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Sample records for c1 inhibitor deficiency

  1. C1 inhibitor deficiency: 2014 United Kingdom consensus document.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, H J; Tarzi, M D; Ashworth, F; Bethune, C; Cale, C; Dempster, J; Gompels, M; Jolles, S; Seneviratne, S; Symons, C; Price, A; Edgar, D

    2015-06-01

    C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder manifesting with recurrent attacks of disabling and potentially life-threatening angioedema. Here we present an updated 2014 United Kingdom consensus document for the management of C1 inhibitor-deficient patients, representing a joint venture between the United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Network and Hereditary Angioedema UK. To develop the consensus, we assembled a multi-disciplinary steering group of clinicians, nurses and a patient representative. This steering group first met in 2012, developing a total of 48 recommendations across 11 themes. The statements were distributed to relevant clinicians and a representative group of patients to be scored for agreement on a Likert scale. All 48 statements achieved a high degree of consensus, indicating strong alignment of opinion. The recommendations have evolved significantly since the 2005 document, with particularly notable developments including an improved evidence base to guide dosing and indications for acute treatment, greater emphasis on home therapy for acute attacks and a strong focus on service organization. PMID:25605519

  2. Acquired C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency in lymphomas: prevalence, symptoms, and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Bekos, Christine; Perkmann, Thomas; Krauth, Maria; Raderer, Markus; Lechner, Klaus; Jaeger, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    We retrospectively studied the prevalence of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH) deficiency in 131 patients with various lymphomas. We determined C1 INH activity, C1 INH antigen, and C4 concentration at diagnosis and after chemotherapy. In follicular lymphoma (FL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) consecutive patients were studied. In these entities, the prevalence of C1 INH deficiency was 10.2% in DLBCL, 4.1% in CLL, and 0% in FL and Hodgkin lymphoma. In indolent lymphomas, we identified only single cases of C1 INH deficiency, predominantly in splenic marginal zone lymphomas (SMZL) (four cases). Only three patients were symptomatic while the majority (11 cases) was asymptomatic. In DLBCL patients who were successfully treated with chemotherapy, complete normalization of C1 INH activity and C4 was observed. In contrast, C1 INH deficiency remained in SMZL patients after splenectomy. We conclude that C1 INH deficiency in lymphomas is frequently asymptomatic and responsive to immunochemotherapy.

  3. In pursuit of excellence: an integrated care pathway for C1 inhibitor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Manson, A L; Price, A; Dempster, J; Clinton-Tarestad, P; Greening, C; Enti, R; Hill, S; Grigoriadou, S; Buckland, M S; Longhurst, H J

    2013-01-01

    There are estimated to be approximately 1500 people in the United Kingdom with C1 inhibitor (C1INH) deficiency. At BartsHealth National Health Service (NHS) Trust we manage 133 patients with this condition and we believe that this represents one of the largest cohorts in the United Kingdom. C1INH deficiency may be hereditary or acquired. It is characterized by unpredictable episodic swellings, which may affect any part of the body, but are potentially fatal if they involve the larynx and cause significant morbidity if they involve the viscera. The last few years have seen a revolution in the treatment options that are available for C1 inhibitor deficiency. However, this occurs at a time when there are increased spending restraints in the NHS and the commissioning structure is being overhauled. Integrated care pathways (ICP) are a tool for disseminating best practice, for facilitating clinical audit, enabling multi-disciplinary working and for reducing health-care costs. Here we present an ICP for managing C1 inhibitor deficiency. PMID:23607500

  4. Home treatment of attacks with conestat alfa in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Henriette; Csuka, Dorottya; Veszeli, Nóra; Zotter, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Erika; Varga, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Conestat alfa, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1-INH) is a novel therapeutic option for the acute treatment of hereditary angioedema due to C1-INH (HAE-C1-INH) deficiency. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and safety profile of conestat alfa in patients with HAE-C1-INH, under real-life conditions. We analyzed 65 edematous episodes requiring acute treatment and occurring in two female HAE-C1-INH patients. The patients were treated at home with rhC1-INH per occasion. They recorded the time of rhC1-INH administration, the time to the onset of improvement, and time to the complete resolution of symptoms, as well as the side effects. Symptom severity and patient satisfaction were measured with a visual analog scale (VAS). Thirty-three HAE attacks occurred in submucosal tissue, 17 in subcutaneous tissue, and 15 had mixed locations. After the administration of rhC1-INH, clinical symptoms improved within 0.50 (0.17-4.50 hours) hours and resolved completely within 9.00 (1.67-58.75 hours) hours. The time between the onset of the attack and the administration of rhC1-INH was correlated with the time when the symptoms stopped worsening (R = 0.3212; p = 0.0096) and the time to complete resolution of the symptoms (R = 0.4774; p < 0.0001). The time to response to the drug differed with attack location. The efficacy and safety of rhC1-INH persisted after repeated use. None of the patients experienced a recurrence of the HAE attack or drug-related systemic adverse events. The mean VAS score of patient satisfaction was 93.14. Home treatment with rhC1-INH was an effective and well-tolerated therapy for all types of HAE attacks.

  5. rhC1INH: a new drug for the treatment of attacks in hereditary angioedema caused by C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2011-03-01

    Recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor (rhC1INH) (Ruconest(®), Pharming) is a new drug developed for the relief of symptoms occurring in patients with angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency. Pertinent results have already been published elsewhere; this article summarizes the progress made since then. Similar to the purified C1-inhibitor derived from human plasma, the therapeutic efficacy of rhC1INH results from its ability to block the actions of enzymes belonging to the overactivated bradykinin-forming pathway, at multiple locations. During clinical trials into the management of acute edema, a total of 190 subjects received recombinant C1-inhibitor by intravenous infusion on 714 occasions altogether. Dose-ranging efficacy studies established 50 U/kg as the recommended dose, and demonstrated the effectiveness of this agent in all localizations of hereditary angioedema attacks. Studies into the safety of rhC1INH based on 300 administrations to healthy subjects or hereditary angioedema patients followed-up for 90 days have not detected the formation of autoantibodies against rhC1INH or IgE antibodies directed against rabbit proteins, even after repeated administration on multiple occasions. These findings met favorable appraisal by the EMA, which granted European marketing authorization for rhC1INH. Pharming is expected to file a biological licence with the US FDA by the end of 2010 to obtain marketing approval in the USA. The launch of rhC1INH onto the pharmaceutical market may represent an important progress in the management of hereditary angioedema patients.

  6. rhC1INH: a new drug for the treatment of attacks in hereditary angioedema caused by C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2011-03-01

    Recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor (rhC1INH) (Ruconest(®), Pharming) is a new drug developed for the relief of symptoms occurring in patients with angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency. Pertinent results have already been published elsewhere; this article summarizes the progress made since then. Similar to the purified C1-inhibitor derived from human plasma, the therapeutic efficacy of rhC1INH results from its ability to block the actions of enzymes belonging to the overactivated bradykinin-forming pathway, at multiple locations. During clinical trials into the management of acute edema, a total of 190 subjects received recombinant C1-inhibitor by intravenous infusion on 714 occasions altogether. Dose-ranging efficacy studies established 50 U/kg as the recommended dose, and demonstrated the effectiveness of this agent in all localizations of hereditary angioedema attacks. Studies into the safety of rhC1INH based on 300 administrations to healthy subjects or hereditary angioedema patients followed-up for 90 days have not detected the formation of autoantibodies against rhC1INH or IgE antibodies directed against rabbit proteins, even after repeated administration on multiple occasions. These findings met favorable appraisal by the EMA, which granted European marketing authorization for rhC1INH. Pharming is expected to file a biological licence with the US FDA by the end of 2010 to obtain marketing approval in the USA. The launch of rhC1INH onto the pharmaceutical market may represent an important progress in the management of hereditary angioedema patients. PMID:21426252

  7. Recombinant replacement therapy for hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Dumitru; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Cicardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare genetic condition transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized most commonly by the production of either inadequate or nonfunctioning C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), a blood protein that regulates proteases in the complement, fibrinolytic and contact systems. Patients with hereditary angioedema suffer from episodic, unpredictable manifestations of edema affecting multiple anatomical locations, including the GI tract, facial tissue, the upper airway, oropharynx, urogenital region and/or the arms and legs. A rational approach to treatment is replacement of C1-INH protein, to normalize the levels of C1-INH activity and halt the progression of the biochemical activation processes underlying the edema formation. Ruconest is a highly purified recombinant human C1-INH. This article will focus on the results of ten clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of Ruconest(®) (Pharming Group NV, Leiden, the Netherlands), which is now approved for use in Europe, Israel and the USA.

  8. Recombinant replacement therapy for hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Dumitru; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Cicardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare genetic condition transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized most commonly by the production of either inadequate or nonfunctioning C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), a blood protein that regulates proteases in the complement, fibrinolytic and contact systems. Patients with hereditary angioedema suffer from episodic, unpredictable manifestations of edema affecting multiple anatomical locations, including the GI tract, facial tissue, the upper airway, oropharynx, urogenital region and/or the arms and legs. A rational approach to treatment is replacement of C1-INH protein, to normalize the levels of C1-INH activity and halt the progression of the biochemical activation processes underlying the edema formation. Ruconest is a highly purified recombinant human C1-INH. This article will focus on the results of ten clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of Ruconest(®) (Pharming Group NV, Leiden, the Netherlands), which is now approved for use in Europe, Israel and the USA. PMID:26250409

  9. The influence of trigger factors on hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hereditary angioedema (HAE) resulting from C1-inhibitor deficiency is characterized by attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal edema. Many factors have been presumed to induce edema. Our study analyzed these factors in a fairly large patient population. Methods In the first stage of our study, we analyzed the data recorded by 92 subjects in their patient diaries over seven years. The second phase included 27 HAE patients, who had been completing the diary entry ‘Trigger factors’ every day for seven months whether or not they had experienced an attack. Results During the initial stage, 91% of the subjects described some factor possibly related to the onset of an attack. They could identify a trigger factor – most commonly (21%) mental stress – in 30% of the 3176 attacks. We found a significant (p < 0.001) difference in the distribution of the trigger factors of the edematous attacks of different locations. The 27 participants of the second phase identified 882 potential trigger factors and recorded 365 attacks. Of these, 246 (67%) occurred on days when the patients identified a potential trigger factor. The likelihood of edema-formation associated with the latter was as follows: menstruation – 63%, infection – 38%, mental stress – 26%, physical exertion – 25%, meteorological changes – 21%, fatigue – 17%. Conclusion This analysis of the trigger factors explored, for the first time, their potential role in inducing HAE attacks. Our findings might open new perspectives in extending the indications for edema-prophylaxis, and could contribute to a better understanding of the pathomechanism of HAE attacks. PMID:24678771

  10. Hereditary and acquired angioedema: problems and progress: proceedings of the third C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency workshop and beyond.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Angelo; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Binkley, Karen E; Blanch, Alvaro; Bork, Konrad; Bouillet, Laurence; Bucher, Christoph; Castaldo, Anthony J; Cicardi, Marco; Davis, Alvin E; De Carolis, Caterina; Drouet, Christian; Duponchel, Christiane; Farkas, Henriette; Fáy, Kálmán; Fekete, Béla; Fischer, Bettina; Fontana, Luigi; Füst, George; Giacomelli, Roberto; Gröner, Albrecht; Hack, C Erik; Harmat, George; Jakenfelds, John; Juers, Mathias; Kalmár, Lajos; Kaposi, Pál N; Karádi, István; Kitzinger, Arianna; Kollár, Tímea; Kreuz, Wolfhart; Lakatos, Peter; Longhurst, Hilary J; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada; Monnier, Nicole; Nagy, István; Németh, Eva; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Nuijens, Jan H; O'grady, Caroline; Pappalardo, Emanuela; Penna, Vincenzo; Perricone, Carlo; Perricone, Roberto; Rauch, Ursula; Roche, Olga; Rusicke, Eva; Späth, Peter J; Szendei, George; Takács, Edit; Tordai, Attila; Truedsson, Lennart; Varga, Lilian; Visy, Beáta; Williams, Kayla; Zanichelli, Andrea; Zingale, Lorenza

    2004-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare but life-threatening condition, manifests as acute attacks of facial, laryngeal, genital, or peripheral swelling or abdominal pain secondary to intra-abdominal edema. Resulting from mutations affecting C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), inhibitor of the first complement system component, attacks are not histamine-mediated and do not respond to antihistamines or corticosteroids. Low awareness and resemblance to other disorders often delay diagnosis; despite availability of C1-INH replacement in some countries, no approved, safe acute attack therapy exists in the United States. The biennial C1 Esterase Inhibitor Deficiency Workshops resulted from a European initiative for better knowledge and treatment of HAE and related diseases. This supplement contains work presented at the third workshop and expanded content toward a definitive picture of angioedema in the absence of allergy. Most notably, it includes cumulative genetic investigations; multinational laboratory diagnosis recommendations; current pathogenesis hypotheses; suggested prophylaxis and acute attack treatment, including home treatment; future treatment options; and analysis of patient subpopulations, including pediatric patients and patients whose angioedema worsened during pregnancy or hormone administration. Causes and management of acquired angioedema and a new type of angioedema with normal C1-INH are also discussed. Collaborative patient and physician efforts, crucial in rare diseases, are emphasized. This supplement seeks to raise awareness and aid diagnosis of HAE, optimize treatment for all patients, and provide a platform for further research in this rare, partially understood disorder.

  11. A focused parameter update: hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.

    PubMed

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lang, David M; Craig, Timothy; Dreyfus, David; Hsieh, Fred; Khan, David; Sheikh, Javed; Weldon, David; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Cox, Linda; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Randolph, Christopher R; Schuller, Diane E; Spector, Sheldon L; Tilles, Stephen A; Wallace, Dana

    2013-06-01

    These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters (JTFPP), representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The AAAAI and the ACAAI have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "A focused parameter update: Hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the JTFPP, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters understands that the cost of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents is an important concern that might appropriately influence the work-up and treatment chosen for a given patient. The JTFPP recognizes that the emphasis of our primary recommendations regarding a medication might vary, for example, depending on third-party payer issues and product patent expiration dates. However, because the cost of a given test or agent is so widely variable and there is a paucity of pharmacoeconomic data, the JTFPP generally does not consider cost when formulating practice parameter recommendations. In some instances the cost benefit of an intervention is considered relevant, and commentary might be provided. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion

  12. A nationwide study of acquired C1-inhibitor deficiency in France: Characteristics and treatment responses in 92 patients.

    PubMed

    Gobert, Delphine; Paule, Romain; Ponard, Denise; Levy, Pierre; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Bouillet, Laurence; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle; Drouet, Christian; Gayet, Stéphane; Launay, David; Martin, Ludovic; Mekinian, Arsène; Leblond, Véronique; Fain, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Acquired angioedema (AAE) due to C1-inhibitor (C1INH) deficiency is rare. Treatment options for acute attacks are variable and used off-label. Successful treatment of the associated lymphoma with rituximab seems to prevent acute attacks in subjects with AAE. The aim of this study was to describe AAE manifestations, its associated diseases, and patients' responses to treatments in a representative cohort.A retrospective nationwide study was conducted in France. The inclusion criteria were recurrent angioedema attacks and an acquired decrease in functional C1INH <50% of the reference value.A total of 92 cases were included, with a median age at onset of 62 years. Facial edema and abdominal pain were the most frequent symptoms. Fifteen patients were hospitalized in the intensive care unit because of laryngeal edema, and 1 patient died. Anti-C1INH antibodies were present in 43 patients. The associated diseases were primarily non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 44, with 24 splenic marginal zone lymphomas) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n = 24). Three patients had myeloma, 1 had amyloid light-chain (of immunoglobulin) (AL) amyloidosis, 1 patient had a bronchial adenocarcinoma, and 19 patients had no associated disease. Icatibant relieved the symptoms in all treated patients (n = 26), and plasma-derived C1INH concentrate in 19 of 21 treated patients. Six patients experienced thromboembolic events under tranexamic acid prophylaxis. Rituximab prevented angioedema in 27 of 34 patients as a monotherapy or in association with chemotherapy. Splenectomy controlled AAE in 7 patients treated for splenic marginal zone lymphoma. After a median follow-up of 4.2 years, angioedema was on remission in 52 patients.AAE cases are primarily associated with indolent lymphoma-especially splenic marginal zone lymphoma-and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance but not with autoimmune diseases or other conditions. Icatibant and plasma-derived C1INH concentrate control

  13. Cleavage of the second component of complement by plasma proteases: implications in hereditary C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M A; Kerr, M A

    1985-01-01

    EDTA plasma from patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE), the genetic deficiency of C1-inhibitor, when incubated at 37 degrees produces a kinin-like activity which can induce contraction of oestrus rat uterus. The second component of complement (C2) has previously been suggested to be the source of this kinin-like activity, with the implication that C2-kinin is a normal product of complement activation. Our results show that purified human C2 is cleaved rapidly to C2a and C2b when added to HAE plasma, but not normal plasma or plasma from a danazol-treated HAE patient. However, the addition to HAE plasma of C2 at 20 X normal plasma concentration had no effect on the kinin activity generated on incubation at 37 degrees. In the presence of soya bean trypsin inhibitor, the rate of C2 cleavage and products were unaltered but no kinin activity was generated. C2 was cleaved by purified C1s to C2a and C2b. Incubation of C2 with trypsin resulted in cleavage to C2a and C2b followed by more extensive cleavage of both C2a and C2b. Kallikrein cleaved C2 to C2a and C2b but plasmin had no effect on C2. In no case was kinin activity generated. When C2 was cleaved by C1s to C2a and C2b then incubated with trypsin, kallikrein, or plasmin, no kinin activity was generated: only trypsin cleaved the C2 fragments further. The results suggest that C2 is not the source of the kinin-like activity generated in hereditary angioedema plasma. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2934317

  14. C1-inhibitor and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Excessive activation of the protein cascade systems has been associated with post-transplantation inflammatory disorders. There is increasing evidence that complement not only significantly contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury upon cold storage of the organ but also, although to a different degree, to allograft rejection. Complement activation is most fulminant in hyperacute rejection but seems also to contribute to acute transplant rejection. Therapeutic substitution of appropriate regulators, therefore, appears to be a reasonable approach to reduce undesirable inflammatory reactions in the grafted organ. C1-inhibitor, a multifunctional regulator of the various kinin-generating cascade systems (for review see: E. Hack, chapter in this issue), is frequently reduced in patients suffering from severe inflammatory disorders. Studies applying pathophysiologically relevant animal models of allo- and xenotransplantation as well as promising first clinical results from successful allotransplantation now provide evidence that C1-inhibitor may also serve as an effective means to protect the grafted organ against inflammatory tissue injury. In xenotransplantation, complement inhibition by specific regulators such as C1-inhibitor may help to overcome hyperacute graft rejection. After a brief introduction on the significance of complement to allo- and xenotransplantation the following review will focus on the impact of C1-inhibitor treatment on transplantation-associated inflammatory disorders, where complement contributes to the pathogenesis.

  15. A novel sensitive assay for functional factor XII based on the generation of kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes in factor XII-deficient plasma by glass-bound factor XII.

    PubMed

    Dors, D M; Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; Hack, C E

    1992-06-01

    We developed a very sensitive assay for functional factor XII. This assay is based on the property of glass-bound factor XII to activate prekallikrein (PK) into kallikrein in factor XII-deficient plasma, which is assessed by measuring the formation of kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes in this plasma by radioimmunoassay. Incubation of varying amounts of factor XII in glass tubes led to a dose-dependent increase in kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes in factor XII-deficient plasma with a lower limit of detection of +/- 20 pg of factor XII. The specificity of the assay for factor XII was demonstrated by experiments with plasmas deficient for factor XII, PK or high molecular weight kininogen (HK) and by incubation of factor XII with Polybrene or with a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the amidolytic and procoagulant activity of factor XII. The high sensitivity of the assay appeared to be due to the inability of C1-inhibitor to inhibit factor XII bound to glass, which resulted in a molar ratio of generated kallikrein to glass-bound factor XII of at least 100:1. This assay for factor XII may be a feasible tool in studies on structural and functional aspects of (recombinant) factor XII species synthesized by cultured cells.

  16. In vitro interaction of C1-inhibitor with thrombin.

    PubMed

    Cugno, M; Bos, I; Lubbers, Y; Hack, C E; Agostoni, A

    2001-06-01

    Previous observations of increased generation of thrombin during acute attacks of angioedema in plasma of patients with C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency prompted us to evaluate the interaction of C1-INH with thrombin in both purified systems and human plasma. For this purpose, we used several methods: (1) sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis; (2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to measure complexes between C1-INH and thrombin and inactivated C1-INH; and (3) kinetic studies using a chromogenic assay. We found that the interaction of purified C1-INH with thrombin is associated with the formation of bimolecular complexes of molecular weight (Mr) 130 000 and 120 000 as well as with the appearance of a cleaved form of C1-INH of Mr 97 000. The kinetic studies of inhibition of thrombin by C1-INH showed an average second-order rate constant of 19/s per mol/l, which was significantly increased in the presence of heparin. The addition of thrombin to human plasma was not associated with detectable C1-INH-thrombin complex formation or with cleavage of C1-INH. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that C1-INH upon interaction with thrombin, in part, forms enzyme-inhibitor complexes and, in part, is cleaved. The low second-order rate constant and the lack of a significant interaction in plasma suggest that the inhibition of thrombin by C1-INH has a minor role in circulating blood; however, its role might be important at the endothelial surface, where high concentrations of glycosaminoglycans occur.

  17. Structure and function of C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke G A; Hack, C Erik

    2006-11-01

    C1-INH belongs to the family of serpins. Structural studies have yielded a clear understanding of the biochemical principle underlying the functional activities of these proteins. Although the crystal structure of C1-INH has yet to be revealed, homology modeling has provided a three-dimensional model of the serpin part of C1-INH. This model has helped us understand the biochemical consequences of mutations of the C1-INH gene as they occur in patients who have HAE. The structure of the N-terminal domain of C1-INH remains unknown; however, this part of the molecule is unlikely to be important in the inhibitory activity of C1-INH toward its target proteases. Mutations in this part have not been described in patients who have HAE, except for a deletion containing two cysteine residues involved in the stabilization of the serpin domain. Recent studies suggest some anti-inflammatory functions for this N-terminal part, possibly explaining the effects of C1-INH in diseases other than HAE.

  18. Functional C1-inhibitor diagnostics in hereditary angioedema: assay evaluation and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke G A; Drouet, Christian; Aygören-Pursun, Emel; Bork, Konrad; Bucher, Christoph; Bygum, Anette; Farkas, Henriette; Fust, George; Gregorek, Hanna; Hack, C Erik; Hickey, Alaco; Joller-Jemelka, Helen I; Kapusta, Maria; Kreuz, Wolfhart; Longhurst, Hilary; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Madalinski, Kazimierz; Naskalski, Jerzy; Nieuwenhuys, Ed; Ponard, Denise; Truedsson, Lennart; Varga, Lilian; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Wagner, Eric; Zingale, Lorenza; Cicardi, Marco; van Ham, S Marieke

    2008-09-30

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of potentially life-threatening angioedema. The most widespread underlying genetic deficiency is a heterozygous deficiency of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). In addition to low C4 levels, the most important laboratory parameter for correct diagnosis of HAE or angioedema due to acquired C1-Inh deficiency is reduced C1-Inh function (fC1-Inh). No direct recommendations about the assays for fC1-Inh or sample handling conditions are available, although this would prove especially useful when a laboratory first starts to offer assays on fC1-Inh for HAE diagnosis. In the present study we evaluated the performance of fC1-Inh assays in the 15 different laboratories that are specialised in HAE diagnostics and assessed inter-laboratory variation with each laboratory using their own assays and standards. A double-blind survey was conducted using plasma/serum samples from healthy donors and HAE patients and the uniformity of HAE diagnosis was evaluated. It can be concluded that the diagnosis of fC1-Inh deficiency was made correctly in most cases in this survey. We can recommend the chromogenic assay for the determination of fC1-Inh, while the complex ELISA needs further investigation.

  19. Inactivation of C-1 inhibitor by proteases: demonstration by a monoclonal antibody of a neodeterminant on inactivated, non-complexed C-1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; van Mierlo, G M; Hack, C E

    1987-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against kallikrein-C-1 inhibitor and factor XIIa-C-1 inhibitor complexes. One of the monoclonal antibodies (KII) appeared to react predominantly with C-1 inhibitor complexes in an ELISA. However, the apparent binding of KII to C-1 inhibitor complexes was probably due to the presence of proteolytically inactivated C-1 inhibitor in the complex mixture used for the coating:KII did not bind either kallikrein-C-1 inhibitor or factor XIIa-C-1 inhibitor complexes generated in plasma by dextran sulphate. SDS-PAGE analysis of C-1 inhibitor incubated with proteases revealed that KII-reactive C-1 inhibitor has a lower molecular weight than native C-1 inhibitor. We propose that the determinant that reacts with KII is exposed after cleavage of C-1 inhibitor in its reactive site. The monoclonal antibody KII will enable us to study the inactivation of C-1 inhibitor in human inflammatory disease.

  20. Plasma levels of C1- inhibitor complexes and cleaved C1- inhibitor in patients with hereditary angioneurotic edema.

    PubMed

    Cugno, M; Nuijens, J; Hack, E; Eerenberg, A; Frangi, D; Agostoni, A; Cicardi, M

    1990-04-01

    C1- inhibitor (C1(-)-Inh) catabolism in plasma of patients with hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) was assessed by measuring the complexes formed by C1(-)-Inh with its target proteases (C1-s, Factor XIIa, and kallikrein) and a modified (cleaved) inactive form of C1(-)-Inh (iC1(-)-Inh). This study was performed in plasma from 18 healthy subjects and 30 patients with HANE in remission: 20 with low antigen concentration (type I) and 10 (from 5 different kindreds) with dysfunctional protein (type II). Both type-I and type-II patients had increased C1(-)-C1(-)-Inh complexes (P less than 0.0001), which in type I inversely correlated with the levels of C1(-)-Inh (P less than 0.001). iC1(-)-Inh was normal in all type-I patients and in type-II patients from three families with increased C1(-)-Inh antigen, whereas iC1(-)-Inh was higher than 20 times the normal values in patients from the remaining two families with C1(-)-Inh antigen in the normal range. None of the subjects had an increase of either Factor XIIa-C1(-)-Inh or kallikrein-C1(-)-Inh complexes. This study shows that the hypercatabolism of C1(-)-Inh in HANE patients at least in part occurs via the formation of complexes with C1- and that genetically determined differences in catabolism of dysfunctional C1(-)-Inh proteins are present in type-II patients.

