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Sample records for c-type lectin surface

  1. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer. PMID:28123516

  2. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer.

  3. Lactobacillus reuteri Surface Mucus Adhesins Upregulate Inflammatory Responses Through Interactions With Innate C-Type Lectin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bene, Krisztián P.; Kavanaugh, Devon W.; Leclaire, Charlotte; Gunning, Allan P.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Wittmann, Alexandra; Young, Ian D.; Kawasaki, Norihito; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Juge, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    The vertebrate gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri exhibits strain-specific adhesion and health-promoting properties. Here, we investigated the role of the mucus adhesins, CmbA and MUB, upon interaction of L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 strains with human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We showed that mucus adhesins increased the capacity of L. reuteri strains to interact with moDCs and promoted phagocytosis. Our data also indicated that mucus adhesins mediate anti- and pro-inflammatory effects by the induction of interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 cytokines. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 were exclusively able to induce moDC-mediated Th1 and Th17 immune responses. We further showed that purified MUB activates moDCs and induces Th1 polarized immune responses associated with increased IFNγ production. MUB appeared to mediate these effects via binding to C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), as shown using cell reporter assays. Blocking moDCs with antibodies against DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) or Dectin-2 did not affect the uptake of the MUB-expressing strain, but reduced the production of TNF-α and IL-6 by moDCs significantly, in line with the Th1 polarizing capacity of moDCs. The direct interaction between MUB and CLRs was further confirmed by atomic force spectroscopy. Taken together these data suggest that mucus adhesins expressed at the cell surface of L. reuteri strains may exert immunoregulatory effects in the gut through modulating the Th1-promoting capacity of DCs upon interaction with C-type lectins. PMID:28326063

  4. Scavenger Receptor C-Type Lectin Binds to the Leukocyte Cell Surface Glycan Lewis By a Novel Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Taylor, M.E.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-10

    The scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL) is unique in the family of class A scavenger receptors, because in addition to binding sites for oxidized lipoproteins it also contains a C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) that interacts with specific glycans. Both human and mouse SRCL are highly specific for the Lewis(x) trisaccharide, which is commonly found on the surfaces of leukocytes and some tumor cells. Structural analysis of the CRD of mouse SRCL in complex with Lewis(x) and mutagenesis show the basis for this specificity. The interaction between mouse SRCL and Lewis(x) is analogous to the way that selectins and DC-SIGN bind to related fucosylated glycans, but the mechanism of the interaction is novel, because it is based on a primary galactose-binding site similar to the binding site in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Crystals of the human receptor lacking bound calcium ions reveal an alternative conformation in which a glycan ligand would be released during receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  5. Macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) recognizes glycosylated surface (S)-layer of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Settem, Rajendra P; Honma, Kiyonobu; Kay, Jason G; Sharma, Ashu

    2017-01-01

    The oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that leads to the destruction of the gum and tooth supporting tissues, often leading to tooth loss. T. forsythia is a unique Gram-negative organism endowed with an elaborate protein O-glycosylation system that allows the bacterium to express a glycosylated surface (S)-layer comprising two high molecular weight glycoproteins modified with O-linked oligosaccharides. The T. forsythia S-layer has been implicated in the modulation of cytokine responses of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages, that play a significant role during inflammation associated with periodontitis. The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin receptor (Mincle) is an FcRγ-coupled pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes a wide variety of sugar containing ligands from fungal and bacterial pathogens. In this study, we aimed to determine if Mincle might be involved in the recognition of T. forsythia S-layer and modulation of cytokine response of macrophages against the bacterium. Binding studies using recombinant Mincle-Fc fusion protein indicated a specific Ca2+-dependent binding of Mincle to T. forsythia S-layer. Subsequent experiments with Mincle-expressing and Mincle-knockdown macrophages revealed a role for Mincle/S-layer interaction in the induction of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion in macrophages stimulated with T. forsythia as well as its S-layer. Together, these studies revealed Mincle as an important macrophage receptor involved in the modulation of cytokine responses of macrophages against T. forsythia, and thus may play a critical role in orchestrating the host immune response against the bacterium.

  6. Macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) recognizes glycosylated surface (S)-layer of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Settem, Rajendra P.; Honma, Kiyonobu; Kay, Jason G.

    2017-01-01

    The oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that leads to the destruction of the gum and tooth supporting tissues, often leading to tooth loss. T. forsythia is a unique Gram-negative organism endowed with an elaborate protein O-glycosylation system that allows the bacterium to express a glycosylated surface (S)-layer comprising two high molecular weight glycoproteins modified with O-linked oligosaccharides. The T. forsythia S-layer has been implicated in the modulation of cytokine responses of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages, that play a significant role during inflammation associated with periodontitis. The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin receptor (Mincle) is an FcRγ-coupled pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes a wide variety of sugar containing ligands from fungal and bacterial pathogens. In this study, we aimed to determine if Mincle might be involved in the recognition of T. forsythia S-layer and modulation of cytokine response of macrophages against the bacterium. Binding studies using recombinant Mincle-Fc fusion protein indicated a specific Ca2+-dependent binding of Mincle to T. forsythia S-layer. Subsequent experiments with Mincle-expressing and Mincle-knockdown macrophages revealed a role for Mincle/S-layer interaction in the induction of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion in macrophages stimulated with T. forsythia as well as its S-layer. Together, these studies revealed Mincle as an important macrophage receptor involved in the modulation of cytokine responses of macrophages against T. forsythia, and thus may play a critical role in orchestrating the host immune response against the bacterium. PMID:28264048

  7. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  8. C-type lectins in immunity: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Dambuza, Ivy M; Brown, Gordon D

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) comprise a large superfamily of proteins, which recognise a diverse range of ligands, and are defined by the presence of at least one C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). Of particular interest are the single extracellular CTLD-containing receptors of the ‘Dectin-1’ and ‘Dectin-2’ clusters, which associate with signalling adaptors or possess integral intracellular signalling domains. These CLRs have traditionally been associated with the recognition of fungi, but recent discoveries have revealed diverse and unexpected functions. In this review, we describe their newly identified roles in anti-microbial host defence, homeostasis, autoimmunity, allergy and their functions in the recognition and response to dead and cancerous cells. PMID:25553393

  9. C-type lectin receptors in tuberculosis: what we know.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Surabhi; Klassert, Tilman E; Slevogt, Hortense

    2016-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiologic agent of tuberculosis (TB), is recognized by a number of pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), either soluble or predominantly expressed on the surface of various cells of innate and adaptive immunity. C-type lectin receptors (CTLRs) are a class of PRRs which can recognize a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands, thereby playing a crucial role in immunity, as well as in maintaining homeostasis. Mtb surface ligands, including mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan and cord factor, are important immune modulators which recently have been found to be directly recognized by several CTLRs. Receptor ligation is followed by cellular activation, mainly via nuclear factor κB mediated by a series of adaptors with subsequent expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mtb recognition by CTLRs and their cross talk with other PRRs on immune cells is of key importance for the better understanding of the Mtb-induced complexity of the host immune responses. Epidemiological studies have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in several PRRs, as well as the adaptors in their signaling cascades, are directly involved in the susceptibility for developing disease and the disease outcome. In addition, an increasing number of CTLRs have been studied for their functional effects in the pathogenesis of TB. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the various roles played by different CTLRs in TB, as well as the role of their SNPs associated with disease susceptibility and outcome in different human populations.

  10. Mosquito C-type lectins maintain gut microbiome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Rudian; Liu, Jianying; Liu, Qiyong; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    The long-term evolutionary interaction between the host immune system and symbiotic bacteria determines their cooperative rather than antagonistic relationship. It is known that commensal bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms to manipulate the mammalian host immune system and maintain homeostasis. However, the strategies employed by the microbiome to overcome host immune responses in invertebrates still remain to be understood. Here, we report that the gut microbiome in mosquitoes utilizes C-type lectins (mosGCTLs) to evade the bactericidal capacity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Aedes aegypti mosGCTLs facilitate colonization by multiple bacterial strains. Furthermore, maintenance of the gut microbial flora relies on the expression of mosGCTLs in A. aegypti. Silencing the orthologues of mosGCTL in another major mosquito vector (Culex pipiens pallens) also impairs the survival of gut commensal bacteria. The gut microbiome stimulates the expression of mosGCTLs, which coat the bacterial surface and counteract AMP activity. Our study describes a mechanism by which the insect symbiotic microbiome offsets gut immunity to achieve homeostasis. PMID:27170846

  11. Transmission-blocking antibodies against mosquito C-type lectins for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Fuchun; Liu, Jianying; Xiao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Siyin; Qin, Chengfeng; Xiang, Ye; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2014-02-01

    C-type lectins are a family of proteins with carbohydrate-binding activity. Several C-type lectins in mammals or arthropods are employed as receptors or attachment factors to facilitate flavivirus invasion. We previously identified a C-type lectin in Aedes aegypti, designated as mosquito galactose specific C-type lectin-1 (mosGCTL-1), facilitating the attachment of West Nile virus (WNV) on the cell membrane. Here, we first identified that 9 A. aegypti mosGCTL genes were key susceptibility factors facilitating DENV-2 infection, of which mosGCTL-3 exhibited the most significant effect. We found that mosGCTL-3 was induced in mosquito tissues with DENV-2 infection, and that the protein interacted with DENV-2 surface envelop (E) protein and virions in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the other identified mosGCTLs interacted with the DENV-2 E protein, indicating that DENV may employ multiple mosGCTLs as ligands to promote the infection of vectors. The vectorial susceptibility factors that facilitate pathogen invasion may potentially be explored as a target to disrupt the acquisition of microbes from the vertebrate host. Indeed, membrane blood feeding of antisera against mosGCTLs dramatically reduced mosquito infective ratio. Hence, the immunization against mosGCTLs is a feasible approach for preventing dengue infection. Our study provides a future avenue for developing a transmission-blocking vaccine that interrupts the life cycle of dengue virus and reduces disease burden.

  12. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  13. Identification and characterization of C-type lectin genes from the reniform nematode

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    C-type lectins represent a large family of sugar-binding proteins which require calcium for their ligand-binding activity. C-type lectins play an important role in the innate immune response in all life forms when challenged by pathogens. Ligand binding occurs via conserved domain sequences which re...

  14. Integrative analysis workflow for the structural and functional classification of C-type lectins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is important to understand the roles of C-type lectins in the immune system due to their ubiquity and diverse range of functions in animal cells. It has been observed that currently confirmed C-type lectins share a highly conserved domain known as the C-type carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Using the sequence profile of the CRD, an increasing number of putative C-type lectins have been identified. Hence, it is highly needed to develop a systematic framework that enables us to elucidate their carbohydrate (glycan) recognition function, and discover their physiological and pathological roles. Results Presented herein is an integrated workflow for characterizing the sequence and structural features of novel C-type lectins. Our workflow utilizes web-based queries and available software suites to annotate features that can be found on the C-type lectin, given its amino acid sequence. At the same time, it incorporates modeling and analysis of glycans - a major class of ligands that interact with C-type lectins. Thereafter, the results are analyzed together with context-specific knowledge to filter off unlikely predictions. This allows researchers to design their subsequent experiments to confirm the functions of the C-type lectins in a systematic manner. Conclusions The efficacy and usefulness of our proposed immunoinformatics workflow was demonstrated by applying our integrated workflow to a novel C-type lectin -CLEC17A - and we report some of its possible functions that warrants further validation through wet-lab experiments. PMID:22372988

  15. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-surface glycoprotein apa as a potential adhesin to colonize target cells via the innate immune system pulmonary C-type lectin surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Ragas, Aude; Roussel, Lucie; Puzo, Germain; Rivière, Michel

    2007-02-23

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem, and understanding the mechanism by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) invades and colonizes its host target cells remains an important issue for the control of infection. The innate immune system C-type lectins (C-TLs), including the human pulmonary surfactant protein A (PSP-A), have been recently identified as determinant players in the early recognition of the invading pathogen and in mounting the host defense response. Although the antigenic lipoglycan mannosylated lipoarabinomannan is currently considered to be the major C-TL target on the mycobacterial surface, the recognition by some C-TLs of the only mycobacterial species composing the "Mtb complex" indicates that mannosylated lipoarabinomannan cannot account alone for this specificity. Thus, we searched for the mycobacterial molecules targeted by human PSP-A, focusing our attention on the Mtb surface glycoproteins. We developed an original functional proteomic approach based on a lectin blot assay using crude human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as a source of physiological PSP-A. Combined with selective cell-surface protein extraction and mass spectrometry peptide mapping, this strategy allowed us to identify the Apa (alanine- and proline-rich antigenic) glycoprotein as new potential target for PSP-A. This result was supported by direct binding of PSP-A to purified Apa. Moreover, EDTA addition or deglycosylation of purified Apa samples completely abolished the interaction, demonstrating that the interaction is calcium- and mannose-dependent, as expected. Finally, we provide convincing evidence that Apa, formerly considered as mainly secreted, is associated with the cell wall for a sufficiently long time to aid in the attachment of PSP-A. Because, to date, Apa seems to be restricted to the Mtb complex strains, we propose that it may account for the selective recognition of those strains by PSP-A and other immune system C-TLs containing homologous functional

  16. The three-dimensional structure of codakine and related marine C-type lectins.

    PubMed

    Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Markiv, Anatoly; Smith-Ravin, Juliette

    2007-10-01

    Codakine is a new Ca(2+)-dependent mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) isolated from the gill tissue of the tropical clam, Codakia orbicularis. Bioinformatic analyses with the BLAST program have revealed similarities with marine lectins involved in immunity whose three-dimensional (3D) structures were unknown up until recently. In this article, we present bioinformatic analyses of marine lectins that are homologous to codakine, in particular lectins from the sea worm Laxus oneistus, named mermaid. These lectins are involved in the symbiotic association with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria which are closely related to the C. orbicularis gill symbiont. Using homology modelling, folding that is characteristic of C-type lectins was observed in all the marine Ca(2+)-dependent lectins studied, with conservation of random coiled structures of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and Ca(2+)-binding sites. Like codakine, the marine lectins analysed contain a signal peptide commonly found in secreted and transmembrane proteins. The majority of the predictive 3D models established from the lectins exhibit a common feature, namely the involvement in invertebrate and vertebrate immunity (dendritic cell receptor, macrophage receptor, etc.). These bioinformatic analyses and the literature data support the hypothesis that codakine, like the L. oneistus mermaids, is probably involved in the cellular mediation of symbiosis and defence against pathogenic microorganisms.

  17. C-type Lectin Binds to β-Integrin to Promote Hemocytic Phagocytosis in an Invertebrate*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a conserved cellular response among metazoans. Opsonins are some molecules that label targets to increase their susceptibility to phagocytosis. Opsonins are usually captured by receptors on the surface of phagocytes. Our previous study found the C-type lectin FcLec4 from Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis might function as an opsonin to facilitate bacterial clearance. In the present study we purified the native FcLec4 protein and confirmed its opsonic activity in the near relation, kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus. The possible receptor of FcLec4 was identified as β-integrin by panning a T7 phage display library of shrimp hemocytes and then confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assay. We further proved that the interaction between FcLec4 and β-integrin did not rely on the carbohydrate recognition domain but on the N terminus of FcLec4. In addition, inhibition of FcLec4 expression using RNAi delayed bacterial clearance, and β-integrin knockdown suppressed the opsonic activity of FcLec4. This study is the first to show the direct interaction between an opsonin and its receptor in crustaceans. Our study provides new insights into invertebrate phagocytosis and the functions of C-type lectins. PMID:24324258

  18. A C-type lectin associated and translocated with cortical granules during oocyte maturation and egg fertilization in fish.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cai-Hua; Yang, Shu-Ting; Yang, Zhong-An; Zhang, Lei; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2004-01-15

    Oocyte maturation and egg fertilization in both vertebrates and invertebrates are marked by orchestrated cytoplasmic translocation of secretory vesicles known as cortical granules. It is thought that such redistribution of cellular content is critical for asymmetrical cell division during early development, but the mechanism and regulation of the process is poorly understood. Here we report the identification, purification and cDNA cloning of a C-type lectin from oocytes of a freshwater fish species gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio). The purified protein has been demonstrated to have lectin activity and to be a Ca(2+)-dependent C-type lectin by hemagglutination activity assay. Immunocytochemistry revealed that the lectin is associated with cortical granules, gradually translocated to the cell surface during oocyte maturation, and discharged to the egg envelope upon fertilization. Interestingly, the lectin becomes phosphorylated on threonine residues upon induction of exocytosis by fertilization and returns to its original state after morula stage of embryonic development, suggesting that this posttranslational modification may represent a critical molecular switch for early embryonic development.

  19. A C-Type Lectin from Bothrops jararacussu Venom Disrupts Staphylococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Raphael Contelli; Fabres-Klein, Mary Hellen; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Feio, Renato Neves; Malouin, François; Ribon, Andréa de Oliveira Barros

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16) showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model. PMID:25811661

  20. Characterization of β-Glucan Recognition Site on C-Type Lectin, Dectin 1

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Takashi; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Aketagawa, Jun; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ohno, Naohito

    2004-01-01

    Dectin 1 is a mammalian cell surface receptor for (1→3)-β-d-glucans. Since (1→3)-β-d-glucans are commonly present on fungal cell walls, it has been suggested that dectin 1 is important for recognizing fungal invasion. In this study we tried to deduce the amino acid residues in dectin 1 responsible for β-glucan recognition. HEK293 cells transfected with mouse dectin 1 cDNA could bind to a gel-forming (1→3)-β-d-glucan, schizophyllan (SPG). The binding of SPG to a dectin 1 transfectant was inhibited by pretreatment with other β-glucans having a (1→3)-β-d-glucosyl linkage but not by pretreatment with α-glucans. Dectin 1 has a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) consisting of six cysteine residues that are highly conserved in C-type lectins. We prepared 32 point mutants with mutations in the CRD and analyzed their binding to SPG. Mutations at Trp221 and His223 resulted in decreased binding to β-glucan. Monoclonal antibody 4B2, a dectin- 1 monoclonal antibody which had a blocking effect on the β-glucan interaction, completely failed to bind the dectin-1 mutant W221A. A mutant with mutations in Trp221 and His223 did not have a collaborative effect on Toll-like receptor 2-mediated cellular activation in response to zymosan. These amino acid residues are distinct from residues in other sugar-recognizing peptide sequences of typical C-type lectins. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence W221-I222-H223 is critical for formation of a β-glucan binding site in the CRD of dectin 1. PMID:15213161

  1. Overexpression of a C-type lectin enhances bacterial resistance in red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Liu, Ying-Ying; Mu, Yi; Ren, Qian; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-05-01

    C-type lectins play important roles in the innate immune system of crustaceans. In this study, a novel C-type lectin gene, designated as PcLec4, was obtained from the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that PcLec4 is mainly expressed in the crayfish hepatopancreas and intestine, and the PcLec4 mRNA expression is upregulated after challenged with the bacteria Vibrio anguillarum. PcLec4 was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and anti-PcLec4 polyclonal antiserum was prepared. Binding experiments revealed that the recombinant PcLec4 binds to various bacteria and polysaccharides on the bacterial surface, which suggests that PcLec4 recognizes bacterial pathogens. Overexpression of PcLec4 in crayfish using the pIeLec4 vector was performed. The results show that the crayfish overexpressing PcLec4 eliminate injected V. anguillarum more quickly than the control, which suggests that PcLec4 elicits further immune response for removing invading bacteria. The results of the survival experiment confirmed the function of PcLec4 in resisting V. anguillarum because PcLec4 overexpression in crayfish significantly increased the crayfish survival rate. These results reveal that PcLec4 has an important role in the antibacterial immunity of crayfish, and in vivo PcLec4 overexpression might be used as a disease control strategy in aquiculture.

  2. mosGCTL-7, a C-Type Lectin Protein, Mediates Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection in Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Qian, Yingjuan; Jung, Yong-Sam; Zhou, Bin; Cao, Ruibing; Shen, Ting; Shao, Donghua; Wei, Jianchao; Ma, Zhiyong; Chen, Puyan; Zhu, Huaimin; Qiu, Yafeng

    2017-05-15

    cultured cells. JEV infection changed the expression of almost all C-type lectins in vivo and in vitro, and mosGCTL-7 bound to the JEV envelope protein via an N-glycan at N154. Cell surface mosPTP-1 interacted with the mosGCTL-7-JEV complex to facilitate virus infection in vivo and in vitro Our findings provide further opportunities for developing new strategies to control arbovirus dissemination in nature. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. The structure of a tunicate C-type lectin from Polyandrocarpa misakiensis complexed with D -galactose.

    PubMed

    Poget, S F; Legge, G B; Proctor, M R; Butler, P J; Bycroft, M; Williams, R L

    1999-07-23

    C-type lectins are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-recognising proteins. Isothermal titration calorimetry of the C-type Polyandrocarpa lectin (TC14) from the tunicate Polyandrocarpa misakiensis revealed the presence of a single calcium atom per monomer with a dissociation constant of 2.6 microM, and confirmed the specificity of TC14 for D -galactose and related monosaccharides. We have determined the 2.2 A X-ray crystal structure of Polyandrocarpa lectin complexed with D -galactose. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that TC14 behaves as a dimer in solution. This is reflected by the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit with the dimeric interface formed by antiparallel pairing of the two N-terminal beta-strands and hydrophobic interactions. TC14 adopts a typical C-type lectin fold with differences in structure from other C-type lectins mainly in the diverse loop regions and in the second alpha-helix, which is involved in the formation of the dimeric interface. The D -galactose is bound through coordination of the 3 and 4-hydroxyl oxygen atoms with a bound calcium atom. Additional hydrogen bonds are formed directly between serine, aspartate and glutamate side-chains of the protein and the sugar 3 and 4-hydroxyl groups. Comparison of the galactose binding by TC14 with the mannose binding by rat mannose-binding protein reveals how monosaccharide specificity is achieved in this lectin. A tryptophan side-chain close to the binding site and the distribution of hydrogen-bond acceptors and donors around the 3 and 4-hydroxyl groups of the sugar are essential determinants of specificity. These elements are, however, arranged in a very different way than in an engineered galactose-specific mutant of MBPA. Possible biological functions can more easily be understood from the fact that TC14 is a dimer under physiological conditions. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Cloning of cDNAs encoding C-type lectins from Elapidae snakes Bungarus fasciatus and Bungarus multicinctus.

    PubMed

    Zha, H G; Lee, W H; Zhang, Y

    2001-12-01

    A number of C-type lectins with various biological activities have been purified and characterized from Viperidae snake venoms. In contrast, only a few reports could be found in literature concerning the C-type lectins in Elapidae snake venoms. Based on the published cDNA sequences of C-type lectins from Viperidae snake venoms, oligonucleotide primers were designed and used to screen the cDNA libraries made from the venom glands of Bungarus fasciatus and Bungarus multicinctus. This allowed the cloning of three full length cDNAs encoding C-type lectins. The encoded proteins, named BFL-1, BFL-2 and BML, exhibit high degrees of sequence identities with Viperidae snake venom saccharide-binding lectins (around 60% with Trimeresurus stejnegeri venom lectin, Crotalus atrox venom lectin and Agkistrodon piscivorus venom lectin). They show much less identities with other venom C-type lectin-like proteins (around 30% with the platelet glycoprotein Ib-binding protein from Agkistrodon blomhoffi venom and the factor IX/X-binding protein from Trimeresurus flavoviridis venom). The cDNAs revealed that the precursors contain potential signal peptides characterized by a hydrophobic core. To our knowledge, these are the first cDNA cloning of group VII C-type lectins (Drickamer K. 1993. Prog. Nucleic Acid Res. Mol. Biol. 45, 207-232) from Elapidae snake venom glands.

  5. C-type lectin-like receptors of the dectin-1 cluster: ligands and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Plato, Anthony; Willment, Janet A; Brown, Gordon D

    2013-04-01

    Innate immunity is constructed around genetically encoded receptors that survey the intracellular and extracellular environments for signs of invading microorganisms. These receptors recognise the invader and through complex intracellular networks of molecular signaling, they destroy the threat whilst instructing effective adaptive immune responses. Many of these receptors, like the Toll-like receptors in particular, are well-known for their ability to mediate downstream responses upon recognition of exogenous or endogenous ligands; however, the emerging family known as the C-type lectin-like receptors contains many members that have a huge impact on immune and homeostatic regulation. Of particular interest here are the C-type lectin-like receptors that make up the Dectin-1 cluster and their intracellular signaling motifs that mediate their functions. In this review, we aim to draw together current knowledge of ligands, motifs and signaling pathways, present downstream of Dectin-1 cluster receptors, and discuss how these dictate their role within biological systems.

  6. Identification of a Macrobrachium nipponense C-type lectin with a close evolutionary relationship to vertebrate lectins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Li, Tingting; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2017-07-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are involved in the innate immune defense of vertebrates and invertebrates against invading pathogens. This study cloned and characterized a novel C-type lectin (MnCTL) of the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense. The cloned MnCTL cDNA encompasses an open reading frame of 774 nucleotides and encodes polypeptides of 257 residues. The deduced MnCTL protein contains a single carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) with an EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif in calcium-binding site 2. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MnCTL has a closer evolutionary relationship with vertebrate lectins than with invertebrate lectins. Tissue expression analysis showed that high levels of MnCTL are ubiquitously distributed in the gills and stomach of M. nipponense. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that MnCTL expression was up-regulated by bacteria or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. Knock-down of the MnCTL gene in WSSV-challenged prawns significantly decreased MnALF1 and MnALF2 transcript levels. The recombinant MnCRD (rMnCRD) agglutinated both Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus) in the presence of calcium. Furthermore, rMnCRD could bind to all the tested bacteria with different activities. The sugar-binding assay showed that rMnCRD was able to bind lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, rMnCRD could accelerate bacterial clearance. On the contrary, MnCTL silencing by dsRNA interference could weaken the bacterial clearance ability. All these findings implicated MnCTL were involved in the antiviral and antibacterial innate immunity of M. nipponense. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Computational and experimental prediction of human C-type lectin receptor druggability.

    PubMed

    Aretz, Jonas; Wamhoff, Eike-Christian; Hanske, Jonas; Heymann, Dario; Rademacher, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian C-type lectin receptors (CTLRS) are involved in many aspects of immune cell regulation such as pathogen recognition, clearance of apoptotic bodies, and lymphocyte homing. Despite a great interest in modulating CTLR recognition of carbohydrates, the number of specific molecular probes is limited. To this end, we predicted the druggability of a panel of 22 CTLRs using DoGSiteScorer. The computed druggability scores of most structures were low, characterizing this family as either challenging or even undruggable. To further explore these findings, we employed a fluorine-based nuclear magnetic resonance screening of fragment mixtures against DC-SIGN, a receptor of pharmacological interest. To our surprise, we found many fragment hits associated with the carbohydrate recognition site (hit rate = 13.5%). A surface plasmon resonance-based follow-up assay confirmed 18 of these fragments (47%) and equilibrium dissociation constants were determined. Encouraged by these findings we expanded our experimental druggability prediction to Langerin and MCL and found medium to high hit rates as well, being 15.7 and 10.0%, respectively. Our results highlight limitations of current in silico approaches to druggability assessment, in particular, with regard to carbohydrate-binding proteins. In sum, our data indicate that small molecule ligands for a larger panel of CTLRs can be developed.

  8. Two antibacterial C-type lectins from crustacean, Eriocheir sinensis, stimulated cellular encapsulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xing-Kun; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiao-Nv; Cheng, Lin; Wu, Min-Hao; Tan, Shang-Jian; Zhu, You-Ting; Yu, Ai-Qing; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Qun

    2013-12-01

    The first step of host fighting against pathogens is that pattern recognition receptors recognized pathogen-associated molecular patterns. However, the specificity of recognition within the innate immune molecular of invertebrates remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated how invertebrate pattern recognition receptor (PRR) C-type lectins might be involved in the antimicrobial response in crustacean. Based on our previously obtained completed coding regions of EsLecA and EsLecG in Eriocheir sinensis, the recombinant EsLectin proteins were produced via prokaryotic expression system and affinity chromatography. Subsequently, both rEsLecA and rEsLecG were discovered to have wide spectrum binding activities towards microorganisms, and their microbial-binding was calcium-independent. Moreover, the binding activities of both rEsLecA and rEsLecG induced the aggregation against microbial pathogens. Both microorganism growth inhibitory activities assays and antibacterial activities assays revealed their capabilities of suppressing microorganisms growth and directly killing microorganisms respectively. Furthermore, the encapsulation assays signified that both rEsLecA and rEsLecG could stimulate the cellular encapsulation in vitro. Collectively, data presented here demonstrated the successful expression and purification of two C-type lectins proteins in the Chinese mitten crab, and their critical role in the innate immune system of an invertebrate.

  9. Molecular cloning and analysis of a C-type lectin from silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Toufeeq; Zhan, Ming-Yue; Yang, Pei-Jin; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Rao, Xiang-Jun

    2017-07-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) play a variety of roles in plants and animals. They are involved in animal development, pathogen recognition, and the activation of immune responses. CTLs carry one or more non-catalytic carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) to bind specific carbohydrates reversibly. Here, we report the molecular cloning and functional analysis of a single-CRD CTL, named C-type lectin-S2 (BmCTL-S2) from the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae). The ORF of CTL-S2 is 666 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 221 amino acids. BmCTL-S2 is expressed in a variety of immune-related tissues, including hemocytes and fat body among others. BmCTL-S2 mRNA level in the midgut and the fat body was significantly increased by bacterial challenges. The recombinant protein (rBmCTL-S2) bound different bacterial cell wall components and bacterial cells. rBmCTL-S2 also inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, we infer that BmCTL-S2 is a pattern-recognition receptor with antibacterial activities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a C-type lectin in yellow catfish Tachysurus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Ke, F; Zhang, H B; Wang, Y; Hou, L F; Dong, H J; Wang, Z F; Pan, G W; Cao, X Y

    2016-09-01

    This study represents the first report of a C-type lectin (ctl) in yellow catfish Tachysurus fulvidraco. The complete sequence of ctl complementary (c)DNA consisted of 685 nucleotides. The open reading frame potentially encoded a protein of 177 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of c.y 20.204 kDa. The deduced amino-acid sequence contained a signal peptide and a single carbohydrate recognition domain with four cysteine residues and GlnProAsp (QPD) and TrpAsnAsp (WND) motifs. Ctl showed the highest identity (56.0%) to the predicted lactose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Quantitative real-time (qrt)-PCR analysis showed that ctl messenger (m)RNA was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues in normal fish, with high expression in trunk kidney and head kidney, which was increased following Aeromonas hydrophila challenge in a duration-dependent manner. Purified recombinant Ctl (rCtl) from Escherichia coli BL21 was able to bind and agglutinate Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in a calcium-dependent manner. These results suggested that Ctl might be a C-type lectin of T. fulvidraco involved in innate immune responses as receptors (PRR).

  11. The C-type lectin-like receptors of Dectin-1 cluster in natural killer gene complex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui

    2012-08-01

    Natural killer gene complex (NKC) encodes a group of proteins with a single C-type lectin-like domain, (CTLD) which can be subdivided several subfamilies according to their structures and expression patterns. The receptors containing the conserved calcium binding sites in the CTLD fold belong to group II of C-type lectin superfamily and are expressed on myeloid cells and non- myeloid cells. The receptors lacking conserved calcium binding sites in the CTLD fold have evolved to bind ligands other than carbohydrates independently on calcium and thereby are named as C-type lectin-like receptors. The C-type lectin-like receptors are previously thought to be exclusively expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and enable NK cells to discriminate self, missing self or altered self. However, some C-type lectin-like receptors are identified in myeloid cells and are intensely investigated, recently. These myeloid C-type lectin-like receptors, especially Dectin-1 cluster, have a wide variety of ligands, including those of exogenous origin, and play important roles in the physiological functions and pathological processes including immune homeostasis, immune defenses, and immune surveillance. In this review, we summarize each member of the Dectin-1 cluster, including their structural profiles, expression patterns, signaling properties as well as known physiological functions.

  12. Purification and biological effects of C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops insularis venom.

    PubMed

    Braga, Marcus Davis Machado; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Amora, Daniela Nascimento; de Menezes, Dalgimar Beserra; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Toyama, Daniela Oliveira; Marangoni, Sergio; Barbosa, Paulo Sérgio Ferreira; de Sousa Alves, Renata; Fonteles, Manassés Claudino; Monteiro, Helena Serra Azul

    2006-06-15

    Bothrops insularis is a snake from Queimada Grande Island, which is an island located about 20 miles away from the southeastern coast of Brazil. Compared to other Brazilian species of Bothrops, the toxinology of B. insularis is still poorly understood. Its C-type lectin is involved in several biological processes including anticoagulant and platelet-modulating activities. We purified the C-type lectin (BiLec) from Bothrops insularis venom and investigated its effect in the isolated kidney. BiLec was purified after two chromatographic steps; firstly, the whole venom was submitted to an HPLC molecular exclusion chromatography followed by a second purification through affinity chromatography. B. insularis lectin (BiLec) was studied as to its effect on the renal function of isolated perfused rat kidneys with the use of six Wistar rats. The concentration of 10mug/mL increased perfusion pressure (PP; control(60)=108.27+/-4.9; BiLec(60)=112.9+/-5.4 mmHg; *p<0.05) and renal vascular resistance (RVR; control(60)=5.38+/-0.51; BiLec(60)=6.01+/-0.57 mmHg; *p<0.05). The urinary flow reduced significantly at 90 and 120 min of perfusion (UF; control(120)=0.160+/-0.020; BiLec(120)=0.082+/-0.008 mL g(-1) min(-1); *p<0.05). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR; control(120)=0.697+/-0.084; BiLec(120)=0.394+/-0.063 mL g(-1) min(-1); *p<0.05) diminished only at 120 min. BiLec did not change the percentage of sodium (TNa(+)), potassium (TK(+)) and chloride tubular transport (TCl(-)). The histological alterations probably reflected direct injury on glomerular and tubular renal cells, as demonstrated by the rise in permeability of glomerular endothelial cells, revealed by the presence of a proteinaceous material in the Bowman space. We postulate that the C-type lectin B. insularis promoted its effects probably through interactions with endothelial cells or through the release of other mediators by tubular, mesangial and endothelial cells.

  13. High Bacterial Agglutination Activity in a Single-CRD C-Type Lectin from Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Gasmi, Leila; Ferré, Juan; Herrero, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-interacting proteins that play a pivotal role in multiple physiological and developmental aspects of all organisms. They can specifically interact with different bacterial and viral pathogens through carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRD). In addition, lectins are also of biotechnological interest because of their potential use as biosensors for capturing and identifying bacterial species. In this work, three C-type lectins from the Lepidoptera Spodoptera exigua were produced as recombinant proteins and their bacterial agglutination properties were characterized. The lowest protein concentration producing bacterial agglutination against a panel of different Gram+ and Gram− as well as their carbohydrate binding specificities was determined for the three lectins. One of these lectins, BLL2, was able to agglutinate cells from a broad range of bacterial species at an extremely low concentration, becoming a very interesting protein to be used as a biosensor or for other biotechnological applications involving bacterial capture. PMID:28257054

  14. High Bacterial Agglutination Activity in a Single-CRD C-Type Lectin from Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Leila; Ferré, Juan; Herrero, Salvador

    2017-03-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-interacting proteins that play a pivotal role in multiple physiological and developmental aspects of all organisms. They can specifically interact with different bacterial and viral pathogens through carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRD). In addition, lectins are also of biotechnological interest because of their potential use as biosensors for capturing and identifying bacterial species. In this work, three C-type lectins from the Lepidoptera Spodoptera exigua were produced as recombinant proteins and their bacterial agglutination properties were characterized. The lowest protein concentration producing bacterial agglutination against a panel of different Gram+ and Gram- as well as their carbohydrate binding specificities was determined for the three lectins. One of these lectins, BLL2, was able to agglutinate cells from a broad range of bacterial species at an extremely low concentration, becoming a very interesting protein to be used as a biosensor or for other biotechnological applications involving bacterial capture.

  15. Myeloid C-Type Lectin Receptors in Viral Recognition and Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, João T.; Lepenies, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of viral glycans by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity contributes to antiviral immune responses. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are PRRs capable of sensing glycans present in viral pathogens to activate antiviral immune responses such as phagocytosis, antigen processing and presentation, and subsequent T cell activation. The ability of CLRs to elicit and shape adaptive immunity plays a critical role in the inhibition of viral spread within the host. However, certain viruses exploit CLRs for viral entry into host cells to avoid immune recognition. To block CLR interactions with viral glycoproteins, antiviral strategies may involve the use of multivalent glycan carrier systems. In this review, we describe the role of CLRs in antiviral immunity and we highlight their dual function in viral clearance and exploitation by viral pathogens. PMID:28327518

  16. Rewiring monocyte glucose metabolism via C-type lectin signaling protects against disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Andrés, Jorge; Arts, Rob J W; Ter Horst, Rob; Gresnigt, Mark S; Smeekens, Sanne P; Ratter, Jacqueline M; Lachmandas, Ekta; Boutens, Lily; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Joosten, Leo A B; Notebaart, Richard A; Ardavín, Carlos; Netea, Mihai G

    2017-09-01

    Monocytes are innate immune cells that play a pivotal role in antifungal immunity, but little is known regarding the cellular metabolic events that regulate their function during infection. Using complementary transcriptomic and immunological studies in human primary monocytes, we show that activation of monocytes by Candida albicans yeast and hyphae was accompanied by metabolic rewiring induced through C-type lectin-signaling pathways. We describe that the innate immune responses against Candida yeast are energy-demanding processes that lead to the mobilization of intracellular metabolite pools and require induction of glucose metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and glutaminolysis, while responses to hyphae primarily rely on glycolysis. Experimental models of systemic candidiasis models validated a central role for glucose metabolism in anti-Candida immunity, as the impairment of glycolysis led to increased susceptibility in mice. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of understanding the complex network of metabolic responses triggered during infections, and unveil new potential targets for therapeutic approaches against fungal diseases.

  17. C-type lectin from red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii participates in cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Xian-Wei; Sun, Chen; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2011-03-01

    Lectins are potential immune recognition proteins. In this study, a novel C-type lectin (Pc-Lec1) is reported in freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Pc-Lec1 encodes a protein of 163 amino acids with a putative signal peptide and a single carbohydrate recognition domain. It was constitutively expressed in various tissues of a normal crayfish, especially in the hepatopancreas and gills. Expressions of Pc-Lec1 were up-regulated in the hepatopancreas and gills of crayfish challenged with Vibrio anguillarum, Staphylococcus aureus, or the white spot syndrome virus. Recombinant mature Pc-Lec1 bound bacteria and polysaccharides (peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, and lipopolysaccharide) but did not agglutinate bacteria. Pc-Lec1 enhanced hemocyte encapsulation of the sepharose beads in vitro, and the blocking of beads by a polyclonal antibody inhibited encapsulation. Pc-Lec1 promoted clearance of V. anguillarum in vivo. These results suggest that Pc-Lec1 is a pattern recognition receptor and participates in cellular immune response. Pc-Lec1 performs its function as an opsonin by enhancing the encapsulation or clearance of pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Schistosoma mansoni egg glycoproteins and C-type lectins of host immune cells: molecular partners that shape immune responses.

    PubMed

    Meevissen, Moniek H J; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2012-09-01

    Schistosome eggs and egg-derived molecules are potent immunomodulatory agents. There is increasing evidence that the interplay between egg glycoproteins and host C-type lectins plays an important role in shaping immune responses during schistosomiasis. As most experiments in this field so far have been performed using complex protein/glycoprotein mixtures or synthetic model glycoconjugates, it is still largely unclear which individual moieties of schistosome eggs are immunologically active. In this review we will discuss molecular aspects of Schistosoma mansoni egg glycoproteins, their interactions with C-type lectins, and the relevance to schistosome egg immunobiology.

  19. Efficient generation of a monoclonal antibody against the human C-type lectin receptor DCIR by targeting murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Heidkamp, Gordon F.; Neubert, Kirsten; Haertel, Eric; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Dudziak, Diana

    2010-01-01

    1. Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) are very important for the generation of long lasting immune responses against pathogens or the induction of anti-tumor responses. Targeting antigen to dendritic cells via monoclonal antibodies specific for DC cell surface receptors such as DEC205 was shown to elicit potent cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo. Therefore we investigated whether this novel strategy might also be useful for the generation of new monoclonal antibodies against molecules of choice. We show, that by targeting the extracellular domain of the human C-type lectin receptor ClecSF6/DCIR/LLIR (hDCIR) to DEC205 on DCs in vivo, we were able to generate highly specific monoclonal antibodies against hDCIR. PMID:20566350

  20. A new LDLa domain-containing C-type lectin with bacterial agglutinating and binding activity in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Qu, Baozhen; Yang, Shuangshuang; Ma, Zengyu; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-12-15

    Over 1200 C-type lectin gene models have been identified in amphioxus, but only a few of them have been functionally characterized. In this study, we identified a C-type lectin, BjCTL, with domain structure of LDLa-CTLD-EGF_Lam, the first such data in chordates. It was expressed mainly in the notochord and ovary in a tissue-dependent fashion. Recombinant BjCTL was characterized as a typical Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding protein capable of agglutinating and binding to both Gram-negative and positive bacteria we tested. In addition, it specifically bound to insoluble lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid and peptidoglycan, which can be inhibited by galactose. We also showed that the interaction of BjCTL with the bacteria is primarily attributable to CTLD domain. Thus, BjCTL is a novel pattern recognition protein involved in lectin-mediated innate immunity.

  1. Identification of a C-type lectin from tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and its functional characterization under low-temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, ChangGeng; Jiang, Ming; Wu, Fan; Yu, Lijuan; Tian, Juan; Liu, Wei; Lu, Xing; Wen, Hua

    2016-11-01

    C-type lectin, which plays an important role in fish innate immunity, was cloned from tilapia and its functional characterization under low-temperature stress is reported. Its ORF is 453 bp, encoding 150 amino acids, and has a 5'UTR of 83 bp, a 3'UTR of 559 bp, and a poly (A) tail. The tilapia C-type lectin genomic DNA was acquired with a length of 5714 bp, containing six exons and five introns. Its promoter sequence was cloned and has a length of 2251 bp. The highest promoter activity occurs in the regulatory region (-900 bp to -450 bp). A hemagglutination assay of recombinant tilapia C-type lectin protein showed positive hemagglutination of rabbit and tilapia erythrocytes. RT-qPCR and western blot assays showed that its expression in the liver, spleen, and intestine were clearly affected by low-temperature stress. Thus, tilapia C-type lectin appear to be affected by abiotic stress, as well as by biological stress. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. C-type lectin-like receptor 2 promotes hematogenous tumor metastasis and prothrombotic state in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Shirai, T; Inoue, O; Tamura, S; Tsukiji, N; Sasaki, T; Endo, H; Satoh, K; Osada, M; Sato-Uchida, H; Fujii, H; Ozaki, Y; Suzuki-Inoue, K

    2017-03-01

    Essentials The role of C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) in cancer progression is unclear. CLEC-2-depleted mouse model is generated by using a rat anti-mouse CLEC-2 monoclonal antibody. CLEC-2 depletion inhibits hematogenous tumor metastasis of podoplanin-expressing B16F10 cells. CLEC-2 depletion prolongs cancer survival by suppressing thrombosis and inflammation.

  3. Human CLEC18 Gene Cluster Contains C-type Lectins with Differential Glycan-binding Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Lang; Pai, Feng-Shuo; Tsou, Yun-Ting; Mon, Hsien-Chen; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chou, Teh-Ying; Yang, Wen-Bin; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wong, Chi-Huey; Hsieh, Shie-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The human C-type lectin 18 (clec18) gene cluster, which contains three clec18a, clec18b, and clec18c loci, is located in human chromosome 16q22. Although the amino acid sequences of CLEC18A, CLEC18B, and CLEC18C are almost identical, several amino acid residues located in the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) and the sperm-coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) domain, also known as the cysteine-rich secretory proteins/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP) domain, are distinct from each other. Genotyping by real-time PCR and sequencing further shows the presence of multiple alleles in clec18a/b/c loci. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrates that CLEC18 (CLEC18A, -B, and -C) are expressed abundantly in human peripheral blood cells. Moreover, CLEC18 expression is further up-regulated when monocytes differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells. Immunofluorescence staining reveals that CLEC18 are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and endosome. Interestingly, CLEC18 are also detectable in human sera and culture supernatants from primary cells and 293T cells overexpressing CLEC18. Moreover, CLEC18 bind polysaccharide in Ca2+-independent manner, and amino acid residues Ser/Arg339 and Asp/Asn421 in CTLD domain contribute to their differential binding abilities to polysaccharides isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (GLPS-F3). The Ser339 (CLEC18A) → Arg339 (CLEC18A-1) mutation completely abolishes CLEC18A-1 binding to GLPS-F3, and a sugar competition assay shows that CLEC18 preferentially binds to fucoidan, β-glucans, and galactans. Because proteins with the SCP/TAPS/CAP domain are able to bind sterol and acidic glycolipid, and are involved in sterol transport and β-amyloid aggregation, it would be interesting to investigate whether CLEC18 modulates host immunity via binding to glycolipids, and are also involved in glycolipid transportation and protein aggregation in the future. PMID:26170455

  4. A C-type lectin isolated from the skin of Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus) binds a remarkably broad range of sugars and induces blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Dotsuta, Yuma; Ono, Ayaka; Suzuki, Masanari; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakamura, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physiological role of skin lectins of the Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus). A skin extract was subjected to affinity chromatography using seven different sugars as ligands. Molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses indicated elution of the same protein by each of the seven respective cognate ligands from sugar affinity columns. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA of this protein [designated as H. japonicus C-type-lectin (HjCL)] identified it as a novel fish subgroup VII C-type lectin evolutionarily related to snake venom lectins. HjCL was predicted to bind to mannose because of the presence of a Glu-Pro-Asn (EPN) motif; however, haemagglutination inhibition assays and glycoconjugate microarray analysis demonstrated its binding to numerous structurally diverse sugars. Competitive sugar-binding assays using affinity chromatography indicated that HjCL bound multiple sugars via a common carbohydrate-recognition domain. The mRNA encoding HjCL was specifically detected in the skin, and immunohistochemical analysis detected its expression in uncharacterized large cells in the epidermis. HjCL agglutinated the bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella tarda and promoted immediate clotting of shark blood, indicating that HjCL is involved in host defence on the skin surface especially when the shark is injured and bleeds. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  5. C-type lectins on macrophages participate in the immunomodulatory response to Fasciola hepatica products

    PubMed Central

    Guasconi, Lorena; Serradell, Marianela C; Garro, Ana P; Iacobelli, Luciana; Masih, Diana T

    2011-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica releases excretory–secretory products (FhESP), and immunomodulatory properties have been described for the carbohydrates present in these parasite products. The interaction of FhESP with the innate immune cells, such as macrophages, is crucial in the early stage of infection. In this work we observed that peritoneal macrophages from naive BALB/c mice stimulated in vitro with FhESP presented: an increased arginase activity as well as Arginase I expression, and high levels of transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-10. A similar macrophage population was also observed in the peritoneum of infected mice. A partial inhibition of the immunomodulatory effects described above was observed when macrophages were pre-incubated with Mannan, anti-mannose receptor, Laminarin or anti-Dectin-1, and then stimulated with FhESP. In addition, we observed a partial inhibition of these effects in macrophages obtained from mice that were intraperitoneally injected with Mannan or Laminarin before being infected. Taken together, these results suggest the participation of at least two C-type lectin receptors, mannose receptor and Dectin-1, in the interaction of FhESP with macrophages, which allows this parasite to induce immunoregulatory effects on these important innate immune cells and may constitute a crucial event for extending its survival in the host. PMID:21595685

  6. A C-type lectin could selectively facilitate bacteria clearance in red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-11-01

    C-type lectins function as pattern recognition receptors and play important roles in the innate immune system of crustaceans. In this study, we reported a new CTL gene (designated as PcLec5) from red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. PcLec5 was mainly distributed in hepatopancreas, gills and intestine, and the PcLec5 transcripts were up-regulated in all the three tissues after challenge with bacteria Vibrio anguillarum. For further functional analyses, PcLec5 was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and anti-PcLec5 polyclonal antiserum was prepared. The results of bacteria binding assay revealed that PcLec5 could selectively bind to 5 of 9 kinds of bacteria we used and had a tendency to bind to Gram-negative bacteria. Sugar binding assay showed that PcLec5 could bind to peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharide, with the highest affinity to LPS. Furthermore, bacteria-clearance experiment showed PcLec5 could selectively facilitate the clearance of injected bacteria in crayfish, and the bacteria-clearance facilitating spectrum of PcLec5 was totally in agreement with its bacteria binding spectrum. These results suggested PcLec5 function as a pattern recognition receptor in crayfish immune system and had certain selectivity on bacteria pathogens.

  7. C-type lectin SIGNR1-mediated oral tolerance to food systemic anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng; Kawasaki, Hirokazu; Hsu, Shih-Chang; Lee, Reiko T.; Yao, Xu; Plunkett, Beverly; Fu, Jinrong; Yang, Kuender; Lee, Yuan C.; Huang, Shau-Ku

    2010-01-01

    We propose that a C-type lectin receptor, SIGNR-1, plays a role in conditioning gastrointestinal lamina propria (LP) DC subset for the induction of oral tolerance in a model of food-induced anaphylaxis. Oral delivery of bovine serum albumin (BSA) bearing 51 mols of mannosides (Man51-BSA) significantly reduced the levels of BSA-induced anaphylactic response. Man51-BSA was found to, selectively, target the LPDC subset expressing a member of the CLRs, SIGNR1, and induce the expression of IL-10, but not IL-6 and IL-12p70. This was noted also in Man51-BSA-treated IL-10-GFPknockin (tiger) mice. The Man51-BSA–SIGNR1 axis in LPDCs, both in vitro and in vivo, promoted the generation of CD4+ Tr1-like cells expressing IL-10 and IFN-γ, in a SIGNR-1- and IL-10-dependent manner, but not of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs. The in vivo-generated Tr1-like cells were capable of transferring tolerance. These results suggest the potential utility of sugar-modified antigen in oral tolerance through targeting of SIGNR1 and LPDCs. PMID:20835248

  8. Differential expression of skin mucus C-type lectin in two freshwater eel species, Anguilla marmorata and Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Komiya, Kaoru; Yamashita, Hiroka; Nakamura, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Two types of lactose-specific lectins, galectin (AJL-1) and C-type lectin (AJL-2), were previously identified in the mucus of adult Anguilla japonica. Here, we compared the expression profiles of these two homologous lectins at the adult and juvenile stages between the tropical eel Anguilla marmorata and the temperate eel A. japonica. Only one lectin, predicted to be an orthologue of AJL-1 by LC-MS/MS, was detected in the mucus of adult A. marmorata. We also found that an orthologous gene to AJL-2 was expressed at very low levels, or not at all, in the skin of adult A. marmorata. However, we detected the gene expression of an AJL-2-orthologue in the skin of juvenile A. marmorata, and a specific antibody also detected the lectin in the juvenile fish epidermis. These findings suggest that expression profiles of mucosal lectins vary during development as well as between species in the Anguilla genus.

  9. Lectin-Dependent Enhancement of Ebola Virus Infection via Soluble and Transmembrane C-type Lectin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L. Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M. Reza; Eisen, Damon P.; Mungall, Bruce A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L.; Ezekowitz, Alan B.; Spear, Gregory T.; Olinger, Gene G.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Michelow, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  10. Functions of Armigeres subalbatus C-type lectins in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Kang, Cui-Jie; Wang, Song-Jie; Zhong, Xue; Beerntsen, Brenda T; Yu, Xiao-Qiang

    2014-09-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are a superfamily of calcium-dependent carbohydrate binding proteins containing at least one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) and they are present in almost all metazoans. Insect CTLs may function as pattern-recognition receptors and play important roles in innate immunity. In this study, we selected five AsCTLs from the mosquito Armigeres subalbatus, a natural vector of filarial nematodes, and performed both in vitro and in vivo studies to elucidate their functions in innate immunity. AsCTLMA15, AsCTLGA5 and AsCTL15 were mainly expressed in hemocytes, AsCTL16 was expressed in fat body, while AsCTLMA11 was expressed in both hemocytes and fat body, and only AsCTLMA11 and AsCTL16 were expressed at high levels in adult females. In vitro binding assays showed that all five recombinant AsCTLs could bind to different microbial cell wall components, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipid A, peptidoglycan (PG), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), zymosan and laminarin (beta-1,3-glucan). Recombinant AsCTLs also bound to several Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and could agglutinate bacterial cells. Injection of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) could significantly reduce expression of the five AsCTL mRNAs, and the survival of mosquitoes treated with dsRNA to AsCTLGA5 was significantly decreased after Escherichia coli infection, but did not change significantly after Micrococcus luteus infection compared to the control groups, suggesting that Ar. subalbatus AsCTLGA5 may participate in innate immunity against E. coli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Shrimp C-type Lectin Inhibits Proliferation of the Hemolymph Microbiota by Maintaining the Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Xu, Ji-Dong; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Vasta, Gerardo Raul; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Some aquatic invertebrates such as shrimp contain low albeit stable numbers of bacteria in the circulating hemolymph. The proliferation of this hemolymph microbiota in such a nutrient-rich environment is tightly controlled in healthy animals, but the mechanisms responsible had remained elusive. In the present study, we report a C-type lectin (MjHeCL) from the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) that participates in restraining the hemolymph microbiota. Although the expression of MjHeCL did not seem to be modulated by bacterial challenge, the down-regulation of its expression by RNA interference led to proliferation of the hemolymph microbiota, ultimately resulting in shrimp death. This phenotype was rescued by the injection of recombinant MjHeCL, which restored the healthy status of the knockdown shrimp. A mechanistic analysis revealed that MjHeCL inhibited bacterial proliferation by modulating the expression of antimicrobial peptides. The key function of MjHeCL in the shrimp immune homeostasis might be related to its broader recognition spectrum of the hemolymph microbiota components than other lectins. Our study demonstrates the role of MjHeCL in maintaining the healthy status of shrimp and provides new insight into the biological significance of C-type lectins, a diversified and abundant lectin family in invertebrate species. PMID:24619414

  12. Podoplanin-rich stromal networks induce dendritic cell motility via activation of the C-type lectin receptor CLEC-2.

    PubMed

    Acton, Sophie E; Astarita, Jillian L; Malhotra, Deepali; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Franz, Bettina; Hess, Paul R; Jakus, Zoltan; Kuligowski, Michael; Fletcher, Anne L; Elpek, Kutlu G; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angelique; Sceats, Lindsay; Reynoso, Erika D; Gonzalez, Santiago F; Graham, Daniel B; Chang, Jonathan; Peters, Anneli; Woodruff, Matthew; Kim, Young-A; Swat, Wojciech; Morita, Takashi; Kuchroo, Vijay; Carroll, Michael C; Kahn, Mark L; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Turley, Shannon J

    2012-08-24

    To initiate adaptive immunity, dendritic cells (DCs) move from parenchymal tissues to lymphoid organs by migrating along stromal scaffolds that display the glycoprotein podoplanin (PDPN). PDPN is expressed by lymphatic endothelial and fibroblastic reticular cells and promotes blood-lymph separation during development by activating the C-type lectin receptor, CLEC-2, on platelets. Here, we describe a role for CLEC-2 in the morphodynamic behavior and motility of DCs. CLEC-2 deficiency in DCs impaired their entry into lymphatics and trafficking to and within lymph nodes, thereby reducing T cell priming. CLEC-2 engagement of PDPN was necessary for DCs to spread and migrate along stromal surfaces and sufficient to induce membrane protrusions. CLEC-2 activation triggered cell spreading via downregulation of RhoA activity and myosin light-chain phosphorylation and triggered F-actin-rich protrusions via Vav signaling and Rac1 activation. Thus, activation of CLEC-2 by PDPN rearranges the actin cytoskeleton in DCs to promote efficient motility along stromal surfaces.

  13. Collaboration between a soluble C-type lectin and calreticulin facilitates white spot syndrome virus infection in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Xu, Yi-Hui; Xu, Ji-Dong; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-09-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) mainly infects crustaceans through the digestive tract. Whether C-type lectins (CLs), which are important receptors for many viruses, participate in WSSV infection in the shrimp stomach remains unknown. In this study, we orally infected kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus to model the natural transmission of WSSV and identified a CL (designated as M. japonicus stomach virus-associated CL [MjsvCL]) that was significantly induced by virus infection in the stomach. Knockdown of MjsvCL expression by RNA interference suppressed the virus replication, whereas exogenous MjsvCL enhanced it. Further analysis by GST pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation showed that MjsvCL could bind to viral protein 28, the most abundant and functionally relevant envelope protein of WSSV. Furthermore, cell-surface calreticulin was identified as a receptor of MjsvCL, and the interaction between these proteins was a determinant for the viral infection-promoting activity of MjsvCL. The MjsvCL-calreticulin pathway facilitated virus entry likely in a cholesterol-dependent manner. This study provides insights into a mechanism by which soluble CLs capture and present virions to the cell-surface receptor to facilitate viral infection.

  14. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Ao, Jingqun; Ding, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Mu, Yinnan; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-12-10

    The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR) from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD), an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1-C6), a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp) and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp). Ca(2+) binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and guppy (Poecilia retitculata) CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR) protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish.

