RCS-rdy+ retinas more intensely than those in the RCS retinas. The major differences between the lectin labeling in normal and dystrophic retinas are the presence of LCA staining on OS debris and the absence of any other lectin staining on these membranes. Other differences are the sparse LCA staining on dystrophic PE microvillous membranes vs. the normal and the presence of WGA staining on OS intradisc membranes of normal retinas. These differences may reflect changes in the accessibility or composition of certain cell surface sugars on OS membranes and PE microvilli which may be related to the diminished rate of phagocytosis in RCS retinas. PMID:6156139

  16. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer.

  17. Binding of Galanthus nivalis lectin to Chlamydia trachomatis and inhibition of in vitro infection.

    PubMed

    Amin, K; Beillevaire, D; Mahmoud, E; Hammar, L; Mårdh, P A; Fröman, G

    1995-10-01

    A glycoprotein present in Chlamydia trachomatis, serotype L1, elementary bodies (EBs) was earlier found to bind the lectin from Galanthus nivalis (GNA). In the present paper we investigate the interaction of GNA with chlamydial EBs and its effect on in vitro infectivity. The binding affinity was studied with 125I-GNA lectin. Within 15 min about 80% maximal binding was obtained. The chlamydia-GNA interaction was inhibited by alpha-methylmannoside, causing a decrease of about 50% at 1 mM. Curve fit analyses indicated two types of binding sites for GNA on the EBs. The affinity to these differed by a factor of 15. The influence of the lectin on the ability of C. trachomatis to infect McCoy cells was also investigated. There was a GNA-dependent inhibition with a 50% reduction in the number of intracellular inclusions at 0.2 microM of the lectin. The findings indicate the presence of terminal mannose structures on the chlamydial surface at or in the proximity of the cell-binding domains. Mannose-binding proteins of eukaryotic cells could be important for the initial uptake of EBs.

  18. Lotus corniculatus nodulation specificity is changed by the presence of a soybean lectin gene

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn P; Goldberg, RB; Hirsch, AM

    1998-01-01

    Plant lectins have been implicated as playing an important role in mediating recognition and specificity in the Rhizobium-legume nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. To test this hypothesis, we introduced the soybean lectin gene Le1 either behind its own promoter or behind the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter into Lotus corniculatus, which is nodulated by R. loti. We found that nodulelike outgrowths developed on transgenic L. corniculatus plant roots in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which nodulates soybean and not Lotus spp. Soybean lectin was properly targeted to L. corniculatus root hairs, and although infection threads formed, they aborted in epidermal or hypodermal cells. Mutation of the lectin sugar binding site abolished infection thread formation and nodulation. Incubation of bradyrhizobia in the nodulation (nod) gene-inducing flavonoid genistein increased the number of nodulelike outgrowths on transgenic L. corniculatus roots. Studies of bacterial mutants, however, suggest that a component of the exopolysaccharide surface of B. japonicum, rather than Nod factor, is required for extension of host range to the transgenic L. corniculatus plants. PMID:9707526

  19. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  20. Closed state-coupled C-type inactivation in BK channels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiusheng; Li, Qin; Aldrich, Richard W

    2016-06-21

    Ion channels regulate ion flow by opening and closing their pore gates. K(+) channels commonly possess two pore gates, one at the intracellular end for fast channel activation/deactivation and the other at the selectivity filter for slow C-type inactivation/recovery. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel lacks a classic intracellular bundle-crossing activation gate and normally show no C-type inactivation. We hypothesized that the BK channel's activation gate may spatially overlap or coexist with the C-type inactivation gate at or near the selectivity filter. We induced C-type inactivation in BK channels and studied the relationship between activation/deactivation and C-type inactivation/recovery. We observed prominent slow C-type inactivation/recovery in BK channels by an extreme low concentration of extracellular K(+) together with a Y294E/K/Q/S or Y279F mutation whose equivalent in Shaker channels (T449E/K/D/Q/S or W434F) caused a greatly accelerated rate of C-type inactivation or constitutive C-inactivation. C-type inactivation in most K(+) channels occurs upon sustained membrane depolarization or channel opening and then recovers during hyperpolarized membrane potentials or channel closure. However, we found that the BK channel C-type inactivation occurred during hyperpolarized membrane potentials or with decreased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and recovered with depolarized membrane potentials or elevated [Ca(2+)]i Constitutively open mutation prevented BK channels from C-type inactivation. We concluded that BK channel C-type inactivation is closed state-dependent and that its extents and rates inversely correlate with channel-open probability. Because C-type inactivation can involve multiple conformational changes at the selectivity filter, we propose that the BK channel's normal closing may represent an early conformational stage of C-type inactivation.

  1. Insights into Collagen Uptake by C-type Mannose Receptors from the Crystal Structure of Endo180 Domains 1-4.

    PubMed

    Paracuellos, Patricia; Briggs, David C; Carafoli, Federico; Lončar, Tan; Hohenester, Erhard

    2015-11-01

    The C-type mannose receptor and its homolog Endo180 (or uPARAP, for urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein) mediate the endocytic uptake of collagen by macrophages and fibroblasts. This process is required for normal tissue remodeling, but also facilitates the growth and dissemination of tumors. We have determined the crystal structure at 2.5 Å resolution of the N-terminal region of Endo180, consisting of a ricin-like domain, a fibronectin type II (FN2) domain, and two C-type lectin (CTL) domains. The L-shaped arrangement of these domains creates a shallow trench spanning the FN2 and CTL1 domains, which was shown by mutagenesis to bind triple-helical and denatured collagen. Small-angle X-ray scattering showed that the L-shaped structure is maintained in solution at neutral and acidic pH, irrespective of calcium ion loading. Collagen binding was equally unaffected by acidic pH, suggesting that collagen release in endosomes is not regulated by changes within the Endo180 N-terminal region. PMID:26481812

  2. Insights into Collagen Uptake by C-type Mannose Receptors from the Crystal Structure of Endo180 Domains 1-4.

    PubMed

    Paracuellos, Patricia; Briggs, David C; Carafoli, Federico; Lončar, Tan; Hohenester, Erhard

    2015-11-01

    The C-type mannose receptor and its homolog Endo180 (or uPARAP, for urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein) mediate the endocytic uptake of collagen by macrophages and fibroblasts. This process is required for normal tissue remodeling, but also facilitates the growth and dissemination of tumors. We have determined the crystal structure at 2.5 Å resolution of the N-terminal region of Endo180, consisting of a ricin-like domain, a fibronectin type II (FN2) domain, and two C-type lectin (CTL) domains. The L-shaped arrangement of these domains creates a shallow trench spanning the FN2 and CTL1 domains, which was shown by mutagenesis to bind triple-helical and denatured collagen. Small-angle X-ray scattering showed that the L-shaped structure is maintained in solution at neutral and acidic pH, irrespective of calcium ion loading. Collagen binding was equally unaffected by acidic pH, suggesting that collagen release in endosomes is not regulated by changes within the Endo180 N-terminal region.

  3. Insights into Collagen Uptake by C-type Mannose Receptors from the Crystal Structure of Endo180 Domains 1–4

    PubMed Central

    Paracuellos, Patricia; Briggs, David C.; Carafoli, Federico; Lončar, Tan; Hohenester, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Summary The C-type mannose receptor and its homolog Endo180 (or uPARAP, for urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein) mediate the endocytic uptake of collagen by macrophages and fibroblasts. This process is required for normal tissue remodeling, but also facilitates the growth and dissemination of tumors. We have determined the crystal structure at 2.5 Å resolution of the N-terminal region of Endo180, consisting of a ricin-like domain, a fibronectin type II (FN2) domain, and two C-type lectin (CTL) domains. The L-shaped arrangement of these domains creates a shallow trench spanning the FN2 and CTL1 domains, which was shown by mutagenesis to bind triple-helical and denatured collagen. Small-angle X-ray scattering showed that the L-shaped structure is maintained in solution at neutral and acidic pH, irrespective of calcium ion loading. Collagen binding was equally unaffected by acidic pH, suggesting that collagen release in endosomes is not regulated by changes within the Endo180 N-terminal region. PMID:26481812

  4. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  5. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  6. Mannose-binding lectin in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Sarah; Dzwonek, Agnieszka; Klein, Nigel J

    2010-01-01

    Infection with HIV represents a significant global health problem, with high infection rates and high mortality worldwide. Treatment with antiretroviral therapy is inaccessible to many patients and efficacy is limited by development of resistance and side effects. The interactions of HIV with the human immune system, both innate and humoral, are complex and complicated by the profound ability of the virus to disable the host immune response. Mannose-binding lectin, a component of the innate immune system, has been demonstrated to play a role in host-virus interactions. This protein may have a key role in determining host susceptibility to infection, pathogenesis and progression of disease, and may contribute to the extensive variability of host response to infection. Further understanding and manipulation of the mannose-binding lectin response may represent a target for immunomodulation in HIV infection, which may, in conjunction with highly active antiretroviral therapy, allow development of a novel therapeutic approach to HIV infection. PMID:21218140

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi RST1 (OspC Type A) Genotype Is Associated with Greater Inflammation and More Severe Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strle, Klemen; Jones, Kathryn L.; Drouin, Elise E.; Li, Xin; Steere, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence is emerging for differential pathogenicity among Borrelia burgdorferi genotypes in the United States. By using two linked genotyping systems, ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer type (RST) and outer surface protein C (OspC), we studied the inflammatory potential of B. burgdorferi genotypes in cells and patients with erythema migrans or Lyme arthritis. When macrophages were stimulated with 10 isolates of each RST1, RST2, or RST3 strain, RST1 (OspC type A)–stimulated cells expressed significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand (CCL) 3, CCL4, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-1β, factors associated with innate immune responses. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, RST1 strains again stimulated significantly higher levels of these mediators. Moreover, compared with RST2, RST1 isolates induced significantly more interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, and CXCL10, which are needed for adaptive immune responses; however, OspC type I (RST3) approached RST1 (OspC type A) in stimulating these adaptive immune mediators. Similarly, serum samples from patients with erythema migrans who were infected with the RST1 genotype had significantly higher levels of almost all of these mediators, including exceptionally high levels of IFN-γ–inducible chemokines, CCL2, CXCL9, and CXCL10; and this pronounced inflammatory response was associated with more symptomatic infection. Differences among genotypes were not as great in patients with Lyme arthritis, but those infected with RST1 strains more often had antibiotic-refractory arthritis. Thus, the B. burgdorferi RST1 (OspC type A) genotype, followed by the RST3 (OspC type I) genotype, causes greater inflammation and more severe disease, establishing a link between spirochetal virulence and host inflammation. PMID:21641395

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi RST1 (OspC type A) genotype is associated with greater inflammation and more severe Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Strle, Klemen; Jones, Kathryn L; Drouin, Elise E; Li, Xin; Steere, Allen C

    2011-06-01

    Evidence is emerging for differential pathogenicity among Borrelia burgdorferi genotypes in the United States. By using two linked genotyping systems, ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer type (RST) and outer surface protein C (OspC), we studied the inflammatory potential of B. burgdorferi genotypes in cells and patients with erythema migrans or Lyme arthritis. When macrophages were stimulated with 10 isolates of each RST1, RST2, or RST3 strain, RST1 (OspC type A)-stimulated cells expressed significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand (CCL) 3, CCL4, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-1β, factors associated with innate immune responses. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, RST1 strains again stimulated significantly higher levels of these mediators. Moreover, compared with RST2, RST1 isolates induced significantly more interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, and CXCL10, which are needed for adaptive immune responses; however, OspC type I (RST3) approached RST1 (OspC type A) in stimulating these adaptive immune mediators. Similarly, serum samples from patients with erythema migrans who were infected with the RST1 genotype had significantly higher levels of almost all of these mediators, including exceptionally high levels of IFN-γ-inducible chemokines, CCL2, CXCL9, and CXCL10; and this pronounced inflammatory response was associated with more symptomatic infection. Differences among genotypes were not as great in patients with Lyme arthritis, but those infected with RST1 strains more often had antibiotic-refractory arthritis. Thus, the B. burgdorferi RST1 (OspC type A) genotype, followed by the RST3 (OspC type I) genotype, causes greater inflammation and more severe disease, establishing a link between spirochetal virulence and host inflammation.

  9. Concept, strategy and realization of lectin-based glycan profiling.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Lectins are a diverse group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Each lectin has its own specificity profile. It is believed that lectins exist in all living organisms that produce glycans. From a practical viewpoint, lectins have been used extensively in biochemical fields including proteomics due to their usefulness as detection and enrichment tools for specific glycans. Nevertheless, they have often been underestimated as probes, especially compared with antibodies, because of their low affinity and broad specificity. However, together with the concept of glycomics, such properties of lectins are now considered to be suitable for the task of 'profiling' in order to cover a wider range of ligands. Recently there has been rapid movement in the field of proteomics aimed at the investigation of glycan-related biomarkers. This is partly because of limitations of the present approach of simply following changes in protein-level expression, without paying sufficient attention to the fact and effects of glycosylation. The trend is reflected in the frequent use of lectins in the contexts of glycoprotein enrichment and glycan profiling. However, there are many aspects to be considered in using lectins, which differ considerably from antibodies. In this article, the author, as a developer of two unique methodologies, frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) and the lectin microarray, describes critical points concerning the use of lectins, together with the concept, strategy and means to achieve advances in these emerging glycan profiling technologies. PMID:18390573

  10. Are vicilins another major class of legume lectins?

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana C; Monteiro, Sara V; Carrapiço, Belmira M; Ferreira, Ricardo B

    2014-01-01

    Legume lectins comprise a structurally related, Ca/Mn-dependent, widespread, abundant and well characterized lectin family when compared to the large number of lectins from other sources described in the literature. Strangely enough, no specific function has been assigned to them aside from a possible role in storage and/or defense. Using a recent and fine-tuned methodology capable of specific lectin identification, β-conglutin, Vicia faba vicilin and β-lathyrin, the vicilin storage globulins from Lupinus albus, V. faba and Lathyrus sativus, respectively, were shown to be capable of affinity binding to thoroughly washed erythrocyte membranes and of specific elution with appropriate sugars. Based on this evidence and on sparse data published in the literature, a second family of legume lectins is proposed: the 7S family of storage proteins from leguminous seeds, or family II of legume lectins. These lectins are also structurally related, widespread and well characterized. In addition, they self-aggregate in a Ca/Mg, electrostatic dependent manner and are even more abundant than the family I of legume lectins. Using the same evidence, reserve and defense roles may be attributed to family II of legume lectins.

  11. Antifungal properties of lectin and new chitinases from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Gozia, O; Ciopraga, J; Bentia, T; Lungu, M; Zamfirescu, I; Tudor, R; Roseanu, A; Nitu, F

    1993-08-01

    We have purified from potato tubers, the lectin STA devoid of chitinase activity and two chitinases devoid of lectin activity. Both enzymes are 16 kDa glycoproteins, and probably belong to a new family of plant chitinases. The respective antifungal properties of lectin and chitinases were studied by following their effects against early developmental stages of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal potato pathogen. Here we demonstrate that: (1) lectin does not inhibit mycelial growth but irreversibly inhibits conidia germination and alters the germ tubes; and (2) chitinases block mycelial growth as well as conidia germination and lyse germ tubes.

  12. Amoebiasis vaccine development: A snapshot on E. histolytica with emphasis on perspectives of Gal/GalNAc lectin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Kennedy, John F

    2016-10-01

    Amoebiasis/amebiasis is a gastrointestinal infection caused by an enteric dwelling protozoan, Entamoeba histolytica. The disease is endemic in the developing world and is transmitted mainly via the faecal-oral route (e.g., in water or food) and may or may not be symptomatic. This disease of socio-economic importance worldwide involves parasite adherence and cytolysis of human cells followed by invasion that is mediated by galactose-binding (Gal/GalNAc) surface lectin. Disruption of the mucus layer leads to invasive intestinal and extraintestinal infection. Gal-lectin based vaccinations have conferred protection in various animal models against E. histolytica infections. Keeping in view the pivotal role of Gal/GalNAc lectin in amoebiasis vaccine development, its regulation, genomic view of the parasite involving gene conversion in lectin gene families, current knowledge about involvement of Gal/GalNAc lectin in adherence, pathogenicity, signalling, encystment, generating host immune response, and in turn protozoa escape strategies, and finally its role as effective vaccine candidate has been described. This review will help researchers to explore pathogenesis mechanism along with genomic studies and will also provide a framework for future amoebiasis vaccine development studies. PMID:27181579

  13. Amoebiasis vaccine development: A snapshot on E. histolytica with emphasis on perspectives of Gal/GalNAc lectin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Kennedy, John F

    2016-10-01

    Amoebiasis/amebiasis is a gastrointestinal infection caused by an enteric dwelling protozoan, Entamoeba histolytica. The disease is endemic in the developing world and is transmitted mainly via the faecal-oral route (e.g., in water or food) and may or may not be symptomatic. This disease of socio-economic importance worldwide involves parasite adherence and cytolysis of human cells followed by invasion that is mediated by galactose-binding (Gal/GalNAc) surface lectin. Disruption of the mucus layer leads to invasive intestinal and extraintestinal infection. Gal-lectin based vaccinations have conferred protection in various animal models against E. histolytica infections. Keeping in view the pivotal role of Gal/GalNAc lectin in amoebiasis vaccine development, its regulation, genomic view of the parasite involving gene conversion in lectin gene families, current knowledge about involvement of Gal/GalNAc lectin in adherence, pathogenicity, signalling, encystment, generating host immune response, and in turn protozoa escape strategies, and finally its role as effective vaccine candidate has been described. This review will help researchers to explore pathogenesis mechanism along with genomic studies and will also provide a framework for future amoebiasis vaccine development studies.