  1. Hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Levi, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled generation of bradykinin (BK) due to insufficient levels of protease inhibitors controlling contact phase (CP) activation, increased activity of CP proteins, and/or inadequate degradation of BK into inactive peptides increases vascular permeability via BK-receptor 2 (BKR2) and results in subcutaneous and submucosal edema formation. Hereditary and acquired angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE and -AAE) are diseases characterized by serious and potentially fatal attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of upper airways, facial structures, abdomen, and extremities, due to inadequate control of BK generation. A decreased activity of C1-inhibitor is the hallmark of C1-INH-HAE (types 1 and 2) due to a mutation in the C1-inhibitor gene, whereas the deficiency in C1-inhibitor in C1-INH-AAE is the result of autoimmune phenomena. In HAE with normal C1-inhibitor, a significant percentage of patients have an increased activity of factor XIIa due to a FXII mutation (FXII-HAE). Treatment of C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focuses on restoring control of BK generation by inhibition of CP proteases by correcting the balance between CP inhibitors and BK breakdown or by inhibition of BK-mediated effects at the BKR2 on endothelial cells. This review will address the pathophysiology, clinical picture, diagnosis and available treatment in C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focusing on BK-release and its regulation. Key Messages Inadequate control of bradykinin formation results in the formation of characteristic subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of the skin, upper airways, facial structures, abdomen and extremities as seen in hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema. Diagnosis of hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema may be troublesome as illustrated by the fact that there is a significant delay in diagnosis; a certain grade of suspicion is therefore crucial for quick diagnosis. Submucosal edema formation in

  2. Characterization of C1 inhibitor binding to neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, N S; Boackle, R J; Leu, R W

    1991-01-01

    In a previous study we have isolated neutrophil membrane proteins that non-covalently bind to native C1-INH (105,000 MW) and a non-functional, degraded C1-INH (88,000 MW; C1-INH-88). To further characterize the binding nature, we have designed a novel kinetic C1 titration assay which enables not only a quantification of the removal of fluid-phase C1-INH by neutrophils, but also a concomitant measure of residual C1-INH function. Native C1-INH, when adsorbed to EDTA-pretreated neutrophils, lost its function in the inhibition of fluid-phase C1. The non-functional C1-INH-88, which is probably devoid of a reactive centre, was found to block the binding of native C1-INH to neutrophils. Pretreatment of neutrophils with serine esterase inhibitors did not abrogate binding capacity of the cells for C1-INH, whereas the binding affinity for C1-INH was lost when the cells were pretreated with trypsin. An array of human peripheral blood leucocytes and several lymphoid cell lines has surface binding sites for C1-INH, but not on human erythrocytes and U937 cells. Binding was further confirmed using (i) C1-INH-microsphere beads to neutrophils, in which the binding was blocked when pretreating neutrophils with excess C1-INH or with trypsin, and (ii) radiolabelled C1-INH to neutrophils, which was competitively blocked by unlabelled non-functional C1-INH-88. Desialylation of C1-INH significantly reduced its binding affinity for neutrophils, indicating that the membrane receptor sites on neutrophils could be specific for the binding of sialic acid residues on C1-INH. Overall, our studies indicate that neutrophils or other leucocytes possess specific surface binding sites for the sialic acid-containing portion of C1-INH. PMID:2045131

  3. Characterization of recombinant C1 inhibitor P1 variants.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Huijbregts, C C; Lubbers, Y T; Longstaff, C; Hack, C E

    1992-04-01

    Twelve human C1 inhibitor P1 variants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the codon for arginine 444 and were expressed in COS-1 cells to analyze the functional properties. The ability to bind to target proteases, as well as potential substrate-like behavior, was investigated with radioimmunoassays. The P1-Lys variant retained binding capacity toward C1s, plasmin, and kallikrein. In addition, complex formation with C1s was detected for P1-Asn and P1-His. All other P1 substitutions resulted in C1 inhibitor variants that neither complexed with nor were inactivated by C1s, kallikrein, beta-factor XIIa, or plasmin. Electrophoretic studies confirmed that P1-Lys and P1-His can form sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant complexes with C1s. In contrast, the C1s-P1-Asn complex dissociated upon addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Kinetic experiments by the method of progress curves generated association rate constants (kon) with C1s of 4.2 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 for recombinant wild-type C1 inhibitor and 1.7 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 for P1-Lys. For P1-Asn and P1-His, kon was decreased approximately 100-fold. The results from inhibition experiments were compatible with a model of reversible inhibition, although the observed dissociation rate for wild-type C1 inhibitor is too low (1-2 x 10(-6) s-1) to be physiologically relevant. The overall inhibition constant (Ki) was estimated to be 0.03 nM. With P1-Asn, reversible inhibition could be demonstrated directly upon dilution of preformed complexes; the observed dissociation rate constant was 3.2 x 10(-4) s-1; and Ki increased to approximately 380 nM. These findings are discussed in relation to inhibitor specificity and inhibition mechanism.

  4. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor produced in Pichia pastoris has the same inhibitory capacity as plasma C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; de Bruin, Eric C; Karuntu, Yani A; Modderman, Piet W; Eldering, Eric; Hack, C Erik

    2003-05-30

    Therapeutic application of the serpin C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) in inflammatory diseases like sepsis, acute myocardial infarction and vascular leakage syndrome seems promising, but large doses may be required. Therefore, a high-yield recombinant expression system for C1-Inh is very interesting. Earlier attempts to produce high levels of C1-Inh resulted in predominantly inactive C1-Inh. We describe the high yield expression of rhC1-Inh in Pichia pastoris, with 180 mg/l active C1-Inh at maximum. On average, 30 mg/l of 80-100% active C1-Inh was obtained. Progress curves were used to study the interaction with C1s, kallikrein, coagulation factor XIIa and XIa, and demonstrated that rhC1-Inh had the same inhibitory capacity as plasma C1-Inh. Structural integrity, as monitored via heat stability, was comparable despite differences in extent and nature of glycosylation. We conclude that the P. pastoris system is capable of high-level production of functionally and structurally intact human C1 inhibitor.

  5. Expression of functional human C1 inhibitor in COS cells.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Nuijens, J H; Hack, C E

    1988-08-25

    Full length human C1 inhibitor cDNA was cloned into a vector suitable for transient expression in COS-1 cells. Transfected COS cells secreted an immunoreactive protein of Mr approximately 110,000 that appeared to be functionally equivalent to the plasma-derived protein as established by the following criteria: 1) ability to form sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable complexes with C1s, factor XIIa, and kallikrein; 2) inhibition of C1s-mediated C4 consumption; and 3) susceptibility to inactivation by the nontarget proteinase elastase. Quantitation of secreted recombinant C1 inhibitor by radioimmunoassay indicated that 72 h after transfection the level was approximately 2.2 micrograms/ml. Treatment of transfected cells with tunicamycin resulted in secretion of a protein of Mr approximately 90,000 that was also capable of complex formation with C1s.

  6. Immune complex processing in C1q-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nash, J T; Taylor, P R; Botto, M; Norsworthy, P J; Davies, K A; Walport, M J

    2001-02-01

    Complement and Fcgamma receptors are known to mediate the processing of immune complexes (IC), and abnormalities in these mechanisms may predispose to the development of lupus. We explored the processing of IC in mice deficient in complement component C1q. 125I-labelled IC comprising Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)/human anti-HBsAg (HBsAg/Ab) were injected intravenously and the sites of IC clearance determined by direct counting of organ uptake at various time points. The liver and spleen were the main sites of IC uptake in all mice. The splenic uptake of IC was significantly reduced in the C1q-deficient mice compared with the control mice. C1q-deficient mice also exhibited an initial accelerated hepatic uptake of IC similar to that seen in human subjects with hypocomplementaemia. The hepatic localization of IC at later time points was similar in both groups of mice. These data in mice are consistent with previous observations in humans that confirm that the classical pathway of complement plays an important role in the appropriate processing of IC in vivo.

  7. Proteolytic inactivation of plasma C1- inhibitor in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Huijbregts, C C; Schreuder, W O; Felt-Bersma, R J; Abbink, J J; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1989-08-01

    Activation of both the complement system and the contact system of intrinsic coagulation is implicated in the pathophysiology of sepsis. Because C1 inhibitor (C1-Inh) regulates the activation of both cascade systems, we studied the characteristics of plasma C1-Inh in 48 patients with severe sepsis on admission to the Intensive Care Unit at the Free University of Amsterdam. The ratio between the level of functional and antigenic C1-Inh (functional index) was significantly reduced in the patients with sepsis compared with healthy volunteers (P = 0.004). The assessment of modified (cleaved), inactive C1-Inh (iC1-Inh), and complexed forms of C1-Inh (nonfunctional C1-Inh species) revealed that the reduced functional index was mainly due to the presence of iC1-Inh. On SDS-PAGE, iC1-Inh species migrated with a lower apparent molecular weight (Mr 98,000, 91,000, and 86,000) than native C1-Inh (Mr 110,000). Elevated iC1-Inh levels (greater than or equal to 0.13 microM) were found in 81% of all patients, sometimes up to 1.6 microM. Levels of iC1-Inh on admission appeared to be of prognostic value: iC1-Inh was higher in 27 patients who died than in 21 patients who survived (P = 0.003). The mortality in 15 patients with iC1-Inh levels up to 0.2 microM was 27%, but in 12 patients with plasma iC1-Inh exceeding 0.44 microM, the mortality was 83%. The overall mortality in the patients with sepsis was 56%. We propose that the cleavage of C1-Inh in patients with sepsis reflects processes that play a major role in the development of fatal complications during sepsis.

  8. Contact system activation in patients with HAE and normal C1 inhibitor function.

    PubMed

    Ghannam, Arije; Defendi, Federica; Charignon, Delphine; Csopaki, Françoise; Favier, Bertrand; Habib, Mohammed; Cichon, Sven; Drouet, Christian

    2013-11-01

    In addition to hereditary angioedema (HAE) with C1 inhibitor (C1INH) deficiency, a type of HAE with dominant inheritance and normal C1INH function (HAE with normal C1INH) has been described. This relates to contact phase activation with exaggerated kinin formation, and mutations in the coagulation factor XII gene have been identified in some affected families, but the cause of the disease has remained elusive in a majority of families. Several triggering factors are responsible for developing kinin forming system, with participation of endothelium and mast cell component. Angioedema conditions meet the accumulation of kinins with failed kinin catabolism. PMID:24176216

  9. The structural basis for neutrophil inactivation of C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, P A; Harrison, R A; Lachmann, P J; Carrell, R W

    1989-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) by neutrophil elastase, Pseudomonas elastase and snake venoms resulted in initial cleavage within the molecule's N-terminus followed by further cleavage within the molecule's C-terminally placed reactive centre. N-Terminal proteolysis occurred at peptide bonds 14-15, 36-37 and 40-41. This had no effect on either the inhibitory activity or the heat-stability of C1-INH. Proteolysis within the reactive centre occurred at peptide bonds 439-440, 440-441, 441-442 and 442-443. Cleavage at any one of these sites inactivated C1-INH and conferred enhanced heat-stability upon a previously heat-labile molecule. Released neutrophil proteinases also cleaved and inactivated C1-INH, suggesting that they may physiologically regulate C1-INH during inflammatory episodes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2930506

  10. Complement C1-inhibitor expression in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hoozemans, J J; De Groot, C J; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1998-09-01

    In situ and in vitro studies suggest that activation of locally produced complement factors may act as a mediator between amyloid deposits and neurodegenerative changes seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh), which regulates activation of C1 of the complement classical pathway, can be detected immunohistochemically in its inactivated form in activated astrocytes and dystrophic neurites in AD plaque areas. In this study, designed to investigate the cellular source of C1-Inh, C1-Inh was found to be secreted in a functionally active form by astrocytes cultured from postmortem human brain specimens as well as by neuroblastoma cell lines. Recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which stimulates C1-Inh synthesis in various cell types, several-fold stimulated C1-Inh protein secretion by cultured human astrocytes derived from different regions of the central nervous system and by one (SK-N-SH) of two neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and IMR-32) included in this study. In contrast to IFN-gamma, other cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] that can be found in brain areas affected by AD, did not stimulate C1-Inh secretion by astrocytes or neuroblastomas in vitro. This inability to secrete C1-Inh is probably due to unresponsiveness at the transcriptional level, since C1-Inh secretion paralleled the expression of the 2.1-kb C1-Inh mRNA. In situ hybridization with a C1-Inh RNA antisense probe labeled neurons rather than astrocytes, suggesting a role for neurons as producers of complement regulatory proteins in vivo. Since IFN-gamma is apparently lacking in the brain parenchyma, and amyloid plaque-associated cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha) do not stimulate C1-Inh expression in vitro, the nature of the stimulus responsible for neuronal C1-Inh expression in AD brains remains to be investigated.

  11. A C1-inhibitor-complex assay (INCA): a method to detect C1 activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Hannema, A J; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Out, T A; Aalberse, R C

    1981-10-01

    A radioimmunoassay (the C1-inhibitor-complex assay, INCA) is described for the detection of complexes that are composed of at least C1s and C1-inhibitor. This INCA is based on demonstrating that C1s and C1-inhibitor (C1-In) are linked: after an incubation with anti-C1s-Sepharose, bound C1sC1-In complexes are detected by 125I-anti-C1-In. C1sC1-In complexes were prepared by the addition of a slight excess of C1s to normal human serum (NHS). As little as 2 ng C1-In bound to C1s was detected. Additional free C1s in serum hardly influenced the detection of C1sC1-In complexes. Complexes presumably composed of C1rC1s(C1-In)2 were generated by the addition of aggregated IgG to NHS. This generation was inhibited by lowering the temperature to 0 degrees C, and by EDTA, and depended on the concentration of aggregated IgG. These complexes had a sedimentation value of approximately 9S. Complexes of C1s and C1-In were also generated in NHS by the addition of DNP-albumin and protein A, but not by zymosan. The INCA was applied to blood samples from normal donors and patients. Sixteen out of 19 samples from patients with acute glomerulonephritis contained increased amounts of C1rC1s(C1-In)2 complexes as compared with the amounts in blood samples from normal donors. The INCA provides a useful tool to assess the activation of C1 in the presence of C1-In, both in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Potential Roles for C1 Inhibitor in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Berger, Mel; Baldwin, William M; Jordan, Stanley C

    2016-07-01

    Complement is a major contributor to inflammation and graft injury. This system is especially important in ischemia-reperfusion injury/delayed graft function as well as in acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). The latter is increasingly recognized as a major cause of late graft loss, for which we have few effective therapies. C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) regulates several pathways which contribute to both acute and chronic graft injuries. However, C1-INH spares the alternative pathway and the membrane attack complex (C5-9) so innate antibacterial defenses remain intact. Plasma-derived C1-INH has been used to treat hereditary angioedema for more than 30 years with excellent safety. Studies with C1-INH in transplant recipients are limited, but have not revealed any unique toxicity or serious adverse events attributed to the protein. Extensive data from animal and ex vivo models suggest that C1-INH ameliorates ischemia-reperfusion injury. Initial clinical studies suggest this effect may allow transplantation of donor organs which are now discarded because the risk of primary graft dysfunction is considered too great. Although the incidence of severe early AMR is declining, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that complement is an important mediator of chronic AMR, a major cause of late graft loss. Thus, C1-INH may also be helpful in preserving function of established grafts. Early clinical studies in transplantation suggest significant beneficial effects of C1-INH with minimal toxicity. Recent results encourage continued investigation of this already-available therapeutic agent.

  13. Recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor in the management of hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder, is caused by a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). This potentially life-threatening condition manifests as recurrent attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal swelling of the skin, gastrointestinal tract and larynx. The management of HAE includes treatment of acute episodes, short-term prophylaxis in preparation for exposure to known triggers and long-term prophylaxis to decrease the incidence and severity of HAE attacks. Four products are approved in the USA for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE, including one human plasma-derived C1-INH therapy, a recombinant human C1-INH product (rhC1-INH), a plasma kallikrein inhibitor and a bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist. In addition, one human plasma-derived C1-INH therapy and danazol are approved for prophylaxis of HAE attacks. rhC1-INH, extracted from the milk of transgenic rabbits, is a glycoprotein of 478 amino acids with an identical amino acid sequence to the endogenous human C1-INH protein. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of rhC1-INH supports an intravenous dosing strategy of 50 U/kg (maximum 4200 U). The safety and efficacy of rhC1-INH in the treatment of acute attacks in patients with HAE were demonstrated in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies and two open-label extension studies. In a pilot prophylaxis study, weekly administration of rhC1-INH 50 U/kg for 8 weeks reduced the incidence of HAE attacks and was well tolerated. Administration of rhC1-INH has not been associated with the development of anti-drug antibodies or antibodies to anti-host-related impurities.

  14. Characterization of recombinant human C1 inhibitor secreted in milk of transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Harrie A; Koiter, Jaco; Vogelezang, Carla J M; van Wessel, Noucha; van Dam, Tijtje; Velterop, Ingeborg; van Houdt, Kristina; Kupers, Luc; Horbach, Danielle; Salaheddine, Mourad; Nuijens, Jan H; Mannesse, Maurice L M

    2012-12-31

    C1 inhibitor (C1INH) is a single-chain glycoprotein that inhibits activation of the contact system of coagulation and the complement system. C1INH isolated from human blood plasma (pd-hC1INH) is used for the management of hereditary angioedema (HAE), a disease caused by heterozygous deficiency of C1INH, and is a promise for treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injuries like acute myocardial or cerebral infarction. To obtain large quantities of C1INH, recombinant human C1INH (rhC1INH) was expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits (12 g/l) harboring genomic human C1INH sequences fused to 5' bovine αS(1) casein promoter sequences. Recombinant hC1INH was isolated from milk to a specific activity of 6.1 U/mg and a purity of 99%; by size-exclusion chromatography the 1% impurities consisted of multimers and N-terminal cleaved C1INH species. Mass spectrometric analysis of purified rhC1INH revealed a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 67,200. Differences in M(r) on SDS PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis between rhC1INH and pd-hC1INH are explained by differential glycosylation (calculated carbohydrate contents of 21% and 28%, respectively), since protein sequencing analysis of rhC1INH revealed intact N- and C-termini. Host-related impurity analysis by ELISA revealed trace amounts of rabbit protein (approximately 10 ppm) in purified batches, but not endogenous rabbit C1INH. The kinetics of inhibition of the target proteases C1s, Factor XIIa, kallikrein and Factor XIa by rhC1INH and pd-hC1INH, indicated comparable inhibitory potency and specificity. Recently, rhC1INH (Ruconest(®)) has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE. PMID:22995741

  15. Clearance of human native, proteinase-complexed, and proteolytically inactivated C1-inhibitor in rats.

    PubMed

    de Smet, B J; de Boer, J P; Agterberg, J; Rigter, G; Bleeker, W K; Hack, C E

    1993-01-01

    C1-inhibitor is the only known inhibitor of the classical pathway of complement and the major inhibitor of the contact pathway of coagulation. Like other serine proteinase inhibitors, C1-inhibitor can exist in three conformations, ie, the native, the proteinase-complexed, and the proteolytically inactivated form. Here we studied the plasma elimination kinetics of these three forms of human C1-inhibitor in rats. The clearance of the complexed form of C1-inhibitor appeared to be the most rapid and depended in part on the proteinase involved (observed plasma t1/2 was 20 minutes for C1s-C1-inhibitor, 32 minutes for kallikrein-C1-inhibitor, and 47 minutes for beta XIIa-C1-inhibitor), whereas that of native C1-inhibitor was the slowest (observed plasma t1/2 4.5 hours). Inactivated C1-inhibitor was cleared with an apparent plasma t1/2 of 1.6 hours. Thus, the short plasma t1/2 of complexed relative to native C1-inhibitor explains why in patients only low concentrations of C1-inhibitor complexes may be observed despite activation of the contact and/or complement systems.

  16. Structural and functional aspects of C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Hack, C Erik; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2002-09-01

    C1-Inh is a serpin that inhibits serine proteases from the complement and the coagulation pathway. C1-Inh consists of a serpin domain and a unique N-terminal domain and is heavily glycosylated. Non-functional mutants of C1-Inh can give insight into the inhibitory mechanism of C1-Inh. This review describes a novel 3D model of C1-Inh, based on a newly developed homology modelling method. This model gives insight into a possible potentiation mechanism of C1-Inh and based on this model the essential residues for efficient inhibition by C1-Inh are discussed.

  17. The Use of Plasma-Derived Complement C1-Esterase Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) in the Treatment of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Related Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Hermanrud, Thorbjørn; Duus, Nicolaj; Bygum, Anette; Rasmussen, Eva Rye

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema of the upper airways is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence has been increasing in the past two decades, primarily due to pharmaceuticals influencing the generation or degradation of the vasoactive molecule bradykinin. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate is a well-established treatment option of hereditary and acquired complement C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency, which are also mediated by an increased level of bradykinin resulting in recurrent angioedema. We here present a case of severe angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor related angioedema (ACEi-AE) of the hypopharynx that completely resolved rapidly after the infusion of plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate adding to the sparse reports in the existing literature. PMID:27123347

  18. C1 inhibitor hinge region mutations produce dysfunction by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E; Aulak, K; Parad, R B; Stecklein, H P; Eldering, E; Hack, C E; Kramer, J; Strunk, R C; Bissler, J; Rosen, F S

    1992-08-01

    Heterozygosity for a mutant dysfunctional C1 inhibitor protein, a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily, results in type II hereditary angioneurotic oedema. We identified a "hinge" region mutation in C1 inhibitor with a Val to Glu replacement at P14 Val-432. Recombinant C1 inhibitors P10 Ala-->Thr and P14Val-->Glu did not form stable complexes with fluid phase C1s or kallikrein. The P14 Val-->Glu mutant, however, was cleaved to a 96K form by C1s, while the P10 Ala-->Thr mutant was not. The recombinant P10 mutant also did not complex with C1s, kallikrein or beta-factor Xlla-Sepharose. The two mutations, therefore, result in dysfunction by different mechanisms: in one (P14 Val-->Glu), the inhibitor is converted to a substrate, while in the other (P10 Ala-->Thr), interaction with target protease is blocked.

  19. SLE like syndrome and functional deficiency of C1q in members of a large family.

    PubMed

    Hannema, A J; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; Hack, C E; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Mallée, C; van Helden, H P

    1984-01-01

    Two sisters and a brother from one family are described whose sera were deficient in haemolytic complement function. This defect was restored by addition of purified C1q. In their sera, C1q like material was found, whereas C1r and C1s were normal or increased in concentration, as were the other complement components tested. All three had suffered from glomerulonephritis during childhood. A renal biopsy in the brother recently disclosed a membranous glomerulopathy stage 1; otherwise, he is apparently healthy. In both sisters, a systemic lupus erythematosus like disease became manifest at the age of 20 and 23, respectively, resulting in the death of one of them. In the serum of these three family members, the C1q like material was antigenically deficient compared with normal C1q and had, on sucrose gradient analysis, a molecular weight of approximately 65,000 daltons. It did not bind to C1r and C1s. Binding of the dysfunctional C1q to aggregated human gammaglobulin could be demonstrated. On double immunodiffusion analysis, the abnormal C1q was identical with reduced and alkylated C1q. The possible structure of the abnormal C1q molecule is discussed.

  20. A neoepitope-based enzyme immunoassay for quantification of C1-inhibitor in complex with C1r and C1s.

    PubMed

    Fure, H; Nielsen, E W; Hack, C E; Mollnes, T E

    1997-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) recognizing neoepitopes exposed on activation products of complement proteins but hidden in the native components have been used for quantification of activated complement. A previously produced and characterized mouse MoAb, recognizing a neoepitope on the human plasma protein C1-inhibitor complexed with its substrates, was used to design an enzyme immunoassay for detection of C1-inhibitor complexed with C1r and C1s. These complexes are indicators of early classical complement pathway activation. The standard was serum activated with heat aggregated IgG defined to contain 1000 arbitrary units (AU)/ml. The lower detection limit was approximately 0.05 AU/ml corresponding to 0.005% of fully activated serum. The reliability of the assay, including day-to-day variation, was tested. Intra-assay variation coefficients were 12% for low plasma control and 13% for high plasma control (n = 12 for both). Inter-assay variation coefficients were 12% for low control (n = 6), 19% for high control (n = 6) and 15% for the normal plasma control (n = 9). A 2.5-97.5 percentile reference range (normal blood donors) was 16-33 AU/ml. Two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus had considerably elevated plasma levels of the activation product (56 and 62 AU/ml), and six patients with hereditary angioedema had normal plasma levels despite considerably reduced C1-inhibitor concentration. We conclude that the present method is sensitive and reliable for detection of early classical pathway activation and superior to previously published methods by utilizing neoepitope specificity and non-radiolabelled reagents.

  1. Effect of reactive site loop elongation on the inhibitory activity of C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Eldering, Eric; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Hack, C Erik

    2004-06-01

    The serine protease inhibitor C1-Inhibitor (C1-Inh) inhibits several complement- and contact-system proteases, which play an important role in inflammation. C1-Inh has a short reactive site loop (RSL) compared to other serpins. RSL length determines the inhibitory activity of serpins. We investigated the effect of RSL elongation on inhibitory activity of C1-Inh by insertion of one or two alanine residues in the RSL. One of five mutants had an increased association rate with kallikrein, but was nevertheless a poor inhibitor because of a simultaneous high stoichiometry of inhibition (>10). The association rate of the other variants was lower than that of wild-type C1-Inh. These data suggest that the relatively weak inhibitory activity of C1-Inh is not the result of its short RSL. The short RSL of C1-Inh has, surprisingly, the optimal length for inhibition.

  2. Treatment of hereditary angioedema with plasma-derived C1 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Prematta, Michael J; Prematta, Tracy; Craig, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    Background: Plasma-derived C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate is a treatment option for acute hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and is considered the standard-of-care in many countries, although it is not yet available in the United States. Studies are still being conducted to establish its safety and efficacy as required by the FDA. Objective: To review the medical literature to determine if C1-INH concentrate is a safe and effective treatment for acute HAE attacks. Methods: The following keywords were searched in PubMed and OVID: C1 esterase inhibitor, C1-inhibitor, C1 inhibitor, and hereditary angioedema treatment. English-language articles were searched from 1966 to the present to look for studies demonstrating the efficacy and the safety of C1-INH concentrate. Results: The English-language literature search revealed several studies showing significantly improved relief of HAE symptoms with the administration of C1-INH concentrate – many studies demonstrated some improvement of symptoms within 30 minutes. Side effects have been similar to placebo, and no proven cases of viral transmission have occurred in over 20 years. Conclusion: C1-INH concentrate appears to be a very safe and effective treatment option for HAE. PMID:19209279

  3. Interaction of C1 inhibitor with thrombin on the endothelial surface.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Sonia; Castelli, Roberto; Maiocchi, Diana; Bergamaschini, Luigi; Cugno, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    Thrombin, the central bioregulatory enzyme of haemostasis, also has a potent vasopermeability effect on the surface of endothelial cells, and has therefore been considered a major link between the activation of the coagulation pathway and inflammation. C1 inhibitor inhibits thrombin with a low second-order rate constant that can be increased by heparin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the C1 inhibitor-induced inhibition of thrombin is potentiated on the endothelial surface. The interaction of C1 inhibitor and thrombin was evaluated in an in-vitro system of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to which purified C1 inhibitor and thrombin have been added. The role of heparins and selectins has been tested by adding heparinase and Mab to selectins. Kinetic analysis under pseudo-first-order conditions showed that the inhibitory effect of C1 inhibitor on thrombin is greater on the surface of endothelial cells. After incubating nanomolar concentrations of thrombin and micromolar concentrations of C1 inhibitor in a purified system, thrombin activity remained significant, but was almost totally suppressed in the presence of HUVECs. The abolition of such suppression by heparinase and Mab to selectins supports the involvement of heparin and selectins in C1 inhibitor-thrombin interaction. Furthermore, the second-order rate constant was 25 ± 3 /s per mol/l in our purified system, but increased to 100 ± 9 /s per mol/l in the presence of HUVECs. Our results indicate that C1 inhibitor can inhibit thrombin activity on vascular endothelium via binding to selectins and potentiation by heparins. This may contribute to the modulation of thrombin activity on vasopermeability and on coagulation especially when the major natural anticoagulant pathways are impaired. PMID:21959589

  4. Treatment with C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate in type I or II hereditary angioedema: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Bork, Konrad; Steffensen, Isabella; Machnig, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1 esterase inhibitor (HAE-C1-INH) deficiency is a rare genetic disorder presenting with recurrent episodes of skin swellings, abdominal pain attacks, and potentially fatal laryngeal edema. This study was designed to review the efficacy and safety of pasteurized, human, plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate for the treatment of patients with HAE-C1-INH. A systematic search of electronic databases up to December 2011 was performed without language or date restrictions. Two reviewers completed the study selection using predefined inclusion criteria, tabulated, and analyzed the data. The data were inappropriate for meta-analysis; thus, a qualitative synthesis was performed. We identified 89 studies (≍2000 patients) that investigated C1-INH. Replacement therapy with C1-INH significantly shortened time to onset of symptom relief in HAE attacks compared with placebo in a randomized controlled trial, and similar improvements were consistently reported in observational and descriptive studies, accompanied by improvements in patients' quality of life. C1-INH has been shown to be effective for patients receiving home therapy and short- and long-term prophylaxis. Treatment with C1-INH was generally well tolerated. Administration of C1-INH was not associated with transmission of viruses or development of autoantibodies irrespective of treatment duration. This research provides additional confirmation of the efficacy of C1-INH in the treatment and prevention of HAE attacks. C1-INH is generally safe and well tolerated and has an excellent safety record for over 25 years of clinical use.