  15. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea)

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Jingqun; Ding, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Mu, Yinnan; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR) from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD), an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1–C6), a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp) and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp). Ca2+ binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and guppy (Poecilia retitculata) CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR) protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca2+-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish. PMID:26690423

  16. Protein–Protein Interaction between Surfactant Protein D and DC-SIGN via C-Type Lectin Domain Can Suppress HIV-1 Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Sonawani, Archana; Murugaiah, Valarmathy; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Nal, Béatrice; Al-Mozaini, Maha M.; Kaur, Anuvinder; Madan, Taruna; Kishore, Uday

    2017-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a soluble C-type lectin, belonging to the collectin (collagen-containing calcium-dependent lectin) family, which acts as an innate immune pattern recognition molecule in the lungs at other mucosal surfaces. Immune regulation and surfactant homeostasis are salient functions of SP-D. SP-D can bind to a range of viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens and trigger clearance mechanisms. SP-D binds to gp120, the envelope protein expressed on HIV-1, through its C-type lectin or carbohydrate recognition domain. This is of importance since SP-D is secreted by human mucosal epithelial cells and is present in the female reproductive tract, including vagina. Another C-type lectin, dendritic cell (DC)-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), present on the surface of the DCs, also binds to HIV-1 gp120 and facilitates viral transfer to the lymphoid tissues. DCs are also present at the site of HIV-1 entry, embedded in vaginal or rectal mucosa. In the present study, we report a direct protein–protein interaction between recombinant forms of SP-D (rfhSP-D) and DC-SIGN via their C-type lectin domains. Both SP-D and DC-SIGN competed for binding to immobilized HIV-1 gp120. Pre-incubation of human embryonic kidney cells expressing surface DC-SIGN with rfhSP-D significantly inhibited the HIV-1 transfer to activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In silico analysis revealed that SP-D and gp120 may occupy same sites on DC-SIGN, which may explain the reduced transfer of HIV-1. In summary, we demonstrate, for the first time, that DC-SIGN is a novel binding partner of SP-D, and this interaction can modulate HIV-1 capture and transfer to CD4+ T cells. In addition, the present study also reveals a novel and distinct mechanism of host defense by SP-D against HIV-1. PMID:28824609

  17. Protein-Protein Interaction between Surfactant Protein D and DC-SIGN via C-Type Lectin Domain Can Suppress HIV-1 Transfer.

    PubMed

    Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Mitchell, Daniel A; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Sonawani, Archana; Murugaiah, Valarmathy; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Nal, Béatrice; Al-Mozaini, Maha M; Kaur, Anuvinder; Madan, Taruna; Kishore, Uday

    2017-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a soluble C-type lectin, belonging to the collectin (collagen-containing calcium-dependent lectin) family, which acts as an innate immune pattern recognition molecule in the lungs at other mucosal surfaces. Immune regulation and surfactant homeostasis are salient functions of SP-D. SP-D can bind to a range of viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens and trigger clearance mechanisms. SP-D binds to gp120, the envelope protein expressed on HIV-1, through its C-type lectin or carbohydrate recognition domain. This is of importance since SP-D is secreted by human mucosal epithelial cells and is present in the female reproductive tract, including vagina. Another C-type lectin, dendritic cell (DC)-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), present on the surface of the DCs, also binds to HIV-1 gp120 and facilitates viral transfer to the lymphoid tissues. DCs are also present at the site of HIV-1 entry, embedded in vaginal or rectal mucosa. In the present study, we report a direct protein-protein interaction between recombinant forms of SP-D (rfhSP-D) and DC-SIGN via their C-type lectin domains. Both SP-D and DC-SIGN competed for binding to immobilized HIV-1 gp120. Pre-incubation of human embryonic kidney cells expressing surface DC-SIGN with rfhSP-D significantly inhibited the HIV-1 transfer to activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In silico analysis revealed that SP-D and gp120 may occupy same sites on DC-SIGN, which may explain the reduced transfer of HIV-1. In summary, we demonstrate, for the first time, that DC-SIGN is a novel binding partner of SP-D, and this interaction can modulate HIV-1 capture and transfer to CD4(+) T cells. In addition, the present study also reveals a novel and distinct mechanism of host defense by SP-D against HIV-1.

  18. Identification of natural killer cell receptor clusters in the platypus genome reveals an expansion of C-type lectin genes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily S W; Sanderson, Claire E; Deakin, Janine E; Whittington, Camilla M; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Belov, Katherine

    2009-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell receptors belong to two unrelated, but functionally analogous gene families: the immunoglobulin superfamily, situated in the leukocyte receptor complex (LRC) and the C-type lectin superfamily, located in the natural killer complex (NKC). Here, we describe the largest NK receptor gene expansion seen to date. We identified 213 putative C-type lectin NK receptor homologs in the genome of the platypus. Many have arisen as the result of a lineage-specific expansion. Orthologs of OLR1, CD69, KLRE, CLEC12B, and CLEC16p genes were also identified. The NKC is split into at least two regions of the genome: 34 genes map to chromosome 7, two map to a small autosome, and the remainder are unanchored in the current genome assembly. No NK receptor genes from the LRC were identified. The massive C-type lectin expansion and lack of Ig-domain-containing NK receptors represents the most extreme polarization of NK receptors found to date. We have used this new data from platypus to trace the possible evolutionary history of the NK receptor clusters.

  19. A C-type lectin with an immunoglobulin-like domain promotes phagocytosis of hemocytes in crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Mu, Yi; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-07-14

    C-type lectins are important immune molecules that participate in host defense response. The present work reports a novel C-type lectin (PcLec3) from the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Sequence analysis found that PcLec3 encodes a polypeptide with252 amino acid residues, which contains an immunoglobulin-like domain (IG) and a C-type lectin domain (CTLD) arranged in tandem. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that PcLec3 is enriched expressed in hemocytes and hepatopancreas cells, in which PcLec3 was up-regulated following bacterial challenge by Vibrio anguillarum. Function analysis using recombinant full-length PcLec3, IG, and CTLD proteins revealed that these recombinant proteins had the capacity to bind carbohydrates and bacteria, while IG determined the cell binding activity. However, only full-length PcLec3 promotes the phagocytic activity of hemocytes and subsequent clearance of invasive bacteria. Taken together, these results manifest that PcLec3 acts as a hemocyte adhesion molecule to promote hemocyte phagocytosis against invasive V. anguillarum.

  20. Differential Use of the C-Type Lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN for Phlebovirus Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Léger, Psylvia; Tetard, Marilou; Youness, Berthe; Cordes, Nicole; Rouxel, Ronan N; Flamand, Marie; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2016-06-01

    Bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to humans and livestock globally. The receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely unidentified and poorly characterized. DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin highly expressed on dermal dendritic cells that has been found to act as an authentic entry receptor for many phleboviruses (Bunyaviridae), including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Toscana virus (TOSV) and Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). We found that these phleboviruses can exploit another C-type lectin, L-SIGN, for infection. L-SIGN shares 77% sequence homology with DC-SIGN and is expressed on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. L-SIGN is required for UUKV binding but not for virus internalization. An endocytosis-defective mutant of L-SIGN was still able to mediate virus uptake and infection, indicating that L-SIGN acts as an attachment receptor for phleboviruses rather than an endocytic receptor. Our results point out a fundamental difference in the use of the C-type lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN by UUKV to enter cells, although both proteins are closely related in terms of molecular structure and biological function. This study sheds new light on the molecular mechanisms by which phleboviruses target the liver and also highlights the added complexity in virus-receptor interactions beyond attachment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A C-type lectin with an immunoglobulin-like domain promotes phagocytosis of hemocytes in crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Mu, Yi; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-01-01

    C-type lectins are important immune molecules that participate in host defense response. The present work reports a novel C-type lectin (PcLec3) from the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Sequence analysis found that PcLec3 encodes a polypeptide with252 amino acid residues, which contains an immunoglobulin-like domain (IG) and a C-type lectin domain (CTLD) arranged in tandem. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that PcLec3 is enriched expressed in hemocytes and hepatopancreas cells, in which PcLec3 was up-regulated following bacterial challenge by Vibrio anguillarum. Function analysis using recombinant full-length PcLec3, IG, and CTLD proteins revealed that these recombinant proteins had the capacity to bind carbohydrates and bacteria, while IG determined the cell binding activity. However, only full-length PcLec3 promotes the phagocytic activity of hemocytes and subsequent clearance of invasive bacteria. Taken together, these results manifest that PcLec3 acts as a hemocyte adhesion molecule to promote hemocyte phagocytosis against invasive V. anguillarum. PMID:27411341

  2. Venom of Parasitoid, Pteromalus puparum, Suppresses Host, Pieris rapae, Immune Promotion by Decreasing Host C-Type Lectin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qi; Wang, Fei; Gatehouse, John A.; Gatehouse, Angharad M. R.; Chen, Xue-xin; Hu, Cui; Ye, Gong-yin

    2011-01-01

    Background Insect hosts have evolved immunity against invasion by parasitoids, and in co-evolutionary response parasitoids have also developed strategies to overcome host immune systems. The mechanisms through which parasitoid venoms disrupt the promotion of host immunity are still unclear. We report here a new mechanism evolved by parasitoid Pteromalus puparum, whose venom inhibited the promotion of immunity in its host Pieris rapae (cabbage white butterfly). Methodology/Principal Findings A full-length cDNA encoding a C-type lectin (Pr-CTL) was isolated from P. rapae. Quantitative PCR and immunoblotting showed that injection of bacterial and inert beads induced expression of Pr-CTL, with peaks of mRNA and Pr-CTL protein levels at 4 and 8 h post beads challenge, respectively. In contrast, parasitoid venom suppressed Pr-CTL expression when co-injected with beads, in a time and dose-dependent manner. Immunolocalization and immunoblotting results showed that Pr-CTL was first detectable in vesicles present in cytoplasm of granulocytes in host hemolymph, and was then secreted from cells into circulatory fluid. Finally, the secreted Pr-CTL bound to cellular membranes of both granulocytes and plasmatocytes. Injection of double-stranded RNA specific for target gene decreased expression of Pr-CTL, and a few other host immune-related genes. Suppression of Pr-CTL expression also down-regulated antimicrobial and phenoloxidase activities, and reducing phagocytotic and encapsulation rates in host. The inhibitory effect of parasitoid venom on host encapsulation is consistent with its effect in suppressing Pr-CTL expression. Binding assay results showed that recombinant Pr-CTL directly attached to the surface of P. puparum egges. We infer that Pr-CTL may serve as an immune signalling co-effector, first binding to parasitoid eggs, regulating expression of a set of immune-related genes and promoting host immunity. Conclusions/Significance P. puparum venom inhibits promotion of host

  3. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a mannose binding C-type lectin gene from salivary gland of Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinzhi; Wang, Yu; Li, Fangzhan; Liu, Jian; Sun, Yu; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-07-22

    The studies on sialomes have shown that hematophagous mosquito saliva consists of a lot of pharmacologically active proteins, in which C-type lectins have been identified and regarded as an important component of saliva. The previous studies showed that C-type lectins play crucial roles not only in innate immunity but also in promoting disease transmission in mammals. However, the function and mechanism of C-type lectins from the mosquito sialome is still elusive. A putative C-type lectin gene (Aalb_CTL1) was cloned and expressed from Aedes albopictus by RT-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence was analyzed by bioinformatic methods. The gene expression profiles in different tissues and various blood-fed stages of Ae. albopictus were examined by Real-Time qRT-PCR and the biological functions of the recombined mature Aalb_CTL1 were tested by hemagglutination and sugar inhibitory agglutination assays. Moreover, the capabilities of rAalb_CTL1 against microorganisms were measured by microbial-agglutination assay. The full-length Open reading frame (ORF) of Aalb_CTL1 consisted of 462 bp, encoding 153 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids. It also contained a CRD domain with a WND (Trp137-Asn138-Asp-139) motif that needed calcium for the hemagglutinating activity and an imperfect EPS (Glu128-Pro129-Ser130) motif that had a predicted ligand binding specificity for mannose. The mRNA level of Aalb_CTL1 was much higher in female mosquito salivary gland than those in fat body and midgut which was down-regulated in salivary gland after blood feeding. The rAalb_CTL1 contained not only hemagglutinating activity and a high affinity with mannose but also agglutinating activity against yeast C. albicans and Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus in Ca2+ dependent manner. Aalb_CTL1 was a mannose-binding C-type lectin and constituted one of the important components in saliva of Ae. albopictus, which could be involved in

  5. Galactose recognition by a tetrameric C-type lectin, CEL-IV, containing the EPN carbohydrate recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Kamiya, Takuro; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Hirabayashi, Jun; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki

    2011-03-25

    CEL-IV is a C-type lectin isolated from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of four identical C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). X-ray crystallographic analysis of CEL-IV revealed that its tetrameric structure was stabilized by multiple interchain disulfide bonds among the subunits. Although CEL-IV has the EPN motif in its carbohydrate-binding sites, which is known to be characteristic of mannose binding C-type CRDs, it showed preferential binding of galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine. Structural analyses of CEL-IV-melibiose and CEL-IV-raffinose complexes revealed that their galactose residues were recognized in an inverted orientation compared with mannose binding C-type CRDs containing the EPN motif, by the aid of a stacking interaction with the side chain of Trp-79. Changes in the environment of Trp-79 induced by binding to galactose were detected by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence and UV absorption spectra of WT CEL-IV and its site-directed mutants. The binding specificity of CEL-IV toward complex oligosaccharides was analyzed by frontal affinity chromatography using various pyridylamino sugars, and the results indicate preferential binding to oligosaccharides containing Galβ1-3/4(Fucα1-3/4)GlcNAc structures. These findings suggest that the specificity for oligosaccharides may be largely affected by interactions with amino acid residues in the binding site other than those determining the monosaccharide specificity.

  6. CfLec-3 from scallop: an entrance to non-self recognition mechanism of invertebrate C-type lectin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jialong; Huang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Wang, Leilei; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2015-01-01

    A C-type lectin (CfLec-3) from Chlamys farreri with three carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) was selected to dissect the possible mechanisms of PAMP binding and functional differentiation of invertebrate lectins. CfLec-3 distributed broadly, and its mRNA expression in hemocytes increased significantly after stimulations with LPS, PGN or β-glucan, but not poly(I:C). The recombinant CfLec-3 (rCfLec-3) could bind PAMPs and several microbes. rCfLec-3 mediated hemocytes phagocytosis against Escherichia coli and encapsulation towards agarose beads. Obvious functional differentiation occurred among the three CRDs, as CRD1 exhibited higher activity to bind PAMPs, while CRD2/3 were expert in promoting hemocyte mediated opsonisation. The tertiary structural differences were suspected to be associated with such functional differentiation. PAMP binding abilities of CfLec-3 were determined by Ca2+-binding site 2 motif. When Pro in this motif of each CRD was mutated into Ser, their PAMP binding abilities were deprived absolutely. rCRD2 acquired mannan binding capability when its EPD was replaced by EPN, but lost when EPN in rCRD3 was changed into EPD. The Pro in Ca2+-binding site 2 was indispensable for PAMPs binding, while Asn was determinant for specific binding to mannan. It shed new insight into PAMPs binding mechanism of invertebrate C-type lectins and their functional differentiation. PMID:25975813

  7. Ophioluxin, a convulxin-like C-type lectin from Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is a powerful platelet activator via glycoprotein VI.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Yan; Clemetson, Jeannine M; Navdaev, Alexei; Magnenat, Edith M; Wells, Timothy N C; Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2002-09-20

    Ophioluxin, a potent platelet agonist, was purified from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra). Under nonreducing conditions it has a mass of 85 kDa, similar to convulxin, and on reduction gives two subunits with masses of 16 and 17 kDa, slightly larger than those of convulxin. The N-terminal sequences of both subunits are very similar to those of convulxin and other C-type lectins. Ophioluxin induces a pattern of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in platelets like that caused by convulxin, when using appropriate concentrations based on aggregation response, because it is about 2-4 times more powerful as agonist than the latter. Ophioluxin and convulxin induce [Ca(2+)](i) elevation both in platelets and in Dami megakaryocytic cells, and each of these C-type lectins desensitizes responses to the other. Convulxin agglutinates fixed platelets at 2 microg/ml, whereas ophioluxin does not, even at 80 microg/ml. Ophioluxin resembles convulxin more than echicetin or alboaggregin B because polyclonal anti-ophioluxin antibodies recognize both ophioluxin and convulxin, but not echicetin, and platelets adhere to and spread on ophioluxin- or convulxin-precoated surfaces in the same way that is clearly different from their behavior on an alboaggregin B surface. Immobilized ophioluxin was used to isolate the glycoprotein VI-Fcgamma complex from resting platelets, which also contained Fyn, Lyn, Syk, LAT, and SLP76. Ophioluxin is the first multiheterodimeric, convulxin-like snake C-type lectin, as well as the first platelet agonist, to be described from the Elapidae snake family.

  8. Function of two novel single-CRD containing C-type lectins in innate immunity from Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Huang, Xin; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Jing-Min; Hui, Kai-Min; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2014-04-01

    C-type lectin is one of the pattern-recognition proteins of the non-self-innate immune system in invertebrates. In this study, two novel C-type lectin cDNAs (EsCTL1 and EsCTL2) of Eriocheir sinensis were cloned and characterized. EsCTL1 has 169 amino acids, whereas EsCTL2 has 164 amino acids. These two lectins contain one carbohydrate-recognition domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that EsCTL1 and EsCTL2 were not clustered with other reported lectins from crabs. EsCTL1 and EsCTL2 were expressed only in the hepatopancreas, as detected by real-time PCR. When healthy crabs were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), Staphylococcus aureus, or Aeromonas hydrophila, the expression levels of EsCTL1 and EsCTL2 were significantly regulated. The recombinant EsCTL1 and EsCTL2 can agglutinate both Gram-positive (S. aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and A. hydrophila) in a Ca2+ -dependent manner. The recombinant EsCTL1 and EsCTL2 can directly bind to LPS and PGN and to all tested microorganisms (S. aureus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Vibrio natriegens, V. parahaemolyticus, and A. hydrophila). Furthermore, rEsCTL1 and rEsCTL2 may facilitate the clearance of V. parahaemolyticus in vivo. These results suggest that EsCTL1 and EsCTL2 may have important roles in the anti-bacterial immunity of Chinese mitten crab.

  9. Multimerin-2 is a ligand for group 14 family C-type lectins CLEC14A, CD93 and CD248 spanning the endothelial pericyte interface.

    PubMed

    Khan, K A; Naylor, A J; Khan, A; Noy, P J; Mambretti, M; Lodhia, P; Athwal, J; Korzystka, A; Buckley, C D; Willcox, B E; Mohammed, F; Bicknell, R

    2017-07-03

    The C-type lectin domain containing group 14 family members CLEC14A and CD93 are proteins expressed by endothelium and are implicated in tumour angiogenesis. CD248 (alternatively known as endosialin or tumour endothelial marker-1) is also a member of this family and is expressed by tumour-associated fibroblasts and pericytes. Multimerin-2 (MMRN2) is a unique endothelial specific extracellular matrix protein that has been implicated in angiogenesis and tumour progression. We show that the group 14 C-type lectins CLEC14A, CD93 and CD248 directly bind to MMRN2 and only thrombomodulin of the family does not. Binding to MMRN2 is dependent on a predicted long-loop region in the C-type lectin domain and is abrogated by mutation within the domain. CLEC14A and CD93 bind to the same non-glycosylated coiled-coil region of MMRN2, but the binding of CD248 occurs on a distinct non-competing region. CLEC14A and CD248 can bind MMRN2 simultaneously and this occurs at the interface between endothelium and pericytes in human pancreatic cancer. A recombinant peptide of MMRN2 spanning the CLEC14A and CD93 binding region blocks CLEC14A extracellular domain binding to the endothelial cell surface as well as increasing adherence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to the active peptide. This MMRN2 peptide is anti-angiogenic in vitro and reduces tumour growth in mouse models. These findings identify novel protein interactions involving CLEC14A, CD93 and CD248 with MMRN2 as targetable components of vessel formation.Oncogene advance online publication, 3 July 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.214.

  10. Clr-a: A Novel Immune-Related C-Type Lectin-like Molecule Exclusively Expressed by Mouse Gut Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Emilia; Leibelt, Stefan; Born, Christina; Friede, Miriam E; Bauer, Stefan; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Steinle, Alexander

    2017-01-15

    The mouse gut epithelium represents a constitutively challenged environment keeping intestinal commensal microbiota at bay and defending against invading enteric pathogens. The complex immunoregulatory network of the epithelial barrier surveillance also involves NK gene complex (NKC)-encoded C-type lectin-like molecules such as NKG2D and Nkrp1 receptors. To our knowledge, in this study, we report the first characterization of the orphan C-type lectin-like molecule Clr-a encoded by the Clec2e gene in the mouse NKC. Screening of a panel of mouse tissues revealed that Clec2e transcripts are restricted to the gastrointestinal tract. Using Clr-a-specific mAb, we characterize Clr-a as a disulfide-linked homodimeric cell surface glycoprotein. Of note, a substantial fraction of Clr-a molecules are retained intracellularly, and analyses of Clr-a/Clr-f hybrids attribute intracellular retention to both the stalk region and parts of the cytoplasmic domain. Combining quantitative PCR analyses with immunofluorescence studies revealed exclusive expression of Clr-a by intestinal epithelial cells and crypt cells throughout the gut. Challenge with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid results in a rapid and strong downregulation of intestinal Clr-a expression in contrast to the upregulation of Clr-f, a close relative of Clr-a, that also is specifically expressed by the intestinal epithelium and acts as a ligand of the inhibitory Nkrp1g receptor. Collectively, we characterize expression of the mouse NKC-encoded glycoprotein Clr-a as strictly associated with mouse intestinal epithelium. Downregulation upon polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid challenge and expression by crypt cells clearly distinguish Clr-a from the likewise intestinal epithelium-restricted Clr-f, pointing to a nonredundant function of these highly related C-type lectin-like molecules in the context of intestinal immunosurveillance.

  11. Characterization of C-type lectins reveals an unexpectedly limited interaction between Cryptococcus neoformans spores and Dectin-1.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Naomi M; Wuthrich, Marcel; Wang, Huafeng; Klein, Bruce; Hull, Christina M

    2017-01-01

    Phagocytosis by innate immune cells is an important process for protection against multiple pathologies and is particularly important for resistance to infection. However, phagocytosis has also been implicated in the progression of some diseases, including the dissemination of the human fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans. Previously, we identified Dectin-1 as a likely phagocytic receptor for C. neoformans spores through the use of soluble components in receptor-ligand blocking experiments. In this study, we used gain-of-function and loss-of-function assays with intact cells to evaluate the in vivo role of Dectin-1 and other C-type lectins in interactions with C. neoformans spores and discovered stark differences in outcome when compared with previous assays. First, we found that non-phagocytic cells expressing Dectin-1 were unable to bind spores and that highly sensitive reporter cells expressing Dectin-1 were not stimulated by spores. Second, we determined that some phagocytes from Dectin-1-/- mice interacted with spores differently than wild type (WT) cells, but the effects varied among assays and were modest overall. Third, while we detected small but statistically significant reductions in phagocytosis by primary alveolar macrophages from Dectin-1-/- mice compared to WT, we found no differences in survival between WT and Dectin-1-/- mice challenged with spores. Further analyses to assess the roles of other C-type lectins and their adapters revealed very weak stimulation of Dectin-2 reporter cells by spores and modest differences in binding and phagocytosis by Dectin-2-/- bone marrow-derived phagocytes. There were no discernable defects in binding or phagocytosis by phagocytes lacking Mannose Receptor, Mincle, Card-9, or FcRγ. Taken together, these results lead to the conclusion that Dectin-1 and other C-type lectins do not individually play a major roles in phagocytosis and innate defense by phagocytes against C. neoformans spores and highlight

  12. Association of a hepatopancreas-specific C-type lectin with the antibacterial response of Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xing-Kun; Guo, Xiao-Nv; Li, Shuang; Wu, Min-Hao; Zhu, You-Ting; Yu, Ai-Qing; Tan, Shang-Jian; Li, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Qun

    2013-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PPRs) are part of the initial step of a host defense against pathogens in detecting pathogen-associated molecular patterns. However, determinants of the specificity of this recognition by innate immune molecules of invertebrates remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential involvement of an invertebrate PRR C-type lectin in the antimicrobial response of the crustacean Eriocheir sinensis. Based on the initial expressed sequence tags (EST) of a hepatopancreatic cDNA library, the full-length EsLecF cDNA was cloned and determined to contain a 477-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 158-amino-acid protein. A comparison with other reported invertebrate and vertebrate C-type lectin superfamily sequences revealed the presence of a common carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). EsLecF transcripts in E. sinensis were mainly detected in the hepatopancreas and were inducible by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. The recombinant EsLecF (rEsLecF) protein produced via a prokaryotic expression system and affinity chromatography was found to have a wide spectrum of binding activities towards various microorganisms, and its microbial-binding activity was calcium-independent. Moreover, the binding of rEsLecF induced the aggregation of microbial pathogens. Results of the microorganism growth inhibitory assay and antibacterial assay revealed capabilities of rEsLecF in suppressing microorganism growth and directly killing bacteria, respectively. Furthermore, rEsLecF could enhance cellular encapsulation in vitro. Collectively, the findings presented here demonstrated the successful isolation of a novel C-type lectin in a crustacean and highlighted its critical role in the innate immunity of an invertebrate.

  13. Characterization of C-type lectins reveals an unexpectedly limited interaction between Cryptococcus neoformans spores and Dectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Naomi M.; Wuthrich, Marcel; Wang, Huafeng; Klein, Bruce; Hull, Christina M.

    2017-01-01

    Phagocytosis by innate immune cells is an important process for protection against multiple pathologies and is particularly important for resistance to infection. However, phagocytosis has also been implicated in the progression of some diseases, including the dissemination of the human fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans. Previously, we identified Dectin-1 as a likely phagocytic receptor for C. neoformans spores through the use of soluble components in receptor-ligand blocking experiments. In this study, we used gain-of-function and loss-of-function assays with intact cells to evaluate the in vivo role of Dectin-1 and other C-type lectins in interactions with C. neoformans spores and discovered stark differences in outcome when compared with previous assays. First, we found that non-phagocytic cells expressing Dectin-1 were unable to bind spores and that highly sensitive reporter cells expressing Dectin-1 were not stimulated by spores. Second, we determined that some phagocytes from Dectin-1-/- mice interacted with spores differently than wild type (WT) cells, but the effects varied among assays and were modest overall. Third, while we detected small but statistically significant reductions in phagocytosis by primary alveolar macrophages from Dectin-1-/- mice compared to WT, we found no differences in survival between WT and Dectin-1-/- mice challenged with spores. Further analyses to assess the roles of other C-type lectins and their adapters revealed very weak stimulation of Dectin-2 reporter cells by spores and modest differences in binding and phagocytosis by Dectin-2-/- bone marrow-derived phagocytes. There were no discernable defects in binding or phagocytosis by phagocytes lacking Mannose Receptor, Mincle, Card-9, or FcRγ. Taken together, these results lead to the conclusion that Dectin-1 and other C-type lectins do not individually play a major roles in phagocytosis and innate defense by phagocytes against C. neoformans spores and highlight

  14. Identification of neutrophil granule glycoproteins as Lewis(x)-containing ligands cleared by the scavenger receptor C-type lectin.

    PubMed

    Graham, Sarah A; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Hitchen, Paul G; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Drickamer, Kurt; Taylor, Maureen E

    2011-07-08

    The scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL) is a glycan-binding receptor that has the capacity to mediate endocytosis of glycoproteins carrying terminal Lewis(x) groups (Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc). A screen for glycoprotein ligands for SRCL using affinity chromatography on immobilized SRCL followed by mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis revealed that soluble glycoproteins from secondary granules of neutrophils, including lactoferrin and matrix metalloproteinases 8 and 9, are major ligands. Binding competition and surface plasmon resonance analysis showed affinities in the low micromolar range. Comparison of SRCL binding to neutrophil and milk lactoferrin indicates that the binding is dependent on cell-specific glycosylation in the neutrophils, as the milk form of the glycoprotein is a much poorer ligand. Binding to neutrophil glycoproteins is fucose-dependent, and mass spectrometry-based glycomic analysis of neutrophil and milk lactoferrin was used to establish a correlation between high affinity binding to SRCL and the presence of multiple clustered terminal Lewis(x) groups on a heterogeneous mixture of branched glycans, some with poly N-acetyllactosamine extensions. The ability of SRCL to mediate uptake of neutrophil lactoferrin was confirmed using fibroblasts transfected with SRCL. The common presence of Lewis(x) groups in granule protein glycans can thus target granule proteins for clearance by SRCL. PCR and immunohistochemical analysis confirm that SRCL is widely expressed on endothelial cells and thus represents a distributed system that could scavenge released neutrophil glycoproteins both locally at sites of inflammation or systemically when they are released in the circulation.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Clec, a Novel C-Type Lectin Domain-Containing Mucin-Like Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bhalchandra, Seema; Ludington, Jacob; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium species are waterborne apicomplexan parasites that cause diarrheal disease worldwide. Although the mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are not well understood, mucin-like glycoproteins of the parasite are known to mediate attachment and invasion in vitro. We identified C. parvum Clec (CpClec), a novel mucin-like glycoprotein that contains a C-type lectin domain (CTLD) and has orthologs in C. hominis and C. muris. CTLD-containing proteins are ligand-binding proteins that function in adhesion and signaling and are present in a wide range of organisms, from humans to viruses. However, this is the first report of a CTLD-containing protein in protozoa and in Apicomplexa. CpClec is predicted to be a type 1 membrane protein, with a CTLD, an O-glycosylated mucin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a YXXϕ sorting motif. The predicted structure of CpClec displays several characteristics of canonical CTLD-containing proteins, including a long loop region hydrophobic core associated with calcium-dependent glycan binding as well as predicted calcium- and glycan-binding sites. CpClec expression during C. parvum infection in vitro is maximal at 48 h postinfection, suggesting that it is developmentally regulated. The 120-kDa mass of native CpClec is greater than predicted, most likely due to O-glycosylation. CpClec is localized to the surface of the apical region and to dense granules of sporozoites and merozoites. Taken together, these findings, along with the known functions of C. parvum mucin-like glycoproteins and of CTLD-containing proteins, strongly implicate a significant role for CpClec in Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions. PMID:23817613

  16. Regulation of C-type Lectin Antimicrobial Activity by a Flexible N-terminal Prosegment*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Partch, Carrie L.; Lehotzky, Rebecca E.; Whitham, Cecilia V.; Chu, Hiutung; Bevins, Charles L.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Hooper, Lora V.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the RegIII family of intestinal C-type lectins are directly antibacterial proteins that play a vital role in maintaining host-bacterial homeostasis in the mammalian gut, yet little is known about the mechanisms that regulate their biological activity. Here we show that the antibacterial activities of mouse RegIIIγ and its human ortholog, HIP/PAP, are tightly controlled by an inhibitory N-terminal prosegment that is removed by trypsin in vivo. NMR spectroscopy revealed a high degree of conformational flexibility in the HIP/PAP inhibitory prosegment, and mutation of either acidic prosegment residues or basic core protein residues disrupted prosegment inhibitory activity. NMR analyses of pro-HIP/PAP variants revealed distinctive colinear backbone amide chemical shift changes that correlated with antibacterial activity, suggesting that prosegment-HIP/PAP interactions are linked to a two-state conformational switch between biologically active and inactive protein states. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism governing C-type lectin biological function and yield new insight into the control of intestinal innate immunity. PMID:19095652

  17. C-type lectin Mermaid inhibits dendritic cell mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Nabatov, Alexey A; de Jong, Marein A W P; de Witte, Lot; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2008-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in HIV-1 transmission; DCs capture invading HIV-1 through the interaction of the gp120 oligosaccharides with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and migrate to the lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is transmitted to T cells. Thus, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is an attractive target to prevent interactions with DCs and subsequent viral transmission. Here, we have investigated whether the structural homologue of DC-SIGN, the nematode C-type lectin Mermaid can be used to prevent HIV-1 transmission by DCs. Our data demonstrate that Mermaid interacts with high mannose structures present on HIV-1 gp120 and thereby inhibits HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN on DCs. Moreover, Mermaid inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission from DC to T cells. We have identified Mermaid as a non-cytotoxic agent that shares the glycan specificity with DC-SIGN and inhibits DC-SIGN-gp120 interaction. The results are important for the anti-HIV-1 microbicide development directed at preventing DC-HIV-1 interactions.

  18. An LDLa domain-containing C-type lectin is involved in the innate immunity of Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; An, Liang; Hui, Kai-Min; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2014-02-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) have crucial functions in recognizing and eliminating pathogens in innate immunity. This study identified a novel low-density lipoprotein receptor class A (LDLa) domain-containing CTL, designated as EsCTLDcp, from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. The EsCTLDcp cDNA is 1258 bp long, with a 975 bp open reading frame that encodes a 324-amino acid protein. EsCTLDcp contains a signal peptide, an LDLa, and a single C-type lectin-like domain. EsCTLDcp was only expressed in the hepatopancreas of normal crabs, and its expression was regulated following crab challenge with pathogen-associated molecular patterns and with bacteria. The recombinant EsCTLDcp agglutinates Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Aeromonas hydrophila) in the presence of calcium. rEsCTLDcp also binds to various bacteria including S. aureus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Vibrio natriegens, V. parahaemolyticus, and A. hydrophila. The rEsCTLDcp protein helped the crabs clear the virulent Gram-negative bacterium V. parahaemolyticus in vivo, as well as interacted with VP24, an envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). These data suggest that EsCTLDcp functions as a pattern-recognition receptor involved in the innate immunity of E. sinensis.

  19. C-type lectin receptor DCIR modulates immunity to tuberculosis by sustaining type I interferon signaling in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Troegeler, Anthony; Mercier, Ingrid; Cougoule, Céline; Pietretti, Danilo; Colom, André; Duval, Carine; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Capilla, Florence; Poincloux, Renaud; Pingris, Karine; Nigou, Jérôme; Rademann, Jörg; Dalod, Marc; Verreck, Frank A. W.; Al Saati, Talal; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Lepenies, Bernd; Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Immune response against pathogens is a tightly regulated process that must ensure microbial control while preserving integrity of the infected organs. Tuberculosis (TB) is a paramount example of a chronic infection in which antimicrobial immunity is protective in the vast majority of infected individuals but can become detrimental if not finely tuned. Here, we report that C-type lectin dendritic cell (DC) immunoreceptor (DCIR), a key component in DC homeostasis, is required to modulate lung inflammation and bacterial burden in TB. DCIR is abundantly expressed in pulmonary lesions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected nonhuman primates during both latent and active disease. In mice, we found that DCIR deficiency impairs STAT1-mediated type I IFN signaling in DCs, leading to increased production of IL-12 and increased differentiation of T lymphocytes toward Th1 during infection. As a consequence, DCIR-deficient mice control M. tuberculosis better than WT animals but also develop more inflammation characterized by an increased production of TNF and inducible NOS (iNOS) in the lungs. Altogether, our results reveal a pathway by which a C-type lectin modulates the equilibrium between infection-driven inflammation and pathogen’s control through sustaining type I IFN signaling in DCs. PMID:28069953

  20. Abundant expression of HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in the foreskin tissue of young Kenyan men.

    PubMed

    Hirbod, Taha; Bailey, Robert C; Agot, Kawango; Moses, Stephen; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah; Murugu, Ruth; Andersson, Jan; Nilsson, Jakob; Broliden, Kristina

    2010-06-01

    A biological explanation for the reduction in HIV-1 (HIV) acquisition after male circumcision may be that removal of the foreskin reduces the number of target cells for HIV. The expression of potential HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in foreskin tissue of men at risk of HIV infection were thus analyzed. Thirty-three foreskin tissue samples, stratified by Herpes simplex virus type 2 status, were obtained from a randomized, controlled trial conducted in Kenya. The samples were analyzed by confocal in situ imaging microscopy and mRNA quantification by quantitative RT-qPCR. The presence and location of T cells (CD3(+)CD4(+)), Langerhans cells (CD1a(+)Langerin/CD207(+)), macrophages (CD68(+) or CD14(+)), and submucosal dendritic cells (CD123(+)BDCA-2(+) or CD11c(+)DC-SIGN(+)) were defined. C-type lectin receptor expressing cells were detected in both the epithelium and submucosa, and distinct lymphoid aggregates densely populated with CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells were identified in the submucosa. Although the presence of lymphoid aggregates and mRNA expression of selected markers varied between study subjects, Herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus was not the major determinant for the detected differences. The detection of abundant and superficially present potential HIV target cells and submucosal lymphoid aggregates in foreskin mucosa from a highly relevant HIV risk group demonstrate a possible anatomical explanation that may contribute to the protective effect of male circumcision on HIV transmission.

  1. The C-type lectin receptor CLECSF8/CLEC4D is a key component of anti-mycobacterial immunity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gillian J; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J; Hoving, Jennifer C; van Laarhoven, Arjan; Drummond, Rebecca A; Kerscher, Bernhard; Keeton, Roanne; van de Vosse, Esther; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Plantinga, Theo S; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Govender, Dhirendra; Besra, Gurdyal S; Netea, Mihai G; Reid, Delyth M; Willment, Janet A; Jacobs, Muazzam; Yamasaki, Sho; van Crevel, Reinout; Brown, Gordon D

    2015-02-11

    The interaction of microbes with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is essential for protective immunity. While many PRRs that recognize mycobacteria have been identified, none is essentially required for host defense in vivo. Here, we have identified the C-type lectin receptor CLECSF8 (CLEC4D, MCL) as a key molecule in anti-mycobacterial host defense. Clecsf8-/- mice exhibit higher bacterial burdens and increased mortality upon M. tuberculosis infection. Additionally, Clecsf8 deficiency is associated with exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, characterized by enhanced neutrophil recruitment. Clecsf8-/- mice show reduced mycobacterial uptake by pulmonary leukocytes, but infection with opsonized bacteria can restore this phagocytic defect as well as decrease bacterial burdens. Notably, a CLECSF8 polymorphism identified in humans is associated with an increased susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis. We conclude that CLECSF8 plays a non-redundant role in anti-mycobacterial immunity in mouse and in man.

  2. C-Type Lectin Receptor Dectin-2 Binds to an Endogenous Protein β-Glucuronidase on Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daiki; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamasaki, Sho

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) recognize pathogen-derived ligands and abnormal self that trigger protective immune responses. However, the precise nature of self ligands recognized by CLRs remains to be determined. Here, we found that Dectin-2 recognizes bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) using Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. This activity was inhibited by an excessive amount of mannose, and by the mutation of mannose-binding motif in Dectin-2. β-glucuronidase (Gusb) was identified as a protein bound to Dectin-2 and mutations of N-glycosylation sites in Gusb impaired the binding of Gusb to Dectin-2. Overexpression of Gusb in a macrophage cell line conferred an ability to stimulate Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. Our study suggests that a glycosylated protein with mannose-related structure is recognized by Dectin-2. PMID:28046067

  3. C-Type Lectin Receptor Dectin-2 Binds to an Endogenous Protein β-Glucuronidase on Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daiki; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamasaki, Sho

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) recognize pathogen-derived ligands and abnormal self that trigger protective immune responses. However, the precise nature of self ligands recognized by CLRs remains to be determined. Here, we found that Dectin-2 recognizes bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) using Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. This activity was inhibited by an excessive amount of mannose, and by the mutation of mannose-binding motif in Dectin-2. β-glucuronidase (Gusb) was identified as a protein bound to Dectin-2 and mutations of N-glycosylation sites in Gusb impaired the binding of Gusb to Dectin-2. Overexpression of Gusb in a macrophage cell line conferred an ability to stimulate Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. Our study suggests that a glycosylated protein with mannose-related structure is recognized by Dectin-2.

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of a C-type lectin from Ancylostoma ceylanicum: evidence for a role in hookworm reproductive physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Allison C.; Harrison, Lisa M.; Kapulkin, Wadim; Jones, Brian F.; Sinha, Anindita; Savage, Amy; Villalon, Nicholas; Cappello, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Lectins comprise a family of related proteins that mediate essential cell functions through binding to carbohydrates. Within this protein family, C-type lectins are defined by the requirement of calcium for optimal biologic activity. Using reverse transcription PCR, a cDNA corresponding to a putative C-type lectin has been amplified from the hookworm parasite Ancylostoma ceylanicum. The 550 nucleotide open reading frame of the Ancylostoma ceylanicum C-type Lectin-1 (AceCTL-1) cDNA corresponds to a 167 amino acid mature protein (18706 Da) preceded by a 17 amino acid secretory signal sequence. The recombinant protein (rAceCTL-1) was expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and purified using a combination of affinity chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. Using in vitro carbohydrate binding studies, it was determined that rAceCTL-1 binds N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, a common component of eukaryotic egg cell membranes. Using a polyclonal IgG raised against the recombinant protein, the native AceCTL-1 was identified in sperm and soluble protein extracts of adult male A. ceylanicum by immunoblot. Probing of adult hookworm sections with the polyclonal IgG demonstrated localization to the testes in males, as well as the spermatheca and developing embryos in females, consistent with its role as a sperm protein. Together, these data strongly suggest that AceCTL-1 is a male gender-specific C-type lectin with a function in hookworm reproductive physiology. PMID:17129620

  5. Involvement of viral envelope GP2 in Ebola virus entry into cells expressing the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, Katsuaki; Matsuno, Keita; Igarashi, Manabu; Denda-Nagai, Kaori; Takada, Ayato; Irimura, Tatsuro

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} Ebola virus infection is mediated by binding to and fusion with the target cells. {yields} Structural feature of the viral glycoprotein determines the infectivity. {yields} Surface C-type lectin, MGL, of macrophages and dendritic cells mediate the infection. {yields} GP2, one of glycoprotein subunits, plays an essential role in MGL-mediated infection. {yields} There is a critical amino acid residue involved in high infectivity. -- Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is initiated by the interaction of the viral surface envelope glycoprotein (GP) with the binding sites on target cells. Differences in the mortality among different species of the Ebola viruses, i.e., Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Reston ebolavirus (REBOV), correspond to the in vitro infectivity of the pseudo-typed virus constructed with the GPs in cells expressing macrophage galactose-type calcium-type lectin (MGL/CD301). Through mutagenesis of GP2, the transmembrane-anchored subunit of GP, we found that residues 502-527 of the GP2 sequence determined the different infectivity between VSV-ZEBOV GP and -REBOV GP in MGL/CD301-expressing cells and a histidine residue at position 516 of ZEBOV GP2 appeared essential in the differential infectivity. These findings may provide a clue to clarify a molecular basis of different pathogenicity among EBOV species.

  6. C-type lectin-like carbohydrate recognition of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III containing ricin-type -trefoil folds.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Unno, Hideaki; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Eto, Seiichiro; Hidemura, Haruki; Kato, Norihisa; Yonekura, Masami; Kusunoki, Masami

    2007-12-28

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent hemolytic lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata. The three-dimensional structure of CEL-III/GalNAc and CEL-III/methyl alpha-galactoside complexes was solved by x-ray crystallographic analysis. In these complexes, five carbohydrate molecules were found to be bound to two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) located in the N-terminal 2/3 portion of the polypeptide and that contained beta-trefoil folds similar to ricin B-chain. The 3-OH and 4-OH of bound carbohydrate molecules were coordinated with Ca(2+) located at the subdomains 1alpha, 1gamma, 2alpha, 2beta, and 2gamma, simultaneously forming hydrogen bond networks with nearby amino acid side chains, which is similar to carbohydrate binding in C-type lectins. The binding of carbohydrates was further stabilized by aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine and tryptophan, through a stacking interaction with the hydrophobic face of carbohydrates. The importance of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate-binding sites was confirmed by the mutational analyses. The orientation of bound GalNAc and methyl alpha-galactoside was similar to the galactose moiety of lactose bound to the carbohydrate-binding site of the ricin B-chain, although the ricin B-chain does not require Ca(2+) ions for carbohydrate binding. The binding of the carbohydrates induced local structural changes in carbohydrate-binding sites in subdomains 2alpha and 2beta. Binding of GalNAc also induced a slight change in the main chain structure of domain 3, which could be related to the conformational change upon binding of specific carbohydrates to induce oligomerization of the protein.

  7. The Interaction of Pneumocystis with the C-Type Lectin Receptor Mincle Exerts a Significant Role in Host Defense against Infection.

    PubMed

    Kottom, Theodore J; Hebrink, Deanne M; Jenson, Paige E; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Wüthrich, Marcel; Wang, Huafeng; Klein, Bruce; Yamasaki, Sho; Lepenies, Bernd; Limper, Andrew H

    2017-03-15

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality within immunocompromised patients. In this study, we examined the potential role of macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) for host defense against Pneumocystis Binding assays implementing soluble Mincle carbohydrate recognition domain fusion proteins demonstrated binding to intact Pneumocystis carinii as well as to organism homogenates, and they purified major surface glycoprotein/glycoprotein A derived from the organism. Additional experiments showed that rats with PCP expressed increased Mincle mRNA levels. Mouse macrophages overexpressing Mincle displayed increased binding to P. carinii life forms and enhanced protein tyrosine phosphorylation. The binding of P. carinii to Mincle resulted in activation of FcRγ-mediated cell signaling. RNA silencing of Mincle in mouse macrophages resulted in decreased activation of Syk kinase after P. carinii challenge, critical in downstream inflammatory signaling. Mincle-deficient CD4-depleted (Mincle(-/-)) mice showed a significant defect in organism clearance from the lungs with higher organism burdens and altered lung cytokine responses during Pneumocystis murina pneumonia. Interestingly, Mincle(-/-) mice did not demonstrate worsened survival during PCP compared with wild-type mice, despite the markedly increased organism burdens. This may be related to increased expression of anti-inflammatory factors such as IL-1Ra during infection in the Mincle(-/-) mice. Of note, the P. murina-infected Mincle(-/-) mice demonstrated increased expression of known C-type lectin receptors Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and MCL compared with infected wild-type mice. Taken together, these data support a significant role for Mincle in Pneumocystis modulating host defense during infection.

  8. Structure of a glycomimetic ligand in the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectin DC-SIGN. Structural requirements for selectivity and ligand design.

    PubMed

    Thépaut, Michel; Guzzi, Cinzia; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Sattin, Sara; Ribeiro-Viana, Renato; Varga, Norbert; Chabrol, Eric; Rojo, Javier; Bernardi, Anna; Angulo, Jesus; Nieto, Pedro M; Fieschi, Franck

    2013-02-20

    In genital mucosa, different fates are described for HIV according to the subtype of dendritic cells (DCs) involved in its recognition. This notably depends on the C-type lectin receptor, langerin or DC-SIGN, involved in gp120 interaction. Langerin blocks HIV transmission by its internalization in specific organelles of Langerhans cells. On the contrary, DC-SIGN enhances HIV trans-infection of T lymphocytes. Thus, approaches aiming to inhibit DC-SIGN, without blocking langerin, represent attractive anti-HIV strategies. We previously demonstrated that dendrons bearing multiple copies of glycomimetic compounds were able to block DC-SIGN-dependent HIV infection in cervical explant models. Optimization of such ligand requires detailed characterization of its binding mode. In the present work, we determined the first high-resolution structure of a glycomimetic/DC-SIGN complex by X-ray crystallography. This glycomimetic, pseudo-1,2-mannobioside, shares shape and conformational properties with Manα1-2Man, its natural counterpart. However, it uses the binding epitope previously described for Lewis X, a ligand specific for DC-SIGN among the C-type lectin family. Thus, selectivity gain for DC-SIGN versus langerin is observed with pseudo-1,2-mannobioside as shown by surface plasmon resonance analysis. In parallel, ligand binding was also analyzed by TR-NOESY and STD NMR experiments, combined with the CORCEMA-ST protocol. These studies demonstrate that the complex, defined by X-ray crystallography, represents the unique binding mode of this ligand as opposed to the several binding orientations described for the natural ligand. This exclusive binding mode and its selective interaction properties position this glycomimetic as a good lead compound for rational improvement based on a structurally driven approach.

  9. E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b negatively regulates C-type lectin receptor–mediated antifungal innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Le-Le; Xu, Xia; Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Wang, Ting-Ting; Tang, Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Activation of various C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) initiates potent proinflammatory responses against various microbial infections. However, how activated CLRs are negatively regulated remains unknown. In this study, we report that activation of CLRs Dectin-2 and Dectin-3 by fungi infections triggers them for ubiquitination and degradation in a Syk-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that E3 ubiquitin ligase Casitas B–lineage lymphoma protein b (Cbl-b) mediates the ubiquitination of these activated CLRs through associating with each other via adapter protein FcR-γ and tyrosine kinase Syk, and then the ubiquitinated CLRs are sorted into lysosomes for degradation by an endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) system. Therefore, the deficiency of either Cbl-b or ESCRT subunits significantly decreases the degradation of activated CLRs, thereby resulting in the higher expression of proinflammatory cytokines and inflammation. Consistently, Cbl-b–deficient mice are more resistant to fungi infections compared with wild-type controls. Together, our study indicates that Cbl-b negatively regulates CLR-mediated antifungal innate immunity, which provides molecular insight for designing antifungal therapeutic agents. PMID:27432944

  10. C-type Lectin Mincle Recognizes Glucosyl-diacylglycerol of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Plays a Protective Role in Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Behler-Janbeck, Friederike; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Jonigk, Danny; Fuehner, Thomas; Prasse, Antje; Welte, Tobias; Stocker, Bridget L.; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Yamasaki, Sho; Maus, Ulrich A.

    2016-01-01

    Among various innate immune receptor families, the role of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in lung protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) is not fully defined. We here show that Mincle gene expression was induced in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice and patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. Moreover, S. pneumoniae directly triggered Mincle reporter cell activation in vitro via its glycolipid glucosyl-diacylglycerol (Glc-DAG), which was identified as the ligand recognized by Mincle. Purified Glc-DAG triggered Mincle reporter cell activation and stimulated inflammatory cytokine release by human alveolar macrophages and alveolar macrophages from WT but not Mincle KO mice. Mincle deficiency led to increased bacterial loads and decreased survival together with strongly dysregulated cytokine responses in mice challenged with focal pneumonia inducing S. pneumoniae, all of which was normalized in Mincle KO mice reconstituted with a WT hematopoietic system. In conclusion, the Mincle-Glc-DAG axis is a hitherto unrecognized element of lung protective immunity against focal pneumonia induced by S. pneumoniae. PMID:27923071

  11. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Shimada, Yohei; Kondoh, Daisuke; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Ghosh, Anil K; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Sinden, Robert E

    2007-12-01

    The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50) of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions.

  12. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  13. C-type Lectin Mincle Recognizes Glucosyl-diacylglycerol of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Plays a Protective Role in Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Behler-Janbeck, Friederike; Takano, Tomotsugu; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Jonigk, Danny; Tort Tarrés, Meritxell; Fuehner, Thomas; Prasse, Antje; Welte, Tobias; Timmer, Mattie S M; Stocker, Bridget L; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Yamasaki, Sho; Maus, Ulrich A

    2016-12-01

    Among various innate immune receptor families, the role of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in lung protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) is not fully defined. We here show that Mincle gene expression was induced in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice and patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. Moreover, S. pneumoniae directly triggered Mincle reporter cell activation in vitro via its glycolipid glucosyl-diacylglycerol (Glc-DAG), which was identified as the ligand recognized by Mincle. Purified Glc-DAG triggered Mincle reporter cell activation and stimulated inflammatory cytokine release by human alveolar macrophages and alveolar macrophages from WT but not Mincle KO mice. Mincle deficiency led to increased bacterial loads and decreased survival together with strongly dysregulated cytokine responses in mice challenged with focal pneumonia inducing S. pneumoniae, all of which was normalized in Mincle KO mice reconstituted with a WT hematopoietic system. In conclusion, the Mincle-Glc-DAG axis is a hitherto unrecognized element of lung protective immunity against focal pneumonia induced by S. pneumoniae.

  14. Syk-coupled C-type lectin receptors that mediate cellular activation via single tyrosine based activation motifs.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Ann M; Brown, Gordon D

    2010-03-01

    Different dendritic cell (DC) subsets have distinct specialized functions contributed in part by their differential expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are a group of PRRs expressed by DCs and other myeloid cells that can recognize endogenous ligands as well as a wide range of exogenous structures present on pathogens. Dual roles in homeostasis and immunity have been demonstrated for some members of this receptor family. Largely due to their endocytic ability and subset specific expression, DC-expressed CLRs have been the focus of significant antigen-targeting studies. A number of CLRs function on the basis of signaling via association with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing adapter proteins. Others contain ITAM-related motifs or immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) in their cytoplasmic tails. Here we review CLRs that induce intracellular signaling via a single tyrosine-based ITAM-like motif and highlight their relevance in terms of DC function.

  15. The C-Type Lectin Receptor MCL Mediates Vaccine-Induced Immunity against Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are essential in shaping the immune response to fungal pathogens. Vaccine-induced resistance requires Dectin-2 to promote differentiation of antifungal Th1 and Th17 cells. Since Dectin-2 and MCL heterodimerize and both CLRs use FcRγ as the signaling adaptor, we investigated the role of MCL in vaccine immunity to the fungal pathogen Blastomyces dermatitidis. MCL−/− mice showed impaired vaccine resistance against B. dermatitidis infection compared to that of wild-type animals. The lack of resistance correlated with the reduced recruitment of Th17 cells to the lung upon recall following experimental challenge and impaired interleukin-17 (IL-17) production by vaccine antigen-stimulated splenocytes in vitro. Soluble MCL fusion protein recognized and bound a water-soluble ligand from the cell wall of vaccine yeast, but the addition of soluble Dectin-2 fusion protein did not augment ligand recognition by MCL. Taken together, our data indicate that MCL regulates the development of vaccine-induced Th17 cells and protective immunity against lethal experimental infection with B. dermatitidis. PMID:26667836

  16. Super-Resolution Imaging of C-Type Lectin and Influenza Hemagglutinin Nanodomains on Plasma Membranes Using Blink Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Itano, Michelle S.; Steinhauer, Christian; Schmied, Jürgen J.; Forthmann, Carsten; Liu, Ping; Neumann, Aaron K.; Thompson, Nancy L.; Tinnefeld, Philip; Jacobson, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin (CTL) that binds a variety of pathogens and facilitates their uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. DC-SIGN forms remarkably stable microdomains on the plasma membrane. However, inner leaflet lipid markers are able to diffuse through these microdomains suggesting that, rather than being densely packed with DC-SIGN proteins, an elemental substructure exists. Therefore, a super-resolution imaging technique, Blink Microscopy (Blink), was applied to further investigate the lateral distribution of DC-SIGN. Blink indicates that DC-SIGN, another CTL (CD206), and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) are all localized in small (∼80 nm in diameter) nanodomains. DC-SIGN and CD206 nanodomains are randomly distributed on the plasma membrane, whereas HA nanodomains cluster on length scales up to several microns. We estimate, as a lower limit, that DC-SIGN and HA nanodomains contain on average two tetramers or two trimers, respectively, whereas CD206 is often nonoligomerized. Two-color Blink determined that different CTLs rarely occupy the same nanodomain, although they appear colocalized using wide-field microscopy. What to our knowledge is a novel domain structure emerges in which elemental nanodomains, potentially capable of binding viruses, are organized in a random fashion; evidently, these nanodomains can be clustered into larger microdomains that act as receptor platforms for larger pathogens like yeasts. PMID:22500753

  17. A C-type lectin collaborates with a CD45 phosphatase homolog to facilitate West Nile virus infection of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Cox, Jonathan; Wang, Penghua; Krishnan, Manoj N; Dai, Jianfeng; Qian, Feng; Anderson, John F; Fikrig, Erol

    2010-09-03

    West Nile virus (WNV) is the most common arthropod-borne flavivirus in the United States; however, the vector ligand(s) that participate in infection are not known. We now show that an Aedes aegypti C-type lectin, mosGCTL-1, is induced by WNV, interacts with WNV in a calcium-dependent manner, and facilitates infection in vivo and in vitro. A mosquito homolog of human CD45 in A. aegypti, designated mosPTP-1, recruits mosGCTL-1 to enable viral attachment to cells and to enhance viral entry. In vivo experiments show that mosGCTL-1 and mosPTP-1 function as part of the same pathway and are critical for WNV infection of mosquitoes. A similar phenomenon was also observed in Culex quinquefasciatus, a natural vector of WNV, further demonstrating that these genes participate in WNV infection. During the mosquito blood-feeding process, WNV infection was blocked in vivo with mosGCTL-1 antibodies. A molecular understanding of flaviviral-arthropod interactions may lead to strategies to control viral dissemination in nature. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of peritrophic matrix C-type lectin (AdPMCTL) on blood-meal size in Anopheles dirus.

    PubMed

    Krairojananan, Panadda; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip

    2012-09-01

    The peritrophic matrix (PM) is penetrated by Plasmodium ookinete to permit transition to oocyst in the mosquito midgut, the manner by which the ookinete interacts with glycoproteins on the PM remains poorly understood. We partially characterized peritrophic matrix C-type lectin (PMCTL) from An. gambiae (CTL10) and An. dirus (AdPMCTL). AdPMCTL protein was produced specifically in blood-fed mosquitoes. The 320 amino acid AdPMCTL exhibits 72% identity with a putative secreted An. gambiae ortholog (AGAP009316, CTL10). AdPMCTL was cloned and its expression profile determined in sugar- and blood-fed midguts. RNAi was used to determine the effect of AdPMCTL on blood meal size and on mosquito survival. AdPMCTL mRNA was present in midguts of sugar-fed mosquitoes and exhibited up-regulation following a blood meal, and AdPMCTL silencing significantly influenced the blood-meal size of engorged mosquitoes, suggesting a role for AdPMCTL as a stabilizing linker molecule, which limits PM distension after blood feeding.