  14. Tomato lectin histochemistry for microglial visualization.

    PubMed

    Villacampa, Nàdia; Almolda, Beatriz; González, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    The use of different lectins for the study of microglial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) is a valuable tool that has been extensively used in the last years for the selective staining of this glial cell population, not only in normal physiological conditions, but also in a wide range of pathological situations where the normal homeostasis of the parenchyma is disturbed. In this chapter we accurately describe the methodology for the selective labelling of microglial cells by using the tomato lectin (TL), a protein lectin obtained from Lycopersicum esculentum with specific affinity for poly-N-acetyl lactosamine sugar residues which are found on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm of microglia. Here we describe how to perform this technique on vibratome, frozen, and paraffin sections for optical microscopy, as well as for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Using this methodology it is possible to visualize amoeboid microglia in the developing brain, ramified microglia in the adult, and activated/reactive microglia in the experimentally damaged brain. In addition, as TL also recognized sugar residues in endothelial cells, this technique is very useful for the study of the relationship established between microglia and the CNS vasculature. PMID:23813385

  15. Importance of c-Type cytochromes for U(VI) reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Coppi, Maddalena V; Korenevsky, Anton A; DiDonato, Laurie N; Sullivan, Sara A; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Leang, Ching; Butler, Jessica E; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lovley, Derek R

    2007-01-01

    Background In order to study the mechanism of U(VI) reduction, the effect of deleting c-type cytochrome genes on the capacity of Geobacter sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI) with acetate serving as the electron donor was investigated. Results The ability of several c-type cytochrome deficient mutants to reduce U(VI) was lower than that of the wild type strain. Elimination of two confirmed outer membrane cytochromes and two putative outer membrane cytochromes significantly decreased (ca. 50–60%) the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI). Involvement in U(VI) reduction did not appear to be a general property of outer membrane cytochromes, as elimination of two other confirmed outer membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcC, had very little impact on U(VI) reduction. Among the periplasmic cytochromes, only MacA, proposed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane to the periplasm, appeared to play a significant role in U(VI) reduction. A subpopulation of both wild type and U(VI) reduction-impaired cells, 24–30%, accumulated amorphous uranium in the periplasm. Comparison of uranium-accumulating cells demonstrated a similar amount of periplasmic uranium accumulation in U(VI) reduction-impaired and wild type G. sulfurreducens. Assessment of the ability of the various suspensions to reduce Fe(III) revealed no correlation between the impact of cytochrome deletion on U(VI) reduction and reduction of Fe(III) hydroxide and chelated Fe(III). Conclusion This study indicates that c-type cytochromes are involved in U(VI) reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The data provide new evidence for extracellular uranium reduction by G. sulfurreducens but do not rule out the possibility of periplasmic uranium reduction. Occurrence of U(VI) reduction at the cell surface is supported by the significant impact of elimination of outer membrane cytochromes on U(VI) reduction and the lack of correlation between periplasmic uranium accumulation and the capacity for uranium reduction

  16. Onion-like glycodendrimersomes from sequence-defined Janus glycodendrimers and influence of architecture on reactivity to a lectin

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qi; Zhang, Shaodong; Wang, Zhichun; Sherman, Samuel E.; Moussodia, Ralph-Olivier; Peterca, Mihai; Muncan, Adam; Williams, Dewight R.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Vértesy, Sabine; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Klein, Michael L.; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    A library of eight amphiphilic Janus glycodendrimers (GDs) with d-mannose (Man) headgroups, a known routing signal for lectin-mediated transport processes, was constructed via an iterative modular methodology. Sequence-defined variations of the Janus GD modulate the surface density and sequence of Man after self-assembly into multilamellar glycodendrimersomes (GDSs). The spatial mode of Man presentation is decisive for formation of either unilamellar or onion-like GDS vesicles. Man presentation and Janus GD concentration determine GDS size and number of bilayers. Beyond vesicle architecture, Man topological display affects kinetics and plateau level of GDS aggregation by a tetravalent model lectin: the leguminous agglutinin Con A, which is structurally related to endogenous cargo transporters. The agglutination process was rapid, efficient, and readily reversible for onion-like GDSs, demonstrating their value as versatile tools to explore the nature of physiologically relevant glycan/lectin pairing. PMID:26787853

  17. High-level expression and characterization of a glycosylated human cementum protein 1 with lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Romo-Arévalo, Enrique; Arzate, Higinio; Montoya-Ayala, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to contribute to the knowledge of human cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), its conformational characteristics and influence during the biomineralization process. The results revealed that hrCEMP1 expressed in Pichia pastoris is a 2.4% glycosylated, thermostable protein which possesses a molecular mass of 28,770 Da. The circular dichroism spectrum indicated a secondary structure content of 28.6% of alpha-helix, 9.9% of beta-sheet and 61.5% of random-coil forms. Biological activity assays demonstrated that hrCEMP1 nucleates and regulates hydroxyapatite crystal growth. Hereby, it is demonstrated for the first time that CEMP1 has a (C-type) lectin-like activity and specifically recognizes mannopyranoside. The information produced by this biochemical and structural characterization may contribute to understand more fully the biological functions of CEMP1.

  18. Tracheobronchial epithelium of the sheep: IV. Lectin histochemical characterization of secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mariassy, A T; Plopper, C G; St George, J A; Wilson, D W

    1988-09-01

    Conventional histochemical characterization of the mucus secretory apparatus is often difficult to reconcile with the biochemical analysis of respiratory secretions. This study was designed to examine the secretory glycoconjugates in airways using lectins with biochemically defined affinities for main sugar residues of mucus. We used five biotinylated lectins--DBA (Dolichos biflorus) and SBA (Glycine max) for N-acetyl galactosamine (galNAc), BSA I (Bandeiraea simplicifolia) and PNA (Arachis hypogea) for galactose (gal), and UEA I (Ulex europeus)--for detection of fucose (fuc) in HgCl2-fixed, paraffin-embedded, serially sectioned trachea, lobar and segmental bronchi and bronchioles of nine sheep. Lectins selectively localized the carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, on epithelial cell surfaces, and in secretory cells. In proximal airways, the major carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, cell surfaces, goblet cells, and glands were fuc and gal-NAc. PNA reacted mainly with apical granules of less than 10% of goblet cells, and gal residues were only detected in some of the mucous cells and on basolateral cell surfaces. Distal airways contained sparse secretion in the lumen, mucous cells contained weakly reactive fuc and gal-NAc, and the epithelial surfaces of Clara cells contained gal. Sugars abundant in the airway secretions were also the major component of cells in glands. We conclude that there is a correlation between specific sugar residues in secretory cells, glycocalyx, and luminal secretions in proximal and distal airways. This suggests that lectins may be used to obtain information about airway secretory cell composition from respiratory secretions. PMID:3189886

  19. Tracheobronchial epithelium of the sheep: IV. Lectin histochemical characterization of secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mariassy, A T; Plopper, C G; St George, J A; Wilson, D W

    1988-09-01

    Conventional histochemical characterization of the mucus secretory apparatus is often difficult to reconcile with the biochemical analysis of respiratory secretions. This study was designed to examine the secretory glycoconjugates in airways using lectins with biochemically defined affinities for main sugar residues of mucus. We used five biotinylated lectins--DBA (Dolichos biflorus) and SBA (Glycine max) for N-acetyl galactosamine (galNAc), BSA I (Bandeiraea simplicifolia) and PNA (Arachis hypogea) for galactose (gal), and UEA I (Ulex europeus)--for detection of fucose (fuc) in HgCl2-fixed, paraffin-embedded, serially sectioned trachea, lobar and segmental bronchi and bronchioles of nine sheep. Lectins selectively localized the carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, on epithelial cell surfaces, and in secretory cells. In proximal airways, the major carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, cell surfaces, goblet cells, and glands were fuc and gal-NAc. PNA reacted mainly with apical granules of less than 10% of goblet cells, and gal residues were only detected in some of the mucous cells and on basolateral cell surfaces. Distal airways contained sparse secretion in the lumen, mucous cells contained weakly reactive fuc and gal-NAc, and the epithelial surfaces of Clara cells contained gal. Sugars abundant in the airway secretions were also the major component of cells in glands. We conclude that there is a correlation between specific sugar residues in secretory cells, glycocalyx, and luminal secretions in proximal and distal airways. This suggests that lectins may be used to obtain information about airway secretory cell composition from respiratory secretions.

  20. Lectin specificity and binding characteristics of human C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Köttgen, E; Hell, B; Kage, A; Tauber, R

    1992-07-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is thought to play an important role in immunomodulation. The exact biologic function of this pentraxin protein is, however, still unclear. Here we report experiments designed to further characterize the binding properties of CRP. Using purified human CRP it could be shown that CRP immobilized onto polystyrene surfaces or onto latex beads binds distinct plasma glycoproteins including IgG, asialofetuin, asialo-beta 2-glycoprotein I and, likewise, synthetic glycoproteins as a lectin, exhibiting binding specificity for terminal galactosyl residues of the glycoprotein glycans. Binding of CRP to IgA, IgM, IgG, asialofetuin, asialo-beta 2-glycoprotein I and to synthetic glycoproteins requires immobilization onto surfaces of both CRP and the ligand. Fibronectin and fibrinogen are bound by surface-immobilized CRP also in soluble phase. Comparing various mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as competitive inhibitors of the lectin binding activity of CRP, only beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-D-GalNAc, beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-D-GalNAc, and beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-D-GlcNAc had significant inhibitory power at a concentration of 8 mmol/liter. Binding activity of CRP was pH-dependent with an optimum at pH 5 to 6 and was reduced by 90% when pH was shifted from 6 to the physiologic pH value of 7.4. CRP exhibited lectin-like properties with binding specificity for galactosyl residues also when bound to K-562 erythroleukemia cells. It is therefore suggested that CRP immobilized onto surfaces exhibits lectin activity toward galactosyl groups preferentially in a mildly acidic environment as present at sites of inflammation.

  1. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  2. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-03-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  3. Biosynthesis of the Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) Lectin in Ripening Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1988-03-01

    The biosynthesis and processing of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin were studied in vivo in ripening snowdrop ovaries. Using labeling and pulse chase labeling experiments it could be demonstrated that the snowdrop lectin is synthesized as a precursor of relative molecular weight (M(r)) 15,000 which is posttranslationally converted into the authentic lectin polypeptide of M(r) 13,000 with a half-life of about 6 hours. Gel filtration of an extract of [(3)H]leucine labeled ovaries on Sepharose 4B showed that a significant portion of the newly synthesized lectin is associated with the particulate fraction. When the organellar fraction was fractionated on isopycnic sucrose gradients this lectin banded in the same density region as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker enzyme NADH cytochrome c reductase. Both radioactivity in lectin and in enzyme activity shifted towards a higher density in the presence of 2 millimolar Mg-acetate indicating that the labeled lectin was associated with the rough ER. Labeled lectin could be chased from the ER with a half-life of 4 hours and then accumulated in the soluble fraction. Whereas the ER-associated lectin contains exclusively polypeptides of M(r) 15,000 the soluble fraction contains both precursor molecules and mature lectin polypeptides. The snowdrop lectin in the ER is fully capable of binding immobilized mannose. It is associated into tetramers with an appropriate molecular weight of 60,000. These results indicate that newly synthesized snowdrop lectin is transiently associated with the ER before transport and processing.

  4. Molecular characterization of the reniform nematode C-type lectin gene family reveals a likely role in mitigating environmental stresses during plant parasitism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a damaging semi-endoparasitic pathogen of more than 300 plant species. As a sedentary obligate biotroph, R. reniformis must establish a complex feeding site within the root vasculature that functions as a continuous supply of nutrients. It was re...

  5. Galatrox is a C-type lectin in Bothrops atrox snake venom that selectively binds LacNAc-terminated glycans and can induce acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sartim, Marco A; Riul, Thalita B; Del Cistia-Andrade, Camillo; Stowell, Sean R; Arthur, Connie M; Sorgi, Carlos A; Faccioli, Lucia H; Cummings, Richard D; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Sampaio, Suely V

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that snake venom contains glycan-binding proteins (GBPs), although the binding specificity and biological activities of many of these GBPs is unclear. Here we report our studies on the glycan binding specificity and activities of galatrox, a Bothrops atrox snake venom-derived GBP. Glycan microarray analysis indicates that galatrox binds most strongly to glycans expressing N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc), with a significant preference for Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ over Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ compounds. Galatrox also bound immobilized laminin, a LacNAc-dense extracellular matrix component, suggesting that this GBP can bind LacNAc-bearing glycoproteins. As several endogenous mammalian GBPs utilize a similar binding LacNAc binding preference to regulate neutrophil and monocyte activity, we hypothesized that galatrox may mediate B. atrox toxicity through regulation of leukocyte activity. Indeed, galatrox bound neutrophils and promoted leukocyte chemotaxis in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. Similarly, galatrox administration into the mouse peritoneal cavity induced significant neutrophil migration and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6. Exposure of bone marrow-derived macrophages to galatrox induced generation of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6, TNF-α, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. This signaling by galatrox was mediated via its carbohydrate recognition domain by activation of the TLR4-mediated MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. These results indicate that galatrox has pro-inflammatory activity through its interaction with LacNAc-bearing glycans on neutrophils, macrophages and extracellular matrix proteins and induce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:24973254

  6. Galatrox is a C-type lectin in Bothrops atrox snake venom that selectively binds LacNAc-terminated glycans and can induce acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Riul, Thalita B; Del Cistia-Andrade, Camillo; Stowell, Sean R; Arthur, Connie M; Sorgi, Carlos A; Faccioli, Lucia H; Cummings, Richard D; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Sampaio, Suely V

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that snake venom contains glycan-binding proteins (GBPs), although the binding specificity and biological activities of many of these GBPs is unclear. Here we report our studies on the glycan binding specificity and activities of galatrox, a Bothrops atrox snake venom-derived GBP. Glycan microarray analysis indicates that galatrox binds most strongly to glycans expressing N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc), with a significant preference for Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ over Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ compounds. Galatrox also bound immobilized laminin, a LacNAc-dense extracellular matrix component, suggesting that this GBP can bind LacNAc-bearing glycoproteins. As several endogenous mammalian GBPs utilize a similar binding LacNAc binding preference to regulate neutrophil and monocyte activity, we hypothesized that galatrox may mediate B. atrox toxicity through regulation of leukocyte activity. Indeed, galatrox bound neutrophils and promoted leukocyte chemotaxis in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. Similarly, galatrox administration into the mouse peritoneal cavity induced significant neutrophil migration and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6. Exposure of bone marrow-derived macrophages to galatrox induced generation of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6, TNF-α, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. This signaling by galatrox was mediated via its carbohydrate recognition domain by activation of the TLR4-mediated MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. These results indicate that galatrox has pro-inflammatory activity through its interaction with LacNAc-bearing glycans on neutrophils, macrophages and extracellular matrix proteins and induce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:24973254

  7. The C-Type Lectin OCILRP2 Costimulates EL4 T Cell Activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guangchao; Ma, Yuanfang

    2014-01-01

    OCILRP2 is a typical Type-II transmembrane protein that is selectively expressed in activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and B cells and functions as a novel co-stimulator of T cell activation. However, the signaling pathways underlying OCILRP2 in T cell activation are still not completely understood. In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability and IL-2 production, inhibit Raf1, MAPK3, and MAPK8 activation, and impair NFAT and NF-κB transcriptional activities. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation results indicated that OCILRP2 could interact with the DAP12 protein, an adaptor containing an intracellular ITAM motif that can transduce signals to induce MAP kinase activation for T cell activation. Our data reveal that after binding with DAP12, OCILRP2 activates the Raf-MAP kinase pathways, resulting in T cell activation. PMID:25411776

  8. Agglucetin, a tetrameric C-type lectin-like venom protein, regulates endothelial cell survival and promotes angiogenesis by activating integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.-J.

    2008-05-02

    Agglucetin, a platelet glycoprotein (GP)Ib binding protein from Formosan Agkistrodon acutus (A. acutus) venom, could sustain human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and HUVEC adhering to immobilized agglucetin showed extensive spreading, which was strongly abrogated by integrin antagonists 7E3 and triflavin. Flow cytometric analyses confirmed the expression of GPIb complex on HUVEC is absent and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-agglucetin binds to HUVEC in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Furthermore, native agglucetin specifically and dose-dependently inhibited the binding of FITC-23C6, an anti-{alpha}v{beta}3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not antibodies against {alpha}2 and {alpha}5, toward HUVEC and purified {alpha}v{beta}3 also bound to immobilized agglucetin-{beta} in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, agglucetin exhibited a pro-angiogenic effect in vitro, as well as the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-associated signaling molecules responsible for HUVEC activation were initiated by agglucetin. In conclusion, agglucetin, acting as a survival factor, promotes endothelial adhesion and angiogenesis by triggering {alpha}v{beta}3 signaling through FAK/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway.

  9. Effects of lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificities on hepatoma, choriocarcinoma, melanoma and osteosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B; Ooi, V E; Liu, W K

    2000-03-01

    The effects of lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificities on human hepatoma (H3B), human choriocarcinoma (JAr), mouse melanoma (B16) and rat osteosarcoma (ROS) cell lines were investigated. Cell viability was estimated by uptake of crystal violet. Wheat germ lectin was the lectin with the most deleterious effect on the viability of H3B, JAr and ROS cell lines. The cytotoxicity of lectins with similar sugar-binding specificity to wheat germ lectin, including Maackia amurensis lectin and Solanum tuberosum lectin, was weaker than that of wheat germ lectin. N-acetylgalactosamine-and galactose-binding Tricholoma mongolicum lectin ranked third, after wheat germ lectin and Maackia amurensis lectin, with regard to its effect on H3B, and ranked, together with Maackia amurensis lectin, as the lectins with the second most pronounced effects on ROS. However, the cytotoxic effects of Tricholoma mongolicum lectin on JAr were much weaker than those of Maackia amurensis lectin, Solanum tuberosum lectin and Anguilla anguilla lectin. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin, Lens culinaris lectin and Anguilla anguilla lectin possessed milder cytotoxicity than the remaining lectins. which were approximately equipotent. The mannose-binding Narcissus pseudonarcissus and Lens culinaris lectins were only weakly cytotoxic, the exception being a stronger effect on H3B. The N-acetylgalactosamine-binding Glycine max lectin and methylgalactose-binding Artocarpus integrifolia lectin similarly exhibited low cytotoxicity. It can thus be concluded that in general the ranking was wheat germ lectin > Maackia amurensis lectin approximately Trichloma mongolicum lectins > other aforementioned lectins in cytotoxicity. A particular lectin may manifest more conspicuous toxicity on certain cell lines and less on others.

  10. Assessment of lectin inactivation by heat and digestion.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Grant, G

    1998-01-01

    Proteins/glycoproteins from plants, particularly lectins, are more resistant to heat denaturation than animal proteins (1, 2). With legume seeds, whose lectin content is appreciable, this presents potentially serious problems in nutritional practice. Therefore, before they can be used safely, legume-based food/ feeds usually require thorough and expensive heat processing to inactivate antinutritive components. Indeed, dry or moist heating of seeds at 70°C for several h has little or no effect on their lectin activity (Fig. 1) and treatment at much higher temperatures is needed to inactivate the biological and antinutritional effects of legume lectins (1, 2). The safety aspect is even more serious with some monocot lectins, such as wheatgerm agglutinin or a number of oilseed lectins, such as peanut agglutinin and many others because they are extremely heat stable and normal cooking or other conventional heat treatments may fail to inactivate them (3) Thus, the best way to avoid potential harmful effects of these heat-resistant lectins is to limit their dietary intake to a minimum. Fig. 1. Loss of lectin activity during aqueous heat treatment of soybean at various temperatures. PMID:21374488

  11. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  12. Plant Lectins: Wheat Defense Strategy Against Hessian Fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants produce a variety of defense proteins, including lectins in response to attack by phytophagous insects. Ultrastructural studies reveal that binding to insect gut structures and resistance to proteolytic degradation by insect digestive enzymes are the two main prerequisites for the lectins to...

  13. Combined biochemical and cytological analysis of membrane trafficking using lectins.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gareth W; Kail, Mark; Hollinshead, Michael; Vaux, David J

    2013-10-01

    We have tested the application of high-mannose-binding lectins as analytical reagents to identify N-glycans in the early secretory pathway of HeLa cells during subcellular fractionation and cytochemistry. Post-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) pre-Golgi intermediates were separated from the ER on Nycodenz-sucrose gradients, and the glycan composition of each gradient fraction was profiled using lectin blotting. The fractions containing the post-ER pre-Golgi intermediates are found to contain a subset of N-linked α-mannose glycans that bind the lectins Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) but not lectins binding Golgi-modified glycans. Cytochemical analysis demonstrates that high-mannose-containing glycoproteins are predominantly localized to the ER and the early secretory pathway. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that GNA colocalizes with the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and the COPI coat protein β-COP. In situ competition with concanavalin A (ConA), another high-mannose specific lectin, and subsequent GNA lectin histochemistry refined the localization of N-glyans containing nonreducing mannosyl groups, accentuating the GNA vesicular staining. Using GNA and treatments that perturb ER-Golgi transport, we demonstrate that lectins can be used to detect changes in membrane trafficking pathways histochemically. Overall, we find that conjugated plant lectins are effective tools for combinatory biochemical and cytological analysis of membrane trafficking of glycoproteins.