  5. Improving patient outcomes in hereditary angioedema: reducing attack frequency using routine prevention with C1 inhibitor concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Dominas, Nina; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Bas, Murat; Greve, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disorder, characterised by recurrent oedema attacks in various regions of the body. In HAE, mutations in the C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) gene result in decreased C1-INH concentrations (type I HAE) or functionally deficient C1-INH (type II HAE), leading to inappropriate activation of the kallikrein–kinin system and release of vasoactive mediators. Treatment of HAE aims to manage acute attacks (using replacement C1-INH or bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist) or prevent attacks through prophylaxis (using C1-INH or attenuated androgens). We present a case of a 67-year-old man with HAE who suffered a high number of breakthrough HAE attacks while undergoing long-term prophylaxis with attenuated androgens. Androgen therapy was safely discontinued and routine prevention therapy with C1-INH (1000 U) introduced as part of an individualised management approach, in line with published clinical trial data, which improved patient outcomes in terms of HAE attack frequency and severity. PMID:24850548

  6. Detection of activation of the contact system of coagulation in vitro and in vivo: quantitation of activated Hageman factor-C-1-inhibitor and kallikrein-C-1-inhibitor complexes by specific radioimmunoassays.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; Cohen, M; Navis, G O; de Vries, A; Eerenberg, A J; Bakker, J C; Hack, C E

    1987-08-01

    Radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for the detection of C-1-inhibitor (C-1-Inh) complexed to either kallikrein or activated Hageman factor (factor XIIa) are described. Kallikrein-C-1-Inh or factor XIIa-C-1-Inh complexes were bound to Sepharose to which monospecific antibodies against (pre)kallikrein or factor XII, respectively, were coupled. Bound complexes were subsequently detected by an incubation with affinity purified 125I-labeled antibodies against C-1-Inh. These RIAs were used to detect activation of the contact system of coagulation in vitro and in vivo. Addition of dextran sulfate (DXS) (20 micrograms/ml) to fresh plasma resulted at 37 degrees C in the rapid generation of amidolytic kallikrein activity, which was maximal after 1 to 2 min of incubation and subsequently decreased within a few minutes. The generation of kallikrein activity coincided with the appearance of both kallikrein-C-1-Inh and factor XIIa-C-1-Inh complexes. However, in contrast to kallikrein activity, both types of complexes remained detectable in the incubation mixtures during the incubation period. Experiments with purified kallikrein. C-1-Inh and partly purified beta-factor XIIa, and activation experiments in plasmas deficient in either factor XII or prekallikrein, demonstrated the specificity of both RIAs. The minimal amount of DXS that resulted in the generation of measurable amounts of both types of complexes in plasma was 2-3 micrograms per ml. Similar experiments with kaolin showed that with limiting amounts of activator (1-2 mg/ml), only kallikrein-C-1-Inh complexes were detected in plasma. When larger amounts of kaolin were added to plasma, factor XIIa-C-1-Inh complexes were additionally detected in plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Potentiation of C1 inhibitor by glycosaminoglycans: dextran sulfate species are effective inhibitors of in vitro complement activation in plasma.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; te Velthuis, H; Lubbers, Y T; de Ruig, C P; Eldering, E; Hack, C E

    1997-08-15

    Activation of the complement system may contribute to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Hence, an effective inhibitor of complement might be useful to reduce tissue damage. Some glycosaminoglycans (GAG), such as heparin, are known to inhibit the interaction of C1q with activators and the assembly of the classical and the alternative pathway C3 convertases. Furthermore, they may potentiate C1 inhibitor-mediated inactivation of C1s. To search for potential complement inhibitors, we systematically investigated the complement inhibitory properties of various synthetic and naturally occurring GAG (dextran sulfates 500,000 and 5,000, heparin, N-acetylheparin, heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfates A and C). First, we assessed the effect of GAG on the second-order rate constant of the inactivation of C1s by C1 inhibitor. This rate constant increased 6- to 130-fold in the presence of the GAG, dextran sulfate being the most effective. Second, all tested GAG were found to reduce deposition of C4 and C3 on immobilized aggregated human IgG (AHG) and to reduce fluid phase formation of C4b/c and C3b/c in recalcified plasma upon incubation with AHG. Dextran sulfate again was found to be most effective. We conclude that GAG modulate complement activation in vitro and that the low molecular weight dextran sulfate (m.w. 5000) may be a candidate for pharmacologic manipulation of complement activation via potentiation of C1 inhibitor.

  8. Clinical presentation of human C1q deficiency: How much of a lupus?

    PubMed

    Stegert, Mihaela; Bock, Merete; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary human C1q deficiency has been well described to be associated with high susceptibility for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The majority of subjects present a clinical syndrome closely related to SLE. However, limited information is available about the primary diagnosis and particular clinical manifestations of SLE in this specific subgroup of patients. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of electronic databases up to November 2014 to identify and analyze reports on patients with C1q deficiency. We identified 71 C1q-deficient patients descending from 45 families that had been published. According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for SLE 39/71 (55%) subjects could be classified as having SLE. Another 16/71 (22.5%) presented a SLE-like syndrome (defined as 3 positive ACR criteria) whereas in 16/71 (22.5%) no SLE could be diagnosed at time of publication. Symptoms began at a median age of 5 years, male and females being equally affected. Discoid rash (56% versus 10%, p<0.001) and oral ulcers (49% versus 24%, p<0.001) occurred significantly more frequent in C1q deficiency-associated SLE/SLE-like disease than in sporadic SLE, whereas arthritis (38% versus 84%, p<001) and anti-ds-DNA (18% versus 78%, p<0.001) occurred less frequently. Renal and neurological manifestations were found to occur similarly frequent. The severe course of disease in some patients seemed to be mostly due to severe infections at early ages and not in particular due to more aggressive SLE manifestations.

  9. C1 inhibitor treatment improves host defense in pneumococcal meningitis in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; van der Poll, Tom; Florquin, Sandrine; Polfliet, Machteld M J; van den Berg, Timo K; Dijkstra, Christine D; Roord, John J; Hack, C Erik; van Furth, A Marceline

    2007-07-01

    In spite of antibiotic treatment, pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The complement system is a key component of innate immunity against invading pathogens. However, activation of complement is also involved in tissue damage, and complement inhibition by C1 inhibitor (C1-inh) is beneficial in animal models of endotoxemia and sepsis. In the present study, we demonstrate classical pathway complement activation during pneumococcal meningitis in rats. We also evaluate the effect of C1-inh treatment on clinical illness, bacterial clearance, and inflammatory responses in rats and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. C1-inh treatment was associated with reduced clinical illness, a less-pronounced inflammatory infiltrate around the meninges, and lower brain levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. C1-inh treatment increased bacterial clearance, possibly through an up-regulation of CR3. Hence, C1-inh may be a useful agent in the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis.

  10. [Acquired angioedema with C1-INH deficiency and accompanying chronic spontaneous urticaria in a patient with chronic lymphatic B cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Klossowski, N; Braun, S A; von Gruben, V; Losem, C; Plewe, D; Homey, B; Meller, S

    2015-10-01

    Acquired angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE) is characterized by recurrent edema of the subcutaneous and/or submucosal tissue without wheals and negative family history of angioedema. Here, we present the case of a patient with a chronic lymphatic B cell leukemia who suffered from both C1-INH-AAE and chronic spontaneous urticaria. Oral corticosteroids, antihistamines, and the anti-IgE antibody omalizumab were applied to treat the chronic urticaria in combination with the plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate Berinert® and the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant, but the symptoms did not improved significantly. Thus, polychemotherapy targeting the slow-growing lymphoproliferative disease including rituximab was initiated, which resulted in remission of both the urticaria and the angioedema.

  11. Treatment of type I and II hereditary angioedema with Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema are of outstanding clinical importance, as edematous attacks associated with these conditions can thrust afflicted patients into mortal danger. Currently, C1 inhibitor concentrate - a human blood product - is available as a replacement therapy. In view of the limited number of donors, as well as the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, it is a reasonable expectation to develop a therapeutic alternative based on recombinant technology, which would eliminate all these shortcomings. Pharming (Leiden, The Netherlands) has developed Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor, as a proprietary product, which is currently being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials. Ongoing studies conducted within the framework of the development program are almost complete and their interim findings are reassuring. This should facilitate successful regulatory approval in the near future, which is indispensable in order to make Rhucin available for patients with hereditary angioedema or other disorders amenable to C1 inhibitor replacement.

  12. Treatment of type I and II hereditary angioedema with Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema are of outstanding clinical importance, as edematous attacks associated with these conditions can thrust afflicted patients into mortal danger. Currently, C1 inhibitor concentrate - a human blood product - is available as a replacement therapy. In view of the limited number of donors, as well as the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, it is a reasonable expectation to develop a therapeutic alternative based on recombinant technology, which would eliminate all these shortcomings. Pharming (Leiden, The Netherlands) has developed Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor, as a proprietary product, which is currently being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials. Ongoing studies conducted within the framework of the development program are almost complete and their interim findings are reassuring. This should facilitate successful regulatory approval in the near future, which is indispensable in order to make Rhucin available for patients with hereditary angioedema or other disorders amenable to C1 inhibitor replacement. PMID:20477114

  13. Self-administered C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates for the management of hereditary angioedema: usability and patient acceptance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huamin Henry

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease characterized by episodic subcutaneous or submucosal swelling. The primary cause for the most common form of HAE is a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). The swelling caused by HAE can be painful, disfiguring, and life-threatening. It reduces daily function and compromises the quality of life of affected individuals and their caregivers. Among different treatment strategies, replacement with C1-INH concentrates is employed for on-demand treatment of acute attacks and long-term prophylaxis. Three human plasma-derived C1-INH preparations are approved for HAE treatment in the US, the European Union, or both regions: Cinryze(®), Berinert(®), and Cetor(®); however, only Cinryze is approved for long-term prophylaxis. Postmarketing studies have shown that home therapy (self-administered or administered by a caregiver) is a convenient and safe option preferred by many HAE patients. In this review, we summarize the role of self-administered plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate therapy with Cinryze at home in the prophylaxis of HAE. PMID:27660422

  14. Self-administered C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates for the management of hereditary angioedema: usability and patient acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huamin Henry

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease characterized by episodic subcutaneous or submucosal swelling. The primary cause for the most common form of HAE is a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). The swelling caused by HAE can be painful, disfiguring, and life-threatening. It reduces daily function and compromises the quality of life of affected individuals and their caregivers. Among different treatment strategies, replacement with C1-INH concentrates is employed for on-demand treatment of acute attacks and long-term prophylaxis. Three human plasma-derived C1-INH preparations are approved for HAE treatment in the US, the European Union, or both regions: Cinryze®, Berinert®, and Cetor®; however, only Cinryze is approved for long-term prophylaxis. Postmarketing studies have shown that home therapy (self-administered or administered by a caregiver) is a convenient and safe option preferred by many HAE patients. In this review, we summarize the role of self-administered plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate therapy with Cinryze at home in the prophylaxis of HAE. PMID:27660422

  15. Self-administered C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates for the management of hereditary angioedema: usability and patient acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huamin Henry

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease characterized by episodic subcutaneous or submucosal swelling. The primary cause for the most common form of HAE is a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). The swelling caused by HAE can be painful, disfiguring, and life-threatening. It reduces daily function and compromises the quality of life of affected individuals and their caregivers. Among different treatment strategies, replacement with C1-INH concentrates is employed for on-demand treatment of acute attacks and long-term prophylaxis. Three human plasma-derived C1-INH preparations are approved for HAE treatment in the US, the European Union, or both regions: Cinryze®, Berinert®, and Cetor®; however, only Cinryze is approved for long-term prophylaxis. Postmarketing studies have shown that home therapy (self-administered or administered by a caregiver) is a convenient and safe option preferred by many HAE patients. In this review, we summarize the role of self-administered plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate therapy with Cinryze at home in the prophylaxis of HAE.

  16. Administration of C1 inhibitor reduces neutrophil activation in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Caliezi, Christoph; van Mierlo, Gerard; Eerenberg-Belmer, Anke; Sulzer, Irmela; Hack, C Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2003-07-01

    Forty patients with severe sepsis or septic shock recently received C1 inhibitor. In the present study we studied the effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on circulating elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complex (EA) and lactoferrin (LF) levels in these patients to gain further insight about agonists involved in the activation of neutrophils in human sepsis. Elevated levels of EA and LF were found in 65 and 85% of the septic patients, respectively. Patients with elevated EA levels had higher organ dysfunction scores, higher levels of cytokines, and higher levels of complement activation products than patients with normal EA levels. C1 inhibitor therapy reduced EA as well as complement activation and IL-8 release in the patients with elevated EA on admission. We conclude that neutrophil activation in human sepsis correlates with the severity of organ dysfunction and involves complement and interleukin-8 as agonists. The effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on neutrophils may provide an explanation for the beneficial, although mild, effects of this treatment on organ dysfunction in sepsis.

  17. Rhucin, a recombinant C1 inhibitor for the treatment of hereditary angioedema and cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, Hilary

    2008-03-01

    Pharming NV and Esteve are developing Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor. Rhucin is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials in North America and is awaiting regulatory approval in Western Europe for the treatment of prophylactic and acute hereditary angioedema. Pharming is also investigating Rhucin for the potential treatment of cerebral ischemic injury.

  18. Rhucin, a recombinant C1 inhibitor for the treatment of hereditary angioedema and cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, Hilary

    2008-03-01

    Pharming NV and Esteve are developing Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor. Rhucin is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials in North America and is awaiting regulatory approval in Western Europe for the treatment of prophylactic and acute hereditary angioedema. Pharming is also investigating Rhucin for the potential treatment of cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:18311668

  19. New insight into the effects of heparinoids on complement inhibition by C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Poppelaars, F; Damman, J; de Vrij, E L; Burgerhof, J G M; Saye, J; Daha, M R; Leuvenink, H G; Uknis, M E; Seelen, M A J

    2016-06-01

    Complement activation is of major importance in numerous pathological conditions. Therefore, targeted complement inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy. C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) controls activation of the classical pathway (CP) and the lectin pathway (LP). However, conflicting data exist on inhibition of the alternative pathway (AP) by C1-INH. The inhibitory capacity of C1-INH for the CP is potentiated by heparin and other glycosaminoglycans, but no data exist for the LP and AP. The current study investigates the effects of C1-INH in the presence or absence of different clinically used heparinoids on the CP, LP and AP. Furthermore, the combined effects of heparinoids and C1-INH on coagulation were investigated. C1-INH, heparinoids or combinations were analysed in a dose-dependent fashion in the presence of pooled serum. Functional complement activities were measured simultaneously using the Wielisa(®) -kit. The activated partial thrombin time was determined using an automated coagulation analyser. The results showed that all three complement pathways were inhibited significantly by C1-INH or heparinoids. Next to their individual effects on complement activation, heparinoids also enhanced the inhibitory capacity of C1-INH significantly on the CP and LP. For the AP, significant potentiation of C1-INH by heparinoids was found; however, this was restricted to certain concentration ranges. At low concentrations the effect on blood coagulation by combining heparinoids with C1-INH was minimal. In conclusion, our study shows significant potentiating effects of heparinoids on the inhibition of all complement pathways by C1-INH. Therefore, their combined use is a promising and a potentially cost-effective treatment option for complement-mediated diseases.

  20. C1-esterase inhibitor treatment: preclinical safety aspects on the potential prothrombotic risk.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Daniel; Herzog, Eva; Raquet, Elmar; Nolte, Marc W; May, Frauke; Müller-Cohrs, Jochen; Björkqvist, Jenny; Dickneite, Gerhard; Pragst, Ingo

    2014-11-01

    Human plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) is an efficacious and safe treatment for hereditary angioedema. However, thrombotic events in subjects treated with C1-INH at recommended or off-label, high doses have been reported. In this study, we addressed the potential prothrombotic risk of C1-INH treatment in high doses using a non-clinical rabbit model. Following intravenous infusion of C1-INH to rabbits at doses up to 800 IU/kg, the exposure and the pharmacodynamic efficacy of C1-INH in rabbits were confirmed by activity measurements of C1-esterase, and coagulation factors XIa and XIIa, respectively. Potential prothrombotic effects were assessed following induction of venous and arterial thrombosis using in vivo models of venous and arterial stasis, complemented by various in vitro assays of coagulation markers. Administration of C1-INH at doses up to 800 IU/kg did not potentiate thrombus formation during venous stasis. In contrast, inhibition of arterial occlusion was observed upon C1-INH administration when compared with isotonic saline treatment, indicating antithrombotic rather than prothrombotic activity of high dose C1-INH treatment in vivo. This was further confirmed in vitro by decreased thrombin generation, increased activated partial thromboplastin time, clotting time and clot formation time, and inhibition of platelet aggregation. No relevant changes in fibrinolysis or in the levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and prothrombin fragment 1+2 were observed upon high dose C1-INH treatment. The data suggest that treatment of healthy rabbits with high doses of C1-INH could potentially inhibit coagulation and thrombus formation rather than induce a prothrombotic risk.

  1. New insight into the effects of heparinoids on complement inhibition by C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Poppelaars, F; Damman, J; de Vrij, E L; Burgerhof, J G M; Saye, J; Daha, M R; Leuvenink, H G; Uknis, M E; Seelen, M A J

    2016-06-01

    Complement activation is of major importance in numerous pathological conditions. Therefore, targeted complement inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy. C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) controls activation of the classical pathway (CP) and the lectin pathway (LP). However, conflicting data exist on inhibition of the alternative pathway (AP) by C1-INH. The inhibitory capacity of C1-INH for the CP is potentiated by heparin and other glycosaminoglycans, but no data exist for the LP and AP. The current study investigates the effects of C1-INH in the presence or absence of different clinically used heparinoids on the CP, LP and AP. Furthermore, the combined effects of heparinoids and C1-INH on coagulation were investigated. C1-INH, heparinoids or combinations were analysed in a dose-dependent fashion in the presence of pooled serum. Functional complement activities were measured simultaneously using the Wielisa(®) -kit. The activated partial thrombin time was determined using an automated coagulation analyser. The results showed that all three complement pathways were inhibited significantly by C1-INH or heparinoids. Next to their individual effects on complement activation, heparinoids also enhanced the inhibitory capacity of C1-INH significantly on the CP and LP. For the AP, significant potentiation of C1-INH by heparinoids was found; however, this was restricted to certain concentration ranges. At low concentrations the effect on blood coagulation by combining heparinoids with C1-INH was minimal. In conclusion, our study shows significant potentiating effects of heparinoids on the inhibition of all complement pathways by C1-INH. Therefore, their combined use is a promising and a potentially cost-effective treatment option for complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26874675

  2. A new simplified procedure for C1 inhibitor purification. A novel use for jacalin-agarose.

    PubMed

    Pilatte, Y; Hammer, C H; Frank, M M; Fries, L F

    1989-06-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), the major regulatory protein of the classical pathway of complement activation, is also involved in the regulation of several other plasma proteolytic systems including the coagulation, fibrinolytic and contact systems. All the previously published methods for the purification of C1-INH are time-consuming and some do not yield highly pure protein. Recently, it was reported that Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) lectin, also called jacalin, binds C1-INH. Since jacalin binds only a small number of human serum proteins it appeared that jacalin-agarose affinity chromatography would constitute a very selective early step for the purification of C1-INH. Consequently we have designed a new, simplified three-step procedure for the purification of C1-INH which includes PEG fractionation, jacalin-agarose chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose which takes advantage of the marked hydrophilicity of the inhibitor. This procedure has three major advantages over those which have been the most frequently used. Firstly, it includes only two fast chromatographic steps. Secondly, because the C1-INH pool is cleanly and predictably separated from the unwanted proteins by differential elution conditions in both chromatographic steps, no antigenic or functional assays are required to define the desired peaks. Thirdly, only the final product is dialyzed while all other methods required several buffer changes. For these reasons this procedure is much faster and simpler than the previously published methods. About 10-12 mg of highly purified and fully active C1-INH can be obtained within 1 day from 120 ml of plasma giving an average yield of 40-45%. This method may thus be highly adaptable to bulk purification for clinical use or for preparation of genetically or pathologically altered C1-INH from clinical specimens.

  3. The thrombogenicity of C1 esterase inhibitor (human): review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Mark; Bauer, Kenneth A; Kaplan, Allen P

    2014-01-01

    Thromboembolic events associated with human plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) use in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) have been reported in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System database. The purpose of this article is to review and assess the strength of available evidence regarding the thrombogenicity of human plasma-derived C1-INH. A PubMed search was conducted of English language articles from January 1990 to December 2013 reporting the thrombogenicity of C1-INH. Original research articles were selected if the following criteria were met: (1) C1-INH was the focus of the study and (2) the authors addressed the pro- or antithrombotic potential of C1-INH. Additional articles on the clinical use of C1-INH in disease states other than HAE were obtained using reference lists of selected articles. Pivotal studies and prescribing information for C1-INH products were also reviewed. Limited animal and clinical data suggest that C1-INH, particularly at high doses of up to 500 U/kg (compared with the U.S. FDA-approved 20-U/kg dose), may be prothrombotic. In contrast, C1-INH has been used in some patients with myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, sepsis, and capillary leak syndrome at off-label supratherapeutic doses (up to 100 U/kg) without evidence of a thrombogenic effect. Based on our review, thromboembolic events reported with C1-INH use are rare and patients with HAE who experienced such events often have underlying thromboembolic risk factors.

  4. C1 inhibitor-mediated myocardial protection from chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinrong; Guo, Furong; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Xiaoman; Hu, Ke; Li, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH)-induced cardiovascular injuries has yet to be determined. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effect and mechanism of a C1 inhibitor in CIH in the myocardium. The present study used a rat model of CIH in which complement regulatory protein, known as C1 inhibitor (C1INH), was administered to the rats in the intervention groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. The expression of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were detected by western blot analysis. The expression of complement C3 protein and RNA were also analyzed. C1INH was observed to improve the cardiac function in rats with CIH. Myocardial myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was significantly decreased in the C1INH intervention group compared with the CIH control group, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly attenuated (P<0.05). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased and those of Bax were increased in the CIH group compared with the normal control group, but the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were increased and those of Bax were decreased in the C1INH intervention group, as compared with the CIH group. Furthermore, the CIH-induced expression and synthesis of complement C3 in the myocardium were also reduced in the C1INH intervention group. C1INH, in addition to inhibiting complement activation and inflammation, preserved cardiac function in CIH-mediated myocardial cell injury through an anti-apoptotic mechanism. PMID:27698713

  5. C1 inhibitor-mediated myocardial protection from chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinrong; Guo, Furong; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Xiaoman; Hu, Ke; Li, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH)-induced cardiovascular injuries has yet to be determined. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effect and mechanism of a C1 inhibitor in CIH in the myocardium. The present study used a rat model of CIH in which complement regulatory protein, known as C1 inhibitor (C1INH), was administered to the rats in the intervention groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. The expression of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were detected by western blot analysis. The expression of complement C3 protein and RNA were also analyzed. C1INH was observed to improve the cardiac function in rats with CIH. Myocardial myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was significantly decreased in the C1INH intervention group compared with the CIH control group, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly attenuated (P<0.05). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased and those of Bax were increased in the CIH group compared with the normal control group, but the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were increased and those of Bax were decreased in the C1INH intervention group, as compared with the CIH group. Furthermore, the CIH-induced expression and synthesis of complement C3 in the myocardium were also reduced in the C1INH intervention group. C1INH, in addition to inhibiting complement activation and inflammation, preserved cardiac function in CIH-mediated myocardial cell injury through an anti-apoptotic mechanism.

  6. Regulation of Complement and Contact System Activation via C1 Inhibitor Potentiation and Factor XIIa Activity Modulation by Sulfated Glycans – Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Lahrsen, Eric; Alban, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The serpin C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is the only regulator of classical complement activation as well as the major regulator of the contact system. Its importance is demonstrated by hereditary angioedema (HAE), a severe disease with potentially life-threatening attacks due to deficiency or dysfunction of C1-INH. C1-INH replacement is the therapy of choice in HAE. In addition, C1-INH showed to have beneficial effects in other diseases characterized by inappropriate complement and contact system activation. Due to some limitations of its clinical application, there is a need for improving the efficacy of therapeutically applied C1-INH or to enhance the activity of endogenous C1-INH. Given the known potentiating effect of heparin on C1-INH, sulfated glycans (SG) may be such candidates. The aim of this study was to characterize suitable SG by evaluating structure-activity relationships. For this, more than 40 structurally distinct SG were examined for their effects on C1-INH, C1s and FXIIa. The SG turned out to potentiate the C1s inhibition by C1-INH without any direct influence on C1s. Their potentiating activity proved to depend on their degree of sulfation, molecular mass as well as glycan structure. In contrast, the SG had no effect on the FXIIa inhibition by C1-INH, but structure-dependently modulated the activity of FXIIa. Among the tested SG, β-1,3-glucan sulfates with a Mr ≤ 10 000 were identified as most promising lead candidates for the development of a glycan-based C1-INH amplifier. In conclusion, the obtained information on structural characteristics of SG favoring C1-INH potentiation represent an useful elementary basis for the development of compounds improving the potency of C1-INH in diseases and clinical situations characterized by inappropriate activation of complement and contact system. PMID:27783665

  7. Human C1 inhibitor attenuates liver ischemia-reperfusion injury and promotes liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Reza F; Rajeshkumar, Barur; Shariftabrizi, Ahmad; Dresser, Karen; Walter, Otto

    2014-04-01

    Liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a well-known cause of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation (LT). Activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of IRI. Effective treatment strategies aimed at reducing hepatic IRI and accelerating liver regeneration could offer major benefits in LT. Herein, we investigated the effect of C1-esterase inhibitor (human) [C1-INH] on IRI and liver regeneration. Mice were subjected to 60-min partial IRI, with or without 70% partial hepatectomy, or CCl4-induced acute liver failure. Before liver injury, the animals were pretreated with intravenous C1-INH or normal saline. Liver IRI was evaluated using serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, serum interleukin-6, and histopathology. Liver samples were stained for specific markers of regeneration (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine [BrdU] staining and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]). Histology, serum interleukin-6, and alanine aminotransferase release revealed that C1-INH treatment attenuated liver injury compared with controls. Improved animal survival and increased number of BrdU- and PCNA-positive cells were observed in C1-INH-treated animals which underwent IRI + partial hepatectomy or CCl4 injection compared with control group. These data indicate that complement plays a key role in IRI and liver regeneration. C1-INH represents a potential therapeutic strategy to reduce IRI and promote regeneration in LT.