  19. Insights into anti-parasitism induced by a C-type lectin from Bothrops pauloensis venom on Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Letícia; Naves de Souza, Dayane Lorena; Silva, Rafaela José; Barbosa, Bellisa; Mineo, José Roberto; Tudini, Kelly Aparecida; Rodrigues, Renata; Ferro, Eloísa Vieira; de Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana

    2015-03-01

    Here we evaluate the effects of BpLec, a C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom, on Toxoplasma gondii parasitism. BpLec (0.195-12.5 μg/mL) did not interfere with HeLa (host cell) viability by MTT assay, whereas higher doses decreased viability and changed HeLa morphology. In addition, the host cell treatment before infection did not influence adhesion and proliferation indexes. BpLec did not alter T. gondii tachyzoite viability, as carried out by trypan blue exclusion, but decreased both adhesion and parasite replication, when tachyzoites were treated before infection. Galactose (0.4 M) inhibited the BpLec effect on adhesion assays, suggesting that BpLec probably recognize some glycoconjugate from T. gondii membrane. Additionally, we performed cytokine measurements from supernatants collected from HeLa cells infected with T. gondii tachyzoites previously treated with RPMI or BpLec. MIF and IL-6 productions by HeLa cells were increased by BpLec treatment. Also, TGF-β1 secretion was diminished post-infection, although this effect was not dependent on BpLec treatment. Taken together, our results show that BpLec is capable of reducing T. gondii parasitism after tachyzoite treatment and may represent an interesting tool in the search for parasite antigens involved in these processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitogenic activity of CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zedong; Kim, Daekyung; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    An N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific Ca(2+)-dependent lectin (C-type lectin), isolated from the marine invertebrate Holothuroidea (Cucumaria echinata), CEL-I, showed potent mitogenic activity toward normal mouse spleen cells. The mitogenic activity of CEL-I, which reached a maximum at 100 microg/ml, was inhibited by GalNAc in a concentration-dependent manner. The mitogenic effect of CEL-I at 10 microg/ml on T cell- enriched splenocytes was at a similar level due to a well-known T cell mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A), at 10 microg/ml. Furthermore, CEL-I evoked a mitogenic response from nude mouse spleen cells, while no significant effects of Con A on this cell population were observed over a wide range of concentrations. These results suggest that CEL-I is a potent mitogenic lectin with the ability to stimulate both T and B cells.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of an invertebrate C-type lectin, CEL-I, from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Matsuo, Noriaki; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Sugawara, Hajime; Uchida, Tatsuya; Kurisu, Genji; Kusunoki, Masami

    2002-01-01

    CEL-I is a GalNAc-specific carbohydrate-binding protein (lectin) isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This protein belongs to the widely distributed C-type lectin family of animal lectins, which require Ca(2+) for their carbohydrate-binding ability and play important roles in various molecular-recognition processes in organisms. CEL-I was crystallized with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The CEL-I crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 92.38 (3), b = 69.94 (3), c = 76.69 (3) A, beta = 136.46 (2) degrees. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The asymmetric unit contains one CEL-I molecule.

  2. Characterization of a novel protein with homology to C-type lectins expressed by the Cotesia rubecula bracovirus in larvae of the lepidopteran host, Pieris rapae.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Richard; Schmidt, Otto; Asgari, Sassan

    2003-05-30

    Polydnaviruses are essential for the survival of many Ichneumonoid endoparasitoids, providing active immune suppression of the host in which parasitoid larvae develop. The Cotesia rubecula bracovirus is unique among polydnaviruses in that only four major genes are detected in parasitized host (Pieris rapae) tissues, and gene expression is transient. Here we describe a novel C. rubecula bracovirus gene (CrV3) encoding a lectin monomer composed of 159 amino acids, which has conserved residues consistent with invertebrate and mammalian C-type lectins. Bacterially expressed CrV3 agglutinated sheep red blood cells in a divalent ion-dependent but Ca2+-independent manner. Agglutination was inhibited by EDTA but not by biological concentrations of any saccharides tested. Two monomers of approximately 14 and approximately 17 kDa in size were identified on SDS-PAGE in parasitized P. rapae larvae. The 17-kDa monomer was found to be an N-glyscosylated form of the 14-kDa monomer. CrV3 is produced in infected hemocytes and fat body cells and subsequently secreted into hemolymph. We propose that CrV3 is a novel lectin, the first characterized from an invertebrate virus. CrV3 shows over 60% homology with hypothetical proteins isolated from polydnaviruses in two other Cotesia wasps, indicating that these proteins may also be C-type lectins and that a novel polydnavirus lectin family exists in Cotesia-associated bracoviruses. CrV3 is probably interacting with components in host hemolymph, resulting in suppression of the Pieris immune response. The high similarity of CrV3 with invertebrate lectins, as opposed to those from viruses, may indicate that some bracovirus functions were acquired from their hosts.

  3. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for accommodating massive sequence variation in archaeal diversity-generating retroelements.

    PubMed

    Handa, Sumit; Paul, Blair G; Miller, Jeffery F; Valentine, David L; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-08-31

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) provide organisms with a unique means for adaptation to a dynamic environment through massive protein sequence variation. The potential scope of this variation exceeds that of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. DGRs were known to exist only in viruses and bacteria until their recent discovery in archaea belonging to the 'microbial dark matter', specifically in organisms closely related to Nanoarchaeota. However, Nanoarchaeota DGR variable proteins were unassignable to known protein folds and apparently unrelated to characterized DGR variable proteins. To address the issue of how Nanoarchaeota DGR variable proteins accommodate massive sequence variation, we determined the 2.52 Å resolution limit crystal structure of one such protein, AvpA, which revealed a C-type lectin (CLec)-fold that organizes a putative ligand-binding site that is capable of accommodating 10(13) sequences. This fold is surprisingly reminiscent of the CLec-folds of viral and bacterial DGR variable protein, but differs sufficiently to define a new CLec-fold subclass, which is consistent with early divergence between bacterial and archaeal DGRs. The structure also enabled identification of a group of AvpA-like proteins in multiple putative DGRs from uncultivated archaea. These variable proteins may aid Nanoarchaeota and these uncultivated archaea in symbiotic relationships. Our results have uncovered the widespread conservation of the CLec-fold in viruses, bacteria, and archaea for accommodating massive sequence variation. In addition, to our knowledge, this is the first report of an archaeal CLec-fold protein.

  4. Angiogenenic effects of BpLec, a C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Letícia Eulalio; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Gimenes, Sarah Natalie Cirilo; Deconte, Simone Ramos; Ferreira, Bruno Antônio; Alves, Patricia Terra; Filho, Luiz Ricardo Goulart; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Rodrigues, Renata Santos; Yoneyama, Kelly Aparecida Geraldo; Araújo, Fernanda de Assis; Rodrigues, Veridiana de Melo

    2017-09-01

    The present work reports the effects of a C-type lectin (BpLec) isolated from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom upon in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis models. Initially, we noted that BpLec was not cytotoxic to endothelial cells (tEnd) in doses up to 40μg/mL, but lower doses (2.5μg/mL, 5μg/mL, 10μg/mL and 20μg/mL) reduced tEnd cells adhesion to some extracellular matrix proteins and inhibited the in vitro vessel formation in Matrigel assay stimulated by bFGF. β-galactosides (d-lactose, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine and d-galactose) at 400mM reversed the effect of BpLec on tEnd cells adhesion, whereas d-galactose (400mM) partially reversed BpLec property of inhibiting vessel formation by tEnd cells in Matrigel. In vivo assays showed that BpLec increased hemoglobin content and capillary vessels number in polyether-polyurethane sponge discs subcutaneously implanted into dorsal skin mice. Additionally, BpLec also reduced collagen deposition and did not induce a pro-inflammatory response, as demonstrated by the decreased the secretion of some inflammatory cytokines, whereas myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) activities were not altered by BpLec. Taken together, our results indicate that BpLec might represent an interesting angiogenesis and inflammatory modulator that could also be used for searching possible therapeutic targets involved in these processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytotoxicity of a GalNAc-specific C-type lectin CEL-I toward various cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takuya; Uzuyama, Hitomi; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Tamura, Tadashi; Nakashima, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    We found that CEL-I was a potent cytotoxic lectin. MDCK, HeLa, and XC cells were highly sensitive to CEL-I cytotoxicity and killed in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CHO, L929, and RAW264.7 cells were relatively resistant to CEL-I, and no significant toxicity was observed up to 10 microg/ml. Among these cell lines, MDCK cells showed the highest susceptibility to CEL-I cytotoxicity. A binding study using FITC-labeled CEL-I (F-CEL-I) revealed that the amounts of bound F-CEL-I on the sensitive cell lines were evidently greater than those on the resistant cell lines, suggesting that the different susceptibility of the cell lines to CEL-I cytotoxicity is partly explained by different efficiencies of binding of CEL-I to these cell lines. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity of CEL-I toward MDCK cells was more potent than those of other lectins such as WGA, PHA-L, and Con A, even though these lectins were capable of binding to MDCK cells at comparable levels to CEL-I. Since the cytotoxicity of CEL-I was strongly inhibited by GalNAc, the binding to cell surface specific carbohydrates is essential for the CEL-I cytotoxicity. The trypan blue dye exclusion test indicated that CEL-I caused a disorder of plasma membrane integrity as a relatively early event. CEL-I failed to induce the release of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from CF-loaded MDCK cells as seen for pore-forming hemolytic isolectin CEL-III, suggesting that the primary cellular target of CEL-I may be the plasma membrane, but its action mechanism differs from that of CEL-III. Although CEL-I induced dramatic cellular morphological changes in MDCK cells, neither typical apoptotic nuclear morphological changes nor DNA fragmentation was observed in CEL-I-treated MDCK cells even after such cellular changes. Our results demonstrated that CEL-I showed a potent cytotoxic effect, especially on MDCK cells, by causing plasma membrane disorder without induction of apoptosis.

  6. Lebecin, a new C-type lectin like protein from Macrovipera lebetina venom with anti-tumor activity against the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Jed; Fakhfekh, Emna; Morgen, Maram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Majdoub, Hafedh; Gargouri, Ali; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Luis, José; Marrakchi, Naziha; Sarray, Sameh

    2014-08-01

    C-type lectins like proteins display various biological activities and are known to affect especially platelet aggregation. Few of them have been reported to have anti-tumor effects. In this study, we have identified and characterized a new C-type lectin like protein, named lebecin. Lebecin is a heterodimeric protein of 30 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of both subunits were determined by Edman degradation and the entire amino acid sequences were deduced from cDNAs. The precursors of both lebecin subunits contain a 23-amino acid residue signal peptide and the mature α and β subunits are composed of 129 and 131 amino acids, respectively. Lebecin is shown to be a potent inhibitor of MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cells proliferation. Furthermore, lebecin dose-dependently inhibited the integrin-mediated attachment of these cells to different adhesion substrata. This novel C-type lectin also completely blocked MDA-MB231 cells migration towards fibronectin and fibrinogen in haptotaxis assays.

  7. CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin, induces nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2009-08-01

    We found that CEL-I, a GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the marine invertebrate Holothuroidea (Cucumaria echinata), induces inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO production in RAW264.7 cells. The NO production was inhibited by an iNOS inhibitor, L-NAME, but was not by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibitor, polymyxin B. In the presence of 0.1-M GalNAc, increased NO production by CEL-I-treated RAW264.7 cells was observed rather than the inhibition. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) significantly inhibited the CEL-I-induced NO production as well as the binding of FITC-labelled CEL-I on RAW264.7 cells. Three MAP kinase inhibitors (specific to extra-cellular regulated kinase, c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and p38 MAP kinase) inhibited CEL-I-induced NO production with different extents. Heat-treatment of CEL-I resulted in a decreased activity of CEL-I depending on the temperature. These results suggest that CEL-I induces NO production in RAW264.7 cells through the protein-cell interaction rather than the binding to the specific carbohydrate chains on the cell surface.

  8. Interactions between the breast cancer-associated MUC1 mucins and C-type lectin characterized by optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hadjialirezaei, Soosan; Picco, Gianfranco; Beatson, Richard; Burchell, Joy; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Sletmoen, Marit

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions govern many crucial processes in biological systems including cell recognition events. We have used the sensitive force probe optical tweezers to quantify the interactions occurring between MGL lectins and MUC1 carrying the cancer-associated glycan antigens mucins Tn and STn. Unbinding forces of 7.6 pN and 7.1 pN were determined for the MUC1(Tn)-MGL and MUC1(STn)-MGL interactions, at a force loading rate of ~40 pN/s. The interaction strength increased with increasing force loading rate, to 27 and 37 pN at a force loading rate of ~ 310 pN/s. No interactions were detected between MGL and MUC1(ST), a glycoform of MUC1 also expressed by breast carcinoma cells. Interestingly, this glycan (ST) can be found on proteins expressed by normal cells, although in this case not on MUC1. Additionally, GalNAc decorated polyethylene glycol displayed similar rupture forces as observed for MUC1(Tn) and MUC1(STn) when forced to unbind from MGL, indicating that GalNAc is an essential group in these interactions. Since the STn glycan decoration is more frequently found on the surface of carcinomas than the Tn glycan, the binding of MUC1 carrying STn to MGL may be more physiologically relevant and may be in part responsible for some of the characteristics of STn expressing tumours.

  9. Orientation of GST-tagged lectins via in situ surface modification to create an expanded lectin microarray for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Propheter, Daniel C; Mahal, Lara K

    2011-07-01

    Herein we describe the orientation of GST-tagged lectins on NHS-activated slides via a one-step deposition of the protein and a glutathione (GSH) scaffold. This technology overcomes the need for a premade GSH-surface to orient GST-tagged proteins, enabling us to rapidly expand the analytical capacity of lectin microarrays through addition of oriented lectins, while maintaining lectin diversity.

  10. New structural insights into the molecular deciphering of mycobacterial lipoglycan binding to C-type lectins: lipoarabinomannan glycoform characterization and quantification by capillary electrophoresis at the subnanomole level.

    PubMed

    Nigou, J; Vercellone, A; Puzo, G

    2000-06-23

    Lipoarabinomannans are key molecules of the mycobacterial envelopes involved in many steps of tuberculosis immunopathogenesis. Several of the biological activities of lipoarabinomannans are mediated by their ability to bind human C-type lectins, such as the macrophage mannose receptor, the mannose-binding protein and the surfactant proteins A and D. The lipoarabinomannan mannooligosaccharide caps have been demonstrated to be involved in the binding to the lectin carbohydrate recognition domains. We report an original analytical approach, based on capillary electrophoresis monitored by laser-induced fluorescence, allowing the absolute quantification, in nanomole quantities of lipoarabinomannan, of the number of mannooligosaccharide units per lipoarabinomannan molecule. Moreover, this analytical approach was successful for the glycosidic linkage determination of the mannooligosaccharide motifs and has been applied to the comparative analysis of parietal and cellular lipoarabinomannans of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, H37Ra and Erdman strains. Significant differences were observed in the amounts of the various mannooligosaccharide units between lipoarabinomannans of different strains and between parietal and cellular lipoarabinomannans of the same strain. Nevertheless, no relationship was found between the number of mannooligosaccharide caps and the virulence of the corresponding strain. The results of the present study should help us to gain more understanding of the molecular basis of lipoarabinomannan discrimination in the process of binding to C-type lectins. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Molecular cloning of a new secreted sulfated mucin-like protein with a C-type lectin domain that is expressed in lymphoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, S; Giordanengo, V; Lesimple, J; Lefebvre, J C

    1998-01-23

    We have previously demonstrated hyposialylation of the two major CD45 and leukosialin (CD43) molecules at the surface of latently human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected CEM T cells (CEMLAI/NP), (Lefebvre, J. C., Giordanengo, V., Doglio, A., Cagnon, L., Breittmayer, J. P., Peyron, J. F., and Lesimple, J. (1994) Virology 199, 265-274; Lefebvre, J. C., Giordanengo, V., Limouse, M., Doglio, A., Cucchiarini, M., Monpoux, F., Mariani, R., and Peyron, J. F. (1994) J. Exp. Med. 180, 1609-1617). Searching to clarify mechanism(s) of hyposialylation, we observed two sulfated secreted glycoproteins (molecular mass approximately 47 and approximately 40 kDa) (P47 and P40), which were differentially sulfated and/or differentially secreted in the culture supernatants of CEMLAI/NP cells when compared with parental CEM cells. A hybridoma clone (7H1) resulting from the fusion between CEMLAI/NP and human embryonic fibroblasts MRC5 cells produced very large amounts of P47 that was purified using Jacalin lectin (specific for O-glycans) and microsequenced. Cloning of P47 was achieved using a CEMLAI/NP cDNA library screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. A single open reading frame encoding a protein of 323 amino acids was deduced from the longest isolated recombinant (1.4 kilobase). P47 is a secreted sulfated protein. It carries an NH2-terminal RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) triplet, a striking alpha-helical leucine zipper composed of six heptads, and a C-terminal C-type lectin domain. The NH2-terminal portion is rich in glutamic acids with a predicted pI of 3.9. In addition, a hinge region with numerous condensed potential sites for O-glycan side chains, which are also the most likely sulfation sites, is located between the RGD and leucine zipper domains. Transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues (notably bone marrow) and abundantly in T and B lymphoblastoid but very faintly in monocytoid cell lines.

  12. A novel C-type lectin with four CRDs is involved in the regulation of antimicrobial peptide gene expression in Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling-Ling; Wang, Yu-Qing; Dai, Yun-Jia; Zhao, Li-Juan; Qin, Qiwei; Lin, Li; Ren, Qian; Lan, Jiang-Feng

    2016-08-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are found in a wide number of invertebrates, and have been reported to participate in immune responses, such as the activation of prophenoloxidase, cell adhesion, bacterial clearance and phagocytosis. Previous studies on CTLs focused on the function of their carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). Currently, studies on lectins with multi-CRDs are limited. In this study, a lectin with four CRDs was cloned from Hyriopsis cumingii, and called HcLec4. HcLec4 was widely distributed in several tissues and was significantly down-regulated at the early stage (2 h) of bacterial infection. We further analyzed the bacteria and carbohydrate binding activities of HcLec4. The results showed that HcLec4 could bind to several bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN). In HcLec4 knockdown mussels, the bacterial clearance rate was increased, and the expression level of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) was up-regulated. This study reveals that HcLec4 exerts its antibacterial effect by regulating the expression of AMPs at the early stage of bacterial infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Distinct usage of three C-type lectins by Japanese encephalitis virus: DC-SIGN, DC-SIGNR, and LSECtin.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Masayuki; Takenouchi, Atsushi; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Naho; Maeda, Ken

    2014-08-01

    Infection with West Nile virus and dengue virus, two mosquito-borne flaviviruses, is enhanced by two calcium-dependent lectins: dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), and its related molecule (DC-SIGNR). The present study examined the relationship between Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection and three lectins: DC-SIGN, DC-SIGNR, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell lectin (LSECtin). Expression of DC-SIGNR resulted in robust JEV proliferation in a lymphoid cell line, Daudi cells, which was otherwise non-permissive to infection. DC-SIGN expression caused moderate JEV proliferation, with effects that varied according to the cells in which JEV was prepared. LSECtin expression had comparatively minor, but consistent, effects, in all cell types used in JEV preparation. While DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR-mediated JEV infection was inhibited by yeast mannan, LSECtin-mediated infection was inhibited by N-acetylglucosamine β1-2 mannose. Although involvement of DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR in infection seems to be a common characteristic, this is the first report on usage of LSECtin in mosquito-borne flavivirus infection.

  14. The Cryptosporidium parvum C-Type Lectin CpClec Mediates Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Interactions with Sulfated Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, Jacob G.

    2016-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium causes significant diarrheal disease worldwide. Effective anticryptosporidial agents are lacking, in part because the molecular mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are poorly understood. Previously, we identified and characterized a novel Cryptosporidium parvum C-type lectin domain-containing mucin-like glycoprotein, CpClec. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms underlying interactions of CpClec with intestinal epithelial cells by using an Fc-tagged recombinant protein. CpClec-Fc displayed Ca2+-dependent, saturable binding to HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells and competitively inhibited C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells. Binding of CpClec-Fc was specifically inhibited by sulfated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparin and heparan sulfate. Binding was reduced after the removal of heparan sulfate and following the inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation in HCT-8 cells. Like CpClec-Fc binding, C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells were inhibited by glycosaminoglycans and were reduced after heparan sulfate removal or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation. Lastly, CpClec-Fc binding and C. parvum sporozoite attachment were significantly decreased in CHO cell mutants defective in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Together, these results indicate that CpClec is a novel C-type lectin that mediates C. parvum attachment and infection via Ca2+-dependent binding to sulfated proteoglycans on intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26975991

  15. Alteration of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a C-type lectin CEL-I mutant with an EPN carbohydrate-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ishimine, Tomohiro; Baba, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masanari; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro

    2013-07-01

    CEL-I is a Gal/GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) with the carbohydrate-recognition motif QPD (Gln-Pro- Asp), which is generally known to exist in galactose-specific C-type CRDs. In the present study, a mutant CEL-I with EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, which is thought to be responsible for the carbohydrate-recognition of mannose-specific Ctype CRDs, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its effects on the carbohydrate-binding specificity were examined using polyamidoamine dendrimer (PD) conjugated with carbohydrates. Although wild-type CEL-I effectively formed complexes with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-PD but not with mannose-PD, the mutant CEL-I showed relatively weak but definite affinity for mannose-PD. These results indicated that the QPD and EPN motifs play a significant role in the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism of CEL-I, especially in the discrimination of galactose and mannose. Additional mutations in the recombinant CEL-I binding site may further increase its specificity for mannose, and should provide insights into designing novel carbohydrate-recognition proteins.

  16. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP interacts with C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 and promotes its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Miaomiao; Li, Lili; Song, Shushu; Wu, Weicheng; Peng, Peike; Yang, Caiting; Zhang, Mingming; Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Ran; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was originally identified as a member of non-classical C-type lectin-like receptors in platelets and immune cells. Activation of CLEC-2 is involved in thrombus formation, lymphatic/blood vessel separation, platelet-mediated tumor metastasis and immune response. Nevertheless, the regulation of CLEC-2 expression is little understood. In this study, we identified that the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) interacted with CLEC-2 by mass spectrometry analysis, and CHIP decreased the protein expression of CLEC-2 through lysine-48-linked ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Deleted and point mutation also revealed that CHIP controlled CLEC-2 protein expression via both tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) domain and Ubox domain in a HSP70/90-independent manner. Moreover, reduced CHIP expression was associated with decreased CLEC-2 polyubiquitination and increased CLEC-2 protein levels in PMA-induced differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages. These results indicate that CLEC-2 is the target substrate of E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP, and suggest that the CHIP/CLEC-2 axis may play an important role in the modulation of immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Soluble expression of disulfide-bonded C-type lectin like domain of human CD93 in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nativel, Brice; Figuester, Audrey; Andries, Jessica; Planesse, Cynthia; Couprie, Joël; Gasque, Philippe; Viranaicken, Wildriss; Iwema, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    CD93 belongs to the group XIV C-type lectin like domain (CTLD) and is closely related to thrombomodulin (CD141). Although CD93 is known to be involved in the regulation of cell adhesion and phagocytosis, its role in innate immunity remains to be fully investigated. Critically, published data about CD141 suggest that CD93 CTLD could be involved in the control of inflammation. In order to address further functional and structural analyses, we expressed human CD93 CTLD with several disulfide bonds in an E. coli expression system. As the E. coli cytoplasm is a reducing compartment, production of disulfide-bond proteins remains a challenge. Hence, we decided to over express CD93 CTLD in commercially available strains of E. coli and co-expressed a sulfhydryl oxidase (Erv1p) and a disulfide isomerase (DsbC). This strategy led to high yield expression of a native form of CD93 CTLD. NMR studies revealed that Ca(2+) was not able to bind to CD93 CTLD. We also showed that the recombinant protein could alter LPS pro-inflammatory activity on THP1. This work provides new tool for further functional and structural studies to decipher the functions associated to the CTLD of CD93. This approach may also be used for others members of the group XIV C-type lectin like domain (CD141, CD248 and CLec14A). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. C-type lectins in immune defense against pathogens: the murine DC-SIGN homologue SIGNR3 confers early protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Tanne, Antoine; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens involves various receptors expressed in cells of the immune system. Upon pathogen recognition, these proteins mediate a plethora of effector functions, such as the secretion of key protective cytokines and other immune mediators. These receptors include C-type lectins (CTLs), which are increasingly being recognized as major players in the host response to microbes. One particular CTL, DCSIGN/CD209, recognizes conserved sugar motifs in a number of viruses, parasites and bacteria. In particular, we and others have shown that DC-SIGN plays an important part in the recognition by dendritic cells and macrophages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal agent of tuberculosis in humans. Using the mouse as a model: host for M. tuberculosis, we recently showed that the DC-SIGN homologue SIGNR3 mediates protection against the tubercle bacillus, possibly through secretion of the key cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor. Here, we summarize and discuss these findings and their implications for the design of future studies aiming to improve our understanding of the role of DC-SIGN and other C-type lectins in immunity to mycobacteria and other pathogens.

  19. The C-Type Lectin Receptor Mincle Binds to Streptococcus pneumoniae but Plays a Limited Role in the Anti-Pneumococcal Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Rabes, Anne; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Reppe, Katrin; Lang, Roland; Seeberger, Peter H.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system employs C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) to recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) is a FcRγ-coupled CLR that was shown to bind to mycobacterial cord factor as well as certain fungal species. However, since CLR functions during bacterial infections have not yet been investigated thoroughly, we aimed to examine their function in Streptococcus pneumonia infection. Binding studies using a library of recombinantly expressed CLR-Fc fusion proteins indicated a specific, Ca2+-dependent, and serotype-specific binding of Mincle to S. pneumonia. Subsequent experiments with different Mincle-expressing cells as well as Mincle-deficient mice, however, revealed a limited role of this receptor in bacterial phagocytosis, neutrophil-mediated killing, cytokine production, and antibacterial immune response during pneumonia. Collectively, our results indicate that Mincle is able to recognize S. pneumonia but is not required for the anti-pneumococcal innate immune response. PMID:25658823

  20. Pathogen recognition of a novel C-type lectin from Marsupenaeus japonicus reveals the divergent sugar-binding specificity of QAP motif

    PubMed Central

    Alenton, Rod Russel R.; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Miyaguchi, Kohei; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins known to assist the innate immune system as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The binding specificity of CTLs lies in the motif of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the tripeptide motifs EPN and QPD bind to mannose and galactose, respectively. However, variants of these motifs were discovered including a QAP sequence reported in shrimp believed to have the same carbohydrate specificity as QPD. Here, we characterized a novel C-type lectin (MjGCTL) possessing a CRD with a QAP motif. The recombinant MjGCTL has a calcium-dependent agglutinating capability against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and its sugar specificity did not involve either mannose or galactose. In an encapsulation assay, agarose beads coated with rMjGCTL were immediately encapsulated from 0 h followed by melanization at 4 h post-incubation with hemocytes. These results confirm that MjGCTL functions as a classical CTL. The structure of QAP motif and carbohydrate-specificity of rMjGCTL was found to be different to both EPN and QPD, suggesting that QAP is a new motif. Furthermore, MjGCTL acts as a PRR binding to hemocytes to activate their adherent state and initiate encapsulation. PMID:28374848

  1. Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens are internalized by human dendritic cells through multiple C-type lectins and suppress TLR-induced dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    van Liempt, Ellis; van Vliet, Sandra J; Engering, Anneke; García Vallejo, Juan Jesus; Bank, Christine M C; Sanchez-Hernandez, Marta; van Kooyk, Yvette; van Die, Irma

    2007-04-01

    In schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease caused by helminths, the parasite eggs induce a T helper 2 cell (T(H)2) response in the host. Here, the specific role of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in initiation and polarization of the egg-specific T cell responses was examined. We demonstrate that immature DCs (iDCs) pulsed with schistosome soluble egg antigens (SEA) do not show an increase in expression of co-stimulatory molecules or cytokines, indicating that no conventional maturation was induced. The ability of SEA to affect the Toll-like receptor (TLR) induced maturation of iDCs was examined by copulsing the DCs with SEA and TLR-ligands. SEA suppressed both the maturation of iDCs induced by poly-I:C and LPS, as indicated by a decrease in co-stimulatory molecule expression and production of IL-12, IL-6 and TNF-alpha. In addition, SEA suppressed T(H)1 responses induced by the poly-I:C-pulsed DCs, and skewed the LPS-induced mixed response towards a T(H)2 response. Immature DCs rapidly internalized SEA through the C-type lectins DC-SIGN, MGL and the mannose receptor and the antigens were targeted to MHC class II-positive lysosomal compartments. The internalization of SEA by multiple C-type lectins may be important to regulate the response of the iDCs to TLR-induced signals.

  2. A C-type lectin (MrLec) with high expression in intestine is involved in innate immune response of Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinling; Huang, Xin; Jin, Min; Zhang, Yi; Li, Tingting; Hui, Kaimin; Ren, Qian

    2016-12-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are pattern-recognition proteins that play an important role in innate immunity of vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, a lectin cDNA named MrLec was cloned and characterized from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachiun rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrLec was 1431 bp, which contained an open reading frame of 1041 bp that encoded a protein with 346 amino acids. MrLec was found to contain a typical signal peptide of 18 amino acids and a single carbohydrate-recognition domain with 121 amino acids. The phylogenetic analysis showed that MrLec was grouped with vertebrates and had 57% identity with C-type lectin 3 from Marsupenaeus japonicas. Tissue expression analysis showed that MrLec was ubiquitously distributed at a high level in the intestine, with lower expression levels in the hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gill and stomach. Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection induced the upregulation of MrLec in the gills and intestine. For the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, MrLec in gills was upregulated at 24, 36 and 48 h. In intestine, MrLec also went up at 36 and 48 h WSSV challenge. Recombinant MrLec can agglutinate (Ca(2+)-dependent) and bind both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. rMrLec could attach to lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated possible MrLec involvement in the immune response of giant freshwater prawns.

  3. The C-type lectin receptors CLEC-2 and Dectin-1, but not DC-SIGN, signal via a novel YXXL-dependent signalling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Gemma L.J.; Williams, Jennifer A.E.; Tomlinson, Michael G.; Eble, Johannes A.; Hanna, Sheri L.; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio; Watson, Steve P.; Pearce, Andrew C.

    2007-01-01

    The two lectin receptors, CLEC-2 and Dectin-1 have been shown to signal through a Syk-dependent pathway, despite the presence of only a single YXXL in their cytosolic tails. In the present study, we show that stimulation of CLEC-2 in platelets and in two mutant cell lines is dependent on the YXXL motif and on proteins that participate in signalling by ITAM receptors including Src, Syk and Tec family kinases and on PLCγ. Strikingly, mutation of either SH2 domain of Syk blocks signalling by CLEC-2 despite the fact that it has only a single YXXL motif. Further, signalling by CLEC-2 is only partially dependent on the BLNK/SLP-76 family of adapter proteins in contrast to that of ITAM receptors. The C-type lectin receptor, Dectin-1, which contains a YXXL motif preceded by the same 4 amino acids as for CLEC-2 (DEDG), signals like CLEC-2 and also requires the two SH2-domains of Syk and is only partially dependent on the BLNK/SLP-76 family of adapters. In marked contrast, the C-type lectin receptor, DC-SIGN, which has a distinct series of amino acids preceding a single YXXL, signals independent of this motif. A mutational analysis of the DEDG sequence of CLEC-2 revealed that the glycine residue directly upstream of the YXXL tyrosine is important for CLEC-2 signalling. These results demonstrate that CLEC-2 and Dectin-1 signal through a single YXXL motif which requires the tandem SH2 domains of Syk but which is only partially dependent on the SLP-76/BLNK family of adapters. PMID:17339324

  4. Characteristic recognition of N-acetylgalactosamine by an invertebrate C-type Lectin, CEL-I, revealed by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hajime; Kusunoki, Masami; Kurisu, Genji; Fujimoto, Tokiko; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2004-10-22

    CEL-I is a C-type lectin, purified from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata, that shows a high specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc). We determined the crystal structures of CEL-I and its complex with GalNAc at 2.0 and 1.7 A resolution, respectively. CEL-I forms a disulfide-linked homodimer and contains two intramolecular disulfide bonds, although it lacks one intramolecular disulfide bond that is widely conserved among various C-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). Although the sequence similarity of CEL-I with other C-type CRDs is low, the overall folding of CEL-I was quite similar to those of other C-type CRDs. The structure of the complex with GalNAc revealed that the basic recognition mode of GalNAc was very similar to that for the GalNAc-binding mutant of the mannose-binding protein. However, the acetamido group of GalNAc appeared to be recognized more strongly by the combination of hydrogen bonds to Arg115 and van der Waals interaction with Gln70. Mutational analyses, in which Gln70 and/or Arg115 were replaced by alanine, confirmed that these residues contributed to GalNAc recognition in a cooperative manner.

  5. C-type lectin-like receptor LOX-1 promotes dendritic cell-mediated class-switched B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeMee; Li, Dapeng; Dullaers, Melissa; Kim, Tae-Whan; Duluc, Dorothee; Upchurch, Katherine; Xue, Yaming; Zurawski, Sandy; Le Grand, Roger; Liu, Yong-Jun; Kuroda, Marcelo; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2014-10-16

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern-recognition receptor for a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. However, LOX-1 function in the host immune response is not fully understood. Here, we report that LOX-1 expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells promotes humoral responses. On B cells LOX-1 signaling upregulated CCR7, promoting cellular migration toward lymphoid tissues. LOX-1 signaling on DCs licensed the cells to promote B cell differentiation into class-switched plasmablasts and led to downregulation of chemokine receptor CXCR5 and upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 on plasmablasts, enabling their exit from germinal centers and migration toward local mucosa and skin. Finally, we found that targeting influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) subunit to LOX-1 elicited HA1-specific protective antibody responses in rhesus macaques. Thus, LOX-1 expressed on B cells and DC cells has complementary functions to promote humoral immune responses.

  6. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PcLT, a novel C-type lectin from Procambarus clarkii, is involved in the innate defense against Vibrio alginolyticus and WSSV.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan-Dan; Meng, Xiao-Lin; Xu, Jin-Ping; Yu, Jing-You; Meng, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Lectins play important roles in the innate immunity. In this work, a C-type lectin, PcLT, was obtained from Procambarus clarkii which contained a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) with the ability to bind to Vibrio alginolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analyses demonstrated PcLT was specifically expressed in the hepatopancreas and the mRNA was markedly upregulated by V. alginolyticus and WSSV challenge, although a slight difference in timing was observed. The study also revealed upregulation of the mRNA expression and activity of immunological factors, peroxinectin, phenoloxidase, and superoxide dismutase in hemolymph in response to recombinant PcLT (rPcLT). Moreover, rPcLT also enhanced the phagocytosis, facilitated the subsequent clearance of V. alginolyticus and prolonged the survival of WSSV-infected shrimp. These results suggested that PcLT not only served as a pathogen recognition receptor (PRR), but also functioned as an immune modulator, participating in host defense against invaders.

  8. Amino acid sequence and carbohydrate-binding analysis of the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific C-type lectin, CEL-I, from the Holothuroidea, Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Matsuo, Noriaki; Shiba, Kouhei; Nishinohara, Shoichi; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Sugawara, Hajime; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2002-01-01

    CEL-I is one of the Ca2+-dependent lectins that has been isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This protein is composed of two identical subunits held by a single disulfide bond. The complete amino acid sequence of CEL-I was determined by sequencing the peptides produced by proteolytic fragmentation of S-pyridylethylated CEL-I. A subunit of CEL-I is composed of 140 amino acid residues. Two intrachain (Cys3-Cys14 and Cys31-Cys135) and one interchain (Cys36) disulfide bonds were also identified from an analysis of the cystine-containing peptides obtained from the intact protein. The similarity between the sequence of CEL-I and that of other C-type lectins was low, while the C-terminal region, including the putative Ca2+ and carbohydrate-binding sites, was relatively well conserved. When the carbohydrate-binding activity was examined by a solid-phase microplate assay, CEL-I showed much higher affinity for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine than for other galactose-related carbohydrates. The association constant of CEL-I for p-nitrophenyl N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide (NP-GalNAc) was determined to be 2.3 x 10(4) M(-1), and the maximum number of bound NP-GalNAc was estimated to be 1.6 by an equilibrium dialysis experiment.

  9. A C-type lectin (AiCTL-3) from bay scallop Argopecten irradians with mannose/galactose binding ability to bind various bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengmeng; Song, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jianmin; Mu, Changkao; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Xiaolin; Song, Linsheng

    2013-11-15

    C-type lectins are a family of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins playing crucial roles in innate immunity of vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, the cDNA of a C-type lectin with one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of 127 amino acids was cloned from bay scallop Argopecten irradians (designated AiCTL-3) by rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) techniques based on expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. The mRNA transcripts of AiCTL-3 could be detected in all the tested tissues including hepatopancreas, gonad, adductor muscle, heart, hemocytes, mantle and gill, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. After the challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, the mRNA expression level of AiCTL-3 was obviously up-regulated and reached the maximum level at 9h (11.87fold, P<0.01, and 20.02-fold, P<0.05, respectively). The recombinant AiCTL-3 (designated as rAiCTL-3) could bind LPS, PGN, and glucan in vitro, but could not bind mannan. And it also bound Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus as well as Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. anguillarum. With a Ca(2+) binding site 2 EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, rAiCTL-3 could bind both mannose and galactose which was quite different from those in vertebrate. Meanwhile, it could significantly enhance the phagocytosis of scallop hemocytes in vitro. The results clearly suggested that AiCTL-3 could serve not only as a PRR participated in the immune response against various PAMPs and bacteria in non-self recognition via mannose/galactose binding specificity but an opsonin playing an important part in clearance of invaders.

  10. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  11. Cloning and the mRNA expression of a C-type lectin with one carbohydrate recognition domain from Fenneropenaeus merguiensis in response to pathogenic inoculation.

    PubMed

    Runsaeng, Phanthipha; Thepnarong, Supattra; Rattanaporn, Onnicha; Utarabhand, Prapaporn

    2015-12-01

    Crustaceans are deficient in an adaptive immune system and depend solely on their innate immunity. One kind of pattern recognition proteins which plays an important role in the shrimp immunity is lectin. A new C-type lectin called FmLC2 was cloned from the stomach of the banana shrimp Fenneropenaeus merguiensis by means of RT-PCR and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Its full-length cDNA contains 1098 bp with a single open reading frame of 738 bp, encoding a peptide of 245 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of FmLC2 consists of a signal peptide of 17 amino acids with a molecular mass of 28,115 Da and an isoelectric point of 6.94. The primary structure of FmLC2 comprises a single carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) with a QPD (Gln-Pro-Asp) motif and one Ca(2+) binding site. Like other C-type lectins, its CRD structure contains a double-loop characteristic being stabilized by two conserved disulfide linkages. The mRNA expression of FmLC2 was detected specifically in the stomach and gills, less was found in the hepatopancreas. Upon inoculation of shrimp with Vibrio harveyi or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), the FmLC2 expression either in stomach or gills was higher than in the hepatopancreas. Besides, its expression in these tissues was up-regulated to reach the highest levels at 12 or 18 h for V. harveyi or WSSV stimulation, respectively. RNAi-based silencing of FmLC2 resulted in suppression of its expression, increases in mortality when the shrimp were challenged with V. harveyi or WSSV, and the median lethal time was reduced compared with controls. These results suggest that FmLC2 may serve as receptor molecules which recognize invading bacterial and viral pathogens and thus contribute a role in the shrimp immune response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Critical Role for an acidic amino acid region in platelet signaling by the HemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif) containing receptor CLEC-2 (C-type lectin receptor-2).

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig E; Sinha, Uma; Pandey, Anjali; Eble, Johannes A; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Watson, Steve P

    2013-02-15

    CLEC-2 is a member of new family of C-type lectin receptors characterized by a cytosolic YXXL downstream of three acidic amino acids in a sequence known as a hemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif). Dimerization of two phosphorylated CLEC-2 molecules leads to recruitment of the tyrosine kinase Syk via its tandem SH2 domains and initiation of a downstream signaling cascade. Using Syk-deficient and Zap-70-deficient cell lines we show that hemITAM signaling is restricted to Syk and that the upstream triacidic amino acid sequence is required for signaling. Using surface plasmon resonance and phosphorylation studies, we demonstrate that the triacidic amino acids are required for phosphorylation of the YXXL. These results further emphasize the distinct nature of the proximal events in signaling by hemITAM relative to ITAM receptors.

  13. Characterization of recombinant CEL-I, a GalNAc-specific C-type lectin, expressed in Escherichia coli using an artificial synthetic gene.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Shiba, Kouhei; Matsuo, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Tokiko; Oda, Tatsuya; Sugawara, Hajime; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2004-01-01

    CEL-I is a C-type lectin isolated from the Holothuroidea Cucumaria echinata. This lectin shows very high N-acetylgalactosamine-binding specificity. We constructed an artificial gene encoding recombinant CEL-I (rCEL-I) using a combination of synthetic oligonucleotides, and expressed it in Escherichia coli cells. Since the recombinant protein was obtained as inclusion bodies, the latter were solubilized using urea and 2-mercaptoethanol, and the protein was refolded during the purification and dialysis steps. The purified rCEL-I showed comparable hemagglutinating activity to that of native CEL-I at relatively high Ca(2+)-concentrations, whereas it was weaker at lower Ca(2+)-concentrations due to decreased Ca(2+)-binding affinity. rCEL-I exhibited similar carbohydrate-binding specificity to native CEL-I, including strong GalNAc-binding specificity, as examined by hemagglutination inhibition assay. Comparison of the far UV-CD spectra of recombinant and native CEL-I revealed that the two proteins undergo a similar conformational change upon binding of Ca(2+). Single crystals of rCEL-I were also obtained under the same conditions as those used for the native protein, suggesting that they have similar tertiary structures. Although native CEL-I exhibited strong cytotoxicity toward cultured cells, rCEL-I showed low cytotoxicity. These results indicate that rCEL-I has a tertiary structure and carbohydrate-binding specificity similar to those of native CEL-I. Howeger, there is a subtle difference in the properties between the two proteins probably due to the additional methionine residue at the N-terminus of rCEL-I.

  14. Syk and Src Family Kinases Regulate C-type Lectin Receptor 2 (CLEC-2)-mediated Clustering of Podoplanin and Platelet Adhesion to Lymphatic Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Alice Y.; Poulter, Natalie S.; Gitz, Eelo; Navarro-Nuñez, Leyre; Wang, Ying-Jie; Hughes, Craig E.; Thomas, Steven G.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Douglas, Michael R.; Owen, Dylan M.; Jackson, David G.; Dustin, Michael L.; Watson, Steve P.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of C-type lectin receptor 2 (CLEC-2) on platelets with Podoplanin on lymphatic endothelial cells initiates platelet signaling events that are necessary for prevention of blood-lymph mixing during development. In the present study, we show that CLEC-2 signaling via Src family and Syk tyrosine kinases promotes platelet adhesion to primary mouse lymphatic endothelial cells at low shear. Using supported lipid bilayers containing mobile Podoplanin, we further show that activation of Src and Syk in platelets promotes clustering of CLEC-2 and Podoplanin. Clusters of CLEC-2-bound Podoplanin migrate rapidly to the center of the platelet to form a single structure. Fluorescence lifetime imaging demonstrates that molecules within these clusters are within 10 nm of one another and that the clusters are disrupted by inhibition of Src and Syk family kinases. CLEC-2 clusters are also seen in platelets adhered to immobilized Podoplanin using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy. These findings provide mechanistic insight by which CLEC-2 signaling promotes adhesion to Podoplanin and regulation of Podoplanin signaling, thereby contributing to lymphatic vasculature development. PMID:25368330

  15. Vixapatin (VP12), a C-Type Lectin-Protein from Vipera xantina palestinae Venom: Characterization as a Novel Anti-angiogenic Compound

    PubMed Central

    Momic, Tatjana; Cohen, Gadi; Reich, Reuven; Arlinghaus, Franziska T.; Eble, Johannes A.; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Lazarovici, Philip

    2012-01-01

    A C-type lectin-like protein (CTL), originally identified as VP12 and lately named Vixapatin, was isolated and characterized from Israeli viper Vipera xantina palestinae snake venom. This CTL was characterized as a selective α2β1 integrin inhibitor with anti-melanoma metastatic activity. The major aim of the present study was to prove the possibility that this protein is also a potent novel anti-angiogenic compound. Using an adhesion assay, we demonstrated that Vixapatin selectively and potently inhibited the α2 mediated adhesion of K562 over-expressing cells, with IC50 of 3 nM. 3 nM Vixapatin blocked proliferation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC); 25 nM inhibited collagen I induced migration of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells; and 50 nM rat C6 glioma and human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. 1 µM Vixapatin reduced HDMEC tube formation by 75% in a Matrigel assay. Furthermore, 1 µM Vixapatin decreased by 70% bFGF-induced physiological angiogenesis, and by 94% C6 glioma-induced pathological angiogenesis, in shell-less embryonic quail chorioallantoic membrane assay. Vixapatin’s ability to inhibit all steps of the angiogenesis process suggest that it is a novel pharmacological tool for studying α2β1 integrin mediated angiogenesis and a lead compound for the development of a novel anti-angiogenic/angiostatic/anti-cancer drug. PMID:23162702

  16. Functional analysis of ligand-binding and signal transduction domains of CD69 and CD23 C-type lectin leukocyte receptors.

    PubMed

    Sancho, D; Santis, A G; Alonso-Lebrero, J L; Viedma, F; Tejedor, R; Sánchez-Madrid, F

    2000-10-01

    CD69 and CD23 are leukocyte receptors with distinctive pattern of cell expression and functional features that belong to different C-type lectin receptor subfamilies. To assess the functional equivalence of different domains of these structurally related proteins, a series of CD69/CD23 chimeras exchanging the carbohydrate recognition domain, the neck region, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains were generated. Biochemical analysis revealed the importance of the neck region (Cys68) in the dimerization of CD69. Functional analysis of these chimeras in RBL-2H3 mast cells and Jurkat T cell lines showed the interchangeability of structural domains of both proteins regarding Ca2+ fluxes, serotonin release, and TNF-alpha synthesis. The type of the signal transduced mainly relied on the cytoplasmic domain and was independent of receptor oligomerization. The cytoplasmic domain of CD69 transduced a Ca2+-mediated signaling that was dependent on the extracellular uptake of Ca2+. Furthermore, a significant production of TNF-alpha was induced through the cytoplasmic domain of CD69 in RBL-2H3 cells, which was additive to that promoted via FcepsilonRI, thus suggesting a role for CD69 in the late phase of reactions mediated by mast cells. Our results provide new important data on the functional equivalence of homologous domains of these two leukocyte receptors.

  17. Association of the C-type lectin-like domain family-16A (CLEC16A) gene polymorphisms with acute coronary syndrome in Mexican patients.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcon, Gilberto; Ramirez-Bello, Julian; Angeles-Martinez, Javier; Rodriguez-Perez, Jose Manuel; Perez-Hernandez, Nonanzit; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Jorge-Galarza, Esteban; Ocampo-Arcos, Wendy Angelica; Obil-Chavarria, Claudia; Fragoso, Jose Manuel

    2014-12-01

    The CLEC16A gene has an important role in the immune activation and regulation inflammatory. This gene encodes to C-type lectin domain that is involved in the recognition of DAMPS. The aim of this study was assess the CLEC16A gene polymorphisms in the risk of developing ACS in a group of patients. Four rs12708716, rs12917716, rs6498142 and rs9925481 (positions 146529 A>G, 155804 G>C, 47905 C>G and 64135 C>T, respectively) single nucleotide polymorphisms of CLEC16A gene were analyzed by TaqMan assays in a group of 452 patients with ACS and 456 healthy controls. The analysis was performed on the total group of individuals and then in groups of men and women separately. Under co-dominant model adjusted by cardiovascular risk factors the rs12708716 (146529 A>G) and rs12917716 (155804 G>C) polymorphisms were significantly associated with decrease risk of ACS in men (OR=0.16, PCo-dom=0.027 and OR=0.37, PCo-dom=0.016, respectively). In summary, our data suggests that two polymorphisms of the CLEC16A gene play an important role in the developing of ACS in men. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CsCTL1, a teleost C-type lectin that promotes antibacterial and antiviral immune defense in a manner that depends on the conserved EPN motif.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ze-jun; Sun, Li

    2015-06-01

    Many C-type lectins (CTLs) have been identified in teleost, however, the in vivo function of fish CTLs is essentially unknown. In this study, we examined the function of a CTL (CsCTL1) from tongue sole. CsCTL1 possesses the conserved EPN motif required for mannose binding in mammals but unknown in function in fish. Recombinant CsCTL1 (rCsCTL1), but not the mutant rCsCTL1M bearing substitutions at EPN, interacted with and agglutinated a limited range of bacteria. The agglutinating ability of rCsCTL1 was abolished in the absence of calcium or presence of mannose. Binding of rCsCTL1 to bacteria promoted phagocytosis and antimicrobial activity of head kidney monocytes. Fish administered with rCsCTL1 exhibited enhanced resistance against bacterial and viral infections. These results provide the first evidence that the EPN site is essential to a fish CTL and that, in addition to antibacterial properties, a fish CTL promotes the immune defense against viral infection as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of C-Type Lectin Mincle with FcεRIβγ Subunits Leads to Functional Activation of RBL-2H3 Cells through Syk

    PubMed Central

    Honjoh, Chisato; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Yamauchi, Shota; Takeuchi, Kenji; Kato, Yuji; Hida, Yukio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Sada, Kiyonao

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) interacts with the γ-subunit of high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRIγ) and activates Syk by recognizing its specific ligand, trehalose-6,6′-dimycolate, a glycolipid produced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It has been suggested that mast cells participate in the immune defense against pathogenic microbes including M. tuberculosis, although the functions are still uncertain. In this study, we examined the Mincle-mediated signaling pathway and cellular responses using RBL-2H3 cells. Mincle formed a protein complex with not only FcεRIγ but also FcεRIβ in a stable cell line expressing myc-tagged Mincle. In addition, engagement of Mincle increased the levels of protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ERK phosphorylation. A pull-down assay demonstrated that cross-linking of Mincle induced binding of FcεRIβγ subunits to the Src homology 2 domain of Syk. Pharmacological and genetic studies indicated that activation of Syk was critical for Mincle-mediated activation of phospholipase Cγ2, leading to the activation of ERK and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Moreover, engagement of Mincle efficiently induced up-regulation of characteristic mast cell genes in addition to degranulation. Taken together, our present results suggest that mast cells contribute to Mincle-mediated immunity through Syk activation triggered by association with the FcεRIβγ complex. PMID:28393919

  20. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes J M; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes.

  1. C-type lectin Langerin is a beta-glucan receptor on human Langerhans cells that recognizes opportunistic and pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marein A W P; Vriend, Lianne E M; Theelen, Bart; Taylor, Maureen E; Fluitsma, Donna; Boekhout, Teun; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2010-03-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) lining the stratified epithelia and mucosal tissues are the first antigen presenting cells to encounter invading pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and fungi. Fungal infections form a health threat especially in immuno-compromised individuals. LCs express C-type lectin Langerin that has specificity for mannose, fucose and GlcNAc structures. Little is known about the role of human Langerin in fungal infections. Our data show that Langerin interacts with both mannan and beta-glucan structures, common cell-wall carbohydrate structures of fungi. We have screened a large panel of fungi for recognition by human Langerin and, strikingly, we observed strong binding of Langerin to a variety of Candida and Saccharomyces species and Malassezia furfur, but very weak binding was observed to Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans. Notably, Langerin is the primary fungal receptor on LCs, since the interaction of LCs with the different fungi was blocked by antibodies against Langerin. Langerin recognizes both mannose and beta-glucans present on fungal cell walls and our data demonstrate that Langerin is the major fungal pathogen receptor on human LCs that recognizes pathogenic and commensal fungi. Together these data may provide more insight in the role of LCs in fungal infections. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lectins with potential for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yau, Tammy; Dan, Xiuli; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-02-26

    This article reviews lectins of animal and plant origin that induce apoptosis and autophagy of cancer cells and hence possess the potential of being developed into anticancer drugs. Apoptosis-inducing lectins encompass galectins, C-type lectins, annexins, Haliotis discus discus lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, mistletoe lectin, and concanavalin A, fucose-binding Dicentrarchus labrax lectin, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, and mistletoe lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, autophagy inducing lectins include annexins and Polygonatum odoratum lectin.

  3. Development of gastrointestinal surface. VIII. Lectin identification of carbohydrate differences

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, K.Y.; Bresson, J.L.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-05-01

    Binding of microvillus membranes (MVM) from newborn and adult rats by concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus (UEA I), Dolichos bifluorus (DBA), and Triticum vulgaris (WGA) was examined to determine the availability of carbohydrate-containing sites for these lectins on the intestinal surface during development. Consistent patterns of differences in the reaction of MVM with these lectins were found. Con A and UEA had much higher reactivities to MVM of adult than newborn rats. /sup 125/I-labeled-UEA gel overlay experiments revealed the abundance of UEA-binding sites in MVM of adult rat in contrast to the two binding sites in MVM of a newborn rat. DBA bound only to MVM of the adults, and very few binding sites were found in immature MVM. In contrast to these lectins, WGA binding was much higher in MVM of the newborns and decreased with maturation. Additional experiments on the age dependence of UEA and DBA reactivities revealed that the most striking changes occur in animals from 2 to 2 wk of age. In MVM from 2-wk-old rats, there were only 13.9% and < 0.2% of the adult binding capacities for UEA and DBA, respectively. By the time the animals were 4 wk old, the binding capacity for UEA had attained close to the level of the adults, whereas for DBA it reached 71.3% of the adult value. These results provide definite evidence of changes in the intestinal surface during perinatal development.

  4. Purification and characterization of a novel C-type hemolytic lectin for clot lysis from the fresh water clam Villorita cyprinoides: a possible natural thrombolytic agent against myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, G R Learnal; Vincent, S G Prakash

    2014-02-01

    Villorita cyprinoides (black clam) is a fresh water clam that belongs as a bivalve to the group of mollusc. The saline extracts from the muscle reveal high titers of agglutination potency on trypsin-treated rabbit erythrocytes. With the help of affinity chromatography a hemolytic protein with lectin activity which could all be inhibited by D-galactose were isolated. The lectins were separated on DEAE-cellulose and the main component was purified after an additional step of gel filtration on sephadex G-75. The main component is a non-glycosylated protein with a molecular weight of 96,560 Da determined by MALDI-ToF, consisting of a single protein chain and characterized by the lack of polymers and intermediate disulfide bonds. The pure main lectin with clot lytic feature shows two bands at molecular weights 36,360 and 26, 520 Da. Optimal inhibition of the pure lectin is achieved by D-galactose containing oligo- and polysaccharides. The lectin activity decreased above 40 °C and was lost at 62 °C, the stability over the pH range between 7.0 and 8.0 and requires divalent cations for their activity. The novel C-type hemolytic lectin for clot lysis from the clam Villorita cyprinoides was identified and evaluated, the purified hemolytic lectin (0.35 mg/ml and 0.175 mg/ml) enhanced clot lysis activity when compared to the different concentration (5 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml) of commercial streptokinase. In the present study identified hemolytic lectin was a rapid and effective clot lytic molecule and could be developed as new drug molecule in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  6. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Itano, Michelle S.; Graus, Matthew S.; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael J.; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith A.; Thompson, Nancy L.; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron K.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (∼80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to 4 h. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150–175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal recognition, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of <30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen. PMID:25506589

  7. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Michelle; Graus, Matthew; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith; Thompson, Nancy; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  8. The dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is a receptor for Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens and recognizes the glycan antigen Lewis x.

    PubMed

    van Die, Irma; van Vliet, Sandra J; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D; Bank, Christine M C; Appelmelk, Ben; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2003-06-01

    Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEAs) are crucially involved in modulating the host immune response to infection by S. mansoni. We report that human dendritic cells bind SEAs through the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN). Monoclonal antibodies against the carbohydrate antigens Lewisx (Lex) and GalNAcbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc (LDNF) inhibit binding of DC-SIGN to SEAs, suggesting that these glycan antigens may be critically involved in binding. In a solid-phase adhesion assay, DC-SIGN-Fc binds polyvalent neoglycoconjugates that contain the Lex antigen, whereas no binding was observed to Galbeta1-4GlcNAc, and binding to neoglycoconjugates containing only alpha-fucose or oligosaccharides with a terminal alpha1-2-linked fucose is low. These data indicate that binding of DC-SIGN to Lex antigen is fucose-dependent and that adjacent monosaccharides and/or the anomeric linkage of the fucose are important for binding activity. Previous studies have shown that DC-SIGN binds HIV gp120 that contains high-mannose-type N-glycans. Site-directed mutagenesis within the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN demonstrates that amino acids E324 and E347 are involved in binding to HIV gp120, Lex, and SEAs. By contrast, mutation of amino acid Val351 abrogates binding to SEAs and Lex but not HIV gp120. These data suggest that DC-SIGN recognizes these ligands through different (but overlapping) regions within its CRD. Our data imply that DC-SIGN not only is a pathogen receptor for HIV gp120 but may also function in pathogen recognition by interaction with the carbohydrate antigens Lex and possibly LDNF, which are found on important human pathogens, such as schistosomes and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori.

  9. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  10. A lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with midgut surface of Lutzomyia migonei, unlike its homologues, Cratylia floribunda lectin and Canavalia gladiata lectin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania.