  14. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  15. Interaction of native and asialo rat sublingual glycoproteins with lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Herp, A; Song, S C; Wu, J H; Chang, K S

    1995-01-01

    The binding properties of the rat sublingual glycoprotein (RSL) and its asialo product with lectins were characterized by quantitative precipitin(QPA) and precipitin inhibition(QPIA) assays. Among twenty lectins tested for QPA, native RSL reacted well only with Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin), but weakly or not at all with the other lectins. However, its asialo product (asialo-RSL) reacted strongly with many Gal and GalNAc specific lectins-it bound best to three of the GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and/or Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc (II) active lectins [jacalin, Wistaria floribunda and Ricinus communis agglutinins] and completely precipitated each of these three lectins. Asialo-RSL also reacted well with Abrus precatorius, Glycine max, Bauhinia purpurea alba, and Maclura pomifera agglutinins, and abrin-a, but not with Arachis hypogeae and Dolichos biflorus agglutinins. The interaction between asialo-RSL and lectins were inhibited by either Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc, p-NO2-phenyl alpha-GalNAc or both. The mapping of the precipitation and inhibition profiles leads to the conclusion that the asialo rat sublingual glycoprotein provides important ligands for II (Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->) and Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr) active lectins.

  16. Entamoeba histolytica: expression and localization of Gal/GalNAc lectin in virulent and non-virulent variants from HM1:IMSS strain.

    PubMed

    López-Vancell, R; Arreguín Espinosa, R; González-Canto, A; Néquiz Avendaño, M; García de León, M C; Olivos-García, A; López-Vancell, D; Pérez-Tamayo, R

    2010-07-01

    We have purified Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica by electroelution. The purified protein was used to immunize rabbits and obtain polyclonal IgG's anti-lectin. These antibodies were used as tools to analyze the expression and localization of the amoebic lectin in both virulent (vEh) and non-virulent (nvEh) variants of axenically cultured HM1:IMSS strain. vEh is able to induce liver abscesses in hamsters, whereas nvEh has lost this ability. In vitro, amoebic trophozoites from both variants equally express this protein as shown by densitometric analysis of the corresponding band in Western blots from lysates. In both types of trophozoites, the pattern of distribution of the lectin was mainly on the surface. We have also compared by immunohistochemistry the presence and distribution of lectin in the in vivo liver lesions produced in hamsters. In order to prolong the survival of nvEh to analyze both variants in an in vivo model, hamsters inoculated with nvEh were treated with methyl prednisolone. Our results suggest that the Gal/GalNAc lectin is equally expressed in both nvEh and vEh.

  17. Two Chitotriose-Specific Lectins Show Anti-Angiogenesis, Induces Caspase-9-Mediated Apoptosis and Early Arrest of Pancreatic Tumor Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Dhiman; Suresh, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative activity of two chito- specific agglutinins purified from Benincasa hispida (BhL) and Datura innoxia (DiL9) of different plant family origin was investigated on various cancer cell lines. Both lectins showed chitotriose specificity, by inhibiting lectin hemagglutinating activity. On further studies, it was revealed that these agglutinins caused remarkable concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic cancerous cells but not on the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells even at higher doses determined using MTT assay. The GI50 values were approximately 8.4 μg ml-1 (0.247 μM) and 142 μg ml-1(14.8 μM) for BhL and DiL9, respectively, against PANC-1 cells. The growth inhibitory effect of these lectins on pancreatic cancer cells were shown to be a consequence of lectin cell surface binding and triggering G0/G1 arrest, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, sustained increase of the intracellular calcium release and the apoptotic signal is amplified by activation of caspases executing cell death. Interestingly, these lectins also showed anti-angiogenic activity by disrupting the endothelial tubulogenesis. Therefore, we report for the first time two chito-specific lectins specifically binding to tumor glycans; they can be considered to be a class of molecules with antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer cells mediated through caspase dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26795117

  18. Two Chitotriose-Specific Lectins Show Anti-Angiogenesis, Induces Caspase-9-Mediated Apoptosis and Early Arrest of Pancreatic Tumor Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruby; Nawale, Laxman; Sarkar, Dhiman; Suresh, C G

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative activity of two chito-specific agglutinins purified from Benincasa hispida (BhL) and Datura innoxia (DiL9) of different plant family origin was investigated on various cancer cell lines. Both lectins showed chitotriose specificity, by inhibiting lectin hemagglutinating activity. On further studies, it was revealed that these agglutinins caused remarkable concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic cancerous cells but not on the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells even at higher doses determined using MTT assay. The GI50 values were approximately 8.4 μg ml(-1) (0.247 μM) and 142 μg ml(-1) (14.8 μM) for BhL and DiL9, respectively, against PANC-1 cells. The growth inhibitory effect of these lectins on pancreatic cancer cells were shown to be a consequence of lectin cell surface binding and triggering G0/G1 arrest, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, sustained increase of the intracellular calcium release and the apoptotic signal is amplified by activation of caspases executing cell death. Interestingly, these lectins also showed anti-angiogenic activity by disrupting the endothelial tubulogenesis. Therefore, we report for the first time two chito-specific lectins specifically binding to tumor glycans; they can be considered to be a class of molecules with antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer cells mediated through caspase dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26795117

  19. Biotoxicity assays for fruiting body lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Garbani, Mattia; Lüthy, Peter; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a specific class of fungal lectins, commonly referred to as fruiting body lectins, play a role as effector molecules in the defense of fungi against predators and parasites. Hallmarks of these fungal lectins are their specific expression in reproductive structures, fruiting bodies, and/or sclerotia and their synthesis on free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Fruiting body lectins are released upon damage of the fungal cell and bind to specific carbohydrate structures of predators and parasites, which leads to deterrence, inhibition of growth, and development or even killing of these organisms. Here, we describe assays to assess the toxicity of such lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins toward three different model organisms: the insect Aedes aegypti, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. All three assays are based on heterologous expression of the examined proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and feeding of these recombinant bacteria to omnivorous and bacterivorous organisms. PMID:20816208

  20. Mitogenic effect of Parkia speciosa seed lectin on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Suvachittanont, W; Jaranchavanapet, P

    2000-12-01

    Mitogenic activity of a lectin, purified from Parkia speciosa seeds, on the isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from normal blood donors and patients with esophageal carcinoma was examined using [3H]thymidine incorporation. The lectin increases the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA of human lymphocytes. The activity of the lectin increased as its concentration was increased and then declined once the concentration passed an optimum point. The stimulant effect was also expressed using a proliferation index (PI): the ratio of [3H]thymidine incorporated into lymphocytes in the presence and absence of the lectin. The mitogenic activity of the lectin is comparable to those of the known T-cell mitogens, such as concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen. Only slightly less responsiveness was observed in the case of lymphocytes from esophageal cancer compared to lymphocytes from normal donors. PMID:11199124

  1. Two-dimensional photonic crystal sensors for visual detection of lectin concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Cai, Zhongyu; Kwak, Daniel H; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2014-09-16

    We fabricated a two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal lectin sensing material that utilizes light diffraction from a 2-D colloidal array attached to the surface of a hydrogel that contains mannose carbohydrate groups. Lectin-carbohydrate interactions create hydrogel cross-links that shrink the hydrogel volume and decrease the 2-D particle spacing. This mannose containing 2-D photonic crystal sensor detects Concanavalin A (Con A) through shifts in the 2-D diffraction wavelength. Con A concentrations can be determined by measuring the diffracted wavelength or visually determined from the change in the sensor diffraction color. The concentrations are easily monitored by measuring the 2-D array Debye ring diameter. Our observed detection limit for Con A is 0.02 mg/mL (0.7 μM). The 2-D photonic crystal sensors are completely reversible and can monitor Con A solution concentration changes. PMID:25162117

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations and MM-PBSA calculations of the lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Yizheng

    2009-12-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), a mannose-specific lectin from snowdrop bulbs, is a member of the monocot mannose-specific lectin family and exhibits antiviral activity toward HIV. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study the interaction between GNA and its carbohydrate ligand over a specific time span. By analysis of the secondary structures, it was observed that the GNA conformation maintains rather stable along the trajectories and the high fluctuations were only centered on the carbohydrate recognition domains. Our MD simulations also reproduced most of the hydrogen bonds observed in the x-ray crystal structure. Furthermore, the obtained MD trajectories were used to estimate the binding free energy of the complex using the molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. It was revealed by the inspection of the binding free energy components that the major contributions to the complex stability arose from electrostatic interactions.

  3. Binding of isolated plant lectin by rhizobia during episodes of reduced gravity obtained by parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. L.; Green, P. D.; Wong, P. P.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Development of a legume root nodule is a complex process culminating in a plant/bacterial symbiosis possessing the capacity for biological dinitrogen fixation. Formation of root nodules is initiated by the binding and stabilization of rhizobia to plant root hairs, mediated in part by a receptor/ligand recognition system composed of lectins on the plant root surface and lectin-binding sites on the rhizobial cell surface. The dinitrogen fixation activity of these root nodules may be an important feature of enclosed, space-based life support systems, and may provide an ecological method to recycle nitrogen for amino acid production. However, the effects on nodule development of varied gravitational fields, or of root nutrient delivery hardware, remain unknown. We have investigated the effects of microgravity on root nodule formation, with preliminary experiments focused upon the receptor/ligand component. Microgravity, obtained during parabolic flight aboard NASA 930, has no apparent effect on the binding of purified lectin to rhizobia, a result that will facilitate forthcoming experiments using intact root tissues.

  4. Analysis of the Glycoproteome of Toxoplasma gondii using Lectin Affinity Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qilie; Upadhya, Rajendra; Zhang, Hong; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Nieves, Edward; Kim, Kami; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Weiss, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Glycoproteins are involved in many important molecular recognition processes including invasion, adhesion, differentiation, and development. To identify the glycoproteins of Toxoplasma gondii, a proteomic analysis was undertaken. T. gondii proteins were prepared and fractioned using lectin affinity chromatography. The proteins in each fraction were then separated using SDS-PAGE and identified by tryptic in gel digestion followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Utilizing these methods 132 proteins were identified. Among the identified proteins were 17 surface proteins, 9 microneme proteins, 15 rhoptry proteins, 11 heat shock proteins (HSP), and 32 hypothetical proteins. Several proteins had 1 to 5 transmembrane domains (TMD) with some being as large as 608.3 kDa. Both lectin-fluorescence labeling and lectin blotting were employed to confirm the presence of carbohydrates on the surface or cytoplasm of T. gondii parasites. PCR demonstrated that selected hypothetical proteins were expressed in T. gondii tachyzoites. This is data provides a large scale analysis of the T. gondii glycoproteome. Studies of the function of glycosylation of these proteins may help elucidate mechanism(s) involved in invasion improving drug therapy as well as identify glycoproteins that may prove to be useful as vaccine candidates. PMID:21920448

  5. Nutritional evaluation of lectin-free soybeans for poultry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, M W; Parsons, C M; Hymowitz, T

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the nutritional value of raw lectin-free soybeans in comparison with raw Kunitz trypsin inhibitor-free soybeans, raw conventional soybeans, and commercial heat processed soybean meal (SBM). Analyzed lectin values (milligrams per kilogram) were 7.2, 7.1, and < 0.00015 for the Kunitz-free, conventional, and lectin-free soybeans, respectively. Three experiments were conducted using New Hampshire x Columbian male chicks fed 23% CP dextrose-soybean diets from 8 to 17 d of age. Growth performance of chicks fed lectin-free soybeans was greater (P < 0.05) than that of chicks fed raw conventional soybeans in all three experiments. However, performance of chicks fed lectin-free soybeans was lower than that of chicks fed Kunitz-free soybeans or SBM. The SBM yielded weight gains and feed efficiencies that were much higher than those observed from any of the raw soybeans. True amino acid digestibility and TMEn of the lectin-free and conventional soybeans were determined using the precision-fed cecectomized rooster assay. Seven roosters were crop-intubated with 30 g of soybeans and excreta were collected for 48 h. Digestibility coefficients of most amino acids for lectin-free soybeans were 5 to 8 percentage units higher than those for conventional soybeans, but the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). Likewise, the TMEn for lectin-free soybeans was 11% higher than that for raw conventional soybeans (3.577 vs 3.227 kcal/g DM) but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that the nutritional value of raw lectin-free soybeans is greater than raw conventional soybeans but is less than raw Kunitz-free soybeans and SBM, suggesting that trypsin inhibitor is a greater antinutritional factor than lectins. PMID:10023754

  6. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age. PMID:27237111

  7. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  8. Differing Lectin Binding Profiles among Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Derivatives Aid in the Isolation of Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Mahesh C.; Young, Amber; Venable, Alison; Hasneen, Kowser; Rao, Raj R.; Machacek, David W.; Stice, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and their differentiated progeny allow for investigation of important changes/events during normal embryonic development. Currently most of the research is focused on proteinacous changes occurring as a result of differentiation of stem cells and little is known about changes in cell surface glycosylation patterns. Identification of cell lineage specific glycans can help in understanding their role in maintenance, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, these glycans can serve as markers for isolation of homogenous populations of cells. Using a panel of eight biotinylated lectins, the glycan expression of hESCs, hESCs-derived human neural progenitors (hNP) cells, and hESCs-derived mesenchymal progenitor (hMP) cells was investigated. Our goal was to identify glycans that are unique for hNP cells and use the corresponding lectins for cell isolation. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry were used to determine expression and localization of glycans, respectively, in each cell type. These results show that the glycan expression changes upon differentiation of hESCs and is different for neural and mesenchymal lineage. For example, binding of PHA-L lectin is low in hESCs (14±4.4%) but significantly higher in differentiated hNP cells (99±0.4%) and hMP cells (90±3%). Three lectins: VVA, DBA and LTL have low binding in hESCs and hMP cells, but significantly higher binding in hNP cells. Finally, VVA lectin binding was used to isolate hNP cells from a mixed population of hESCs, hNP cells and hMP cells. This is the first report that compares glycan expression across these human stem cell lineages and identifies significant differences. Also, this is the first study that uses VVA lectin for isolation for human neural progenitor cells. PMID:21850265

  9. Structures of two lectins from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tomomi; Hayashida, Minoru; Hamasu, Mika; Ishiguro, Masatsune; Hata, Yasuo

    2004-04-01

    Pokeweed lectin (PL), a lectin specific for N-acetylglucosamine-containing saccharides, stimulates peripheral lymphocytes to undergo mitosis by binding to their cell surfaces. Four types of lectins have been isolated from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) and shown to contain homologous domains but to have different molecular sizes and biological properties. PL-D, the smallest lectin in the group, has two isolectins, PL-D1 and PL-D2. PL-D1 consists of 84 amino-acid residues, while PL-D2 is identical to PL-D1 in sequence except for the lack of two C-terminal residues, Leu83 and Thr84. The crystal structures of PL-D1 and PL-D2 were solved by the molecular-replacement method and refined to 1.65 and 1.5 A resolution with R factors of 17.2 and 17.6%, respectively. The PL-Ds are composed of two repetitive chitin-binding domains, each of which has four S-S bridges and one putative carbohydrate-binding site. The two carbohydrate-binding sites in PL-D are located on one side of the molecule. The relative orientation of the two domains in PL-D1 differs from that in PL-D2. Two C-terminal residues of PL-D1 are invisible in the present crystal structure, indicating the flexibility of the region. PL-D2 has a Ca2+ ion bound to the C-terminus on the molecular surface. A wide distribution of acidic residues is characteristically observed on one side of the C-terminal region of PL-D.

  10. Lectin binding pattern of gastric mucosa of pacific white-sided dolphin, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Doihara, Takuya; Makara, Manami; Miyawaki, Kyoji; Nabeka, Hiroaki; Wakisaka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Naoto; Matsuda, Seiji

    2012-02-01

    The stomach of the Pacific white-sided dolphin is divided into three parts: forestomach, proper gastric gland portion, and pyloric chamber. The histological features of the dolphin stomach are similar to those of terrestrial mammal stomachs, although the distribution of glycoconjugates in mucosal cells of the dolphin stomach is unknown. To learn about glycoconjugates in cetacean gastric mucosa, the glycoconjugate distribution in the mucous epithelium of the Pacific white-sided dolphin was studied using 21 lectins. Among the lectins tested, GSL-I and DBA specifically labelled the superficial layer of the forestomach epithelium. GSL-I, SBA, RCA-I, VVA, GSL-II, DSL, LEL, STL, s-WGA, WGA, PNA, and Jacalin labelled the luminal surface of the chief cells in the proper gastric gland. GSL-I, SBA, RCA-I, DSL, LEL, STL, s-WGA, PNA, and LCA labelled tubular structures in the cytoplasm of parietal cells. The surface portion of the pits in the pyloric chamber strongly reacted with RCA-I, GSL-II, WGA, PNA, LCA, PHA-L, and UEA-I, whereas the neck portion reacted weakly. Although lining one tubular portion, individual secretory cells in the pyloric gland displayed a heterogeneous reaction. This is the first report on the lectin histochemistry of a cetacean stomach and reveals GSL-I and DBA as specific marker lectins for the cornified stratified squamous epithelium cells of the Pacific white-sided dolphin. The stomachs of cetaceans and terrestrial mammals have similar histological features and mucous glycoconjugate content.

  11. Lectin binding pattern of gastric mucosa of pacific white-sided dolphin, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Doihara, Takuya; Makara, Manami; Miyawaki, Kyoji; Nabeka, Hiroaki; Wakisaka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Naoto; Matsuda, Seiji

    2012-02-01

    The stomach of the Pacific white-sided dolphin is divided into three parts: forestomach, proper gastric gland portion, and pyloric chamber. The histological features of the dolphin stomach are similar to those of terrestrial mammal stomachs, although the distribution of glycoconjugates in mucosal cells of the dolphin stomach is unknown. To learn about glycoconjugates in cetacean gastric mucosa, the glycoconjugate distribution in the mucous epithelium of the Pacific white-sided dolphin was studied using 21 lectins. Among the lectins tested, GSL-I and DBA specifically labelled the superficial layer of the forestomach epithelium. GSL-I, SBA, RCA-I, VVA, GSL-II, DSL, LEL, STL, s-WGA, WGA, PNA, and Jacalin labelled the luminal surface of the chief cells in the proper gastric gland. GSL-I, SBA, RCA-I, DSL, LEL, STL, s-WGA, PNA, and LCA labelled tubular structures in the cytoplasm of parietal cells. The surface portion of the pits in the pyloric chamber strongly reacted with RCA-I, GSL-II, WGA, PNA, LCA, PHA-L, and UEA-I, whereas the neck portion reacted weakly. Although lining one tubular portion, individual secretory cells in the pyloric gland displayed a heterogeneous reaction. This is the first report on the lectin histochemistry of a cetacean stomach and reveals GSL-I and DBA as specific marker lectins for the cornified stratified squamous epithelium cells of the Pacific white-sided dolphin. The stomachs of cetaceans and terrestrial mammals have similar histological features and mucous glycoconjugate content. PMID:21952399

  12. Surface Glycosylation Profiles of Urine Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Jared Q.; Krüger, Anja; Gallogly, Susan; Hanley, Shirley A.; Hogan, Marie C.; Ward, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications. PMID:24069349

  13. Noncovalent PEGylation via Lectin-Glycopolymer Interactions.

    PubMed

    Antonik, Paweł M; Eissa, Ahmed M; Round, Adam R; Cameron, Neil R; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    PEGylation, the covalent modification of proteins with polyethylene glycol, is an abundantly used technique to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic proteins. The drawback with this methodology is that the covalently attached PEG can impede the biological activity (e.g., reduced receptor-binding capacity). Protein therapeutics with "disposable" PEG modifiers have potential advantages over the current technology. Here, we show that a protein-polymer "Medusa complex" is formed by the combination of a hexavalent lectin with a glycopolymer. Using NMR spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), size exclusion chromatography, and native gel electrophoresis it was demonstrated that the fucose-binding lectin RSL and a fucose-capped polyethylene glycol (Fuc-PEG) form a multimeric assembly. All of the experimental methods provided evidence of noncovalent PEGylation with a concomitant increase in molecular mass and hydrodynamic radius. The affinity of the protein-polymer complex was determined by ITC and competition experiments to be in the micromolar range, suggesting that such systems have potential biomedical applications. PMID:27403588

  14. Cloning and characterization of root-specific barley lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, D.R.; Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNa library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A{sup +}) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A{sup +}) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site.