  8. Population pharmacokinetics of recombinant human C1 inhibitor in patients with hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Colm; Hayes, Siobhan; Relan, Anurag; van Amersfoort, Edwin S; Pijpstra, Rienk; Hack, C Erik

    2013-01-01

    Aims To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) in healthy volunteers and hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients. Methods Plasma levels of C1INH following 294 administrations of rhC1INH in 133 subjects were fitted using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. The model was used to simulate maximal C1INH levels for the proposed dosing scheme. Results A one-compartment model with Michaelis–Menten elimination kinetics described the data. Baseline C1INH levels were 0.901 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.839–0.968] and 0.176 U ml−1 (95% CI: 0.154–0.200) in healthy volunteers and HAE patients, respectively. The volume of distribution of rhC1INH was 2.86 l (95% CI: 2.68–3.03). The maximal rate of elimination and the concentration corresponding to half this maximal rate were 1.63 U ml−1 h−1 (95% CI: 1.41–1.88) and 1.60 U ml−1 (95% CI: 1.14–2.24), respectively, for healthy volunteers and symptomatic HAE patients. The maximal elimination rate was 36% lower in asymptomatic HAE patients. Peak C1INH levels did not change upon repeated administration of rhC1INH. Bodyweight was found to be an important predictor of the volume of distribution. Simulations of the proposed dosing scheme predicted peak C1INH concentrations above the lower level of the normal range (0.7 U ml−1) for at least 94% of all patients. Conclusions The population PK model for C1INH supports a dosing scheme on a 50 U kg−1 basis up to 84 kg, with a fixed dose of 4200 U above 84 kg. The PK of rhC1INH following repeat administration are consistent with the PK following the first administration. PMID:23594263

  9. Biochemical comparison of four commercially available C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates for treatment of hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, Annette; Kalina, Uwe; Hofmann, Peter; Machnig, Thomas; Henkel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background For safe and efficacious treatment of hereditary angioedema, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrates should have high purity and high amounts of functional protein. As no pharmacopoeia requirements exist for C1-INH concentrate lot release, biochemical characteristics as declared by the manufacturers may not be compared directly. This study compared the characteristics and purity profiles of four commercially available C1-INH concentrates. Study Design and Methods The analysis included one transgenic (Ruconest) and three plasma-derived (Berinert, Cetor, Cinryze) C1-INH concentrates. C1-INH antigen concentration was determined by nephelometry, total protein (specific activity) with a Bradford assay, purity by size-exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed. Results Functionality (inversely proportional to antigen-to-activity ratio) was lowest for Ruconest (1.67), followed by Cetor (1.42), Berinert (1.24), and Cinryze (1.22). Specific activity (U/mg) and purity (%) were highest in Ruconest (12.13; 98.6) and Berinert (11.57; 97.0), followed by Cinryze (10.41; 89.5) and Cetor (9.01; 88.6). Main protein bands were found for all plasma-derived products at approximately 105 kDa, and for Ruconest, at approximately 98 kDa. Additional bands in the plasma-derived products were α1-antichymotrypsin, ceruloplasmin, Factor C3 (Cinryze/Cetor), and immunoglobulin heavy constant mu (Berinert). Conclusion Ruconest has a very high purity profile but is not identical to the human C1-INH protein. Of the plasma-derived products, Berinert has the highest purity profile. The impact of the nontherapeutic proteins identified has not yet been evaluated. For harmonization of the analysis for drug release, we recommend the establishment of regulatory requirements for purity determination and the implementation of threshold levels in C1-INH concentrates. PMID:24805006

  10. Nanofiltered C1 esterase inhibitor (human) for hereditary angioedema attacks in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Baker, James W; Craig, Timothy J; Riedl, Marc A; Banerji, Aleena; Fitts, David; Kalfus, Ira N; Uknis, Marc E

    2013-01-01

    Data are limited on hereditary angioedema (HAE) in pregnant women and the safety and efficacy of therapies for treatment and prevention of HAE attacks during pregnancy. Prospective studies are unlikely given the rarity of HAE and ethical considerations regarding enrollment of pregnant female subjects in clinical trials. A retrospective analysis of clinical trial and compassionate-use data was conducted to identify subjects who received nanofiltered C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH-nf; human) during pregnancy. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of human C1 INH-nf for treatment and prevention of HAE attacks in pregnant women. Data from pregnant subjects enrolled in either open-label extensions of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of C1 INH-nf or in a compassionate-use program were retrospectively analyzed for efficacy (e.g., total attacks, attack frequency during prophylaxis, and monthly attack rates) and safety (e.g., pregnancy outcomes and adverse events). C1 INH-nf was administered as acute treatment, preprocedural prophylaxis, or routine prophylaxis. C1 INH-nf prophylaxis substantially reduced monthly attack rates. Of 16 subjects, 13 delivered 14 healthy neonates (1 set of twins). Two adverse fetal outcomes were reported; neither was considered by the principal investigator to be related to C1 INH-nf. One subject's pregnancy outcome was unknown. This analysis shows a favorable risk-benefit profile for C1 INH-nf for managing HAE during pregnancy. NCT Identifier: NCT00438815; NCT00462709. PMID:23484892

  11. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor inhibits cytotoxicity induced by allo- and xenoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Poirier, N; Blancho, G

    2008-03-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is usually poorly controlled, especially in the context of pretransplant immunization, and remains an unsolved issue in xenotransplantation. In order to study prevention and/or treatment of AMR through an early blockade of the complement classical pathway, we designed two strategies to test the effect of a new recombinant human C1-inhibitor that inhibits C1 esterase (rhC1-INH; Pharming, The Netherlands), in a complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay, in the contexts of pretransplant anti-donor alloimmunization and pig-to-primate combinations in order to compare the situations. RhC1-INH appeared to be efficient, in allo- and xenotransplantation settings to block cytotoxicity when given at the initiation of (preventive strategy) or during (curative strategy) the cytotoxicity assay. Importantly, we showed that a small amount of exogenous rhC1-INH was sufficient to prevent cytotoxicity induced by anti-donor alloantibody, thus possibly helping to prevent or treat AMR in preimmunized patients. These in vitro data lead to future in vivo studies in models of AMR in pigs and baboons in allotransplantation and xenotransplantation, in which cytotoxicity due to Gal and non-Gal antibodies is so detrimental.

  12. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor inhibits cytotoxicity induced by allo- and xenoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Poirier, N; Blancho, G

    2008-03-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is usually poorly controlled, especially in the context of pretransplant immunization, and remains an unsolved issue in xenotransplantation. In order to study prevention and/or treatment of AMR through an early blockade of the complement classical pathway, we designed two strategies to test the effect of a new recombinant human C1-inhibitor that inhibits C1 esterase (rhC1-INH; Pharming, The Netherlands), in a complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay, in the contexts of pretransplant anti-donor alloimmunization and pig-to-primate combinations in order to compare the situations. RhC1-INH appeared to be efficient, in allo- and xenotransplantation settings to block cytotoxicity when given at the initiation of (preventive strategy) or during (curative strategy) the cytotoxicity assay. Importantly, we showed that a small amount of exogenous rhC1-INH was sufficient to prevent cytotoxicity induced by anti-donor alloantibody, thus possibly helping to prevent or treat AMR in preimmunized patients. These in vitro data lead to future in vivo studies in models of AMR in pigs and baboons in allotransplantation and xenotransplantation, in which cytotoxicity due to Gal and non-Gal antibodies is so detrimental. PMID:18374134

  13. Efficacy of C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate in treatment of cutaneous attacks of hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Bork, Konrad; Craig, Timothy J.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Feuersenger, Henrike; Machnig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although treatment with C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate is well established for hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks in general, data that assess its efficacy for cutaneous attack treatment are sparse. Objective: To assess efficacy of plasma-derived, nanofiltered C1-INH concentrate for cutaneous attack treatment by comparing treated attacks from the uncontrolled I.M.P.A.C.T.2 study with historical data for untreated attacks. Methods: Cutaneous attack data from patients with HAE who were treated for cutaneous edema with 20 IU/kg body weight C1-INH concentrate in the uncontrolled I.M.P.A.C.T.2 study (38 patients) were compared with data from untreated patients from an historical data base (46 patients) and included subset analyses for facial edema (treated group, 21 patients; untreated group, 33 patients) and peripheral edema (30 patients in each group). Average attack duration (AAD) per patient was the efficacy end point used to compare treated and untreated patients. Differences were assessed with a Wilcoxon test (primary analysis) and a log-rank test; AAD per patient was analyzed descriptively and graphically with Kaplan-Meier curves. Results: The AAD per patient of all cutaneous attacks or facial and peripheral cutaneous attack subsets was significantly faster with C1-INH treatment than without treatment (Wilcoxon and log-rank tests, both p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Mean AADs per patient for all, facial, and peripheral attacks were 2.04, 1.45, and 2.16 days, respectively, in the C1-INH–treated group, and were 3.74, 4.45, and 2.98 days, respectively, in the untreated group. Kaplan-Meier curves corroborated the observed group differences. Conclusion: Treatment of cutaneous HAE attacks (all attacks or facial and peripheral attack subsets) with 20 IU/kg C1-INH concentrate provided faster attack resolution compared with no treatment. PMID:25803207

  14. C1 Inhibitor Limits Organ Injury and Prolongs Survival in Swine Subjected to Battlefield Simulated Injury.

    PubMed

    Campbell, James C; Li, Yansong; van Amersfoort, Edwin; Relan, Anurag; Dubick, Michael; Sheppard, Forest; Pusateri, Anthony; Niemeyer, Debra; Tsokos, George C; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J

    2016-09-01

    Complement system activation is recognized as a deleterious component of the mammalian physiological response to traumatic injury with severe hemorrhage (TH). Female Yorkshire swine were subjected to a simulated austere prehospital battlefield scenario. Each animal underwent controlled hemorrhage of 22 mL/kg at 100 mL/min rate for approximately 10 min followed by soft tissue injury, femur fracture, and spleen injury. Subsequent blood loss was uncontrolled. Twenty-eight minutes postinjury the animals were randomized into treatment or no treatment with recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) (500 IU/kg, n = 11) and into receiving or not permissive hypotensive resuscitation (n = 14) with infusion of 45 mL/kg lactated Ringer's solution (2× blood lost). Observation and animal maintenance continued for 6 h at which time the animals had either expired or were euthanized. Heart, lung, and small intestine tissue samples were collected. Pharmacokinetic, hemodynamic, and metabolic parameters as well as survival time, plasma complement activity and tissue deposition, cytokine levels, and tissue injury were determined. We found that administration of C1INH protected tissues from damage, reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines, and improved blood chemistry. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that C1INH administration following TH markedly reduced complement activation and deposition in tissues. Importantly, C1INH administration prolonged survival of animals particularly in those which received resuscitation fluid infusion. Our data urge early administration of C1INH to limit organ damage and prolong survival of those injured in the battlefield. PMID:27405065

  15. Initial studies on the administration of C1-esterase inhibitor to patients with septic shock or with a vascular leak syndrome induced by interleukin-2 therapy.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Ogilvie, A C; Eisele, B; Jansen, P M; Wagstaff, J; Thijs, L G

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the complement and contact systems occur in patients with septic shock and is associated with a poor outcome. Activation of both systems is regulated by a common inhibitor, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). Functional levels of C1-Inh are normal or slightly decreased in septic patients although this inhibitor is an acute phase protein. Moreover, an increased turn-over of C1-Inh in sepsis likely occurs since levels of proteolytically inactivated ("modified") C1-Inh are increased in this syndrome. One may therefore postulate that in sepsis there is a relative deficiency of C1-Inh. Here we will summarize our preliminary studies in 11 patients with septic shock, who received high doses of C1-Inh for up to 5 days. Activation of complement and contact systems also occurs in "a human model for septic shock" i.e., the vascular leak syndrome (VLS) induced by immunotherapy with the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The similarity between VLS and sepsis is not only reflected by similar patterns of complement and contact activation, but also by comparable hemodynamic and biochemical changes, and by the involvement of a number of other inflammatory mediators, such as the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and of neutrophils. Here we will also summarize our initial studies of the effect of C1-Inh administration to 6 patients with the VLS induced by IL-2. Our results indicate that high doses of C1-Inh can be safely administered to patients with septic shock or with the VLS, and may attenuate complement and contact activation in these conditions. Whether this therapy may reduce mortality and or morbidity of either syndrome has to be established by double-blind controlled studies.

  16. C1-Esterase inhibitor: an anti-inflammatory agent and its potential use in the treatment of diseases other than hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Caliezi, C; Wuillemin, W A; Zeerleder, S; Redondo, M; Eisele, B; Hack, C E

    2000-03-01

    C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) therapy was introduced in clinical medicine about 25 years ago as a replacement therapy for patients with hereditary angioedema caused by a deficiency of C1-Inh. There is now accumulating evidence, obtained from studies in animals and observations in patients, that administration of C1-Inh may have a beneficial effect as well in other clinical conditions such as sepsis, cytokine-induced vascular leak syndrome, acute myocardial infarction, or other diseases. Activation of the complement system, the contact activation system, and the coagulation system has been observed in these diseases. A typical feature of the contact and complement system is that on activation they give rise to vasoactive peptides such as bradykinin or the anaphylatoxins, which in part explains the proinflammatory effects of either system. C1-Inh, belonging to the superfamily of serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins), is a major inhibitor of the classical complement pathway, the contact activation system, and the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, respectively. It is, therefore, endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. However, inactivation of C1-Inh occurs locally in inflamed tissues by proteolytic enzymes (e.g., elastase) released from activated neutrophils or bacteria thereby leading to increased local activation of the various host defense systems. Here we will give an overview on the biochemistry and biology of C1-Inh. We will discuss studies addressing therapeutic administration of C1-Inh in experimental and clinical conditions. Finally, we will provide an explanation for the therapeutic benefit of C1-Inh in so many different diseases.

  17. C1-Inhibitor protects from focal brain trauma in a cortical cryolesion mice model by reducing thrombo-inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Albert-Weissenberger, Christiane; Mencl, Stine; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Salur, Irmak; Göb, Eva; Langhauser, Friederike; Hopp, Sarah; Hennig, Nelli; Meuth, Sven G.; Nolte, Marc W.; Sirén, Anna-Leena; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a strong inflammatory response which includes blood-brain barrier damage, edema formation and infiltration of different immune cell subsets. More recently, microvascular thrombosis has been identified as another pathophysiological feature of TBI. The contact-kinin system represents an interface between inflammatory and thrombotic circuits and is activated in different neurological diseases. C1-Inhibitor counteracts activation of the contact-kinin system at multiple levels. We investigated the therapeutic potential of C1-Inhibitor in a model of TBI. Male and female C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cortical cryolesion and treated with C1-Inhibitor after 1 h. Lesion volumes were assessed between day 1 and day 5 and blood-brain barrier damage, thrombus formation as well as the local inflammatory response were determined post TBI. Treatment of male mice with 15.0 IU C1-Inhibitor, but not 7.5 IU, 1 h after cryolesion reduced lesion volumes by ~75% on day 1. This protective effect was preserved in female mice and at later stages of trauma. Mechanistically, C1-Inhibitor stabilized the blood-brain barrier and decreased the invasion of immune cells into the brain parenchyma. Moreover, C1-Inhibitor had strong antithrombotic effects. C1-Inhibitor represents a multifaceted anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic compound that prevents traumatic neurodegeneration in clinically meaningful settings. PMID:25249935

  18. The functional integrity of the serpin domain of C1-inhibitor depends on the unique N-terminal domain, as revealed by a pathological mutant.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Roem, Dorina; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Hack, C Erik; Eldering, Eric

    2003-08-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) with a unique, non-conserved N-terminal domain of unknown function. Genetic deficiency of C1-Inh causes hereditary angioedema. A novel type of mutation (Delta 3) in exon 3 of the C1-Inh gene, resulting in deletion of Asp62-Thr116 in this unique domain, was encountered in a hereditary angioedema pedigree. Because the domain is supposedly not essential for inhibitory activity, the unexpected loss-of-function of this deletion mutant was further investigated. The Delta 3 mutant and three additional mutants starting at Pro76, Gly98, and Ser115, lacking increasing parts of the N-terminal domain, were produced recombinantly. C1-Inh76 and C1-Inh98 retained normal conformation and interaction kinetics with target proteases. In contrast, C1-Inh115 and Delta 3, which both lack the connection between the serpin and the non-serpin domain via two disulfide bridges, were completely non-functional because of a complex-like and multimeric conformation, as demonstrated by several criteria. The Delta 3 mutant also circulated in multimeric form in plasma from affected family members. The C1-Inh mutant reported here is unique in that deletion of an entire amino acid stretch from a domain not shared by other serpins leads to a loss-of-function. The deletion in the unique N-terminal domain results in a "multimerization phenotype" of C1-Inh, because of diminished stability of the central beta-sheet. This phenotype, as well as the location of the disulfide bridges between the serpin and the non-serpin domain of C1-Inh, suggests that the function of the N-terminal region may be similar to one of the effects of heparin in antithrombin III, maintenance of the metastable serpin conformation.

  19. Recent developments in the treatment of acute abdominal and facial attacks of hereditary angioedema: focus on human C1 esterase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Lourdes Pastó; Bellfill, Ramon Lleonart; Caus, Joaquim Marcoval

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially fatal genetic disorder typified by a deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) of the C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) and characterized by swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, abdominal viscera, and upper airway. Type III is normal estrogen-sensitive C1-INH HAE. Bradykinin, the main mediator of HAE, binds to endothelial B2 receptors, increasing vascular permeability and resulting in edema. HAE management includes short- and long-term prophylaxis. For treating acute episodes, C1-INH concentrate is recommended with regression of symptoms achieved in 30–90 min. Infusions of 500–1000 U have been used in Europe for years. Two plasma-derived C1-INH concentrates have been licensed recently in the United States: Berinert® for treating acute attacks and Cinryze® for prophylaxis in adolescent/adult patients. A recombinant C1-INH that is being considered for approval (conestat alfa) exhibited significant superiority versus placebo. Ecallantide (Kalbitor®) is a selective kallikrein inhibitor recently licensed in the United States for treating acute attacks in patients aged >16 years. It is administered in three 10-mg subcutaneous injections with the risk of anaphylactic reactions. Icatibant (Firazyr®) is a bradykinin B2 receptor competitor. It is administered subcutaneously as a 30-mg injection and approved in Europe but not in the United States. PMID:23776358

  20. The potentiation of human C1-inhibitor by dextran sulphate is transient in vivo: studies in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Bos, I G; van Mierlo, G J; Bleeker, W K; Rigter, G M; te Velthuis, H; Dickneite, G; Hack, C E

    2001-08-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) is an important regulator of inflammatory reactions because it is a potent inhibitor of the contact and complement system. C1-Inh application in inflammatory disease is, however, restricted because of the high doses required. The glycosaminoglycan-like molecule dextran sulphate (DXS) enhances C1-Inh function in vitro. Hence, we investigated whether co-administration with dextran sulphate reduces the amount of C1-Inh required, through enhancement in vivo. C1-Inh potentiation was measured in a newly developed C1s-inactivation assay that is based on activation of C4 by purified C1s. Activated C4 in rat plasma was quantified with a newly developed ELISA. Human C1-Inh (2.5 microM) inhibited C1s in rat plasma 55-fold faster in the presence of dextran sulphate (15 kDa, 5 microM). To study the stability of the complex in vivo, rats were given a mixture of C1-Inh (10 mg/kg) and dextran sulphate (3 mg/kg). C1-Inh activity during 5 h was analyzed ex vivo with the C1s inactivation assay. The noncovalent C1-Inh-dextran sulphate complex resulted in a transient enhancement of the inhibitory capacity of C1-Inh, lasting for 60-90 min. Dextran sulphate did not affect plasma clearance of C1-Inh. We conclude that the enhanced inhibitory capacity of C1-Inh complexed to dextran sulphate is transient in vivo. Hence, co-administration of these compounds seems a feasible approach to achieve short-term inhibition of complement in vivo.

  1. C1-inhibitor substitution therapy in septic shock and in the vascular leak syndrome induced by high doses of interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Ogilvie, A C; Eisele, B; Eerenberg, A J; Wagstaff, J; Thijs, L G

    1993-01-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) is the major plasma inhibitor of the complement and contact systems. Activation of either system has been shown to occur in patients with septic shock and is associated with a poor outcome. Functional levels of C1-INH tend to be normal in septic patients although paradoxically this inhibitor is an acute phase protein. Moreover, levels of proteolytically inactivated C1-INH are increased in sepsis pointing to an increased turn-over. These observations suggest a relative deficiency of biologically active C1-INH in sepsis. Complement and contact activation have also been shown to occur in the vascular leak syndrome (VLS) induced by immunotherapy with the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2), which syndrome may be regarded as a human model for septic shock. The similarity between VLS and sepsis encompasses more than complement and contact activation since a number of other inflammatory mediators considered to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic shock, are also involved in the development of VLS. The role and the mechanisms of complement and contact activation in sepsis and in the VLS are reviewed in this paper. Initial results of intervention therapy with high doses of C1-INH in these syndromes are also reported. It is concluded that high doses of C1-INH can be safely administered to patients with septic shock or with the VLS and may attenuate complement and contact activation in these conditions. Double-blind controlled studies are needed to definitely proved these effects and to establish whether this treatment is able to reduce mortality and morbidity of these syndromes.

  2. Inactivation of factor XIa in human plasma assessed by measuring factor XIa-protease inhibitor complexes: major role for C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; Minnema, M; Meijers, J C; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Nuijens, J H; ten Cate, H; Hack, C E

    1995-03-15

    From experiments with purified proteins, it has been concluded that factor XIa (FXIa) is inhibited in plasma mainly by alpha 1-antitrypsin (a1AT), followed by antithrombin III (ATIII), C1-inhibitor (C1Inh), and alpha 2-antiplasmin (a2AP). However, the validity of this concept has never been studied in plasma. We established the relative contribution of different inhibitors to the inactivation of FXIa in human plasma, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the quantification of complexes of FXIa with a1AT, C1Inh, a2AP, and ATIII. We found that 47% of FXIa added to plasma formed complexes with C1Inh, 24.5% with a2AP, 23.5% with a1AT, and 5% with ATIII. The distribution of FXIa between these inhibitors in plasma was independent of whether FXIa was added to plasma, or was activated endogenously by kaolin, celite, or glass. However, in the presence of heparin (1 or 50 U/mL), C1Inh appeared to be the major inhibitor of FXIa, followed by ATIII. Furthermore, at lower temperatures, less FXIa-C1Inh and FXIa-a1AT complexes but more FXIa-a2AP complexes were formed. These data demonstrate that the contribution of the different inhibitors to inactivation of FXIa in plasma may vary, but C1Inh is the principal inhibitor under most conditions.

  3. A hinge region mutation in C1-inhibitor (Ala436-->Thr) results in nonsubstrate-like behavior and in polymerization of the molecule.

    PubMed

    Aulak, K S; Eldering, E; Hack, C E; Lubbers, Y P; Harrison, R A; Mast, A; Cicardi, M; Davis, A E

    1993-08-25

    C1-inhibitor(Mo), a dysfunctional C1-inhibitor molecule produced in two kindred with type II hereditary angioedema, has a mutation at the P10 position (Ala436 to Thr). Like most serpins with hinge region mutations (P14, P12, P10), C1-inhibitor(Mo) loses its inhibitory activity. However, unlike the other hinge region mutations, this mutant is not converted to a substrate. As shown by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and electron microscopy, C1-inhibitor(Mo) exists in both monomeric and multimeric forms. Polymerization probably results from reactive center loop insertion into the A sheet of an adjacent molecule. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo) was shown to have a thermal stability profile intermediate to those of intact and of cleaved normal C1-inhibitor. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo) did not bind to monoclonal antibody KII, which binds only to reactive center-cleaved normal C1-inhibitor. It did, however, react with monoclonal antibody KOK12, which recognizes complexed or cleaved C1-inhibitor but not intact normal C1-inhibitor. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo), therefore, exists in a conformation similar to the complexed form of normal C1-inhibitor.

  4. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  5. Iron-deficiency anemia caused by a proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Rintaro; Matsuda, Tomoki; Chonan, Akimichi

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was orally administered rabeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), for gastroesophageal reflux disease, after which he gradually developed iron-deficiency anemia. The anemia did not improve following the administration of ferrous fumarate, and endoscopic screening of the entire gastrointestinal tract, including the small intestine, did not reveal any findings indicating the cause of the anemia. The patient was then switched from rabeprazole to famotidine and the anemia was cured within three months. There is much debate as to whether the long-term use of PPIs causes iron-deficiency. However, this case strongly suggests that PPIs can induce iron-deficiency anemia.

  6. Small molecule inhibitors reveal Niemann-Pick C1 is essential for ebolavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Marceline; Misasi, John; Ren, Tao; Bruchez, Anna; Lee, Kyungae; Filone, Claire Marie; Hensley, Lisa; Li, Qi; Ory, Daniel; Chandran, Kartik; Cunningham, James

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ebolavirus (EboV) is a highly pathogenic enveloped virus that causes outbreaks of zoonotic infection in Africa. The clinical symptoms are manifestations of the massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection1 and in many outbreaks, mortality exceeds 75%. The unpredictable onset, ease of transmission, rapid progression of disease, high mortality and lack of effective vaccine or therapy have created a high level of public concern about EboV2. Here we report the identification of a novel benzylpiperazine adamantane diamide-derived compound that inhibits EboV infection. Using mutant cell lines and informative derivatives of the lead compound, we show that the target of the inhibitor is the endosomal membrane protein Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). We find that NPC1 is essential for infection, that it binds to the virus glycoprotein (GP), and that the anti-viral compounds interfere with GP binding to NPC1. Combined with the results of previous studies of GP structure and function, our findings support a model of EboV infection in which cleavage of the GP1 subunit by endosomal cathepsin proteases removes heavily glycosylated domains to expose the N-terminal domain3–7, which is a ligand for NPC1 and regulates membrane fusion by the GP2 subunit8. Thus, NPC1 is essential for EboV entry and a target for anti-viral therapy. PMID:21866101

  7. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor and factor XII mutation: a series of 57 patients from the French National Center of Reference for Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Deroux, A; Boccon-Gibod, I; Fain, O; Pralong, P; Ollivier, Y; Pagnier, A; Djenouhat, K; Du-Thanh, A; Gompel, A; Faisant, C; Launay, D; Bouillet, L

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disease associated with either a quantitative or qualitative deficiency in C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) or normal C1-INH. HAE with normal C1-INH is associated in 20% of cases with mutations in the gene for factor XII (FXII) or FXII-HAE. A recent review described 41 families, including 14 German and 15 Spanish families. We have constructed a register of French patients and their characteristics. A national survey was launched through the French National Center of Reference for Angioedema (CREAK) to study the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of patients with HAE linked to a mutation of FXII gene. Fifty-seven patients were identified from 24 different families. In most cases they were young women (mean age at diagnosis: 31 years, mean age at first symptom: 21 years, female/male ratio: 76%). Twenty-one per cent of the patients experienced angioedema attacks only during pregnancy or when on oestrogen contraception. Sixty-three per cent had attacks at all times, but they were more severe during these same periods. Male carriers of the mutation were more frequently asymptomatic than females (P = 0·003). C1-INH concentrate and icatibant were both effective for treating attacks. The prophylactic use of tranexamic acid led to a 64% decrease in the number of attacks. This is one of the largest series reported of HAE patients with FXII mutation. The therapeutic management appeared to be identical to that of HAE with C1-INH deficiency. PMID:27271546

  8. Deficiency in complement C1q improves histological and functional locomotor outcome after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galvan, Manuel D.; Luchetti, Sabina; Burgos, Adrian M.; Nguyen, Hal X.; Hooshmand, Mitra J.; Anderson, Aileen J.; Hamers, Frank P.T.