  11. A Human Lectin Microarray for Sperm Surface Glycosylation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yangyang; Cheng, Li; Gu, Yihua; Xin, Aijie; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Shumin; Guo, Shujuan; Liu, Yin; Diao, Hua; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Guangyu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-09-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most abundant and functionally important protein post-translational modifications. As such, technology for efficient glycosylation analysis is in high demand. Lectin microarrays are a powerful tool for such investigations and have been successfully applied for a variety of glycobiological studies. However, most of the current lectin microarrays are primarily constructed from plant lectins, which are not well suited for studies of human glycosylation because of the extreme complexity of human glycans. Herein, we constructed a human lectin microarray with 60 human lectin and lectin-like proteins. All of the lectins and lectin-like proteins were purified from yeast, and most showed binding to human glycans. To demonstrate the applicability of the human lectin microarray, human sperm were probed on the microarray and strong bindings were observed for several lectins, including galectin-1, 7, 8, GalNAc-T6, and ERGIC-53 (LMAN1). These bindings were validated by flow cytometry and fluorescence immunostaining. Further, mass spectrometry analysis showed that galectin-1 binds several membrane-associated proteins including heat shock protein 90. Finally, functional assays showed that binding of galectin-8 could significantly enhance the acrosome reaction within human sperms. To our knowledge, this is the first construction of a human lectin microarray, and we anticipate it will find wide use for a range of human or mammalian studies, alone or in combination with plant lectin microarrays. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. A Human Lectin Microarray for Sperm Surface Glycosylation Analysis *

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yangyang; Cheng, Li; Gu, Yihua; Xin, Aijie; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Shumin; Guo, Shujuan; Liu, Yin; Diao, Hua; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Guangyu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most abundant and functionally important protein post-translational modifications. As such, technology for efficient glycosylation analysis is in high demand. Lectin microarrays are a powerful tool for such investigations and have been successfully applied for a variety of glycobiological studies. However, most of the current lectin microarrays are primarily constructed from plant lectins, which are not well suited for studies of human glycosylation because of the extreme complexity of human glycans. Herein, we constructed a human lectin microarray with 60 human lectin and lectin-like proteins. All of the lectins and lectin-like proteins were purified from yeast, and most showed binding to human glycans. To demonstrate the applicability of the human lectin microarray, human sperm were probed on the microarray and strong bindings were observed for several lectins, including galectin-1, 7, 8, GalNAc-T6, and ERGIC-53 (LMAN1). These bindings were validated by flow cytometry and fluorescence immunostaining. Further, mass spectrometry analysis showed that galectin-1 binds several membrane-associated proteins including heat shock protein 90. Finally, functional assays showed that binding of galectin-8 could significantly enhance the acrosome reaction within human sperms. To our knowledge, this is the first construction of a human lectin microarray, and we anticipate it will find wide use for a range of human or mammalian studies, alone or in combination with plant lectin microarrays. PMID:27364157

  13. A novel C-type lectin, Nattectin-like protein, with a wide range of bacterial agglutination activity in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Lv, Changhuan; Zhang, Dongling; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-03-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are generally recognized as a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins, which serve as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity of vertebrates. In this study, the molecular characterization and immune roles of a novel CTL from Larimichthys crocea (designated as LcNTC) were investigated. LcNTC is a novel protein that shared 33%-49% homology with other teleosts CTLs. The full-length cDNA of LcNTC was composed of 859 bp with a 465 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 154 residues. LcNTC contained a single CRD with four conserved disulfide-bonded cysteine residues (Cys(57)-Cys(148), Cys(126)-Cys(140)) and EPN/AND motifs instead of invariant EPN/WND motifs required for carbohydrate-binding specificity and constructing Ca(2+)-binding sites. LcNTC mRNA was detected in all examined tissues with the most abundant in the gill. After challenged with poly I:C and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, the temporal expression of LcNTC was significantly up-regulated in the liver, spleen and head-kidney. LcNTC transcripts were also induced in the gill, skin, spleen and head-kidney post-infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. The recombinant LcNTC (rLcNTC) purified from Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) exhibited strong agglutination activity against erythrocytes from human, rabbit and large yellow croaker in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and the agglutination could be inhibited by D-Mannose, D-Glucose, D-Fructose, α-Lactose, D-Maltose and LPS. Positive microbial agglutination activities of rLcNTC were observed against all tested bacteria in the presence of Ca(2+), including Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus lysoleikticus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, V. parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus and Aeromonas hydrophila). These findings collectively indicated that LcNTC might be involved in the innate immunity of L. crocea as a PRR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  14. U(VI) Reduction by Diverse Outer Surface c-Type Cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Janet J.; Comolli, Luis R.; Csencsits, Roseann; Janot, Noemie; Flanagan, Kelly A.; Gray, Arianna S.; Leang, Ching; Izallalen, Mounir; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    Early studies with Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested that outer-surface c-type cytochromes might play a role in U(VI) reduction, but it has recently been suggested that there is substantial U(VI) reduction at the surface of the electrically conductive pili known as microbial nanowires. This phenomenon was further investigated. A strain of G. sulfurreducens, known as Aro-5, which produces pili with substantially reduced conductivity reduced U(VI) nearly as well as the wild type, as did a strain in which the gene for PilA, the structural pilin protein, was deleted. In order to reduce rates of U(VI) reduction to levels less than 20% of the wild-type rates, it was necessary to delete the genes for the five most abundant outer surface c-type cytochromes of G. sulfurreducens. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy demonstrated that whereas 83% ± 10% of the uranium associated with wild-type cells correspond to U(IV) after 4 h of incubation, with the quintuple mutant, 89% ± 10% of uranium was U(VI). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy revealed that wild-type cells did not precipitate uranium along pili as previously reported, but U(IV) was precipitated at the outer cell surface. These findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have suggested that G. sulfurreducens requires outer-surface c-type cytochromes but not pili for the reduction of soluble extracellular electron acceptors. PMID:23934497

  15. U(VI) reduction by diverse outer surface c-type cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Roberto; Leavitt, Janet J; Comolli, Luis R; Csencsits, Roseann; Janot, Noemie; Flanagan, Kelly A; Gray, Arianna S; Leang, Ching; Izallalen, Mounir; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-10-01

    Early studies with Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested that outer-surface c-type cytochromes might play a role in U(VI) reduction, but it has recently been suggested that there is substantial U(VI) reduction at the surface of the electrically conductive pili known as microbial nanowires. This phenomenon was further investigated. A strain of G. sulfurreducens, known as Aro-5, which produces pili with substantially reduced conductivity reduced U(VI) nearly as well as the wild type, as did a strain in which the gene for PilA, the structural pilin protein, was deleted. In order to reduce rates of U(VI) reduction to levels less than 20% of the wild-type rates, it was necessary to delete the genes for the five most abundant outer surface c-type cytochromes of G. sulfurreducens. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy demonstrated that whereas 83% ± 10% of the uranium associated with wild-type cells correspond to U(IV) after 4 h of incubation, with the quintuple mutant, 89% ± 10% of uranium was U(VI). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy revealed that wild-type cells did not precipitate uranium along pili as previously reported, but U(IV) was precipitated at the outer cell surface. These findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have suggested that G. sulfurreducens requires outer-surface c-type cytochromes but not pili for the reduction of soluble extracellular electron acceptors.

  16. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-06

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Attenuated natural killer (NK) cell activation through C-type lectin-like receptor NKp80 is due to an anomalous hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (HemITAM) with impaired Syk kinase recruitment capacity.

    PubMed

    Rückrich, Thomas; Steinle, Alexander

    2013-06-14

    Cellular cytotoxicity is the hallmark of NK cells mediating both elimination of virus-infected or malignant cells, and modulation of immune responses. NK cytotoxicity is triggered upon ligation of various activating NK cell receptors. Among these is the C-type lectin-like receptor NKp80 which is encoded in the human Natural Killer Gene Complex (NKC) adjacent to its ligand, activation-induced C-type lectin (AICL). NKp80-AICL interaction promotes cytolysis of malignant myeloid cells, but also stimulates the mutual crosstalk between NK cells and monocytes. While many activating NK cell receptors pair with ITAM-bearing adaptors, we recently reported that NKp80 signals via a hemITAM-like sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. Here we molecularly dissect the NKp80 hemITAM and demonstrate that two non-consensus amino acids, in particular arginine 6, critically impair both hemITAM phosphorylation and Syk recruitment. Impaired Syk recruitment results in a substantial attenuation of cytotoxic responses upon NKp80 ligation. Reconstituting the hemITAM consensus or Syk overexpression resulted in robust NKp80-mediated responsiveness. Collectively, our data provide a molecular rationale for the restrained activation potential of NKp80 and illustrate how subtle alterations in signaling motifs determine subsequent cellular responses. They also suggest that non-consensus alterations in the NKp80 hemITAM, as commonly present among mammalian NKp80 sequences, may have evolved to dampen NKp80-mediated cytotoxic responses toward AICL-expressing cells.

  18. Vimentin and desmin possess GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Goto, Mitsuaki; Sato, Takao; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2010-07-01

    Vimentin and desmin are intermediate filament proteins found in various mesenchymal and skeletal muscle cells, respectively. These proteins play an important role in the stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture. Here, we found, using artificial biomimicking glycopolymers, that vimentin and desmin possess N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectin-like properties on the cell surfaces of various vimentin- and desmin-expressing cells such as cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The rod II domain of these proteins was demonstrated to be localized to the cell surface and to directly bind to the artificial biomimicking GlcNAc-bearing polymer, by confocal laser microscopy and surface plasmon resonance analysis. These glycopolymers strongly interact with lectins and are useful tools for the analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions, since glycopolymers binding to lectins can induce the clustering of lectins due to multivalent glycoside ligand binding. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and pull-down assay with His-tagged vimentin-rod II domain protein showed that the vimentin-rod II domain interacts with O-GlcNAc proteins. These results suggest that O-GlcNAc proteins might be one candidate for physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands with which vimentin and desmin interact. These findings demonstrate a novel function of vimentin and desmin that does not involve stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture by which these proteins interact with physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands such as O-GlcNAc proteins on the cell surface through their GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties.

  19. CEL-I, an invertebrate N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin, induces TNF-alpha and G-CSF production by mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2007-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin purified from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea) showed potent cytotoxicity to several cell lines such as HeLa, MDCK and XC cells. In this study, we found that CEL-I induced increased secretion of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF) by mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas this cell line was highly resistant to CEL-I cytotoxicity. The cytokine-inducing activity of CEL-I was stronger than that of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA-L). A binding study using FITC-labelled CEL-I (F-CEL-I) indicated that the amount of bound F-CEL-I on RAW264.7 cells was greater than that of F-PHA-L, suggesting that the greater activity of CEL-I to induce cytokine secretion by RAW264.7 cells is partly due to the higher binding ability. Since the cell binding and cytokine-inducing activity of CEL-I were partly but significantly inhibited by the specific sugar (GalNAc), it is considered that the binding of CEL-I to cell-surface-specific saccharide moieties, which may be recognized by CEL-I with higher affinity than GalNAc, is essential for the induction of cytokine secretion. The secretion of TNF-alpha and G-CSF from CEL-I-treated RAW264.7 cells were almost completely prevented by brefeldin A (BFA), whereas increase in mRNA levels of these cytokines were not affected by BFA. Bio-Plex beads assay suggested that temporal increase in phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase occurred at relatively early time following CEL-I treatment. Furthermore, the secretion of TNF-alpha and G-CSF were inhibited by specific inhibitors for these MAP kinases. These results suggest that the intracellular signal transduction through the activation of MAP kinase system is involved in CEL-I-induced cytokine secretion.

  20. The Activating C-type Lectin-like Receptor NKp65 Signals through a Hemi-immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motif (hemITAM) and Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Björn; Wotapek, Tanja; Zöller, Tobias; Rutkowski, Emilia; Steinle, Alexander

    2017-02-24

    NKp65 is an activating human C-type lectin-like receptor (CTLR) triggering cellular cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion upon high-affinity interaction with the cognate CTLR keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin (KACL) selectively expressed by human keratinocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that NKp65-mediated cellular cytotoxicity depends on tyrosine 7, located in a cytoplasmic sequence motif of NKp65 resembling a hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). HemITAMs have been reported for a few activating myeloid-specific CTLRs, including Dectin-1 and CLEC-2, and consist of a single tyrosine signaling unit preceded by a triacidic motif. Upon receptor engagement, the hemITAM undergoes phosphotyrosinylation and specifically recruits spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), initiating cellular activation. In this study, we addressed the functionality of the putative hemITAM of NKp65. We show that NKp65 forms homodimers and is phosphorylated at the hemITAM-embedded tyrosine 7 upon engagement by antibodies or KACL homodimers. HemITAM phosphotyrosinylation initiates a signaling pathway involving and depending on Syk, leading to cellular activation and natural killer (NK) cell degranulation. However, although NKp65 utilizes Syk for NK cell activation, a physical association of Syk with the NKp65 hemITAM could not be detected, unlike shown previously for the hemITAM of myeloid CTLR. Failure of NKp65 to recruit Syk is not due to an alteration of the triacidic motif, which rather affects the efficiency of hemITAM phosphotyrosinylation. In summary, NKp65 utilizes a hemITAM-like motif for cellular activation that requires Syk, although Syk appears not to be recruited to NKp65.

  1. Enhancement of solubility and yield of a β-glucan receptor Dectin-1 C-type lectin-like domain in Escherichia coli with a solubility-enhancement tag.

    PubMed

    Dulal, Hari Prasad; Nagae, Masamichi; Ikeda, Akemi; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-07-01

    Dectin-1 is a C-type lectin-like pattern recognition receptor for β(1-3)-glucans. It plays a crucial role in protecting against fungal invasion through binding to β-glucans which are commonly present on the fungal cell wall. To probe its ligand binding mechanism by NMR, we expressed the recombinant murine Dectin-1 C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) in E. coli using pCold vector and purified it. However, the high concentration of Dectin-1 CTLD required for NMR analysis could not be attained due to its inherent low solubility and low bacterial expression. In this study, we tried to increase expression and solubility of Dectin-1 CTLD by codon optimization and fusion of a GB1 tag (B1 domain of streptococcal Protein G). GB1 was inserted on either the N-terminal (NT) or C-terminal end as well as both terminal ends of human and mouse Dectin-1 CTLDs. A pure monomeric sample was only obtained with NT-GB1 fused mouse Dectin-1. Expression of mouse Dectin-1 CTLD yielded 0.9 ± 0.2 mg/L culture, codon optimized mouse Dectin-1 CTLD produced 1.4 ± 0.2 mg/L, and the tag-fused domain 7.1 ± 0.3 mg/L. The tag also increased solubility from 0.1 mM to 1.4 mM. The recombinant protein was correctly folded, in a monomeric state, and specifically bound β-glucan laminarin. These results indicate that fusing GB1 to the N-terminus of mouse Dectin-1 domain advantageously increases yield and solubility, allows retention of native structure, and that the site of fusion is critical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hayabusa's follow-on mission for surface and sub-surface sample return from a C-type NEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hajime; Yoshikawa, M.; Yano, H.; Tsuda, Y.; Nakazawa, S.; Mimamino, H.; Terui, F.; Saiki, T.; Nishiyama, K.; Kubota, T.; Okada, T.; Morimoto, M. Y.; Ogawa, N.; Okamoto, C.; Takagi, Y.; Tachibana, S.; Nakamura, R.; Hirata, N.; Demura, H.

    n JAXA's Long-term Vision 2005-2025, acquiring the capability of deep space round trip be-yond the Earth-Moon system is one of key elements for the future space exploration and that has been Hayabusa's primary engineering goal. According to the solar system exploration sci-ence roadmap set by ISAS and JSPEC in 2007, a programmatic approach to small body sample returns from S-type, C-type and then P/D-type asteroids as well as dormant comets, i.e., 'the further, the smaller, the more primitive strategy', is recommended for strengthening Japan's unique position in the field of space exploration. In a more recent international context, NEOs and Martian satellites have been identified as critical targets for the future human space explo-ration en route to Mars; thus their robotic precursor missions with the round trip capability have become more important than ever. Thus, Hayabusa's immediate follow-on mission, nicknamed so far as 'Hayabusa-2', is to aim establishing round trip exploration capability with both technical and operational heritage and lessons leaerned from the original Haybusa mission. It will also conduct in-situ observation and surface and sub-surface sample returns of a C-type NEO after Hayabusa's investigation and sampling attempt at Itokawa, a sub-km, S-type NEO. Important to be reminded is that C-type asteroid exploration is not just matching with carbona-ceous chondrites and interplanetary dust but also enhancing chances to discover new extrater-restrial materials unknown to us today that may become clues to decode interactions among organic, inorganic compounds and "water" kept in various forms inside the object. These three groups of asteroidal materials are basic constituents of the planet Earth, its ocean and its life. Also physical probing inside solid planetary bodies has been recognized as an effective tool to open new scientific insights. By excavating sub-surface materials with artificial physical in-teractions such as an impactor

  3. Glycosylation of surface Ig creates a functional bridge between human follicular lymphoma and microenvironmental lectins.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Vania; Krysov, Sergey; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Emara, Mohamed; Potter, Kathleen N; Johnson, Peter; Packham, Graham; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Stevenson, Freda K

    2010-10-26

    Surface Ig (sIg) of follicular lymphoma (FL) is vital for tumor cell survival. We found previously that the Ig in FL is unusual, because the variable region genes carry sequence motifs for N-glycan addition. These are introduced by somatic mutation and are tumor specific. Unexpectedly, added glycans terminate at high mannose, suggesting a potentially important interaction of FL cells with mannose-binding lectins of the innate immune system. We have now identified mannosylated IgM at the surface of primary lymphoma cells. Recombinant lectin domains of the mannose receptor (MR) or DC-SIGN bind mannosylated Igs in vitro and bind to FL cells, signaling sIgM-associated increases in intracellular Ca(2+). Lectins also bind to normal B cells but fail to signal. In contrast, anti-Ig signaled similarly in both FL and normal B cells. Mannosylation patterns were mimicked by FL Ig-derived single-chain Fvs (scFv), providing probes for potential receptors. Mannosylated scFv bound specifically to the lectin domains of the MR and DC-SIGN and blocked signaling. Mannosylated scFv also bound to DC-SIGN on the surface of dendritic cells. This unique lymphoma-specific interaction of sIg with lectins of innate immunity reveals a potential route for microenvironmental support of tumor cells, mediated via the key B-cell receptor.

  4. Glycosylation of surface Ig creates a functional bridge between human follicular lymphoma and microenvironmental lectins

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vania; Krysov, Sergey; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.; Emara, Mohamed; Potter, Kathleen N.; Johnson, Peter; Packham, Graham; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Stevenson, Freda K.

    2010-01-01

    Surface Ig (sIg) of follicular lymphoma (FL) is vital for tumor cell survival. We found previously that the Ig in FL is unusual, because the variable region genes carry sequence motifs for N-glycan addition. These are introduced by somatic mutation and are tumor specific. Unexpectedly, added glycans terminate at high mannose, suggesting a potentially important interaction of FL cells with mannose-binding lectins of the innate immune system. We have now identified mannosylated IgM at the surface of primary lymphoma cells. Recombinant lectin domains of the mannose receptor (MR) or DC-SIGN bind mannosylated Igs in vitro and bind to FL cells, signaling sIgM-associated increases in intracellular Ca2+. Lectins also bind to normal B cells but fail to signal. In contrast, anti-Ig signaled similarly in both FL and normal B cells. Mannosylation patterns were mimicked by FL Ig-derived single-chain Fvs (scFv), providing probes for potential receptors. Mannosylated scFv bound specifically to the lectin domains of the MR and DC-SIGN and blocked signaling. Mannosylated scFv also bound to DC-SIGN on the surface of dendritic cells. This unique lymphoma-specific interaction of sIg with lectins of innate immunity reveals a potential route for microenvironmental support of tumor cells, mediated via the key B-cell receptor. PMID:20937880

  5. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  6. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Lectin Analysis of the Surface of the Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Yagoda-Shagam, Janet; Barton, Larry L.; Reed, William P.; Chiovetti, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface of Azospirillum brasilense was probed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectins, with binding determined by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. Cells from nitrogen-fixing or ammonium-assimilating cultures reacted similarly to FITC-labeled lectins, with lectin binding in the following order: Griffonia simplicifolia II agglutinin > Griffonia simplicifolia I agglutinin > Triticum vulgaris agglutinin > Glycine max agglutinin > Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin > Limax flavus agglutinin > Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin. The fluorescence intensity of cells labeled with FITC-labeled G. simplicifolia I, C. ensiformis, T. vulgaris, and G. max agglutinins was influenced by lectin concentration. Flow cytometry measurements of lectin binding to cells was consistent with measurements of agglutination resulting from lectin-cell interaction. Capsules surrounding nitrogen-fixing and ammonium-assimilating cells were readily demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopies. Images PMID:16347693

  7. Generation and characterization of β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharide probes from Brucella abortus cyclic β-glucan and their recognition by C-type lectins of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongtao; Palma, Angelina S; Zhang, Yibing; Childs, Robert A; Liu, Yan; Mitchell, Daniel A; Guidolin, Leticia S; Weigel, Wilfried; Mulloy, Barbara; Ciocchini, Andrés E; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2016-01-01

    The β1,2-glucans produced by bacteria are important in invasion, survival and immunomodulation in infected hosts be they mammals or plants. However, there has been a lack of information on proteins which recognize these molecules. This is partly due to the extremely limited availability of the sequence-defined oligosaccharides and derived probes for use in the study of their interactions. Here we have used the cyclic β1,2-glucan (CβG) of the bacterial pathogen Brucella abortus, after removal of succinyl side chains, to prepare linearized oligosaccharides which were used to generate microarrays. We describe optimized conditions for partial depolymerization of the cyclic glucan by acid hydrolysis and conversion of the β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharides, with degrees of polymerization 2–13, to neoglycolipids for the purpose of generating microarrays. By microarray analyses, we show that the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGNR, like the closely related DC-SIGN we investigated earlier, binds to the β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharides, as does the soluble immune effector serum mannose-binding protein. Exploratory studies with DC-SIGN are suggestive of the recognition also of the intact CβG by this receptor. These findings open the way to unravelling mechanisms of immunomodulation mediated by β1,2-glucans in mammalian systems. PMID:27053576

  8. A quantitative analysis of lectin binding to adult rat hepatocyte cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, H O; McMillan, P N; Hevey, K; Naik, S

    1988-05-01

    A quantitative evaluation of lectin binding to adult rat hepatocyte cell surfaces was done using cells isolated by two different collagenase perfusion methodologies and cultured as monolayers with two different tissue culture media formulations (protocol I vs. protocol II). The presence of alpha-D-mannosyl and alpha-D-glucosyl groups was detected by the binding of Concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) to freshly isolated cells. Furthermore, beta-D-galactose [Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA)] and sialic acid residues [wheat germ (WGA)] were also found. Protocols I and II served as models for evaluation of: a) the stripping effect of collagenase separation procedures, b) the restoration in culture of collagenase-stripped sugar residues, c) the effect of the culture environment on cell viability [as measured by lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage] and the protein content of hepatocytes, and d) the presence of cell surface sugar residues as a function of culture duration. The ultrastructural morphology of freshly isolated and cultured hepatocytes was also evaluated. These studies indicated that a decline in lectin binding invariably occurred earlier than a massive leakage of LDH and a decrease in the protein content of the cells in culture. Ultrastructurally, autophagocytosis was an early phenomenon in cells isolated and cultured by protocol I, which was also inferior to protocol II regarding the preservation of hepatocyte glycocalyces. Sugar residues lost due to the collagenase-stripping effect were restored, as shown by lectin binding, within the first 24 h of culture. This stripping effect was confirmed by quantitative evaluations of lectin binding to hepatocytes in culture after an incubation with collagenase. This study shows that the binding of peroxidase-labeled lectins is a useful tool for quantitative evaluation of the sugar composition of hepatocyte cultures.

  9. Glycan profiling of proteins using lectin binding by Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Soriano, Brian; Chen, Qing

    2017-09-22

    Glycan profiling of proteins was studied through their lectin binding activity by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). To validate the method, we monitored specific lectin binding with sequential removal of sugar moieties from human transferrin using specific glycosidases. The results clearly indicated that glycans on the protein can be identified by their selective binding activity to various lectins. Using this method, we characterized Fc glycosylation profiles of therapeutic peptibodies and antibodies expressed in mammalian cells (CHO and HEK 293 6E cells), with E. coli expressed proteins as the negative controls. We observed that antibodies expressed in CHO cells did not contain any sialic acid, while antibodies expressed in 293 6E cells contained sialic acid. CHO cell expressed antibodies were also more heavily fucosylated than the ones expressed by 293 6E cells. We further applied this method to measure the fucose composition of glycan engineered mouse antibodies, as well as to determine mannose composition of human antibody variants with depletion or enrichment of high mannose. The glycan profiles generated using this method were comparable to results from 2-AB labeled glycan analysis of normal-phase separated glycans, and Fc gamma receptor binding activity of the glycan engineered antibodies were consistent with their glycan profiles. Hence, we demonstrated that SPR lectin binding analysis can be a quick alternative method to profile protein glycosylation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Involvement of suppressor of cytokine signalling-1-mediated degradation of MyD88-adaptor-like protein in the suppression of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated signalling by the murine C-type lectin SIGNR1-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Makoto; Iyori, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Ayumi; Tanizume, Naoho; Into, Takeshi; Hasebe, Akira; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shibata, Ken-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells recognize pathogens through pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors and phagocytose and digest them by phagocytic receptors for antigen presentation. This study was designed to clarify the cross-talk between recognition and phagocytosis of microbes in dendritic cells. The murine dendritic cell line XS106 cells were stimulated with the murine C-type lectin SIGNR1 ligand lipoarabinomannan and the Toll-like receptor 2 ligand FSL-1. The co-stimulation significantly suppressed FSL-1-mediated activation of NF-κB as well as production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 in a dose-dependent manner. The suppression was significantly but not completely recovered by knock-down of SIGNR1. SIGNR1 was associated with Toll-like receptor 2 in XS106 cells. The co-stimulation upregulated the expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling-1 in XS106 cells, the knock-down of which almost completely recovered the suppression of the FSL-1-mediated cytokine production by lipoarabinomannan. In addition, it was found that the MyD88-adaptor-like protein in XS106 cells was degraded by co-stimulation with FSL-1 and lipoarabinomannan in the absence, but not the presence, of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and the degradation was inhibited by knock-down of suppressor of cytokine signalling-1. This study suggests that Toll-like receptor 2-mediated signalling is negatively regulated by SIGNR1-mediated signalling in dendritic cells, possibly through suppressor of cytokine signalling-1-mediated degradation of the MyD88-adaptor-like protein. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. The Snake Venom Rhodocytin from Calloselasma rhodostoma—A Clinically Important Toxin and a Useful Experimental Tool for Studies of C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor 2 (CLEC-2)

    PubMed Central

    Bruserud, Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    The snake venom, rhodocytin, from the Malayan viper, Calloselasma rhodostoma, and the endogenous podoplanin are identified as ligands for the C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The snakebites caused by Calloselasma rhodostoma cause a local reaction with swelling, bleeding and eventually necrosis, together with a systemic effect on blood coagulation with distant bleedings that can occur in many different organs. This clinical picture suggests that toxins in the venom have effects on endothelial cells and vessel permeability, extravasation and, possibly, activation of immunocompetent cells, as well as effects on platelets and the coagulation cascade. Based on the available biological studies, it seems likely that ligation of CLEC-2 contributes to local extravasation, inflammation and, possibly, local necrosis, due to microthrombi and ischemia, whereas other toxins may be more important for the distant hemorrhagic complications. However, the venom contains several toxins and both local, as well as distant, symptoms are probably complex reactions that cannot be explained by the effects of rhodocytin and CLEC-2 alone. The in vivo reactions to rhodocytin are thus examples of toxin-induced crosstalk between coagulation (platelets), endothelium and inflammation (immunocompetent cells). Very few studies have addressed this crosstalk as a part of the pathogenesis behind local and systemic reactions to Calloselasma rhodostoma bites. The author suggests that detailed biological studies based on an up-to-date methodology of local and systemic reactions to Calloselasma rhodostoma bites should be used as a hypothesis-generating basis for future functional studies of the CLEC-2 receptor. It will not be possible to study the effects of purified toxins in humans, but the development of animal models (e.g., cutaneous injections of rhodocytin to mimic snakebites) would supplement studies in humans. PMID:23594438

  12. C-type lectin receptor dectin-3 mediates trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM)-induced Mincle expression through CARD9/Bcl10/MALT1-dependent nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Zhu, Le-Le; Chang, Qing; Jiang, Changying; You, Yun; Luo, Tianming; Jia, Xin-Ming; Lin, Xin

    2014-10-24

    Previous studies indicate that both Dectin-3 (also called MCL or Clec4d) and Mincle (also called Clec4e), two C-type lectin receptors, can recognize trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM), a cell wall component from mycobacteria, and induce potent innate immune responses. Interestingly, stimulation of Dectin-3 by TDM can also induce Mincle expression, which may enhance the host innate immune system to sense Mycobacterium infection. However, the mechanism by which Dectin-3 induces Mincle expression is not fully defined. Here, we show that TDM-induced Mincle expression is dependent on Dectin-3-mediated NF-κB, but not nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), activation, and Dectin-3 induces NF-κB activation through the CARD9-BCL10-MALT1 complex. We found that bone marrow-derived macrophages from Dectin-3-deficient mice were severely defective in the induction of Mincle expression in response to TDM stimulation. This defect is correlated with the failure of TDM-induced NF-κB activation in Dectin-3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Consistently, inhibition of NF-κB, but not NFAT, impaired TDM-induced Mincle expression, whereas NF-κB, but not NFAT, binds to the Mincle promoter. Dectin-3-mediated NF-κB activation is dependent on the CARD9-Bcl10-MALT1 complex. Finally, mice deficient for Dectin-3 or CARD9 produced much less proinflammatory cytokines and keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)-specific antibodies after immunization with an adjuvant containing TDM. Overall, this study provides the mechanism by which Dectin-3 induces Mincle expression in response to Mycobacterium infection, which will have significant impact to improve adjuvant and design vaccine for antimicrobial infection.

  13. Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines express a fusion protein encoded by intergenically spliced mRNA for the multilectin receptor DEC-205 (CD205) and a novel C-type lectin receptor DCL-1.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masato; Khan, Seema; Gonzalez, Nelson; O'Neill, Brian P; McDonald, Kylie J; Cooper, Ben J; Angel, Nicola Z; Hart, Derek N J

    2003-09-05

    Classic Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) tissue contains a small population of morphologically distinct malignant cells called Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, associated with the development of HL. Using 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) we identified an alternative mRNA for the DEC-205 multilectin receptor in the HRS cell line L428. Sequence analysis revealed that the mRNA encodes a fusion protein between DEC-205 and a novel C-type lectin DCL-1. Although the 7.5-kb DEC-205 and 4.2-kb DCL-1 mRNA were expressed independently in myeloid and B lymphoid cell lines, the DEC-205/DCL-1 fusion mRNA (9.5 kb) predominated in the HRS cell lines (L428, KM-H2, and HDLM-2). The DEC-205 and DCL-1 genes comprising 35 and 6 exons, respectively, are juxtaposed on chromosome band 2q24 and separated by only 5.4 kb. We determined the DCL-1 transcription initiation site within the intervening sequence by 5'-RACE, confirming that DCL-1 is an independent gene. Two DEC-205/DCL-1 fusion mRNA variants may result from cotranscription of DEC-205 and DCL-1, followed by splicing DEC-205 exon 35 or 34-35 along with DCL-1 exon 1. The resulting reading frames encode the DEC-205 ectodomain plus the DCL-1 ectodomain, the transmembrane, and the cytoplasmic domain. Using DCL-1 cytoplasmic domain-specific polyclonal and DEC-205 monoclonal antibodies for immunoprecipitation/Western blot analysis, we showed that the fusion mRNA is translated into a DEC-205/DCL-1 fusion protein, expressed in the HRS cell lines. These results imply an unusual transcriptional control mechanism in HRS cells, which cotranscribe an mRNA containing DEC-205 and DCL-1 prior to generating the intergenically spliced mRNA to produce a DEC-205/DCL-1 fusion protein.

  14. Carbohydrate profiling of fungal cell wall surface glycoconjugates of Trichophyton tonsurans and other keratinophilic filamentous fungi using lectins.

    PubMed

    Leal, André Ferraz Goiana; de Lima Neto, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2011-11-01

    Various researchers have concluded that lectins are useful reagents for the study of fungal cell wall surface glycoconjugates. In this study, we evaluated the expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, L-fucose, D-galactose and glucose/mannose on the cell wall surface of Trichophyton tonsurans and other keratinophilic filamentous fungi, using a simple lectin-binding protocol. The fungal cultures used were isolated from soils obtained from public parks by the hair-bait technique. The lectin assays used concanavalin A (Con A), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), all conjugated with horseradish peroxidase. Adhesive tape was placed sticky-side down over the fungal colony, gently pressed and then removed. The fungal-tape samples were incubated with the lectin for 1 h at 4 °C. Lectin binding was visualised using 3,3-diaminobendizine (DAB) and hydrogen peroxidase. There was a high expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine on the cell wall surface of all fungi species tested, whereas the expression of L-fucose, D-galactose and glucose/mannose demonstrated inter-specific variations. The lectin-binding assay presented in this article eliminates many of the laborious steps involved in other protocols. The amount and quality of the mycelium and spores immobilised by the adhesive tapes were suitable for obtaining the carbohydrate profile in glycoconjugates of the cell wall surface of filamentous fungi. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Plant Lectins Targeting O-Glycans at the Cell Surface as Tools for Cancer Diagnosis, Prognosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Poiroux, Guillaume; Barre, Annick; van Damme, Els J. M.; Benoist, Hervé; Rougé, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant O-glycans expressed at the surface of cancer cells consist of membrane-tethered glycoproteins (T and Tn antigens) and glycolipids (Lewis a, Lewis x and Forssman antigens). All of these O-glycans have been identified as glyco-markers of interest for the diagnosis and the prognosis of cancer diseases. These epitopes are specifically detected using T/Tn-specific lectins isolated from various plants such as jacalin from Artocarpus integrifola, and fungi such as the Agaricus bisporus lectin. These lectins accommodate T/Tn antigens at the monosaccharide-binding site; residues located in the surrounding extended binding-site of the lectins often participate in the binding of more extended epitopes. Depending on the shape and size of the extended carbohydrate-binding site, their fine sugar-binding specificity towards complex O-glycans readily differs from one lectin to another, resulting in a great diversity in their sugar-recognition capacity. T/Tn-specific lectins have been extensively used for the histochemical detection of cancer cells in biopsies and for the follow up of the cancer progression and evolution. T/Tn-specific lectins also induce a caspase-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells, often associated with a more or less severe inhibition of proliferation. Moreover, they provide another potential source of molecules adapted to the building of photosensitizer-conjugates allowing a specific targeting to cancer cells, for the photodynamic treatment of tumors. PMID:28598369

  16. Lectin-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-poly(vinyldimethyl azlactone) surface supports for high avidity microbial capture

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ryan R; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan P; Shubert, Katherine R; Morrell, Jennifer L.; Pelletier, Dale A; Messman, Jamie M; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S; Retterer, Scott T

    2013-01-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPS) play a critical and dynamic role in shaping the interactions between microbial community members and their local environment. The capture of targeted microbes using surface immobilized lectins that recognize specific extracellular oligosaccharide moieties offers a non-destructive method for functional characterization based on EPS content. In this report, we evaluate the use of the block co-polymer, poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-4,4-dimethyl-2-vinylazlactone (PGMA-b-PVDMA), as a surface support for lectin-specific microbial capture. Arrays of circular polymer supports ten micron in diameter were generated on silicon substrates to provide discrete, covalent coupling sites for Triticum vulgare and Lens culinaris lectins. These supports promoted microbe adhesion and colony formation in a lectin-specific manner. Silicon posts with similar topography containing only physisorbed lectins showed significantly less activity. These results demonstrate that micropatterned PGMA-b-PVDMA supports provide a unique platform for microbial capture and screening based on EPS content by combining high avidity lectin surfaces with three-dimensional topography.

  17. A lectin-based cell microarray approach to analyze the mammalian granulosa cell surface glycosylation profile.

    PubMed

    Accogli, Gianluca; Desantis, Salvatore; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena; Gemeiner, Peter; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-10-01

    The high complexity of glycome, the repertoire of glycans expressed in a cell or in an organism, is difficult to analyze and the use of new technologies has accelerated the progress of glycomics analysis. In the last decade, the microarray approaches, and in particular glycan and lectin microarrays, have provided new insights into evaluation of cell glycosylation status. Here we present a cell microarray method based on cell printing on microarray slides for the analysis of the glycosylation pattern of the cell glycocalyx. In order to demonstrate the reliability of the developed method, the glycome profiles of equine native uncultured mural granulosa cells (uGCs) and in vitro cultured mural granulosa cells (cGCs) were determined and compared. The method consists in the isolation of GCs, cell printing into arrays on microarray slide, incubation with a panel of biotinylated lectins, reaction with fluorescent streptavidin and signal intensity detection by a microarray scanner. Cell microarray technology revealed that glycocalyx of both uGCs and cGCs contains N-glycans, sialic acid terminating glycans, N-acetylglucosamine and O-glycans. The comparison of uGCs and cGCs glycan signals indicated an increase in the expression of sialic acids, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-glycans in cGCs. Glycan profiles determined by cell microarray agreed with those revealed by lectin histochemistry. The described cell microarray method represents a simple and sensitive procedure to analyze cell surface glycome in mammalian cells.

  18. Cyborg lectins: novel leguminous lectins with unique specificities.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Maruyama, I N; Osawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPA) is one of the beta-galactose-binding leguminous lectins. Leguminous lectins contain a long metal-binding loop, part of which determines their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Random mutations were introduced into a portion of the cDNA coding BPA that corresponds to the carbohydrate-binding loop of the lectin. An library of the mutant lectin expressed on the surface of lambda foo phages was screened by the panning method. Several phage clones with an affinity for mannose or N-acetylglucosamine were isolated. These results indicate the possibility of making artificial lectins (so-called "cyborg lectins") with distinct and desired carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  19. Convulxin, a C-type lectin-like protein, inhibits HCASMCs functions via WAD-motif/integrin-αv interaction and NF-κB-independent gene suppression of GRO and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ho; Chiang, Tin-Bin; Wang, Wen-Jeng

    2017-03-15

    Convulxin (CVX), a C-type lectin-like protein (CLPs), is a potent platelet aggregation inducer. To evaluate its potential applications in angiogenic diseases, the multimeric CVX were further explored on its mode of actions toward human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). The N-terminus of β-chain of CVX (CVX-β) contains a putative disintegrin-like domain with a conserved motif upon the sequence comparison with other CLPs. Importantly, native CVX had no cytotoxic activity as examined by electrophoretic pattern. A Trp-Ala-Asp (WAD)-containing octapeptide, MTWADAEK, was thereafter synthesized and analyzed in functional assays. In the case of specific integrin antagonists as positive controls, the anti-angiogenic effects of CVX on HCASMCs were investigated by series of functional analyses. CVX showed to exhibit multiple inhibitory activities toward HCASMCs proliferation, adhesion and invasion with a dose- and integrin αvβ3-dependent fashion. However, the WAD-octapeptide exerting a minor potency could also work as an active peptidomimetic. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated both the intact CVX and synthetic peptide can specifically interact with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and CVX was shown to have a down-regulatory effect on the gene expression of CXC-chemokines, such as growth-related oncogene and interleukin-8. According to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation assay and Western blotting analysis, the NF-κB activation was not involved in the signaling events of CVX-induced gene expression. In conclusion, CVX may act as a disintegrin-like protein via the interactions of WAD-motif in CVX-β with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and it also is a gene suppressor with the ability to diminish the expression of two CXC-chemokines in a NF-κB-independent manner. Indeed, more extensive investigations are needed and might create a new avenue for the development of a novel angiostatic agent.

  20. Thermal Inertia Determination of C-type Asteroid Ryugu from in-situ Surface Brightness Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Maximilian; Grott, Matthias; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kührt, Ekkehard; Pelivan, Ivanka

    2016-10-01

    The Japanese Hayabusa-2 mission is a sample-return mission currently on its way to the C-type asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa-2 carries the small lander MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout), whose scientific payload includes the infrared radiometer MARA. The primary science goal of MARA is to determine Ryugu's surface brightness temperatures at the landing site for a full asteroid rotation, which will be measured using a long-pass filter, an 8 to 12 µm bandpass, as well as four narrow bandpasses centered at wavelengths between 5 and 15 µm. From these measurements, surface thermal inertia will be derived, but because MARA performs single pixel measurements, heterogeneity in the field of view cannot be resolved. Yet, the surface will likely exhibit different surface textures, and thermal inertia in the field of view could vary from 600 (small rocks) to 50 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 (fine regolith grains). Sub-pixel heterogeneity is a common problem when interpreting radiometer data, since the associated ambiguities cannot be resolved without additional information on surface texture. For MARA, this information will be provided by the MASCOT camera, and in the present paper we have investigated to what extent different thermal inertias can be retrieved from MARA data. To test the applied approach, we generated synthetic MARA data using a thermal model of Ryugu, assuming different thermal inertias for sections of the field of view. We find that sub-pixel heterogeneity systematically deforms the diurnal temperature curve so that it is not possible to fit the data using a single thermal inertia value. However, including the area fractions of the different surface sections enables us to reconstruct the different thermal inertias to within 10% assuming appropriate measurement noise. The presented approach will increase robustness of the Ryugu thermal inertia determination and results will serve as a ground truth for the global measurements performed by the thermal infrared mapper (TIR) on

  1. Analysis of unconventional approaches for the rapid detection of surface lectin binding ligands on human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Welty, Lily Anne Y; Heinrich, Eileen L; Garcia, Karina; Banner, Lisa R; Summers, Michael L; Baresi, Larry; Metzenberg, Stan; Coyle-Thompson, Cathy; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2006-01-01

    For over a decade our laboratory has developed and used a novel histochemical assay using derivatized agarose beads to examine the surface properties of various cell types. Most recently, we have used this assay to examine lectin binding ligands on two human cell types, CCL-220, a colon cancer cell line, and CRL-1459, a non-cancer colon cell line. We found that CCL-220 cells bound specific lectins better than CRL-1459, and this information was used to test for possible differential toxicity of these lectins in culture, as a possible approach in the design of more specific anti-cancer drugs. Although we have examined the validity of the bead-binding assay in sea urchin cell systems, we have not previously validated this technique for mammalian cells. Here the binding results of the bead assay are compared with conventional fluorescence assays, using lectins from three species (Triticum vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Lens culinaris) on the two colon cell lines. These lectins were chosen because they seemed to interact with the two cell lines differently. Binding results obtained using both assays were compared for frozen, thawed and fixed; cultured and fixed; and live cells. Both qualitative and quantitative fluorescence results generally correlated with those using the bead assay. Similar results were also obtained with all of the three different cell preparation protocols. The fluorescence assay was able to detect lower lectin binding ligand levels than the bead assay, while the bead assay, because it can so rapidly detect cells with large numbers of lectin binding ligands, is ideal for initial screening studies that seek to identify cells that are rich in surface binders for specific molecules. The direct use of frozen, thawed and fixed cells allows rapid mass screening for surface molecules, without the requirement for costly and time consuming cell culture.

  2. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens and implications for respiratory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Iavarone, Anthony T; Gorur, Amita; Yeo, Boon Siang; Tran, Rosalie; Melnyk, Ryan A; Mathies, Richard A; Auer, Manfred; Coates, John D

    2012-01-31

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they may be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an analog of the redox active components of humic substances. The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin-shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS, and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants, suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results provide unique direct evidence for cell wall-associated cytochromes and support MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium.

  3. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens and implications for respiratory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Gorur, Amita; Yeo, Boon Siang; Tran, Rosalie; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Mathies, Richard A.; Auer, Manfred; Coates, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they may be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an analog of the redox active components of humic substances. The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin-shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS, and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants, suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results provide unique direct evidence for cell wall-associated cytochromes and support MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:22307634

  4. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens: Implications for dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Iavarone, A. T.; Gorur, A.; Yeo, B. S.; Tran, R.; Melnyk, R. A.; Mathies, R. A.; Auer, M.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they have been shown to be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or the humic substances analog, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface of T. potens. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results are the first direct evidence for cell-wall associated cytochromes and MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium.

  5. Polyvalent display of monosaccharides on ferritin protein cage nanoparticles for the recognition and binding of cell-surface lectins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Young Ji; Yang, Hyun Ji; Jeon, Sangbin; Kang, Young-Sun; Do, Yoonkyung; Hong, Sung You; Kang, Sebyung

    2014-05-01

    Carbohydrate-lectin interactions are important in many biological events. Endogenous cell-surface lectins are attractive markers for the recognition and targeting. Human ferritin protein cage nanoparticles (HFPCNs) are prepared as delivery nanoplatforms and two different types of monosaccharide derivatives; maleimido group terminated-mannopyranoside and galactopyranoside. Uniform and polyvalent displays of mannoses or galactoses on the surface of HFPCNs are achieved by using site-specific thiol-maleimide Michael-type addition. Mannose- or galactose-displaying HFPCNs recognize and tightly bind to DC-SIGN or ASGP-R lectins on the surface of the mammalian cells, DCEK or HepG2 cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Symbiotic Bacteria Direct Expression of an Intestinal Bactericidal Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Heather L.; Whitham, Cecilia V.; Behrendt, Cassie L.; Hooper, Lora V.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian intestine harbors complex societies of beneficial bacteria that are maintained in the lumen with minimal penetration of mucosal surfaces. Microbial colonization of germ-free mice triggers epithelial expression of RegIIIγ, a secreted C-type lectin. RegIIIγ binds intestinal bacteria but lacks the complement recruitment domains present in other microbe-binding mammalian C-type lectins. We show that RegIIIγ and its human counterpart, HIP/PAP, are directly antimicrobial proteins that bind their bacterial targets via interactions with peptidoglycan carbohydrate. We propose that these proteins represent an evolutionarily primitive form of lectin-mediated innate immunity, and that they reveal intestinal strategies for maintaining symbiotic host-microbial relationships. PMID:16931762

  7. Role of Geobacter sulfurreducens Outer Surface c-Type Cytochromes in Reduction of Soil Humic Acid and Anthraquinone-2,6-Disulfonate▿

    PubMed Central

    Voordeckers, James W.; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Izallalen, Mounir; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Deleting individual genes for outer surface c-type cytochromes in Geobacter sulfurreducens partially inhibited the reduction of humic substances and anthraquinone-2,6,-disulfonate. Complete inhibition was obtained only when five of these genes were simultaneously deleted, suggesting that diverse outer surface cytochromes can contribute to the reduction of humic substances and other extracellular quinones. PMID:20154112

  8. Role of Geobacter sulfurreducens outer surface c-type cytochromes in reduction of soil humic acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate.

    PubMed

    Voordeckers, James W; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Izallalen, Mounir; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-04-01

    Deleting individual genes for outer surface c-type cytochromes in Geobacter sulfurreducens partially inhibited the reduction of humic substances and anthraquinone-2,6,-disulfonate. Complete inhibition was obtained only when five of these genes were simultaneously deleted, suggesting that diverse outer surface cytochromes can contribute to the reduction of humic substances and other extracellular quinones.

  9. Programmable Glycan-Presentation of Glycodendrimersomes and Cells React with Engineered Human Lectins to Unveil Cell-Surface Sugar Functionality.

    PubMed

    Kopitz, Jürgen; Xiao, Qi; Ludwig, Anna-Kristin; Romero, Antonio; Michalak, Malwina; Sherman, Samuel E; Zhou, Xuhao; Dazen, Cody; Vértesy, Sabine; Kaltner, Herbert; Klein, Michael L; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Percec, Virgil

    2017-09-22

    Chemical and biological tools are harnessed to investigate the impact of spatial factors for functional pairing of human lectins with counterreceptors. The homodimeric adhesion/growth-regulatory galectin-1 and a set of covalently linked homo-oligomers from di- to tetramers serve as proof-of-principle test cases. Glycodendrimersomes provide a versatile and sensitive diagnostic platform to reveal thresholds for ligand density and protein concentration in aggregation assays (trans-activity), irrespective of linker length between lectin domains. Monitoring the affinity of cell binding and ensuing tumor growth inhibition reveal the linker length to be a bidirectional switch for cis-activity. The discovery that two aspects of lectin functionality (trans- versus cis- activity) respond non-uniformly to a structural change underscores the power of combining synthetic and biological tools to advance understanding of cell-surface sugar functionality. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Mammalian Cell Surface Display as a Novel Method for Developing Engineered Lectins with Novel Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Keisuke; Abo, Hirohito; Qin, Sheng-Ying; Kyoutou, Takuya; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Leguminous lectins have a conserved carbohydrate recognition site comprising four loops (A–D). Here, we randomly mutated the sequence and length of loops C and D of peanut agglutinin (PNA) and expressed the proteins on the surface of mouse green fluorescent protein (GFP)-reporter cells. Flow cytometry, limiting dilution, and cDNA cloning were used to screen for several mutated PNAs with distinct properties. The mutated PNA clones obtained using NeuAcα2-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc as a ligand showed preference for NeuAcα2-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc rather than non-sialylated Galβ1-3GlcNAc, whereas wild-type PNA binds to Galβ1-3GlcNAc but not sialylated Galβ1-3GalNAc. Sequence analyses revealed that for all of the glycan-reactive mutated PNA clones, (i) loop C was eight amino acids in length, (ii) loop D was identical to that of wild-type PNA, (iii) residue 127 was asparagine, (iv) residue 125 was tryptophan, and (v) residue 130 was hydrophobic tyrosine, phenylalanine, or histidine. The sugar-binding ability of wild-type PNA was increased nine-fold when Tyr125 was mutated to tryptophan, and that of mutated clone C was increased more than 30-fold after His130 was changed to tyrosine. These results provide an insight into the relationship between the amino acid sequences of the carbohydrate recognition site and sugar-binding abilities of leguminous lectins. PMID:26287256

  11. Boronate-Affinity Glycan-Oriented Surface Imprinting: A New Strategy to Mimic Lectins for the Recognition of an Intact Glycoprotein and Its Characteristic Fragments.

    PubMed

    Bie, Zijun; Chen, Yang; Ye, Jin; Wang, Shuangshou; Liu, Zhen

    2015-08-24

    Lectins possess unique binding properties and are of particular value in molecular recognition. However, lectins suffer from several disadvantages, such as being hard to prepare and showing poor storage stability. Boronate-affinity glycan-oriented surface imprinting was developed as a new strategy for the preparation of lectin-like molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The prepared MIPs could specifically recognize an intact glycoprotein and its characteristic fragments, even within a complex sample matrix. Glycan-imprinted MIPs could thus prove to be powerful tools for important applications such as proteomics, glycomics, and diagnostics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Real-time analysis of the carbohydrates on cell surfaces using a QCM biosensor: a lectin-based approach.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhichao; Saint-Guirons, Julien; Käck, Camilla; Ingemarsson, Björn; Aastrup, Teodor

    2012-05-15

    A novel approach to the study of molecular interactions on the surface of mammalian cells using a QCM biosensor was developed. For this study, an epidermoid carcinoma cell line (A-431) and a breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-468) were immobilized onto polystyrene-coated quartz crystals. The binding and dissociation between the lectin Con A and the cells as well as the inhibition of the binding by monosaccharides were monitored in real time and provided an insight into the complex avidic recognition of cell glycoconjugates. The real-time lectin screening of a range of lectins, including Con A, DBA, PNA and UEA-I, enabled the accurate study of the glycosylation changes between cells, such as changes associated with cancer progression and development. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters of the interaction of Con A with MDA-MB-468 cells were studied. This application provides investigators in the field of glycobiology with a novel tool to study cell surface glycosylation and may also have impacts on drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Diversity of lectins in Macrobrachium rosenbergii and their expression patterns under spiroplasma MR-1008 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huanxi; Du, Jie; Hui, Kai-Min; Liu, Peng; Chen, Jing; Xiu, Yunji; Yao, Wei; Wu, Ting; Meng, Qingguo; Gu, Wei; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2013-08-01

    Lectins play important roles in crustacean innate immunity through recognition of foreign pathogens. In this study, 20 lectins including C-type lectins [dual-carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) type and single-CRD type], L-type lectin, and lectin with low-density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) domain were identified from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The tissue distribution and expression patterns of these lectins under spiroplasma strain MR-1008 challenge were investigated. Most of the lectins were found to be mainly distributed in the hepatopancreas. Lectin5, Lectin14, Lectin17, and Lectin18 exhibited the highest expression level in the hemocytes, nerve, intestine, and heart, respectively. MrLec1 to MrLec6 (dual-CRD lectins) in the hepatopancreas were up-regulated by spiroplasma challenge. Single-CRD lectins reached the highest level at 72 h after spiroplasma challenge. Lectin9 and Lectin15 both belong to L-type lectins. At post-spiroplasma challenge, Lectin9 expression was up-regulated, whereas Lectin15 expression was down-regulated. Lectin11 with LDLa domain showed the highest level after 12 h Lectin18 and Lectin20, namely, CD209, were also up-regulated by spiroplasma challenge. Lectin14, a C-type lectin, quickly reached the highest level after 2 h Lectin16 showed the highest level after 72 h Lectin5 reached the highest level in cultured hemocytes after 6 h Lectin17 in the intestine and Lectin14 in the nerve were slightly up-regulated after 6 and 2 h, respectively. Our research results indicate that lectins may play important roles in early or late immune responses against spiroplasma challenge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reverse micellar extraction of lectin from black turtle bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): optimisation of extraction conditions by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    He, Shudong; Shi, John; Walid, Elfalleh; Zhang, Hongwei; Ma, Ying; Xue, Sophia Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lectin from black turtle bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was extracted and purified by reverse micellar extraction (RME) method. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise the processing parameters for both forward and backward extraction. Hemagglutinating activity analysis, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC and FTIR techniques were used to characterise the lectin. The optimum extraction conditions were determined as 77.59 mM NaCl, pH 5.65, AOT 127.44 mM sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) for the forward extraction; and 592.97 mM KCl, pH 8.01 for the backward extraction. The yield was 63.21 ± 2.35 mg protein/g bean meal with a purification factor of 8.81 ± 0.17. The efficiency of RME was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, respectively. FTIR analysis indicated there were no significant changes in the secondary protein structure. Comparison with conventional chromatographic method confirmed that the RME method could be used for the purification of lectin from the crude extract.

  15. Diversity and multiple functions of lectins in shrimp immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Lectins play important roles in many biological processes, including protein trafficking, cell signaling, pathogen recognition, as effector molecules, and so on, because of their capacity to bind carbohydrates. Presently, seven groups of lectins have been identified in shrimp: C-type, L-type, P-type, M-type, fibrinogen-like domain lectins, galectins, and calnexin/calreticulin. These lectins have different structures, diverse expression patterns, and multiple functions in the shrimp immune response. This review summarizes the research progress and analyzes the diversity of shrimp lectins, focusing mainly on the C-type lectin family. Shrimp C-type lectins show considerable diversity in their domain architectures, sugar substrates, tissue distributions, expression patterns responding to pathogen challenge and functions in shrimp immunity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A quantitative method to discriminate between non-specific and specific lectin-glycan interactions on silicon-modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Boukherroub, Rabah; Ozanam, François; Szunerits, Sabine; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal

    2016-02-15

    Essential to the success of any surface-based carbohydrate biochip technology is that interactions of the particular interface with the target protein be reliable and reproducible and not susceptible to unwanted nonspecific adsorption events. This condition is particularly important when the technology is intended for the evaluation of low-affinity interactions such as those typically encountered between lectins and their monomeric glycan ligands. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of glycan (mannoside and lactoside) monolayers immobilized on hydrogenated crystalline silicon (111) surfaces. An efficient conjugation protocol featuring a key "click"-based coupling step has been developed which ensures the obtention of interfaces with controlled glycan density. The adsorption behavior of these newly developed interfaces with the lectins, Lens culinaris and Peanut agglutinin, has been probed using quantitative IR-ATR and the data interpreted using various isothermal models. The analysis reveals that protein physisorption to the interface is more prevalent than specific chemisorption for the majority of washing protocols investigated. Physisorption can be greatly suppressed through application of a strong surfactinated rinse. The coexistence of chemisorption and physisorption processes is further demonstrated by quantification of the amounts of adsorbed proteins distributed on the surface, in correlation with the results obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Taken together, the data demonstrates that the nonspecific adsorption of proteins to these glycan-terminated surfaces can be effectively eliminated through the proper control of the chemical structure of the surface monolayer combined with the implementation of an appropriate surface-rinse protocol.