  15. Potential immunomodulatory effects of plant lectins in Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Reis, Eliana A G; Athanazio, Daniel A; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; de Paulo Teixeira Pinto, Vicente; Carmo, Theomira M A; Reis, Alice; Trocolli, Graziela; Croda, Julio; Harn, Donald; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Reis, Mitermayer G

    2008-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding glycoproteins that can stimulate, in a non-antigen-specific fashion, lymphocytes, leading to proliferation and cytokine production. Some lectins are utilized as in vitro mitogenic lymphocyte stimulators and their use as immunomodulators against infectious diseases has been evaluated experimentally. In the experimental murine model, the immune response to schistosomiasis is Th1-like during the initial stage of infection, with a shift towards a Th2-like response after oviposition. We report the response of schistosomiasis patients' (n=37) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to stimulation by lectins, including newly isolated lectins from Brazilian flora, and by Schistosomamansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA). Cytokine production upon lectin stimulation ex vivo was assessed in PBMC supernatants, collected at 24 and 72 h, by sandwich ELISA to IL-5, IL-10, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In PBMC from infected patients all but one of the lectins induced a Th2-like cytokine response, characterized by elevated IL-5 production that was higher than that induced by SEA stimulation alone. Our results show that the Th2 environment present during schistosomiasis is not affected and that it may be further stimulated by the presence of lectins. PMID:18579103

  16. The insecticidal activity of recombinant garlic lectins towards aphids.

    PubMed

    Fitches, Elaine; Wiles, Duncan; Douglas, Angela E; Hinchliffe, Gareth; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-10-01

    The heterodimeric and homodimeric garlic lectins ASAI and ASAII were produced as recombinant proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The proteins were purified as functional dimeric lectins, but underwent post-translational proteolysis. Recombinant ASAII was a single homogenous polypeptide which had undergone C-terminal processing similar to that occurring in planta. The recombinant ASAI was glycosylated and subject to variable and heterogenous proteolysis. Both lectins showed insecticidal effects when fed to pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) in artificial diet, ASAII being more toxic than ASAI at the same concentration. Acute toxicity (mortality at < or =48 h exposure; similar timescale to starvation) was only apparent at the highest lectin concentrations tested (2.0 mg ml(-)1), but dose-dependent chronic toxicity (mortality at >3d exposure) was observed over the concentration range 0.125-2.0 mg ml(-1). The recombinant lectins caused mortality in both symbiotic and antibiotic-treated aphids, showing that toxicity is not dependent on the presence of the bacterial symbiont (Buchnera aphidicola), or on interaction with symbiont proteins, such as the previously identified lectin "receptor" symbionin. A pull-down assay coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting identified two abundant membrane-associated aphid gut proteins, alanyl aminopeptidase N and sucrase, as "receptors" for lectin binding. PMID:18707000

  17. Isolation and characterization of a lectin from Japanese mottled beans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Ahmad, Ameer Maqsood; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-07-01

    A 64-kDa dimeric lectin was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Japanese mottled beans. The purification protocol involved ion exchange chromatography with Q-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose and size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was adsorbed on both Q-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose columns. Finally, the lectin gave a sharp absorbance peak which corresponded to 64 kDa based on results of size exclusion chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulphate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis displayed a single band at around 32 kDa, indicating that the protein was dimeric. The hemagglutination inhibition assay indicated that the lectin showed specificity toward galactose. The lectin preserved hemagglutinating activity below 70 °C and at a pH range 3 - 12. The lectin was able to inhibit proliferation of MCF-7 cells and Hep G2 cells and possessed antifungal activity toward Mycosphaeralla arachidicola with an IC50 value of 3.9 µM. The activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was reduced by 61.9 % in the presence of the lectin at 6.25 µM concentration. PMID:24654854

  18. New sensitive detection method for lectin hemagglutination using microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adamová, Lenka; Malinovská, Lenka; Wimmerová, Michaela

    2014-10-01

    The blood group system AB0 is determined by the composition of terminal oligosaccharides on red blood cells. Thanks to this structural feature, these groups can be recognized by saccharide-recognizing compounds. Lectins are proteins that are able to reversibly bind saccharide structures. They generally occur as multimers and are known as hemagglutination agents. Hemagglutination is a process in which blood cells are cross-linked via multivalent molecules. Apart from lectins, hemagglutination can also be caused by antibodies or viruses. A hemagglutination assay is commonly used for the detection of multivalent molecules that recognize blood cells, in order to search for their sugar specificity. It is traditionally performed on a microtiter plate, where the lectin solution is serially diluted and the lowest concentration of lectin causing agglutination is detected. This experimental set-up is utilized further for testing lectin specificity via a hemagglutination inhibition assay. We have developed a new way of detecting hemagglutination using microscopy, which was tested on purified lectins as well as cell lysates. Hemagglutination was performed on a microscope slide directly and detected using a microscope. Comparison with the standard hemagglutination assay using microtiter plates revealed that microscopic approach is faster and more robust and allows fast determination of lectin activities immediately in bacterial cytosols.

  19. Intrinsic fluorescence studies on saccharide binding to Artocarpus integrifolia lectin.

    PubMed

    Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1986-10-01

    The combining region of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin has been studied by using the ligand-induced changes in the fluorescence of the lectin. The saccharide binding properties of the lectin show that C-1, C-2, C-4, and C-6 hydroxyl groups of D-galactose are important loci for sugar binding. The alpha-anomer of galactose binds more strongly than its beta-counterpart. Inversion in the configuration at C-4 as in glucose results in a loss of binding to the lectin. The C-6 hydroxyl group is also presumably involved in binding as D-fucose does not bind to the lectin. The lectin binds to the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (Gal beta(1----3)GalNAc) more strongly than the other disaccharides studied, viz. Gal beta (1----4) Gal and Gal beta (1----3) GlcNAc, which are topographically similar to T-antigen. This observation suggests that the combining region of Artocarpus lectin is complementary to that of T-antigen. Solvent accessibility of the protein fluorophores have been probed by the quenching of protein fluorescence by Iodide ion in the absence and presence of sugar. In the presence of sugar a slight inaccessibility of the fluorophores to the solvent has been observed.

  20. Multiple lectin detection by cell membrane affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana; Catarino, Sofia; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida

    2012-05-01

    Assuming that lectins evolved to recognise relatively complex and branched oligosaccharides or parts of them, rather than simple sugars, a procedure based on lectin affinity binding to isolated erythrocyte (or any other cell type) membranes is proposed. This methodology was validated using six pure commercial lectins, as well as lectins from total protein extracts of Arbutus unedo leaves. All commercial lectins, as well as five polypeptides from A. unedo leaves bound to the glycosylated membrane receptors and were eluted by the corresponding sugars. When compared to the standard affinity chromatography procedure involving an individual sugar bound to a solid matrix, the new method provides a single-step, effective detection method for lectins and allows the rapid screening of their profile present in any unknown protein solution, indicates their biological carbohydrate affinities as well as their sugar specificities (if any), enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples, does not require any pre-purification steps, permits detection of additional lectins and provides data which are more relevant from the physiological point of view. PMID:22381939

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptors on PC12 cells: alteration of binding properties by lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Shooter, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    The PC12 cell line displays cell surface receptors for both nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). It has been previously shown that the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) alters the properties of NGF receptors on these cells. We now report that preincubations with either WGA or concanavalin A (Con A) decrease the binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to PC12 cells by greater than 50%. The inhibition of binding occurred at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C and could be blocked or reversed by the addition of sugars which bind specifically to WGA or Con A. Scatchard analysis revealed that these lectins decreased binding primarily by lowering the affinity of the receptor and to a lesser extent by decreasing receptor number. Succinylation of Con A (sCon A) produced a derivative that was less effective than the native lectin in decreasing EGF binding; however, addition of an antibody against Con A restored the ability of sCon A to decrease binding. Similar to results obtained with /sup 125/I-NGF binding, WGA but not Con A was found to increase, by severalfold, the proportion of /sup 125/I-EGF binding that is resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 detergent. A potential association of the EGF receptor with cytoskeletal elements is discussed which could account for such results.

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates thrombomodulin lectin-like domain shedding in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Hualin; Lin ChiIou; Huang Yuanli; Chen, Pin-Shern; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Shing; Wu, G.C.-C.; Shi, G.-Y.; Yang, H.-Y.; Lee Hsinyu

    2008-02-29

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anticoagulant glycoprotein highly expressed on endothelial cell surfaces. Increased levels of soluble TM in circulation have been widely accepted as an indicator of endothelial damage or dysfunction. Previous studies indicated that various proinflammatory factors stimulate TM shedding in various cell types such as smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator present in biological fluids during endothelial damage or injury. In the present study, we first observed that LPA triggered TM shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By Cyflow analysis, we showed that the LPA-induced accessibility of antibodies to the endothelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain of TM is independent of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), while LPA-induced TM lectin-like domain shedding is MMP-dependent. Furthermore, a stable cell line expressing TM without its lectin-like domain exhibited a higher cell proliferation rate than a stable cell line expressing full-length TM. These results imply that LPA induces TM lectin-like domain shedding, which might contribute to the exposure of its EGF-like domain for EGF receptor (EGFR) binding, thereby stimulating subsequent cell proliferation. Based on our findings, we propose a novel mechanism for the exposure of TM EGF-like domain, which possibly mediates LPA-induced EGFR transactivation.

  3. Development of supermacroporous monolithic adsorbents for purifying lectins by affinity with sugars.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gabriel Ramos Ferreira; Gandolfi, Olga Reinert Ramos; Santos, Carilan Moreira Souza; Bonomo, Renata Cristina Ferreira; Veloso, Cristiane Martins; Fontan, Rafael da Costa Ilhéu

    2016-10-15

    Affinity techniques are frequently used to purify biocompounds, because of specific interactions observed in many cases. One example are the lectins, proteins connected in a reversible manner and specific to carbohydrates or sugar-containing molecules. Four different methods were investigated (epoxy, Schiff base, glutaraldehyde and ethylenediamine) to immobilize the carbohydrate N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (d-GlcNAc) on the surface of supermacroporous cryogels made for lectin purification. The glutaraldehyde method presented the highest immobilization capacity of d-GlcNAc (147.77mg/g), while the ethylenediamine method presented the lowest capacity (32.47mg/g). FTIR spectra analysis confirmed the presence of the immobilized carbohydrate. The cryogels containing d-GlcNAc immobilized by the different methods were characterized in terms of swelling capacity, degree of expansion, porosity and constituent fractions. Results showed that the activation methods did not affect the macroporous structure. Images obtained from scanning electron microscopy evidenced the presence of interconnected macropores in the structure of the cryogels produced. The cryogels presented even lower flow resistance in the permeability analysis. Finally, the cryogel modified by the glutaraldehyde method was used in the Concanavalin A lectin adsorption process, presenting an adsorptive capacity of 44.49mg/g and high stability after five cycles of use. PMID:27643576

  4. Mannose-binding lectin: targeting the microbial world for complement attack and opsonophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jack, D L; Klein, N J; Turner, M W

    2001-04-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important constituent of the innate immune system. This protein binds through multiple lectin domains to the repeating sugar arrays that decorate many microbial surfaces, and is then able to activate the complement system through a specific protease called MBL-associated protease-2. We have used flow cytometry to study both the binding of MBL to microorganisms and the subsequent activation of complement. For selected Gram-negative organisms, such as Salmonella and Neisseria, we have examined the relative roles of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and capsule in determining binding and conclude that the LPS is of major importance. Our results from studies with several clinically relevant organisms also show that MBL binding detected by flow cytometry leads to measurable activation of purified C4, suggesting that the bound lectin is capable of initiating opsonophagocytosis and/or bacterial lysis. There is an increasing literature suggesting that MBL deficiency, which mainly results from three relatively common single point mutations in exon 1 of the gene, predisposes both to infection by extracellular pathogens and to autoimmune disease. In addition, the protein also modulates disease severity, at least in part through a complex, dose-dependent influence on cytokine production. The mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in such processes remain to be elucidated. PMID:11414367

  5. Synthesis and non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes rings: new nanomaterials with lectin affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Pernía Leal, Manuel; Fernández, Inmaculada; Khiar, Noureddine

    2013-03-01

    We present a mild and practical carbon nanotubes rings (CNRs) synthesis from non-covalent functionalized and water-soluble linear single-wall carbon nanotubes. The hemi-micellar-supramolecular self-organization of lactose-based glycolipid 1 on the ring surface, followed by photo-polymerization of the diacetylenic function triggered by UV light afforded the first water-soluble and biocompatible CNRs. The obtained donut-like nanoconstructs expose a high density of lactose moieties on their surface, and are able to engage specific interactions with Arachis hypogea lectin similar to glycoconjugates on the cell membrane.

  6. In vivo biosynthetic studies of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.M.; Etzler, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The in vivo biosynthesis of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin was studied by pulse-chase labeling experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine. These studies demonstrate that each of the two mature lectin subunit types are derived by the processing of separate glycosylated precursors. The appearance of the precursor to subunit I before the precursor to subunit II supports the possibility raised by previous studies that both subunit types of this lectin may originate from a single gene product.

  7. The gene for stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin) encodes both a lectin and a chitinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, D R; Raikhel, N V

    1992-06-01

    Chitin-binding proteins are present in a wide range of plant species, including both monocots and dicots, even though these plants contain no chitin. To investigate the relationship between in vitro antifungal and insecticidal activities of chitin-binding proteins and their unknown endogenous functions, the stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin, UDA) cDNA was cloned using a synthetic gene as the probe. The nettle lectin cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding 374 amino acids. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed a 21-amino acid putative signal sequence and the 86 amino acids encoding the two chitin-binding domains of nettle lectin. These domains were fused to a 19-amino acid "spacer" domain and a 244-amino acid carboxyl extension with partial identity to a chitinase catalytic domain. The authenticity of the cDNA clone was confirmed by deduced amino acid sequence identity with sequence data obtained from tryptic digests, RNA gel blot, and polymerase chain reaction analyses. RNA gel blot analysis also showed the nettle lectin message was present primarily in rhizomes and inflorescence (with immature seeds) but not in leaves or stems. Chitinase enzymatic activity was found when the chitinase-like domain alone or the chitinase-like domain with the chitin-binding domains were expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first example of a chitin-binding protein with both a duplication of the 43-amino acid chitin-binding domain and a fusion of the chitin-binding domains to a structurally unrelated domain, the chitinase domain. PMID:1375935

  8. The peanut lectin-binding glycoproteins of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, A.I. ); Keeble, S.; Watt, F.M. )

    1988-08-01

    The peanut lectin (PNA) is known to bind more strongly to keratinocytes that are undergoing terminal differentiation than to proliferating keratinocytes. In order to investigate the significance of this change in cell-surface carbohydrate authors have identified the PNA-binding glycoproteins of cultured human keratinocytes and antibodies against them. Two heavily glycosylated bands of 110 and 250 kDa were resolved by PAGE of ({sup 14}C)galactose- or ({sup 14}C)mannose- and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine-labeled cell extracts eluted with galactose from PNA affinity columns. The higher molecular weight band was also detected on PNA blots of unlabeled cell extracts transferred to nitrocellulose. Both bands were sensitive to pronase digestion, but only the 250-kDa band was digested with trypsin. A rabbit antiserum that we prepared (anti-PNA-gp) immunoprecipitated both bands from cell extracts. In contrast to PNA, anti-PNA-gp bound equally to proliferating and terminally differentiating cells, indicating that some epitope(s) of the PNA-binding glycoproteins is present on the cell surface prior to terminal differentiation. When keratinocytes grown as a monolayer in low-calcium medium were switched to medium containing 2 mM calcium ions in order to induce desmosome formation and stratification, there was a dramatic redistribution of the PNA-binding glycoproteins, which became concentrated at the boundaries between cells. This may suggest a role for the glycoproteins in cell-cell interactions during stratification.

  9. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-07-01

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well-studied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  10. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-06-24

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  11. Fine specificities of two lectins from Cymbosema roseum seeds: a lectin specific for high-mannose oligosaccharides and a lectin specific for blood group H type II trisaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Cavada, Benildo S; Nagano, Celso S; Rocha, Bruno Am; Benevides, Raquel G; Nascimento, Kyria S; de Sousa, Luiz Ag; Oscarson, Stefan; Brewer, C Fred

    2011-07-01

    The legume species of Cymbosema roseum of Diocleinae subtribe produce at least two different seed lectins. The present study demonstrates that C. roseum lectin I (CRL I) binds with high affinity to the "core" trimannoside of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cymbosema roseum lectin II (CRL II), on the other hand, binds with high affinity to the blood group H trisaccharide (Fucα1,2Galα1-4GlcNAc-). Thermodynamic and hemagglutination inhibition studies reveal the fine binding specificities of the two lectins. Data obtained with a complete set of monodeoxy analogs of the core trimannoside indicate that CRL I recognizes the 3-, 4- and 6-hydroxyl groups of the α(1,6) Man residue, the 3- and 4-hydroxyl group of the α(1,3) Man residue and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the trimannoside. CRL I possesses enhanced affinities for the Man5 oligomannose glycan and a biantennary complex glycan as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans. On the other hand, CRL II distinguishes the blood group H type II epitope from the Lewis(x), Lewis(y), Lewis(a) and Lewis(b) epitopes. CRL II also distinguishes between blood group H type II and type I trisaccharides. CRL I and CRL II, respectively, possess differences in fine specificities when compared with other reported mannose and fucose recognizing lectins. This is the first report of a mannose-specific lectin (CRL I) and a blood group H type II-specific lectin (CRL II) from seeds of a member of the Diocleinae subtribe.

  12. Photogenerated Lectin Sensors Produced by Thiol-Ene/Yne Photo-Click Chemistry in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Oscar; Lee, Irene H.; Aastrup, Teodor; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2012-01-01

    The photoinitiated radical reactions between thiols and alkenes/alkynes (thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry) have been applied to a functionalization methodology to produce carbohydrate-presenting surfaces for analyses of biomolecular interactions. Polymer-coated quartz surfaces were functionalized with alkenes or alkynes in a straightforward photochemical procedure utilizing perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) chemistry. The alkene/alkyne surfaces were subsequently allowed to react with carbohydrate thiols in water under UV-irradiation. The reaction can be carried out in a drop of water directly on the surface without photoinitiator and any disulfide side products were easily washed away after the functionalization process. The resulting carbohydrate-presenting surfaces were evaluated in real-time studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions using a quartz crystal microbalance flow-through system with recurring injections of selected lectins with intermediate regeneration steps using low pH buffer. The resulting methodology proved fast, efficient and scalable to high-throughput analysis formats, and the produced surfaces showed significant protein binding with expected selectivities of the lectins used in the study. PMID:22341757

  13. Immunohistochemical and developmental studies to elucidate the mechanism of action of the snowdrop lectin on the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stal).

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, A M.R.; Gatehouse, J A.; Bharathi, M; Spence, J; Powell, K S.