    2009-01-01

    Although studies have suggested a role for the complement system in the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI), that role remains poorly defined. Additionally, the relative contribution of individual complement pathways in SCI is unknown. Our initial studies revealed that systemic complement activation was strongly influenced by genetic background and gender. Thus, to investigate the role of the classical complement pathway in contusion-induced SCI, male C1q knockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice on a complement sufficient background (BUB) received a mild-moderate T9 contusion injury with the Infinite Horizon (IH) impactor. BUB C1q KO mice exhibited greater locomotor recovery in comparison to BUB WT mice (p < 0.05). Improved recovery observed in BUB C1q KO mice was also associated with decreased threshold for withdrawal from a mild stimulus using von Frey filament testing. Surprisingly, quantification of microglia/macrophages (F4/80) by FACS analysis showed that BUB C1q KO mice exhibited a significantly greater percentage of macrophages in the spinal cord compared to BUB WT mice 3 days post injury (p < 0.05). However, this increased macrophage response appeared to be transient as stereological assessment of spinal cord tissue obtained 28 days post injury revealed no difference in F4/80 positive cells between groups. Stereological assessment of spinal cord tissue showed that BUB C1q KO mice had reduced lesion volume and an increase in tissue sparing in comparison to BUB WT mice (p < 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that initiation of the classical complement pathway via C1q is detrimental to recovery after SCI. PMID:19091977

  9. Recombinant C1 inhibitor P5/P3 variants display resistance to catalytic inactivation by stimulated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Huijbregts, C C; Nuijens, J H; Verhoeven, A J; Hack, C E

    1993-03-01

    Proteolytic inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by neutrophil elastase (HNE) is presumed to contribute to the deregulation of plasma cascade systems in septic shock. Here, we report a supplementary approach to construct serpins, in our case C1 inhibitor, that are resistant to catalytic inactivation by HNE. Instead of shifting the specificity of alpha 1-antitrypsin towards the proteases of the contact activation and complement systems, we attempted to obtain a C1 inhibitor species which resists proteolytic inactivation by HNE. 12 recombinant C1 inhibitor variants were produced with mainly conservative substitutions at the cleavage sites for HNE, 440-Ile and/or 442-Val. Three variants significantly resisted proteolytic inactivation, both by purified HNE, as well as by activated neutrophils. The increase in functional half-life in the presence of FMLP-stimulated cells was found to be 18-fold for the 440-Leu/442-Ala variant. Inhibitory function of these variants was relatively unimpaired, as examined by the formation of stable complexes with C1s, beta-Factor XIIa, kallikrein, and plasmin, and as determined by kinetic analysis. The calculated association rate constants (k(on)) were reduced twofold at most for C1s, and appeared unaffected for beta-Factor XIIa. The effect on the k(on) with kallikrein was more pronounced, ranging from a significant ninefold reduction to an unmodified rate. The results show that the reactive centre loop of C1 inhibitor can be modified towards decreased sensitivity for nontarget proteases without loss of specificity for target proteases. We conclude that this approach extends the possibilities of applying recombinant serpin variants for therapeutic use in inflammatory diseases.

  10. 20 CFR 664.205 - How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How is the âdeficient in basic literacy... INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills... requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) may be...

  11. 20 CFR 664.205 - How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How is the âdeficient in basic literacy... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy... documentation requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1)...

  12. 20 CFR 664.205 - How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How is the âdeficient in basic literacy... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy... documentation requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1)...

  13. 20 CFR 664.205 - How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the âdeficient in basic literacy... INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills... requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) may be...

  14. 20 CFR 664.205 - How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How is the âdeficient in basic literacy... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy... documentation requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1)...

  15. Potential therapeutic benefit of C1-esterase inhibitor in neuromyelitis optica evaluated in vitro and in an experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Asavapanumas, Nithi; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Verkman, A S

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which binding of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) to astrocytes causes complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and inflammation resulting in oligodendrocyte and neuronal injury. There is compelling evidence for a central role of complement in NMO pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the potential of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh) for complement-targeted therapy of NMO. C1-inh is an anti-inflammatory plasma protein with serine protease inhibition activity that has a broad range of biological activities on the contact (kallikrein), coagulation, fibrinolytic and complement systems. C1-inh is approved for therapy of hereditary angioedema (HAE) and has been studied in a small safety trial in acute NMO relapses (NCT 01759602). In vitro assays of NMO-IgG-dependent CDC showed C1-inh inhibition of human and rat complement, but with predicted minimal complement inhibition activity at a dose of 2000 units in humans. Inhibition of complement by C1-inh was potentiated by ∼10-fold by polysulfated macromolecules including heparin and dextran sulfate. In rats, intravenous C1-inh at a dose 30-fold greater than that approved to treat HAE inhibited serum complement activity by <5%, even when supplemented with heparin. Also, high-dose C1-inh did not reduce pathology in a rat model of NMO produced by intracerebral injection of NMO-IgG. Therefore, although C1r and C1s are targets of C1-inh, our in vitro data with human serum and in vivo data in rats suggest that the complement inhibition activity of C1-inh in serum is too low to confer clinical benefit in NMO.

  16. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Baldwin, W. Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. PMID:27381905

  17. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-01

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium.

  18. Effect of C1 inhibitor on inflammatory and physiologic response patterns in primates suffering from lethal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P M; Eisele, B; de Jong, I W; Chang, A; Delvos, U; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of C1 inhibitor (C1-inh), an inhibitor of the classical pathway of complement and the contact system, on the physiologic and inflammatory response in baboons suffering from lethal Escherichia coli sepsis. Five animals pretreated with 500 U/kg C1-inh (treatment group; n = 5), followed by a 9-h continuous infusion of 200 U/kg C1-inh subsequent to bacterial challenge, were compared with five controls receiving E. coli alone. Of the treatment group, one animal survived and another lived beyond 48 h, whereas all control animals died within 27 h. In four of five treated animals, less severe pathology was observed in various target organs. C1-inh administration did not prevent the hemodynamic or hematologic changes observed upon E. coli infusion. The activation of fibrinolysis and the development of disseminated intravascular coagulation were essentially unaffected by C1-inh. However, C1-inh supplementation significantly reduced decreases in plasma levels of factor XII and prekallikrein and abrogated the systemic appearance of C4b/c, indicating substantial inhibition of activation of the contact system and the classical complement pathway, respectively. Furthermore, treated animals displayed a reduced elaboration of various cytokines including TNF, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-8. Thus, the administration of C1-inh may have a beneficial but modest effect on the clinical course and outcome of severe sepsis in nonhuman primates. We suggest that activated complement and/or contact system proteases may, at least in part, contribute to the attendant manifestations of septic shock through an augmentation of the cytokine response.

  19. C1-inhibitor therapy for hereditary angioedema attacks: prospective patient assessments of health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bewtra, Againdra K; Levy, Robyn J; Jacobson, Kraig W; Wasserman, Richard L; Machnig, Thomas; Craig, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    C1-inhibitor (INH) concentrate, which is recommended as first-line treatment for acute hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks in many countries, was recently approved in the United States. We sought to solicit patients' feedback about their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) while being treated with C1-INH concentrate for acute HAE attacks under real-world conditions, as well as the personal impact of the availability of C1-INH on lifestyle and mental health domains. Subjects enrolled in an open-label study of C1-INH at 20 U/kg for acute HAE attacks were invited to participate in a prospectively designed survey to solicit "real-time" patient responses that were collected via an interactive voice response service or online with a personal computer. Eighteen subjects submitted 60 quarterly HRQoL and treatment impact survey responses over 29 months. Seventeen of 18 patients responding reported mean short form 12 HRQoL scores that were within a normal range. More than one-half indicated that C1-INH availability made them feel somewhat or much better, and >80% reported having a better outlook on the future and feeling more secure about the danger of life-threatening attacks. These data confirm a high level of HRQoL and a positive impact in lifestyle and emotional domains among patients who were treated for acute attacks of HAE with C1-INH concentrate.

  20. 84 Immuno-Safety of Recombinant Human C1 Inhibitor in Patients With Hereditary Angioedema: An Integrated Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hack, Erik; Relan, Anurag; Kaufman, Leonard; Pijpstra, Rienk

    2012-01-01

    Background Recombinant C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) is a novel therapeutic option for the treatment of acute angioedema attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). The amino acid sequence of rhC1INH is identical to that of endogenous C1INH. However, any recombinant protein may elicit antibodies against the protein and/or host related impurities (HRI). Clinical consequences of these antibodies can theoretically range from no clinical symptoms to allergic reactions and reduced C1INH activity due to neutralizing antibodies. Objective To analyze the immuno-safety of rhC1INH in symptomatic patients with HAE. Methods Plasma samples were collected pre-treatment and 22 and 90 days post-treatment of an acute angioedema attack. Plasma samples were tested for the presence of antibodies against plasma-derived C1INH and rhC1INH using 6 different, validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), to detect IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies against plasma-derived C1INH or rhC1INH. Antibodies against HRI in plasma samples were measured in an ELISA testing for all antibody classes. Plasma samples from normal healthy controls and HAE patients, never exposed to rhC1INH, were used to estimate cut off levels of the assays. Plasma samples with antibody levels above the cut-off level in the screening assays were tested in confirmatory displacement assay in case of anti-HRI antibodies and in an assay for neutralizing antibodies in case of antibodies against C1INH. Results Data from 155 symptomatic HAE patients having received a total of 424 administrations of rhC1INH were analyzed. The frequency of anti-C1INH antibody levels above the assay cut-off was low and similar in pre- and post-exposure samples (1.7 and 1.8%, respectively). Results above the assay cut-off were sporadic and transient. Occurrence of anti-C1INH antibodies did not correlate with repeated treatment or time since last treatment. No neutralizing antibodies were detected. A total of 5/155 (3%) rhC1INH-treated patients

  1. Molecular phylogeny of C1 inhibitor depicts two immunoglobulin-like domains fusion in fishes and ray-finned fishes specific intron insertion after separation from zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Sarde, Sandeep J.; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • C1 inhibitors of fishes have two Ig domains fused in the N-terminal end. • Spliceosomal introns gain in two Ig domains of selected ray-finned fishes. • C1 inhibitors gene is maintained from 450 MY on the same locus. • C1 inhibitors gene is missing in frog and lampreys. • C1 inhibitors of tetrapod and fishes differ in the RCL region. - Abstract: C1 inhibitor (C1IN) is a multi-facet serine protease inhibitor in the plasma cascades, inhibiting several proteases, notably, regulates both complement and contact system activation. Despite huge advancements in the understanding of C1IN based on biochemical properties and its roles in the plasma cascades, the phylogenetic history of C1IN remains uncharacterized. To date, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history of C1IN. Herein, we explored phylogenetic history of C1IN gene in vertebrates. Fishes have C1IN with two immunoglobulin like domains attached in the N-terminal region. The RCL regions of CIIN from fishes and tetrapod genomes have variations at the positions P2 and P1′. Gene structures of C1IN gene from selected ray-finned fishes varied in the Ig domain region with creation of novel intron splitting exon Im2 into Im2a and Im2b. This intron is limited to ray-finned fishes with genome size reduced below 1 Gb. Hence, we suggest that genome compaction and associated double-strand break repairs are behind this intron gain. This study reveals the evolutionary history of C1IN and confirmed that this gene remains the same locus for ∼450 MY in 52 vertebrates analysed, but it is not found in frogs and lampreys.

  2. A C1 inhibitor ortholog from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus): molecular perspectives of a central regulator in terms of its genomic arrangement, transcriptional profiles and anti-protease activities of recombinant peptide.

    PubMed

    Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Bathige, S D N K; Revathy, Kasthuri Saranya; Wickramaarachchi, W D N; Wan, Qiang; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Eunmi; Park, Myoung-Ae; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2014-02-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1Inh), a member of serpin superfamily, is a crucial regulator of the activation of various plasmatic cascades associated with immunity and inflammation. This study describes the identification and characterization of a C1Inh gene from rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus (OfC1Inh) at structural, expressional and functional levels. The cDNA-(2245bp) and corresponding gDNA-sequences (5.2kbp) of OfC1Inh were isolated from rock bream transcriptome- and BAC-libraries, respectively. Predicted amino acid sequence of OfC1Inh revealed a two-domain architecture composed of an N-terminal region with two Ig-like domains and a C-terminal region with a serpin domain. Tertiary model of OfC1Inh disclosed its active site topology. In the multi-exonic genomic arrangement of OfC1Inh, it consisted of eleven exons disjoined by ten introns as observed in few other fish homologs. Our comparative analysis indicated that the teleostean C1Inhs were distinct from their non-teleostean vertebrate counterparts in terms of their (1) extended N-terminal domains, (2) evolutionary divergence and (3) exon-intron distribution. The OfC1Inh had a TATA-deficient promoter with a putative initiator element, and two tandemly arranged downstream promoter elements. Several components associated with the immune and inflammatory transcriptional activation were also predicted to exist in 5' flanking region of OfC1Inh. The exclusive mRNA levels in liver and moderate levels in extra-hepatic tissues intimated the diversified importance of OfC1Inh in rock bream physiology. We also provide an evidence for the involvement of OfC1Inh in immune balance, based on its modulated transcription upon different PAMP (lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C)- or pathogen (Streptococcus iniae and rock bream irido virus)-challenges. A recombinantly expressed fusion protein [(r)OfC1Inh] was employed in demonstrating the anti-protease function of OfC1Inh. The (r)OfC1Inh exhibited detectable inhibitory activity against C1

  3. Feasibility of home infusion and self-administration of nanofiltered C1 esterase inhibitor for routine prophylaxis in patients with hereditary angioedema and characterization of a training and support program.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Cherylann; Landmesser, Ladonna M; Corrigan, Larry; Mariano, David

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare, chronic disease of C1 inhibitor deficiency. Study researchers evaluated the prevalence of home and self-administration of nanofiltered, human-derived C1 esterase inhibitor infusions and the implementation of a nursing training and support program. Home administration rate increased from 49.0% to 75.8%. The percentage who self-administered increased from 20.3% to 43.9%. Doses per week averaged 1.85 at home compared with 1.40 in infusion centers and physicians' offices. Patients required an average of 5 visits to be trained. Self-administration is a viable, feasible option in the management of HAE, which is facilitated by a nurse-managed training and support program.

  4. C3 is activated in hereditary angioedema, and C1/C1-inhibitor complexes rise during physical stress in untreated patients.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, E W; Johansen, H T; Gaudesen, O; Osterud, B; Olsen, J O; Høgåsen, K; Hack, C E; Mollnes, T E

    1995-12-01

    Seven patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) were studied to understand further how physical exercise may induce attacks. The most pronounced differences between patients and controls, however, were independent of the controlled bicycle run (mean values in patients/ controls); C4(g/L): 0.12/0.28 (P = 0.0122); C4bc (AU/ml): 137.0/18.0 (P = 0.0002); C4d (mg/mL): 5.03/2.35 (P = 0.0004); C3bc (AU/ml): 8.4/6.3 (P = 0.0049); C3a (AU/ml): 11.1/5.6 (P = 0.0102). The ratio C4bc to C4 was 1141 versus 64. Consequently, a substantial part of the low amount of C4 left in HAE patients consists of activation products, and the authors show for the first time that a mild but significant activation of C3 occurs in HAE. The two HAE patients treated with danazol had values of C1-INH function and antigen, C4, and C2 in-between those of normal and untreated patients, and lower levels of split products from C4 and high molecular weight kininogen than untreated patients. As a result of the exercise, fibrinolysis increased significantly in both patients and controls, while C1/C1-INH complexes rose significantly only in the five HAE patients without treatment when compared to the seven controls (P = 0.0089). This study thus suggests that complement activation is enhanced in untreated HAE patients following physical stress.

  5. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julia A; Hair, Pamela S; Pallera, Haree K; Kumar, Parvathi S; Mauriello, Clifford T; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Phelps, Cody A; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M; Pascal, Stephen M; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M; Lattanzio, Frank A; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  6. T Cell–dependent Immune Response in C1q-deficient Mice: Defective Interferon γ Production by Antigen-specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Antony J.; Botto, Marina; van Essen, Dominic; Rivi, Roberta; Davies, Kevin A.; Gray, David; Walport, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the classical complement pathway in humoral immune responses was investigated in gene-targeted C1q-deficient mice (C1qA−/−). Production of antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a and IgG3 in primary and secondary responses to T cell–dependent antigen was significantly reduced, whereas IgM, IgG1, and IgG2b responses were similar in control and C1qA−/− mice. Despite abnormal humoral responses, B cells from C1qA−/− mice proliferated normally to a number of stimuli in vitro. Immune complex localization to follicular dendritic cells within splenic follicles was lacking in C1qA−/− mice. The precursor frequency of antigen-specific T cells was similar in C1qA−/− and wild-type mice. However, analysis of cytokine production by primed T cells in response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin revealed a significant reduction in interferon-γ production in C1qA−/− mice compared with control mice, whereas interleukin 4 secretion was equivalent. These data suggest that the classical pathway of complement may influence the cytokine profile of antigen-specific T lymphocytes and the subsequent immune response. PMID:9607920

  7. Cytokines associated with amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease brain stimulate human glial and neuronal cell cultures to secrete early complement proteins, but not C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; De Groot, C J; Van Muiswinkel, F L; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1999-11-01

    Complement activation products C1q, C4c/d, and C3c/d in amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease probably result from direct binding and activation of C1 by amyloid beta peptides. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization studies have shown that several complement factors are produced in the brain parenchyma. In the present study, cytokines that can be detected in amyloid plaques (i.e., interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) were found to differentially stimulate the expression of C1 subcomponents, C1-Inhibitor (C1-Inh), C4, and C3, by astrocyte and microglial cell cultures derived from postmortem adult, human brain specimens and by neuroblastoma cell lines in culture. C1r and C1s were secreted at low levels by astrocytes and neuroblastoma cell lines. Exposure of cells to IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha and to a far lesser extent IL-6, markedly upregulated C1r, C1s, and C3 production. C4 synthesis increased in response to interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-6, whereas that of C1-Inh could be stimulated only by IFN-gamma. Thus, C1-Inh production is refractory to stimulation by plaque-associated cytokines, whereas these cytokines do stimulate C1r, C1s, and also C4 and C3 secretion by astrocytes and neuronal cells in culture. In contrast to the amyloid plaque associated cytokines IL-1 beta, IL-1 alpha, and TNF-alpha, the amyloid peptide A beta 1-42 itself did not stimulate C1r and C1s synthesis by astrocytes, microglial cells, or neuroblastoma cell lines. Microglial cells were the only cell type that constitutively expressed C1q. The ability of C1q to reassociate with newly formed C1r and C1s upon activation of C1 and subsequent inactivation by C1-Inh, may enable ongoing complement activation at sites of amyloid deposition, especially when C1-Inh is consumed and not replaced.

  8. C1q protein binds to the apoptotic nucleolus and causes C1 protease degradation of nucleolar proteins.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yitian; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Yeo, Joo Guan; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-09-11

    In infection, complement C1q recognizes pathogen-congregated antibodies and elicits complement activation. Among endogenous ligands, C1q binds to DNA and apoptotic cells, but whether C1q binds to nuclear DNA in apoptotic cells remains to be investigated. With UV irradiation-induced apoptosis, C1q initially bound to peripheral cellular regions in early apoptotic cells. By 6 h, binding concentrated in the nuclei to the nucleolus but not the chromatins. When nucleoli were isolated from non-apoptotic cells, C1q also bound to these structures. In vivo, C1q exists as the C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2), and C1q binding to ligands activates the C1r/C1s proteases. Incubation of nucleoli with C1 caused degradation of the nucleolar proteins nucleolin and nucleophosmin 1. This was inhibited by the C1 inhibitor. The nucleoli are abundant with autoantigens. C1q binding and C1r/C1s degradation of nucleolar antigens during cell apoptosis potentially reduces autoimmunity. These findings help us to understand why genetic C1q and C1r/C1s deficiencies cause systemic lupus erythematosus.

  9. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Deficiency Amplifies Acute Lung Injury in Bleomycin-Exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Burkhart, Kristin; Chen, Peter; Frevert, Charles W.; Randolph-Habecker, Julie; Hackman, Robert C.; Soloway, Paul D.; Madtes, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury triggers a profound and durable increase in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 expression, suggesting a potential role for this antiproteinase in the regulation of lung inflammation and fibrosis. TIMP-1 protein induction is spatially restricted to areas of lung injury as determined by immunohistochemistry. Using TIMP-1 null mutation mice, we demonstrate that TIMP-1 deficiency amplifies acute lung injury as determined by exaggerated pulmonary neutrophilia, hemorrhage, and vascular permeability compared with wild-type littermates after bleomycin exposure. The augmented pulmonary neutrophilia observed in TIMP-1–deficient animals was not found in similarly treated TIMP-2–deficient mice. Using TIMP-1 bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice, we observed that the TIMP-1–deficient phenotype was abolished in wild-type recipients of TIMP-1–deficient BM but not in TIMP-1–deficient recipients of wild-type BM. Acute lung injury in TIMP-1–deficient mice was accompanied by exaggerated gelatinase-B activity in the alveolar compartment. TIMP-1 deficiency did not alter neutrophil chemotactic factor accumulation in the injured lung nor neutrophil migration in response to chemotactic stimuli in vivo or in vitro. Moreover, TIMP-1 deficiency did not modify collagen accumulation after bleomycin injury. Our results provide direct evidence that TIMP-1 contributes significantly to the regulation of acute lung injury, functioning to limit inflammation and lung permeability. PMID:15947421

  10. Targeting MAGE-C1/CT7 Expression Increases Cell Sensitivity to the Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib in Multiple Myeloma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Fabricio; Costa, Erico T.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Gregorio, Juliana C.; Masotti, Cibele; Andrade, Valeria C.C.; Strauss, Bryan E.; Caballero, Otavia L.; Atanackovic, Djordje; Colleoni, Gisele W.B.

    2011-01-01

    The MAGE-C1/CT7 encodes a cancer/testis antigen (CTA), is located on the chromosomal region Xq26–27 and is highly polymorphic in humans. MAGE-C1/CT7 is frequently expressed in multiple myeloma (MM) that may be a potential target for immunotherapy in this still incurable disease. MAGEC1/CT7 expression is restricted to malignant plasma cells and it has been suggested that MAGE-C1/CT7 might play a pathogenic role in MM; however, the exact function this protein in the pathophysiology of MM is not yet understood. Our objectives were (1) to clarify the role of MAGE-C1/CT7 in the control of cellular proliferation and cell cycle in myeloma and (2) to evaluate the impact of silencing MAGE-C1/CT7 on myeloma cells treated with bortezomib. Myeloma cell line SKO-007 was transduced for stable expression of shRNA-MAGE-C1/CT7. Downregulation of MAGE-C1/CT7 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR and western blot. Functional assays included cell proliferation, cell invasion, cell cycle analysis and apoptosis. Western blot showed a 70–80% decrease in MAGE-C1/CT7 protein expression in inhibited cells (shRNA-MAGE-C1/CT7) when compared with controls. Functional assays did not indicate a difference in cell proliferation and DNA synthesis when inhibited cells were compared with controls. However, we found a decreased percentage of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle among inhibited cells, but not in the controls (p<0.05). When myeloma cells were treated with bortezomib, we observed a 48% reduction of cells in the G2/M phase among inhibited cells while controls showed 13% (empty vector) and 9% (ineffective shRNA) reduction, respectively (p<0.01). Furthermore, inhibited cells treated with bortezomib showed an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-) in comparison with bortezomib-treated controls (p<0.001). We found that MAGE-C1/CT7 protects SKO-007 cells against bortezomib-induced apoptosis. Therefore, we could speculate that MAGE-C1/CT7 gene therapy could be

  11. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase.

  12. Plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor does not prevent mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Beer, F M; Aslami, H; Hoeksma, J; van Mierlo, G; Wouters, D; Zeerleder, S; Roelofs, J J T H; Juffermans, N P; Schultz, M J; Lagrand, W K

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation has the potential to cause lung injury, and the role of complement activation herein is uncertain. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement cascade by administration of plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) prevents ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation, and as such attenuates lung inflammation and lung injury in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Forty hours after intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae causing pneumonia rats were subjected to ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or high tidal volumes without PEEP, after an intravenous bolus of C1-INH (200 U/kg) or placebo (saline). After 4 h of ventilation blood, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected. Non-ventilated rats with S. pneumoniae pneumonia served as controls. While ventilation with lower tidal volumes and PEEP slightly amplified pneumonia-induced complement activation in the lungs, ventilation with higher tidal volumes without PEEP augmented local complement activation more strongly. Systemic pre-treatment with C1-INH, however, failed to alter ventilation-induced complement activation with both ventilation strategies. In accordance, lung inflammation and lung injury were not affected by pre-treatment with C1-INH, neither in rats ventilated with lower tidal volumes and PEEP, nor rats ventilated with high tidal volumes without PEEP. Ventilation augments pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Systemic administration of C1-INH, however, does not attenuate ventilation-induced complement activation, lung inflammation, and lung injury. PMID:24760631

  13. Antithrombin III, but not C1 esterase inhibitor reduces inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes in an ex-vivo whole blood setting.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Patrick; Nestler, Frank; Leimert, Anja; Bucher, Michael; Czeslick, Elke; Sablotzki, Armin; Raspè, Christoph

    2014-12-01

    In order to examine the immunomodulatory effects of antithrombin III (AT-III) and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) in human monocytes, we investigated the intracellular expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in an ex-vivo laboratory study in a whole blood setting. Heparinized whole blood samples from 23 healthy male and female volunteers (mean age: 27±7years) were pre-incubated with clinically relevant concentrations of AT-III (n=11) and C1-INH (n=12), then stimulated with 0.2 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 3h. After phenotyping CD14⁺ monocytes, intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α was assessed using flow cytometry. In addition, 12 whole blood samples (AT-III and C1-INH, n=6 each) were examined using hirudin for anticoagulation; all samples were processed in the same way. To exclude cytotoxicity effects, 7-amino-actinomycin D and Nonidet P40 staining were used to investigate probes. This study is the first to demonstrate the influence of C1-INH and AT-III on the monocytic inflammatory response in a whole blood setting, which mimics the optimal physiological setting. Cells treated with AT-III exhibited significant downregulation of the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes for IL-6 and IL-8, in a dose-dependent manner; downregulation for TNF-α did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant effects on mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). In contrast, C1-INH did not significantly reduce the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes or the MFI regarding IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-8. When using hirudin for anticoagulation, no difference in the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III and C1-INH in monocytes occurs. Taken together, in contrast to TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly downregulated in monocytes in an ex-vivo setting of human whole blood when treated with AT-III. This finding implicates monocytes as an important point of action regarding the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III in sepsis. C1

  14. A pilot study to evaluate the effects of C1 esterase inhibitor on the toxicity of high-dose interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, A C; Baars, J W; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Pinedo, H M; Thijs, L G; Wagstaff, J

    1994-03-01

    In a pilot study six patients received 4 days' treatment with interleukin 2 (IL-2) [cumulative dose (CD) 264 +/- 26 x 10(6) IU m-2] and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) (loading dose 2,000 U, followed by 500-1,000 U twice daily). Toxicity was compared with that in patients given 4 days' treatment with standard (CD 66 +/- 12 x 10(6) IU m-2) or escalating-dose (CD 99 +/- 8 x 10(6) IU m-2) IL-2. IL-2-induced hypotension was equivalent and complement activation was less after IL-2 + C1-INH (C3a = 10.5 +/- 3.2 nmol l-1) than following standard (14.1 +/- 8.4 nmol l-1) or escalating-dose (18.3 +/- 2.9 nmol l-1) IL-2. This study demonstrates that C1-INH administration during IL-2 treatment is safe and warrants further study to evaluate its ability to ameliorate IL-2-induced toxicity.