  17. Lectin RCA-I specifically binds to metastasis-associated cell surface glycans in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shu-Min; Cheng, Li; Guo, Shu-Juan; Wang, Yang; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Gao, Huafang; Hu, Xiao-Fang; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-03-11

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients often face a high risk of early relapse characterized by extensive metastasis. Previous works have shown that aberrant cell surface glycosylation is associated with cancer metastasis, suggesting that altered glycosylations might serve as diagnostic signatures of metastatic potential. To address this question, we took TNBC as an example and analyzed six TNBC cell lines, derived from a common progenitor, that differ in metastatic potential. We used a microarray with 91 lectins to screen for altered lectin bindings to the six TNBC cell lines. Candidate lectins were then verified by lectin-based flow cytometry and immunofluorescent staining assays using both TNBC/non-TNBC cancer cells. Patient-derived tissue microarrays were then employed to analyze whether the staining of Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA-I), correlated with TNBC severity. We also carried out real-time cell motility assays in the presence of RCA-I. Finally, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/tandem spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed to identify the membrane glycoproteins recognized by RCA-I. Using the lectin microarray, we found that the bindings of RCA-I to TNBC cells are proportional to their metastatic capacity. Tissue microarray experiments showed that the intensity of RCA-I staining is positively correlated with the TNM grades. The real-time cell motility assays clearly demonstrated RCA-I inhibition of adhesion, migration, and invasion of TNBC cells of high metastatic capacity. Additionally, a membrane glycoprotein, POTE ankyrin domain family member F (POTEF), with different galactosylation extents in high/low metastatic TNBC cells was identified by LC-MS/MS as a binder of RCA-I. We discovered RCA-I, which bound to TNBC cells to a degree that is proportional to their metastatic capacities, and found that this binding inhibits the cell invasion, migration, and adhesion, and identified a membrane protein, POTEF, which may play a key role in

  18. Distribution of cell surface saccharides on pancreatic cells. II. Lectin-labeling patterns on mature guinea pig and rat pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    The surface saccharide composition of collagenase-dispersed pancreatic cells from adult guinea pig and rat glands was examined by using eight lectins and their ferritin conjugates: Concanavalin A (ConA); Lens culinaris (LCL); Lotus tetragonolobus (LTL); Ricinus communis agglutinins I and II (RCA I, RCA II); Soybean agglutinin (SBA); Ulex europeus lectin (UEL); and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). Binding studies of iodinated lectins and lectin-ferritin conjugates both revealed one population of saturable, high-affinity receptor sites on the total cell population (approximately 95% acinar cells). Electron microscopy, however, revealed differences in lectin-ferritin binding to the plasmalemma of acinar, centroacinar, and endocrine cells. Whereas acinar cells bound heavily all lectin conjugates, endocrine and centroacinar cells were densely labeled only by ConA, LCL, WGA, and RCA I, and possessed few receptors for LTL, UEL, and SBA. Endocrine and centroacinar cells could be differentiated from each other by using RCA II, which binds to centroacinar cells but not to endocrine cells. Some RCA II receptors appeared to be glycolipids because they were extracted by ethanol and chloroform-methanol in contrast to WGA receptors which resisted solvent treatment but were partly removed by papain digestion. RCA I receptors were affected by neither treatment. The apparent absence of receptors for SBA on endocrine and centroacinar cells, and for RCA II on endocrine cells, was reversed by neuraminidase digestion, which suggested masking of lectin receptors by sialic acid. The absence of LTL and UEL receptors on endocrine and centroacinar cells was not reversed by neuraminidase. We suggest that the differential lectin- binding patterns observed on acinar, centroacinar, and endocrine cells from the adult pancreas surface-carbohydrate-developmental programs expressed during morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of the gland. PMID:422654

  19. Distribution of cell surface saccharides on pancreatic cells. II. Lectin-labeling patterns on mature guinea pig and rat pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Maylié-Pfenninger, M F; Jamieson, J D

    1979-01-01

    The surface saccharide composition of collagenase-dispersed pancreatic cells from adult guinea pig and rat glands was examined by using eight lectins and their ferritin conjugates: Concanavalin A (ConA); Lens culinaris (LCL); Lotus tetragonolobus (LTL); Ricinus communis agglutinins I and II (RCA I, RCA II); Soybean agglutinin (SBA); Ulex europeus lectin (UEL); and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). Binding studies of iodinated lectins and lectin-ferritin conjugates both revealed one population of saturable, high-affinity receptor sites on the total cell population (approximately 95% acinar cells). Electron microscopy, however, revealed differences in lectin-ferritin binding to the plasmalemma of acinar, centroacinar, and endocrine cells. Whereas acinar cells bound heavily all lectin conjugates, endocrine and centroacinar cells were densely labeled only by ConA, LCL, WGA, and RCA I, and possessed few receptors for LTL, UEL, and SBA. Endocrine and centroacinar cells could be differentiated from each other by using RCA II, which binds to centroacinar cells but not to endocrine cells. Some RCA II receptors appeared to be glycolipids because they were extracted by ethanol and chloroform-methanol in contrast to WGA receptors which resisted solvent treatment but were partly removed by papain digestion. RCA I receptors were affected by neither treatment. The apparent absence of receptors for SBA on endocrine and centroacinar cells, and for RCA II on endocrine cells, was reversed by neuraminidase digestion, which suggested masking of lectin receptors by sialic acid. The absence of LTL and UEL receptors on endocrine and centroacinar cells was not reversed by neuraminidase. We suggest that the differential lectin-binding patterns observed on acinar, centroacinar, and endocrine cells from the adult pancreas surface-carbohydrate-developmental programs expressed during morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of the gland.

  20. Animal lectins: potential antitumor therapeutic targets in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Qian; Peng, Hao; Zhang, Wen-zhi

    2012-10-01

    Lectins, a group of carbohydrate-binding proteins ubiquitously distributed into plants and animals, are well-known to have astonishing numerous links to human cancers. In this review, we present a brief outline of the representative animal lectins such as galectins, C-type lectins, and annexins by targeting programmed cell death (or apoptosis) pathways, and also summarize these representative lectins as possible anti-cancer drug targets. Taken together, these inspiring findings would provide a comprehensive perspective for further elucidating the multifaceted roles of animal lectins in apoptosis pathways of cancer, which, in turn, may ultimately help us to exploit lectins for their therapeutic purposes in future drug discovery.

  1. Identification of a porcine DC-SIGN-related C-type lectin, porcine CLEC4G (LSECtin), and its order of intron removal during splicing: comparative genomic analyses of the cluster of genes CD23/CLEC4G/DC-SIGN among mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y W; Meng, X J

    2009-06-01

    Human CLEC4G (previously named LSECtin), DC-SIGN, and L-SIGN are three important C-type lectins capable of mediating viral and bacterial pathogen recognitions. These three genes, together with CD23, form a lectin gene cluster at chromosome 19p13.3. In this study, we have experimentally identified the cDNA and the gene encoding porcine CLEC4G (pCLEC4G). Full-length pCLEC4G cDNA encodes a type II transmembrane protein of 290 amino acids. pCLEC4G gene has the same gene structure as the human and the predicted bovine, canis, mouse and rat CLEC4G genes with nine exons. A multi-species-conserved site at the extreme 3'-untranslated region of CLEC4G mRNAs was predicted to be targeted by microRNA miR-350 in domesticated animals and by miR-145 in primates, respectively. We detected pCLEC4G mRNA expression in liver, lymph node and spleen tissues. We also identified a series of sequential intermediate products of pCLEC4G pre-mRNA during splicing from pig liver. The previously unidentified porcine CD23 cDNA containing the complete coding region was subsequently cloned and found to express in spleen, thymus and lymph node. Furthermore, we compared the chromosomal regions syntenic to the human cluster of genes CD23/CLEC4G/DC-SIGN/L-SIGN in representative mammalian species including primates, domesticated animal, rodents and opossum. The L-SIGN homologues do not exist in non-primates mammals. The evolutionary processes of the gene cluster, from marsupials to primates, were proposed based upon their genomic structures and phylogenetic relationships.

  2. Lectins in the investigation of receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtin, V. M.; Yamskov, Igor A.

    1991-08-01

    Problems of the purification and characterisation are considered for approximately 270 receptors (including cell surface and organelle enzymes), which are glycoconjugates (mainly glycoproteins) from animals, plants and microorganisms, using various lectins (mainly lectin sorbents). An analysis has been carried out of the stages of lectin affinity chromatography of receptors (choice of detergent, use of organic solvents, elution with carbohydrates, etc.). Examples are given of procedures for the purification of receptors, including the use of paired columns and combination chromatography on lectins. The possibility of separating sub-populations of receptors using lectins has been demonstrated. Examples are given of the use of lectins in the analysis of the oligosaccharide structure of receptors. Cases are recorded of the interaction of receptors with endogenous lectins and of receptor lectins with endogenous glycoconjugates. It has been shown that lectins, in combination with glycosidases and antibodies, may be useful in the investigation of receptors. The bibliography contains 406 references.

  3. Population heterogeneity in the surface expression of Ulex europaeus I-lectin (UEA I)-binding sites in cultured malignant and transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, I; Lehtonen, E; Närvänen, O; Leivo, I; Lehto, V P

    1985-11-01

    We studied the binding of fluorochrome-coupled Ulex europaeus I-lectin (UEA-I) to cultured malignant cells: all human malignant and transformed cells and also mouse teratocarcinoma cells examined gave a homogeneous cell membrane-type of surface staining only in some of the cells. Such a population heterogeneity appeared to be independent of the cell cycle. Instead, other lectin conjugates used bound homogeneously to all cells. In permeabilized cells, a juxtanuclear reticular staining of the Golgi apparatus was seen in the UEA-I-positive cells. No staining of the pericellular matrix components, produced by malignant cells grown in serum-free culture medium, could be obtained with TRITC-UEA-I. UEA-I-lectin recognized most polypeptides from A8387 fibrosarcoma cells and HeLa cells, metabolically labeled with [3H]fucose. Furthermore, surface labelling of these cells with the neuraminidase-galactose oxidase/sodium borohydride method disclosed that both UEA-I and Ricinus communis agglutinin I revealed the same major surface glycoproteins. Results with metabolically labelled cells showed, in addition, that UEA-I-lectin did not bind to secreted glycoproteins produced by A8387 cells and recognized by other lectins. The results indicate that transformed and malignant cells show a distinct population heterogeneity in their expression of some cell surface-associated fucosyl glycoconjugates. The results also suggest that malignant cells can glycosylate their membrane and secreted glycoproteins in a different manner.

  4. The Antiretroviral Lectin Cyanovirin-N Targets Well-Known and Novel Targets on the Surface of Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Carpentieri, Andrea; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ghosh, Sudip K.; Banerjee, Sulagna; Bushkin, G. Guy; Cui, Jike; Lubrano, Michael; Steffen, Martin; Costello, Catherine E.; O'Keefe, Barry; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2010-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the protist that causes amebic dysentery and liver abscess, has a truncated Asn-linked glycan (N-glycan) precursor composed of seven sugars (Man5GlcNAc2). Here, we show that glycoproteins with unmodified N-glycans are aggregated and capped on the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites by the antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N and then replenished from large intracellular pools. Cyanovirin-N cocaps the Gal/GalNAc adherence lectin, as well as glycoproteins containing O-phosphodiester-linked glycans recognized by an anti-proteophosphoglycan monoclonal antibody. Cyanovirin-N inhibits phagocytosis by E. histolytica trophozoites of mucin-coated beads, a surrogate assay for amebic virulence. For technical reasons, we used the plant lectin concanavalin A rather than cyanovirin-N to enrich secreted and membrane proteins for mass spectrometric identification. E. histolytica glycoproteins with occupied N-glycan sites include Gal/GalNAc lectins, proteases, and 17 previously hypothetical proteins. The latter glycoproteins, as well as 50 previously hypothetical proteins enriched by concanavalin A, may be vaccine targets as they are abundant and unique. In summary, the antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N binds to well-known and novel targets on the surface of E. histolytica that are rapidly replenished from large intracellular pools. PMID:20852023

  5. Characterization of the Decaheme c-type Cytochrome OmcA in Solution and on Hematite Surfaces by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Neutron Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Shi, Liang; Droubay, Timothy; Ankner, John Francis; Liang, Liyuan

    2010-01-01

    The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate electron shuttling, generated by the bacteria s metabolism, to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite ( -Fe2O3). To investigate the mechanism by which OmcA interacts with hematite, we purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and its interaction with hematite by neutron reflectometry (NR). SAXS results showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with a dimension of 3.4 9.0 6.5 nm3. Changes in redox state affect OmcA conformation. In addition, OmcA interacts with small organic ligands known to act as electron shuttle molecules, such as flavin mononucleotide (FMN), resulting in the formation of high molecular weight assemblies. A model system, developed using NR to study the interaction of OmcA with hematite, shows that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces. This allows OmcA to preferentially interact with hematite in a conformation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. Overall, these results provide experimental and quantitative evidence for OmcA reduction of solid metal oxides involving both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  6. Engulfment and clearance of apoptotic cells based on a GlcNAc-binding lectin-like property of surface vimentin.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Goto, Mitsuaki; Komura, Kenta; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2012-06-01

    The clearance of apoptotic cells is important to maintain tissue homeostasis. The engulfment of apoptotic cells is performed by professional phagocytes, such as macrophages, and also by non-professional phagocytes, such as mesenchymal cells. Here, we show that vimentin, a cytoskeletal protein, functions as an engulfment receptor on neighboring phagocytes, which recognize O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc)-modified proteins from apoptotic cells as "eat me" ligands. Previously, we reported that vimentin possesses a GlcNAc-binding lectin-like property on cell surface. However, the physiological relevance of the surface localization and GlcNAc-binding property of vimentin remained unclear. In the present study, we observed that O-GlcNAc proteins from apoptotic cells interacted with the surface vimentin of neighboring phagocytes and that this interaction induced serine 71-phosphorylation and recruitment of vimentin to the cell surface of the neighboring phagocytes. Moreover, tetrameric vimentin that was disassembled by serine 71-phosphorylation possessed a GlcNAc-binding activity and was localized to the cell surface. We demonstrated our findings in vimentin-expressing common cell lines such as HeLa cells. Furthermore, during normal developmental processes, the phagocytic engulfment and clearance of apoptotic footplate cells in mouse embryos was mediated by the interaction of surface vimentin with O-GlcNAc proteins. Our results suggest a common mechanism for the clearance of apoptotic cells, through the interaction of surface vimentin with O-GlcNAc-modified proteins.

  7. Cell-surface changes in cadmium-resistant Euglena: Studies using lectin-binding techniques and flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaly, J.; Brochiero, E.

    1994-01-01

    Most in vitro studies on contaminants focus on the short-term effects of pollutants on cells, without regard to long-term effects and the ability of cells or microorganisms to develop a specific resistance to a pollutant. Cadmium is ubiquitous environmental contaminant. This heavy metal enters the aquatic environment mainly through vapor emissions and fallout during smelting operations. Diverse mechanisms of algal resistance to toxic metals are known. Among these, the most general mechanism is the development of metal-binding proteins. In cadmium-resistant unicellular Euglena gracilis Z algae cells, the metal did not appear to be sequestered on soluble metal-binding ligands. Previous experiments have shown that resistance development is related to a diminution of cadmium penetration into cells, implicating cell surface or membrane alteration. This research investigates the mechanisms of development of cadmium resistance in Euglena cells at the cell-surface level. Sugar chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids are a predominant feature of the surface of cells. Moreover, the cell-response to environmental changes is often orchestrated through surface macromolecules such as glycoproteins. In this study, we applied this lectin method to investigate surface carbohydrate expression during and after resistance development. Our interest was twofold: (1) to learn more about the carbohydrate composition of the cell-surface of Euglena; and (2) to determine whether transition from wild cells to Cd-resistant cells changes the expression of cell-surface carbohydrates. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Characterization of the Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome OmcA in Solution and on Hematite Surfaces by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and Neutron Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, A.; Shi, L.; Droubay, T.; Ankner, J. F.; Liang, L.

    2010-06-15

    The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate shuttling of electrons to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite (α-Fe2O3). No information is yet available concerning OmcA structure in physiologically relevant conditions such as aqueous environments. We purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and its interaction at the hematite-water interface by neutron reflectometry. SAXS showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with an overall dimension of 34 × 90 × 65 Å3. To our knowledge, we obtained the first direct evidence that OmcA undergoes a redox state-dependent conformational change in solution whereby reduction decreases the overall length of OmcA by ~7 Å (the maximum dimension was 96 Å for oxidized OmcA, and 89 Å for NADH and dithionite-reduced OmcA). OmcA was also found to physically interact with electron shuttle molecules such as flavin mononucleotide, resulting in the formation of high-molecular-weight assemblies. Neutron reflectometry showed that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces, where it assumes an orientation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. Finally, these novel insights into the molecular structure of OmcA in solution, and its interaction with insoluble hematite and small organic ligands, demonstrate the fundamental structural bases underlying OmcA's role in mediating redox processes.

  9. Characterization of the decaheme c-type cytochrome OmcA in solution and on hematite surfaces by small angle x-ray scattering and neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Johs, A; Shi, L; Droubay, T; Ankner, J F; Liang, L

    2010-06-16

    The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate shuttling of electrons to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)). No information is yet available concerning OmcA structure in physiologically relevant conditions such as aqueous environments. We purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and its interaction at the hematite-water interface by neutron reflectometry. SAXS showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with an overall dimension of 34 x 90 x 65 A(3). To our knowledge, we obtained the first direct evidence that OmcA undergoes a redox state-dependent conformational change in solution whereby reduction decreases the overall length of OmcA by approximately 7 A (the maximum dimension was 96 A for oxidized OmcA, and 89 A for NADH and dithionite-reduced OmcA). OmcA was also found to physically interact with electron shuttle molecules such as flavin mononucleotide, resulting in the formation of high-molecular-weight assemblies. Neutron reflectometry showed that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces, where it assumes an orientation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. These novel insights into the molecular structure of OmcA in solution, and its interaction with insoluble hematite and small organic ligands, demonstrate the fundamental structural bases underlying OmcA's role in mediating redox processes. (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of the Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome OmcA in Solution and on Hematite Surfaces by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and Neutron Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Johs, A.; Shi, L.; Droubay, T.; Ankner, J.F.; Liang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate shuttling of electrons to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite (α-Fe2O3). No information is yet available concerning OmcA structure in physiologically relevant conditions such as aqueous environments. We purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and its interaction at the hematite-water interface by neutron reflectometry. SAXS showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with an overall dimension of 34 × 90 × 65 Å3. To our knowledge, we obtained the first direct evidence that OmcA undergoes a redox state-dependent conformational change in solution whereby reduction decreases the overall length of OmcA by ∼7 Å (the maximum dimension was 96 Å for oxidized OmcA, and 89 Å for NADH and dithionite-reduced OmcA). OmcA was also found to physically interact with electron shuttle molecules such as flavin mononucleotide, resulting in the formation of high-molecular-weight assemblies. Neutron reflectometry showed that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces, where it assumes an orientation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. These novel insights into the molecular structure of OmcA in solution, and its interaction with insoluble hematite and small organic ligands, demonstrate the fundamental structural bases underlying OmcA's role in mediating redox processes. PMID:20550916

  11. Carbohydrate immobilized on a dendrimer-coated colloidal gold surface for fabrication of a lectin-sensing device based on localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, Masayo; Kobayashi, Junko; Imai, Tomoko; Matsuoka, Koji; Itoh, Miki; Imamura, Takeshi; Okada, Tomoko; Miura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Toshinori; Hatanaka, Kenichi; Minoura, Norihiko

    2013-03-15

    Carbohydrate-mediated functions in biological systems have generated considerable interest in recent years. We have developed a device bearing immobilized carbohydrates on a colloidal gold surface and applied this device to the detection of carbohydrate-binding molecules by using localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy. The sensing device was constructed by using cyanuric chloride as an amine-linker between an amino residue of a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer-coated colloidal gold surface and the amino residue of a 12-aminododecyl glycoside. After optimizing the construction of the device, we characterized its LSPR-based sensing capability. Binding specificity with lectins and linear range responses were obtained with the device. Our LSPR-based sensing device thus provides a label-free, low-cost detection method for use as a laboratory research tool or in medical glycan arrays. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Lectins and Tetrahymena - A review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-09-01

    The unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena is a complete organism, one of the most highly developed protozoans, which has specialized organelles performing each of the functions characteristic to the cells of higher ranked animals. It is also able to produce, store, and secrete hormones of higher ranked animals and also react to them. It produces lectins that can bind them and has functions, which are influenced by exogenous lectins. The review lists the observations on the relationship between lectins and Tetrahymena and try to construe them on the basis of the data, which are at our disposal. Considering the data, lectins can be used by Tetrahymena as materials for influencing conjugation, for stimulating hormone receptors, and by this, mimic the hormonal functions. Lectins can influence phagocytosis and movement of the cells as well as the cell division. As Tetrahymena can recognize both related and hostile cells by the help of lectins and surface sugars, it could be surmised a complex predator-prey system. This could determine the survival of the population as well as the nourishment conditions. When Tetrahymena is pathogenic, it can use lectins as virulence factors.

  13. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  14. Functional assay using lectin gene targeting technologies (over-expression).

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Motohiro; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2014-01-01

    Function of lectin depends on its amino acid sequence of carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), conformation, and extracellular/intracellular localization. Altering lectin gene expression by over-expression or knockdown is a powerful tool for analyzing its cellular function. Here, we describe a method of lectin gene over-expression, taking a C-type lectin, mannan-binding protein (MBP), as an example. Carbohydrate-binding ability of MBP, its subcellular localization, and functional co-localization with ligand glycoprotein are assayed comparing with an inactive mutant MBP.

  15. Evidence for an increase in positive surface charge and an increase in susceptibility to trypsin of Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina) on its interaction with galactose, a hapten sugar of the lectin.

    PubMed

    Komano, H; Kurama, T; Nagasawa, Y; Natori, S

    1992-05-15

    When Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina), an insect humoral lectin, was eluted from a column of DEAE-cellulose in the presence of galactose (a hapten sugar of this lectin), it emerged at a lower salt concentration than when galactose was absent. In the presence of galactose the lectin was, in addition, more susceptible to trypsin digestion. The lectin was found to have an affinity for basic proteins such as histone H3 and sarcotoxin IA, but this property was lost in the presence of galactose. These results suggested that the lectin changes its conformation on interaction with galactose. This change is suggested to result in the exposure of some hidden lysine and/or arginine residues.

  16. Evidence for an increase in positive surface charge and an increase in susceptibility to trypsin of Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina) on its interaction with galactose, a hapten sugar of the lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Komano, H; Kurama, T; Nagasawa, Y; Natori, S

    1992-01-01

    When Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina), an insect humoral lectin, was eluted from a column of DEAE-cellulose in the presence of galactose (a hapten sugar of this lectin), it emerged at a lower salt concentration than when galactose was absent. In the presence of galactose the lectin was, in addition, more susceptible to trypsin digestion. The lectin was found to have an affinity for basic proteins such as histone H3 and sarcotoxin IA, but this property was lost in the presence of galactose. These results suggested that the lectin changes its conformation on interaction with galactose. This change is suggested to result in the exposure of some hidden lysine and/or arginine residues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:1599400

  17. Microbial lectins and their prospective mitogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep K

    2014-11-01

    The binding of mitogenic lectins to the glycoconjugates on cell surface receptor triggers multitude of reactions involving different signal transduction pathways which ultimately results in cell proliferation. Since 1960 after the chance discovery of mitogenic property of lectins by Nowell, it has attracted more attention. The property of stimulation of mature lymphocytes aided the immunological investigations to study and analyse the mechanism of cell stimulation and division. Plant lectins are extensively studied for mitogenic activity and their widespread applications are also reported. During the past two decades, the study of biological properties of microbial lectins has increased tremendously. Their biological activities including mitogenic potential are equally applicable as that of plant lectins. The review mainly focuses on mitogenic potential of microbial lectins. It will provide a comprehensive view regarding distribution of this remarkable property among microbes including algae, fungi and bacteria, mechanisms and models of mitogenic stimulation, and also assays being employed to detect the mitogenic activity.

  18. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  19. SEM visualization of glycosylated surface molecules using lectin-coated microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J.; Janer, L.; Campbell, M.

    1985-01-01

    There are several techniques currently used to localize glycosylated surface molecules by scanning electron microscopy (Grinnell, 1980; Molday, 1976; Linthicum and Sell, 1975; Nicolson, 1974; Lo Buglio, et al, 1972). A simple and rapid method, using a modification of Grinnell's technique is reported here. Essentially, microspheres coated with Concavalin A are used to bind to glycosylated regions of the palatal shelf epithelium and are visualized in the scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  20. SEM visualization of glycosylated surface molecules using lectin-coated microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J.; Janer, L.; Campbell, M.

    1985-01-01

    There are several techniques currently used to localize glycosylated surface molecules by scanning electron microscopy (Grinnell, 1980; Molday, 1976; Linthicum and Sell, 1975; Nicolson, 1974; Lo Buglio, et al, 1972). A simple and rapid method, using a modification of Grinnell's technique is reported here. Essentially, microspheres coated with Concavalin A are used to bind to glycosylated regions of the palatal shelf epithelium and are visualized in the scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  1. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, William J.; Kirby, Jonathan M.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism.

  2. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K.; Veelken, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25784678

  3. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A M; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K; Veelken, Hendrik; Jumaa, Hassan

    2015-05-21

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches.

  4. Lectin staining and flow cytometry reveals female-induced sperm acrosome reaction and surface carbohydrate reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Kekäläinen, Jukka; Larma, Irma; Linden, Matthew; Evans, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    All cells are covered by glycans, an individually unique layer of oligo- and polysaccharides that are critical moderators of self-recognition and other cellular-level interactions (e.g. fertilization). The functional similarity between these processes suggests that gamete surface glycans may also have an important, but currently overlooked, role in sexual selection. Here we develop a user-friendly methodological approach designed to facilitate future tests of this possibility. Our proposed method is based on flow cytometric quantification of female-induced sperm acrosome reaction and sperm surface glycan modifications in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this species, as with many other taxa, eggs release water-soluble factors that attract conspecific sperm (chemoattraction) and promote potentially measurable changes in sperm behavior and physiology. We demonstrate that flow cytometry is able to identify sperm from other seawater particles as well as accurately measure both acrosome reaction and structural modifications in sperm glycans. This methodological approach can increase our understanding of chemically-moderated gamete-level interactions and individual-specific gamete recognition in Mytilus sp. and other taxa with similar, easily identifiable acrosome structure. Our approach is also likely to be applicable to several other species, since carbohydrate-mediated cellular-level interactions between gametes are universal among externally and internally fertilizing species. PMID:26470849

  5. Characterization and antimicrobial activity of lectins from Penicillium sp.

    PubMed

    Singh, R S; Jain, P; Kaur, H P

    2013-11-01

    Ten Penicillium sp. were screened for lectin activity for occurrence of lectins. Mycelial extracts from submerged cultures of P. corylophilum, P. expansum and P. purpurogenum showed agglutination against human (A, B, AB and O), goat, sheep, pig and rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment to human blood- type O erythrocytes substantially increased their agglutinability by all the lectins as compared to untreated erythrocytes. Modification of erythrocyte surfaces by protease increased the lectin titre only of P. corylophilum with no effect on other two lectins. P. corylophilum and P. expansum displayed relatively lower titres in mycelial extracts prepared from agar plate cultures as compared to broth cultures. A panel of sugars was tested for inhibition of lectin activity. All the lectins were found to be specific for asialofetuin, bovine submaxillary mucin, porcine stomach mucin, chondroitin-6-sulphate, D-sucrose and D-glucose. P. corylophilum lectin was expressed (Titre 8) by 5 day old cultures, reaching its maximum level (Titre 32) upon 8 days of cultivation, thereafter declin in lectin activity was observed. P. purpurogenum lectin was expressed by 7-10 days old cultures, while in P. expansum maximum lectin activity was elaborated by 5-8 days old cultures. Lectin extracts from all the three species were found to possess antimicrobial activities. Lectin extracts from the three Penicillium species displayed antifungal activity and antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains.

  6. Contact-dependent transfer of the galactose-specific lectin of Entamoeba histolytica to the lateral surface of enterocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Leroy, A; De Bruyne, G; Mareel, M; Nokkaew, C; Bailey, G; Nelis, H

    1995-11-01

    In a study to investigate early interactions of Entamoeba histolytica with epithelial cell monolayers, we found that a monoclonal antibody (MAb), CD6, against an ameba surface antigen recognized the lateral surface of epithelial cells after coculture with trophozoites. Display of the CD6 antigen on the epithelial cells necessitated contact with active trophozoites. It was found neither at 4 degrees C, nor with prefixed trophozoites, nor with trophozoite-conditioned media, nor when a filter prevented direct contact. Monolayers exposed to amebic sonicates or detergent lysates showed random immunostaining. Access to the antigenic site was limited, as immunostaining occurred predominantly with subconfluent monolayers. CD6 epithelial cell binding was first observed after 5 min of coculture; trophozoite-mediated target cell lysis was not detected until 15 min following coculture. Epithelial cell immunostaining occurred with some other ameba-specific antibodies but not with MAbs raised against the 170-kDa subunit of the galactose-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc)-specific lectin. The CD6 MAb as well as some other ameba-specific antibodies immunoprecipitated from trophozoite lysates the same bands as the MAbs against the cysteine-rich domain of the 170-kDa subunit of the Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin. Why the latter MAbs failed to stain epithelial cells in the vicinity of attached trophozoites is presently unknown. We concluded that E. histolytica trophozoites transferred the intact amebic Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin or a portion of it to the lateral surface of epithelial cells. This juxtacrine transfer preceded killing of target cells.

  7. Purification and Characterization of OmcZ, an Outer-Surface, Octaheme c-Type Cytochrome Essential for Optimal Current Production by Geobacter sulfurreducens▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kengo; Qian, Xinlei; Morgado, Leonor; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Mester, Tünde; Izallalen, Mounir; Salgueiro, Carlos A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the c-type cytochrome OmcZ, which is present in large (OmcZL; 50-kDa) and small (OmcZS; 30-kDa) forms, for optimal current production in microbial fuel cells. This protein was further characterized to aid in understanding its role in current production. Subcellular-localization studies suggested that OmcZS was the predominant extracellular form of OmcZ. N- and C-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of purified OmcZS and molecular weight measurements indicated that OmcZS is a cleaved product of OmcZL retaining all 8 hemes, including 1 heme with the unusual c-type heme-binding motif CX14CH. The purified OmcZS was remarkably thermally stable (thermal-denaturing temperature, 94.2°C). Redox titration analysis revealed that the midpoint reduction potential of OmcZS is approximately −220 mV (versus the standard hydrogen electrode [SHE]) with nonequivalent heme groups that cover a large reduction potential range (−420 to −60 mV). OmcZS transferred electrons in vitro to a diversity of potential extracellular electron acceptors, such as Fe(III) citrate, U(VI), Cr(VI), Au(III), Mn(IV) oxide, and the humic substance analogue anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, but not Fe(III) oxide. The biochemical properties and extracellular localization of OmcZ suggest that it is well suited for promoting electron transfer in current-producing biofilms of G. sulfurreducens. PMID:20400562

  8. Identification of mycobacterial lectins from genomic data.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-four sequences containing lectin domains with homologs of known three-dimensional structure were identified through a search of mycobacterial genomes. They appear to belong to the β-prism II, the C-type, the Microcystis virdis (MV), and the β-trefoil lectin folds. The first three always occur in conjunction with the LysM, the PI-PLC, and the β-grasp domains, respectively while mycobacterial β-trefoil lectins are unaccompanied by any other domain. Thirty heparin binding hemagglutinins (HBHA), already annotated, have also been included in the study although they have no homologs of known three-dimensional structure. The biological role of HBHA has been well characterized. A comparison between the sequences of the lectin from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria provides insights into the carbohydrate binding region of the molecule, but the structure of the molecule is yet to be determined. A reasonable picture of the structural features of other mycobacterial proteins containing one or the other of the four lectin domains can be gleaned through the examination of homologs proteins, although the structure of none of them is available. Their biological role is also yet to be elucidated. The work presented here is among the first steps towards exploring the almost unexplored area of the structural biology of mycobacterial lectins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Interaction of Lens culinaris lectin, concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin and wheat germ agglutinin with the cell surface of normal and transformed rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Roth, J; Neupert, G; Thoss, K

    1975-01-01

    The observation of BOREK et al. (1973) on nonagglutinability of transformed rat liver cells by Lens culinaris lectin and our ultrastructural findings of a greater mobility of the Lens culinaris lectin receptors on transformed rat liver cells as compared to normal rat liver cells (ROTH 1975) initiated the present agglutination experiments on liver cells with lectins. For agglutination assay the microhemadsorption technique after FURMANSKI et al. (1973) was used with exception of several tests on EDTA-detached cells. The transformed rat liver cells exhibited, in contrast to the findings of BOREK et al. (1973), a positive microhemadsorption with Lens culinaris lectin as well as with Concanavalin A, Ricinus communis lectin and wheat germ agglutinin whereas the normal rat liver cells became positive only after a brief trypsin treatment. The significance of the difference in agglutinability of rat liver cells with Lens culinaris lectin and the other lectins used is discussed with regard to the cell-cell interaction mediated by lectins.

  10. Lectin-binding epitopes at the surface of Escherichia coli K-12: examination by electron microscopy, with special reference to the presence of a colanic acid-like polymer.

    PubMed

    Stoitsova, Stoyanka; Ivanova, Radka; Dimova, Ivanka

    2004-01-01

    The presence and distribution of lectin-binding epitopes at the surface of Escherichia coli K-12, strain W1655, was studied by electron microscopy after lectin-gold labeling and negative staining. A comparison was made between the lectin-binding capacity of cells cultivated at 20 degrees C and 37 degrees C (in broth or on agar). A variety of pre-treatment protocols were applied prior to labeling. The gold-conjugated lectins used were wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), soybean agglutinin (SBA) and Ulex europaeus lectin (UEA-I). For all culture conditions, the bacteria had moderate exposure of WGA-binding sites, and this was not changed after pre-treatment. Cells cultivated at 37 degrees C had exposed SBA- and UEA-I-binding epitopes apparently associated with the cell surface. These significantly increased in number after boiling the cells for 10 min. With bacteria cultivated at 20 degrees C these two lectins recognized sites situated on exopolysaccharide filaments. Affino dot-blot experiments with isolated polysaccharides of the strain identified the K-12 lipooligosaccharide as the source of WGA-binding epitopes, and the exopolysaccharide, colanic acid (CA) as the source of SBA- and UEA-I-binding sites. The interaction with these two lectins of bacteria cultivated at 37 degrees C could be due to altered translocation of CA from the cytoplasm to the environment. This suggestion was supported by the demonstration by electron microscopy of SBA and UEA-I binding at the surface of hot phenol-water extracted cell walls.

  11. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8(+) and CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4(+) T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections.

  12. Archeal lectins: An identification through a genomic search.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Samuel, Ebenezer; Vijayan, M

    2016-01-01

    Forty-six lectin domains which have homologues among well established eukaryotic and bacterial lectins of known three-dimensional structure, have been identified through a search of 165 archeal genomes using a multipronged approach involving domain recognition, sequence search and analysis of binding sites. Twenty-one of them have the 7-bladed β-propeller lectin fold while 16 have the β-trefoil fold and 7 the legume lectin fold. The remainder assumes the C-type lectin, the β-prism I and the tachylectin folds. Acceptable models of almost all of them could be generated using the appropriate lectins of known three-dimensional structure as templates, with binding sites at one or more expected locations. The work represents the first comprehensive bioinformatic study of archeal lectins. The presence of lectins with the same fold in all domains of life indicates their ancient origin well before the divergence of the three branches. Further work is necessary to identify archeal lectins which have no homologues among eukaryotic and bacterial species. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  14. Spectral characters of lectin saccharide interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deyu; Jiang, Duxiao; Yuan, Chunwei

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we report attempts to directly detect the interaction behavior between erythrocyte and lectin concanavalin a (Con A) as well as phaseolus vulgaris (PHA) on the polystyrene film surface. In the procedure, an optical transducer based reflectance interferometry was set up and used to detect the film thickness change during the lectin adsorption and lectin- erythrocyte interaction. The specific interactions among Con A, PHA and erythrocyte were obtained. The solubility monosaccharide inhibition test confirmed that there is affinity between (alpha) - D-mannose and Con A.

  15. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557: A receptor for lectin-mediated interbacterial adherence

    SciTech Connect

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A. ); Cisar, J.O. )

    1991-07-02

    Lectin-carbohydrate binding is known to play an important role in a number of different cell-cell interactions including those between certain species of oral streptococci and actinomyces that colonize teeth. The cell wall polysaccharides of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557, S. oralis 34, and Streptococcus mitis J22, although not identical antigenically, each function as a receptor molecule for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii. Carbohydrate analysis of the receptor polysaccharide isolated from S. oralis ATCC 10557 shows galactose (3 mol), glucose (1 mol), GalNAc (1 mol), and rhamnose (1 mol). {sup 1}H NMR spectra of the polysaccharide show that is partially O-acetylated. Analysis of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the de-O-acetylated polysaccharide shows that it is composed of repeating subunits containing six monosaccharides and that the subunits are joined by a phosphodiester linkage. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra were completely assigned by two-dimensional homonuclear correlation methods and by {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation ({sup 1}H({sup 13}C)HMQC). The complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C assignment of the native polysaccharide was carried out by the same techniques augmented by a {sup 13}C-coupled hybrid HMQC-COSY method, which is shown to be especially useful for carbohydrates in which strong coupling and overlapping peaks in the {sup 1}H spectrum pose difficulties.

  16. Mannan-binding lectin, a serum collectin, suppresses T-cell proliferation via direct interaction with cell surface calreticulin and inhibition of proximal T-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Wu, Jie; Xiong, Simin; Zhang, Liyun; Lu, Xiao; Chen, Shangliang; Wu, Qifeng; Wang, Hailan; Liu, Ying; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2017-06-01

    Mannan binding lectin (MBL), initially reported to activate the complement pathway, is also known to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We report a thus far unknown function of MBL as a suppressor of T-cell activation. MBL markedly inhibited T-cell proliferation induced by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. Moreover, the presence of MBL during T-cell priming interfered with proximal T-cell receptor signaling by decreasing phosphorylation of Lck, ZAP-70, and LAT. MBL bound to T cells through interaction between the collagen-like region of MBL and calreticulin (CRT) expressed on the T-cell surface. The neutralizing antibody against CRT abrogated MBL-mediated suppression of T-cell proliferation, suggesting that MBL down-modulates T-cell proliferation via cell surface CRT. We further demonstrated that the feature of MBL-mediated T-cell suppression is shared by other serum collectins (e.g., C1q and collectin 11). The concentrations of MBL correlated negatively with in vivo T-cell activation status in patients with early-stage silicosis. Furthermore, MBL efficiently inhibited activation and proliferation of autoreactive T cells derived from patients with silicosis, indicating that MBL serves as a negative feedback control of the T-cell responses.-Zhao, N., Wu, J., Xiong, S., Zhang, L., Lu, X., Chen, S., Wu, Q., Wang, H., Liu, Y., Chen, Z., Zuo, D. Mannan-binding lectin, a serum collectin, suppresses T-cell proliferation via direct interaction with cell surface calreticulin and inhibition of proximal T-cell receptor signaling. © FASEB.

  17. Application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques to the study of lectin-binding site distribution on Paramecium primaurelia (Protista, Ciliophora) cell surface.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, D; Delmonte Corrado, M U; Politi, H; Bottiroli, G

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a photophysical phenomenon occurring between the molecules of two fluorochromes with suitable spectral characteristics (donor-acceptor dye pair), and consisting in an excitation energy migration through a non-radiative process. Since the efficiency of the process is strictly dependent on the distance and reciprocal orientation of the donor and acceptor molecules, FRET-based techniques can be successfully applied to the study of biomolecules and cell component organisation and distribution. These techniques have been employed in studying Paramecium primaurelia surface membrane for the reciprocal distribution of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) glycosidic residues, which were found to be involved in mating cell pairing. NeuAc and GlcNAc were detected by their specific binding lectins, Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (LPA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), respectively. Microspectrofluorometric analysis afforded the choice of fluorescein isothiocyanate and Texas red conjugated with LPA and WGA, respectively, as a suitable donor-acceptor couple efficiently activating FRET processes. Studies performed both in solution and in cells allowed to define the experimental conditions favourable for a FRET analysis. The comparative study carried out both on the conjugating-region and the non conjugating region of the surface membrane, indicates that FRET distribution appears quite homogeneous in mating-competent mating type (mt) I, whereas, in mating-competent mt II cells, FRET distribution seems to be preferentially localised on the conjugating-region functionally involved in mating cell pairing. This difference in the distribution of lectin-binding sites is suggested to be related to mating-competence acquisition.

  18. Analysis of EST and lectin expressions in hemocytes of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) (Bivalvia: Mollusca) infected with Perkinsus olseni.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Young-Mee; Park, Kyung-Il; Kim Cho, Somi; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Moonjae

    2006-01-01

    The hemocytes of invertebrates play key roles in both cellular and humoral immune reactions by phagocytosis or delivering immune factors such as lectin and anti-microbial peptides. Bacterial infection causes changes in components such as lectins, anti-bacterial peptides, and lysosomal enzymes of plasma or hemolymph in molluscs. Previously, we found that infection with the protozoan parasite, Perkinsus, increases lectin synthesis in hemocytes. In order to investigate the patterns of genes expressed in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) infected with the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni, we constructed a cDNA library and sequenced 1850 clones (expressed sequence tags). A total of 79 ESTs, were related to 29 functional immune genes such as C-type lectin, lysozyme, and cystatin B, in Manila clams. Lectins were the largest group of immune-function ESTs found in our Manila clams library. Among 7 lectin clones, two full length cDNAs of lectins were cloned. MCL-3, which is a simple C-type lectin composed of 151 amino acids, has a relatively short signal sequence of 17aa and single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of approximately 130 residues. It is highly homologous to eel C-type lectin. The sequence of mc-sialic acid-binding lectin consists of 168 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 19.2 and shows high homology to sialic acid-binding lectin from the snail, Cepaea hortensis. The expression of 7 different lectins in hemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR using gene-specific primers. Hemocytes from Perkinsus-infected clam expressed different sets of lectins than with Vibrio infection. These results demonstrate that several lectins are involved in Manila clam innate immunity and different challenges induce expression of different lectins.

  19. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  20. Differential responses of Helicoverpa armigera C-type immunlectin genes to the endoparasitoid Campoletis chlorideae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong-Ya; Bai, Su-Fen; Li, Xin; An, Shi-Heng; Yin, Xin-Ming; Li, Xian-Chun

    2017-03-01

    The C-type lectins mediate nonself recognition in insects. The previous studies focused on host immunlectin response to bacterial infection; however, the molecular basis of immunlectin reactions to endoparasitoids has not been elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of parasitization by Campoletis chlorideae on hemagglutination activity (HA; defined as the ability of lectin to agglutinate erythrocytes or other cells), and transcriptional expression of C-type immunlectin genes in the larval host, Helicoverpa armigera. Parasitization induced four- to eightfold higher HA in the parasitized larvae, compared to nonparasitized larvae at days 2 and 6 postparasitization (PP), however inhibited HA at other days PP. Eight C-type lectins were differentially expressed in different host developmental stages, from feeding to wandering stage. The mRNA levels of HaCTL1, HaCTL3, HaCTL4, and HaCTL5 were upregulated and HaCTL2 and HaCTL7 were downregulated. Tissue analysis showed that HaCTLs were mainly expressed in fat body or hemocytes, while HaCTL5 was highly expressed in testes. The effects of parasitization on the lectin expression patterns differed. Lectins except HaCTL6 or HaCTL5 were significantly down- or upregulated in parasitized larvae at day 4 or 6 PP compared with that of nonparasitized larvae. We infer from our results that C-type immunlectins are involved in host-parasitoid interactions, and parasitization alter host immunlectin levels both in inhibiting and promoting host immune defenses to endoparasitoids. These immunlectin genes indicated an altered physiological status of the host insect, depending on developmental stage, tissue, and parasitization.

  1. Lectins from edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Singh, Senjam Sunil; Wang, Hexiang; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Dan, Xiuli; Yin, Cui Ming; Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-12-31

    Mushrooms are famous for their nutritional and medicinal values and also for the diversity of bioactive compounds they contain including lectins. The present review is an attempt to summarize and discuss data available on molecular weights, structures, biological properties, N-terminal sequences and possible applications of lectins from edible mushrooms. It further aims to update and discuss/examine the recent advancements in the study of these lectins regarding their structures, functions, and exploitable properties. A detailed tabling of all the available data for N-terminal sequences of these lectins is also presented here.

  2. Legume Lectins: Proteins with Diverse Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lagarda-Diaz, Irlanda; Guzman-Partida, Ana Maria; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are a diverse class of proteins distributed extensively in nature. Among these proteins; legume lectins display a variety of interesting features including antimicrobial; insecticidal and antitumor activities. Because lectins recognize and bind to specific glycoconjugates present on the surface of cells and intracellular structures; they can serve as potential target molecules for developing practical applications in the fields of food; agriculture; health and pharmaceutical research. This review presents the current knowledge of the main structural characteristics of legume lectins and the relationship of structure to the exhibited specificities; provides an overview of their particular antimicrobial; insecticidal and antitumor biological activities and describes possible applications based on the pattern of recognized glyco-targets. PMID:28604616

  3. Lectins, Interconnecting Proteins with Biotechnological/Pharmacological and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Priscila Marcelino dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are proteins extensively used in biomedical applications with property to recognize carbohydrates through carbohydrate-binding sites, which identify glycans attached to cell surfaces, glycoconjugates, or free sugars, detecting abnormal cells and biomarkers related to diseases. These lectin abilities promoted interesting results in experimental treatments of immunological diseases, wounds, and cancer. Lectins obtained from virus, microorganisms, algae, animals, and plants were reported as modulators and tool markers in vivo and in vitro; these molecules also play a role in the induction of mitosis and immune responses, contributing for resolution of infections and inflammations. Lectins revealed healing effect through induction of reepithelialization and cicatrization of wounds. Some lectins have been efficient agents against virus, fungi, bacteria, and helminths at low concentrations. Lectin-mediated bioadhesion has been an interesting characteristic for development of drug delivery systems. Lectin histochemistry and lectin-based biosensors are useful to detect transformed tissues and biomarkers related to disease occurrence; antitumor lectins reported are promising for cancer therapy. Here, we address lectins from distinct sources with some biological effect and biotechnological potential in the diagnosis and therapeutic of diseases, highlighting many advances in this growing field. PMID:28367220

  4. Lectin-binding by sporozoites of Elmeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A L; McDougald, L R

    2002-02-01

    Sporozoites of Eimeria tenella were reacted in vitro with 19 different lectins characterized with a variety of carbohydrate-binding properties. Nine lectins caused sporozoite agglutination, which was inhibited by the specific carbohydrates mannose, sialic acid, melibiose, D-galactose, or D-galNAc. When intact live or fixed whole sporozoites were reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectins, another nine lectins bound to sporozoites, giving weak to strong fluorescence but not agglutination. Of these, all nine lectins bound to surface sites, but four also bound to the refractile body. Two of the agglutinating lectins also bound to intracellular organelles of air-dried sporozoites. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that biotinylated lectins bound a wide variety of parasite proteins. Lectins with similar carbohydrate specificities had some similarity in binding patterns of parasite proteins, as well as marked differences. In a few cases lectins with different carbohydrate specificities bound common protein bands. Only one lectin (Dolichos biflorus) showed no evidence of binding to whole sporozoites, organelles, or proteins.

  5. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Lander; Naalden, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2017-01-04

    Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species.

  6. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search

    PubMed Central

    Bauters, Lander; Naalden, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2017-01-01

    Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species. PMID:28054982

  7. Interaction between Lactobacillus kefir and Saccharomyces lipolytica isolated from kefir grains: evidence for lectin-like activity of bacterial surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Golowczyc, Marina Alejandra; Mobili, Pablo; Garrote, Graciela Liliana; de Los Angeles Serradell, María; Abraham, Analía Graciela; De Antoni, Graciela Liliana

    2009-02-01

    Several microbial interactions involving yeast and lactobacilli have been suggested in fermented products. Co-aggregation between Lactobacillus kefir and yeast Saccharomyces lipolytica isolated from kefir grains was studied by scanning electron microscopy and aggregation assays. Six out of twenty Lb. kefir strains were able to co-aggregate with Sacch. lipolytica CIDCA 812 and showed thermolabile non-covalently bound surface molecules involved in this interaction. Co-aggregation inhibition after Lb. kefir pre-treatment with 5 m-LiCl or 20 g SDS/l showed that bacterial S-layer proteins play an important role in this interaction. Presence of different sugar (mannose, sucrose and fructose) or yeast pre-treatment with sodium periodate inhibited co-aggregation between Lb. kefir and Sacch. lipolytica. Co-aggregating Lb. kefir strains were also able to agglutinate with human red blood cells and they lost this ability after treatment with 5 m-LiCl. These results and the capacity of purified S-layer proteins of Lb. kefir to haemagglutinate, strongly suggest that a lectin-like activity of bacterial surface proteins (S-layer) mediates the aggregation with yeast cells.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to endogenous galactose-specific tumor cell lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Raz, A; Meromsky, L; Carmi, P; Karakash, R; Lotan, D; Lotan, R

    1984-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 5D7, was obtained after immunization of syngeneic mice with B16 melanoma cell extracts enriched for endogenous lectin activity and screening for inhibition of lectin-mediated hemagglutination. Binding of this antibody to affinity-purified B16 melanoma galactoside-specific lectin was revealed by solid-phase radioimmunoassay and binding to the surface of viable B16 cells was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence. Inhibition of lectin activity and cell surface labeling by 5D7 antibody were also found with several types of cultured human and murine cells including melanoma, sarcoma and carcinoma. This monoclonal antibody should be useful for evaluating the role of tumor cell surface lectins in intercellular interactions and metastasis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6084591

  9. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  10. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Santos, I K; Pereira, M E

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various 125I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  11. Molecular basis for peptidoglycan recognition by a bactericidal lectin.

    PubMed

    Lehotzky, Rebecca E; Partch, Carrie L; Mukherjee, Sohini; Cash, Heather L; Goldman, William E; Gardner, Kevin H; Hooper, Lora V

    2010-04-27

    RegIII proteins are secreted C-type lectins that kill Gram-positive bacteria and play a vital role in antimicrobial protection of the mammalian gut. RegIII proteins bind their bacterial targets via interactions with cell wall peptidoglycan but lack the canonical sequences that support calcium-dependent carbohydrate binding in other C-type lectins. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to determine the molecular basis for peptidoglycan recognition by HIP/PAP, a human RegIII lectin. We show that HIP/PAP recognizes the peptidoglycan carbohydrate backbone in a calcium-independent manner via a conserved "EPN" motif that is critical for bacterial killing. While EPN sequences govern calcium-dependent carbohydrate recognition in other C-type lectins, the unusual location and calcium-independent functionality of the HIP/PAP EPN motif suggest that this sequence is a versatile functional module that can support both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent carbohydrate binding. Further, we show HIP/PAP binding affinity for carbohydrate ligands depends on carbohydrate chain length, supporting a binding model in which HIP/PAP molecules "bind and jump" along the extended polysaccharide chains of peptidoglycan, reducing dissociation rates and increasing binding affinity. We propose that dynamic recognition of highly clustered carbohydrate epitopes in native peptidoglycan is an essential mechanism governing high-affinity interactions between HIP/PAP and the bacterial cell wall.

  12. Molecular basis for peptidoglycan recognition by a bactericidal lectin

    PubMed Central

    Lehotzky, Rebecca E.; Partch, Carrie L.; Mukherjee, Sohini; Cash, Heather L.; Goldman, William E.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Hooper, Lora V.

    2010-01-01

    RegIII proteins are secreted C-type lectins that kill Gram-positive bacteria and play a vital role in antimicrobial protection of the mammalian gut. RegIII proteins bind their bacterial targets via interactions with cell wall peptidoglycan but lack the canonical sequences that support calcium-dependent carbohydrate binding in other C-type lectins. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to determine the molecular basis for peptidoglycan recognition by HIP/PAP, a human RegIII lectin. We show that HIP/PAP recognizes the peptidoglycan carbohydrate backbone in a calcium-independent manner via a conserved “EPN” motif that is critical for bacterial killing. While EPN sequences govern calcium-dependent carbohydrate recognition in other C-type lectins, the unusual location and calcium-independent functionality of the HIP/PAP EPN motif suggest that this sequence is a versatile functional module that can support both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent carbohydrate binding. Further, we show HIP/PAP binding affinity for carbohydrate ligands depends on carbohydrate chain length, supporting a binding model in which HIP/PAP molecules “bind and jump” along the extended polysaccharide chains of peptidoglycan, reducing dissociation rates and increasing binding affinity. We propose that dynamic recognition of highly clustered carbohydrate epitopes in native peptidoglycan is an essential mechanism governing high-affinity interactions between HIP/PAP and the bacterial cell wall. PMID:20382864

  13. Tandem lectin affinity chromatography monolithic columns with surface immobilised concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I for capturing sub-glycoproteomics from breast cancer and disease-free human sera.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Subhashini; El Rassi, Ziad

    2012-07-01

    In this study, a liquid-phase separation platform consisting of tandem lectin affinity chromatography was introduced for the selective capturing of sub-glycoproteomics that are affected in cancers, e.g. breast cancer. The platform is comprised of three monolithic columns with surface immobilised lectins including concanavalin A (Con A), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I). While WGA and Con A have specificities directed towards the core portion of N-glycans on the glycoprotein surface, RCA-I specifically interacts with the non-reducing terminal moieties of the outer chain structures of N-glycans. The effects of the order in which the three lectin columns were arranged in the tandem columns format were evaluated. The most suitable order proved to be WGA → Con A → RCA-I (denoted as WCR) as far as the number of captured proteins was concerned. The WCR tandem columns allowed the capture of 113 and 112 proteins from disease-free and breast cancer sera, respectively, corresponding to 75 and 65 non-redundant proteins, respectively. Using mass spectral count ratios and Q-Q plots yielded a panel of 23 non-redundant differentially expressed proteins (i.e. a panel of 23 candidate markers), which should in principle be more representative of a pathophysiological state than a single marker candidate.

  14. Study of bacterial adhesion on different glycopolymer surfaces by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinan; Narain, Ravin; Liu, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions are involved in a wide variety of cellular recognition processes including cell growth regulation, differentiation and adhesion, the immune response, and viral or bacterial infections. A common way for bacteria to achieve adhesion is through their fimbriae which possess cellular lectins that can bind to complementary carbohydrates on the surface of the host tissues. In this work, we synthesized glycopolymers using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization which were subsequently immobilized on a sensor surface for studies of bacterial adhesion by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Ricinus communis Agglutinin (RCA120), a galactose specific lectin, was first studied by QCM-D to determine the specific lectin interactions to the different glycopolymers-treated surfaces. Subsequently, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (a Gram-negative bacterium with galactose-specific binding C-type lectin (PA-IL)) and Escherichia coli K-12 (a Gram-negative bacterium with mannose-specific binding lectin) were then used as model bacteria to study bacterial adhesion mechanisms on different polymer-treated sensor surfaces by the coupled resonance theory. Our results showed that lectin-carbohydrate interactions play significant roles in comparison to the nonspecific interactions, such as electrostatic interactions. A significantly higher amount of P. aeruginosa PAO1 could adhere on the glycopolymer surface with strong contact point stiffness as compared to E. coli K-12 on the same surface. Furthermore, in comparison to E. coli K-12, the adhesion of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to the glycopolymers was found to be highly dependent on the presence of calcium ions due to the specific C-type lectin interactions of PA-IL, and also the enhanced bacterial adhesion is attributed to the stiffer glycopolymer surface in higher ionic strength condition.

  15. Lectin binding to cystic stages of Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R M; Williams, J F

    1984-10-01

    Studies of membrane glycoconjugates of Taenia taeniaeformis were initiated by assays of the lectin binding characteristics of 35-day-old cysticerci. Parasites fixed in glutaraldehyde were incubated with one of the following FITC-labelled lectins: Concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), fucose binding protein (FBP) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and either their specific or a nonspecific sugar. Ultraviolet microscopy revealed that only Con A and LCA bound in large amounts to the surface of cysticerci. This binding was partly inhibited by the specific sugar, but the nonspecific sugar had little effect. The lectin not removed by either of the sugars may have been bound nonspecifically to the charged glycocalyx. Lectins were primarily bound on the anterior third of the parasite around the scolex invagination. Kinetic studies of lectin interactions were carried out with LCA and RCA by spectrophotofluorometric analysis of the amount bound specifically or nonspecifically over a range of lectin concentrations. Lens culinaris lectin binding was found to be specific and involve 2 receptors which showed large differences in their affinity for lectin and prevalence on the surface. Ricinus communis lectin did not bind specifically but nonspecific interactions were observed. Adherence of small numbers of host cells was shown to have no measurable effect on the lectin binding characteristics. The results suggest that the major surface carbohydrates exposed are D-mannose and/or D-glucose residues with the other sugar groups poorly represented. This relatively homogeneous surface may have implications for the antigenicity of the parasite in its host.

  16. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  17. Lectins of living organisms. The overview.

    PubMed

    Lakhtin, Vladimir; Lakhtin, Mikhail; Alyoshkin, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    Occurrence, organization, and functioning of lectins as well as their current classifications are under investigation. Results indicate importance of symbiotic lectins for clinical microecology. Lectins and lectin-based approaches have wide perspectives for medical biotechnology. Lectin terms, relationships between lectins and enzymes are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  19. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively.

  20. Lectins: production and practical applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lectins are proteins found in a diversity of organisms. They possess the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes with known carbohydrate specificity since they have at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. This articles aims to review the production and practical applications of lectins. Lectins are isolated from their natural sources by chromatographic procedures or produced by recombinant DNA technology. The yields of animal lectins are usually low compared with the yields of plant lectins such as legume lectins. Lectins manifest a diversity of activities including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory, and anti-insect activities, which may find practical applications. A small number of lectins demonstrate antibacterial and anti-nematode activities. PMID:20890754

  1. Glycan profiling of endometrial cancers using lectin microarray.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Sugiyama, Taro; Miyazawa, Masaki; Muramatsu, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kyoko; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Mikami, Mikio

    2012-10-01

    Cell surface glycans change during the process of malignant transformation. To characterize and distinguish endometrial cancer and endometrium, we performed glycan profiling using an emerging modern technology, lectin microarray analysis. The three cell lines, two from endometrial cancers [well-differentiated type (G1) and poorly differentiated type (G3)] and one from normal endometrium, were successfully categorized into three independent groups by 45 lectins. Furthermore, in cancer cells, a clear difference between G1 and G3 type was observed for the glycans recognized with six lectins, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), Sambucus sieboldiana agglutinin (SSA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Trichosanthes japonica agglutinin I (TJA-I), Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA), and Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPL). The lectin microarray analysis using G3 type tissues demonstrated that stage I and stage III or IV were distinguished depending on signal pattern of three lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), BPL, and ACA. In addition, the analysis of the glycans on the ovarian cancer cells showed that only anticancer drug-sensitive cell lines had almost no activities to specific three lectins. Glycan profiling by the lectin microarray may be used to assess the characteristics of tumors and potentially to predict the success of chemotherapy treatment.

  2. Effects of Lectins on initial attachment of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Shiota, Yasuyoshi; Ito, Yuki; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Takashiba, Shogo

    2017-09-08

    Oral bacteria initiate biofilm formation by attaching to tooth surfaces via an interaction of a lectin-like bacterial protein with carbohydrate chains on the pellicle. This study aimed to find naturally derived lectins that inhibit the initial attachment of a cariogenic bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), to carbohydrate chains in saliva in vitro. Seventy kinds of lectins were screened for candidate motifs that inhibit the attachment of S. mutans ATCC 25175 to a saliva-coated culture plate. The inhibitory effect of the lectins on attachment of the S. mutans to the plates was quantified by crystal violet staining, and the biofilm was observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis was performed to examine the binding of S. mutans to carbohydrate chains and the binding of candidate lectins to carbohydrate chains, respectively. Moreover, binding assay between the biotinylated-lectins and the saliva components was conducted to measure the lectin binding. Lectins recognizing a salivary carbohydrate chain, Galβ1-3GalNAc, inhibited the binding of S. mutans to the plate. In particular, Agaricus bisporus agglutinin (ABA) markedly inhibited the binding. This inhibition was confirmed by SEM observation. SPR analysis indicated that S. mutans strongly binds to Galβ1-3GalNAc, and ABA binds to Galβ1-3GalNAc. Finally, the biotinylated Galβ1-3GalNAc-binding lectins including ABA demonstrated marked binding to the saliva components. These results suggest that ABA lectin inhibited the attachment of S. mutans to Galβ1-3GalNAc in saliva and ABA can be useful as a potent inhibitor for initial attachment of oral bacteria and biofilm formation.