    1998-07-01

    Rice brown planthoppers (Nilaparvata lugens) were fed on artificial diet containing snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA), which has been shown to be toxic towards this insect pest. In addition to decreasing survival, the lectin affected development, reducing the growth rate of nymphs by approximately 50% when present at a concentration of 5.3&mgr;M. Immunolocalisation studies showed that lectin binding was concentrated on the luminal surface of the midgut epithelial cells within the planthopper, suggesting that GNA binds to cell surface carbohydrate moieties in the gut. Immunolabelling at a lower level was also observed in the fat bodies, the ovarioles, and throughout the haemolymph. These observations suggest that GNA is able to cross the midgut epithelial barrier, and pass into the insect's circulatory system, resulting in a systemic toxic effect. Electron microscope studies showed morphological changes in the midgut region of planthoppers fed on a toxic dose of GNA, with disruption of the microvilli brush border region. No significant proteolytic degradation of GNA was observed either in the gut or honeydew of planthoppers fed on lectin-containing diet. The presence of glycoproteins which bind GNA in the gut of the brown planthopper was confirmed using digoxigen-labeled lectins to probe blots of extracted gut polypeptides.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility assays based on the quantification of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via a label free lectin biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fen; Rehman, Abdul; Sims, Matthew; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2015-04-21

    A label free lectin biosensor developed in our laboratory that can quantitatively measure the binding between the lectin immobilized at the carbohydrate sensor surface and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on Gram-negative bacteria was demonstrated for an antibiotic susceptibility assay. The biosensor utilizes a polythiophene interface containing fused quinone moieties glycosylated to form a carbohydrate platform for the immobilization of Concanavalin A (Con A) and is capable of LPS binding measurements via orthogonal quartz crystal microbalance and electrochemical readouts (EQCM). Such orthogonal transduction provides cross-validation, better sensor sensitivity, and a large dynamic range of the measurements. We have applied this label free lectin biosensor for a new antibiotic susceptibility assay by characterizing the antimicrobial activities of various antibiotics (i.e., ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline) against Escherichia coli W1485 as a model system. The label free biosensor allows both end point and real time measurements of antibiotic effects on the bacterial cell surface LPS, which is shown to correlate to their antibiotic effects. At the end point, after 18 h incubation of bacterial cells with these three antibiotics respectively, the bacterial LPS binding signal was reduced to 23%, 27%, and 38%, respectively, for the three antibiotics, indicating that ciprofloxacin is the most effective against this E. coli strain. Real time measurements at the 1 h time point showed a similar trend with a reduction of binding to 91%, 93%, and 95%, respectively. From the binding kinetics of these measurements, the relaxation time (τ) was obtained, where higher τ value means slow binding interactions between the lectin and the bacterial LPS. The obtained order of τ, (i.e., τciprofloxacin > τceftriaxone > τtetracycline) again indicated that ciprofloxacin has more bactericidal activity than the other two antibiotics with the same concentrations. Thus, we are

  15. Structural studies of Helix aspersa agglutinin complexed with GalNAc: A lectin that serves as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, Agnieszka J; Bujacz, Anna; Mak, Paweł; Potempa, Barbara; Niedziela, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Lectins belong to a differentiated group of proteins known to possess sugar-binding properties. Due to this fact, they are interesting research targets in medical diagnostics. Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) is a lectin that recognizes the epitopes containing α-d-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), which is present at the surface of metastatic cancer cells. Although several reports have already described the use of HAA as a diagnostic tool, this protein was not characterized on the molecular level. Here, we present for the first time the structural information about lectin isolated from mucus of Helix aspersa (garden snail). The amino acid sequence of this agglutinin was determined by Edman degradation and tertiary as well as quaternary structure by X-ray crystallography. The high resolution crystal structure (1.38Å) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis provide the detailed information about a large part of the HAA natural glycan chain. The topology of the GalNAc binding cleft and interaction with lectin are very well defined in the structure and fully confirmed by STD HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Together, this provides structural clues regarding HAA specificity and opens possibilities to rational modifications of this important diagnostic tool.

  16. Alterations in lectin binding to the epidermis following treatment with 8-methoxypsoralen plus long-wave ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Takigawa, M.; Horio, T.

    1984-02-01

    The alterations in lectin fluorescence stainings to the epidermis were examined in guinea pig skin treated with topical application of a 1% 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) solution plus long-wave ultraviolet (UVA) radiation (1.5-3.5 J/cm2) (PUVA). Serial biopsy specimens taken up to 21 days postirradiation were stained with 8 commercially available lectins labeled with either fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or biotin (followed by avidin D-FITC): Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin I (BSA), concanavalin A (Con-A), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA), and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). In normal guinea pig skin UEA staining was absent. Following PUVA treatment, UEA and DBA stainings became apparent or stronger in intensity after days 7-14 (UEA) and days 4-7 (DBA), respectively, and returned to negative or weak by days 14-21. Stainings with Con-A, SBA, and WGA gave remarkable decreases in intensity after days 2-4 and recovered to the baseline by days 7-14. Intensity of BSA, PNA, and RCA stainings was decreased to a lesser degree than the other lectins. Such changes were not produced by application of 8-MOP, UVA radiation (less than 10 J/cm2), UVB radiation (900-2700 mJ/cm2), or tape stripping. These results suggest that PUVA treatment perturbs the composition or organization of epidermal cell surface glycoconjugates to induce alterations in lectin stainings.

  17. Structure and Function of Mammalian Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kevin; Evers, David; Rice, Kevin G.

    Over the past three decades the field of glycobiology has expanded beyond a basic understanding of the structure and biosynthesis of glycoprotein, proteoglycans, and glycolipids toward a more detailed picture of how these molecules afford communication through binding to mammalian lectins. Although the number of different mammalian lectin domains appears to be finite and even much smaller than early estimates predicated based on the diversity of glycan structures, nature appears capable of using these in numerous combinations to fine tune specificity. The following provides an overview of the major classes of mammalian lectins and discusses their glycan binding specificity. The review provides a snapshot of the field of glycobiology that continues to grow providing an increasing number of examples of biological processes that rely upon glycan-lectin binding.

  18. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit. PMID:17590430

  19. Isolation and characterization of a lectin from Annona muricata seeds.

    PubMed

    Damico, D C S; Freire, M G M; Gomes, V M; Toyama, M H; Marangoni, S; Novello, J C; Macedo, M L R

    2003-11-01

    A lectin with a high affinity for glucose/mannose was isolated from Annona muricata seeds (Annonaceae) by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE SP-5 PW column, and molecular exclusion on a Protein Pak Glass 300 SW column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) yielded two protein bands of approximately 14 kDa and 22 kDa. However, only one band was seen in native PAGE. The Mr of the lectin estimated by fast-performance liquid chromatography-gel filtration on Superdex 75 was 22 kDa. The lectin was a glycoprotein with 8% carbohydrate (neutral sugar) and required divalent metal cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+) for full activity. Amino acid analysis revealed a large content of Glx, Gly, Phe, and Lys. The lectin agglutinated dog, chicken, horse, goose, and human erythrocytes and inhibited the growth of the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Colletotrichum musae.

  20. Sweet complementarity: the functional pairing of glycans with lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H-J; Manning, J C; Kopitz, J; André, S; Kaltner, H

    2016-05-01

    Carbohydrates establish the third alphabet of life. As part of cellular glycoconjugates, the glycans generate a multitude of signals in a minimum of space. The presence of distinct glycotopes and the glycome diversity are mapped by sugar receptors (antibodies and lectins). Endogenous (tissue) lectins can read the sugar-encoded information and translate it into functional aspects of cell sociology. Illustrated by instructive examples, each glycan has its own ligand properties. Lectins with different folds can converge to target the same epitope, while intrafamily diversification enables functional cooperation and antagonism. The emerging evidence for the concept of a network calls for a detailed fingerprinting. Due to the high degree of plasticity and dynamics of the display of genes for lectins the validity of extrapolations between different organisms of the phylogenetic tree yet is inevitably limited. PMID:26956894

  1. Insights into animal and plant lectins with antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Dias, Renata de Oliveira; Machado, Leandro Dos Santos; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2015-01-05

    Lectins are multivalent proteins with the ability to recognize and bind diverse carbohydrate structures. The glyco -binding and diverse molecular structures observed in these protein classes make them a large and heterogeneous group with a wide range of biological activities in microorganisms, animals and plants. Lectins from plants and animals are commonly used in direct defense against pathogens and in immune regulation. This review focuses on sources of animal and plant lectins, describing their functional classification and tridimensional structures, relating these properties with biotechnological purposes, including antimicrobial activities. In summary, this work focuses on structural-functional elucidation of diverse lectin groups, shedding some light on host-pathogen interactions; it also examines their emergence as biotechnological tools through gene manipulation and development of new drugs.

  2. Protozoa lectins and their role in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins of non-immune origin that agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc., and bind reversibly to carbohydrates present on the apposing cells. They have at least two carbohydrate binding sites and their binding can be inhibited by one or more carbohydrates. Owing to carbohydrate binding specificity of lectins, they mediate cell-cell interactions and play role in protozoan adhesion and host cell cytotoxicity, thus are central to the pathogenic property of the parasite. Several parasitic protozoa possess lectins which mediate parasite adherence to host cells based on their carbohydrate specificities. These interactions could be exploited for development of novel therapeutics, targeting the adherence and thus helpful in eradicating wide spread of protozoan diseases. The current review highlights the present state knowledge with regard to protozoal lectins with an emphasis on their haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, characteristics and also their role in pathogenesis notably as adhesion molecules, thereby aiding the pathogen in disease establishment.

  3. Potential of KM+ lectin in immunization against Leishmania amazonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Clarissa R; Cavassani, Karen A; Gomes, Regis B; Teixeira, Maria Jania; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Cavada, Benildo S; da Silva, João Santana; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2006-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated Canavalia brasiliensis (ConBr), Pisum arvense (PAA) and Artocarpus integrifolia (KM+) lectins as immunostimulatory molecules in vaccination against Leishmania amazonensis infection. Although they induced IFN-gamma production, the combination of the lectins with SLA antigen did not lead to lesion reduction. However, parasite load was largely reduced in mice immunized with KM+ lectin and SLA. KM+ induced a smaller inflammatory reaction in the air pouch model and was able to inhibit differentiation of dendritic cells (BMDC), but to induce maturation by enhancing the expression of MHC II, CD80 and CD86. These observations indicate the modulatory role of plant lectins in leishmaniasis vaccination may be related to their action on the initial innate response.

  4. Bacterial Isolation by Lectin-Modified Microengines

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Susana; Orozco, Jahir; Kagan, Daniel; Guix, Maria; Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Claussen, Jonathan C.; Merkoçi, Arben; Wang, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    New template-based self-propelled gold/nickel/polyaniline/platinum (Au/Ni/PANI/Pt) microtubular engines, functionalized with the Concanavalin A (ConA) lectin bioreceptor, are shown to be extremely useful for the rapid, real-time isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria from fuel-enhanced environmental, food and clinical samples. These multifunctional microtube engines combine the selective capture of E. coli with the uptake of polymeric drug-carrier particles to provide an attractive motion-based theranostics strategy. Triggered release of the captured bacteria is demonstrated by movement through a low-pH glycine-based dissociation solution. The smaller size of the new polymer-metal microengines offers convenient, direct and label-free optical visualization of the captured bacteria and discrimination against non-target cells. PMID:22136558

  5. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  6. A multiplex lectin-channel monitoring method for human serum glycoproteins by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Kim, Yong-Sam; Ko, Jeong Heon; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-02-01

    A mass profiling method and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based quantitative approach were used to analyze multiple lectin-captured fractions of human serum using different lectins such as aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), phytohemagglutinin-L(4) (L-PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) to quantitatively monitor protein glycosylation diversity. Each fraction, prepared by multiple lectin-fractionation and tryptic digestion, was analyzed by 1-D LC-MS/MS. Semi-quantitative profiling showed that the list of glycoproteins identified from each lectin-captured fraction is significantly different according to the used lectin. Thus, it was confirmed that the multiplex lectin-channel monitoring (LCM) using multiple lectins is useful for investigating protein glycosylation diversity in a proteome sample. Based on the semi-quantitative mass profiling, target proteins showing lectin-specificity among each lectin-captured fraction were selected and analyzed by the MRM-based method in triplicate using each lectin-captured fraction (average CV 7.9%). The MRM-based analysis for each lectin-captured fraction was similar to those obtained by the profiling experiments. The abundance of each target protein measured varied dramatically, based on the lectin-specificity. The multiplex LCM approach using MRM-based analyses is useful for quantitatively monitoring target protein glycoforms selectively fractionated by multiple lectins. Thus through multiplex LCM rather than single, we could inquire minutely into protein glycosylation states. PMID:22158852

  7. The effect of lectins on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst in vitro attachment to host cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Barry; Stover, Larry; Gillem, Ashley; Winters, Katherine; Leet, John H; Chauret, Christian

    2006-02-01

    The influence of lectins on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst agglutination and on attachment to both fixed Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and fixed HCT-8 (human colorectal epithelial) cells was examined. Oocyst cell wall characteristics were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Lectin-free oocysts were shown to adhere equally to both MDCK cells and HCT-8 cells. In MDCK cells, the addition of 1-25 microg/ml Codium fragile lectin, 10 microg/ml Maclura pomifera lectin, 10 microg/ml Helix pomatia lectin, and 10-200 microg/ml Artocarpus integrifolia lectin significantly increased attachment to at least 1 of the cell cultures as compared to oocysts incubated without any lectin. The lectin-enhanced attachment was reversed by co-incubation of lectin treated-oocysts with 250 mM of each specific sugar (for a given lectin). In agglutination assays, concentrations as low as 0.5 microg/ml of C. fragile, M. pomifera, and A. integrifolia lectin agglutinated oocysts within 60 min. Finally, in TEM samples, colloidal gold conjugated-lectins from A. integrifolia, C. fragile, H. pomatia, and M. pomifera attached to oocysts, and this could be competitively inhibited by a lectin-specific sugar. This suggests that C. parvum oocysts are highly reactive to N-acetyl galactosamine-binding lectins and that the presence of N-acetyl-galactosamine containing molecules on oocysts can potentially help in oocyst attachment to host cells.

  8. Assessment of Sauromatum guttatum lectin toxicity against Bactrocera cucurbitae.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Thakur, Kshema; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Kaur, Satwinder; Kaur, Amritpal; Singh, Jatinder

    2015-11-01

    Lectins are proteins that bind specifically to foreign glycans. Due to this binding property, these molecules have potential application as bioinsecticidal tools replacing conventional chemical insecticides. The present study involved purification of phytolectin from the tubers of Sauromatum guttatum by affinity chromatography on asialofetuin-linked silica matrix. The purity of the sample was checked by SDS-PAGE at pH 8.3. Purified lectin was incorporated in the artificial diet of a Dipteran model, Bactrocera cucurbitae at different concentrations (10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 µgml(-1)). The lectin significantly affected various developmental parameters that were studied. Percentage pupation and percentage emergence was reduced to 44 % and 7.9%, respectively, at 80 µgml(-1) concentration as compared to control (100%). LC50 of Sauromatum guttatum lectin was calculated to be 19.42 µgml(-1). Treatment of insect larvae with LC50 of Sauromatum guttatum lectin suppressed the activity of hydrolytic enzymes (esterases and acid phosphatases) and oxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase). Thus, with low LC50 and high mortality (approximately 92% at 80 µgml(-1)) of the insect larvae, Sauromatum guttatum lectin offers a possibility to engineer crop plants for improved and safer agriculture. PMID:26688959

  9. Antifungal activity of lectins against yeast of vaginal secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruno Severo; Siqueira, Ana Beatriz Sotero; de Cássia Carvalho Maia, Rita; Giampaoli, Viviana; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; de Lima, Adriana Nunes; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-imune origin. This group of proteins is distributed widely in nature and they have been found in viruses, microorganisms, plants and animals. Lectins of plants have been isolated and characterized according to their chemical, physical-chemical, structural and biological properties. Among their biological activities, we can stress its fungicidal action. It has been previously described the effect of the lectins Dviol, DRL, ConBr and LSL obtained from the seeds of leguminous plants on the growth of yeasts isolated from vaginal secretions. In the present work the experiments were carried out in microtiter plates and the results interpreted by both methods: visual observations and a microplate reader at 530nm. The lectin concentrations varied from 0.5 to 256μg/mL, and the inoculum was established between 65-70% of trammitance. All yeast samples isolated from vaginal secretion were evaluated taxonomically, where were observed macroscopic and microscopic characteristics to each species. The LSL lectin did not demonstrate any antifungal activity to any isolate studied. The other lectins DRL, ConBr and DvioL, showed antifungal potential against yeast isolated from vaginal secretion. These findings offering offer a promising field of investigation to develop new therapeutic strategies against vaginal yeast infections, collaborating to improve women's health. PMID:24031889

  10. Chemical modification studies of Artocarpus lakoocha lectin artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Ahmed, H; Chatterjee, B P

    1991-05-01

    The effect of chemical modification on an anti T-like lectin, artocarpin isolated from Artocarpus lakoocha seeds was investigated in order to identify the type of amino acids involved in its agglutinating activity. Modification of carboxyl groups, arginine and lysine residues, did not affect the lectin activity. However, modification of tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine residues led to a complete loss of its activity, indicating the involvement of these amino acids in the saccharide-binding ability. A protection was observed in the presence of inhibitory sugar. A marked decrease in the fluorescence emission was found when the tryptophan residues of lectin were modified. The circular dichroism spectra showed the presence of an identical pattern of conformation in the native and modified lectin, indicating that the loss in activity was due to modification only. The effect of pronase on artocarpin showed loss of activity whereas papain and trypsin had no effect. The specific activity of artocarpin remained unaltered on treatment with glycosidases but remarkable increase in the activity (of the same) was observed with xylanase treatment. Immunodiffusion studies with chemically modified lectin showed no gross structural changes, indicating that the group specific modifying agents did not alter the antigenic sites of the modified lectin.

  11. Thermal Infrared Imaging Experiments of C-Type Asteroid 162173 Ryugu on Hayabusa2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsuaki; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Taguchi, Makoto; Imamura, Takeshi; Arai, Takehiko; Senshu, Hiroki; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Demura, Hirohide; Kitazato, Kohei; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kouyama, Toru; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Wada, Takehiko; Takita, Jun; Sakatani, Naoya; Horikawa, Yamato; Endo, Ken; Helbert, Jörn; Müller, Thomas G.; Hagermann, Axel

    2016-09-01

    The thermal infrared imager TIR onboard Hayabusa2 has been developed to investigate thermo-physical properties of C-type, near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu. TIR is one of the remote science instruments on Hayabusa2 designed to understand the nature of a volatile-rich solar system small body, but it also has significant mission objectives to provide information on surface physical properties and conditions for sampling site selection as well as the assessment of safe landing operations. TIR is based on a two-dimensional uncooled micro-bolometer array inherited from the Longwave Infrared Camera LIR on Akatsuki (Fukuhara et al., 2011). TIR takes images of thermal infrared emission in 8 to 12 μm with a field of view of 16 × 12° and a spatial resolution of 0.05° per pixel. TIR covers the temperature range from 150 to 460 K, including the well calibrated range from 230 to 420 K. Temperature accuracy is within 2 K or better for summed images, and the relative accuracy or noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) at each of pixels is 0.4 K or lower for the well-calibrated temperature range. TIR takes a couple of images with shutter open and closed, the corresponding dark frame, and provides a true thermal image by dark frame subtraction. Data processing involves summation of multiple images, image processing including the StarPixel compression (Hihara et al., 2014), and transfer to the data recorder in the spacecraft digital electronics (DE). We report the scientific and mission objectives of TIR, the requirements and constraints for the instrument specifications, the designed instrumentation and the pre-flight and in-flight performances of TIR, as well as its observation plan during the Hayabusa2 mission.