  15. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15–3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations. PMID:26890881

  16. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15-3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations.

  17. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15-3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations. PMID:26890881

  18. Serum concentrations of canine alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor in cobalamin-deficient Yorkshire Terrier dogs.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Niels; Heilmann, Romy M; Bridges, Cory S; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2013-05-01

    Fecal canine alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (cα1-PI) concentration has been reported to be increased in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy due to the loss of cα1-PI into the gastrointestinal tract. A chronic loss of cα1-PI may theoretically deplete serum cα1-PI, potentially altering the proteinase-to-proteinase inhibitor balance. Protein-losing enteropathy has been reported to occur frequently in certain dog breeds such as Yorkshire Terriers and to be associated with hypocobalaminemia. The objective was to compare serum cα1-PI concentrations in Yorkshire Terriers with and without cobalamin (COB) deficiency. Serum samples from 52 COB-deficient and 69 normocobalaminemic Yorkshire Terriers, which had been submitted to the Gastrointestinal Laboratory (2008-2011; College Station, TX), were included retrospectively. Serum cα1-PI concentrations were measured using an in-house radioimmunoassay and compared between Yorkshire Terriers with and without COB deficiency using a Mann-Whitney U test. A Fisher exact test was used to evaluate whether a decreased serum cα1-PI concentration is associated with COB deficiency in Yorkshire Terriers. Serum cα1-PI concentrations were significantly lower in COB-deficient Yorkshire Terriers (median: 1,016 mg/l, range: 315-3,945 mg/l) than in normocobalaminemic Yorkshire Terriers (median: 1,665 mg/l, range: 900-2,970 mg/l; P < 0.0001). One-fourth (n = 13) of the COB-deficient Yorkshire Terriers had a serum cα1-PI concentration below the lower limit of the reference interval (<732 mg/l), and COB deficiency was associated with decreased serum cα1-PI concentrations (P < 0.0001). In the current study, serum cα1-PI concentrations are significantly lower in COB-deficient Yorkshire Terriers when compared to normocobalaminemic Yorkshire Terriers. Further studies are needed to determine the functional and potential prognostic implications of serum cα1-PI concentrations in dogs with gastrointestinal disease.

  19. Cloning and molecular characterization of complement component 1 inhibitor (C1INH) and complement component 8β (C8β) in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    He, Anyuan; Yang, Jie; Tang, Shoujie; Wang, Chenghui

    2013-09-01

    Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), one of the most important groups of food fishes in the world, has frequently suffered from serious challenge from pathogens in recent years. Immune responses of Nile tilapia should be understood to protect the aquaculture industry of this fish. The complement system has an important function in recognizing bacteria, opsonizing these pathogens by phagocytes, or killing them by direct lysis. In this study, two Nile tilapia complement component genes, complement component 1 inhibitor (C1INH) and complement component 8β subunit (C8β), were cloned and their expression characteristics were analyzed. C1INH cDNA was found containing a 1791 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a putative protein with 597 amino acids, a 101 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 236 bp 3'-UTR. The predicted protein structure for this gene consisted of two Ig-like domains and glycosyl hydrolase family-9 active site signature 2. The C8β cDNA consisted of a 1761 bp ORF encoding 587 amino acids, a 15 bp 5'-UTR and a 170 bp 3'-UTR. The predicted protein of C8β contained three motifs, thrombospondin type-1 repeat, membrane attack complex/perforin domain, and LDL-receptor class A. Expression analysis revealed that these two complement genes were highly expressed in the liver, however, were weakly expressed in the gill, heart, brain, kidney, intestine, spleen and dorsal muscle tissues. The present study provided insights into the complement system and immune functions of Nile tilapia.

  20. Type II hereditary angioneurotic edema that may result from a single nucleotide change in the codon for alanine-436 in the C1 inhibitor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, N.J.; Ramesh, N.; Daviss, A.E. III ); Cicardi, M. ); Harrison, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Identical single-base changes in the C1 inhibitor gene that may result in dysfunctional inhibitor proteins are described in two different families with type II hereditary angioneurotic edema. Initially, a restriction fragment length polymorphism was defined that resulted from loss of a Pst I site within exon VIII, which encodes the region containing the reactive center. Exon VIII from the normal and abnormal allelles was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. Amplified DNA product was cloned into plasmid pUC18; clones representing normal and mutant allelles were distinguished by the presence and absence, respectively of the Pst I restriction site. DNA sequence analysis revealed a G {yields} A mutation in the codon for alanine-436, which would result in replacement with a threonine residue. This position is nine amino acid residues amino-terminal to the reactive-center arginylthreonine peptide bond. In contrast, previously defined mutations in type II hereditary angioneurotic edema result in replacement of the reactive-center arginine.

  1. Exploring a glycolytic inhibitor for the treatment of an FH-deficient type-2 papillary RCC

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Toshinari; Tran, Tram Anh T.; Oz, Orhan K.; Raj, Ganesh V.; Schwarz, Roderich E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Zhang, Xuewu; Brugarolas, James

    2011-01-01

    Background A 24-year-old woman presented with a 45 cm complex cystic renal mass, which was resected. The tumor was a type-2 papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC-2), and several nodules remained. The patient was treated with mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitors, but after 5 months the tumor had progressed. Genetic testing of the patient revealed a novel heterozygous germline mutation in the gene encoding fumarate hydratase (FH), an enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. As the tumor exhibited loss of heterozygosity for FH and markedly reduced FH activity, and in the absence of other established therapies, treatment with the glycolytic inhibitor 2DG (2-deoxy-d-glucose) was explored. Investigations CT, histology, immunohistochemistry, genetic studies, 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-d-glucose (18FDG)-PET/CT, FH enzymatic assays, reconstitution experiments and in vitro studies of the effects of 2DG on FH-deficient tumor cells. Diagnosis pRCC-2 arising in a patient with a novel germline FH mutation and de novo hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome progressing after mTORC1 inhibitor therapy. Management Surgical resection of the renal mass, treatment with mTORC1 inhibitors followed by 2DG. Unfortunately, 2DG was not effective, and the patient died several weeks later. PMID:21304509

  2. ATM-deficiency sensitizes Mantle Cell Lymphoma cells to PARP-1 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chris T.; Muzik, Huong; Turhan, Ali G.; Zamò, Alberto; O’Connor, Mark J.; Bebb, D. Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    Poly-ADP ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition is toxic to cells with mutations in the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, a concept, termed synthetic lethality. However, whether this approach is applicable to other human cancers with defects in other DNA repair genes has yet to be determined. The Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) gene is altered in a number of human cancers including Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). Here, we characterize a panel of MCL cell lines for ATM status and function and investigate the potential for synthetic lethality in MCL in the presence of small molecule inhibitors of PARP-1. We show that Granta-519 and UPN2 cells have low levels of ATM protein, are defective in DNA damage-induced ATM-dependent signaling, are radiation sensitive and have cell cycle checkpoint defects: all characteristics of defective ATM function. Significantly, Granta-519 and UPN2 cells were more sensitive to PARP-1 inhibition, than were the ATM-proficient MCL cell lines examined. Furthermore, the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib (previously known as AZD2281/KU-0059436) significantly decreased tumour growth and increased overall survival in mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of ATM-deficient Granta-519 cells, while producing only a modest effect on overall survival of mice bearing xenografts of the ATM-proficient cell line, Z138. Thus, PARP inhibitors have therapeutic potential in the treatment of MCL and the concept of synthetic lethality extends to human cancers with ATM alterations. PMID:20124459

  3. Bortezomib, C1-inhibitor and Plasma Exchange Do Not Prolong the Survival of Multi-transgenic GalT-KO Pig Kidney Xenografts in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Le, Bas-Bernardet S.; Tillou, X.; Branchereau, J.; Dilek, N.; Poirier, N.; Châtelais, M.; Charreau, B.; Minault, D.; Hervouet, J.; Renaudin, K.; Crossan, C.; Scobie, L.; Takeuchi, Y.; Diswall, M.; Breimer, M.E.; Klar, N.; Daha, M.R.; Simioni, P.; Robson, S.C.; Nottle, M.B.; Salvaris, E.J.; Cowan, P.J.; d’Apice, A.J.F.; Sachs, D.H.; Yamada, K.; Lagutina, I.; Duchi, R.; Perota, A.; Lazzari, G.; Galli, C.; Cozzi, E.; Soulillou, J.-P.; B., Vanhove; Blancho, G.

    2014-01-01

    Galactosyl-transferase knock-out (GalT-KO) pigs represent a potential solution to xenograft rejection, particularly in the context of additional genetic modifications. We have performed life supporting kidney xenotransplantation into baboons utilizing GalT-KO pigs transgenic for human CD55/CD59/CD39/HT. Baboons received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids and recombinant human C1 Inhibitor combined with cyclophosphamide or bortezomib with or without 2–3 plasma exchanges. One baboon received a control GalT-KO xenograft with the latter immunosuppression. All immunosuppressed baboons rejected the xenografts between days 9 to 15 with signs of acute humoral rejection, in contrast to untreated controls (n=2) which lost their grafts on day 3 and 4. Immunofluorescence analyses showed deposition of IgM, C3, C5b-9 in rejected grafts, without C4d staining, indicating classical complement pathway blockade but alternate pathway activation. Moreover, rejected organs exhibited predominantly monocyte/macrophage infiltration with minimal lymphocyte representation. None of the recipients showed any signs of PERV transmission but some showed evidence of PCMV replication within the xenografts. Our work indicates that the addition of bortezomib and plasma exchange to the immunosuppressive regimen did not significantly prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO renal xenografts. Non-Gal antibodies, the alternative complement pathway, innate mechanisms with monocyte activation and PCMV replication may have contributed to rejection. PMID:25612490

  4. Yeast Dun1 Kinase Regulates Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor Sml1 in Response to Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sanvisens, Nerea; Romero, Antonia M.; An, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Caiguo; de Llanos, Rosa; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Bañó, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox-active cofactor in many biological processes, including DNA replication and repair. Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are Fe-dependent enzymes that catalyze deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate (dNDP) synthesis. We show here that the levels of the Sml1 protein, a yeast RNR large-subunit inhibitor, specifically decrease in response to both nutritional and genetic Fe deficiencies in a Dun1-dependent but Mec1/Rad53- and Aft1-independent manner. The decline of Sml1 protein levels upon Fe starvation depends on Dun1 forkhead-associated and kinase domains, the 26S proteasome, and the vacuolar proteolytic pathway. Depletion of core components of the mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly leads to a Dun1-dependent diminution of Sml1 protein levels. The physiological relevance of Sml1 downregulation by Dun1 under low-Fe conditions is highlighted by the synthetic growth defect observed between dun1Δ and fet3Δ fet4Δ mutants, which is rescued by SML1 deletion. Consistent with an increase in RNR function, Rnr1 protein levels are upregulated upon Fe deficiency. Finally, dun1Δ mutants display defects in deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) biosynthesis under low-Fe conditions. Taken together, these results reveal that the Dun1 checkpoint kinase promotes RNR function in response to Fe starvation by stimulating Sml1 protein degradation. PMID:24958100

  5. ASK1 Inhibitor Halts Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy in Nos3-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Greg H; Ma, Frank Y; Han, Yingjie; Liles, John T; Breckenridge, David G; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2015-11-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling promotes diabetic kidney injury. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK)1 is one of the upstream kinases in the p38 MAPK-signaling pathway, which is activated by inflammation and oxidative stress, suggesting a possible role for ASK1 in diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we examined whether a selective ASK1 inhibitor can prevent the induction and progression of diabetic nephropathy in mice. Diabetes was induced in hypertensive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (Nos3)-deficient mice by five low-dose streptozotocin (STZ) injections. Groups of diabetic Nos3(-/-) mice received ASK1 inhibitor (GS-444217 delivered in chow) as an early intervention (2-8 weeks after STZ) or late intervention (weeks 8-15 after STZ). Control diabetic and nondiabetic Nos3(-/-) mice received normal chow. Treatment with GS-444217 abrogated p38 MAPK activation in diabetic kidneys but had no effect upon hypertension in Nos3(-/-) mice. Early intervention with GS-444217 significantly inhibited diabetic glomerulosclerosis and reduced renal dysfunction but had no effect on the development of albuminuria. Late intervention with GS-444217 improved renal function and halted the progression of glomerulosclerosis, renal inflammation, and tubular injury despite having no effect on established albuminuria. In conclusion, this study identifies ASK1 as a new therapeutic target in diabetic nephropathy to reduce renal inflammation and fibrosis independent of blood pressure control. PMID:26180085

  6. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M; Wang, Charles X; An, W Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V

    2016-05-19

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  7. High-fat diet enhances and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency attenuates bone loss in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1-/-) on bone structure in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) by 22% and 21%, trabecular number (Tb.N) by 8% and 4% and bone mineral de...

  8. The Elephant and the Blind Men: Making Sense of PARP Inhibitors in Homologous Recombination Deficient Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Silvana B.; Patel, Anand G.; Hurley, Rachel M.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is an important component of the base excision repair (BER) pathway as well as a regulator of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Previous studies have demonstrated that treatment of HR-deficient cells with PARP inhibitors results in stalled and collapsed replication forks. Consequently, HR-deficient cells are extremely sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Several explanations have been advanced to explain this so-called synthetic lethality between HR deficiency and PARP inhibition: (i) reduction of BER activity leading to enhanced DNA double-strand breaks, which accumulate in the absence of HR; (ii) trapping of inhibited PARP1 at sites of DNA damage, which prevents access of other repair proteins; (iii) failure to initiate HR by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer-dependent BRCA1 recruitment; and (iv) activation of the NHEJ pathway, which selectively induces error-prone repair in HR-deficient cells. Here we review evidence regarding these various explanations for the ability of PARP inhibitors to selectively kill HR-deficient cancer cells and discuss their potential implications. PMID:24062981

  9. RING domain-deficient BRCA1 promotes PARP inhibitor and platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Krais, John J; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Cai, Kathy Q; Harrell, Maria I; Kim, Hyoung H; George, Erin; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Simpkins, Fiona; Johnson, Neil

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cancers that harbor breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) mutations initially respond well to platinum and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor (PARPi) therapy; however, resistance invariably arises in these patients and is a major clinical problem. The BRCA1185delAG allele is a common inherited mutation located close to the protein translation start site that is thought to produce a shortened, nonfunctional peptide. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms that lead to PARPi and platinum resistance in the SUM1315MO2 breast cancer cell line, which harbors a hemizygous BRCA1185delAG mutation. SUM1315MO2 cells were initially sensitive to PARPi and cisplatin but readily acquired resistance. PARPi- and cisplatin-resistant clones did not harbor secondary reversion mutations; rather, PARPi and platinum resistance required increased expression of a really interesting gene (RING) domain-deficient BRCA1 protein (Rdd-BRCA1). Initiation of translation occurred downstream of the frameshift mutation, probably at the BRCA1-Met-297 codon. In contrast to full-length BRCA1, Rdd-BRCA1 did not require BRCA1-associated RING domain 1 (BARD1) interaction for stability. Functionally, Rdd-BRCA1 formed irradiation-induced foci and supported RAD51 foci formation. Ectopic overexpression of Rdd-BRCA1 promoted partial PARPi and cisplatin resistance. Furthermore, Rdd-BRCA1 protein expression was detected in recurrent carcinomas from patients who carried germline BRCA1185delAG mutations. Taken together, these results indicate that RING-deficient BRCA1 proteins are hypomorphic and capable of contributing to PARPi and platinum resistance when expressed at high levels. PMID:27454289

  10. Selective resistance to the PARP inhibitor olaparib in a mouse model for BRCA1-deficient metaplastic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Linda; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Michalak, Ewa M.; Braumuller, Tanya M.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Drenth, Anne Paulien; de Korte-Grimmerink, Renske; Gogola, Ewa; Szuhai, Karoly; Schlicker, Andreas; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Huijbers, Ivo J.; Berns, Anton; Rottenberg, Sven; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological breast cancer subtype characterized by mesenchymal elements and poor clinical outcome. A large fraction of MBCs harbor defects in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). As BRCA1 deficiency sensitizes tumors to DNA cross-linking agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, we sought to investigate the response of BRCA1-deficient MBCs to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. To this end, we established a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for BRCA1-deficient MBC by introducing the MET proto-oncogene into a BRCA1-associated breast cancer model, using our novel female GEMM ES cell (ESC) pipeline. In contrast to carcinomas, BRCA1-deficient mouse carcinosarcomas resembling MBC show intrinsic resistance to olaparib caused by increased P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux transporter expression. Indeed, resistance could be circumvented by using another PARP inhibitor, AZD2461, which is a poor Pgp substrate. These preclinical findings suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated MBC may show poor response to olaparib and illustrate the value of GEMM-ESC models of human cancer for evaluation of novel therapeutics. PMID:26100884

  11. Selective resistance to the PARP inhibitor olaparib in a mouse model for BRCA1-deficient metaplastic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Henneman, Linda; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Michalak, Ewa M; Braumuller, Tanya M; Jaspers, Janneke E; Drenth, Anne Paulien; de Korte-Grimmerink, Renske; Gogola, Ewa; Szuhai, Karoly; Schlicker, Andreas; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Huijbers, Ivo J; Berns, Anton; Rottenberg, Sven; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-07-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological breast cancer subtype characterized by mesenchymal elements and poor clinical outcome. A large fraction of MBCs harbor defects in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). As BRCA1 deficiency sensitizes tumors to DNA cross-linking agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, we sought to investigate the response of BRCA1-deficient MBCs to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. To this end, we established a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for BRCA1-deficient MBC by introducing the MET proto-oncogene into a BRCA1-associated breast cancer model, using our novel female GEMM ES cell (ESC) pipeline. In contrast to carcinomas, BRCA1-deficient mouse carcinosarcomas resembling MBC show intrinsic resistance to olaparib caused by increased P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux transporter expression. Indeed, resistance could be circumvented by using another PARP inhibitor, AZD2461, which is a poor Pgp substrate. These preclinical findings suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated MBC may show poor response to olaparib and illustrate the value of GEMM-ESC models of human cancer for evaluation of novel therapeutics.

  12. Lhx4 Deficiency: Increased Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Expression and Pituitary Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gergics, Peter; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the Lhx4, Lhx3, and Pitx2 genes can cause combined pituitary hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia in both humans and mice. Not much is known about the mechanism underlying hypoplasia in these mutants beyond generally increased cell death and poorly maintained proliferation. We identified both common and unique abnormalities in developmental regulation of key cell cycle regulator gene expression in each of these three mutants. All three mutants exhibit reduced expression of the proliferative marker Ki67 and the transitional marker p57. We discovered that expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) is expanded dorsally in the pituitary primordium of both Lhx3 and Lhx4 mutants. Uniquely, Lhx4 mutants exhibit reduced cyclin D1 expression and have auxiliary pouch-like structures. We show evidence for indirect and direct effects of LHX4 on p21 expression in αT3-1 pituitary cells. In summary, Lhx4 is necessary for efficient pituitary progenitor cell proliferation and restriction of p21 expression. PMID:25668206

  13. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency ameliorates insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia but not bone loss in obese female mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yukinori; Kawao, Naoyuki; Yano, Masato; Okada, Kiyotaka; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is involved in type 1 diabetic bone loss in female mice. PAI-1 is well known as an adipogenic factor induced by obesity. We therefore examined the effects of PAI-1 deficiency on bone and glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat and high-sucrose diet (HF/HSD)-induced obese female mice. Female wild-type (WT) and PAI-1-deficient mice were fed with HF/HSD or normal diet for 20 weeks from 10 weeks of age. HF/HSD increased the levels of plasma PAI-1 in WT mice. PAI-1 deficiency suppressed the levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, and total cholesterol elevated by obesity. Moreover, PAI-1 deficiency improved glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by obesity. Bone mineral density (BMD) at trabecular bone as well as the levels of osterix, alkaline phosphatase, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand mRNA in tibia were decreased by HF/HSD in WT mice, and those changes by HF/HSD were not affected by PAI-1 deficiency. HF/HSD increased the levels of plasma TNF-α in both WT and PAI-1-deficient mice, and the levels of plasma TNF-α were negatively correlated with trabecular BMD in tibia of female mice. In conclusion, we revealed that PAI-1 deficiency does not affect the trabecular bone loss induced by obesity despite the amelioration of insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia in female mice. Our data suggest that the changes of BMD and bone metabolism by obesity might be independent of PAI-1 as well as glucose and lipid metabolism.

  14. Identification of the novel autoantigen candidate Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha in isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Atsushi; Iwama, Shintaro; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Takeuchi, Seiji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Iwata, Naoko; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Suzuki, Haruyuki; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kato, Takuya; Enomoto, Atsushi; Arima, Hiroshi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency (IAD) is characterized by low or absent adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production. IAD is presumed to be caused in part by an autoimmune mechanism, and several lines of evidence have suggested the presence of anti-pituitary antibodies in IAD. However, the exact autoantigens remain unknown. The present study was designed to identify the autoantigen(s) in IAD using chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Rat anterior pituitary lysate was subjected to SDS-PAGE, and immunoblotting was performed using the sera from two patients with IAD and from a healthy subject. The bands detected by the patient serum samples, but not by the healthy subject sample, were excised, in-gel digested using trypsin, and subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. On immunoblots, a 51-kDa band in the insoluble pellet was detected by the sera from the IAD patients but not from the healthy subject. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the 51-kDa band contained Rab guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) alpha. Consistent with the mass spectrometric analysis, a recombinant full-length human Rab GDI alpha was recognized by the two IAD patient samples but not by the healthy subject sample using immunoblotting. In total, anti-Rab GDI alpha antibodies were detected in serum samples from three of five patients with IAD (60%) but were absent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, Rab GDI alpha was expressed in the anterior pituitary. In conclusion, it appears that Rab GDI alpha is a candidate autoantigen involved in IAD, and that anti-Rab GDI alpha antibodies are present predominantly in patients with IAD.

  15. Deficiency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Akyuerek, Levent M.; Boehm, Manfred; Olive, Michelle; Zhou, Alex-Xianghua; San, Hong; Nabel, Elizabeth G.

    2010-05-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, are upregulated during vascular cell proliferation and negatively regulate growth of vascular cells. We hypothesized that absence of either p21{sup Cip1} or p27{sup Kip1} in apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficiency may increase atherosclerotic plaque formation. Compared to apoE{sup -/-} aortae, both apoE{sup -/-}/p21{sup -/-} and apoE{sup -/-}/p27{sup -/-} aortae exhibited significantly more atherosclerotic plaque following a high-cholesterol regimen. This increase was particularly observed in the abdominal aortic regions. Deficiency of p27{sup Kip1} accelerated plaque formation significantly more than p21{sup -/-} in apoE{sup -/-} mice. This increased plaque formation was in parallel with increased intima/media area ratios. Deficiency of p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} accelerates atherogenesis in apoE{sup -/-} mice. These findings have significant implications for our understanding of the molecular basis of atherosclerosis associated with excessive proliferation of vascular cells.

  16. Deficiency of a Niemann-Pick, Type C1-related Protein in Toxoplasma Is Associated with Multiple Lipidoses and Increased Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lige, Bao; Romano, Julia D.; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Ehrenman, Karen; Levitskaya, Jelena; Sampels, Vera; Haughey, Norman J.; Coppens, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Several proteins that play key roles in cholesterol synthesis, regulation, trafficking and signaling are united by sharing the phylogenetically conserved ‘sterol-sensing domain’ (SSD). The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma possesses at least one gene coding for a protein containing the canonical SSD. We investigated the role of this protein to provide information on lipid regulatory mechanisms in the parasite. The protein sequence predicts an uncharacterized Niemann-Pick, type C1-related protein (NPC1) with significant identity to human NPC1, and it contains many residues implicated in human NPC disease. We named this NPC1-related protein, TgNCR1. Mammalian NPC1 localizes to endo-lysosomes and promotes the movement of sterols and sphingolipids across the membranes of these organelles. Miscoding patient mutations in NPC1 cause overloading of these lipids in endo-lysosomes. TgNCR1, however, lacks endosomal targeting signals, and localizes to flattened vesicles beneath the plasma membrane of Toxoplasma. When expressed in mammalian NPC1 mutant cells and properly addressed to endo-lysosomes, TgNCR1 restores cholesterol and GM1 clearance from these organelles. To clarify the role of TgNCR1 in the parasite, we genetically disrupted NCR1; mutant parasites were viable. Quantitative lipidomic analyses on the ΔNCR1 strain reveal normal cholesterol levels but an overaccumulation of several species of cholesteryl esters, sphingomyelins and ceramides. ΔNCR1 parasites are also characterized by abundant storage lipid bodies and long membranous tubules derived from their parasitophorous vacuoles. Interestingly, these mutants can generate multiple daughters per single mother cell at high frequencies, allowing fast replication in vitro, and they are slightly more virulent in mice than the parental strain. These data suggest that the ΔNCR1 strain has lost the ability to control the intracellular levels of several lipids, which subsequently results in the stimulation of lipid

  17. Effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient and wild-type mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1-/-) and wildtype mice (C57BL/6J background) fed the AIN93G diet or that diet modified with 45% calories from fat. The high-fat diet i...

  18. 4,5-Disubstituted 6-Aryloxy-1,3-dihydrobenzo[c][1,2]oxaboroles Are Broad-Spectrum Serine β-Lactamase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David C; Zhou, Fei; Eyermann, Charles J; Ferguson, Andrew D; Prince, D Bryan; Breen, John; Giacobbe, Robert A; Lahiri, Sushmita; Verheijen, Jeroen C

    2015-07-10

    Bacterially expressed β-lactamases are rapidly eroding the clinical utility of the important β-lactam class of antibacterials, significantly impairing our ability to fight serious bacterial infections. This paper describes a study of oxaborole-derived β-lactamase inhibitors in which crystal structures and computational modeling aided in the rational design of analogues with improved spectrum of activity against class A, C, and D enzymes. Crystal structures of two of these inhibitors covalently bound to two different serine β-lactamases, class C Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpC and class D OXA-10, are described herein. Improved physicochemical properties as well as increased activity against an array of β-lactamases resulted in substantial restoration of susceptibility to ceftazidime in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:27622821

  19. HCV core/gC1qR interaction arrests T cell cycle progression through stabilization of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi Qiang; Eisen-Vandervelde, Audrey; Ray, Suma; Hahn, Young S

    2003-09-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is efficient in the establishment of persistent infection. We have previously shown that HCV core protein inhibits T cell proliferation through its interaction with the complement receptor, gC1qR. Here we show that HCV core-induced inhibition of T cell proliferation involves a G(0)/G(1) cell cycle arrest, which is reversible upon addition of anti-gC1qR antibody. Correspondingly, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) 2/4 and cyclin E/D, as well as subsequent phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (pRb), is reduced in core-treated T cells in response to mitogenic stimulation. Remarkably, degradation of p27(Kip1), a negative regulator of both Cdk4/cyclin D and Cdk2/cyclin E complexes, is significantly diminished in T cells treated with HCV core upon mitogenic stimulation. These data indicate that the stability of p27(Kip1) by HCV core is associated with blocking activated T cells for the G(1) to S phase transition and inhibiting T cell proliferation.