  3. Histochemical staining using lectin probes.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Kawakami, Hayato

    2014-01-01

    In histochemistry and cytochemistry, lectins are often used as probes for the localization of carbohydrates in cells and tissues. With lectins, cells and tissues can be identified as a particular type or a group in situ. Various lectins have been used for mapping of normal cells and tissues, pathological diagnosis such as malignant transformation, and identification of cell lineages during development. This chapter describes light and electron microscopic methods using lectin probes for determining carbohydrate localization in cells and tissues.

  4. The lectin of Dolichos biflorus agglutinin recognises glycan epitopes on the surface of a subset of cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanfeng; Wang, Man; Xiang, Qiang; Sun, Zhenliang; Zhang, Rong

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of adult cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) provides a promising way for treating heart disease; however, their surface characteristics that play a critical role in regulating their maintenance, self-renewal, migration, and differentiation have not been fully investigated. One subpopulation of Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA)-positive cells was identified in the heart of adult mice. Flow cytometry showed that 3.7% of heart cells could be labeled by FITC conjugated DBA. BrdU pulse-chase showed that 55-75% of DBA(+) cells were CPCs. Evidences from 5-FU-induced myelosuppression along with BrdU pulse-chasing suggests that DBA-positive cells are proliferative. Furthermore, DBA positive cells display a cologenic appearance in vivo. Our findings suggest that DBA-positive cells in the heart of adult mouse contained a subset of CPCs, and DBA reactivity is one novel surface characteristic on CPCs.

  5. Self-assembled carbohydrate-based vesicles for lectin targeting.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marinalva Cardoso; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; da Silveira, Nadya Pesce; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Giacomelli, Fernando Carlos; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues; Frizon, Tiago Elias Allievi; Dal-Bó, Alexandre Gonçalves

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the physicochemical interactions between vesicles formed by phosphatidylcholine (PC) and glycosylated polymeric amphiphile N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminyl-PEG900-docosanate (C22PEG900GlcNAc) conjugated with Bauhinia variegata lectin (BVL). Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins capable of binding glycosylated membrane components. Accordingly, the surface functionalization by such entities is considered a potential strategy for targeted drug delivery. We observed increased hydrodynamic radii (RH) of PC+C22PEG900GlcNAc vesicles in the presence of lectins, suggesting that this aggregation was due to the interaction between lectins and the vesicular glycosylated surfaces. Furthermore, changes in the zeta potential of the vesicles with increasing lectin concentrations implied that the vesicular glycosylated surfaces were recognized by the investigated lectin. The presence of carbohydrate residues on vesicle surfaces and the ability of the vesicles to establish specific interactions with BVL were further explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. The results indicated that the thickness of the hydrophilic layer was to some extent influenced by the presence of lectins. The presence of lectins required a higher degree of polydispersity as indicated by the width parameter of the log-normal distribution of size, which also suggested more irregular structures. Reflectance Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis.) analyses revealed that the studied lectin preferentially interacted with the choline and carbonyl groups of the lipid, thereby changing the choline orientation and intermolecular interactions. The protein also discretely reduced the intermolecular communication of the hydrophobic acyl chains, resulting in a disordered state.

  6. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  7. Plant Lectins and Lectin Receptor-Like Kinases: How Do They Sense the Outside?

    PubMed

    Bellande, Kevin; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Savelli, Bruno; Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé

    2017-05-31

    Lectins are fundamental to plant life and have important roles in cell-to-cell communication; development and defence strategies. At the cell surface; lectins are present both as soluble proteins (LecPs) and as chimeric proteins: lectins are then the extracellular domains of receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) and receptor-like proteins (LecRLPs). In this review; we first describe the domain architectures of proteins harbouring G-type; L-type; LysM and malectin carbohydrate-binding domains. We then focus on the functions of LecPs; LecRLKs and LecRLPs referring to the biological processes they are involved in and to the ligands they recognize. Together; LecPs; LecRLKs and LecRLPs constitute versatile recognition systems at the cell surface contributing to the detection of symbionts and pathogens; and/or involved in monitoring of the cell wall structure and cell growth.

  8. Lectin typing of Campylobacter isolates.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, N; Benjamin, J; Skirrow, M B

    1990-01-01

    Isolates of Campylobacter jejuni, C coli, C fetus and C laridis were tested for agglutination reactions with a panel of five lectins: Arachis hypogaea, Bauhinia purpurea, Solanum tuberosum, Triticum vulgaris and Wisteria floribunda. Twenty three patterns of agglutination (lectin types) were recorded among 376 isolates. Patterns were consistent and reproducible. Only 4.5% of isolates were untypable because of autoagglutination. Some lectin types were found exclusively or predominantly in a species, but others were shared between species. Forty two per cent of C jejuni and 35% of C coli isolates belonged to lectin type 4. There was no apparent correlation between lectin type and serotype; different lectin types were found among strains of single Penner and Lior serotypes. Lectin typing is a simple and economical procedure suitable for use in non-specialist laboratories, either as an adjunct to serogrouping or, after further development, as a sole typing scheme. PMID:2262570

  9. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs.

  10. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs. PMID:26407233

  11. The roles of direct recognition by animal lectins in antiviral immunity and viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Pang, Xiaojing; Liu, Tao; Ning, Zhijie; Cheng, Gong

    2015-01-29

    Lectins are a group of proteins with carbohydrate recognition activity. Lectins are categorized into many families based on their different cellular locations as well as their specificities for a variety of carbohydrate structures due to the features of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) modules. Many studies have indicated that the direct recognition of particular oligosaccharides on viral components by lectins is important for interactions between hosts and viruses. Herein, we aim to globally review the roles of this recognition by animal lectins in antiviral immune responses and viral pathogenesis. The different classes of mammalian lectins can either recognize carbohydrates to activate host immunity for viral elimination or can exploit those carbohydrates as susceptibility factors to facilitate viral entry, replication or assembly. Additionally, some arthropod C-type lectins were recently identified as key susceptibility factors that directly interact with multiple viruses and then facilitate infection. Summarization of the pleiotropic roles of direct viral recognition by animal lectins will benefit our understanding of host-virus interactions and could provide insight into the role of lectins in antiviral drug and vaccine development.

  12. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J M

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses.

  13. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function.

  14. Lectins: getting familiar with translators of the sugar code.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; Kaltner, Herbert; Manning, Joachim C; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-22

    The view on the significance of the presence of glycans in glycoconjugates is undergoing a paradigmatic change. Initially mostly considered to be rather inert and passive, the concept of the sugar code identifies glycans as highly versatile platform to store information. Their chemical properties endow carbohydrates to form oligomers with unsurpassed structural variability. Owing to their capacity to engage in hydrogen (and coordination) bonding and C-H/π-interactions these "code words" can be "read" (in Latin, legere) by specific receptors. A distinct class of carbohydrate-binding proteins are the lectins. More than a dozen protein folds have developed carbohydrate-binding capacity in vertebrates. Taking galectins as an example, distinct expression patterns are traced. The availability of labeled endogenous lectins facilitates monitoring of tissue reactivity, extending the scope of lectin histochemistry beyond that which traditionally involved plant lectins. Presentation of glycan and its cognate lectin can be orchestrated, making a glycan-based effector pathway in growth control of tumor and activated T cells possible. In order to unravel the structural basis of lectin specificity for particular glycoconjugates mimetics of branched glycans and programmable models of cell surfaces are being developed by strategic combination of lectin research with synthetic and supramolecular chemistry.

  15. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  16. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  17. Generation of fibronectin receptors on macrophages by wheat germ lectin.

    PubMed

    Hörmann, H; Jelinić, V; Richter, H

    1983-08-01

    A chymotrypsin-derived and 125I-labelled 125-kDa fragment of human plasma fibronectin which contained the cell binding site, was only weakly bound by peritoneal macrophages of guinea pigs and binding was not saturable. In presence of wheat germ lectin binding increased proportionally to the logarithm of the lectin concentration. Association of 125I-fragment with cells was partially prevented by non-labelled fragment indicating a saturable receptor-ligand interaction. An apparent affinity constant of about 2--4 x 10(-5) M was evaluated. A considerable fraction of the cell-bound 125I-fragment resisted removal by proteases suggesting that it was internalized. In order to investigate an influence of wheat germ lectin on the binding of 125I-fibronectin by the cells the macrophages were preincubated with the lectin followed by washing and evaluation of 125I-fibronectin binding. A simultaneous incubation of the cells with 125I-fibronectin and lectin was impractical due to partial interaction of the two proteins giving rise to some unspecific precipitates. Preincubation with wheat germ lectin considerably improved the capacity of the macrophages for binding of 125I-fibronectin. Again the binding of 125I-labelled protein could be restricted by unlabelled one. N-acetyl-glucosamine inhibited the binding of 125I-fibronectin by wheat germ lectin-treated cells if applied in the preincubation phase and more effectively, if applied in the final 125I-fibronectin binding assay. N-Acetylneuraminic acid also inhibited this step. In addition to wheat germ lectin concanavalin A was capable of generating fibronectin receptors on the cell surface. Soy bean lectin, however, was ineffective.

  18. Glycoprotein targeting and other applications of lectins in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Saleemuddin, M; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-06-01

    Glycoconjugates comprise a variety of structures, include glycoproteins and glycolipids and are found on the surfaces of animal and plant cells, as well as on the surface of microorganisms. Determination of the structure and the distribution of glycoconjugates on cell surfaces are important for the understanding their biological function. Lectins are useful to investigate protein-carbohydrate interactions, because they have specificity for defined carbohydrate structure. They have been implicated in cell-to-cell recognition and signaling, blood group typing, in immune recognition process, and various other biological processes, such as viral, bacterial, mycoplasmal and parasitic infections, fertilization, cancer metastasis, growth and differentiation. Once thought to be confined to plant seeds, lectins are now recognized as ubiquitous in virtually all living systems, ranging from viruses and bacteria to animals. Plant lectins provide a rich source of carbohydrate-recognizing protein reagents for glycobiologists and biotechnologists. Biotechnology offers the therapeutic use of lectin against certain life threatening diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus and cancer. This review presents a comprehensive summary of research efforts that focus on the actual and potential uses and advantages of using lectins to target glycoproteins and also glycoproteins to target lectins.

  19. Lectins from Mycelia of Basidiomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Nikitina, Valentina E.; Loshchinina, Ekaterina A.; Vetchinkina, Elena P.

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are proteins of a nonimmunoglobulin nature that are capable of specific recognition of and reversible binding to the carbohydrate moieties of complex carbohydrates, without altering the covalent structure of any of the recognized glycosyl ligands. They have a broad range of biological activities important for the functioning of the cell and the whole organism and, owing to the high specificity of reversible binding to carbohydrates, are valuable tools used widely in biology and medicine. Lectins can be produced by many living organisms, including basidiomycetes. Whereas lectins from the fruit bodies of basidiomycetes have been studied sufficiently well, mycelial lectins remain relatively unexplored. Here, we review and comparatively analyze what is currently known about lectins isolated from the vegetative mycelium of macrobasidiomycetes, including their localization, properties, and carbohydrate specificities. Particular attention is given to the physiological role of mycelial lectins in fungal growth and development. PMID:28640205

  20. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  1. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  2. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  3. Interactions of lectins with plasma membrane glycoproteins of the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Nachbar, M S; Oppenheim, J D; Aull, F

    1976-02-06

    Several aspects of the interaction of various lectins with the surface of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells are described. The order of agglutinating activity for various lectins is Ricinus communis greater than wheat germ greater than or equal to concanavalin A greater than or equal to soybean greater than Limulus polyphemus. No agglutination was noted for Ulex europaeus. Using 125I-labeled lectins it was determined that there are 1.6 and 7 times as many Ricinus communis lectin binding sites for concanavalin A and soybean lectins. Sodium deoxycholate-solubilized plasma membrane material was subjected to lectin affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The lectin receptors of the plasma membrane appeared to be heterogeneous and some qualitative differences could be discerned among the electrophoretically analyzed material, which bound to and was specifically eluted from the various lectin affinity columns. The characteristics of elution of bound material from individual lectin columns indicated secondary hydrophobic interactions between concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin and their respective lectin receptor molecules.

  4. Purification and characterization of a mucin specific mycelial lectin from Aspergillus gorakhpurensis: application for mitogenic and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Kaur, Hemant Preet; Singh, Jatinder

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins or glycoproteins that bind reversibly to specific carbohydrates present on the apposing cells, which are responsible for their ability to agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc. Interest in lectins has been intensified due to their carbohydrate specificity as they can be valuable reagents for the investigation of cell surface sugars, purification and characterization of glycoproteins. The present study reports the purification, characterization and evaluation of mitogenic and antimicrobial potential of a mycelial lectin from Aspergillus gorakhpurensis. Affinity chromatography on mucin-sepharose column was carried out for purification of Aspergillus gorakhpurensis lectin. The lectin was characterized for physico-chemical parameters. Mitogenic potential of the lectin was evaluated against splenocytes of Swiss albino mice by MTT assay. Antimicrobial activity of the purified lectin has also been evaluated by disc diffusion assay. Single-step affinity purification resulted in 18.6-fold purification of the mycelial lectin. The molecular mass of the lectin was found to be 70 kDa and it was composed of two subunits of 34.8 kDa as determined by gel filtration chromatography, SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. pH optima of the lectin was found to be 6.5-9.5, while optimum temperature for lectin activity was 20-30 °C. Lectin was stable within a pH range of 7.0-10.5 and showed fair thermostability. EDTA did not affect lectin activity whereas it was found susceptible to the denaturants tested. MTT assay revealed strong mitogenic potential of A. gorakhpurensis lectin at a concentration upto 150 µg/mL. Antimicrobial activity assay showed its potent antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcous aureus and Escherichia coli and marginal antifungal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This is the first report on the mitogenic and antimicrobial potential of Aspergillus gorakhpurensis lectin. The

  5. Ureaplasma urealyticum binds mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Barbara D; Ourth, Donald D; Crouse, Dennis T; Shanklin, D Radford

    2004-10-01

    Mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity in mammals. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an acute phase protein, acts as an opsonin for phagocytosis and also activates the mannan-binding lectin complement pathway. It may play a particularly significant role during infancy before adequate specific protection can be provided by the adaptive immune system. Ureaplasma urealyticum has been linked to several diseases including pneumonia and chronic lung disease (CLD) in premature infants. We therefore investigated the ability of U. urealyticum to bind MBL. A guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit-MBL antiserum was produced. An immunoblot (dot-blot) assay done on nitrocellulose membrane determined that the anti-MBL antibody had specificity against both rabbit and human MBL. Pure cultures of U. urealyticum, serotype 3, were used to make slide preparations. The slides containing the organisms were then incubated with nonimmune rabbit serum containing MBL. Ureaplasma was shown to bind rabbit MBL with an immunocytochemical assay using the guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit MBL antiserum. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-guinea pig IgG was used to localize the reaction. The anti-MBL antiserum was also used in an immunocytochemical assay to localize U. urealyticum in histological sections of lungs from mice specifically infected with this organism. The same method also indicated binding of MBL by ureaplasma in human lung tissue obtained at autopsy from culture positive infants. Our results demonstrate that ureaplasma has the capacity to bind MBL. The absence of MBL may play a role in the predisposition of diseases related to this organism.

  6. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes.

  7. Fungal lectins: a growing family.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are members of a large group of eukaryotic organisms that include yeasts and molds, as well as the most familiar member, mushrooms. Fungal lectins with unique specificity and structures have been discovered. In general, fungal lectins are classified into specific families based on their amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the approximately 80 types of mushroom and fungal lectins that have been isolated and studied to date. In particular, we have focused on ten fungal lectins (Agaricus bisporus, Agrocybe cylindracea, Aleuria aurantia, Aspergillus oryzae, Clitocybe nebularis, Marasmius oreades, Psathyrella velutina, Rhizopus stolonifer, Pholiota squarrosa, Polyporus squamosus), many of which are commercially available and their properties, sugar-binding specificities, structural grouping into families, and applications for biological research being described. The sialic acid-specific lectins (Agrocybe cylindracea and Polyporus squamosus) and fucose-specific lectins (Aleuria aurantia, Aspergillus oryzae, Rhizopus stolonifer, and Pholiota squarrosa) each showed potential for use in identifying sialic acid glycoconjugates and fucose glycoconjugates. Although not much is currently known about fungal lectins compared to animal and plant lectins, the knowledge accumulated thus far shows great promise for several applications in the fields of taxonomy, biomedicine, and molecular and cellular biology.

  8. Molecular Simulations of Carbohydrates with a Fucose-Binding Burkholderia ambifaria Lectin Suggest Modulation by Surface Residues Outside the Fucose-Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Dingjan, Tamir; Imberty, Anne; Pérez, Serge; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Ramsland, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia ambifaria is an opportunistic respiratory pathogen belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a collection of species responsible for the rapidly fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. A fucose-binding lectin identified in the B. ambifaria genome, BambL, is able to adhere to lung tissue, and may play a role in respiratory infection. X-ray crystallography has revealed the bound complex structures for four fucosylated human blood group epitopes (blood group B, H type 1, H type 2, and Lex determinants). The present study employed computational approaches, including docking and molecular dynamics (MD), to extend the structural analysis of BambL-oligosaccharide complexes to include four additional blood group saccharides (A, Lea, Leb, and Ley) and a library of blood-group-related carbohydrates. Carbohydrate recognition is dominated by interactions with fucose via a hydrogen-bonding network involving Arg15, Glu26, Ala38, and Trp79 and a stacking interaction with Trp74. Additional hydrogen bonds to non-fucose residues are formed with Asp30, Tyr35, Thr36, and Trp74. BambL recognition is dominated by interactions with fucose, but also features interactions with other parts of the ligands that may modulate specificity or affinity. The detailed computational characterization of the BambL carbohydrate-binding site provides guidelines for the future design of lectin inhibitors. PMID:28680402

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of mannose-binding lectin ameliorates neurobehavioral dysfunction following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Daiana; Fumagalli, Stefano; Longhi, Luca; Orsini, Franca; Palmioli, Alessandro; Stravalaci, Matteo; Vegliante, Gloria; Zanier, Elisa R; Bernardi, Anna; Gobbi, Marco; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is present in the contusion area of traumatic brain-injured patients and in that of traumatic brain-injured mice, where mannose-binding lectin-C exceeds mannose-binding lectin-A. The reduced susceptibility to traumatic brain injury of mannose-binding lectin double knock-out mice (mannose-binding lectin(-/-)) when compared to wild type mice suggests that mannose-binding lectin may be a therapeutic target following traumatic brain injury. Here, we evaluated the effects of a multivalent glycomimetic mannose-binding lectin ligand, Polyman9, following traumatic brain injury in mice. In vitro surface plasmon resonance assay indicated that Polyman9 dose-dependently inhibits the binding to immobilized mannose residues of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C selectively over that of mannose-binding lectin-A. Male C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham/controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury and intravenous treatment with Polyman9/saline. Ex-vivo surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed that Polyman9 effectively reduces the binding of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C to immobilized mannose residues. In vivo studies up to four weeks post injury, showed that Polyman9 induces significant improvement in sensorimotor deficits (by neuroscore and beam walk), promotes neurogenesis (73% increase in doublecortin immunoreactivity), and astrogliosis (28% increase in glial fibrillary acid protein). Polyman9 administration in brain-injured mannose-binding lectin(-/-) mice had no effect on post-traumatic brain-injured functional deficits, suggestive of the specificity of its neuroprotective effects. The neurobehavioral efficacy of Polyman9 implicates mannose-binding lectin-C as a novel therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury.

  10. Regulation of Adherence and Virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica Lectin Cytoplasmic Domain, Which Contains a β2 Integrin Motif

    PubMed Central

    Vines, Richard R.; Ramakrishnan, Girija; Rogers, Joshua B.; Lockhart, Lauren A.; Mann, Barbara J.; Petri, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the β2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediated cell adherence. Mutation of the integrin-like sequence abrogates the dominant negative effect. Amebae expressing the dominant negative mutant are less virulent in an animal model of amebiasis. These results suggest that inside-out signaling via the lectin cytoplasmic domain may control the extracellular adhesive activity of the amebic lectin and provide in vivo demonstration of the lectin’s role in virulence. PMID:9693367

  11. Dual Specificity of Langerin to Sulfated and Mannosylated Glycans via a Single C-type Carbohydrate Recognition Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Ohnishi, Koji; Yabe, Rikio; Hayatsu, Norihito; Sato, Takashi; Takeya, Motohiro; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Langerin is categorized as a C-type lectin selectively expressed in Langerhans cells, playing roles in the first line of defense against pathogens and in Birbeck granule formation. Although these functions are thought to be exerted through glycan-binding activity of the C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, sugar-binding properties of Langerin have not been fully elucidated in relation to its biological functions. Here, we investigated the glycan-binding specificity of Langerin using comprehensive glycoconjugate microarray, quantitative frontal affinity chromatography, and conventional cell biological analyses. Langerin showed outstanding affinity to galactose-6-sulfated oligosaccharides, including keratan sulfate, while it preserved binding activity to mannose, as a common feature of the C-type lectins with an EPN motif. By a mutagenesis study, Lys-299 and Lys-313 were found to form extended binding sites for sulfated glycans. Consistent with the former observation, the sulfated Langerin ligands were found to be expressed in brain and spleen, where the transcript of keratan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase is expressed. Moreover, such sulfated ligands were up-regulated in glioblastoma relative to normal brain tissues, and Langerin-expressing cells were localized in malignant brain tissues. Langerin also recognized pathogenic fungi, such as Candida and Malassezia, expressing heavily mannosylated glycans. These observations provide strong evidence that Langerin mediates diverse functions on Langerhans cells through dual recognition of sulfated as well as mannosylated glycans by its uniquely evolved C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain. PMID:20026605

  12. Structural and functional overview of the lectin complement pathway: its molecular basis and physiological implication.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Misao; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo

    2013-08-01

    The complement system is an effector mechanism in immunity. It is activated in three ways, the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. The lectin pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins to carbohydrates on the surfaces of pathogens. In humans, MBL and three types of ficolins (L-ficolin, H-ficolin, and M-ficolin) are present in plasma. Of these lectins, at least, MBL, L-ficolin, and H-ficolin are complexed with three types of MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), MASP-1, MASP-2, and MASP-3 and their truncated proteins (MAp44 and sMAP). In the lectin pathway, the lectin-MASP complex (i.e., a complex of lectin, MASPs and their truncated proteins) binds to pathogens, resulting in the activation of C4 and C2 to generate a C3 convertase capable of activating C3. MASP-2 is involved in the activation of C4 and C2. MASP-1 activates C2 and MASP-2. The functions of MASP-3, sMAP, and MAp44 in the lectin pathway remain unknown. MASP-1 and MASP-3 also have a role in the alternative pathway. MBL and ficolins are able to bind to a variety of pathogens depending on their carbohydrate binding specificity, resulting in the activation of the lectin pathway. Deficiencies of the components of the lectin pathway are associated to susceptibility to infection, indicating an important role of the lectin pathway in innate immunity. The lectin-MASP complex is also involved in innate immunity by activating the coagulation system. Recent findings suggest a crucial role of MASP-3 in development.

  13. Microencapsulation of lectin anti-cancer agent and controlled release by alginate beads, biosafety approach.

    PubMed

    El-Aassar, M R; Hafez, Elsayed E; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered as one of the most aggressive cancer worldwide. In Egypt, the prevalence of HCC is increasing during last years. Recently, drug-loaded microparticles were used to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. This study is designed to evaluate the anticancer potentialities of lectins against HCC while hinting to its safety usage. The aim is also extended to encapsulate lectins in alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery purposes. The extracted lectins showed anti-proliferative effect against HCC with a percentage of 60.76% by using its nontoxic dose with an up-regulation of P53 gene expression. Concerning the handling of lectin alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery, the prepared lectin alginate beads were ∼100μm in diameter. The efficiency of the microcapsules was checked by scanning electron microscopy, the SEM showed the change on the alginate beads surface revealing the successful lectin encapsulation. The release of lectins from the microbeads depended on a variety of factors as the microbeads forming carriers and the amount-encapsulated lectins. The Pisum sativum extracted lectins may be considered as a promising agent in controlling HCC and this solid dosage form could be suitable for oral administration complemented with/or without the standard HCC drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Algal Lectins as Potential HIV Microbicide Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Huskens, Dana; Schols, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The development and use of topical microbicides potentially offers an additional strategy to reduce the spread of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) that show specificity for high mannose carbohydrates on the surface of the heavily glycosylated envelope of HIV are endowed with potent anti-HIV activity. In fact, a number of algal lectins such as cyanovirin-N, microvirin, microcystis viridis lectin, scytovirin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin and griffithsin are considered as potential microbicide candidates to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV through topical applications. They not only inhibit infection of cells by cell-free virus but they can also efficiently prevent virus transmission from virus-infected cells to uninfected CD4+ target T-lymphocytes and DC-SIGN-directed capture of HIV-1 and transmission to CD4+ T lymphocytes. This review focuses on the structural properties and carbohydrate specificity of these algal lectins, their antiviral activity against HIV and several other enveloped viruses, their safety profile and viral resistance patterns. PMID:22851920

  15. Human intelectin is a novel soluble lectin that recognizes galactofuranose in carbohydrate chains of bacterial cell wall.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, S; Uehori, J; Matsumoto, M; Suzuki, Y; Matsuhisa, A; Toyoshima, K; Seya, T

    2001-06-29

    Galactofuranosyl residues are present in various microorganisms but not in mammals. In this study, we identified a human lectin binding to galactofuranosyl residues and named this protein human intelectin (hIntL). The mature hIntL was a secretory glycoprotein consisting of 295 amino acids and N-linked oligosaccharides, and its basic structural unit was a 120-kDa homotrimer in which 40-kDa polypeptides were bridged by disulfide bonds. The hIntL gene was split into 8 exons on chromosome 1q21.3, and hIntL mRNA was expressed in the heart, small intestine, colon, and thymus. hIntL showed high levels of homology with mouse intelectin, Xenopus laevis cortical granule lectin/oocyte lectin, lamprey serum lectin, and ascidian galactose-specific lectin. These homologues commonly contained no carbohydrate recognition domain, which is a characteristic of C-type lectins, although some of them have been reported as Ca(2+)-dependent lectins. Recombinant hIntL revealed affinities to d-pentoses and a d-galactofuranosyl residue in the presence of Ca(2+), and recognized the bacterial arabinogalactan of Nocardia containing d-galactofuranosyl residues. These results suggested that hIntL is a new type lectin recognizing galactofuranose, and that hIntL plays a role in the recognition of bacteria-specific components in the host.

  16. Bjcul, a snake venom lectin, modulates monocyte-derived macrophages to a pro-inflammatory profile in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dias-Netipanyj, M F; Boldrini-Leite, L M; Trindade, E S; Moreno-Amaral, A N; Elifio-Esposito, S

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages are cells of high plasticity and can act in different ways to ensure that the appropriate immune response remains controlled. This study shows the effects of the C-type Bothrops jararacussu venom lectin (BJcuL) on the activation of human macrophages derived from the U937 cell line. BJcuL binds on the cell surface, and this event is inhibited by its specific carbohydrate. It induced phagocytosis and production of H2O2, and expression of antigen presentation molecules. It also enhanced the production of TNF-α, GM-CSF and IL-6 by macrophages and indirectly induced T cells to an increased production of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 in the presence of LPS. Our results suggest that BJcuL can modulate macrophage functional activation towards an M1 state.

  17. Parkia pendula lectin as histochemistry marker for meningothelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Beltrão, E I C; Medeiros, P L; Rodrigues, O G; Figueredo-Silva, J; Valença, M M; Coelho, L C B B; Carvalho, L B

    2003-01-01

    Lectins have been intensively used in histochemical techniques for cell surface characterization. These proteins are involved in several biological processes and their use as histochemical markers have been evaluated since they can indicate differences in cell surfaces. Parkia pendula lectin (PpeL) was evaluated as histochemical marker for meningothelial meningioma biopsies. Tissue slices were incubated with PpeL conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (PpeL-HRP) and Concanavalin A-HRP (ConA-HPR) and the binding visualized with diaminobenzidine and hydrogen peroxide. The lectin-tissue binding was inhibited with D-glucose. PpeL showed to be a useful tool for the characterization of meningothelial tumour and clinico-pathological diagnosis.

  18. Assessment of weak sugar-binding ability using lectin tetramer and membrane-based glycans.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To consider biological significance of glycosylation of proteins, it is necessary to evaluate the importance of sugar-recognition processes mediated by lectins. Though the interaction between sugars and proteins, especially animal lectins, is quite weak with K d approximately 10(-4) M, cellular and molecular recognitions mediated via sugar-protein interaction increase their avidity by 1-3 orders of magnitude by the self-association of both receptors and their ligands on cell surfaces. To assess the weak interaction between lectins and their sugar ligands, we established lectin tetramer binding to cell surface glycans using flow cytometry. This strategy is highly sensitive, and useful to determine whether or not a putative lectin domain may have sugar-binding ability.

  19. A review of fish lectins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Fai Cheung, Randy Chi; Wing Ng, Charlene Cheuk; Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Lectins have been reported from various tissues of a diversity of fish species including Japanese eel, conger eel, electric eel, bighead carp, gibel carp, grass carp, Arabian Gulf catfish, channel catfish, blue catfish, catfish, pike perch, perch, powan, zebrafish, toxic moray, cobia fish, steelhead trout, Japanese trout, Atlantic salmon, chinook salmon, olive rainbow smelt, rainbow smelt, white-spotted charr, tilapia, blue gourami, ayu, Potca fish, Spanish mackerel, gilt head bream, tench, roach, rudd, common skate, and sea lamprey. The tissues from which the lectins were isolated comprise gills, eggs, electric organ, stomach, intestine, and liver. Lectins have also been isolated from skin, mucus serum, and plasma. The lectins differ in molecular weight, number of subunits, glycosylation, sugar binding specificity and amino acid sequence. Their activities include antimicrobial, antitumor, immunoregulatory and a role in development.

  20. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of quail intestinal mucin as a ligand for endogenous quail lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, R; Mantle, M; Ceri, H

    1993-01-01

    The S-type lectins have been shown to be components of mucosal scrapings, and in avian systems these lectins have been localized immunohistochemically to the mucosal surface and goblet cells of the intestine. The interaction of lectin specifically with purified mucin has not, however, been established. Quail intestinal mucin was purified by two subsequent isopycnic density-gradient centrifugations in CsCl and chromatography on Sepharose Cl-2B. Purified mucin, obtained from the void volume of the Sepharose column, was characterized by SDS/PAGE, amino acid and carbohydrate analyses, sensitivity to thiol reduction, and cross-reactivity with antibody preparations to rat and human intestinal mucins on Western blots. Antibody raised against purified quail mucin partially cross-reacts with purified rat, rabbit and human intestinal mucins, and specifically labels the mucosal surface and goblet cells of quail intestine by the immunoperoxidase technique. Protein eluted by lactose from an affinity matrix composed of quail intestinal mucin possessed the same molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as intestinal lectin and reacted on Western blots with a lectin-specific antibody. The data clearly demonstrate the co-localization of lectin and mucin in the quail intestine and also the ability of the lectin to specifically interact with the purified mucin, raising the question of the role of endogenous lectins in secretions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8352754

  2. Protein superfamily members as targets for computer modeling: The carbohydrate recognition domain of a macrophage lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Stenkamp, R.E.; Aruffo, A.; Bajorath, J. |

    1996-12-31

    Members of protein superfamilies display similar folds, but share only limited sequence identity, often 25% or less. Thus, it is not straightforward to apply standard homology modeling methods to construct reliable three-dimensional models of such proteins. A three-dimensional model of the carbohydrate recognition domain of the rat macrophage lectin, a member of the calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin superfamily, has been generated to illustrate how information provided by comparison of X-ray structures and sequence-structure alignments can aid in comparative modeling when primary sequence similarities are low. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Probing the cons and pros of lectin-induced immunomodulation: case studies for the mistletoe lectin and galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H J

    2001-07-01

    When imagining to monitor animal cells through a microscope with resolution at the molecular level, a salient attribute of their surfaces will be the abundance of glycan chains. They present galactosides at their termini widely extending like tentacles into the extracellular space. Their spatial accessibility and their potential for structural variability endow especially these glycan parts with capacity to act as docking points for molecular sensors (sugar receptors such as lectins). Binding and ligand clustering account for transmission of post-binding signals into the cell interior. The range of triggered activities has turned plant lectins into popular tools in cell biology and immunology. Potential for clinical application has been investigated rigorously only in recent years. As documented in vitro and in vivo for the galactoside-specific mistletoe lectin, its apparent immunomodulatory capacity reflected in upregulation of production of proinflammatory cytokines will not necessarily be clinically favorable but a double-edged sword. In fact, lectin application has been shown to stimulate tumor growth in cell lines, histocultures of human tumors and in two animal models using chemical carcinogenesis or tumor transplantation. When testing immunological effects of the endogenous lectin galectin-1, protection against disorders mediated by activated T cells came up for consideration. Elimination of these cells via CD7-dependent induction of apoptosis, and a shift to the Th2 response by the galectin, are factors to ameliorate disease states. This result encourages further efforts with other galectins. Functional redundancy, synergism, diversity or antagonism among galectins are being explored to understand the actual role of this class of endogenous lectins in inflammation. Regardless of the results of further preclinical testing for galectin-1, these two case studies break new ground in our understanding how glycans as ligands for lectins convey reactivity to

  4. Characterization of IgE-binding epitopes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) PNA lectin allergen cross-reacting with other structurally related legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Rougé, Pierre; Culerrier, Raphaël; Granier, Claude; Rancé, Fabienne; Barre, Annick

    2010-08-01

    Sera from peanut allergic patients contain IgE that specifically interact with the peanut lectin PNA and other closely related legume lectins like LcA from lentil, PsA from pea and PHA from kidney bean. The IgE-binding activity of PNA and legume lectins was assessed by immunoblotting, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA measurements, using sera from peanut allergic patients as a IgE source. This IgE-binding cross-reactivity most probably depends on the occurrence of structurally related epitopes that have been identified on the molecular surface of PNA and other legume lectins. These epitopes definitely differ from those responsible for the allergenicity of the major allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3, also recognized by the IgE-containing sera of peanut allergic patients. Peanut lectin PNA and other legume lectins have been characterized as potential allergens for patients allergic to edible legume seeds. However, the clinical significance of the lectin-IgE interaction has to be addressed. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lectin binding to olfactory system in a shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, V; Ciani, F

    1993-01-01

    Lectin histochemical studies were performed on the olfactory system of Scyliorhinus canicula to identify specific glycoconjugates on the cell surface of primary olfactory neurons. The olfactory receptor cells, the olfactory nerve fibers and their terminals in the bulbs were labelled with SBA, BSA-I and BSA-I-B4. The lectin staining patterns indicate that the membranes of small-spotted catshark olfactory neurons had glycoproteins with alpha-galactose residues. This carbohydrate moiety could be related to modulation of the cell-cell interactions in the olfactory system.

  6. Structural and functional diversity of the lectin repertoire in teleost fish: Relevance to innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, Gerardo R.; Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Giomarelli, Barbara; Ahmed, Hafiz; Du, Shaojun; Cammarata, Matteo; Parrinello, Nicolò; Bianchet, Mario A.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2012-01-01

    Protein–carbohydrate interactions mediated by lectins have been recognized as key components of innate immunity in vertebrates and invertebrates, not only for recognition of potential pathogens, but also for participating in downstream effector functions, such as their agglutination, immobilization, and complement-mediated opsonization and killing. More recently, lectins have been identified as critical regulators of mammalian adaptive immune responses. Fish are endowed with virtually all components of the mammalian adaptive immunity, and are equipped with a complex lectin repertoire. In this review, we discuss evidence suggesting that: (a) lectin repertoires in teleost fish are highly diversified, and include not only representatives of the lectin families described in mammals, but also members of lectin families described for the first time in fish species; (b) the tissue-specific expression and localization of the diverse lectin repertoires and their molecular partners is consistent with their distinct biological roles in innate and adaptive immunity; (c) although some lectins may bind endogenous ligands, others bind sugars on the surface of potential pathogens; (d) in addition to pathogen recognition and opsonization, some lectins display additional effector roles, such as complement activation and regulation of immune functions; (e) some lectins that recognize exogenous ligands mediate processes unrelated to immunity: they may act as anti-freeze proteins or prevent polyspermia during fertilization. PMID:21896283

  7. Artocarpin is a polyspecific jacalin-related lectin with a monosaccharide preference for mannose.

    PubMed

    Barre, Annick; Peumans, Willy J; Rossignol, Michel; Borderies, Gisèle; Culerrier, Raphaël; Van Damme, Els J M; Rougé, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    A reinvestigation of the carbohydrate-binding properties revealed that artocarpin, a previously described mannose-specific lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds, behaves as a polyspecific lectin. Surface plasmon resonance hapten inhibition experiments demonstrated that artocarpin readily interacted with a wide range of monosaccharides covering galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, mannose, glucose, sialic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Molecular docking confirmed this unexpected ability of artocarpin to interact with structurally different sugars. The biological significance of the polyspecificity of the lectin is discussed in terms of the broadening of the range of potential target glycans present on the surface of plant phytopathogens or predators.

  8. Lectin-probed western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-probed western blot analysis, the so-called lectin blot analysis, is a useful method to yield basic information on the glycan structures of glycoproteins, based on the carbohydrate-binding specificities of lectins. By lectin blot analysis, researchers can directly analyze the glycan structures without releasing the glycans from glycoproteins. Here, the author describes protocols for standard analysis, and applies analysis in combination with glycosidase digestion of blot.

  9. pH and glucose responsive nanofibers for the reversible capture and release of lectins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinan; Kotsuchibashi, Yohei; Uto, Koichiro; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Aoyagi, Takao; Liu, Yang; Narain, Ravin

    2015-01-01

    A dual pH and glucose responsive boronic acid containing nanofiber was constructed for the reversible capture and release of lectins. The effects of surface groups and pH values on selective lectin capture were investigated by fluorescence microscopy. Compared to the pristine nanofibrous membrane, glucose and galactose functionalized nanofiber surfaces showed significantly higher capture of ConA and Jacalin, under alkaline conditions. On the other hand, treatment of the modified nanofibers with an acidic solution resulted in the detachment of both the lectins and glycopolymers from the nanofiber surface. As expected, once the glycopolymers are displaced, no lectins were adhered to the nanofiber surface under alkaline conditions. These functional nanofibers can therefore be easily modified and hence can be used for quick removal of selective proteins or toxins from the solution.

  10. Quantum Torus Algebras and B(C)-Type Toda Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Na; Li, Chuanzhong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we construct a new even constrained B(C)-type Toda hierarchy and derive its B(C)-type Block-type additional symmetry. Also we generalize the B(C)-type Toda hierarchy to the N-component B(C)-type Toda hierarchy which is proved to have symmetries of a coupled \\bigotimes ^NQT_+ algebra (N-fold direct product of the positive half of the quantum torus algebra QT).

  11. Monitoring lectin interactions with carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    de Bentzmann, Sophie; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions are often involved in the first step of infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces several proteins that are able to bind specifically to glycan epitopes present on host epithelia. The experimental approaches for studying protein-carbohydrate interaction have been inspired, with some adaptations, from those commonly used for protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions. A range of methods are described herein for detecting lectin activity, screening for monosaccharide or oligosaccharide specificity, determining the affinity of binding together with thermodynamics and kinetics parameters, and producing crystal of lectin-carbohydrate complexes for further structural studies.

  12. Lectin conjugates as potent, nonabsorbable CFTR inhibitors for reducing intestinal fluid secretion in cholera.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, N D; Zhao, Dan; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Galietta, Luis J V; Verkman, A S

    2007-04-01

    Inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel are predicted to prevent intestinal fluid secretion in cholera. We previously discovered low- affinity glycine hydrazide (GlyH) CFTR inhibitors that block CFTR at its external pore. The goal of this study was to develop potent CFTR inhibitors that are minimally absorbed and washed out of the intestinal lumen for application as antisecretory agents in cholera. GlyH analogs (malonic hydrazides, MalH) were chemically conjugated to various lectins ("MalH-lectin") and purified. CFTR inhibition potency was measured by short-circuit current analysis, mechanism of action by patch-clamp, and antidiarrheal efficacy in closed-loop and suckling mouse models. By lectin conjugation, we improved CFTR inhibitory potency by approximately 100-fold (to 50 nmol/L) and retarded washout. High-affinity CFTR inhibition was abolished by MalH-lectin heat denaturation, protease digestion, or competition by mannose or unconjugated lectin. Patch-clamp analysis indicated CFTR inhibition by an external pore occlusion mechanism. Fluorescently labeled MalH-lectin remained membrane bound for >6 hours after washout, whereas washout occurred in a few minutes without the lectin. MalH-ConA and MalH-wheat (IC50 50-100 pmol) blocked cholera toxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion in closed intestinal loops in mice and greatly reduced mortality in a suckling mouse model of cholera. The high potency of MalH-lectin conjugates results from "anchoring" the CFTR-blocking MalH to cell surface carbohydrates by the lectin. The high-affinity, slow washout, and external site of action of the MalH-lectin conjugates support their further development as antisecretory drugs for enterotoxin-mediated secretory diarrheas.

  13. Crystal structure of extracellular domain of human lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1), the ligand for natural killer receptor-P1A.

    PubMed

    Kita, Shunsuke; Matsubara, Haruki; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Tamaoki, Takaharu; Okabe, Yuki; Fukuhara, Hideo; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Krayukhina, Elena; Uchiyama, Susumu; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence has revealed the pivotal roles of C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) in the regulation of a wide range of immune responses. Human natural killer cell receptor-P1A (NKRP1A) is one of the CTLRs and recognizes another CTLR, lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) on target cells to control NK, NKT and Th17 cells. The structural basis for the NKRP1A-LLT1 interaction was limitedly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the ectodomain of LLT1. The plausible receptor-binding face of the C-type lectin-like domain is flat, and forms an extended β-sheet. The residues of this face are relatively conserved with another CTLR, keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin, which binds to the CTLR member, NKp65. A LLT1-NKRP1A complex model, prepared using the crystal structures of LLT1 and the keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin-NKp65 complex, reasonably satisfies the charge consistency and the conformational complementarity to explain a previous mutagenesis study. Furthermore, crystal packing and analytical ultracentrifugation revealed dimer formation, which supports a complex model. Our results provide structural insights for understanding the binding modes and signal transduction mechanisms, which are likely to be conserved in the CTLR family, and for further rational drug design towards regulating the LLT1 function. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-01-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery. PMID:26832966

  15. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility.

    PubMed

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-02-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery.

  16. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  17. Receptor mobility and the binding of cells to lectin-coated fibers

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The ability of cells to bind to nylon fibers coated with lectin molecules interspaced with varying numbers of albumin molecules has been analyzed. The cells used were lymphoma cells, normal lymphocytes, myeloid leukemia cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, and the fibers were coated with different densities of concanavalin A or the lectins from soybean or wheat germ. Cells fixed with glutaraldehyde did not bind to lectin-coated fibers. The number of cells bound to fibers could be increased by increasing the density of lectin molecules on the fiber, the density of specific receptors on the cell, or the mobility of the receptors. It is suggested that binding of cells to fibers involves alignment and binding of specific cell surface receptors with lectin molecules immobilized on the fibers, and that this alignment requires short-range rapid lateral mobility (RLM) of the receptors. The titration of cell binding to fibers coated with different densities of lectin and albumin has been used to measure the relative RLM of unoccupied cell surface receptors for the lectin. The results indicate a relationship of RLM to lectin-induced cell-to-cell binding. The RLM or receptors for concanavalin A (Con A) was generally found to be higher than that of receptors for the lectins from wheat germ or soybean. Receptor RLM could be decreased by use of metabolic inhibitors or by lowering the temperature. Receptors for Con A had a lower RLM on normal fibroblasts than on SV40-transformed fibroblasts, and trypsinization of normal fibroblasts increased Con A receptor RLM. Normal lymphocytes, lymphoma cells, and lines of myeloid leukemia cells that can be induced to differentiate had a high receptor RLM, whereas lines of myeloid leukemia cells that could not be induced to differentiate had a low receptor RLM. These results suggest that the RLM of Con A receptors is related to the transformation of fibroblasts and the ability of myeloid leukemia cells to undergo differentiation PMID

  18. A novel L-fucose-binding lectin from Fenneropenaeus indicus induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biji; Ghosh, Krishna; Yadav, Nitin; Kanade, Santosh R

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are omnipresent in almost all life forms, being the proteins which specifically bind to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface; they have been explored for their anti-tumour activities. In this study, we purified a fucose specific-lectin (IFL) from Fenneropenaeus indicus haemolymph using fucose-affinity column and characterized for its haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, dependency on cations and cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The lectin showed non-specificity against human erythrocytes. It was a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin which remained stable over wide pH and temperature ranges. The lectin showed effective dose dependent cytotoxicity against different human cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as evidenced by DNA ladder assay and PARP cleavage in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, an increased p21 level corresponding to cyclin D downregulation in response to IFL treatment was observed which might work as probable factors to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. Therefore, we report a novel lectin from the prawn haemolymph with high specificity for L-fucose and antiproliferative towards human cancer cells. However, further establishment of the modus operandi of this lectin is required to enable its biotechnological applications.

  19. An overview of lectins purification strategies.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kelany S; Cunha, Ana I; Nascimento, Kyria S; Cavada, Benildo S; Azevedo, Ana M; Aires-Barros, Maria Raquel

    2012-11-01

    Lectins hold great promise not only as reagents for diagnostics and drug discovery but also as a novel class of biopharmaceutical products. In fact, new research directions in the last years have led to major developments in the uses of plant lectins as therapeutic agents against numerous diseases in an ageing society. It is even expected that lectins may occupy an important place in the biopharmaceutical industry next to monoclonal antibodies. All these new trends are placing a tremendous emphasis on the development of new approaches for faster lectins development, selection, and optimization, including alternatives methods of purification. This article reviews the isolation and purification methods used for lectins purification. Origins and applications of lectins are described, highlighting the special features of this class of proteins, such as the carbohydrated-binding domains and their importance in the development of affinity methodologies to increase and facilitate lectins purification. Published strategies for the purification of lectins from different sources are analyzed in relation to the purification methods used, their sequence, and the number of times they are used in a purification procedure. The purity of lectins is analyzed in relation to the average overall yield and purification factors obtained for each purification scheme for these proteins and the purification steps necessary. New directions are described for improving lectins separation and purification. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Mucin Specific Mycelial Lectin from Aspergillus gorakhpurensis: Application for Mitogenic and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Kaur, Hemant Preet; Singh, Jatinder

    2014-01-01

    Background Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins or glycoproteins that bind reversibly to specific carbohydrates present on the apposing cells, which are responsible for their ability to agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc. Interest in lectins has been intensified due to their carbohydrate specificity as they can be valuable reagents for the investigation of cell surface sugars, purification and characterization of glycoproteins. The present study reports the purification, characterization and evaluation of mitogenic and antimicrobial potential of a mycelial lectin from Aspergillus gorakhpurensis. Methods Affinity chromatography on mucin-sepharose column was carried out for purification of Aspergillus gorakhpurensis lectin. The lectin was characterized for physico-chemical parameters. Mitogenic potential of the lectin was evaluated against splenocytes of Swiss albino mice by MTT assay. Antimicrobial activity of the purified lectin has also been evaluated by disc diffusion assay. Results Single-step affinity purification resulted in 18.6-fold purification of the mycelial lectin. The molecular mass of the lectin was found to be 70 kDa and it was composed of two subunits of 34.8 kDa as determined by gel filtration chromatography, SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. pH optima of the lectin was found to be 6.5–9.5, while optimum temperature for lectin activity was 20–30°C. Lectin was stable within a pH range of 7.0–10.5 and showed fair thermostability. EDTA did not affect lectin activity whereas it was found susceptible to the denaturants tested. MTT assay revealed strong mitogenic potential of A. gorakhpurensis lectin at a concentration upto 150 µg/mL. Antimicrobial activity assay showed its potent antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcous aureus and Escherichia coli and marginal antifungal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion This is the first report on the mitogenic and antimicrobial potential of

  1. Lectins: a primer for histochemists and cell biologists.

    PubMed

    Manning, Joachim C; Romero, Antonio; Habermann, Felix A; García Caballero, Gabriel; Kaltner, Herbert; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2017-02-01

    An experimental observation on selecting binding partners underlies the introduction of the term 'lectin'. Agglutination of erythrocytes depending on their blood-group status revealed the presence of activities in plant extracts that act in an epitope-specific manner like antibodies. As it turned out, their binding partners on the cell surface are carbohydrates of glycoconjugates. By definition, lectins are glycan-specific (mono- or oligosaccharides presented by glycoconjugates or polysaccharides) receptors, distinguished from antibodies, from enzymes using carbohydrates as substrates and from transporters of free saccharides. They are ubiquitous in Nature and structurally widely diversified. More than a dozen types of folding pattern have evolved for proteins that bind glycans. Used as tool, this capacity facilitates versatile mapping of glycan presence so that plant/fungal and also animal/human lectins have found a broad spectrum of biomedical applications. The functional pairing with physiological counterreceptors is involved in a wide range of cellular activities from cell adhesion, glycoconjugate trafficking to growth regulation and lets lectins act as sensors/effectors in host defense.

  2. Lectin staining patterns in human gastric mucosae with and without exposure to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Junior, Mario R.; Cavalcanti, Carmelita L.B.; Pontes-Filho, Nicodemos T.; Carvalho Jr, Luiz B.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate qualitative changes in the glycoconjugate expression in human gastric tissue of positive and negative patients for Helicobacter pylori, through lectins: Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) and Concanavalin A (Con A). The lectins recognized differently the glycoconjugates in the superficial mucous layer at the gastric tissues. The results suggest a significant change in the carbohydrate moieties present on the surface of the gastric cells during infection. PMID:24031208

  3. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), as well as the Gal beta 1-3GalNAc-specific lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Agaricus bisporus (ABA) inhibited killing of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 by sialidase-treated PMNs. These five lectins detected a 130-kDa surface-labeled glycoprotein on nitrocellulose transfers of PMN extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This glycoprotein was revealed only after treatment of the transfers with sialidase, a condition analogous to the sialidase dependence of the lectin-mediated biological responses of the PMNs to the actinomyces. The mannose-reactive lectin concanavalin A did not inhibit killing of the actinomyces and failed to detect the 130-kDa glycoprotein but did block PMN-dependent killing of Escherichia coli B, a bacterium that possesses mannose-sensitive fimbriae. Therefore, the PMN glycoprotein receptor for A. naeslundii is clearly distinct from those recognized by E. coli. Two major putative glycolipid receptors were also identified by actinomyces and RCAI overlays on sialidase-treated thin-layer chromatograms of PMN gangliosides. Thus, both a 130-kDa glycoprotein and certain gangliosides are implicated in the attachment of the actinomyces to PMNs. PMID:7790078

  4. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  5. Lectin Binding to the Root and Root Hair Tips of the Tropical Legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, R. W.; Rolfe, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Ten fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins were tested on the roots of the tropical legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb. Four of these (concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Ricinis communis agglutinin I [RCA-I], wheat germ agglutinin) were found to bind to the exterior of root cap cells, the root cap slime, and the channels between epidermal cells in the root elongation zone. One of these lectins, RCA-I, bound to the root hair tips in the mature and emerging hair zones and also to sites at which root hairs were only just emerging. There was no RCA-I binding to immature trichoblasts. Preincubation of these lectins with their hapten sugars eliminated all types of root cell binding. By using a microinoculation technique, preincubation of the root surface with RCA-I lectin was found to inhibit infection and nodulation by Rhizobium spp. Preincubation of the root surface with the RCA-I hapten β-d-galactose or a mixture of RCA-I lectin and its hapten failed to inhibit nodulation. Application of RCA-I lectin to the root surface caused no apparent detrimental effects to the root hair cells and did not prevent the growth of root hairs. The lectin did not prevent Rhizobium sp. motility or viability even after 24 h of incubation. It was concluded that the RCA-I lectin-specific sugar β-d-galactose may be involved in the recognition or early infection stages, or both, in the Rhizobium sp. infection of M. atropurpureum. Images PMID:16346989

  6. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  7. SUEL-related lectins, a lectin family widely distributed throughout organisms.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Glycan-binding proteins are categorized into two groups, lectins and sulfated glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins. SUEL-related lectins are members of a superfamily of proteins containing a carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), which is structurally similar to sea urchin egg lectin (SUEL). Here I review the structure and function of this family of proteins.

  8. Influence of Lectins on Constricting Ring Formation by Arthrobotrys dactyloides.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L; Walter, D E

    1991-04-01

    Incubation of Arthrobotrys dactyloides conidia in the presence of Radopholus citrophilus in lectin solutions with their corresponding sugars did not alter the stimulation of trap formation in solutions containing lectins alone. The lack of inhibition of lectin-stimulated trap formation by sugars or by lectin denaturation and the lack of lectin specificity indicate that the carbohydrate-binding regions of the particular lectins studied are not the stimulatory moieties of these macromolecules.

  9. Fungal lectins: structure, function and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Varrot, Annabelle; Basheer, Soorej M; Imberty, Anne

    2013-10-01

    Lectins are a widespread class of proteins implicated in many essential cellular and molecular recognition processes. They recognize carbohydrates in a non-catalytic, specific and reversible manner. Fungi, which include mushrooms, microfungi and yeasts, have attracted wide interest in recent years. They are indeed a promising source for novel lectins with unique specificity and potential for biomedical and biotechnological applications. Information on fungal lectins, particularly structural insight, is scarce compared to that on their plant and animal counterparts. This review therefore focuses on the structure, function, and exploitable properties of fungal lectins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Perspectives in glycomics and lectin engineering.

    PubMed

    Tkac, Jan; Bertok, Tomas; Nahalka, Jozef; Gemeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This chapter would like to provide a short survey of the most promising concepts applied recently in analysis of glycoproteins based on lectins. The first part describes the most exciting analytical approaches used in the field of glycoprofiling based on integration of nanoparticles, nanowires, nanotubes, or nanochannels or using novel transducing platforms allowing to detect very low levels of glycoproteins in a label-free mode of operation. The second part describes application of recombinant lectins containing several tags applied for oriented and ordered immobilization of lectins. Besides already established concepts of glycoprofiling several novel aspects, which we think will be taken into account for future, more robust glycan analysis, are described including modified lectins, peptide lectin aptamers, and DNA aptamers with lectin-like specificity introduced by modified nucleotides. The last part of the chapter describes a novel concept of a glycocodon, which can lead to a better understanding of glycan-lectin interaction and for design of novel lectins with unknown specificities and/or better affinities toward glycan target or for rational design of peptide lectin aptamers or DNA aptamers.

  11. Distribution of cell surface saccharides on pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Maylie-Pfenninger, M; Jamieson, JD

    1979-01-01

    We describe here a simple, general procedure for the purification of a variety of lectins, and for the preparation of lectin-ferritin conjugates of defined molar composition and binding properties to be used as probes for cell surface saccharides. The technique uses a “universal” affinity column for lectins and their conjugates, which consists of hog sulfated gastric mucin glycopeptides covalently coupled to agarose. The procedure involes: (a) purification of lectins by chromatography of aqueous extracts of seeds or other lectin-containing fluids over the affinity column, followed by desorption of the desired lectin with its hapten suge; (b) iodination of the lectin to serve as a marker during subsequent steps; (c) conjugation of lectin to ferritin with glutaraldehyde; (d) collection of active lectin-ferritin conjugates by affinity chromatography; and (e) separation of monomeric lectin-ferritin conjugates from larger aggregates and unconjugated lectin by gel chromatography. Based on radioactivity and absorbancy at 310 nm for lectin and ferritin, respectively, the conjugates consist of one to two molecules of lectin per ferrritin molecule. Binding studies of native lectins and their ferritin conjugates to dispersed pancreatic acinar cells showed that the conjugation procedure does not significantly alter either the affinity constant of the lectin for its receptor on the cell surface or the number of sites detected. PMID:422653

  12. A Lectin-Based Glycomic Approach to Identify Characteristic Features of Xenopus Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Yasuko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Shingo; Hirabayashi, Jun; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface glycans show dynamic changes during cell differentiation. Several glycans are useful biomarkers of tumors, stem cells, and embryogenesis. Glycomic studies have been performed using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, which are powerful tools for glycan structural analysis but are difficult to use for small sample sizes. Recently, a lectin microarray system was developed for profiling cell surface glycome changes to terminal carbohydrate chains and branch types, using sample sizes of a few micrograms. In this study, we used the lectin microarray system for the first time to investigate stage-specific glycomes in Xenopus laevis embryos. Unsupervised cluster analysis of lectin microarray data indicated that glycan profiles changed sequentially during development. Nine lectin probes showed significantly different signals between early and the late-stage embryos: 4 showed higher signals in the early stages, and 5 exhibited higher signals in the late stages. The gene expression profiles of relevant glycosyltransferase genes support the lectin microarray data. Therefore, we have shown that lectin microarray is an effective tool for high-throughput glycan analysis in Xenopus embryogenesis, allowing glycan profiling of early embryos and small biopsy specimens. PMID:23457585

  13. Multivalent interaction of cyclodextrin vesicles, carbohydrate guests, and lectins: a kinetic investigation.

    PubMed

    Vico, Raquel V; Voskuhl, Jens; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2011-02-15

    An artificial glycocalix self-assembles when unilamellar bilayer vesicles of amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins are decorated with maltose- and lactose-adamantane conjugates by host-guest interactions. The maltose-decorated vesicles aggregate in the presence of lectin concanavalin A whereas the lactose-decorated vesicles aggregate in the presence of lectin peanut agglutinin. The kinetics of the orthogonal multivalent interfacial interactions present in this ternary system of vesicles, carbohydrates, and lectins were studied by time-dependent measurements of the optical density at 400 nm. The average vesicle and vesicle aggregate sizes were monitored by dynamic light scattering. The aggregation process was evaluated as a function of lectin concentration, vesicle concentration, and surface coverage of the vesicles by the carbohydrate-adamantane conjugates. The initial rate of vesicle aggregation scales linearly with the lectin as well as the cyclodextrin vesicle concentration. Furthermore, each lectin requires a characteristic critical density of carbohydrates at the vesicle surface. These observations allow a prediction of the response of the ternary supramolecular system at different concentrations of its components. Also, the effective binding site separation in a multivalent receptor such as a multiple binding site protein can be accurately determined. This methodology can be extended to multivalent noncovalent interactions in other ligand-receptor systems at interfaces.