  12. Purification and cDNA cloning of a lectin and a lectin-like protein from Apios americana Medikus tubers.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Irie, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Rikiya; Yonekura, Masami

    2014-01-01

    An Apios americana lectin (AAL) and a lectin-like protein (AALP) were purified from tubers by chromatography on Butyl-Cellulofine, ovomucoid-Cellulofine, and DEAE-Cellulofine columns. AAL showed strong hemagglutinating activity toward chicken and goose erythrocytes, but AALP showed no such activity toward any of the erythrocytes tested. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was not inhibited by mono- or disaccharides, but was inhibited by glycoproteins, such as asialofetuin and ovomucoid, suggesting that AAL is an oligosaccharide-specific lectin. The cDNAs of AAL and AALP consist of 1,093 and 1,104 nucleotides and encode proteins of 302 and 274 amino acid residues, respectively. Both amino acid sequences showed high similarity to known legume lectins, and those of their amino acids involved in carbohydrate and metal binding were conserved. PMID:25036952

  13. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions – a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel. PMID:27278891

  14. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions - a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel.

  15. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions – a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel.

  16. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions - a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd(2+) bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K(+) coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd(2+) bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel. PMID:27278891

  17. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  18. Complement-mediated neutralization of dengue virus requires mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Hauhart, Richard E; Marovich, Mary A; Garred, Peter; Atkinson, John P; Diamond, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble pathogen recognition protein of the innate immune system that binds specific mannose-containing glycans on the surfaces of microbial agents and initiates complement activation via the lectin pathway. Prior studies showed that MBL-dependent activation of the complement cascade neutralized insect cell-derived West Nile virus (WNV) in cell culture and restricted pathogenesis in mice. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of MBL in infection by dengue virus (DENV), a related flavivirus. Using a panel of naïve sera from mouse strains deficient in different complement components, we showed that inhibition of infection by insect cell- and mammalian cell-derived DENV was primarily dependent on the lectin pathway. Human MBL also bound to DENV and neutralized infection of all four DENV serotypes through complement activation-dependent and -independent pathways. Experiments with human serum from naïve individuals with inherent variation in the levels of MBL in blood showed a direct correlation between the concentration of MBL and neutralization of DENV; samples with high levels of MBL in blood neutralized DENV more efficiently than those with lower levels. Our studies suggest that allelic variation of MBL in humans may impact complement-dependent control of DENV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus that causes a spectrum of clinical disease in humans ranging from subclinical infection to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Four serotypes of DENV exist, and severe illness is usually associated with secondary infection by a different serotype. Here, we show that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule that initiates the lectin pathway of complement activation, neutralized infection of all four DENV serotypes through complement activation-dependent and -independent pathways. Moreover, we observed a direct correlation with the concentration of MBL in

  19. Burkholderia cenocepacia BC2L-C Is a Super Lectin with Dual Specificity and Proinflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Šulák, Ondřej; Cioci, Gianluca; Lameignère, Emilie; Balloy, Viviane; Round, Adam; Gutsche, Irina; Malinovská, Lenka; Chignard, Michel; Kosma, Paul; Aubert, Daniel F.; Marolda, Cristina L.; Valvano, Miguel A.; Wimmerová, Michaela; Imberty, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Lectins and adhesins are involved in bacterial adhesion to host tissues and mucus during early steps of infection. We report the characterization of BC2L-C, a soluble lectin from the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia, which has two distinct domains with unique specificities and biological activities. The N-terminal domain is a novel TNF-α-like fucose-binding lectin, while the C-terminal part is similar to a superfamily of calcium-dependent bacterial lectins. The C-terminal domain displays specificity for mannose and l-glycero-d-manno-heptose. BC2L-C is therefore a superlectin that binds independently to mannose/heptose glycoconjugates and fucosylated human histo-blood group epitopes. The apo form of the C-terminal domain crystallized as a dimer, and calcium and mannose could be docked in the binding site. The whole lectin is hexameric and the overall structure, determined by electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, reveals a flexible arrangement of three mannose/heptose-specific dimers flanked by two fucose-specific TNF-α-like trimers. We propose that BC2L-C binds to the bacterial surface in a mannose/heptose-dependent manner via the C-terminal domain. The TNF-α-like domain triggers IL-8 production in cultured airway epithelial cells in a carbohydrate-independent manner, and is therefore proposed to play a role in the dysregulated proinflammatory response observed in B. cenocepacia lung infections. The unique architecture of this newly recognized superlectin correlates with multiple functions including bacterial cell cross-linking, adhesion to human epithelia, and stimulation of inflammation. PMID:21909279

  20. Contributions of the Lectin and Polypeptide Binding Sites of Calreticulin to Its Chaperone Functions in Vitro and in Cells.

    PubMed

    Lum, Ronnie; Ahmad, Samar; Hong, Seo Jung; Chapman, Daniel C; Kozlov, Guennadi; Williams, David B

    2016-09-01

    Calreticulin is a lectin chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum that interacts with newly synthesized glycoproteins by binding to Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 oligosaccharides as well as to the polypeptide chain. In vitro, the latter interaction potently suppresses the aggregation of various non-glycosylated proteins. Although the lectin-oligosaccharide association is well understood, the polypeptide-based interaction is more controversial because the binding site on calreticulin has not been identified, and its significance in the biogenesis of glycoproteins in cells remains unknown. In this study, we identified the polypeptide binding site responsible for the in vitro aggregation suppression function by mutating four candidate hydrophobic surface patches. Mutations in only one patch, P19K/I21E and Y22K/F84E, impaired the ability of calreticulin to suppress the thermally induced aggregation of non-glycosylated firefly luciferase. These mutants also failed to bind several hydrophobic peptides that act as substrate mimetics and compete in the luciferase aggregation suppression assay. To assess the relative contributions of the glycan-dependent and -independent interactions in living cells, we expressed lectin-deficient, polypeptide binding-deficient, and doubly deficient calreticulin constructs in calreticulin-negative cells and monitored the effects on the biogenesis of MHC class I molecules, the solubility of mutant forms of α1-antitrypsin, and interactions with newly synthesized glycoproteins. In all cases, we observed a profound impairment in calreticulin function when its lectin site was inactivated. Remarkably, inactivation of the polypeptide binding site had little impact. These findings indicate that the lectin-based mode of client interaction is the predominant contributor to the chaperone functions of calreticulin within the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:27413183

  1. Enhancing T-DNA Transfer Efficiency in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Cells Using Extracellular Cellulose and Lectin.

    PubMed

    Gürel, Filiz; Uçarlı, Cüneyt; Tufan, Feyza; Kalaskar, Deepak M

    2015-06-01

    A major limitation of transforming barley tissues by Agrobacterium tumefaciens is the low frequency of T-DNA transfer due to recalcitrance of barley as a host. The effect of extracellular cellulose and lectin on Agrobacterium transformation efficiency was investigated in this study. Barley callus cultures were transformed with the AGL1 strain containing the vector pBI121 in the presence of 10 mg mL(-1) cellulose or 0.001, 0.05 and 0.1 mg mL(-1) lectin. Addition of cellulose significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased the number of GUS spots by 50 % compared to standard conditions in the presence of only 200 μM acetosyringone (AS). Frequency of G418-resistant aggregates on the surfaces of callus cultures was 29 and 71.5 %, following AS and AS + cellulose treatments, respectively, after 4 weeks of selection. Presence of 0.05 or 0.1 mg mL(-1) lectin also increased the number of GUS spots and frequency of G418-resistant cells in the selection period, but the increase in blue spots was not significant. We examined the effect of lectin and cellulose on bacterial attachment to callus tissues. Both cellulose and lectin were found to have a significant positive effect on the numbers of bacteria attached to barley callus. Epifluorescence microscopy revealed that Agrobacterium cells had accumulated in the scaffolds of irregular fibrous cellulose with a mean particle size of 200 μm. Expression of nptII in transformed callus lines confirmed the stable transformation of the gene. Our study showed for the first time the binding of Agrobacterium cells to fibrous cellulose and also demonstrated how polysaccharides and glycoproteins can be used to improve T-DNA transfer in monocotyledon transformation procedures.

  2. Neutrophil activation induced by the lectin KM+ involves binding to CXCR2.

    PubMed

    Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Moreno, Andréa N; Marques, Fabiana; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2006-01-01

    The lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia, also known as artocarpin, induces neutrophil migration by haptotaxis. The interactions of KM+ with both neutrophils and the extracellular matrix depend on the lectin's ability to recognize mannose-containing glycans. In the present study, we characterized the binding of KM+ to human neutrophils and the responses stimulated by this binding. Exposure to KM+ results in cell polarization, formation of a lamellipodium, and induction of deep ruffles on the cell surface. By fluorescence microscopy, we observed that KM+ is distributed homogeneously over the cell surface. KM+/ligand complexes are rapidly internalized, reaching maximum intracellular concentrations at 120 min, and decreasing thereafter. Furthermore, KM+ binding to the surface of human neutrophils is inhibited by the specific sugars, d-mannose or mannotriose. KM+-induced neutrophil migration is inhibited by pertussis toxin as well as by inhibition of CXCR2 activity. These results suggest that the KM+ ligand on the neutrophil surface is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The results also suggest that neutrophil migration induced by KM+ involves binding to CXCR2.

  3. New low-Ni (igneous?) particles among the C and C? types of cosmic dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.; Kloeck, W.

    1993-03-01

    Low-Ni particles with major element abundances, optical properties, and morphologies sufficiently similar to chondritic interplanetery dust particles (IDP's) to receive JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog classifications of C or C?-types were shown to have trace element contents and mineralogies similar to igneous material. Examination of the JSC Catalog EDX spectra by Cooke et al. has shown that 13 percent of the C-type and 38 percent of the C?-type particles are potentially low-Ni particles. Two new low-Ni particles were identified, and it was shown that an additional fragment from the L2002*C cluster has an igneous composition. A newly analyzed fragment of the W7066*A cluster has a chondritic composition. The W7066*A cluster is important because it has yielded a fragment of igneous composition and another fragment having high concentrations of He and Ne suggesting an extraterrestrial origin.

  4. c-Type Cytochromes and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Ron; Tebo, Bradley M.; Haygood, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida MnB1 is an isolate from an Mn oxide-encrusted pipeline that can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides. We used transposon mutagenesis to construct mutants of strain MnB1 that are unable to oxidize manganese, and we characterized some of these mutants. The mutants were divided into three groups: mutants defective in the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes, mutants defective in genes that encode key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mutants defective in the biosynthesis of tryptophan. The mutants in the first two groups were cytochrome c oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Mn(II) oxidation capability could be recovered in a c-type cytochrome biogenesis-defective mutant by complementation of the mutation. PMID:9758766

  5. c-Type cytochromes and manganese oxidation in Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, R.; Tebo, B.M.; Haygood, M.G.

    1998-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida MnB1 is an isolate from an Mn oxide-encrusted pipeline that can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides. The authors used transposon mutagenesis to construct mutants of strain MnB1 that are unable to oxidize manganese, and they characterized some of these mutants. The mutants were divided into three groups: mutants defective in the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes, mutants defective in genes that encode key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mutants defective in the biosynthesis of tryptophan. The mutants in the first two groups were cytochrome c oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Mn(II) oxidation capability could be recovered in a c-type cytochrome biogenesis-defective mutant by complementation of the mutation.

  6. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity. PMID:25451301

  7. HGA-2, a novel galactoside-binding lectin from the sea cucumber Holothuria grisea binds to bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Arthur Alves; Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; de Melo Silva, Winnie; Moura, Raniere da Mata; Silva, Giselle Cristina; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; de Sousa Saboya, Jefferson Pablo; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago do; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2014-03-01

    A novel lectin, HGA-2, was isolated from the sea cucumber Holothuria grisea. The protein was isolated by a single chromatographic step using a column of Guar Gum as affinity. HGA-2 showed an apparent molecular mass of 17 kDa and 34 kDa under reducing and nonreducing conditions, respectively. The hemagglutinating activity was specific for rabbit erythrocytes, showing no activity for human blood A, B and O. Its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by carbohydrates containing galactose, with higher affinity for GalNAc and glycoprotein porcine stomach mucin (PSM). HGA-2 was stable at pH 6-10, significantly declining at pH 5 and a temperature of 40°C, with its activity being abolished at 100 °C. The HGA-2 protein was found to be Ca(2+)-dependent; it was highly toxic against Artemia nauplii and able to recognize and agglutinate cells of Escherichia coli. Amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides of HGA-2 strongly suggest that HGA-2 is a member of the C-type lectin family. PMID:24393613

  8. Partial characterization of the lectin of runner beans (Phaseolus coccieneus) var. Alubia.

    PubMed

    Armienta-Aldana, Eduardo; Moreno-Legorreta, Manuel; Armienta-Aldana, Ernesto; Laguna-Granados, Sandra Viviana

    2009-03-01

    We extracted and partial characterized lectin from runner beans (Phaseolus coccineus L.). This lectin shows a great affinity to fetuin-agarose column like others lectins and the electrophoretic gels point one band of approximately 45 kDa. In addition to the previous assays, we detected the presence of lectins by agglutination assays. We know that lectins are non-enzymatic proteins or glycoproteins that bind carbohydrates. The biological function of plant lectins is not fully understood, but they are hypothesized to be involved in a number of intrinsic processes. Many of those processes include hemagglutination. We believe that the P. coocineus lectin will be an important tool for know the properties of many lectins, included their capacity to detected and quantify tumor markers.

  9. Tissue binding pattern of plant lectins in benign and malignant lesions of thyroid.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, T; Augustine, J; Mathew, L; Aleykutty, M A; Nair, M B; Remani, P; Nair, M K

    1992-01-01

    N-acetyl D-galactosamine specific lectins were isolated from the seeds of Jack Fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and Winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) and D-galactose specific lectin was isolated from peanut (Arachis hypogaea). These lectins were conjugated to Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP) and were used to study the lectin binding properties of benign and malignant lesions of the thyroid. For comparison of the results 10 normal fresh autopsy specimens were included in the study. The Peanut lectin (PNL) and Jack fruit lectin (JFL) conjugates showed positive binding with the cells in different lesions, while Winged Bean Lectin (WBL), despite its having a common inhibitory sugar, showed no binding even after neuraminidase treatment. These lectins revealed difference in the composition of glycoconjugates of benign and malignant thyroid cells. The HRP conjugated JFL and PNL may be of use in distinguishing carcinomatous tissues from benign tissues which makes them potential tools in the differential diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

  10. Immobilized glycosylated Fmoc-amino acid for SPR: comparative studies of lectin-binding to linear or biantennary diLacNAc structures.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Sakagami, Hiromi; Asanuma-Date, Kimie; Nagasawa, Nao; Nakahara, Yoshiaki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Haruko

    2013-12-15

    A method to immobilize glycan-linked amino acids with protected α-amino groups, which are key intermediates to produce the desired neoglycoprotein, to a Biacore sensor chip was developed and its utility for interaction analyses was demonstrated. Two types of diN-acetyllactosamine (diLacNAc)-containing glycans, a core 2 hexasaccharide involving linear diLacNAc that is O-linked to N-(9-fluorenyl)methoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-Thr and a biantennary diLacNAc that is N-linked to Fmoc-Asn, were used as ligands. For immobilization, the free carboxyl groups of the amino acid residues were activated with EDC/NHS, then reacted with the ethylenediamine-derivatized carboxymethyldextran sensor chip to obtain the desired ligand concentrations. Interactions of the ligands with five plant lectins were analyzed by surface plasmon resonance, and the bindings were compared. The resonance unit of each lectin was corrected by subtracting that of the reference cell on which the Fmoc-Thr-core 1 or Fmoc-Asn was immobilized as a ligand. The carbohydrate specificities of interactions were verified by preincubating lectins with their respective inhibitory sugar before injection. By steady state analysis, the Lycopersicon esculentum lectin showed a 27-fold higher affinity to linear diLacNAc than to biantennary diLacNAc, while Datura stramonium and Solanum tuberosum lectins both showed low Ka,apps of 10(6)M(-1) for these two ligands. In contrast, Ricinus communis agglutinin-120 showed a 3.2-fold higher Ka,app to biantennary LacNAc than to linear diLacNAc. A lectin purified from Pleurocybella porrigens mushroom interacted at the high affinity of 10(8)M(-1) with both linear and biantennary diLacNAcs, which identified it as a unique probe. This method provides a useful and sensitive system to analyze interactions by simulating the glycans on the cell surface. PMID:24211369

  11. A yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, shows high binding affinity towards lectins on a self-assembled monolayer system.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-03-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), which are glycolipid biosurfactants secreted by the Pseudozyma yeasts, show not only excellent surface-active properties but also versatile biochemical actions including antitumor and cell-differentiation activities. In order to address the biochemical actions, interactions between MEL-A, the major component of MEL, and different lectins were investigated using the surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. The monolayer of MEL-A showed high binding affinity to concanavalin A (ConA) and Maackia amurensis lectin-I (MAL-I). The observed affinity constants for ConA and MAL-I were estimated to be 9.48 +/- 1.31 x 10(6) and 3.13 +/- 0.274 x 10(6) M(-1), respectively; the value was comparable to that of Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3)Man, which is one of the most specific probe to ConA. Significantly, alpha-methyl-D-mannopyranoside (1 mM) exhibited no binding inhibition between MEL-A and ConA. MEL-A is thus likely to self-assemble to give a high affinity surface, where ConA binds to the hydrophilic headgroup in a different manner from that generally observed in lectin-saccharide interactions. The binding manner should be related with the biochemical actions of MEL toward mammalian cells via protein-carbohydrate interactions. PMID:17205206

  12. Lectins Identify Glycan Biomarkers on Glioblastoma-Derived Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tucker-Burden, Carol; Chappa, Prasanthi; Krishnamoorthy, Malini; Gerwe, Brian A.; Scharer, Christopher D.; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Harris, Wayne; Usta, Sümeyra Naz; Eilertson, Carmen D.; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G.; Stice, Steven L.; Brat, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive primary brain tumor with a poor prognosis. Despite aggressive therapy with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, nearly all patients succumb to disease within 2 years. Several studies have supported the presence of stem-like cells in brain tumor cultures that are CD133-positive, are capable of self-renewal, and give rise to all cell types found within the tumor, potentially perpetuating growth. CD133 is a widely accepted marker for glioma-derived cancer stem cells; however, its reliability has been questioned, creating a need for other identifiers of this biologically important subpopulation. We used a panel of 20 lectins to identify differences in glycan expression found in the glycocalyx of undifferentiated glioma-derived stem cells and differentiated cells that arise from them. Fluorescently labeled lectins that specifically recognize α-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and α-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) differentially bound to the cell surface based on the state of cellular differentiation. GalNAc and GlcNAc were highly expressed on the surface of undifferentiated cells and showed markedly reduced expression over a 12-day duration of differentiation. Additionally, the GalNAc-recognizing lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin was capable of specifically selecting and sorting glioma-derived stem cell populations from an unsorted tumor stock and this subpopulation had proliferative properties similar to CD133+ cells in vitro and also had tumor-forming capability in vivo. Our preliminary results on a single cerebellar GBM suggest that GalNAc and GlcNAc are novel biomarkers for identifying glioma-derived stem cells and can be used to isolate cancer stem cells from unsorted cell populations, thereby creating new cell lines for research or clinical testing. PMID:22435486

  13. Photo- and biophysical studies of lectin-conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles: reduced sensitivity in high density assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Basu, Amit; Zimmt, Matthew B

    2010-11-18

    Lectin-conjugated, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fNP) have been developed for carbohydrate-based histopathology evaluations of epithelial tissue biopsies. The fNP platform was selected for its enhanced emissive brightness compared to direct dye labeling. Carbohydrate microarray studies were performed to compare the carbohydrate selectivity of the mannose-recognizing lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) before and after conjugation to fluorescent silica nanoparticles (ConA-fNP). These studies revealed surprisingly low emission intensities upon staining with ConA-fNP compared to those with biotin-ConA/Cy3-streptavidin staining. A series of photophysical and biophysical characterizations of the fNP and ConA-fNP conjugates were performed to probe the low sensitivity from fNP in the microarray assays. Up to 1200 fluorescein (FL) and 80 tetramethylrhodamine (TR) dye molecules were incorporated into 46 nm diameter fNP, yielding emissive brightness values 400 and 35 times larger than the individual dye molecules, respectively. ConA lectin conjugated to carboxylic acid surface-modified nanoparticles covers 15-30% of the fNP surface. The CD spectra and mannose substrate selectivity of ConA conjugated to the fNP differed slightly compared to that of soluble ConA. Although, the high emissive brightness of fNP enhances detection sensitivity for samples with low analyte densities, large fNP diameters limit fNP recruitment and binding to samples with high analyte densities. The high analyte density and nearly two-dimensional target format of carbohydrate microarrays make probe size a critical parameter. In this application, fNP labels afford minimal sensitivity advantage compared to direct dye labeling.