  20. Deficiency of Fyn protein is prerequisite for apoptosis induced by Src family kinase inhibitors in human mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryoji; Kubo, Shuji; Takeda, Hiromi; Ohta, Toshiro; Tabata, Chiharu; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Nakano, Takashi; Fujimori, Yoshihiro

    2012-05-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor arising from mesothelial cells of serous membranes. Src family kinases (SFKs) have a pivotal role in cell adhesion, proliferation, survival and apoptosis. Here, we examined the effect of SFK inhibitors in NCI-H2052, ACC-MESO-4 and NCI-H28 cells, mesothelioma cell lines and Met5A, a human non-malignant mesothelial cell line. We found that PP2, a selective SFK inhibitor, inhibited SFK activity and induced apoptosis mediated by caspase-8 in NCI-H28 but not Met5A, NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. Src, Yes, Fyn and Lyn protein, which are members of the SFK, were expressed in these cell lines, whereas NCI-H28 cells were deficient in Fyn protein. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Fyn facilitated PP2-induced apoptosis mediated by caspase-8 in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. PP2 reduced Lyn protein levels and suppressed SFK activity in all mesothelioma cell lines. Lyn siRNA induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis in NCI-H28 cells but not in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. However, double RNA interference knockdown of Fyn and Lyn induced apoptosis accompanied by caspase-8 activation in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. Dasatinib, an inhibitor of multi-tyrosine kinases including SFK, also inhibited SFK activity and induced reduction of Lyn protein levels, caspase-8 activation and apoptosis in NCI-H28 cells but not in other cell lines. Present study suggests that SFK inhibitors induce caspase-8-dependent apoptosis caused by reduction of Lyn protein in Fyn-deficient mesothelioma cells.

  1. Identification of amylase inhibitor deficient mutants in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millisp.).

    PubMed

    Chougule, N P; Giri, A P; Hivrale, V K; Chhabda, P J; Kachole, M S

    2004-06-01

    We have developed and analyzed several mutant lines (M6 generation) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) for the content of defensive proteins and antinutritional factors. Inhibitors of proteinase and of amylase, lectins, and raffinose family oligosaccharides were analyzed in mature seeds of different pigeonpea accessions (untreated) and compared with mutant lines. Proteinase inhibitor profiles were similar in terms of number and intensities of activity bands but they differ marginally in the activity units in pigeonpea accessions and mutants. Pigeonpea mutants showed significant differences in amylase inhibitor profiles as well as activity units from those of pigeonpea accessions. Interestingly, two mutants (A6-5-1 and A7-3-2) were identified to have absence of amylase inhibitor isoforms. Hemagglutinating activity and raffinose family oligosaccharides content were found to be significantly higher in mutants than in accessions. It is evident from the results that proteinase inhibitors of pigeonpea are stable while amylase inhibitors, lectins, and raffinose family oligosaccharides show altered expression upon mutagen treatments. These mutants will be ideal candidates for further evaluation. PMID:15260142

  2. Induction of an inhibitor antibody to factor XI in a patient with severe inherited factor XI deficiency by Rh immune globulin.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Michal; Zivelin, Ariella; Teitel, Jerome; Seligsohn, Uri

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we report an inhibitor antibody to factor XI (FXI) in a woman with severe inherited FXI deficiency, induced by FXI present in an Rh immune globulin preparation. The patient is homozygous for the Glu117Stop mutation, associated with a FXI level of less than 1 U/dL. Unlike all previously described patients with severe FXI deficiency and an inhibitor, the patient had never been exposed to blood products. Following 3 injections of Rh immune globulin during pregnancy, she developed an inhibitor to FXI (8 Bethesda units) that was shown to bind specifically to FXI and inhibit factor IX cleavage by purified FXIa. The administered Rh immune globulin and 2 other similar products were shown to contain FXI. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for immunization of severely FXI-deficient patients by FXI present in Rh immune globulin preparations.

  3. The enzymatic nature of C'1r. Conversion of C'1s to C'1 esterase and digestion of amino acid esters by C'1r.

    PubMed

    Naff, G B; Ratnoff, O S

    1968-10-01

    Human C'1, a macromolecular complex composed of three subunits, is the zymogen for at least two distinct enzymes. Preparations of one subunit, C'1r, functioned as a protease which converted another subunit, C'1s, to C'1 esterase. The conversion of C'1s to C'1 esterase by C'1r was blocked by Liquoid, phenyl methylsulfonyl fluoride, and calcium ions, but not by soybean trypsin inhibitor, hirudin, or heparin. Preparations of C'1r also possessed two additional functions, i.e., the ability to hydrolyze certain synthetic amino acid esters and to participate in immune hemolysis. Evidence was presented which indicates that these three functions are properties of a single entity, C'1r, but not of the same portion of its molecular structure. These observations suggest that C'1r has at least two active sites, one for its reaction with C'1q, an additional subunit of C'1, and one for its reaction with C'1s; together, the three subcomponents, C'1q, C'1r, and C'1s, form a single functional unit, the first component of complement.

  4. The prolyl 4-hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate generates effective iron deficiency in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Buss, Joan L; Chen, Guohua; Ponka, Prem; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2002-10-01

    Ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB) is commonly utilized as a substrate analog and competitive inhibitor of prolyl 4-hydroxylases. These iron-dependent enzymes have received a lot of attention for their involvement in crucial biochemical pathways such as collagen maturation and oxygen sensing. Since EDHB is also capable of chelating the enzyme-bound iron, we study here its function as a chelator. We show that the affinity of EDHB for ferric iron is significantly lower than that of desferrioxamine. Nevertheless, EDHB is sufficient to promote effective iron deficiency in cells, reflected in the activation of the iron-responsive element/iron regulatory protein regulatory network. Thus, treatment of B6 fibroblasts with EDHB results in slow activation of iron regulatory protein 1 accompanied by an increase in transferrin receptor levels and reduction of the ferritin pool.

  5. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1{sup -/-} knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1{sup -/-} mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  6. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Upregulates Peroxisomal Fatty Acid Oxidation and Inhibits Apoptotic Cell Death in Abcd1-Deficient Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaspreet; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Pujol, Aurora; Baarine, Mauhamad; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-01-01

    In X-ALD, mutation/deletion of ALD gene (ABCD1) and the resultant very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derangement has dramatically opposing effects in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While loss of Abcd1 in astrocytes produces a robust inflammatory response, the oligodendrocytes undergo cell death leading to demyelination in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). The mechanisms of these distinct pathways in the two cell types are not well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Abcd1-knockdown and the subsequent alteration in VLCFA metabolism in human U87 astrocytes and rat B12 oligodendrocytes. Loss of Abcd1 inhibited peroxisomal β-oxidation activity and increased expression of VLCFA synthesizing enzymes, elongase of very long chain fatty acids (ELOVLs) (1 and 3) in both cell types. However, higher induction of ELOVL's in Abcd1-deficient B12 oligodendrocytes than astrocytes suggests that ELOVL pathway may play a prominent role in oligodendrocytes in X-ALD. While astrocytes are able to maintain the cellular homeostasis of anti-apoptotic proteins, Abcd1-deletion in B12 oligodendrocytes downregulated the anti-apototic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and cell survival (phospho-Erk1/2) proteins, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bim, Bax and Bid) leading to cell loss. These observations provide insights into different cellular signaling mechanisms in response to Abcd1-deletion in two different cell types of CNS. The apoptotic responses were accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-9-dependent mechanism in Abcd1-deficient oligodendrocytes. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) corrected the VLCFA derangement both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the oligodendrocytes loss. These observations provide a proof-of principle that HDAC inhibitor SAHA may have a therapeutic potential for X-ALD. PMID:23923017

  7. Efficacy of ASP2151, a helicase-primase inhibitor, against thymidine kinase-deficient herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Himaki, Takehiro; Masui, Yumi; Chono, Koji; Daikoku, Tohru; Takemoto, Masaya; Haixia, Bo; Okuda, Tomoko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2012-02-01

    ASP2151 was developed as a novel inhibitor of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella-zoster virus helicase-primase. The anti-HSV activity of ASP2151 toward a clinical HSV isolate with acyclovir (ACV)-resistant/thymidine kinase (TK)-deficiency was characterized in vitro and in vivo using a plaque reduction assay and the ear pinna infection in mice. The IC(50) ranged from 0.018 to 0.024 μg/ml, indicating the susceptibility of TK-deficient HSV-2 was similar to that of wild-type HSV-2 strains. Anti-HSV activity of ASP2151 in vivo was evaluated in mice infected with wild-type HSV-2 and TK-deficient HSV-2. ASP2151 significantly reduced the copy numbers of wild-type HSV-2 and TK-deficient HSV-2 at the inoculation ear pinna, while valacyclovir significantly reduced the copy number of wild type HSV-2 but not that of TK-deficient HSV-2 in the inoculated ear pinna. Thus, ASP 2151 showed therapeutic efficacy in mice infected with both wild-type and TK-deficient HSV-2. In conclusion, ASP2151 is a promising novel herpes helicase-primase inhibitor that indicates the feasibility of ASP2151 for clinical application for the treatment of HSV infections, including ACV-resistant/TK-deficient HSV infection.

  8. CDK4/6 and IGF1 receptor inhibitors synergize to suppress the growth of p16INK4A-deficient pancreatic cancers

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, Andreas M.; Perera, Rushika M.; Ecker, Veronika; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Benes, Cyril H.; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in p16INK4A (CDKN2A) occur in approximately 80% of sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), contributing to its early progression. While this loss activates the cell cycle-dependent kinases CDK4/6, which have been considered as drug targets for many years, p16INK4A-deficient PDAC cells are inherently resistant to CDK4/6 inhibitors. This study searched for targeted therapies that might synergize with CDK4/6 inhibition in this setting. We report that the IGF1R/IR inhibitor BMS-754807 cooperated with the CDK4/6 inhibitor PD-0332991 to strongly block proliferation of p16INK4A-deficient PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo. Sensitivity to this drug combination correlated with reduced activity of the master cell growth regulator mTORC1. Accordingly, replacing the IGF1R/IR inhibitor with the rapalog inhibitor temsirolimus broadened the sensitivity of PDAC cells to CDK4/6 inhibition. Our results establish targeted therapy combinations with robust cytostatic activity in p16INK4A-deficient PDAC cells and possible implications for improving treatment of a broad spectrum of human cancers characterized by p16INK4A loss. PMID:24986516

  9. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a boy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis deficiency presenting with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming-Yan; Guo, Xia; Sun, Shu-Wen; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency, also known as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2 (XLP2), is a rare inherited primary immunodeficiency resulting from the XIAP (also known as BIRC4) mutation. XIAP deficiency is mainly associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) phenotypes, and genetic testing is crucial in diagnosing this syndrome. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only successful strategy for the treatment of this disease; however, a limited number of studies has been published concerning the outcomes of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. The present study reported a successful allogeneic HSCT performed to treat XIAP deficiency in a Chinese boy presenting with HLH. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing were performed to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency, and allogeneic HSCT was performed. Genetic tests revealed a two-nucleotide deletion (c.1021_1022delAA) in the patient, which was inherited from his mother, and resulted in frameshift mutation and premature stop codon (p.N341fsX348); this is considered to be a disease-causing mutation. The XIAP deficiency patient underwent allogeneic HSCT, receiving busulfan-containing reduced intensity myeloablative conditioning regimen, with a good intermediate follow-up result obtained. Therefore, genetic testing is essential to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency and detect the carrier of mutation. The present case study may promote the investigation of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency.

  10. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a boy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis deficiency presenting with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming-Yan; Guo, Xia; Sun, Shu-Wen; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency, also known as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2 (XLP2), is a rare inherited primary immunodeficiency resulting from the XIAP (also known as BIRC4) mutation. XIAP deficiency is mainly associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) phenotypes, and genetic testing is crucial in diagnosing this syndrome. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only successful strategy for the treatment of this disease; however, a limited number of studies has been published concerning the outcomes of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. The present study reported a successful allogeneic HSCT performed to treat XIAP deficiency in a Chinese boy presenting with HLH. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing were performed to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency, and allogeneic HSCT was performed. Genetic tests revealed a two-nucleotide deletion (c.1021_1022delAA) in the patient, which was inherited from his mother, and resulted in frameshift mutation and premature stop codon (p.N341fsX348); this is considered to be a disease-causing mutation. The XIAP deficiency patient underwent allogeneic HSCT, receiving busulfan-containing reduced intensity myeloablative conditioning regimen, with a good intermediate follow-up result obtained. Therefore, genetic testing is essential to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency and detect the carrier of mutation. The present case study may promote the investigation of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. PMID:27602064

  11. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  12. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) deficient mice display motor deficits.

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Diane M.; Soloway, Paul; Caterina, John; Falls., William A.

    2005-01-01

    The degradation of the extracellular matrix is regulated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Matrix components of the basement membrane play critical roles in the development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), yet almost nothing is known about the regulation of MMP and TIMP expression in either the presynaptic or postsynaptic compartments. Here, we demonstrate that TIMP-2 is expressed by both spinal motor neurons and skeletal muscle. To determine whether motor function is altered in the absence of TIMP-2, motor behavior was assessed using a battery of tests (e.g., RotaRod, balance beam, hindlimb extension, grip strength, loaded grid and gait analysis). TIMP-2−/− mice fall off the RotaRod significantly faster than wild-type littermates. In addition, hindlimb extension is reduced and gait is both splayed and lengthened in TIMP-2−/− mice. Motor dysfunction is more pronounced during early postnatal development. A preliminary analysis revealed NMJ alterations in TIMP-2−/− mice. Juvenile TIMP-2−/− mice have increased nerve branching and acetylcholine receptor expression. Adult TIMP-2−/− endplates are enlarged and more complex. This suggests a role for TIMP-2 in NMJ sculpting during development. In contrast to the increased NMJ nerve branching, cerebellar Purkinje cells have decreased neurite outgrowth. Thus, the TIMP-2−/− motor phenotype is likely due to both peripheral and central defects. The tissue specificity of the nerve branching phenotype suggests the involvement of different MMPs and/or extracellular matrix molecules underlying the TIMP-2−/− motor phenotype. PMID:16216006

  13. Persistent Macrophage/Microglial Activation and Myelin Disruption after Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Stephen J.; Whitmire, Jason K.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Chertboonmuang, Parntip; Soloway, Paul D.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Campbell, Iain L.

    2006-01-01

    Increased leukocyte trafficking into the parenchyma during inflammatory responses in the central nervous system (CNS) is facilitated by the extracellular proteolytic activities of matrix metalloproteinases that are regulated, in part, by the endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), TIMP-1 gene expression is induced in astrocytes surrounding inflammatory lesions in the CNS. The physiological importance of this temporal and spatial relationship is not clear. Herein, we have addressed the functional role of TIMP-1 in a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55)-induced model of EAE using TIMP-1-deficient (TIMP-1−/−) C57BL/6 mice. Although CD4+ T-cell immune responses to myelin in wild-type (WT) and TIMP-1−/− mice were similar, analysis of CNS tissues from TIMP-1−/− mice after EAE revealed more severe myelin pathology than that of WT mice. This disruption of myelin was associated with both increased lymphocyte infiltration and microglial/macrophage accumulation in the brain parenchyma. These findings suggest that induction of TIMP-1 by astrocytes during EAE in WT mice represents an inherent cytoprotective response that mitigates CNS myelin injury through the regulation of both immune cell infiltration and microglial activation. PMID:17148673

  14. Deficiency of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, CDKN1B, results in overgrowth and neurodevelopmental delay.

    PubMed

    Grey, William; Izatt, Louise; Sahraoui, Wafa; Ng, Yiu-Ming; Ogilvie, Caroline; Hulse, Anthony; Tse, Eric; Holic, Roman; Yu, Veronica

    2013-06-01

    Germline mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, CDKN1B, have been described in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN), a cancer predisposition syndrome with adult onset neoplasia and no additional phenotypes. Here, we describe the first human case of CDKN1B deficiency, which recapitulates features of the murine CDKN1B knockout mouse model, including gigantism and neurodevelopmental defects. Decreased mRNA and protein expression of CDKN1B were confirmed in the proband's peripheral blood, which is not seen in MEN syndrome patients. We ascribed the decreased protein level to a maternally derived deletion on chromosome 12p13 encompassing the CDKN1B locus (which reduced mRNA expression) and a de novo allelic variant (c.-73G>A) in the CDKN1B promoter (which reduced protein translation). We propose a recessive model where decreased dosage of CDKN1B during development in humans results in a neuronal phenotype akin to that described in mice, placing CDKN1B as a candidate gene involved in developmental delay. PMID:23505216

  15. Yeast Mutants Deficient in Er-Associated Degradation of the Z Variant of Alpha-1-Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, A. A.; Karpichey, I. V.; Ernaga, J. E.; Werner, E. D.; Dillin, A. G.; Courchesne, W. E.

    1996-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants deficient in degradation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor Z (A1PiZ) have been isolated and genetically characterized. Wild-type yeast expressing A1PiZ synthesize an ER form of this protein that is rapidly degraded by an intracellular proteolytic process known as ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). The mutant strains were identified after treatment with EMS using a colony blot immunoassay to detect colonies that accumulated high levels of A1PiZ. A total of 120,000 colonies were screened and 30 putative mutants were identified. The level of A1PiZ accumulation in these mutants, measured by ELISA, ranged from two to 11 times that of A1PiZ in the parent strain. Further studies demonstrated that the increased levels of A1PiZ in most of the mutant strains was not the result of defective secretion or elevated A1PiZ mRNA. Pulse chase experiments indicated that A1PiZ was stabilized in several strains, evidence that these mutants are defective in ER-associated protein degradation. Genetic analyses revealed that most of the mutations were recessive, ~30% of the mutants characterized conformed to simple Mendelian inheritance, and at least seven complementation groups were identified. PMID:8978025

  16. Calpain 1 inhibitor BDA-410 ameliorates α-klotho-deficiency phenotypes resembling human aging-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Yoko; Washida, Miwa; Tamura, Masaru; Maeno, Akiteru; Ohnishi, Mutsuko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Imura, Akihiro; Razzaque, M Shawkat; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Taking good care of elderly is a major challenge of our society, and thus identification of potential drug targets to reduce age-associated disease burden is desirable. α-klotho(-/-) (α-kl) is a short-lived mouse model that displays multiple phenotypes resembling human aging-related syndromes. Such ageing phenotype of α-kl(-/-) mice is associated with activation of a proteolytic enzyme, Calpain-1. We hypothesized that uncontrolled activation of calpain-1 might be causing age-related phenotypes in α-kl-deficient mice. We found that daily administration of BDA-410, a calpain-1 inhibitor, strikingly ameliorated multiple aging-related phenotypes. Treated mice showed recovery of reproductive ability, increased body weight, reduced organ atrophy, and suppression of ectopic calcifications, bone mineral density reduction, pulmonary emphysema and senile atrophy of skin. We also observed ectopic expression of FGF23 in calcified arteries of α-kl(-/-) mice, which might account for the clinically observed association of increased FGF23 level with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. These findings allow us to propose that modulation of calpain-1 activity is a potential therapeutic option for delaying age-associated organ pathology, particularly caused by the dysregulation of mineral ion homeostasis.

  17. Discovery of methyl 4'-methyl-5-(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxylate, an improved small-molecule inhibitor of c-Myc-max dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Jay; Wang, Huabo; Yap, Jeremy L; Sabato, Philip E; Hu, Angela; Prochownik, Edward V; Fletcher, Steven

    2014-10-01

    c-Myc is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) transcription factor that is responsible for the transcription of a wide range of target genes involved in many cancer-related cellular processes. Over-expression of c-Myc has been observed in, and directly contributes to, a variety of human cancers including those of the hematopoietic system, lung, prostate and colon. To become transcriptionally active, c-Myc must first dimerize with Myc-associated factor X (Max) via its own bHLH-ZIP domain. A proven strategy towards the inhibition of c-Myc oncogenic activity is to interfere with the structural integrity of the c-Myc-Max heterodimer. The small molecule 10074-G5 is an inhibitor of c-Myc-Max dimerization (IC50 =146 μM) that operates by binding and stabilizing c-Myc in its monomeric form. We have identified a congener of 10074-G5, termed 3jc48-3 (methyl 4'-methyl-5-(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxylate), that is about five times as potent (IC50 =34 μM) at inhibiting c-Myc-Max dimerization as the parent compound. 3jc48-3 exhibited an approximate twofold selectivity for c-Myc-Max heterodimers over Max-Max homodimers, suggesting that its mode of action is through binding c-Myc. 3jc48-3 inhibited the proliferation of c-Myc-over-expressing HL60 and Daudi cells with single-digit micromolar IC50 values by causing growth arrest at the G0 /G1 phase. Co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that 3jc48-3 inhibits c-Myc-Max dimerization in cells, which was further substantiated by the specific silencing of a c-Myc-driven luciferase reporter gene. Finally, 3jc48-3's intracellular half-life was >17 h. Collectively, these data demonstrate 3jc48-3 to be one of the most potent, cellularly active and stable c-Myc inhibitors reported to date.

  18. E7449: A dual inhibitor of PARP1/2 and tankyrase1/2 inhibits growth of DNA repair deficient tumors and antagonizes Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiayi; Chang, Paul; Kolber-Simonds, Donna; Ackermann, Karen; Twine, Natalie C.; Shie, Jue-Lon; Miu, Jingzang Tao; Huang, Kuan-Chun; Moniz, George A.; Nomoto, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase1 (PARP1) impairs DNA damage repair, and early generation PARP1/2 inhibitors (olaparib, niraparib, etc.) have demonstrated clinical proof of concept for cancer treatment. Here, we describe the development of the novel PARP inhibitor E7449, a potent PARP1/2 inhibitor that also inhibits PARP5a/5b, otherwise known as tankyrase1 and 2 (TNKS1 and 2), important regulators of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. E7449 inhibits PARP enzymatic activity and additionally traps PARP1 onto damaged DNA; a mechanism previously shown to augment cytotoxicity. Cells deficient in DNA repair pathways beyond homologous recombination were sensitive to E7449 treatment. Chemotherapy was potentiated by E7449 and single agent had significant antitumor activity in BRCA-deficient xenografts. Additionally, E7449 inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colon cancer cell lines, likely through TNKS inhibition. Consistent with this possibility, E7449 stabilized axin and TNKS proteins resulting in β-catenin de-stabilization and significantly altered expression of Wnt target genes. Notably, hair growth mediated by Wnt signaling was inhibited by E7449. A pharmacodynamic effect of E7449 on Wnt target genes was observed in tumors, although E7449 lacked single agent antitumor activity in vivo, a finding typical for selective TNKS inhibitors. E7449 antitumor activity was increased through combination with MEK inhibition. Particularly noteworthy was the lack of toxicity, most significantly the lack of intestinal toxicity reported for other TNKS inhibitors. E7449 represents a novel dual PARP1/2 and TNKS1/2 inhibitor which has the advantage of targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling addicted tumors. E7449 is currently in early clinical development. PMID:26513298

  19. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14740.001 PMID:27434671

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. PMID:27434671

  1. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation.

  2. Identification of ATR-Chk1 pathway inhibitors that selectively target p53-deficient cells without directly suppressing ATR catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawasumi, Masaoki; Bradner, James E.; Tolliday, Nicola; Thibodeau, Renee; Sloan, Heather; Brummond, Kay M.; Nghiem, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapy is a barrier to effective treatment that appears to be augmented by p53 functional deficiency in many cancers. In p53-deficient cells where the G1/S checkpoint is compromised, cell viability after DNA damage relies upon intact intra-S and G2/M checkpoints mediated by the ATR and Chk1 kinases. Thus, a logical rationale to sensitize p53-deficient cancers to DNA-damaging chemotherapy is through the use of ATP-competitive inhibitors of ATR or Chk1. To discover small molecules that may act on uncharacterized components of the ATR pathway, we performed a phenotype-based screen of 9,195 compounds for their ability to inhibit hydroxyurea-induced phosphorylation of Ser345 on Chk1, known to be a critical ATR substrate. This effort led to the identification of four small-molecule compounds, three of which were derived from known bioactive library (anthothecol, dihydrocelastryl, and erysolin) and one of which was a novel synthetic compound termed MARPIN. These compounds all inhibited ATR-selective phosphorylation and sensitized p53-deficient cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these compounds did not inhibit ATR catalytic activity in vitro, unlike typical ATP-competitive inhibitors, but acted in a mechanistically distinct manner to disable ATR-Chk1 function. Our results highlight a set of novel molecular probes to further elucidate druggable mechanisms to improve cancer therapeutic responses produced by DNA-damaging drugs. PMID:25336189

  3. Discovery and optimization of new benzimidazole- and benzoxazole-pyrimidone selective PI3Kβ inhibitors for the treatment of phosphatase and TENsin homologue (PTEN)-deficient cancers.

    PubMed

    Certal, Victor; Halley, Frank; Virone-Oddos, Angela; Delorme, Cécile; Karlsson, Andreas; Rak, Alexey; Thompson, Fabienne; Filoche-Rommé, Bruno; El-Ahmad, Youssef; Carry, Jean-Christophe; Abecassis, Pierre-Yves; Lejeune, Pascale; Vincent, Loic; Bonnevaux, Hélène; Nicolas, Jean-Paul; Bertrand, Thomas; Marquette, Jean-Pierre; Michot, Nadine; Benard, Tsiala; Below, Peter; Vade, Isabelle; Chatreaux, Fabienne; Lebourg, Gilles; Pilorge, Fabienne; Angouillant-Boniface, Odile; Louboutin, Audrey; Lengauer, Christoph; Schio, Laurent

    2012-05-24

    Most of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) kinase inhibitors currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment exhibit pan PI3K isoform profiles. Single PI3K isoforms differentially control tumorigenesis, and PI3Kβ has emerged as the isoform involved in the tumorigenicity of PTEN-deficient tumors. Herein we describe the discovery and optimization of a new series of benzimidazole- and benzoxazole-pyrimidones as small molecular mass PI3Kβ-selective inhibitors. Starting with compound 5 obtained from a one-pot reaction via a novel intermediate 1, medicinal chemistry optimization led to the discovery of compound 8, which showed a significant activity and selectivity for PI3Kβ and adequate in vitro pharmacokinetic properties. The X-ray costructure of compound 8 in PI3Kδ showed key interactions and structural features supporting the observed PI3Kβ isoform selectivity. Compound 8 achieved sustained target modulation and tumor growth delay at well tolerated doses when administered orally to SCID mice implanted with PTEN-deficient human tumor xenografts.