  14. Disruption of the C. elegans Intestinal Brush Border by the Fungal Lectin CCL2 Phenocopies Dietary Lectin Toxicity in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Stutz, Katrin; Kaech, Andres; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin carbohydrate-binding proteins without enzymatic activity towards the bound carbohydrates. Many lectins of e.g. plants or fungi have been suggested to act as toxins to defend the host against predators and parasites. We have previously shown that the Coprinopsis cinerea lectin 2 (CCL2), which binds to α1,3-fucosylated N-glycan cores, is toxic to Caenorhabditis elegans and results in developmental delay and premature death. In this study, we investigated the underlying toxicity phenotype at the cellular level by electron and confocal microscopy. We found that CCL2 directly binds to the intestinal apical surface and leads to a highly damaged brush border with loss of microvilli, actin filament depolymerization, and invaginations of the intestinal apical plasma membrane through gaps in the terminal web. We excluded several possible toxicity mechanisms such as internalization and pore-formation, suggesting that CCL2 acts directly on intestinal apical plasma membrane or glycocalyx proteins. A genetic screen for C. elegans mutants resistant to CCL2 generated over a dozen new alleles in bre 1, ger 1, and fut 1, three genes required for the synthesis of the sugar moiety recognized by CCL2. CCL2-induced intestinal brush border defects in C. elegans are similar to the damage observed previously in rats after feeding the dietary lectins wheat germ agglutinin or concanavalin A. The evolutionary conserved reaction of the brush border between mammals and nematodes might allow C. elegans to be exploited as model organism for the study of dietary lectin-induced intestinal pathology in mammals. PMID:26057124

  15. Expression of LSLCL, a new C-type lectin, is closely restricted, in bone marrow, to immature neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Bayle, J; Bannwarth, S; Michiels, J F; Heudier, P; Lefebvre, J C; Giordanengo, V

    2001-12-01

    In vitro, LSLCL is expressed by numerous myeloid, promyelocytic, and T or B lymphoblastoid cell lines. In vivo, LSLCL is strongly expressed in bone marrow and only faintly in lymphoid organs. We show here that, in bone marrow, LSLCL is detected: (i) concentrated in the cytoplasm of immature neutrophils but not in myeloblasts nor in mature neutrophils, (ii) in extracellular bone marrow fluid. Besides, numerous cDNAs, similar to LSLCL (identity of 93-99%), are found in 'expressed sequence tags' databases from various origins, mostly fetal and undifferentiated tumour tissues. Since LSLCL and various closely related cDNAs are expressed at definite stages of cellular maturation processes, we hypothesize that this class of proteins could play an important role in the control of cellular differentiation.

  16. The role of Toll-like receptors and C-type lectins for vaccination against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ferwerda, Gerben; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A; van der Meer, Jos W M; Romani, Luigina; Kullberg, Bart Jan

    2010-01-08

    Recent progress has provided important novel insights in the processes driving the adaptive immune responses. Central to these developments is the discovery of pattern recognition receptors like TLRs and CLRs that not only induce innate immune responses, but also modulate cellular and humoral adaptive immunity. As vaccination is one of the great achievements in medicine and probably the most powerful tool to protect human and animals against infectious disease, further vaccine development and optimization of current strategies can improve health status of large groups of people. Development of a vaccine against Candida spp. should induce both cellular and humoral immune responses. While the TLRs are strong inducers of inflammatory responses, it seems that the CLRs have the potential to modulate these responses by enhancement or inhibition of cytokine production. Understanding the natural host defense mechanisms against pathogens like C. albicans therefore helps to identify the proper targets for inducing a strong adjuvant effect, in order to stimulate an effective adaptive immune response and protection.

  17. Fluorescence Lectin Bar-Coding of Glycoconjugates in the Extracellular Matrix of Biofilm and Bioaggregate Forming Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Thomas R.; Kuhlicke, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Microbial biofilm systems are defined as interface-associated microorganisms embedded into a self-produced matrix. The extracellular matrix represents a continuous challenge in terms of characterization and analysis. The tools applied in more detailed studies comprise extraction/chemical analysis, molecular characterization, and visualisation using various techniques. Imaging by laser microscopy became a standard tool for biofilm analysis, and, in combination with fluorescently labelled lectins, the glycoconjugates of the matrix can be assessed. By employing this approach a wide range of pure culture biofilms from different habitats were examined using the commercially available lectins. From the results, a binary barcode pattern of lectin binding can be generated. Furthermore, the results can be fine-tuned and transferred into a heat map according to signal intensity. The lectin barcode approach is suggested as a useful tool for investigating the biofilm matrix characteristics and dynamics at various levels, e.g. bacterial cell surfaces, adhesive footprints, individual microcolonies, and the gross biofilm or bio-aggregate. Hence fluorescence lectin bar-coding (FLBC) serves as a basis for a subsequent tailor-made fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) of a particular biofilm. So far, the lectin approach represents the only tool for in situ characterization of the glycoconjugate makeup in biofilm systems.  Furthermore, lectin staining lends itself to other fluorescence techniques in order to correlate it with cellular biofilm constituents in general and glycoconjugate producers in particular. PMID:28208623

  18. Fluorescence Lectin Bar-Coding of Glycoconjugates in the Extracellular Matrix of Biofilm and Bioaggregate Forming Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Neu, Thomas R; Kuhlicke, Ute

    2017-02-10

    Microbial biofilm systems are defined as interface-associated microorganisms embedded into a self-produced matrix. The extracellular matrix represents a continuous challenge in terms of characterization and analysis. The tools applied in more detailed studies comprise extraction/chemical analysis, molecular characterization, and visualisation using various techniques. Imaging by laser microscopy became a standard tool for biofilm analysis, and, in combination with fluorescently labelled lectins, the glycoconjugates of the matrix can be assessed. By employing this approach a wide range of pure culture biofilms from different habitats were examined using the commercially available lectins. From the results, a binary barcode pattern of lectin binding can be generated. Furthermore, the results can be fine-tuned and transferred into a heat map according to signal intensity. The lectin barcode approach is suggested as a useful tool for investigating the biofilm matrix characteristics and dynamics at various levels, e.g. bacterial cell surfaces, adhesive footprints, individual microcolonies, and the gross biofilm or bio-aggregate. Hence fluorescence lectin bar-coding (FLBC) serves as a basis for a subsequent tailor-made fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) of a particular biofilm. So far, the lectin approach represents the only tool for in situ characterization of the glycoconjugate makeup in biofilm systems.  Furthermore, lectin staining lends itself to other fluorescence techniques in order to correlate it with cellular biofilm constituents in general and glycoconjugate producers in particular.

  19. Lectin binding patterns and carbohydrate mediation of sperm binding to llama oviductal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Apichela, Silvana A; Valz-Gianinet, Jorge N; Schuster, Stefanie; Jiménez-Díaz, María A; Roldán-Olarte, Eugenia M; Miceli, Dora C

    2010-04-01

    Sperm binding to oviductal epithelium would be involved in sperm reservoir formation in the utero tubal junction (UTJ). Although in other mammals sperm-oviduct interaction has been proved to be mediated by carbohydrate-recognition mechanisms, the factors implicated in the sperm adhesion to oviductal epithelium of llama are still unknown. In order to assess the role of carbohydrates present in the mucosa surface, we examined the distribution of glycoconjugates in the llama oviduct by confocal lectin-histochemistry. Mannosyl, glucosyl, N-acetylglucosaminyl, galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosaminyl and sialic acid residues were detected in the oviductal mucose glycocalyx. By incubation of UTJ oviductal explants with LCA, DBA, UEA-1 or PNA lectin previous to co-culture with sperm, we observed a significant decrease in sperm binding only with LCA lectin. In the mucosa surface there were numerous d-glucosyl and D-manosyl residues, which were spotted by this lectin. Probably, this fact promotes the whole covering of the oviduct luminal surface by the sugar-lectin complex, preventing sperm access and adhesion of further residues. However, sperm incubation with mannose or glucose does not significantly prevent binding, which means that glucose and mannose would not be involved in a specific sperm-oviduct interaction. On the other hand, we observed a high reduction in sperm binding to UTJ explants with N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose (p<0.001). Coincidentally, binding sites for N-acetylgalactosamine-PAA-FITC conjugate were observed on the whole surface of the sperm, supporting the concept that llama sperm have lectin-like molecules in their surface, as is the case in other mammals. Probably, these lectin-like molecules, by means of N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose recognition, could link the sperm to the oviductal mucosa with the purpose of forming storing sites in the UTJ. Our results support the idea that more than one carbohydrate could participate in sperm reservoir

  20. C-type starches and their derivatives: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zebin; Jia, Xiangze; Zhao, Beibei; Zeng, Shaoxiao; Xiao, Jianbo; Zheng, Baodong

    2017-06-01

    The C-type starches are widely distributed in seeds or rhizomes of various legumes, medicinal plants, and crops. These carbohydrate polymers directly affect the application of starchy plant resources. The structural and crystal properties of starches are crucial parameters of starch granules, which significantly influence their physicochemical and mechanical properties. The unique crystal structure consisting of both A- and B-type polymorphs endows C-type starches with specific crystal adjustability. Furthermore, large proportions of resistant starches and slowly digestible starches are C-type starches, which contribute to benign glycemic response and proliferation of gut microflora. Here, we review the distribution of C-type starches in various plant sources, the structural models and crystal properties of C-type starches, and the behavior and functionality relevant to modified C-type starches. We outline recent advances, potential applications, and limitations of C-type starches in industry, aiming to provide a theoretical basis for further research and to broaden the prospects of its applications. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  2. Mouse macrophage galactose-type lectin (mMGL) is critical for host resistance against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Alicia; Ruiz-Rosado, Juan de Dios; Terrazas, Luis I; Juárez, Imelda; Gomez-Garcia, Lorena; Calleja, Elsa; Camacho, Griselda; Chávez, Ana; Romero, Miriam; Rodriguez, Tonathiu; Espinoza, Bertha; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptor mMGL is expressed exclusively by myeloid antigen presenting cells (APC) such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (Mφ), and it mediates binding to glycoproteins carrying terminal galactose and α- or β-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) residues. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) expresses large amounts of mucin (TcMUC)-like glycoproteins. Here, we show by lectin-blot that galactose moieties are also expressed on the surface of T. cruzi. Male mMGL knockout (-/-) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were infected intraperitoneally with 10(4) T. cruzi trypomastigotes (Queretaro strain). Following T. cruzi infection, mMGL-/- mice developed higher parasitemia and higher mortality rates compared with WT mice. Although hearts from T. cruzi-infected WT mice presented few amastigote nests, mMGL-/- mice displayed higher numbers of amastigote nests. Compared with WT, Mφ from mMGL-/- mice had low production of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in response to soluble T. cruzi antigens (TcAg). Interestingly, upon in vitro T. cruzi infection, mMGL-/- Mφ expressed lower levels of MHC-II and TLR-4 and harbored higher numbers of parasites, even when mMGL-/- Mφ were previously primed with IFN-γ or LPS/IFN-γ. These data suggest that mMGL plays an important role during T. cruzi infection, is required for optimal Mφ activation, and may synergize with TLR-4-induced pathways to produce TNF-α, IL-1β and NO during the early phase of infection.

  3. Is mannan-binding lectin (MBL) detectable on monocytes and monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells?

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Shirley L; Downing, Ian; Turner, Marc; Kilpatrick, David C

    2008-12-01

    MBL (mannan-binding lectin; also called mannose-binding lectin) is a circulating C-type lectin with a collagen-like region synthesized mainly by the liver. MBL may influence susceptibility to infection in recipients of stem cell transplants, and it has even been suggested that the MBL status of a donor can influence the recipient's susceptibility to post-transplant infections. We have previously reported that MBL can be detected on human monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells, based on detection using biotinylated anti-MBL, suggesting that those cells could synthesize MBL. If true, permanent MBL replacement therapy could be achieved by stem cell infusions. However, two other groups independently failed to find mbl-2-derived mRNA in monocytes. Therefore, to confirm or refute our previous observations, we used an alternative experimental strategy. Instead of using biotinylated antibody and labelled streptavidin, detection of surface MBL was attempted using MBL-specific primary antibodies (131-1, 131-10 and 131-11) followed by fluorescein-labelled anti-IgG, and controlled by the use of non-specific IgG as primary antibody. Monocytes were counterstained with anti-CD14-PE before FACS analysis. Adherent monocytes were also cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium or converted into immature dendritic cells by culture with IL-4 (interleukin-4) and GM-CSF (granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor). During FACS analysis, the dendritic cells were gated after counter-staining with anti-CD1a-PE. MBL was readily detected on the surface of fresh monocytes using all three specific anti-MBL monoclonal antibodies, but specific anti-MBL binding was greatly diminished after monocytes had been cultured for 2 days in serum-free medium. Moreover, we could not detect any MBL present on the surface of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. We therefore conclude that MBL is indeed present on the surface of fresh human monocytes. However, in view of the mRNA findings of others and our

  4. Marine lectins and their medicinal applications.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Pan, Wenliang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-05-01

    Marine organisms have been extensively explored for the last several decades as potential sources of novel biologically active compounds, and extensive research has been conducted on lectins. Lectins derived from marine organisms are structurally diverse and also differ from those identified from terrestrial organisms. Marine lectins appear to be particularly useful in some biological applications. They seem to induce negligible immunogenicity because they have a relatively small size, are more stable due to extensive disulfide bridge formation, and have high specificity for complex glyco-conjugates and carbohydrates instead of simple sugars. It is clear that many of them have not yet been extensively studied when compared with their terrestrial counterparts. Marine lectins can be used to design and develop new potentially useful therapeutic agents. This review encompasses recent research on the isolation and identification of marine lectins with potential value in medicinal applications.

  5. Potential use of the Macrobrachium rosenbergii lectin for diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Campos-Mayoral, Laura; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; Pérez-Romano, Beatriz; Zenteno, Edgar; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Martínez-Cruz, Ruth; Martínez-Cruz, Margarito; Pina-Canseco, Socorro; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children. Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins from plants or animals that recognize oligossacharides on the cell surface and have been used to characterize the structural changes of oligosaccharides in leukemias. In this study, we used the lectin from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium (M. rosenbergii), specific for acetyl groups in sialylated glycans, because increased sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids has been identified in lymphoblastic leukemias. We compared the specificity of the M. rosenbergii lectin for lymphoblastic leukemias with the specificities of the lectins from Triticum vulgaris, Solanum tuberosum, Arachis hipogaea, and Phytolacca americana. By morphologic and phenotype characterization with a panel of monoclonal antibodies, we identified four types of leukemias from 106 leukemia patients: 11 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 61 cases of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 24 cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia, and 10 cases of acute biphenotypic leukemia. As determined by cytofluorometric assays, nine of the eleven cases with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (8 +/- 3 years old) were specifically identified with the lectin from M. rosenbergii. In contrast, only six cases of B-cell leukemia, one case of myeloblastic leukemia, and 2 cases of biphenotypic leukemia were identified with this M. rosenbergii lectin. The other lectins tested showed no capacity to differentiate, in a significant manner, any of the four types of leukemias tested. Thus, the lectin from M. rosenbergii could be considered a useful tool for the diagnosis and study of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Legume lectins inhibit human parainfluenza virus type 2 infection by interfering with the entry.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Jun; Koyama, Aoi; Takano, Sayaka; Ura, Yukari; Tanemura, Miho; Kihira, Sahoko; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Kawano, Mitsuo; Tsurudome, Masato; O'Brien, Myles; Komada, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    Three lectins with different sugar binding specificities were investigated for anti-viral activity against human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV-2). The lectins, concanavalin A (Con A), lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), inhibited cell fusion and hemadsorption induced by hPIV-2. Virus nucleoprotein (NP) gene synthesis was largely inhibited, but fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene syntheses were not. An indirect immunofluorescence study showed that Con A inhibited virus NP, F and HN protein syntheses, but LCA did not completely inhibit them, and that PNA inhibited only NP protein synthesis. Using a recombinant green fluorescence protein-expressing hPIV-2, without matrix protein (rghPIV-2ΔM), it was found that virus entry into the cells was not completely prevented. The lectins considerably reduced the number of viruses released compared with that of virus infected cells. The lectins bound to cell surface within 10 min, and many aggregates were observed at 30 min. Con A and LCA slightly disrupted actin microfilaments and microtubules, but PNA had almost no effect on them. These results indicated that the inhibitory effects of the lectins were caused mainly by the considerable prevention of virus adsorption to the cells by the lectin binding to their receptors.

  7. Legume Lectins Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 2 Infection by Interfering with the Entr

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Jun; Koyama, Aoi; Takano, Sayaka; Ura, Yukari; Tanemura, Miho; Kihira, Sahoko; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Kawano, Mitsuo; Tsurudome, Masato; O’Brien, Myles; Komada, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Three lectins with different sugar binding specificities were investigated for anti-viral activity against human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV-2). The lectins, concanavalin A (Con A), lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), inhibited cell fusion and hemadsorption induced by hPIV-2. Virus nucleoprotein (NP) gene synthesis was largely inhibited, but fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene syntheses were not. An indirect immunofluorescence study showed that Con A inhibited virus NP, F and HN protein syntheses, but LCA did not completely inhibit them, and that PNA inhibited only NP protein synthesis. Using a recombinant green fluorescence protein-expressing hPIV-2, without matrix protein (rghPIV-2ΔM), it was found that virus entry into the cells was not completely prevented. The lectins considerably reduced the number of viruses released compared with that of virus infected cells. The lectins bound to cell surface within 10 min, and many aggregates were observed at 30 min. Con A and LCA slightly disrupted actin microfilaments and microtubules, but PNA had almost no effect on them. These results indicated that the inhibitory effects of the lectins were caused mainly by the considerable prevention of virus adsorption to the cells by the lectin binding to their receptors. PMID:22852043

  8. Density Variant Glycan Microarray for Evaluating Cross-Linking of Mucin-like Glycoconjugates by Lectins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Interactions of mucin glycoproteins with cognate receptors are dictated by the structures and spatial organization of glycans that decorate the mucin polypeptide backbone. The glycan-binding proteins, or lectins, that interact with mucins are often oligomeric receptors with multiple ligand binding domains. In this work, we employed a microarray platform comprising synthetic glycopolymers that emulate natural mucins arrayed at different surface densities to evaluate how glycan valency and spatial separation affect the preferential binding mode of a particular lectin. We evaluated a panel of four lectins (Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Wisteria floribunda lectin (WFL), Vicia villosa-B-4 agglutinin (VVA), and Helix pomatia agglutin (HPA)) with specificity for α-N-acetylgalactosamine (α-GalNAc), an epitope displayed on mucins overexpressed in many adenocarcinomas. While these lectins possess the ability to agglutinate A1-blood cells carrying the α-GalNAc epitope and cross-link low valency glycoconjugates, only SBA showed a tendency to form intermolecular cross-links among the arrayed polyvalent mucin mimetics. These results suggest that glycopolymer microarrays can reveal discrete higher-order binding preferences beyond the recognition of individual glycan epitopes. Our findings indicate that glycan valency can set thresholds for cross-linking by lectins. More broadly, well-defined synthetic glycopolymers enable the integration of glycoconjugate structural and spatial diversity in a single microarray screening platform. PMID:22967056

  9. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  10. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  11. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  12. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  13. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide.

  14. FEATURE C, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, WEST SIDE, FEATURE D IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE C, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, WEST SIDE, FEATURE D IN BACKGROUND, VIEW FACING EAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Shore Pillbox Complex-Type 1 Pillbox, Along shoreline, seaward of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  15. FEATURE C, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, EAST SIDE, VIEW FACING WESTNORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE C, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, EAST SIDE, VIEW FACING WEST-NORTHWEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Shore Pillbox Complex-Type 1 Pillbox, Along shoreline, seaward of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Lectin microarray technology identifies specific lectins related to lymph node metastasis of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Keishi; Kuno, Atsushi; Matsuda, Atsushi; Ikehata, Yuzuru; Katada, Natsuya; Hirabayashi, Jun; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Although various molecular profiling technologies have the potential to predict specific tumor phenotypes, the comprehensive profiling of lectin-bound glycans in human cancer tissues has not yet been achieved. We examined 242 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients without or with lymph node metastasis-N0 (n = 62) or N+ (n = 180)-by lectin microarray, and identified the specific lectins highly associated with AGC phenotypes. In seven gastric cancer cell lines, in contrast to expressed-in-cancer lectins, not-expressed-in-cancer (NEC) lectins were tentatively designated by lectin microarray. Binding signals of the specific lectins were robustly reduced in AGC patients with N+ status as compared with those with N0 status. The receiver operating characteristic curve determined the optimal cutoff value to differentiate N0 status from N+ status, and subsequent profiling of NEC lectins identified Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) association with the significant other lectins involved in lymph node metastasis. VVA reaction was clearly found on cancer cells, suggesting that it may result from carcinoma-stroma interaction in primary AGC, because VVA is an NEC lectin. Most intriguingly, VVA reaction was remarkably attenuated in the tumor cells of the metastatic lymph nodes, even if it was recognized in primary AGC. In AGC, histological type was strongly associated with soybean agglutinin and Bauhinia purpurea lectin, whereas p53 mutation was the best correlated with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II. Lectin microarrays can be used to very accurately quantify the reaction of glycans with tumor tissues, and such profiles may represent the specific phenotypes, including N+ status, histological type, or p53 mutation of AGC.

  17. Near-planar Solution Structures of Mannose-binding Lectin Oligomers Provide Insight on Activation of Lectin Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ami; Phillips, Anna; Gor, Jayesh; Wallis, Russell; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is a fundamental component of innate immunity that orchestrates complex immunological and inflammatory processes. Complement comprises over 30 proteins that eliminate invading microorganisms while maintaining host cell integrity. Protein-carbohydrate interactions play critical roles in both the activation and regulation of complement. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) activates the lectin pathway of complement via the recognition of sugar arrays on pathogenic surfaces. To determine the solution structure of MBL, synchrotron x-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the MBL dimer, trimer, and tetramer are positioned close to each other in near-planar fan-like structures. These data were subjected to constrained modeling fits. A bent structure for the MBL monomer was identified starting from two crystal structures for its carbohydrate-recognition domain and its triple helical region. The MBL monomer structure was used to identify 10–12 near-planar solution structures for each of the MBL dimers, trimers, and tetramers starting from 900 to 6,859 randomized structures for each. These near-planar fan-like solution structures joined at an N-terminal hub clarified how the carbohydrate-recognition domain of MBL binds to pathogenic surfaces. They also provided insight on how MBL presents a structural template for the binding and auto-activation of the MBL-associated serine proteases to initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. PMID:22167201

  18. Overall strategy for functional analysis of animal lectins.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Norihito

    2014-01-01

    Animal lectins elicit biological functions through the interaction with glycan ligands. To clarify the functions of the lectins, both identification of their glycan ligand structure and assessment of impact of lectin-glycan interaction on the biological event are essential strategies. This chapter focuses on two of key useful methodologies for planning experiments based on the strategies. One is the detection of lectin-glycan interaction by the multivalent display of lectins and glycans. This methodology is a powerful means for identification of the glycan ligand structure and proteins and/or lipids carrying the glycan ligands for lectins. The other is the intervention of lectin-glycan interaction to assess the biological roles of lectins. Bioinformatics especially useful for animal lectins will be also described in this chapter. The concepts described in this chapter are versatile and applicable to a wide range of animal lectin research.

  19. Lectins in human cancer: both a devil and an angel?

    PubMed

    Dan, Xiu Li; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-09-01

    Lectins are a group of proteins which could recognize different sugar structures and specifically initiate reversible binding with them. Lectins are universally expressed in different organisms and undertake important biological roles. Understanding of their inherent roles and mechanisms that they employ has inspired researches with new ideas and applications. For example, along with the revelation of their anti-insect function, plant lectins exhibit great potential in agriculture. In human beings, lectins shoulder great missions in cell communication, differentiation and vesicle trafficking etc., aberrant expression of lectins is always associated with diseases. Mannan-binding lectin deficiency leads to immune disorder and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell lectin is involved in colorectal carcinoma liver metastasis. In this review, we present two contradictory roles of lectins in human cancer: the promotive roles of homologous lectins and suppressive roles of heterologous lectins in cancer development. Hopefully, this review will facilitate a better understanding of tumorigenesis and provide references for cancer treatment.

  20. Mushroom Lectins as Promising Anticancer Substances.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Kaur, Hemant Preet; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins of non-immune origin, which are widely distributed in nature. They have at least one non-catalytic domain, which binds reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. Lectins recognizing sugar moieties in cell walls or cell membranes alter the membrane physiology and trigger biochemical changes in the cell. Thus, various applications of lectins have been described, for example as tools to identify aberrant glycans expressed by neoplastic cells and as antitumor agents by inducing apoptosis by various mechanisms. In order to widen applications of anti-tumor lectins, a detailed investigation of their action mechanism is required. Mushrooms are a valuable source of novel lectins with unique specificities and potentials for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This article reviews information on anti-proliferative activity of mushroom lectins obtained in-vitro and in-vivo. The possible role of lectins as cancer therapeutics is discussed together with the mechanisms underlying the anti-proliferative activity, which may help to exploit these biomolecules as potential novel antitumor drugs in near future.

  1. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  2. Lectins influence chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in limb bud mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Monsefi, Malihezaman; Ghasemi, Mansoureh

    2011-02-01

    The role of cell surface glycoproteins in cell behavior can be characterized by their interactions with plant lectins. This study was designed to identify the effects of lectins on chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in limb bud mesenchymal cells in vitro. Limb bud mesenchymal cells from mouse embryos were cultured in high-density micromass culture. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), concanavalin A (ConA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA) were added separately to the culture media. Cells were cultured for 5 or 9 days, and cell viability was assayed by neutral red on day 5. The micromasses were stained with alcian blue, alizarin red S and Von Kossa stains, and alkaline phosphatase assays were also done. Dolichos biflorus agglutinin induced an increase in chondrogenesis, calcium precipitation and proteoglycan production. ConA and PNA did not affect chondrocyte differentiation but induced chondrocytes to produce more proteoglycan. Wheat germ agglutinin reduced chondrification and ossification but induced mesenchymal cells to store lipid droplets. Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 was toxic and significantly reduced cell survival. In conclusion, DBA was the most effective inducer of ossification and chondrification. Wheat germ agglutinin induced adipogenesis instead. These assays showed that lectins play important roles in limb bud development.

  3. Antiviral lectins as potential HIV microbicides.

    PubMed

    Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2014-08-01

    A growing class of potential antivirals encompasses carbohydrate-binding proteins, such as antibodies and lectins. They block virus entry into host target cells and halt virus transmission from virus-infected cells to non-infected cells, thereby preventing infection. Here, we review the structural basis for the anti-HIV activity of various lectins, describing their structures and determinants of high-affinity oligosaccharide binding. The mechanism of glycan recognition on the gp120 envelope protein by these antiviral lectins may therefore be exploited for developing agents and alternative strategies to prevent HIV transmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  5. Fucosylation is associated with the malignant transformation of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms: a lectin microarray-based study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kiminori; Ohta, Masayuki; Yada, Kazuhiro; Komori, Yoko; Iwashita, Yukio; Kashima, Kenji; Inomata, Masafumi

    2016-10-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is an intraductal mucin-producing pancreatic neoplasm with the potential for malignant transformation. Changes in glycans expressed on the cell surface and glycotransferases play important roles in malignant transformation. We conducted this study to analyze glycan alterations in IPMNs by using a lectin microarray and to identify the factors associated with altered glycans and their relationships with malignant transformation. Using a lectin microarray, we evaluated glycan expression in 22 samples of IPMN with carcinoma, obtained from curative resections performed in our department. We also used immunohistochemistry to investigate fucosyltransferase 8 (Fut 8) protein expression, which is associated with glycan alterations in IPMNs. The lectin microarray demonstrated that only two lectins, Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) and Aspergillus oryzae L-fucose-specific lectin (AOL), which bind to fucose, exhibited significant sequential increases from normal pancreatic duct to adenoma and carcinoma. Similarly, Fut 8 protein expression, which is associated with AAL and AOL, sequentially and significantly increased from the normal pancreatic duct to adenoma and carcinoma. Lectin microarray analysis suggested that fucosylation is associated with the malignant transformation of IPMNs.

  6. Hemagglutinating activity and conformation of a lactose-binding lectin from mushroom Agrocybe cylindracea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhao, Xi; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Li, Ling-Rui; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhong, Shao-Dong; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2008-03-01

    A lactose-binding lectin (Agrocybe cylindracea Lectin, ACL) purified from fruiting bodies of the mushroom A. cylindracea was investigated to determine the hemagglutinating activity and conformation changes after chemical modification, removal of metal ion and treatment at different temperatures and pH. ACL agglutinated both rabbit and human erythrocytes and its hemagglutinating activity could be inhibited by lactose. This lectin was stable in the pH range of 6-9 and temperature up to 60 degrees C. Fluorescence quenching and modification of tryptophan residues indicated that there were about two tryptophan residues in ACL molecule and one of them might be located on the surface, while the other was buried in the hydrophobic shallow groove near the surface. Chemical modification of serine/threonine and histidine showed that the partial necessity of these residues for the hemagglutinating activity of ACL. However, modifications of arginine, tyrosine and cysteine residues had no effect on its agglutinating activity.

  7. Glycan heterogeneity on gold nanoparticles increases lectin discrimination capacity in label-free multiplexed bioassays†

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Lucienne; Vlachou, Denise; Richards, Sarah-Jane; Gibson, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new analytical tools as point-of-care biosensors is crucial to combat the spread of infectious diseases, especially in the context of drug-resistant organisms, or to detect biological warfare agents. Glycan/lectin interactions drive a wide range of recognition and signal transduction processes within nature and are often the first site of adhesion/recognition during infection making them appealing targets for biosensors. Glycosylated gold nanoparticles have been developed that change colour from red to blue upon interaction with carbohydrate-binding proteins and may find use as biosensors, but are limited by the inherent promiscuity of some of these interactions. Here we mimic the natural heterogeneity of cell-surface glycans by displaying mixed monolayers of glycans on the surface of gold nanoparticles. These are then used in a multiplexed, label-free bioassay to create ‘barcodes’ which describe the lectin based on its binding profile. The increased information content encoded by using complex mixtures of a few sugars, rather than increased numbers of different sugars makes this approach both scalable and accessible. These nanoparticles show increased lectin identification power at a range of lectin concentrations, relative to single-channel sensors. It was also found that some information about the concentration of the lectins can be extracted, all from just a simple colour change, taking this technology closer to being a realistic biosensor. PMID:27181289

  8. Subsets of epidermal Langerhans cells as defined by lectin binding profiles.

    PubMed

    Schuler, G; Romani, N; Linert, J; Shevach, E M; Stingl, G

    1983-11-01

    In this study we characterize the cell surface glycoconjugate moieties of strain 2 guinea pig epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) in single cell suspension by using a battery of 17 fluorescent lectins. All LC displayed binding sites for concanavalin A, succinylated concanavalin A, Lens culinaris agglutinin, Pisum sativum agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin, succinylated wheat germ agglutinin, Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I, Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Phaseolus vulgaris E agglutinin, and Phaseolus vulgaris L agglutinin, but failed to bind Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I). Neuraminidase pretreatment rendered LC reactive for SJA, but not for DBA and UEA I. The binding profiles of certain lectins point to the existence of LC subpopulations in that Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 isolectin, peanut agglutinin (PNA), Helix pomatia agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin bound to only 80% (range 70-90%) of Ia-positive epidermal cells; binding sites for these lectins on primarily unreactive Ia-positive cells were unmasked when epidermal cells were treated with neuraminidase prior to lectin labeling. Ultrastructural PNA labeling studies revealed that the vast majority of Birbeck granule-containing LC displayed PNA binding sites, whereas indeterminate cells were consistently PNA-negative. Identification of carbohydrate configurations expressed on LC surfaces by lectin binding may provide a clue for the elucidation of the mechanisms of established LC functions and possibly the discovery of as yet unknown properties of this cell type.

  9. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  10. Lectin-conjugated Fe2O3@Au core@Shell nanoparticles as dual mode contrast agents for in vivo detection of tumor.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuxia; Liu, Fuyao; Liu, Liang; Duan, Taicheng; Zhang, Huimao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2014-03-03

    Here, we report the covalent conjugation of lectin on Fe2O3@Au core@shell nanoparticle (lectin-Fe2O3@Au NP) for T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) dual-modality imaging. The lectin-Fe2O3@Au NPs are prepared by coupling lectins to the Fe2O3@Au NP surfaces through bifunctional PEG NHS ester disulfide (NHS-PEG-S-S-PEG-NHS) linkers. After the nonspecific adsorption sites on the nanoparticle surface are blocked by thiolated PEG (PEG-SH), the lectin-Fe2O3@Au NPs exhibit excellent stability in biological medium and inappreciable cytotoxicity. A series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were then carried out for evaluating the capabilities of three selected lectin (ConA, RCA and WGA)-Fe2O3@Au NPs. The results revealed that the lectin-Fe2O3@Au NPs had a capacity not only for dual mode MR and CT imaging in vitro but also for MR and CT imaging of colorectal cancer in vivo. The experimental results also suggest that lectin could be used as tumor targeting ligand for synthesizing nanoparticle-based contrast agents.

  11. Lectin-like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor (LOX-1): A Chameleon Receptor for Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Zeya, Bushra; Arjuman, Albina; Chandra, Nimai Chand

    2016-08-16

    LOX-1, one of the main receptors for oxLDL, is found mainly on the surface of endothelial cells. It is a multifacet 52 kDa type II transmembrane protein that structurally belongs to the C-type lectin family. It exists with short intracellular N-terminal and long extracellular C-terminal hydrophilic domains separated by a hydrophobic domain of 26 amino acids. LOX-1 acts like a bifunctional receptor either showing pro-atherogenicity by activating the NFκB-mediated down signaling cascade for gene activation of pro-inflammatory molecules or playing an atheroprotective agent by receptor-mediated uptake of oxLDL in the presence of an anti-inflammatory molecule like IL-10. Mildly, moderately, and highly oxidized LDL show their characteristic features upon LOX-1 activation and its ligand binding indenture. The polymorphic LOX-1 genes are intensively associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial diseases. The splicing variant LOX IN dimerizes with the native form of LOX-1 and protects cells from damage by oxidized LDL. In the developing field of regenerating medicine, LOX-1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus by the cyanobacterial protein Microcystis viridis lectin: mechanistic differences between the high-mannose specific lectins MVL, CV-N, and GNA.

    PubMed

    Kachko, Alla; Loesgen, Sandra; Shahzad-Ul-Hussan, Syed; Tan, Wendy; Zubkova, Iryna; Takeda, Kazuyo; Wells, Frances; Rubin, Steven; Bewley, Carole A; Major, Marian E

    2013-12-02

    Plant or microbial lectins are known to exhibit potent antiviral activities against viruses with glycosylated surface proteins, yet the mechanism(s) by which these carbohydrate-binding proteins exert their antiviral activities is not fully understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to possess glycosylated envelope proteins (gpE1E2) and to be potently inhibited by lectins. Here, we tested in detail the antiviral properties of the newly discovered Microcystis viridis lectin (MVL) along with cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) against cell culture HCV, as well as their binding properties toward viral particles, target cells, and recombinant HCV glycoproteins. Using infectivity assays, CV-N, MVL, and GNA inhibited HCV with IC50 values of 0.6 nM, 30.4 nM, and 11.1 nM, respectively. Biolayer interferometry analysis demonstrated a higher affinity of GNA to immobilized recombinant HCV glycoproteins compared to CV-N and MVL. Complementary studies, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, confocal microscopy, and pre- and post-virus binding assays, showed a complex mechanism of inhibition for CV-N and MVL that includes both viral and cell association, while GNA functions by binding directly to the viral particle. Combinations of GNA with CV-N or MVL in HCV infection studies revealed synergistic inhibitory effects, which can be explained by different glycan recognition profiles of the mainly high-mannoside specific lectins, and supports the hypothesis that these lectins inhibit through different and complex modes of action. Our findings provide important insights into the mechanisms by which lectins inhibit HCV infection. Overall, the data suggest MVL and CV-N have the potential for toxicity due to interactions with cellular proteins while GNA may be a better therapeutic agent due to specificity for the HCV gpE1E2.

  13. Lectin binding to formalin-fixed paraffin sections.

    PubMed Central

    Leathem, A; Atkins, N

    1983-01-01

    Lectins are potentially useful tools in histopathology for the identification of carbohydrates and distinguishing cells according to their type, differentiation or function. Conjugated to fluorescent or enzyme labels, lectins are simple to use on fresh tissue but fixation and processing sequesters glycoconjugates and dissolves out fat-linked sugars. We describe here the use of labelled antibodies to lectins to localise sites of lectin binding and increase sensitivity, combined with trypsin and neuraminidase to reveal sequestered carbohydrates. Absorbing lectins with appropriate sugars establishes the specificity of binding and allows lectins to be used as sensitive and specific reagents. PMID:6190843

  14. Reducing Macro- and Microheterogeneity of N-Glycans Enables the Crystal Structure of the Lectin and EGF-Like Domains of Human L-Selectin To Be Solved at 1.9 Å Resolution.

    PubMed

    Wedepohl, Stefanie; Dernedde, Jens; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Tauber, Rudolf; Saenger, Wolfram; Bulut, Haydar

    2017-07-04

    L-Selectin, a cell-adhesion receptor on the surface of most leukocytes, contains seven N-glycosylation sites. In order to obtain the crystal structure of human L-selectin, we expressed a shortened version of L-selectin comprising the C-type lectin and EGF-like domains (termed LE) and systematically analysed mutations of the three glycosylation sites (Asn22, Asn66 and Asn139) in order to reduce macroheterogeneity. After we further removed microheterogeneity, we obtained crystals that diffracted X-rays up to 1.9 Å from a variant (LE010) with exchanges N22Q and N139Q and one GlcNAc2 Man5 N-glycan chain attached to Asn66. Crystal-structure analysis showed that the terminal mannose of GlcNAc2 Man5 of one LE010 molecule was coordinated to Ca(2+) in the binding site of a symmetry-related LE010. The orientation of the lectin and EGF-like domain was similar to the described "bent" conformation of E- and P-selectins. The Ca(2+) -binding site reflects the binding mode seen in E- and P-selectin structures co-crystallised with ligands. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Screening for lectins from basidiomycetes and isolation of Punctularia atropurpurascens lectin.

    PubMed

    Alborés, Silvana; Mora, Paola; Cerdeiras, María Pía; Fraguas, Laura Franco

    2014-02-01

    Aqueous extracts of basidiomycete fungi were screened for the presence of lectins by hemagglutination (HA) assays with mouse, rabbit, and sheep red blood cells. From mycelia and/or fruiting bodies, 23 extracts were prepared; 15 extracts exhibited HA activity towards mouse erythrocytes, with specific activities ranging from 12 to 440 lectin units (LU) mg(-1) protein. In HA inhibition assays, 43 carbohydrates including mono-, di-, tri-, tetrasaccharides, glycoproteins, and polysaccharides were tested as haptens, to determine the saccharide-binding specificities of the lectins. A novel lectin with specificity towards N-acetyl-glucosamine was purified from mycelia of Punctularia atropurpurascens using affinity chromatography on chitosan-Sepharose. The lectin has a subunit molecular mass of 67 kDa determined by SDS-PAGE and a pI of 5.0. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Detection of tumor-associated glycopeptides by lectins: the peptide context modulates carbohydrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Madariaga, David; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Somovilla, Víctor J; Coelho, Helena; Valero-González, Jessika; Castro-López, Jorge; Asensio, Juan L; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Busto, Jesús H; Avenoza, Alberto; Marcelo, Filipa; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Corzana, Francisco; Peregrina, Jesús M

    2015-03-20

    Tn antigen (α-O-GalNAc-Ser/Thr) is a convenient cancer biomarker that is recognized by antibodies and lectins. This work yields remarkable results for two plant lectins in terms of epitope recognition and reveals that these receptors show higher affinity for Tn antigen when it is incorporated in the Pro-Asp-Thr-Arg (PDTR) peptide region of mucin MUC1. In contrast, a significant affinity loss is observed when Tn antigen is located in the Ala-His-Gly-Val-Thr-Ser-Ala (AHGVTSA) or Ala-Pro-Gly-Ser-Thr-Ala-Pro (APGSTAP) fragments. Our data indicate that the charged residues, Arg and Asp, present in the PDTR sequence establish noteworthy fundamental interactions with the lectin surface as well as fix the conformation of the peptide backbone, favoring the presentation of the sugar moiety toward the lectin. These results may help to better understand glycopeptide-lectin interactions and may contribute to engineer new binding sites, allowing novel glycosensors for Tn antigen detection to be designed.

  17. [Lectin histochemical studies on the musk gland in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus)].

    PubMed

    Aoki-Komori, S; Saito, T R; Umeda, M; Sugiyama, M; Takahashi, K W; Taniguchi, K

    1993-07-01

    The musk gland of the adult house musk shrews (Suncus murinus) of both sexes was studied lectin histochemically. The musk gland was a kind of scent gland, consisted of congregation of branched or unbranched simple tubuloalveolar gland holocrine in nature and was attached by an apocrine gland-like structure (sweat gland) in the deeper layer of its periphery. Acinar cells of the musk gland were distinguishable into three type from basal to luminal parts of the acinus; immature cells, mature cells and degenerating cells. There was no histological difference between both sexes. Lectin-binding pattern of the musk gland was examined in comparison with that of the sweat gland and ordinary sebaceous gland by histochemical staining techniques using seven lectins: ConA, RCA I, PNA, SBA, UEA-I, DBA, WGA, WGA and PNA labelled the duct of the musk gland more intense than the acinus. Several lectins showed a tendency to label the cells situated near the luminal surface more intense than those near the basement membrane in both the acinus and duct of the musk gland. In the sweat gland and ordinary sebaceous gland, the lectin-binding pattern was different with each other and from that in the musk gland. These findings suggest that the musk gland, sweat gland, and ordinary sebaceous gland are different to each other in nature of cells and the secretion.

  18. Determining the binding affinities of prostate-specific antigen to lectins: SPR and microarray approaches.

    PubMed

    Damborský, Pavel; Zámorová, Martina; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common newly diagnosed cancers among men and we focused on its traditional biomarker, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), using targeted glycomics-based strategies. The aberrant glycosylation pattern of PSA may serve as a valuable tool for improving PCa diagnosis including its early-stage. In this study, we evaluated the usability of two techniques, surface plasmon resonance and protein microarray assay, for the study and characterization of interactions of PSA (both free and complexed) with six lectins (SNA, ConA, RCA, AAL, WGA and MAA II). The information on the character of such interactions is important for the application of lectins as prospective bioreceptors for biomarker glycoprofiling in a follow-up biosensing assays. SPR as well as established bioanalytical techniques allowed determination of KD values of PSA-lectin interactions in a more reliable way than protein microarray. The protein microarray method did not allow accurate quantification of KD values. However, the features of a microarray approach, such as speed and costs, enabled the screening and estimation of the nature of lectin-glycan biomarker interaction in an effective and time-saving way. All of the tested lectins interacted with commercial PSA standard isolated from healthy persons, except MAA II which reacted only very weakly. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A lectin-based gold nanoparticle assay for probing glycosylation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pomales, Germarie; Morris, Todd A; Falabella, James B; Tarlov, Michael J; Zangmeister, Rebecca A

    2012-09-01

    We report a glycoanalysis method in which lectins are used to probe the glycans of therapeutic glycoproteins that are adsorbed on gold nanoparticles. A model mannose-presenting glycoprotein, ribonuclease B (RNase B), and the therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab, were found to adsorb spontaneously and non-specifically to bare gold nanoparticles such that glycans were accessible for lectin binding. Addition of a multivalent binding lectin, such as concanavalin A (Con A), to a solution of the modified gold nanoparticles resulted in cross-linking of the nanoparticles. This phenomenon was evidenced within 1 min by a change in the hydrodynamic diameter, D(H), measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and a shift and increase in absorbance of the plasmon resonance band of the gold nanoparticles. By combining the sugar-binding specificity and the cross-linking capabilities of lectins, the non-specific adsorption of glycoproteins to gold surfaces, and the unique optical reporting properties of gold nanoparticles, a glycosylation pattern of rituximab could be generated. This assay provides advantages over currently used glycoanalysis methods in terms of short analysis time, simplicity of the conjugation method, convenience of simple spectroscopic detection, and feasibility of providing glycan characterization of the protein drug product by using a variety of binding lectins.

  20. Dairy bacteria remove in vitro dietary lectins with toxic effects on colonic cells.

    PubMed

    Zárate, G; Chaia, A Perez

    2009-03-01

    To assess in vitro the ability of some dairy bacteria to bind concanavalin A (Con A), peanut agglutinin (PNA) and jacalin (AIL), preventing their toxicity on mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Con A and AIL reduced significantly IEC viability in vitro, as determined by Trypan Blue dye exclusion or by propidium iodide/fluorescein diacetate/Hoescht staining. Different strains of dairy bacteria were able to remove lectins from the media. Two strains were subjected to treatments used to remove S-layer, cell wall proteins, polysaccharides and lectin-like adhesins. They were then assayed for the ability to bind dietary lectins and reduce toxicity against IEC and to adhere to IEC after interaction with lectins. Con A and AIL were removed by Propionibacterium acidipropionici and Propionibacterium freudenreichii by binding with specific sugar moieties on the bacterial surface. Removal of lectins by bacteria impaired IEC protection. Adhesion of P. acidipropionici to IEC was reduced but not abolished after binding Con A or AIL. Removal of Con A or AIL by dairy propionibacteria was effective to avoid the toxic effect against colonic cells in vitro. Consumption of foods containing these bacteria would be a tool to protect the intestinal epithelia.

  1. Lectin sensitized anisotropic silver nanoparticles for detection of some bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Vardan K; Bazukyan, Inga L

    2013-03-05

    A method of bacteria detection by sensitized anisotropic silver nanoparticles is presented. Anisotropic silver nanoparticles with two bands of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are prepared and sensitized with potato lectin. These nanoparticles are able to detect three bacterial species: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. The interaction of these bacteria with such nanoparticles induces drastic changes in optical spectra of nanoparticles that are correlated with bacteria titer. The maximal sensitivity is observed for S. aureus (up to 1.5×10(4) mL(-1)).

  2. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  3. Functional environmental proteomics: elucidating the role of a c-type cytochrome abundant during uranium bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jiae; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-02-01

    Studies with pure cultures of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms have demonstrated that outer-surface c-type cytochromes are important electron transfer agents for the reduction of metals, but previous environmental proteomic studies have typically not recovered cytochrome sequences from subsurface environments in which metal reduction is important. Gel-separation, heme-staining and mass spectrometry of proteins in groundwater from in situ uranium bioremediation experiments identified a putative c-type cytochrome, designated Geobacter subsurface c-type cytochrome A (GscA), encoded within the genome of strain M18, a Geobacter isolate previously recovered from the site. Homologs of GscA were identified in the genomes of other Geobacter isolates in the phylogenetic cluster known as subsurface clade 1, which predominates in a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments. Most of the gscA sequences recovered from groundwater genomic DNA clustered in a tight phylogenetic group closely related to strain M18. GscA was most abundant in groundwater samples in which Geobacter sp. predominated. Expression of gscA in a strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens that lacked the gene for the c-type cytochrome OmcS, thought to facilitate electron transfer from conductive pili to Fe(III) oxide, restored the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Atomic force microscopy provided evidence that GscA was associated with the pili. These results demonstrate that a c-type cytochrome with an apparent function similar to that of OmcS is abundant when Geobacter sp. are abundant in the subsurface, providing insight into the mechanisms for the growth of subsurface Geobacter sp. on Fe(III) oxide and suggesting an approach for functional analysis of other Geobacter proteins found in the subsurface.

  4. Functional environmental proteomics: elucidating the role of a c-type cytochrome abundant during uranium bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jiae; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-01-01

    Studies with pure cultures of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms have demonstrated that outer-surface c-type cytochromes are important electron transfer agents for the reduction of metals, but previous environmental proteomic studies have typically not recovered cytochrome sequences from subsurface environments in which metal reduction is important. Gel-separation, heme-staining and mass spectrometry of proteins in groundwater from in situ uranium bioremediation experiments identified a putative c-type cytochrome, designated Geobacter subsurface c-type cytochrome A (GscA), encoded within the genome of strain M18, a Geobacter isolate previously recovered from the site. Homologs of GscA were identified in the genomes of other Geobacter isolates in the phylogenetic cluster known as subsurface clade 1, which predominates in a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments. Most of the gscA sequences recovered from groundwater genomic DNA clustered in a tight phylogenetic group closely related to strain M18. GscA was most abundant in groundwater samples in which Geobacter sp. predominated. Expression of gscA in a strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens that lacked the gene for the c-type cytochrome OmcS, thought to facilitate electron transfer from conductive pili to Fe(III) oxide, restored the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Atomic force microscopy provided evidence that GscA was associated with the pili. These results demonstrate that a c-type cytochrome with an apparent function similar to that of OmcS is abundant when Geobacter sp. are abundant in the subsurface, providing insight into the mechanisms for the growth of subsurface Geobacter sp. on Fe(III) oxide and suggesting an approach for functional analysis of other Geobacter proteins found in the subsurface. PMID:26140532

  5. Different Origins or Different Evolutions? Decoding the Spectral Diversity Among C-type Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Beck, P.; Emery, J.; Brunetto, R.; Delbo, M.; Marsset, M.; Marchis, F.; Groussin, O.; Zanda, B.; Lamy, P.; Jorda, L.; Mousis, O.; Delsanti, A.; Djouadi, Z.; Dionnet, Z.; Borondics, F.; Carry, B.

    2017-02-01

    Anhydrous pyroxene-rich interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have been proposed as surface analogs for about two-thirds of all C-complex asteroids. However, this suggestion appears to be inconsistent with the presence of hydrated silicates on the surfaces of some of these asteroids, including Ceres. Here, we report the presence of enstatite (pyroxene) on the surface of two C-type asteroids (Ceres and Eugenia) based on their spectral properties in the mid-infrared range. The presence of this component is particularly unexpected in the case of Ceres, because most thermal evolution models predict a surface consisting of hydrated compounds only. The most plausible scenario is that Ceres’ surface has been partially contaminated by exogenous enstatite-rich material, possibly coming from the Beagle asteroid family. This scenario questions a similar origin for Ceres and the remaining C-types, and it possibly supports recent results obtained by the Dawn mission (NASA) that Ceres may have formed in the very outer solar system. Concerning the smaller D ∼ 200 km C-types such as Eugenia, both their derived surface composition (enstatite and amorphous silicates) and low density (<1.5 g cm‑3) suggest that these bodies accreted from the same building blocks, namely chondritic porous, pyroxene-rich IDPs and volatiles (mostly water ice), and that a significant volume fraction of these bodies has remained unaffected by hydrothermal activity likely implying a late accretion. In addition, their current heliocentric distance may best explain the presence or absence of water ice at their surfaces. Finally, we raise the possibility that CI chondrites, Tagish-Lake-like material, or hydrated IDPs may be representative samples of the cores of these bodies.

  6. Carbohydrate-binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.) bulb lectins.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Goldstein, I J

    1990-06-01

    retarded on the immobilized HHA column; Man5-GlcNAc2-Asn [containing two Man alpha 1,3(Man alpha 1,6) units] bound to the HHA column. On the contrary, glycopeptides with hybrid type glycan chains were not retarded on either column. These two new lectins which differ in their fine sugar binding specificity from each other, and also from the snowdrop lectin, should prove to be useful probes for the detection and preliminary characterization of glycoconjugates on cell surfaces and in solution.

  7. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  8. Carbohydrate-induced modulation of cell membrane. VIII. Agglutination with mammalian lectin galectin-1 increases osmofragility and membrane fluidity of trypsinized erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajesh K; Pande, Abhay H; Gulla, Krishana C; Gabius, Hans-J; Hajela, Krishnan

    2006-03-06

    Interaction of lectins with cell surface determinants may alter membrane properties. Using trypsinized rabbit erythrocytes as model we tested the capacity of an endogenous lectin in this respect. Galectin-1 is a member of an adhesion/growth-regulatory family known to interact for example with ganglioside GM(1) and also the hydrophobic tail of oncogenic H-Ras. Assays on membrane fluidity and osmofragility detect galectin-1's capacity to increase the parameters. Moreover, it increases susceptibility of erythrocytes to radical damage. These observations indicate the potential of this endogenous lectin to affect membrane properties beyond the immediate interaction with cell surface epitopes.

  9. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  10. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E K; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S; Winton, Douglas J; Neves, André A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-04-13

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apc(min) mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy.

  11. Structural and functional properties of C-type starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinwen; Cai, Canhui; Man, Jianmin; Zhou, Weidong; Wei, Cunxu

    2014-01-30

    This study investigated the structural and functional properties of C-type starches from pea seeds, faba bean seeds, yam rhizomes and water chestnut corms. These starches were mostly oval in shape with significantly different sizes and contents of amylose, damaged starch and phosphorus. Pea, faba bean and water chestnut starches had central hila, and yam starch had eccentric hilum. Water chestnut and yam starches had higher amylopectin short and long chain, respectively. Water chestnut and faba bean starches showed CA-type crystallinities, and pea and yam starches had C-type crystallinities. Water chestnut starch had the highest swelling power, granule swelling and pasting viscosity, lowest gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy. Faba bean starch had the lowest pasting viscosity, whereas yam starch had the highest gelatinization temperatures. Water chestnut and yam starches possessed significantly higher and lower susceptibility to acid and enzyme hydrolysis, the highest and lowest RDS contents, and the lowest and highest RS contents, respectively.

  12. A rainbow trout lectin with multimeric structure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Thiel, S; Petersen, T E; Jensenius, J C

    1997-04-01

    A novel lectin has been identified in rainbow trout serum and plasma. The lectin binds to Sepharose (an agarose polymer) in a calcium-dependent manner. Glucose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, mannose, N-acetyl-mannosamine, L-fucose, maltose and alpha-methyl-mannoside are good inhibitors of this binding, whereas glucosamine and D-fucose inhibits to a lesser degree and mannosamine and galactose do not inhibit the binding to Sepharose. When analysed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, the lectin appears as a characteristic ladder of bands with approximately 16 kDa between consecutive bands. Upon reduction, the lectin appears as a 16-kDa band. On size-exclusion chromatography of trout serum and plasma, the protein emerges over a broad range corresponding to sizes from about 2000 kDa to less than 200 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequence (AAENRNQXPPG) shows no significant homology with known proteins. Because of the characteristic appearance in non-reducing SDS-PAGE and the lectin activity, we propose to name the protein "ladderlectin."

  13. Antimicrobial and antiparasitic activity of lectins.

    PubMed

    Iordache, Florin; Ionita, Mariana; Mitrea, Liviu Ioan; Fafaneata, Cornelia; Pop, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in current contemporary medicine and it has become a major concern of the 21st century. New resistance mechanisms developed by microorganisms spread greatly, threatening the ability to treat numerous infectious diseases, and increasing the number of nosocomial infections. Besides the role in immunology and glycobiology where they are used as hemaglutinine and identification of complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, lectins proved to mediate diversified biological functions like cytotoxicity, complement activation, cell-to-cell and host-pathogen communications, innate immune response, and cell-to-cell signalling. Recently, great interest has been developed for the research and applications of lectins in agriculture and medicine due to their antiparasitic and antimicrobial potentials. This review focuses on the recent data regarding the antimicrobial and antiparasitic activities of lectins, by presenting the role of lectins in host-pathogen interaction and also the cytotoxic effects on microorganisms and parasites. Identification and characterisation of new lectins with antimicrobial activity could serve as a natural alternative for the treatment of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant microorganisms and parasites.

  14. Structural mechanism of C-type inactivation in K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Luis G; Jogini, Vishwanath; Cortes, D Marien; Perozo, Eduardo

    2010-07-08

    Interconversion between conductive and non-conductive forms of the K(+) channel selectivity filter underlies a variety of gating events, from flicker transitions (at the microsecond timescale) to C-type inactivation (millisecond to second timescale). Here we report the crystal structure of the Streptomyces lividans K(+) channel KcsA in its open-inactivated conformation and investigate the mechanism of C-type inactivation gating at the selectivity filter from channels 'trapped' in a series of partially open conformations. Five conformer classes were identified with openings ranging from 12 A in closed KcsA (Calpha-Calpha distances at Thr 112) to 32 A when fully open. They revealed a remarkable correlation between the degree of gate opening and the conformation and ion occupancy of the selectivity filter. We show that a gradual filter backbone reorientation leads first to a loss of the S2 ion binding site and a subsequent loss of the S3 binding site, presumably abrogating ion conduction. These structures indicate a molecular basis for C-type inactivation in K(+) channels.