  14. Achieving high affinity towards a bacterial lectin through multivalent topological isomers of calix[4]arene glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Cecioni, Samy; Lalor, Ruth; Blanchard, Bertrand; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Imberty, Anne; Matthews, Susan E; Vidal, Sébastien

    2009-12-01

    A family of seven topologically isomeric calix[4]arene glycoconjugates was prepared through the synthesis of a series of alkyne-derivatised calix[4]arene precursors that are suitable for the attachment of sugar moieties by microwave-assisted copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The glycoconjugates thus synthesised comprised one mono-functionalised derivative, two 1,2- or 1,3-divalent regioisomers, one trivalent and three tetravalent topoisomers in the cone, partial cone or 1,3-alternate conformations. The designed glycoconjugates were evaluated as ligands for the galactose-binding lectin PA-IL from the opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major causative agent of lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Binding affinities were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and the interaction with the lectin was shown to be strongly dependant on both the valence and the topology. Whereas the trivalent conjugate displayed enhanced affinity when compared to a monosaccharide model, the tetravalent conjugates are to-date the highest-affinity ligands measured by ITC. The topologies presenting carbohydrates on both faces of calixarene are the most potent ones with dissociation constants of approximately 200 nM. Molecular modelling suggests that such a multivalent molecule can efficiently chelate two of the binding sites of the tetrameric lectin; this explains the 800-fold increase of affinity achieved by the tetravalent molecule. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments confirmed that this glycoconjugate is the strongest inhibitor for binding of PA-IL to galactosylated surfaces for potential applications as an anti-adhesive agent.

  15. Structure and specificity of a binary tandem domain F-lectin from striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Bianchet, Mario A; Odom, Eric W; Vasta, Gerardo R; Amzel, L Mario

    2010-08-13

    The plasma of the striped bass Morone saxatilis contains a fucose-specific lectin (MsaFBP32) that consists of two F-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in tandem. The crystal structure of the complex of MsaFBP32 with l-fucose reported here shows a cylindrical 81-A-long and 60-A-wide trimer divided into two globular halves: one containing N-terminal CRDs (N-CRDs) and the other containing C-terminal CRDs (C-CRDs). The resulting binding surfaces at the opposite ends of the cylindrical trimer have the potential to cross-link cell surface or humoral carbohydrate ligands. The N-CRDs and C-CRDs of MsaFBP32 exhibit significant structural differences, suggesting that they recognize different glycans. Analysis of the carbohydrate binding sites provides the structural basis for the observed specificity of MsaFBP32 for simple carbohydrates and suggests that the N-CRD recognizes more complex fucosylated oligosaccharides and with a relatively higher avidity than the C-CRD. Modeling of MsaFBP32 complexed with fucosylated glycans that are widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes rationalizes the observation that binary tandem CRD F-type lectins function as opsonins by cross-linking "non-self" carbohydrate ligands and "self" carbohydrate ligands, such as sugar structures displayed by microbial pathogens and glycans on the surface of phagocytic cells from the host.

  16. Structure and Specificity of a Binary Tandem Domain F-Lectin from Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchet, M.; Odom, E; Vasta, J; Amzel, M

    2010-01-01

    The plasma of the striped bass Morone saxatilis contains a fucose-specific lectin (MsaFBP32) that consists of two F-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in tandem. The crystal structure of the complex of MsaFBP32 with l-fucose reported here shows a cylindrical 81-A-long and 60-A-wide trimer divided into two globular halves: one containing N-terminal CRDs (N-CRDs) and the other containing C-terminal CRDs (C-CRDs). The resulting binding surfaces at the opposite ends of the cylindrical trimer have the potential to cross-link cell surface or humoral carbohydrate ligands. The N-CRDs and C-CRDs of MsaFBP32 exhibit significant structural differences, suggesting that they recognize different glycans. Analysis of the carbohydrate binding sites provides the structural basis for the observed specificity of MsaFBP32 for simple carbohydrates and suggests that the N-CRD recognizes more complex fucosylated oligosaccharides and with a relatively higher avidity than the C-CRD. Modeling of MsaFBP32 complexed with fucosylated glycans that are widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes rationalizes the observation that binary tandem CRD F-type lectins function as opsonins by cross-linking 'non-self' carbohydrate ligands and 'self' carbohydrate ligands, such as sugar structures displayed by microbial pathogens and glycans on the surface of phagocytic cells from the host.

  17. Mannan-Binding Lectin in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cedzyński, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide so research continues into underlying mechanisms. Since innate immunity and its potent component mannan-binding lectin have been proven to play an important role in the inflammatory response during infection and ischaemia-reperfusion injury, attention has been paid to its role in the development of cardiovascular complications as well. This review provides a general outline of the structure and genetic polymorphism of MBL and its role in inflammation/tissue injury with emphasis on associations with cardiovascular disease. MBL appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and, in consequence, coronary artery disease and also inflammation and tissue injury after myocardial infarction and heart transplantation. The relationship between MBL and disease is rather complex and depends on different genetic and environmental factors. That could be why the data obtained from animal and clinical studies are sometimes contradictory proving not for the first time that innate immunity is a “double-edge sword,” sometimes beneficial and, at other times disastrous for the host. PMID:24877121

  18. Lectin-like activity from Persea americana.

    PubMed

    Meade, N A; Staat, R H; Langley, S D; Doyle, R J

    1980-01-15

    An extract from the seeds of Persea americana possessed an erythro-agglutinating activity. The agglutinin was devoid of specificity for carbohydrates, but interacted readily with basic proteins or basic polyamino acids. The interaction between the agglutinin and egg-white lysozyme was not inhibited by chaotropic salts, but was sensitive to relatively low concentrations of urea. An affinity chromatographic procedure was developed in an effort to purify the agglutinin. Products from the chromatographic procedure were found not to contain higher specific agglutinating activities than the crude extract. Amino acid acid analyses of the extract showed the presence of relatively high proportions of glutamic and aspartic acids. In addition, the extract contained phosphorus and a visible chromophore. The agglutinin was resistant to detergents and denaturants, and proteases, nucleases, and other enzymes. The results suggest that, as opposed to other plant agglutinins, the active component from Persea is not a protein. Similarly, in contrast to many lectins, the agglutinin from Persea was not mitogenic for mouse lymphocytes. The agglutinin partially inhibited the mitogenesis of lymphocytes when the cells were treated with concanavalin A, or with bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

  19. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches. PMID:25943580

  20. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches.

  1. Identification of Lectins from Metastatic Cancer Cells through Magnetic Glyconanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kavunja, Herbert W.; Voss, Patricia G.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells can have characteristic carbohydrate binding properties. Previously, it was shown that a highly metastatic melanoma cell line B16F10 bound to galacto-side-functionalized nanoparticles much stronger than the corresponding less metastatic B16F1 cells. To better understand the carbohydrate binding properties of cancer cells, herein, we report the isolation and characterization of endogenous galactose binding proteins from B16F10 cells using magnetic glyconanoparticles. The galactose-coated magnetic glyconanoparticles could bind with lectins present in the cells and be isolated through magnet-mediated separation. Through Western blot and mass spectrometry, the arginine/serine rich splicing factor Sfrs1 was identified as a galactose-selective endogenous lectin, overexpressed in B16F10 cells, compared with B16F1 cells. In addition, galactin-3 was found in higher amounts in B16F10 cells. Finally, the glyconanoparticles exhibited a superior efficiency in lectin isolation, from both protein mixtures and live cells, than the corresponding more traditional microparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. Thus, the magnetic glyconanoparticles present a useful tool for discovery of endogenous lectins, as well as binding partners of lectins, without prior knowledge of protein identities. PMID:27110035

  2. K⁺ channel gating: C-type inactivation is enhanced by calcium or lanthanum outside.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Clay M; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2014-09-01

    Many voltage-gated K(+) channels exhibit C-type inactivation. This typically slow process has been hypothesized to result from dilation of the outer-most ring of the carbonyls in the selectivity filter, destroying this ring's ability to bind K(+) with high affinity. We report here strong enhancement of C-type inactivation upon extracellular addition of 10-40 mM Ca(2+) or 5-50 µM La(3+). These multivalent cations mildly increase the rate of C-type inactivation during depolarization and markedly promote inactivation and/or suppress recovery when membrane voltage (V(m)) is at resting levels (-80 to -100 mV). At -80 mV with 40 mM Ca(2+) and 0 mM K(+) externally, ShBΔN channels with the mutation T449A inactivate almost completely within 2 min or less with no pulsing. This behavior is observed only in those mutants that show C-type inactivation on depolarization and is distinct from the effects of Ca(2+) and La(3+) on activation (opening and closing of the V(m)-controlled gate), i.e., slower activation of K(+) channels and a positive shift of the mid-voltage of activation. The Ca(2+)/La(3+) effects on C-type inactivation are antagonized by extracellular K(+) in the low millimolar range. This, together with the known ability of Ca(2+) and La(3+) to block inward current through K(+) channels at negative voltage, strongly suggests that Ca(2+)/La(3+) acts at the outer mouth of the selectivity filter. We propose that at -80 mV, Ca(2+) or La(3+) ions compete effectively with K(+) at the channel's outer mouth and prevent K(+) from stabilizing the filter's outer carbonyl ring.

  3. GRID3C: Computer program for generation of C type multilevel, three dimensional and boundary conforming periodic grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer program, GRID3C, was developed for accurately generating periodic, boundary conforming, three dimensional, consecutively refined computational grids applicable to realistic axial turbomachinery geometries. The method is based on using two functions to generate two dimensional grids on a number of coaxial axisymmetric surfaces positioned between the centerbody and the outer radial boundary. These boundary fitted grids are of the C type and are characterized by quasi-orthogonality and geometric periodicity. The built in nonorthogonal coordinate stretchings and shearings cause the grid clustering in the regions of interest. The stretching parameters are part of the input to GRID3C. In its present version GRID3C can generate and store a maximum of four consecutively refined three dimensional grids. The output grid coordinates can be calculated either in the Cartesian or in the cylindrical coordinate system.

  4. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-09

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport.

  5. Production and purification of active snowdrop lectin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, M; Powell, K S; Gatehouse, J A; Raemaekers, R; Newell, C A; Hamilton, W D

    1998-02-15

    Recombinant snowdrop lectin was produced in Escherichia coli from a cDNA clone encoding mature Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. After induction with isopropylthio-beta-D-galactoside, inclusion bodies from E. coli were solubilised and the G. nivalis agglutinin purified by metal-affinity chromatography using a carboxy-terminal hexahistidine tag. The protein was refolded on the metal-affinity column prior to elution. After purification, the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes to a dilution similar to that determined for 'native' lectin purified from snowdrop, and showed similar specific binding to mannose. The toxicity of the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin towards rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) was shown to be similar to that of 'native' G. nivalis agglutinin when incorporated into an artificial diet. The recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin is thus functionally similar to 'native' snowdrop lectin.

  6. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport. PMID:25584830

  7. Interaction of wild-type and variant mouse 3T3 cells with lectins from Bandeiraea simplicifolia seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, W S; Peters, B P; Blake, D A; Yep, D; Chu, E H; Goldstein, I J

    1979-01-01

    An isolectin (BS I-B4) derived from Bandeiraea simplicifolia seeds and specific for terminal alpha-D-galactopyranosyl groups was found to be cytotoxic to Swiss 3T3 mouse cells. After mutagenesis and selection with BS I-B4, a variant clonal cell line resistant to both this isolectin and the alpha-D- and beta-D-galactose-binding lectin abrin was isolated. The parental cell line showed homogeneous and noninteracting binding sites for BS I-B4, whereas the variant cells exhibited a curved plot with a reduced number of binding regions. Another lectin, BS II, which is derived from the same seeds by specific for terminal N-acetyl-D-glucosaminyl groups, was cytotoxic to the variant but not the parental cells. These results suggest a possible lesion in the biosynthesis of cell surface structures resulting in the exposure of subterminal N-acetyl-D-glucosaminyl moieties in the variant line. Images PMID:284346

  8. Lectin histochemical studies on the vomeronasal organ of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ of sheep was examined using lectin histochemistry in order to compare the types and amounts of the glycoconjugates among various components of the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. In the vomeronasal sensory epithelium, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) stained particular cells, located at the same level as the vomeronasal receptor cells, while the distribution, shape and number of the stained cells did not correspond to those of the vomeronasal receptor cells. Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L) labeled the basal cells of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. While, Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL) and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120) labeled the basal cells of the sensory epithelium, and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I) stained the basal cells of the non-sensory epithelium, respectively. Seventeen lectins labeled the free border of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, while Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Jacalin and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) labeled neither free border of the sensory nor that of non-sensory epithelia. The expression pattern of glycoconjugate was similar, but not identical, in the free border between the sensory and non-sensory epithelia. These results indicate that there are dissimilar features in the type and amount of glycoconjugates between the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, and at the same time, among the various cell types either in the vomeronasal sensory or non-sensory epithelium. PMID:23595118

  9. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26638121

  10. Erythrina lectins detect the H/HI blood groups.

    PubMed

    Sudakevitz, D; Gilboa-Garber, N; Levene, C; Sela, R; Bhattacharyya, L

    1991-08-01

    The lectin purified from Erythrina corallodendron seeds which binds N-acetyllactosamine greater than N-acetyl-D-galactosamine greater than alpha and beta galactosides greater than D-galactose was examined for its ABO(H) blood group specificity. It has been shown that this lectin causes the strongest hemagglutination of O(H) and weakest of Oh(Bombay) red blood cells, and interacts with the H antigen in association with the I antigen. The reactions of Erythrina corallodendron and Erythrina indica lectins (which are similar in sugar specificity) with erythrocytes of different ABO(H) and Ii blood groups (the I bloods were all from adults and the i from either cord or adult bloods) revealed the following order of activity: O(H)I greater than A2 I greater than O(H)i adult greater than A2BI greater than BI greater than O(H)i cord greater than A1I greater than A1i adult greater than Bi cord greater than A1BI greater than Ai cord greater than ABi cord greater than OhI. The Erythrina indica lectin showed a lower differentiation between the agglutination of O(H) and Oh erythrocytes. Both Erythrina lectins exhibited H/HI blood group preference but were not inhibited by the saliva from ABO(H) "secretors". Thus they may be classified with the Cytisus sessilifolius, Lotus tetragonolobus and Laburnum alpinum lectins which are inhibited by lactose but not by H blood group substances in secretions.

  11. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Identification of OmpA-Like Protein of Tannerella forsythia as an O-Linked Glycoprotein and Its Binding Capability to Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Toshi; Inomata, Megumi; Into, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins are associated with physiological and pathogenic functions of bacteria. It remains unclear whether bacterial glycoproteins can bind to specific classes of lectins expressed on host cells. Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative oral anaerobe that contributes to the development of periodontitis. In this study, we aimed to find lectin-binding glycoproteins in T. forsythia. We performed affinity chromatography of wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and sialic acid (Sia), and identified OmpA-like protein as the glycoprotein that has the highest affinity. Mass spectrometry revealed that OmpA-like protein contains O-type N-acetylhexosamine and hexose. Fluorometry quantitatively showed that OmpA-like protein contains Sia. OmpA-like protein was found to bind to lectins including E-selectin, P-selectin, L-selectin, Siglec-5, Siglec-9, Siglec-10, and DC-SIGN. The binding of OmpA-like protein to these lectins, except for the Siglecs, depends on the presence of calcium. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc), which is the most abundant Sia, inhibited the binding of OmpA-like protein to all of these lectins, whereas GlcNAc and mannose only inhibited the binding to DC-SIGN. We further found that T. forsythia adhered to human oral epithelial cells, which express E-selectin and P-selectin, and that this adhesion was inhibited by addition of NeuAc. Moreover, adhesion of an OmpA-like protein-deficient T. forsythia strain to the cells was reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain. Our findings indicate that OmpA-like protein of T. forsythia contains O-linked sugar chains that can mediate interactions with specific lectins. This interaction is suggested to facilitate adhesion of T. forsythia to the surface of host cells. PMID:27711121

  13. Phylogenetic and specificity studies of two-domain GNA-related lectins: generation of multispecificity through domain duplication and divergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Els J M; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Smith, David F; Ongenaert, Maté; Winter, Harry C; Rougé, Pierre; Goldstein, Irwin J; Mo, Hanqing; Kominami, Junko; Culerrier, Raphaël; Barre, Annick; Hirabayashi, Jun; Peumans, Willy J

    2007-05-15

    A re-investigation of the occurrence and taxonomic distribution of proteins built up of protomers consisting of two tandem arrayed domains equivalent to the GNA [Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin] revealed that these are widespread among monotyledonous plants. Phylogenetic analysis of the available sequences indicated that these proteins do not represent a monophylogenetic group but most probably result from multiple independent domain duplication/in tandem insertion events. To corroborate the relationship between inter-domain sequence divergence and the widening of specificity range, a detailed comparative analysis was made of the sequences and specificity of a set of two-domain GNA-related lectins. Glycan microarray analyses, frontal affinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrated that the two-domain GNA-related lectins acquired a marked diversity in carbohydrate-binding specificity that strikingly contrasts the canonical exclusive specificity of their single domain counterparts towards mannose. Moreover, it appears that most two-domain GNA-related lectins interact with both high mannose and complex N-glycans and that this dual specificity relies on the simultaneous presence of at least two different independently acting binding sites. The combined phylogenetic, specificity and structural data strongly suggest that plants used domain duplication followed by divergent evolution as a mechanism to generate multispecific lectins from a single mannose-binding domain. Taking into account that the shift in specificity of some binding sites from high mannose to complex type N-glycans implies that the two-domain GNA-related lectins are primarily directed against typical animal glycans, it is tempting to speculate that plants developed two-domain GNA-related lectins for defence purposes.

  14. A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on carboxymethyl chitosan-quantum dots and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Hua; Wang, Lei; Su, Xingguang

    2016-08-17

    In this work, we report a novel label-free fluorescence "turn off-on" biosensor for lectin detection. The highly sensitive and selective sensing system is based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-CHIT), CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs). Firstly, CuInS2 QDs featuring carboxyl groups were directly synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the carboxyl groups on the CuInS2 QDs surface were interacted with the amino groups (NH2), carboxyl groups (COOH) and hydroxyl groups (OH) within CM-CHIT polymeric chains via electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding to form CM-CHIT-QDs assemblies. Introduction of Au NPs could quench the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs through electron and energy transfer. In the presence of lectin, lectin could bind exclusively with CM-CHIT-QDs by means of specific multivalent carbohydrate-protein interaction. Thus, the electron and energy transfer process between CM-CHIT-QDs and Au NPs was inhibited, and as a result, the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs was effectively "turned on". Under the optimum conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I0 (I and I0 were the fluorescence intensity of CM-CHIT-QDs-Au NPs in the presence and absence of lectin, respectively) and lectin concentration in the range of 0.2-192.5 nmol L(-1), And the detection limit could be down to 0.08 nmol L(-1). Furthermore, the proposed biosensor was employed for the determination of lectin in fetal bovine serum samples with satisfactory results. PMID:27286773

  15. Dietary Plant Lectins Appear to Be Transported from the Gut to Gain Access to and Alter Dopaminergic Neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, a Potential Etiology of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jolene; Wang, Mingming; Wei, Wenqian; Keller, Jeffrey N; Adhikari, Binita; King, Jason F; King, Michael L; Peng, Nan; Laine, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Lectins from dietary plants have been shown to enhance drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of rats, be transported trans-synaptically as shown by tracing of axonal and dendritic paths, and enhance gene delivery. Other carbohydrate-binding protein toxins are known to traverse the gut intact in dogs. Post-feeding rhodamine- or TRITC-tagged dietary lectins, the lectins were tracked from gut to dopaminergic neurons (DAergic-N) in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) [egIs1(Pdat-1:GFP)] where the mutant has the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fused to a dopamine transport protein gene labeling DAergic-N. The lectins were supplemented along with the food organism Escherichia coli (OP50). Among nine tested rhodamine/TRITC-tagged lectins, four, including Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E), Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Arachis hypogaea agglutinin (PNA), appeared to be transported from gut to the GFP-DAergic-N. Griffonia Simplicifolia and PHA-E, reduced the number of GFP-DAergic-N, suggesting a toxic activity. PHA-E, BS-I, Pisum sativum (PSA), and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (Succinylated) reduced fluorescent intensity of GFP-DAergic-N. PHA-E, PSA, Concanavalin A, and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin decreased the size of GFP-DAergic-N, while BS-I increased neuron size. These observations suggest that dietary plant lectins are transported to and affect DAergic-N in C. elegans, which support Braak and Hawkes' hypothesis, suggesting one alternate potential dietary etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). A recent Danish study showed that vagotomy resulted in 40% lower incidence of PD over 20 years. Differences in inherited sugar structures of gut and neuronal cell surfaces may make some individuals more susceptible in this conceptual disease etiology model. PMID:27014695

  16. Structural Basis for Multiple Sugar Recognition of Jacalin-related Human ZG16p Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Liu, Yan; Hanashima, Shinya; Ikeda, Akemi; Chai, Wengang; Nakano, Yukiko; Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko; Feizi, Ten; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2014-01-01

    ZG16p is a soluble mammalian lectin, the first to be described with a Jacalin-related β-prism-fold. ZG16p has been reported to bind both to glycosaminoglycans and mannose. To determine the structural basis of the multiple sugar-binding properties, we conducted glycan microarray analyses of human ZG16p. We observed that ZG16p preferentially binds to α-mannose-terminating short glycans such as Ser/Thr-linked O-mannose, but not to high mannose-type N-glycans. Among sulfated glycosaminoglycan oligomers examined, chondroitin sulfate B and heparin oligosaccharides showed significant binding. Crystallographic studies of human ZG16p lectin in the presence of selected ligands revealed the mechanism of multiple sugar recognition. Manα1–3Man and Glcβ1–3Glc bound in different orientations: the nonreducing end of the former and the reducing end of the latter fitted in the canonical shallow mannose binding pocket. Solution NMR analysis using 15N-labeled ZG16p defined the heparin-binding region, which is on an adjacent flat surface of the protein. On-array competitive binding assays suggest that it is possible for ZG16p to bind simultaneously to both types of ligands. Recognition of a broad spectrum of ligands by ZG16p may account for the multiple functions of this lectin in the formation of zymogen granules via glycosaminoglycan binding, and in the recognition of pathogens in the digestive system through α-mannose-related recognition. PMID:24790092

  17. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  18. Structural and functional similarities of breadfruit seed lectin and jacalin.

    PubMed

    Pineau, N; Pousset, J L; Preud'Homme, J L; Aucouturier, P

    1990-03-01

    Aquous extracts from seeds of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) were compared by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two bands of the same size (12 and 15 kD) as the jacalin subunits were the major components in breadfruit seed extract. They strongly reacted with anti-jacalin antibodies by western blotting. The breadfruit lectin displayed the same IgAl and IgD precipitation specificity as jacalin in gel double diffusion experiments. It also stimulated in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These results suggest that lectins from both species of Artocarpus are very similar.

  19. Wheat germ agglutinin and other selected lectins increase synthesis of decay-accelerating factor in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R W; Granzow, C A; Siegel, M I; Egan, R W; Billah, M M

    1991-09-15

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF) is a cell-surface phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that protects the cell from inadvertent complement attack by binding to and inactivating C3 and C5 convertases. We have measured DAF on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by immunoradiometric assay after its removal by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C or Nonidet P-40 detergent extraction and have previously demonstrated that DAF synthesis can be stimulated by phorbol ester activation of protein kinase C. We now report that although stimulation (4-48 h) of HUVEC with various cytokines, including TNF, IL-1, and IFN-gamma, did not alter DAF levels, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (5-50 micrograms/ml), a lectin specific for binding N-acetyl neuraminic acid and N-acetyl glucosamine residues, increased DAF levels fivefold when incubated with HUVEC for 12 to 24 h. The lectins Con A and PHA also stimulated DAF expression twofold, whereas a number of others including Ulex europaeus, Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin I, and Ricinus communis agglutinin I, which bind to endothelial cells, were inactive. The increase in DAF by WGA was inhibited by N-acetyl glucosamine (10-50 mM) but by neither N-acetyl neuraminic acid nor removal of surface N-acetyl neuraminic acid with neuraminidase. However, succinylated WGA, which has unaltered affinity for N-acetyl glucosamine but not longer binds N-acetyl neuraminic acid, was inactive. These data suggest that the binding of WGA to sugar residues alone is not sufficient to trigger DAF expression and that occupation of additional, specific sites are required. The increase in DAF levels on HUVEC was blocked by inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis. We conclude that continuous occupation by WGA of specific binding sites on HUVEC triggers events leading to DAF synthesis. This unique, long term stimulation of endothelial cells by lectins may be relevant to cell:cell interactions at the endothelium.

  20. Lectin extracts of champedak seeds demonstrate selective stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Gendeh, G S; Jaafar, M I

    1992-06-01

    The effect of extracts of champedak (Artocarpus integer) seed lectin on the proliferation of normal human lymphocyte was investigated. The IgA1 binding lectin was demonstrated to stimulate the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Action of the lectin on enriched T and B cell populations demonstrated T lymphocyte specificity. The lectin was not mitogenic to B lymphocytes. Optimal stimulation of proliferative response was achieved when cells were subjected to 5 days exposure to the crude lectin at 20 micrograms/ml.

  1. Spin-glass transition in Ni carbide single crystal nanoparticles with Ni3C - type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, S.; Kuboniwa, T.; Shinoda, K.; Suzuki, S.; Echigoya, J.

    2016-05-01

    Hexagonal shaped nanoparticles about 60 nm in size were successfully synthesized in tetraethylene glycol solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone. By the analysis of the electron diffraction pattern, these were identified as a single crystal of Ni carbide with Ni3C - type structure. Their magnetization curve at 5 K was not completely saturated under a magnetic field of 5 T. The thermomagnetization curves after zero-field cooling and after field cooling exhibited the magnetic cooling effect at low temperatures. Furthermore, the 2nd order nonlinear term of AC magnetic susceptibility exhibited a negative divergence at about 17 K. It is concluded that Ni carbide single crystal nanoparticles with the Ni3C - type structure exhibit spin-glass transition at low temperatures.

  2. Development of an in vitro infectivity assay for the C-type bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, J F; Diglio, C A

    1976-03-01

    The ability of the bovine C-type leukemia virus to induce syncytia formation in monolayer cell cultures has been used to develop a specific and simple infectivity assay for the virus. Using bovine embryonic spleen cells or human diploid embryonic lung cells as indicator cells, the results of the assay can be evaluated in 4 to 6 or 6 to 8 days, respectively. Pretreatment of the indicator cells with DEAE-dextran greatly increases the sensitivity of the assay. The assay is quantitative and can be applied as a direct method for the identification of bovine C-type leukemia virus-infected animals; it also provides a simple, and sensitive procedure for the detection and titration of virus-neutralizing antibodies.

  3. Ruthenium red preserves glycoprotein peplomers of C-type retroviruses for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fassel, T A; Raisch, K P; Chetty, N; Grossberg, S E; Kushnaryov, V M

    1998-07-01

    Peplomers, the glycoprotein projections of the outer viral envelope, are distinctive for many viruses. Peplomers of retroviral C-type particles are fragile and are not preserved in standard preparations for transmission electron microscopy of thin sections, whereas the peplomers of B- and D- type retroviruses are usually preserved. Ruthenium red, extensively used in transmission electron microscopy to enhance the preservation of glycosylated proteins, was used in the preparation of three retrovirus-producing lymphoblastoid cell lines: murine SC-1 cells producing the C-type murine leukemia retrovirus LP-BM5 that causes immunodeficiency, human DG-75 cells producing a murine leukemia retrovirus, and human C5/MJ cells producing human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). Fixation of cells was carried out with ruthenium red present in the glutaraldehyde, osmium tetroxide, and the ethanol dehydration through the 70% ethanol step. The detailed structure of peplomers of these three different viruses was well preserved. PMID:9735881

  4. Supercapacitors based on c-type cytochromes using conductive nanostructured networks of living bacteria.

    PubMed

    Malvankar, Nikhil S; Mester, Tünde; Tuominen, Mark T; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-02-01

    Supercapacitors have attracted interest in energy storage because they have the potential to complement or replace batteries. Here, we report that c-type cytochromes, naturally immersed in a living, electrically conductive microbial biofilm, greatly enhance the device capacitance by over two orders of magnitude. We employ genetic engineering, protein unfolding and Nernstian modeling for in vivo demonstration of charge storage capacity of c-type cytochromes and perform electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge cycling to confirm the pseudocapacitive, redox nature of biofilm capacitance. The biofilms also show low self-discharge and good charge/discharge reversibility. The superior electrochemical performance of the biofilm is related to its high abundance of cytochromes, providing large electron storage capacity, its nanostructured network with metallic-like conductivity, and its porous architecture with hydrous nature, offering prospects for future low cost and environmentally sustainable energy storage devices.

  5. Order within a mosaic distribution of mitochondrial c-type cytochrome biogenesis systems?

    PubMed

    Allen, James W A; Jackson, Andrew P; Rigden, Daniel J; Willis, Antony C; Ferguson, Stuart J; Ginger, Michael L

    2008-05-01

    Mitochondrial cytochromes c and c(1) are present in all eukaryotes that use oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor in the respiratory chain. Maturation of c-type cytochromes requires covalent attachment of the heme cofactor to the protein, and there are at least five distinct biogenesis systems that catalyze this post-translational modification in different organisms and organelles. In this study, we use biochemical data, comparative genomic and structural bioinformatics investigations to provide a holistic view of mitochondrial c-type cytochrome biogenesis and its evolution. There are three pathways for mitochondrial c-type cytochrome maturation, only one of which is present in prokaryotes. We analyze the evolutionary distribution of these biogenesis systems, which include the Ccm system (System I) and the enzyme heme lyase (System III). We conclude that heme lyase evolved once and, in many lineages, replaced the multicomponent Ccm system (present in the proto-mitochondrial endosymbiont), probably as a consequence of lateral gene transfer. We find no evidence of a System III precursor in prokaryotes, and argue that System III is incompatible with multi-heme cytochromes common to bacteria, but absent from eukaryotes. The evolution of the eukaryotic-specific protein heme lyase is strikingly unusual, given that this protein provides a function (thioether bond formation) that is also ubiquitous in prokaryotes. The absence of any known c-type cytochrome biogenesis system from the sequenced genomes of various trypanosome species indicates the presence of a third distinct mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, this system attaches heme to mitochondrial cytochromes c that contain only one cysteine residue, rather than the usual two, within the heme-binding motif. The isolation of single-cysteine-containing mitochondrial cytochromes c from free-living kinetoplastids, Euglena and the marine flagellate Diplonema papillatum suggests that this unique form of heme attachment

  6. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin(s): use and applications in chromosome studies of lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Soares, M B; Armada, J L; Soares, V M; Seuánez, H N

    1982-01-01

    A simple procedure for extracting a lectin from the seeds of the jackfruit, Artocarpus integrifolia, is described. The extracts had an average protein concentration of 13.3 mg/ml, and were strongly erythroagglutinating with a 10(6) titre. Erythroagglutination was shown to be non-specific for A1-B-0 erythrocytes. Lymphoblastic transformation and mitogenic stimulation occurred in lymphocyte cultures both in man and Rhesus monkey, and chromosome preparations were obtained. Such preparations were of good quality and were adequate for chromosome analysis with chromosome banding techniques. In man, the response to the mitogenic stimulation did not vary significantly between individuals. In Rhesus monkey, where Phaseolus vulgaris phytohaemagglutinin produced a weaker mitogenic stimulation than in man, jacalin proved to be very effective.

  7. Lectin-binding sites in epithelial cells of the mouse prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Kentaro; Yoshida, Ayaka; Muragishi, Ryoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The prostate is an exocrine gland in the male reproductive tract that secretes seminal fluids. To gain insight into the cytochemical properties of prostatic epithelial cells, the characteristics of glycoconjugates in mouse prostate sections were examined by lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Characteristic staining patterns were observed, depending on the type of lectins present in the epithelia. Luminal cells reacted specifically with mannose-binding lectins (Galanthus nivalis lectin, Hippeastrum hybrid lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin) and Maclura pomifera lectin in all lobes of the prostate. Luminal cells also expressed galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), and fucose residues in the lateral and ventral lobes. Basal cells expressed GlcNAc and fucose, and reacted with Datura stramonium lectin and Aleuria aurantia lectin in all lobes. These results indicate that in the mouse prostate, the selectivity of lectin-binding sites for distinct cell types and lobe-dependent staining may relate to cellular and regional differences in function. Furthermore, some lectins selectively bound to prostatic epithelial cells, indicating their potential use as markers for the histopathological evaluation of prostatic diseases, cancer diagnosis, or male infertility. PMID:26004072

  8. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  9. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  10. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  11. Binding of mannose-functionalized dendrimers with pea (Pisum sativum) lectin.

    PubMed

    Schlick, Kristian H; Udelhoven, Rachel A; Strohmeyer, Gregory C; Cloninger, Mary J

    2005-01-01

    Lectins are invaluable tools for chemical biology because they recognize carbohydrate arrays. Multivalent carbohydrate binding by lectins is important for processes such as bacterial and viral adhesion and cancer metastasis. A better understanding of mammalian lectin binding to carbohydrate arrays is critical for controlling these and other cellular recognition processes. Plant lectins are excellent model systems for the study of multivalent protein-carbohydrate interactions because of their robustness and ready availability. Here, we describe binding studies of mannose-functionalized poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to a mitogenic lectin from Pisum sativum (pea lectin). Hemagglutination and precipitation assays were performed, and results were compared to those obtained from concanavalin A (Con A), a lectin that has been studied in more detail. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments are also described.

  12. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation on mistletoe (Viscum album) lectin-mediated toxicity and immunomodulatory activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Jung, Pil-Mun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on the reduction of the toxicity of mistletoe lectin using both in vitro and in vivo models. To extract the lectin from mistletoe, an (NH4)2SO4 precipitation method was employed and the precipitant purified using a Sepharose 4B column to obtain the pure lectin fraction. Purified lectin was then gamma-irradiated at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 kGy, or heated at 100 °C for 30 min. Toxic effects of non-irradiated, irradiated, and heat-treated lectins were tested using hemagglutination assays, cytotoxicity assays, hepatotoxicity, and a mouse survival test and immunological response was tested using cytokine production activity. Hemagglutination of lectin was remarkably decreased (P < 0.05) by irradiation at doses exceeding 10 kGy and with heat treatment. However, lectin irradiated with 5 kGy maintained its hemagglutination activity. The cytotoxicity of lectin was decreased by irradiation at doses over 5 kGy and with heat treatment. In experiments using mouse model, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) levels were decreased in the group treated with the 5 kGy irradiated and heat-treated lectins as compared to the intact lectin, and it was also shown that 5 kGy irradiated and heat-treated lectins did not cause damage in liver tissue or mortality. In the result of immunological response, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL-6) levels were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the 5 kGy gamma-irradiated lectin treated group. These results indicate that 5 kGy irradiated lectin still maintained the immunological response with reduction of toxicity. Therefore, gamma-irradiation may be an effective method for reducing the toxicity of lectin maintaining the immune response. PMID:23847758

  14. Architectures of Multivalent Glycomimetics for Probing Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, Martina

    Well-defined multivalent glycoconjugates are valued tools in glycoscience and they are particularly valuable for the investigation of carbohydrate-lectin interactions. In addition to the relatively globularly shaped glycodendrimers many other designs have been realized. This chapter gives an overview on the common different architectures and their chemical synthesis by focussing on the achievements made since 2001.

  15. Membrane adsorbers comprising grafted glycopolymers for targeted lectin binding

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Husson, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    This work details the design and testing of affinity membrane adsorbers for lectin purifications that incorporate glucose-containing glycopolymers. It is the selective interaction between the sugar residues of the glycopolymer and the complementary carbohydrate-binding domain of the lectin that provides the basis for the isolation and purification of lectins from complex biological media. The design approach used in these studies was to graft glycopolymer ‘tentacles’ from macroporous regenerated cellulose membranes by atom transfer radical polymerization. As shown in earlier studies, this design approach can be used to prepare high-productivity membrane adsorbers. The model lectin, concanavalin A (conA), was used to evaluate membrane performance in bind-and-elute purification, using a low molecular weight sugar for elution. The membrane capacity for binding conA was measured at equilibrium and under dynamic conditions using flow rates of 0.1 and 1.0 mL/min. The first Damkohler number was estimated to relate the adsorption rate to the convective mass transport rate through the membrane bed. It was used to assess whether adsorption kinetics or mass transport contributed the primary limitation to conA binding. Analyses indicate that this system is not limited by the accessibility of the binding sites, but by the inherent rate of adsorption of conA onto the glycopolymer. PMID:25866416

  16. Momordica charantia seed lectin: toxicity, bacterial agglutination and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Nabi, Md Mahamodun; Nurujjaman, Md; Abu Reza, Md; Alam, A H M Khurshid; Uz Zaman, Rokon; Khalid-Bin-Ferdaus, Khandaker Md; Amin, Ruhul; Khan, Md Masudul Hasan; Hossain, Md Anowar; Uddin, Md Salim; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat

    2015-03-01

    In last three decades, several studies were carried out on the D-galactose-specific lectin of Momordica charantia seeds (MCL). In the present study, in vitro growth inhibition (8-23 %) at different concentrations (6-24 μg/ml) of MCL was observed against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. MCL also showed 28, 45, and 75 % growth inhibitions against EAC cells when administered 1.2, 2.0, and 2.8 mg/kg/day (i.p.), respectively for five consequent days in vivo in mice. After lectin treatment, the level of red blood cell and hemoglobin was increased significantly with the decrease of white blood cell and maintained the normal level when compared with EAC-bearing control and normal mice without EAC cells. Although MCL caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase of EAC cells, any irregular shape or apoptotic morphological alterations in the lectin-treated EAC cells was not observed by an optical and fluorescence microscope. Lectin showed toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii with an LC50 value of 49.7 μg/ml. Four out of seven pathogenic bacteria were agglutinated by MCL in the absence of inhibitory sugar D-lactose/D-galactose. In conclusion, MCL showed strong cytotoxic effect and ther