  15. Structural mechanism of C-type inactivation in K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Cuello, Luis G.; Jogini, Vishwanath; Cortes, D. Marien; Perozo, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Interconversion between conductive and non-conductive forms of the K+ channel selectivity filter underlies a variety of gating events, from flicker transitions (μs) to C-type inactivation (ms-s). Here, we report the crystal structure of the K+ channel KcsA in its Open-Inactivated conformation and investigate the mechanism of C-type inactivation gating at the selectivity filter from channels “trapped” in a series of partially open conformations. Five conformer classes were identified with openings ranging, from 12 Å in closed KcsA (Cα-Cα distances at T112) to 32 Å when fully open. They revealed a remarkable correlation between the degree of gate opening and the conformation and ion occupancy of the selectivity filter. We show that a gradual filter backbone reorientation leads first, to a loss of the S2 ion binding site and a subsequent loss of the S3 binding site, presumably abrogating ion conduction. These structures suggest a molecular basis for C-type inactivation in K+ channels. PMID:20613835

  16. Isolation, characterization and molecular cloning of a leaf-specific lectin from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-11-01

    Lectins were isolated from roots and leaves of ramsons and compared to the previously described bulb lectins. Biochemical analyses indicated that the root lectins AUAIr and AUAIIr are identical to the bulb lectins AUAI and AUAII, whereas the leaf lectin AUAL has no counterpart in the bulbs. cDNA cloning confirmed that the leaf lectin differs from the bulb lectins. Northern blot analysis further indicated that the leaf lectin is tissue-specifically expressed. Sequence comparisons revealed that the ramsons leaf lectin differs considerably from the leaf lectins of garlic, leek, onion and shallot.

  17. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Blood Products § 864.9550 Lectins and protectins. (a) Identification. Lectins and protectins are...

  18. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Blood Products § 864.9550 Lectins and protectins. (a) Identification. Lectins and protectins are...

  19. Lectin Microarray Reveals Binding Profiles of Lactobacillus casei Strains in a Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Cell Wall Polysaccharides▿†

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Emi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabarashi, Jun; Iino, Tohru; Sako, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed a pivotal role of the polysaccharide (PS) moiety in the cell wall of the Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (YIT 9029) as a possible immune modulator (E. Yasuda M. Serata, and T. Sako, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74:4746-4755, 2008). To distinguish PS structures on the bacterial cell surface of individual strains in relation to their activities, it would be useful to have a rapid and high-throughput methodology. Recently, a new technique called lectin microarray was developed for rapid profiling of glycosylation in eukaryotic polymers and cell surfaces. Here, we report on the development of a simple and sensitive method based on this technology for direct analysis of intact bacterial cell surface glycomes. The method involves labeling bacterial cells with SYTOX Orange before incubation with the lectin microarray. After washing, bound cells are directly detected using an evanescent-field fluorescence scanner in a liquid phase. Using this method, we compared the cell surface glycomes from 16 different strains of L. casei. The patterns of lectin-binding affinity of most strains were found to be unique. There appears to be two types of lectin-binding profiles: the first is characterized by a few lectins, and the other is characterized by multiple lectins with different specificities. We also showed a dramatic change in the lectin-binding profile of a YIT 9029 derivative with a mutation in the cps1C gene, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase. In conclusion, the developed technique provided a novel strategy for rapid profiling and, more importantly, differentiating numerous bacterial strains with relevance to the biological functions of PS. PMID:21602390

  20. Redox regulation of morphology, cell stiffness, and lectin-induced aggregation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Shamova, Ekaterina V; Gorudko, Irina V; Drozd, Elizaveta S; Chizhik, Sergey A; Martinovich, Grigory G; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Timoshenko, Alexander V

    2011-02-01

    Redox regulation and carbohydrate recognition are potent molecular mechanisms which can contribute to platelet aggregation in response to various stimuli. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between these mechanisms and to examine whether cell surface glycocalyx and cell stiffness of human platelets are sensitive to the redox potential formed by glutathione. To this end, human platelets were treated with different concentrations (0.05 μM to 6 mM) and ratios of reduced or oxidized glutathione (GSH or GSSG), and platelet morphological, mechanical, and functional properties were determined using conventional light microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and lectin-induced cell aggregation analysis. It was found that lowering the glutathione redox potential changed platelet morphology and increased platelet stiffness as well as modulated nonuniformly platelet aggregation in response to plant lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificity including wheat germ agglutinin, Sambucus nigra agglutinin, and Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin. Extracellular redox potential and redox buffering capacity of the GSSG/2GSH couple were shown to control the availability of specific lectin-binding glycoligands on the cell surface, while the intracellular glutathione redox state affected the general functional ability of platelets to be aggregated independently of the type of lectins. Our data provide the first experimental evidence that glutathione as a redox molecule can affect the mechanical stiffness of human platelets and induce changes of the cell surface glycocalyx, which may represent a new mechanism of redox regulation of intercellular contacts.

  1. Unfolding energetics and stability of banana lectin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Sinha, Sharmistha; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-08-01

    The unfolding pathway of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca was determined by isothermal denaturation induced by the chaotrope GdnCl. The unfolding was found to be a reversible process. The data obtained by isothermal denaturation provided information on conformational stability of banana lectin. The high values of DeltaG of unfolding at various temperatures indicated the strength of intersubunit interactions. It was found that banana lectin is a very stable and denatures at high chaotrope concentrations only. The basis of the stability may be attributed to strong hydrogen bonds of the order 2.5-3.1 A at the dimeric interface along with the presence of water bridges. This is perhaps very unique example in proteins where subunit association is not a consequence of the predominance of hydrophobic interactions.

  2. Cloning and characterization of two different L-type lectin genes from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Tan, Jing-Min; Wang, Zheng; Yin, Shao-Wu; Huang, Xin; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2014-10-01

    L-type lectins contain a leguminous lectin domain and bind to high-mannose type oligosaccharides. In the secretory pathway, L-type lectins play crucial functions in the trafficking, sorting, and targeting of maturing glycoproteins. This study identified two novel L-type lectins, designated as EsERGIC-53 and EsVIP36, from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. The complete nucleotide sequence of ERGIC-53 cDNA was 1955 bp, containing a 1506 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a putative protein of 501 deduced amino acids. The full-length cDNA of VIP36 was 3474 bp with a 984 bp ORF encoding a 327-amino acid peptide. The deduced ERGIC-53 and VIP36 proteins contained a putative signal peptide and an L-type lectin-like domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ERGIC-53 and VIP36 belonged to different clades of L-type lectin family. Reverse transcription PCR showed that ERGIC-53 and VIP36 were expressed in all tested tissues. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that ERGIC-53 and VIP36 transcripts in hepatopancreas were significantly induced at various time points after infection with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. A bacterium-binding experiment showed that both ERGIC-53 and VIP36 could bind to different microbes. Sugar binding assay revealed that these lectins could also bind to the glycoconjugates of bacteria surface, such as LPS, PGN, d-Mannose, and N-Acetyl-d-mannosamine. Moreover, these two L-type lectins agglutinated bacteria in a calcium-dependent manner, and both exerted the ability of facilitating the clearance of injected bacteria V. parahaemolyticus in the crab. Our results suggested that ERGIC-53 and VIP36 functioned as pattern recognition receptors in the immune system of E. sinensis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diversity in recognition of glycans by F-type lectins and galectins: molecular, structural, and biophysical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, Gerardo R.; Ahmed, Hafiz; Bianchet, Mario A.; Fernández-Robledo, José A.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2013-01-01

    Although lectins are “hard-wired” in the germline, the presence of tandemly arrayed carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs), of chimeric structures displaying distinct CRDs, of polymorphic genes resulting in multiple isoforms, and in some cases, of a considerable recognition plasticity of their carbohydrate binding sites, significantly expand the lectin ligand-recognition spectrum and lectin functional diversification. Analysis of structural/functional aspects of galectins and F-lectins—the most recently identified lectin family characterized by a unique CRD sequence motif (a distinctive structural fold) and nominal specificity for l-Fuc—has led to a greater understanding of self/nonself recognition by proteins with tandemly arrayed CRDs. For lectins with a single CRD, however, recognition of self and nonself glycans can only be rationalized in terms of protein oligomerization and ligand clustering and presentation. Spatial and temporal changes in lectin expression, secretion, and local concentrations in extracellular microenvironments, as well as structural diversity and spatial display of their carbohydrate ligands on the host or microbial cell surface, are suggestive of a dynamic interplay of their recognition and effector functions in development and immunity. PMID:22973821

  4. A unique epidermal mucus lectin identified from catfish (Silurus asotus): first evidence of intelectin in fish skin slime.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Komatsu, Yukie; Sugiura, Takaya; Araki, Kyosuke; Nakamura, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    The present study reports a new type of skin mucus lectin found in catfish Silurus asotus. The lectin exhibited calcium-dependent mannose-binding activity. When mannose eluate from chromatography with mannose-conjugated agarose was analysed by SDS-PAGE, the lectin appeared as a single 35-kDa band. Gel filtration showed that the lectin forms monomers and dimers. A 1216-bp cDNA sequence obtained by RACE-PCR from the skin encoded a 308 amino acid secretory protein with homology to mammalian and fish intelectins. RT-PCR demonstrated that the lectin gene was expressed in the gill, kidney and skin. Subsequent sequencing revealed the presence of an isoform in the gills. Antiserum detected the intelectin protein in club cells in the skin and gill, renal tubules and blood plasma. Although intelectin gene expression was not induced by in vivo bacterial stimulation, the intelectin showed agglutination activity against the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida, suggesting that the lectin plays an important role in self-defence against bacteria in the skin surface of the catfish. These findings represent one of the few examples of characterization and functional analysis of a fish intelectin protein.

  5. Characterization of Caenorhabditis Elegans Lectin-Binding Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Link, C. D.; Silverman, M. A.; Breen, M.; Watt, K. E.; Dames, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    We have identified 45 mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans that show ectopic surface binding of the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA). These mutations are all recessive and define six genes: srf-2, srf-3, srf-4, srf-5, srf-8 and srf-9. Mutations in these genes fall into two phenotypic classes: srf-2, -3, -5 mutants are grossly wild-type, except for their lectin-binding phenotype; srf-4, -8, -9 mutants have a suite of defects, including uncoordinated movement, abnormal egg laying, and defective copulatory bursae morphogenesis. Characterization of these pleiotropic mutants at the cellular level reveals defects in the migration of the gonadal distal tip cell and in axon morphology. Unexpectedly, the pleiotropic mutations also interact with mutations in the lin-12 gene, which encodes a putative cell surface receptor involved in the control of cell fate. We propose that the underlying defect in the pleiotropic mutations may be in the general processing or secretion of extracellular proteins. PMID:1516818

  6. Lectins Offer New Perspectives in the Development of Macrophage-Targeted Therapies for COPD/Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Mukaro, Violet R.; Bylund, Johan; Hodge, Greg; Holmes, Mark; Jersmann, Hubertus; Reynolds, Paul N.; Hodge, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the defective ability of alveolar macrophages (AM) to phagocytose apoptotic cells (‘efferocytosis’) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema (COPD) could be therapeutically improved using the C-type lectin, mannose binding lectin (MBL), although the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. An S-type lectin, galectin-3, is also known to regulate macrophage phenotype and function, via interaction with its receptor CD98. We hypothesized that defective expression of galectin/CD98 would be associated with defective efferocytosis in COPD and that mechanisms would include effects on cytoskeletal remodeling and macrophage phenotype and glutathione (GSH) availability. Galectin-3 was measured by ELISA in BAL from controls, smokers and current/ex-smokers with COPD. CD98 was measured on AM using flow cytometry. We assessed the effects of galectin-3 on efferocytosis, CD98, GSH, actin polymerisation, rac activation, and the involvement of PI3K (using β-actin probing and wortmannin inhibition) in vitro using human AM and/or MH-S macrophage cell line. Significant decreases in BAL galectin-3 and AM CD98 were observed in BAL from both current- and ex-smoker COPD subjects vs controls. Galectin 3 increased efferocytosis via an increase in active GTP bound Rac1. This was confirmed with β-actin probing and the role of PI3K was confirmed using wortmannin inhibition. The increased efferocytosis was associated with increases in available glutathione and expression of CD98. We provide evidence for a role of airway lectins in the failed efferocytosis in COPD, supporting their further investigation as potential macrophage-targeted therapies. PMID:23441163

  7. Lectins offer new perspectives in the development of macrophage-targeted therapies for COPD/emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mukaro, Violet R; Bylund, Johan; Hodge, Greg; Holmes, Mark; Jersmann, Hubertus; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the defective ability of alveolar macrophages (AM) to phagocytose apoptotic cells ('efferocytosis') in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema (COPD) could be therapeutically improved using the C-type lectin, mannose binding lectin (MBL), although the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. An S-type lectin, galectin-3, is also known to regulate macrophage phenotype and function, via interaction with its receptor CD98. We hypothesized that defective expression of galectin/CD98 would be associated with defective efferocytosis in COPD and that mechanisms would include effects on cytoskeletal remodeling and macrophage phenotype and glutathione (GSH) availability. Galectin-3 was measured by ELISA in BAL from controls, smokers and current/ex-smokers with COPD. CD98 was measured on AM using flow cytometry. We assessed the effects of galectin-3 on efferocytosis, CD98, GSH, actin polymerisation, rac activation, and the involvement of PI3K (using β-actin probing and wortmannin inhibition) in vitro using human AM and/or MH-S macrophage cell line. Significant decreases in BAL galectin-3 and AM CD98 were observed in BAL from both current- and ex-smoker COPD subjects vs controls. Galectin 3 increased efferocytosis via an increase in active GTP bound Rac1. This was confirmed with β-actin probing and the role of PI3K was confirmed using wortmannin inhibition. The increased efferocytosis was associated with increases in available glutathione and expression of CD98. We provide evidence for a role of airway lectins in the failed efferocytosis in COPD, supporting their further investigation as potential macrophage-targeted therapies.

  8. Identification and transcriptional analysis of two types of lectins (SgCTL-1 and SgGal-1) from mollusk Solen grandis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Yang, Dinglong; Xu, Jie; Fang, Jinghui; Wang, Weijun; Yang, Jialong

    2012-08-01

    C-type lectin and galectin are two types of animal carbohydrate-binding proteins which serve as pathogen recognition molecules and play crucial roles in the innate immunity of invertebrates. In the present study, a C-type lectin (designated as SgCTL-1) and galectin (designated as SgGal-1) were identified from mollusk Solen grandis, and their expression patterns, both in tissues and toward three pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) stimulation were characterized. The full-length cDNA of SgCTL-1 and SgGal-1 was 1280 and 1466 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 519 and 1218 bp, respectively. Their deduced amino acid sequences showed high similarity to other members of C-type lectin and galectin superfamily, respectively. SgCTL-1 encoded a single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), and the motif of Ca(2+)-binding site 2 was EPN (Glu(135)-Pro(136)-Asn(137)). While SgGal-1 encoded two CRDs, and the amino acid residues constituted the carbohydrate-binding motifs were well conserved in CRD1 but partially conserved in CRD2. Although SgCTL-1 and SgGal-1 exhibited different tissue expression pattern, they were both constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, including hemocytes, gonad, mantle, muscle, gill and hepatopancreas, and they were both highly expressed in hepatopancreas and gill. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of two lectins in hemocytes was significantly (P < 0.01) up-regulated with different levels after S. grandis were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) or β-1,3-glucan. Our results suggested that SgCTL-1 and SgGal-1 from razor clam were two novel members of animal lectins, and they might function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) taking part in the process of pathogen recognition.

  9. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets with remarkably high sensitivity and specificity. A functional mannose self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in combination with lectin Con A was used as molecular recognition elements for the detection of E. coli W1485 using Quartz Crytsal Microbalance (QCM) as a transducer. The multivalent binding of Concanavalin A (Con A) to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface O-antigen favors the strong adhesion of E. coli to mannose modified QCM surface by forming bridges between these two. As a result, the contact area between cell and QCM surface increases that leads to rigid and strong attachment. Therefore it enhances the binding between E. coli and the mannose. Our results show a significant improvement of the sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate QCM biosensor with a experimental detection limit of a few hundred bacterial cells. The linear range is from 7.5 × 102 to 7.5 × 107 cells/mL that is four decade wider than the mannose alone QCM sensor. The change of damping resistances for E. coli adhesion experiments was no more than 1.4% suggesting that the bacterial attachment was rigid, rather than a viscoelastic behavior. Little non-specific binding was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and other proteins (Fetal Bovine serum, Erythrina cristagalli lectin). Our approach not only overcomes the challenges of applying QCM technology for bacterial detection but

  10. A Mesorhizobium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) specific lectin (CRL) from the roots of nodulating host plant, Cicer arietinum.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Praveen; Kumar, Saravanan; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Das, Hasi R; Das, Rakha H

    2011-03-01

    A 30 kDa rabbit erythrocyte agglutinating glycoprotein isolated and characterized from the roots of Cicer arietinum and designated as cicer root lectin (CRL). Hemagglutination activity of CRL is strongly inhibited by cell surface LPS of nodulating cicer specific Rhizobium. CRL agglutinates mesorhizobial cells and not Escherichia coli or yeast cells. It binds to immobilized LPS of cicer specific Rhizobium only. The primary structure of CRL as predicted by peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight) indicated ~54% amino acid sequence homology with C. arietinum seedling lectin (Accession no. gi/3204123) and ~26% with C. arietinum (Accession no. gi/110611256), and Pisum sativum (Accession nos. gi/230612, gi/6729956, gi/126148) lectins. These suggested CRL to be a member of vegetative tissue lectin. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that the secondary structure of CRL consists of 48% β-sheets, 26% random coils, and 11% α-helix. CRL has six isoforms of closely associated molecular mass with differential acidic pI of 5.30, 5.20, 5.15, 5.05, 5.00, 4.80. Identity of these isoforms was confirmed from their binding with cicer specific Rhizobium LPS. All the isoforms of CRL are differentially glycosylated as identified by deglycosylation and monosaccharide analysis using high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). All these results suggest that unlike other plant lectins CRL is a LPS-binding lectin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Ferguson, Ardene L.

    1978-01-01

    Three different assay procedures have been used to quantitate the levels of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lectin in various tissues of soybean plants. The assays used were a standard hemagglutination assay, a radioimmunoassay, and an isotope dilution assay. Most of the lectin in seeds was found in the cotyledons, but lectin was also detected in the embryo axis and the seed coat. Soybean lectin was present in all of the tissues of young seedlings, but decreased as the plants matured and was not detectable in plants older than 2 to 3 weeks. Soybean lectin isolated from seeds of several soybean varieties were identical when compared by several methods. PMID:16660384

  12. Capillary-based lectin affinity electrophoresis for interaction analysis between lectins and glycans.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Capillary affinity electrophoresis (CAE) is a powerful technique for glycan analysis, and one of the analytical approaches for analyzing the interaction between lectins and glycans. The method is based on the high-resolution separation of fluorescently labeled glycans by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced fluorescence detection (LIF) in the presence of lectins (or glycan binding proteins). CAE allows simultaneous determination of glycan structures in a complex mixture of glycans. In addition, we can calculate the binding kinetics on a specific glycan in the complex mixture of glycans with a lectin. Here, we show detailed procedures for capillary affinity electrophoresis of fluorescently labeled glycans with lectins using CE-LIF apparatus. Its application to screening a sialic acid binding protein in plant barks is also shown.

  13. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  14. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  15. Comprehensive list of lectins: origins, natures, and carbohydrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Tateno, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Haruko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the first lectin ricin was discovered. Since then, a wide variety of lectins (lect means "select" in Latin) have been isolated from plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, as well as viruses, and their structures and properties have been characterized. At present, as many as 48 protein scaffolds have been identified as functional lectins from the viewpoint of three-dimensional structures as described in this chapter. In this chapter, representative 53 lectins are selected, and their major properties that include hemagglutinating activity, mitogen activity, blood group specificity, molecular weight, metal requirement, and sugar specificities are summarized as a comprehensive table. The list will provide a practically useful, comprehensive list for not only experienced lectin users but also many other non-expert researchers, who are not familiar to lectins and, therefore, have no access to advanced lectin biotechnologies described in other chapters.

  16. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  17. Efficacy of glycoprotein enrichment by microscale lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Madera, Milan; Mann, Benjamin; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V

    2008-08-01

    Reproducible and efficient affinity enrichment is increasingly viewed as an essential step in many investigations leading to the discovery of new biomarkers. In this work, we have evaluated the repeatability of lectin enrichment of glycoproteins from human blood serum through both qualitative and quantitative proteomic approaches. In a comprehensive evaluation of lectin binding, we have performed 30 separate microscale lectin affinity chromatography experiments, followed by a conventional sample purification, and LC-MS/MS analysis of the enriched glycoproteins. Two lectin affinity matrixes, both with Con A lectin, immobilized to the same solid support but differing in the amount of immobilized lectin, were investigated to characterize their binding properties. Both qualitative and quantitative data indicate acceptable repeatability and binding efficiency for the lectin materials received from two different commercial sources.

  18. Use of lectins to in situ visualize glycoconjugates of extracellular polymeric substances in acidophilic archaeal biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R Y; Neu, T R; Bellenberg, S; Kuhlicke, U; Sand, W; Vera, M

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by meso- and thermoacidophilic metal-oxidizing archaea on relevant substrates have been studied to a limited extent. In order to investigate glycoconjugates, a major part of the EPS, during biofilm formation/bioleaching by archaea on pyrite, a screening with 75 commercially available lectins by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) has been performed. Three representative archaeal species, Ferroplasma acidiphilum DSM 28986, Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482T and a novel isolate Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 were used. In addition, Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur were studied. The results of FLBA indicate (i) 22 lectins bound to archaeal biofilms on pyrite and 21 lectins were binding to Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur; (ii) major binding patterns, e.g. tightly bound EPS and loosely bound EPS, were detected on both substrates; (iii) the three archaeal species produced various EPS glycoconjugates on pyrite surfaces. Additionally, the substratum induced different EPS glycoconjugates and biofilm structures of cells of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099. Our data provide new insights into interactions between acidophilic archaea on relevant surfaces and also indicate that FLBA is a valuable tool for in situ investigations on archaeal biofilms. PMID:25488256

  19. Use of lectins to in situ visualize glycoconjugates of extracellular polymeric substances in acidophilic archaeal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R Y; Neu, T R; Bellenberg, S; Kuhlicke, U; Sand, W; Vera, M

    2015-05-01

    Biofilm formation and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by meso- and thermoacidophilic metal-oxidizing archaea on relevant substrates have been studied to a limited extent. In order to investigate glycoconjugates, a major part of the EPS, during biofilm formation/bioleaching by archaea on pyrite, a screening with 75 commercially available lectins by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) has been performed. Three representative archaeal species, Ferroplasma acidiphilum DSM 28986, Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482(T) and a novel isolate Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 were used. In addition, Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur were studied. The results of FLBA indicate (i) 22 lectins bound to archaeal biofilms on pyrite and 21 lectins were binding to Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur; (ii) major binding patterns, e.g. tightly bound EPS and loosely bound EPS, were detected on both substrates; (iii) the three archaeal species produced various EPS glycoconjugates on pyrite surfaces. Additionally, the substratum induced different EPS glycoconjugates and biofilm structures of cells of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099. Our data provide new insights into interactions between acidophilic archaea on relevant surfaces and also indicate that FLBA is a valuable tool for in situ investigations on archaeal biofilms. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Docking, synthesis, and NMR studies of mannosyl trisaccharide ligands for DC-SIGN lectin.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Díaz, Irene; Nieto, Pedro M; Campillo, Nuria E; Páez, Juan A; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2008-08-07

    DC-SIGN, a lectin, which presents at the surface of immature dendritic cells, constitutes nowadays a promising target for the design of new antiviral drugs. This lectin recognizes highly glycosylated proteins present at the surface of several pathogens such as HIV, Ebola virus, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, etc. Understanding the binding mode of this lectin is a topic of tremendous interest and will permit a rational design of new and more selective ligands. Here, we present computational and experimental tools to study the interaction of di- and trisaccharides with DC-SIGN. Docking analysis of complexes involving mannosyl di- and trisaccharides and the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN have been performed. Trisaccharides Manalpha1,2[Manalpha1,6]Man 1 and Manalpha1,3[Manalpha1,6]Man 2 were synthesized from an orthogonally protected mannose as a common intermediate. Using these ligands and the soluble extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN, NMR experiments based on STD and transfer-NOE were performed providing additional information. Conformational analysis of the mannosyl ligands in the free and bound states was done. These studies have demonstrated that terminal mannoses at positions 2 or 3 in the trisaccharides are the most important moiety and present the strongest contact with the binding site of the lectin. Multiple binding modes could be proposed and therefore should be considered in the design of new ligands.

  1. Lectins from tropical sponges. Purification and characterization of lectins from genus Aplysina.

    PubMed

    Miarons, P B; Fresno, M

    2000-09-22

    Only a few animal phyla have been screened for the presence and distribution of lectins. Probably the most intensively studied group is the mollusk. In this investigation, 22 species from 12 families of tropical sponges collected in Los Roques National Park (Venezuela) were screened for the presence of lectins. Nine saline extracts exhibited strong hemagglutinating activity against pronase-treated hamster red blood cells; five of these reacted against rabbit red blood cells, four with trypsin-treated bovine red blood cells, and five with human red blood cells regardless of the blood group type. Extracts from the three species studied from genus Aplysina (archeri, lawnosa, and cauliformis) were highly reactive and panagglutinating against the panel of red blood cells tested. The lectins from A. archeri and A. lawnosa were purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on p-aminobenzyl-beta-1-thiogalactopyranoside-agarose, and gel filtration chromatography. Both lectins exhibited a native molecular mass of 63 kDa and by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions have an apparent molecular mass of 16 kDa, thus suggesting they occur as homotetramers. The purified lectins contain 3-4 mol of divalent cation per molecule, which are essential for their biological activity. Hapten inhibition of hemagglutination was carried out to define the sugar binding specificity of the purified A. archeri lectin. The results indicate a preference of the lectin for nonreducing beta-linked d-Gal residues being the best inhibitors of red blood cells binding methyl-beta-d-Gal and thiodigalactoside (Gal beta 1-4-thiogalactopyranoside). The behavior of several glycans on immobilized lectin affinity chromatography confirmed and extended the specificity data obtained by hapten inhibition.

  2. Cutting edge: lectin-like transcript-1 is a ligand for the inhibitory human NKR-P1A receptor.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David B; Bettadapura, Jayaram; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Mathew, Porunelloor A; Warren, Hilary S; Lanier, Lewis L

    2005-12-15

    Increasingly, roles are emerging for C-type lectin receptors in immune regulation. One receptor whose function has remained largely enigmatic is human NKR-P1A (CD161), present on NK cells and subsets of T cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the lectin-like transcript-1 (LLT1) is a physiologic ligand for NKR-P1A. LLT1-containing liposomes bind to NKR-P1A+ cells, and binding is inhibited by anti-NKR-P1A mAb. Additionally, LLT1 activates NFAT-GFP reporter cells expressing a CD3zeta-NKR-P1A chimeric receptor; reciprocally, reporter cells with a CD3zeta-LLT1 chimeric receptor are stimulated by NKR-P1A. Moreover, LLT1 on target cells can inhibit NK cytotoxicity via interactions with NKR-P1A.

  3. Structural and histological characterization of oviductal magnum and lectin-binding patterns in Gallus domesticus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although chicken oviduct is a useful model and target tissue for reproductive biology and transgenesis, little is known because of the highly specific hormonal regulation and the lack of fundamental researches, including lectin-binding activities and glycobiology. Because lectin is attached to secreted glycoproteins, we hypothesized that lectin could be bound to secretory egg-white proteins, and played a crucial role in the generation of egg-white protein in the oviduct. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the structural, histological and lectin-binding characteristics of the chicken oviductal magnum from juvenile and adult hens. Methods The oviductal magnums from juvenile and adult hens were prepared for ultrastructural analysis, qRT-PCR and immunostaining. Immunohistochemistry of anti-ovalbumin, anti-ESR1 and anti-PGR, and mRNA expression of egg-white genes and steroid hormone receptor genes were evaluated. Lectin histochemical staining was also conducted in juvenile and adult oviductal magnum tissues. Results The ultrastructural analysis showed that ciliated cells were rarely developed on luminal surface in juvenile magnum, but not tubular gland cells. In adult magnum, two types of epithelium and three types of tubular gland cells were observed. qRT-PCR analysis showed that egg-white genes were highly expressed in adult oviduct compared with the juvenile. However, mRNA expressions of ESR1 and PGR were considerably higher in juvenile oviduct than adult (P < 0.05). The immunohistochemical analysis showed that anti-ovalbumin antibody was detected in adult oviduct not in juvenile, unlikely anti-ESR1 and anti-PGR antibodies that were stained in both oviducts. In histological analysis, Toluidine blue was stained in juvenile and adult oviductal epithelia, and adult tubular glands located in the outer layer of oviductal magnum. In contrast, PAS was positive only in adult oviductal tubular gland. Lectins were selectively bound to oviductal

  4. Lectin-mediated drug delivery: influence of mucin on cytoadhesion of plant lectins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wirth, M; Gerhardt, K; Wurm, C; Gabor, F

    2002-02-19

    As the mucous layer represents the first barrier to peroral lectin-mediated drug delivery, the influence of mucin on the cytoadhesive properties of lectins was studied in vitro by establishing a rapid and simple microplate format assay using pig gastric mucin (PGM) for coating the wells. The lectin-binding capacity of mucin followed the order WGA>UEA-I>LCA=STL>PNA>DBA. The PGM-binding of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was strongly dependent on pH being highest at pH 5.0. In comparison, PGM-binding of WGA was about 15% at gastric pH and 60-70% at intestinal pH. This points to unimpeded gastric transit of WGA-grafted formulations and favorable conditions within the intestine for binding to mucus coated enterocytes. Moreover the WGA-PGM interaction was concentration-dependent, specific and fully reversible. According to a competitive assay in the presence of Caco-2 monolayers, the PGM-binding of WGA was saturated and influenced by the lectin-concentration yielding 28% Caco-2 bound WGA (125 ng WGA/0.29 cm(2) monolayer) and 68% Caco-2 bound WGA (4 microg WGA/0.29 cm(2) monolayer), respectively. Following on from these results, lectins are expected to suffer at least partially from premature inactivation by shed off mucus like bioadhesives of the first generation, however initial but reversible mucus-binding of lectins offers partititioning to the cell membrane followed by uptake into the enterocyte.

  5. Structural analysis of a Dioclea sclerocarpa lectin: Study on the vasorelaxant properties of Dioclea lectins.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Neto, Ito L; Delatorre, Plinio; Teixeira, Claudener S; Correia, Jorge L A; Cajazeiras, João B; Pereira, Ronniery I; Nascimento, Kyria S; Laranjeira, Eva P P; Pires, Alana F; Assreuy, Ana M S; Rocha, Bruno A M; Cavada, Benildo S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are proteins that show a variety of biological activities. However, they share in common at least one domain capable of recognizing specific carbohydrates reversibly without changing its structure. The legume lectins family is the most studied family of plant lectins, in particular the Diocleinae subtribe, which possesses high degree of structural similarity, but variable biological activities. This variability lies in small differences that can be analyzed in studies based on structures. In particular, Dioclea sclerocarpa seed lectin (DSL) presents low ability to relax endothelialized rat aorta in comparison with other Dioclea lectins such as Dioclea violacea (DVL), Dioclea virgata (DvirL) and Dioclea rostrata (DRL). The DSL relaxation mechanism relies on nitric oxide production and carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). This feature can be explained by structural differences, since DSL has a carbohydrate recognition domain design less favorable. In addition, the presence of a glutamate residue at position 205 proved to be a decisive factor for the low relaxant effect of Dioclea lectins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  7. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  8. Use of lectin-functionalized particles for oral immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Diesner, Susanne C; Wang, Xue-Yan; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Untersmayr, Eva; Gabor, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy, in recent times, has found its application in a variety of immunologically mediated diseases. Oral immunotherapy may not only increase patient compliance but may, in particular, also induce both systemic as well as mucosal immune responses, due to mucosal application of active agents. To improve the bioavailability and to trigger strong immunological responses, recent research projects focused on the encapsulation of drugs and antigens into polymer particles. These particles protect the loaded antigen from the harsh conditions in the GI tract. Furthermore, modification of the surface of particles by the use of lectins, such as Aleuria aurantia lectin, wheatgerm agglutinin or Ulex europaeus-I, enhances the binding to epithelial cells, in particular to membranous cells, of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Membranous cell-specific targeting leads to an improved transepithelial transport of the particle carriers. Thus, enhanced uptake and presentation of the encapsulated antigen by antigen-presenting cells favor strong systemic, but also local, mucosal immune responses. PMID:22834202

  9. Dairy propionibacteria prevent the proliferative effect of plant lectins on SW480 cells and protect the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zárate, Gabriela; Sáez, Gabriel D; Pérez Chaia, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    Plant lectins are specific carbohydrate-binding proteins that are widespread in legumes such as beans and pulses, seeds, cereals, and many plants used as farm feeds. They are highly resistant to cooking and digestion, reaching the intestinal lumen and/or blood circulation with biological activity. Since many legume lectins trigger harmful local and systemic reactions after their binding to the mucosal surface, these molecules are generally considered anti-nutritive and/or toxic substances. In the gut, specific cell receptors and bacteria may interact with these dietary components, leading to changes in intestinal physiology. It has been proposed that probiotic microorganisms with suitable surface glycosidic moieties could bind to dietary lectins, favoring their elimination from the intestinal lumen or inhibiting their interaction with epithelial cells. In this work, we assessed in vitro the effects of two representative plant lectins, concanavalin A (Con A) and jacalin (AIL) on the proliferation of SW480 colonic adenocarcinoma cells and metabolic activity of colonic microbiota in the absence or presence of Propionibacterium acidipropionici CRL 1198. Both lectins induced proliferation of colonic cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ConA inhibited fermentative activities of colonic microbiota. Pre-incubation of propionibacteria with lectins prevented these effects, which could be ascribed to the binding of lectins by bacterial cells since P. acidipropionici CRL 1198 was unable to metabolize these proteins, and its adhesion to colonic cells was reduced after reaction with Con A or AIL. The results suggest that consumption of propionibacteria at the same time as lectins could reduce the incidence of lectin-induced alterations in the gut and may be a tool to protect intestinal physiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Redox processes controlling the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Géraldine; Corvest, Vincent; Meyer, Etienne H; Hamel, Patrice P

    2010-11-01

    In mitochondria, two mono heme c-type cytochromes are essential electron shuttles of the respiratory chain. They are characterized by the covalent attachment of their heme C to a CXXCH motif in the apoproteins. This post-translational modification occurs in the intermembrane space compartment. Dedicated assembly pathways have evolved to achieve this chemical reaction that requires a strict reducing environment. In mitochondria, two unrelated machineries operate, the rather simple System III in yeast and animals and System I in plants and some protozoans. System I is also found in bacteria and shares some common features with System II that operates in bacteria and plastids. This review aims at presenting how different systems control the chemical requirements for the heme ligation in the compartments where cytochrome c maturation takes place. A special emphasis will be given on the redox processes that are required for the heme attachment reaction onto apocytochromes c.

  11. A multigene family encoding surface glycoproteins in Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Thonnus, Magali; Guérin, Amandine; Rivière, Loïc

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense, the causative agent of the most important livestock disease in Africa, expresses specific surface proteins involved in its parasitic lifestyle. Unfortunately, the complete repertoire of such molecules is far from being deciphered. As these membrane components are exposed to the host environment, they could be used as therapeutic or diagnostic targets. By mining the T. congolense genome database, we identified a novel family of lectin-like glycoproteins (TcoClecs). These molecules are predicted to have a transmembrane domain, a tandem repeat amino acid motif, a signal peptide and a C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). This paper depicts several experimental arguments in favor of a surface localization in bloodstream forms of T. congolense. A TcoClec gene was heterologously expressed in U-2 OS cells and the product could be partially found at the plasma membrane. TcoClecs were also localized at the surface of T. congolense bloodstream forms. The signal was suppressed when the cells were treated with a detergent to remove the plasma membrane or with trypsin to « shave » the parasites and remove their external proteins. This suggests that TcoClecs could be potential diagnostic or therapeutic antigens of African animal trypanosomiasis. The potential role of these proteins in T. congolense as well as in other trypanosomatids is discussed. PMID:28357394

  12. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators. PMID:12169094

  13. [C-type scaphoid fracture in a elite power lifting].

    PubMed

    Heckmann, A; Lahoda, L U; Alkandari, Q; Vogt, P M; Knobloch, K

    2008-06-01

    Power lifting injuries most often involve shoulder injuries with an injury rate of 0.57 to 0.71/1000 hours of power lifting. Wrist injuries are less common in power lifters with 0.05/1000 hours exposure vs. 0.23/1000 h in elite weight lifting men. Often, two contributing factors causing wrist injuries are encountered: a) loss of balance causing the barbell to drift back behind the head of the power lifter, which hyperextends the wrist and b) the maximal weight. We report on an elite power lifting athlete preparing for the World Masters Bench press championships suffering two months of persisting pain during bench press exercise and rest in the snuff-box area following a loss of balance of the bar-bell during bench press with 280 kg load. Following prolonged presentation 2 months after the initial injury with training in the meantime, CT-scan was performed revealing a C-type scaphoid fracture. Surgery was performed as Herbert screw fixation and bone grafting according to the technique of Matti-Russe, followed by an immobilisation of twelve weeks with a plaster. We recommended ending the athletes' power lifting career, however he further exercised with the plaster with consecutive re-operation 3months later and 2nd Matti-Russe and Herbert screw re-do. One year later he became national champion with 240 kg bench pressing. Given the limited scaphoid blood supply and the high complication rate especially among C-type scaphoid fractures, a surgical procedure with bone grafting, Herbert screw fixation and sufficient plaster immobilisation is advocated in scaphoid fractures in elite athletes.

  14. P2C-Type ATPases and Their Regulation.

    PubMed

    Retamales-Ortega, Rocío; Vio, Carlos P; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-03-01

    P2C-type ATPases are a subfamily of P-type ATPases comprising Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is ubiquitously expressed and has been implicated in several neurological diseases, whereas H(+)/K(+)-ATPase is found principally in the colon, stomach, and kidney. Both ATPases have two subunits, α and β, but Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase also has a regulatory subunit called FXYD, which has an important role in cancer. The most important functions of these ATPases are homeostasis, potassium regulation, and maintaining a gradient in different cell types, like epithelial cells. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has become a center of attention ever since it was proposed that it might play a crucial role in neurological disorders such as bipolar disorder, mania, depression, familial hemiplegic migraine, rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism, chronic stress, epileptogenesis, and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, it has been reported that lithium could have a neuroprotective effect against ouabain, which is the best known Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor, but and high concentrations of lithium could affect negatively H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, that has a key role in regulating acidosis and potassium deficiencies. Finally, potassium homeostasis regulation is composed of two main mechanisms, extrarenal and renal. Extrarenal mechanism controls plasma levels, shifting potassium from the extracellular to the intracellular, whereas renal mechanism concerns with body balance and is influenced by potassium intake and its urinary excretion. In this article, we discuss the functions, isoforms, and localization of P2C-type ATPases, describe some of their modulators, and discuss their implications in some diseases.

  15. Production, purification, and capsid stability of rhinovirus C types.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Theodor F; Bochkov, Yury A; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Palmenberg, Ann C; Gern, James E

    2015-06-01

    The rhinovirus C (RV-C) were discovered in 2006 and these agents are an important cause of respiratory morbidity. Little is known about their biology. RV-C15 (C15) can be produced by transfection of recombinant viral RNA into cells and subsequent purification over a 30% sucrose cushion, even though yields and infectivity of other RV-C genotypes with this protocol are low. The goal of this study was to determine whether poor RV-C yields were due to capsid instability, and moreover, to develop a robust protocol suitable for the purification of many RV-C types. Capsid stability assays indicated that virions of RV-C41 (refractory to purification) have similar tolerance for osmotic and temperature stress as RV-A16 (purified readily), although C41 is more sensitive to low pH. Modification to the purification protocol by removing detergent increased the yield of RV-C. Addition of nonfat dry milk to the sucrose cushion increased the virus yield but sacrificed purity of the viral suspension. Analysis of virus distribution following centrifugation indicated that the majority of detectable viral RNA (vRNA) was found in pellets refractory to resuspension. Reduction of the centrifugal force with commiserate increase in spin-time improved the recovery of RV-C for both C41 and C2. Transfection of primary lung fibroblasts (WisL cells) followed by the modified purification protocol further improved yields of infectious C41 and C2. Described herein is a higher yield purification protocol suitable for RV-C types refractory to the standard purification procedure. The findings suggest that aggregation-adhesion problems rather than capsid instability influence RV-C yield during purification.

  16. Optimized immobilization of lectins using self-assembled monolayers on polysilicon encoded materials for cell tagging.

    PubMed

    Penon, Oriol; Siapkas, Dimitrios; Novo, Sergi; Durán, Sara; Oncins, Gerard; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Barrios, Lleonard; Nogués, Carme; Duch, Marta; Plaza, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Lluïsa

    2014-04-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been used for the preparation of functional microtools consisting of encoded polysilicon barcodes biofunctionalized with proteins of the lectin family. These hybrid microtools exploit the lectins ability for recognizing specific carbohydrates of the cell membrane to give an efficient system for cell tagging. This work describes how the control of the methodology for SAM formation on polysilicon surfaces followed by lectin immobilization has a crucial influence on the microtool biofunction. Several parameters (silanization time, silane molar concentration, type of solvent or deposition methodology) have been studied to establish optimal function. Furthermore, silanes incorporating different terminal groups, such as aldehyde, activated ester or epoxide groups were tested in order to analyze their chemical coupling with the biomolecules, as well as their influence on the biofunctionality of the immobilized protein. Two different lectins - wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L) - were immobilized, because they have different and specific cell recognition behaviour and exhibit different cell toxicity. In this way we can assess the effect of intrinsic bulk toxicity with that of the cell compatibility once immobilized as well as the importance of cell affinity. A variety of nanometrical techniques were used to characterize the active surfaces, and lectin immobilization was quantified using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis) and optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy (OWLS). Once the best protocol was found, WGA and PHA were immobilized on polysilicon coded barcodes, and these microtools showed excellent cell tagging on living mouse embryos when WGA was used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Capture and Concentration of Waterborne Pathogens Using Lectin and Antibody Coupled Magnetic Beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Alena M.; Ozanich, Rich M.

    2005-01-01

    Capture and Concentration of Waterborne Pathogens Using Lectin and Antibody Coupled Magnetic Beads. ALENA BENNETT (University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA, 98416) RICHARD M. OZANICH, JR. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352). The primary challenge of the surveillance of natural and introduced biological threats in large water samples is the purification and concentration process. A method for simultaneously capturing many types of biological pathogens is desired. Lectins coupled with magnetic beads were studied due to their ability to bind to the carbohydrates on the surfaces of cells. With lectin coupled beads we attempted to trap Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Brevundimonas diminuta. Also E. coli antibody coupled beads were tested for their effectiveness at concentrating E. coli cells. Bench top indirect and direct cell capture methods were studied for both lectins and antibodies. The indirect method was found to be more effective for cell concentration. Experiments are underway to understand the differences in the two approaches and improve the direct capture method for implementation on an online automated system.

  18. Lotus corniculatus nodulation specificity is changed by the presence of a soybean lectin gene

    PubMed

    van Rhijn P; Goldberg; Hirsch

    1998-08-01

    Plant lectins have been implicated as playing an important role in mediating recognition and specificity in the Rhizobium-legume nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. To test this hypothesis, we introduced the soybean lectin gene Le1 either behind its own promoter or behind the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter into Lotus corniculatus, which is nodulated by R. loti. We found that nodulelike outgrowths developed on transgenic L. corniculatus plant roots in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which nodulates soybean and not Lotus spp. Soybean lectin was properly targeted to L. corniculatus root hairs, and although infection threads formed, they aborted in epidermal or hypodermal cells. Mutation of the lectin sugar binding site abolished infection thread formation and nodulation. Incubation of bradyrhizobia in the nodulation (nod) gene-inducing flavonoid genistein increased the number of nodulelike outgrowths on transgenic L. corniculatus roots. Studies of bacterial mutants, however, suggest that a component of the exopolysaccharide surface of B. japonicum, rather than Nod factor, is required for extension of host range to the transgenic L. corniculatus plants.

  19. Roles for the galactose-/N-acetylgalactosamine-binding lectin of Entamoeba in parasite virulence and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Jesse R; Petri, William A

    2005-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an intestinal protozoan parasite, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The pathology of the disease is caused by the colonization of the large intestine by the amoebic trophozoites and the invasion of the intestinal epithelium. Some of the trophozoites will eventually differentiate into the infectious cyst form, allowing them to be transmitted out of the bowel and into water supplies to be passed from person to person. Both the virulence of the organism and the differentiation process relies on a galactose-/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-binding lectin that is expressed on the surface of trophozoites. The functional activity of this lectin has been shown to be involved in host cell binding, cytotoxicity, complement resistance, induction of encystation, and generation of the cyst wall. The role of the lectin in both differentiation and virulence suggests that it may be a pivotal molecule that determines the severity of the infection from a commensal state resulting from increased encystation to an invasive state. The lectin-glycan interactions that initiate these diverse processes are discussed with emphasis on comparing the binding of host ligands and the interactions involved in encystation.

  20. Purification of a secreted lectin from Andrias davidianus skin and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Qu, Min; Tong, Changqing; Kong, Liang; Yan, Xin; Chernikov, Oleg V; Lukyanov, Pavel A; Jin, Qiao; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A lectin secreted from Andrias davidianus skin (ADL) was purified by affinity chromatography on porcine stomach mucin (type III) (PSM)-crosslinked albumin, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 and HPLC on TSK gel G3000PWXL. The purified lectin was found to be a dimeric protein, as revealed by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. SDS-PAGE showed that the ADL protein had a molecular mass of 17 kDa. ADL produced an 8.5 kDa band when examined using SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. ADL agglutinated native and trypsinized human B erythrocytes. The hemagglutination activity was inhibited by glycoproteins, such as PSM and asialo-PSM, but not by any of the monosaccharides tested. The activity was stable between 4 °C and 50 °C. Significant ADL activity was observed between pH 4–5. The lectin reaction did not depend on the presence of the divalent cation Ca2+ or Mg2+. The N-terminal ADL sequence was determined to be VGYTVGATPM. The lectin exhibited antibacterial activity, involving growth and respiration inhibition in Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella sp. Furthermore, ADL showed inhibition activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These findings suggest that ADL plays an important role in the innate immunity of A. davidianus on the body surface.

  1. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer.

  2. Evaluation of glycophenotype in breast cancer by quantum dot-lectin histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Camila G; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Tenório, Denise P L; Santos, Beate S; Beltrão, Eduardo I C; Fontes, Adriana; Carvalho, Luiz B

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface glycoconjugates play an important role in differentiation/dedifferentiation processes and lectins are employed to evaluate them by several methodologies. Fluorescent probes are considered a valuable tool because of their ability to provide a particular view, and are more detailed and sensitive in terms of cell structure and molecular content. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression and distribution of glycoconjugates in normal human breast tissue, and benign (fibroadenoma), and malignantly transformed (invasive ductal carcinoma) breast tissues. For this, we used mercaptosuccinic acid-coated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with concanavalin A (Con A) or Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) lectins to detect α-D-glucose/mannose and L-fucose residues, respectively. The QD-lectin conjugates were evaluated by hemagglutination activity tests and carbohydrate inhibition assays, and were found to remain functional, keeping their fluorescent properties and carbohydrate recognition ability. Fluorescence images showed that different regions of breast tissue expressed particular types of carbohydrates. While the stroma was preferentially and intensely stained by QD-Con A, ductal cells were preferentially labeled by QD-UEA I. These results indicate that QD-lectin conjugates can be used as molecular probes and can help to elucidate the glycoconjugate profile in biological processes.

  3. Evaluation of glycophenotype in breast cancer by quantum dot-lectin histochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Camila G; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Tenório, Denise PL; Santos, Beate S; Beltrão, Eduardo IC; Fontes, Adriana; Carvalho, Luiz B

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface glycoconjugates play an important role in differentiation/dedifferentiation processes and lectins are employed to evaluate them by several methodologies. Fluorescent probes are considered a valuable tool because of their ability to provide a particular view, and are more detailed and sensitive in terms of cell structure and molecular content. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression and distribution of glycoconjugates in normal human breast tissue, and benign (fibroadenoma), and malignantly transformed (invasive ductal carcinoma) breast tissues. For this, we used mercaptosuccinic acid-coated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with concanavalin A (Con A) or Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) lectins to detect α-D-glucose/mannose and L-fucose residues, respectively. The QD-lectin conjugates were evaluated by hemagglutination activity tests and carbohydrate inhibition assays, and were found to remain functional, keeping their fluorescent properties and carbohydrate recognition ability. Fluorescence images showed that different regions of breast tissue expressed particular types of carbohydrates. While the stroma was preferentially and intensely stained by QD-Con A, ductal cells were preferentially labeled by QD-UEA I. These results indicate that QD-lectin conjugates can be used as molecular probes and can help to elucidate the glycoconjugate profile in biological processes. PMID:24324334

  4. Properties of lectins from snails of the genus Helix probed by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schneider, H A

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against the lectin of Helix pomatia (HPL). Besides antibodies bearing the more common gamma and kappa chains, antibodies with alpha, mu and lambda 2 chains were elicited. The anti-HPL antibodies are expected to be useful in studies on HPL biogenesis and HPL substructure and in studies concerned with the binding of HPL to cell surfaces. Binding of carbohydrates to HPL impaired the binding of anti-HPL antibodies. One to 3 mM GalNAc inhibited HPL-binding in two out of nine antibodies. None of the antibodies bound in the presence of micrograms per ml of the polyvalent blood group A-substance from hog stomach. Similarly, all anti-HPL antibodies were prevented from binding if non-inhibitory concentrations of A-substance were supplemented with GalNAc. Lectins from Helix aspersa (HAL) and Helix lucorum (HLL) differed from HPL in antigenic properties. Only one anti-HPL antibody each bound these lectins as well as HPL. Binding of lectins of Cepaea and Rapana was scarcely detectable. Most of the anti-HPL antibodies and the multivalent HPL-antigens formed precipitation lines in double diffusion tests. At least two antibodies (IgMs) did so with HLL but none with HAL. The possibility that antibodies were selected because of unknown interactions between HPL and the carbohydrate moieties of certain fractions of antibodies was excluded by raising the antibodies in the presence of tunicamycin to inhibit N-glycosylation.

  5. Mechanisms of the insecticidal action of TEL (Talisia esculenta lectin) against Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues; de Castro, Márcia Mota; Freire, Maria das Graças Machado

    2004-06-01

    Plant lectins have insecticidal activity that is probably mediated through their ability to bind carbohydrates. To examine the influence of sugars on the insecticidal activity of a lectin from Talisia esculenta seeds (TEL), the lectin was mixed with mannose, glucose, or mannose plus glucose. Mannose abolished the insecticidal activity. Affinity chromatography showed that TEL bound to midgut proteins of the insect Callosobruchus maculatus. Immunoblotting showed that TEL recognized some proteins, probably glycoproteins, present in the midgut membrane of this insect. The principal proteases responsible for digestive proteolysis in fourth instar larvae of C. maculatus were purified by chromatography on activated thiol-Sepharose. These purified proteases were unable to digest TEL after a 15-h incubation. These results suggest that the insecticidal activity of TEL involves a specific carbohydrate-lectin interaction with glycoconjugates on the surface of digestive tract epithelial cells, as well as binding to assimilatory glycoproteins present in midgut extracts and resistance to enzymatic digestion by cysteine proteinases. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Sensing lectin-glycan interactions using lectin super-microarrays and glycans labeled with dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Matei, Elena; Deng, Lingquan; Koharudin, Leonardus; Gronenborn, Angela M; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2013-09-15

    A new microarray platform, based on lectin super-microarrays and glycans labeled with dye-doped nanoparticles, has been developed to study glycan-lectin interactions. Glycan ligands were conjugated onto fluorescein-doped silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) using a general photocoupling chemistry to afford FSNP-labeled glycan probes. Lectins were printed on epoxy slides in duplicate sets to generate lectin super-microarrays where multiple assays could be carried out simultaneously in each lectin microarray. Thus, the lectin super-microarray was treated with FSNP-labeled glycans to screen for specific binding pairs. Furthermore, a series of ligand competition assays were carried out on a single lectin super-microarray to generate the dose-response curve for each glycan-lectin pair, from which the apparent affinity constants were obtained. Results showed 4-7 orders of magnitude increase in affinity over the free glycans with the corresponding lectins. Thus, the glycan epitope structures having weaker affinity than the parent glycans could be readily identified and analyzed from the lectin super-microarrays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    PubMed

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interactions suggesting of their use in diverse areas of glycobiology.

  8. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  9. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  10. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  11. C-type natriuretic peptide stimulates ovarian follicle development.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yorino; Cheng, Yuan; Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Takae, Seido; Hsueh, Aaron J W

    2012-07-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) encoded by the NPPC (Natriuretic Peptide Precursor C) gene expressed in ovarian granulosa cells inhibits oocyte maturation by activating the natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)B (NPRB) in cumulus cells. RT-PCR analyses indicated increased NPPC and NPRB expression during ovarian development and follicle growth, associated with increases in ovarian CNP peptides in mice. In cultured somatic cells from infantile ovaries and granulosa cells from prepubertal animals, treatment with CNP stimulated cGMP production. Also, treatment of cultured preantral follicles with CNP stimulated follicle growth whereas treatment of cultured ovarian explants from infantile mice with CNP, similar to FSH, increased ovarian weight gain that was associated with the development of primary and early secondary follicles to the late secondary stage. Of interest, treatment with FSH increased levels of NPPC, but not NPRB, transcripts in ovarian explants. In vivo studies further indicated that daily injections of infantile mice with CNP for 4 d promoted ovarian growth, allowing successful ovulation induction by gonadotropins. In prepubertal mice, CNP treatment alone also promoted early antral follicle growth to the preovulatory stage, leading to efficient ovulation induction by LH/human chorionic gonadotropin. Mature oocytes retrieved after CNP treatment could be fertilized in vitro and developed into blastocysts, allowing the delivery of viable offspring. Thus, CNP secreted by growing follicles is capable of stimulating preantral and antral follicle growth. In place of FSH, CNP treatment could provide an alternative therapy for female infertility.

  12. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Amie J; Khambata, Rayomand S; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J; Baliga, Reshma S; Lumsden, Natalie G; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J; Simone, Michela I; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J; MacAllister, Raymond J; Selwood, David L; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders.

  13. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Amie J.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Lumsden, Natalie G.; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J.; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J.; Simone, Michela I.; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F.; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J.; MacAllister, Raymond J.; Selwood, David L.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor–C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25105365

  14. Lectin-induced aggregates of blood cells from patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gorudko, Irina V; Buko, Inna V; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Polonetsky, Leonid Z; Timoshenko, Alexander V

    2008-10-01

    Cell surface glycoligands and circulating glycoproteins are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) through cell aggregation/adhesion mechanisms. To characterize the glycobiological status of blood cells from patients with ACS, we used an advanced lectin-mediated aggregation technique allowing for detection of not only conventional lectin-induced cell aggregates but also their fraction resistant to haptenic/inhibitory sugars. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 24 patients with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina and 18 healthy control subjects. Two plant lectins, Viscum album agglutinin (VAA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), were tested as cell aggregation stimuli binding to cell membrane beta-galactosides and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine acid residues, respectively. Two major types of differences were found between the clinical group and control: (1) VAA-induced aggregation of lymphocytes and platelets was decreased in ACS patients in comparison with healthy donors and (2) the stability of the lectin-induced cell aggregates was found to be an independent aggregation index that revealed opposite trends in the resistance of WGA-induced aggregates of platelets and neutrophils from ACS patients to haptenic sugars in comparison with respective controls. Thus, in the ACS group the stability of WGA-induced aggregates of platelets was impaired, whereas WGA-induced aggregates of neutrophils were more stable and their formation was accompanied by increased generation of H(2)O(2). We conclude that (a) glycobiological status of blood cells undergoes a complex remodeling in association with ACS and (b) detection of lectin-induced stable aggregates can serve as a sensitive method for determination of cellular dysfunctions in ACS.

  15. Soluble Lectins: A New Class of Extracellular Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barondes, Samuel H.

    1984-03-01

    Soluble lectins of cellular slime molds and vertebrates are present at extracellular sites in the developing or adult tissues that make them. Some lectins are concentrated around cell groups, as in extracellular matrix or elastic fibers. Others are at the interface between cells and the external environment, as in much or slime. Specific glycoproteins, proteoglycans, or polysaccharides that bind these endogenous lectins may also be present at these sites. Interactions between the lectins and glycoconjugates appear to play a role in shaping extracellular environments.

  16. A thermostable lectin from the rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora.

    PubMed

    Konkumnerd, Wichchulada; Karnchanatat, Aphichart; Sangvanich, Polkit

    2010-08-30

    Kaempferia parviflora, or black galingale (Kra-Chai-Dam), belongs to the Zingiberaceae family and is used as both a food ingredient and a medicinal plant. There are diverse reports on the biological activities of compounds extracted from the plant, such as antimalarial, antifungal and an effective sexual-enhancing role, but not on the lectins. A lectin was isolated from the rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora using affinity chromatography on Concanavalin A followed by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-100. The molecular weight of the purified lectin was about 41.7 kDa. This lectin showed haemagglutinating activity against erythrocytes from several sources, with the highest level being against those from rabbits. Moreover, the lectin was thermostable, with significant haemagglutinating activity detectable up to 75 degrees C. The results of trypsin digestion and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis suggested that this protein could be a member of the lectin/endochitnase1 family. A lectin that showed thermotolerant haemagglutinating activity against erythrocytes from several sources was successfully purified from K. paviflora rhizomes. Peptide sequence analysis indicated that this lectin is similar to lectin/endochitinase 1 (Urtica dioica) or Hevein-like protein (Hevea brasiliensis). Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Role of bean lectins inRhizobium phaseoli-Phaseolus vulgaris interactions. Some properties of lectins from tw