  4. YU238259 Is a Novel Inhibitor of Homology-dependent DNA Repair that Exhibits Synthetic Lethality and Radiosensitization in Repair-deficient Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stachelek, Gregory C.; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Liu, Yanfeng; Fernandez, Rafael J.; Pike, Luke R. G.; Qian, Jack M.; Abriola, Laura; Hoyer, Denton; Hungerford, William; Merkel, Janie; Glazer, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy and DNA-damaging chemotherapy are frequently utilized in the treatment of solid tumors. Innate or acquired resistance to these therapies remains a major clinical challenge in oncology. The development of small molecules that sensitize cancers to established therapies represents an attractive approach to extending survival and quality of life in patients. Here, we demonstrate that YU238259, a member of a novel class of DNA double-strand break repair inhibitors, exhibits potent synthetic lethality in the setting of DNA damage response and DNA repair defects. YU238259 specifically inhibits homology-dependent DNA repair (HDR), but not non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), in cell-based GFP reporter assays. Treatment with YU238259 is not only synergistic with ionizing radiation (IR), etoposide, and PARP inhibition, but this synergism is heightened by BRCA2-deficiency. Further, growth of BRCA2-deficient human tumor xenografts in nude mice is significantly delayed by YU238259 treatment even in the absence of concomitant DNA-damaging therapy. The cytotoxicity of these small molecules in repair-deficient cells results from an accumulation of unresolved DNA double-strand breaks. These findings suggest that YU238259 or related small molecules may have clinical benefit to patients with advanced BRCA2-negative tumors, either as a monotherapy or as an adjuvant to radiotherapy and certain chemotherapies. PMID:26116172

  5. Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 4 (CHD4) Regulates Homologous Recombination DNA Repair, and Its Deficiency Sensitizes Cells to Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (PARP) Inhibitor Treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Hsieh, Hui-Ju; Dai, Hui; Hung, Wen-Chun; Li, Kaiyi; Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2012-01-01

    To ensure genome stability, cells have evolved a robust defense mechanism to detect, signal, and repair damaged DNA that is generated by exogenous stressors such as ionizing radiation, endogenous stressors such as free radicals, or normal physiological processes such as DNA replication. Homologous recombination (HR) repair is a critical pathway of repairing DNA double strand breaks, and it plays an essential role in maintaining genomic integrity. Previous studies have shown that BRIT1, also known as MCPH1, is a key regulator of HR repair. Here, we report that chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is a novel BRIT1 binding partner that regulates the HR repair process. The BRCA1 C-terminal domains of BRIT1 are required for its interaction with CHD4. Depletion of CHD4 and overexpression of the ATPase-dead form of CHD4 impairs the recruitment of BRIT1 to the DNA damage lesions. As a functional consequence, CHD4 deficiency sensitizes cells to double strand break-inducing agents, reduces the recruitment of HR repair factor BRCA1, and impairs HR repair efficiency. We further demonstrate that CHD4-depleted cells are more sensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor treatment. In response to DNA damage induced by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, CHD4 deficiency impairs the recruitment of DNA repair proteins BRIT1, BRCA1, and replication protein A at early steps of HR repair. Taken together, our findings identify an important role of CHD4 in controlling HR repair to maintain genome stability and establish the potential therapeutic implications of targeting CHD4 deficiency in tumors. PMID:22219182

  6. Concomitant Inhibition of PI3Kβ and BRAF or MEK in PTEN-Deficient/BRAF-Mutant Melanoma Treatment: Preclinical Assessment of SAR260301 Oral PI3Kβ-Selective Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bonnevaux, Hélène; Lemaitre, Olivier; Vincent, Loic; Levit, Mikhail N; Windenberger, Fanny; Halley, Frank; Delorme, Cécile; Lengauer, Christoph; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Virone-Oddos, Angela

    2016-07-01

    Class IA PI3K pathway activation resulting from PTEN deficiency has been associated with lack of sensitivity of melanoma to BRAF kinase inhibitors. Although previous studies have shown synergistic activity when pan-PI3K inhibitors were combined with MAPK inhibitors in the treatment of melanoma exhibiting concurrent genetic abnormalities, overlapping adverse events in patients limit optimal dosing and clinical application. With the aim of specifically targeting PTEN-deficient cancers and minimizing the potential for on-target toxicity when inhibiting multiple PI3K isoforms, we developed a program to discover PI3Kβ-selective kinase inhibitors and identified SAR260301 as a potent PI3Kβ-selective, orally available compound, which is now in clinical development. Herein, we provide a detailed biological characterization of SAR260301, and show that this compound has outstanding biochemical and cellular selectivity for the PI3Kβ isoform versus the α, δ, and γ isoforms and a large panel of protein and lipid kinases. We demonstrate that SAR260301 blocks PI3K pathway signaling preferentially in PTEN-deficient human tumor models, and has synergistic antitumor activity when combined with vemurafenib (BRAF inhibitor) or selumetinib (MEK inhibitor) in PTEN-deficient/BRAF-mutated human melanoma tumor models. Combination treatments were very well tolerated, suggesting the potential for a superior safety profile at optimal dosing using selective compounds to inhibit multiple signaling pathways. Together, these experiments provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for safely combining inhibitors of PI3Kβ and BRAF or MEK kinase modulators to improve antitumor activity in PTEN-deficient/BRAF-mutant melanoma, and support the evaluation of SAR260301-based combinations in clinical studies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1460-71. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196754

  7. Autophagy inhibitor Lys05 has single-agent antitumor activity and reproduces the phenotype of a genetic autophagy deficiency.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Quentin; Zhang, Zhihui; Samanta, Arabinda; Levi, Samuel M; Ma, Xiao-Hong; Piao, Shengfu; Lynch, John P; Uehara, Takeshi; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Davis, Lisa E; Winkler, Jeffrey D; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2012-05-22

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradative process that protects cancer cells from multiple stresses. In preclinical models, autophagy inhibition with chloroquine (CQ) derivatives augments the efficacy of many anticancer therapies, but CQ has limited activity as a single agent. Clinical trials are underway combining anticancer agents with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), but concentrations of HCQ required to inhibit autophagy are not consistently achievable in the clinic. We report the synthesis and characterization of bisaminoquinoline autophagy inhibitors that potently inhibit autophagy and impair tumor growth in vivo. The structural motifs that are necessary for improved autophagy inhibition compared with CQ include the presence of two aminoquinoline rings and a triamine linker and C-7 chlorine. The lead compound, Lys01, is a 10-fold more potent autophagy inhibitor than HCQ. Compared with HCQ, Lys05, a water-soluble salt of Lys01, more potently accumulates within and deacidifies the lysosome, resulting in impaired autophagy and tumor growth. At the highest dose administered, some mice develop Paneth cell dysfunction that resembles the intestinal phenotype of mice and humans with genetic defects in the autophagy gene ATG16L1, providing in vivo evidence that Lys05 targets autophagy. Unlike HCQ, significant single-agent antitumor activity is observed without toxicity in mice treated with lower doses of Lys05, establishing the therapeutic potential of this compound in cancer. PMID:22566612

  8. [Homozygote mice deficient in serotonin 5-HT1B receptor and antidepressant effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Trillat, A C; Malagié, I; Bourin, M; Jacquot, C; Hen, R; Gardier, A M

    1998-01-01

    We use the knockout mice strategy to investigate the contribution of the 5-HT1B receptor in mediating the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Using microdialysis in awake 129/Sv mice, we show that the absence of the 5-HT1B receptor in mutant mice (KO 1B -/-) potentiated the effect of paroxetine on extracellular 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex compared to wild-type mice (WT). Furthermore, using the forced swimming test, we demonstrate that SSRIs decreased immobility of WT mice, and this effect is absent in KO 1B -/- mice showing therefore that activation of 5-HT1B receptors mediate the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs. Taken together these findings suggest that 5-HT1B autoreceptors limit the effects of SSRI particularly in the hippocampus while postsynaptic 5-HT1B receptors are required for the antidepressant activity of SSRIs.

  9. BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cell lines are resistant to MEK inhibitors and show distinct sensitivities to 6-thioguanine

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuexi; Helenius, Mikko; Väänänen, Kristiina; Bulanova, Daria; Saarela, Jani; Sokolenko, Anna; Martens, John; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Germ-line or somatic inactivation of BRCA1 is a defining feature for a portion of human breast cancers. Here we evaluated the anti-proliferative activity of 198 FDA-approved and experimental drugs against four BRCA1-mutant (HCC1937, MDA-MB-436, SUM1315MO2, and SUM149PT) and four BRCA1-wild-type (MDA-MB-231, SUM229PE, MCF10A, and MCF7) breast cancer cell lines. We found that all BRCA1-mutant cell lines were insensitive to inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) Selumetinib and Pimasertib in contrast to BRCA1-wildtype control cell lines. However, unexpectedly, only two BRCA1-mutant cell lines, HCC1937 and MDA-MB-436, were hypersensitive to a nucleotide analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG). SUM149PT cells readily formed radiation-induced RAD51-positive nuclear foci indicating a functional homologous recombination, which may explain their resistance to 6-TG. However, the reason underlying 6-TG resistance of SUM1315MO2 cells remains unclear. Our data reveal a remarkable heterogeneity among BRCA1-mutant cell lines and provide a reference for future studies. PMID:27313062

  10. BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cell lines are resistant to MEK inhibitors and show distinct sensitivities to 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuexi; Helenius, Mikko; Väänänen, Kristiina; Bulanova, Daria; Saarela, Jani; Sokolenko, Anna; Martens, John; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Germ-line or somatic inactivation of BRCA1 is a defining feature for a portion of human breast cancers. Here we evaluated the anti-proliferative activity of 198 FDA-approved and experimental drugs against four BRCA1-mutant (HCC1937, MDA-MB-436, SUM1315MO2, and SUM149PT) and four BRCA1-wild-type (MDA-MB-231, SUM229PE, MCF10A, and MCF7) breast cancer cell lines. We found that all BRCA1-mutant cell lines were insensitive to inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) Selumetinib and Pimasertib in contrast to BRCA1-wildtype control cell lines. However, unexpectedly, only two BRCA1-mutant cell lines, HCC1937 and MDA-MB-436, were hypersensitive to a nucleotide analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG). SUM149PT cells readily formed radiation-induced RAD51-positive nuclear foci indicating a functional homologous recombination, which may explain their resistance to 6-TG. However, the reason underlying 6-TG resistance of SUM1315MO2 cells remains unclear. Our data reveal a remarkable heterogeneity among BRCA1-mutant cell lines and provide a reference for future studies. PMID:27313062

  11. Angiotensin type 1a receptor-deficient mice develop diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction, which is prevented by renin-angiotensin system inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes-induced organ damage is significantly associated with the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Recently, several studies have demonstrated a change in the RAS from an extracellular to an intracellular system, in several cell types, in response to high ambient glucose levels. In cardiac myocytes, intracellular angiotensin (ANG) II synthesis and actions are ACE and AT1 independent, respectively. However, a role of this system in diabetes-induced organ damage is not clear. Methods To determine a role of the intracellular ANG II in diabetic cardiomyopathy, we induced diabetes using streptozotocin in AT1a receptor deficient (AT1a-KO) mice to exclude any effects of extracellular ANG II. Further, diabetic animals were treated with a renin inhibitor aliskiren, an ACE inhibitor benazeprilat, and an AT1 receptor blocker valsartan. Results AT1a-KO mice developed significant diastolic and systolic dysfunction following 10 wks of diabetes, as determined by echocardiography. All three drugs prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction in these animals, without affecting blood pressure or glucose levels. A significant down regulation of components of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) was observed in diabetic animals, which was largely prevented by benazeprilat and valsartan, while aliskiren normalized kininogen expression. Conclusions These data indicated that the AT1a receptor, thus extracellular ANG II, are not required for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The KKS might contribute to the beneficial effects of benazeprilat and valsartan in diabetic cardiomyopathy. A role of intracellular ANG II is suggested by the inhibitory effects of aliskiren, which needs confirmation in future studies. PMID:24215514

  12. A novel BET bromodomain inhibitor, RVX-208, shows reduction of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jahagirdar, Ravi; Zhang, Haiyan; Azhar, Salman; Tobin, Jennifer; Attwell, Sarah; Yu, Raymond; Wu, Jin; McLure, Kevin G; Hansen, Henrik C; Wagner, Gregory S; Young, Peter R; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Wong, Norman C W; Johansson, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Despite the benefit of statins in reducing cardiovascular risk, a sizable proportion of patients still remain at risk. Since HDL reduces CVD risk through a process that involves formation of pre-beta particles that facilitates the removal of cholesterol from the lipid-laden macrophages in the arteries, inducing pre-beta particles, may reduce the risk of CVD. A novel BET bromodomain antagonist, RVX-208, was reported to raise apoA-I and increase preβ-HDL particles in non-human primates and humans. In the present study, we investigated the effect of RVX-208 on aortic lesion formation in hyperlipidemic apoE(-/-) mice. Oral treatments of apoE(-/-) mice with 150 mg/kg b.i.d RVX-208 for 12 weeks significantly reduced aortic lesion formation, accompanied by 2-fold increases in the levels of circulating HDL-C, and ∼50% decreases in LDL-C, although no significant changes in plasma apoA-I were observed. Circulating adhesion molecules as well as cytokines also showed significant reduction. Haptoglobin, a proinflammatory protein, known to bind with HDL/apoA-I, decreased >2.5-fold in the RVX-208 treated group. With a therapeutic dosing regimen in which mice were fed Western diet for 10 weeks to develop lesions followed by switching to a low fat diet and concurrent treatment with RVX-208 for 14 weeks, RVX-208 similarly reduced lesion formation by 39% in the whole aorta without significant changes in the plasma lipid parameters. RVX-208 significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokines IP-10, MIP1(®) and MDC. These results show that the antiatherogenic activity of BET inhibitor, RVX-208, occurs via a combination of lipid changes and anti-inflammatory activities.

  13. Effect of the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban on arterial thrombosis in wild-type and apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nana-Maria; Dressel, Tobias; Schäfer, Katrin; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2012-11-01

    Rivaroxaban is a potent and specific direct inhibitor of coagulation factor Xa. Recent studies have highlighted its effectiveness in the prevention of venous thrombosis and embolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation. To evaluate the antithrombotic effects of rivaroxaban in an in vivo model of arterial thrombosis, photochemical vascular injury was induced in wild-type mice by intravenous rose bengal (50 mg/kg body weight [BW]) followed by illumination of the left common carotid artery using a 543 nm helium-neon laser beam. Rivaroxaban, injected concomitantly with rose bengal at doses of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mg/kg BW, dose-dependently prolonged the times to first thrombotic occlusion and stable thrombosis. Quantitative analysis of carotid flow curves revealed higher blood volumes passing through the injured artery with increasing rivaroxaban doses (P<0.01 and P<0.001 vs. vehicle for 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg , respectively), suggesting a dose-dependent effect on vascular patency. Consistently, a significantly higher proportion of mice that received 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban exhibited patent carotid arteries at the end of the flow monitoring period compared to vehicle alone (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). Histological analysis showed complete thrombotic arterial occlusion in vehicle-treated mice compared to less thrombotic material in mice injected with 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban (P<0.05). Rivaroxaban also prolonged the time to cessation of tail bleeding in a dose-dependent manner, starting at 1.5 mg/kg. Similar findings were obtained in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. Rivaroxaban may exert beneficial effects by preventing arterial thrombosis and vascular occlusion after endothelial injury. PMID:22281071

  14. Effects on coagulation and fibrinolysis induced by influenza in mice with a reduced capacity to generate activated protein C and a deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1.

    PubMed

    Keller, Tymen T; van der Sluijs, Koen F; de Kruif, Martijn D; Gerdes, Victor E A; Meijers, Joost C M; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom; van Gorp, Eric C M; Brandjes, Dees P M; Büller, Harry R; Levi, Marcel

    2006-11-24

    Influenza infections increase the risk of diseases associated with a prothrombotic state, such as venous thrombosis and atherothrombotic diseases. However, it is unclear whether influenza leads to a prothrombotic state in vivo. To determine whether influenza activates coagulation, we measured coagulation and fibrinolysis in influenza-infected C57BL/6 mice. We found that influenza increased thrombin generation, fibrin deposition, and fibrinolysis. In addition, we used various anti- and prothrombotic models to study pathways involved in the influenza-induced prothrombotic state. A reduced capacity to generate activated protein C in TM(pro/pro) mice increased thrombin generation and fibrinolysis, whereas treatment with heparin decreased thrombin generation in influenza-infected C57Bl/6 mice. Thrombin generation was not changed in hyperfibrinolytic mice, deficient in plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1(-/-)); however, increased fibrin degradation was seen. Treatment with tranexamic acid reduced fibrinolysis, but thrombin generation was unchanged. We conclude that influenza infection generates thrombin, increased by reduced levels of protein C and decreased by heparin. The fibrinolytic system appears not to be important for thrombin generation. These findings suggest that influenza leads to a prothrombotic state by coagulation activation. Heparin treatment reduces the influenza induced prothrombotic state. PMID:17068293

  15. The conversion of C'IS to C'1 esterase by plasmin and trypsin.

    PubMed

    Ratnoff, O D; Naff, G B

    1967-02-01

    The formation of C'1 esterase from C'1, the first component of complement, may be brought about by the action of plasmin or trypsin upon C'1s, a subcomponent of C'1. These enzymes also decrease the esterolytic activity of C'1 esterase. The formation of C'1 esterase was demonstrated by measuring the appearance of an agent or agents with esterolytic properties and the capacity to inactivate C'2 and C'4, attributes of C'1 esterase. The activity of the agent which evolved was blocked by serum inhibitor of C'1 esterase. The implications of these observations, that the formation of C'1 esterase during complement fixation is mediated by proteolytic processes, are under study. The possible inhibition of C'1q by soybean trypsin inhibitor is in agreement with this hypothesis.

  16. C1q rs292001 polymorphism and C1q antibodies in juvenile lupus and their relation to lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mosaad, Y M; Hammad, A; Fawzy, Z; El-Refaaey, A; Tawhid, Z; Hammad, E M; Youssef, L F; ElAttar, E A A; Radwan, D F; Fawzy, I M

    2015-01-01

    C1q deficiency is related strongly to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but very few and inconsistent studies explored the single nucleotide polymorphisms of the C1q gene in relation to juvenile SLE (jSLE) and lupus nephritis (LN). The objective of this study was to analyse whether C1q rs 292001 polymorphism is associated with SLE and disease phenotype, especially nephritis, and to investigate the relation between this polymorphism and clinical data, treatment outcome, serum level of C1q protein and antibodies. Typing of C1q rs292001 polymorphism using restriction fragment length polymorphism and measuring serum levels of C1q protein and antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed for 130 children with SLE and 208 healthy controls. The A allele of C1q rs292001 was associated with jSLE and LN (P = 0·005 and 0·013, respectively) and the AA genotype was associated with jSLE (P = 0·036). Low serum levels of C1q protein were found in jSLE and LN (P < 0·001 and 0·009, respectively), and these levels were increased after treatment in patients with LN (P = 0·009) and active renal disease (P = 0·027). Higher titres of C1q antibodies were found in patients with LN (P = 0·015) and correlated negatively with C1q protein level (P < 0·001) and patient age (P = 0·04). The A allele and AA genotype of C1q rs292001 can be considered a susceptibility risk factor and the GG genotype could be considered protective for jSLE and LN in the studied cohort of Egyptian children. Decreased serum levels of C1q protein and increased titres of C1q antibodies may be involved in the pathogenesis of jSLE, especially LN. PMID:26095468

  17. Deletion of mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae decreased cellular and mitochondrial ATP levels under non-nutritional conditions and induced a respiration-deficient cell-type.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y M; Miyazawa, K; Yamaguchi, K; Nowaki, K; Iwatsuki, H; Wakamatsu, Y; Ichikawa, N; Hashimoto, T

    2001-12-01

    T(1), a mutant yeast lacking three regulatory proteins of F(1)F(o)ATPase, namely ATPase inhibitor, 9K protein and 15K protein, grew on non-fermentable carbon source at the same rate as normal cells but was less viable when incubated in water. During the incubation, the cellular ATP content decreased rapidly in the T(1) cells but not in normal cells, and respiration-deficient cells appeared among the T(1) cells. The same mutation was also induced in D26 cells lacking only the ATPase inhibitor. Overexpression of the ATPase inhibitor in YC63 cells, which were derived from the D26 strain harboring an expression vector containing the gene of the ATPase inhibitor, prevented the decrease of cellular ATP level and the mutation. Isolated T(1) mitochondria exhibited ATP hydrolysis for maintenance of membrane potential when antimycin A was added to the mitochondrial suspension, while normal and YC63 mitochondria continued to show low hydrolytic activity and low membrane potential. Thus, it is likely that deletion of the ATPase inhibitor induces ATPase activity of F(1)F(o)ATPase to create a dispensable membrane potential under the non-nutritional conditions and that this depletes mitochondrial and cellular ATP. The depletion of mitochondrial ATP in turn leads to occurrence of aberrant DNA in mitochondria.

  18. The distortive mechanism for the activation of complement component C1 supported by studies with a monoclonal antibody against the "arms" of C1q.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Martens, M; Brouwer, M C; Hack, C E

    1988-05-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (IgG1 isotype) against human C1q (MAb 130) is presented that activates C1 in serum through its antigen-binding sites at an optimal molar ratio of 3 MAbs:1 C1q. The antibody does not inhibit binding of C1q to IgG. Experiments with pepsin- and collagenase-digested C1q showed that MAb 130 binds to the fibril-like strands (arms) of C1q, close to the globular heads. Bivalency of MAb 130 was a requirement for C1-activation, but not for binding to C1q. Increasing the segmental flexibility of the intact antibody by reduction and alkylation destroyed its capacity to activate C1. A MAb against the globular heads of C1q completely inhibited C1-activation by aggregated IgG (AHG), but did not prevent activation by MAb 130. C1, reconstituted by adding C1q-stalks that lack the globular heads to C1q-depleted serum was not activated by AHG, whereas activation by MAb 130 was not affected. Activation of serum-C1 by AHG and MAb 130 was inhibited by addition of excess purified C1-inhibitor in a comparable and dose-dependent manner. Sucrose-gradient analysis indicated a predominance of stable complexes of a single C1q-molecule with three MAbs at the optimal activating ratio. When isolated and added to C1q-depleted serum, these complexes activated C1 efficiently. A mechanism for activation by MAb 130 is proposed that supports the "distortive" model of C1-activation.

  19. Uncoupling complement C1s activation from C1q binding in apoptotic cell phagocytosis and immunosuppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Parry, Graham C; Panicker, Sandip; Elkon, Keith B

    2016-02-01

    Complement activation contributes to inflammation in many diseases, yet it also supports physiologic apoptotic cells (AC) clearance and its downstream immunosuppressive effects. The roles of individual complement components in AC phagocytosis have been difficult to dissect with artificially depleted sera. Using human in vitro systems and the novel antibody complement C1s inhibitor TNT003, we uncoupled the role of the enzymatic activation of the classical pathway from the opsonizing role of C1q in mediating a) the phagocytosis of early and late AC, and b) the immunosuppressive capacity of early AC. We found that C1s inhibition had a small impact on the physiologic clearance of early AC, leaving their immunosuppressive properties entirely unaffected, while mainly inhibiting the phagocytosis of late apoptotic/secondary necrotic cells. Our data suggest that C1s inhibition may represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to control classical pathway activation without causing significant AC accumulation in diseases without defects in AC phagocytosis.

  20. Biosynthesis of normal and low-molecular-mass complement component C1q by cultured human monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Brouwer, M C; de Graeff-Meeder, E R; van Helden, H P; Hack, C E

    1989-01-15

    High levels of low-molecular-mass complement component C1q (LMM-C1q), a haemolytically inactive form of C1q, are found in serum of individuals with inherited complete (functional) C1q deficiency and in serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, whereas lower levels are present in normal serum [Hoekzema, Hannema, Swaak, Paardekooper & Hack (1985) J. Immunol. 135, 265-271]. To investigate whether LMM-C1q is a (by-)product of C1q synthesis or the result of degradation of C1q, cultures of blood monocytes and of alveolar macrophages, which secrete functional C1q, were studied. A considerable portion of C1q-like protein secreted by these cells was found to be LMM-C1q. In contrast with the C1q fragments that resulted from degradation of normal C1q during phagocytosis, culture-derived LMM-C1q appeared to be identical with LMM-C1q found in serum, as judged by sedimentation behaviour, subunit structure and recognition by poly- and mono-clonal antibodies raised against C1q. The presence of LMM-C1q in cytoplasmic organelles compatible with the Golgi apparatus and the inability to generate LMM-C1q by impeding hydroxylation and triple-helix formation of C1q further argues against degradation as its source. Monocyte cultures of homozygous probands from two families with complete functional C1q deficiency reflected the abnormalities in serum, i.e. absence of functional C1q, but increased levels of LMM-C1q. By contrast, secretion of C1q and LMM-C1q by cells from healthy individuals was clearly co-ordinate, indicating that LMM-C1q in serum may provide a unique marker of C1q synthesis in vivo.

  1. Emerging and Novel Functions of Complement Protein C1q

    PubMed Central

    Kouser, Lubna; Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Shastri, Abhishek; Saraon, Anuvinder; Ferluga, Janez; Al-Mozaini, Maha; Kishore, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Complement protein C1q, the recognition molecule of the classical pathway, performs a diverse range of complement and non-complement functions. It can bind various ligands derived from self, non-self, and altered self and modulate the functions of immune and non-immune cells including dendritic cells and microglia. C1q involvement in the clearance of apoptotic cells and subsequent B cell tolerance is more established now. Recent evidence appears to suggest that C1q plays an important role in pregnancy where its deficiency and dysregulation can have adverse effects, leading to preeclampsia, missed abortion, miscarriage or spontaneous loss, and various infections. C1q is also produced locally in the central nervous system, and has a protective role against pathogens and possible inflammatory functions while interacting with aggregated proteins leading to neurodegenerative diseases. C1q role in synaptic pruning, and thus CNS development, its anti-cancer effects as an immune surveillance molecule, and possibly in aging are currently areas of extensive research. PMID:26175731

  2. Effects of Lewis lung carcinoma on trabecular microstructural changes in wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone is a major target organ of metastasis. The present study investigated the effects of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) on trabecular microstructural changes, using tomographic analysis, in distal femur and lumbar 4 vertebra from LLC-bearing wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) defi...

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Isebaert, Sofie F.; Swinnen, Johannes V.; McBride, William H.; Haustermans, Karin M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  4. Involvement of NADPH oxidase in up-regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and heat shock factor-1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts induced by oxidized LDL and in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruozhi; Moghadasian, Mohammed H; Shen, Garry X

    2011-09-01

    The present study demonstrated that oxidized LDL (oLDL) increased the generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the abundances of NADPH oxidase (NOX)4, NOX2, p22-phox and lectin-like oLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) in wild-type or heat shock factor-1 (HSF1)-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF). LOX-1 antibody inhibited LDL or oLDL-induced expression of NOX components in MEF. Abundance of HSF1 or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was increased by oLDL in wild-type, but not in HSF1-deficient MEF. Diphenyleneiodonium or siRNA for NOX or p22-phox inhibited oLDL-induced increases of HSF1, PAI-1 and H(2)O(2) in MEF. Increased NOX4, NOX2, LOX1, HSF1 and PAI-1 were detected in aortae and hearts of apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice compared to controls, which were associated with increased serum cholesterol or plasma PAI-1. The results suggest that NOX is required for oLDL-induced HSF1 or PAI-1 expression in MEF, which was supported by the up-regulation of NOX, LOX-1, HSF1 and PAI-1 in apoE-KO mice.

  5. Curtiss SB2C-1 Helldiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1944-01-01

    Curtiss SB2C-1 Helldiver: This Curtiss SB2C-1 Helldiver was flown by the NACA at Langley with an early radio-control system. Flying controls such as a spring tab were also examined with this airframe. Helldivers were also operated by the U. S. Army as A-25 Shrikes.

  6. C1 neurons: the body's EMTs.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Depuy, Seth D; Burke, Peter G R; Abbott, Stephen B G

    2013-08-01

    The C1 neurons reside in the rostral and intermediate portions of the ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, IVLM). They use glutamate as a fast transmitter and synthesize catecholamines plus various neuropeptides. These neurons regulate the hypothalamic pituitary axis via direct projections to the paraventricular nucleus and regulate the autonomic nervous system via projections to sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons. The presympathetic C1 cells, located in the RVLM, are probably organized in a roughly viscerotopic manner and most of them regulate the circulation. C1 cells are variously activated by hypoglycemia, infection or inflammation, hypoxia, nociception, and hypotension and contribute to most glucoprivic responses. C1 cells also stimulate breathing and activate brain stem noradrenergic neurons including the locus coeruleus. Based on the various effects attributed to the C1 cells, their axonal projections and what is currently known of their synaptic inputs, subsets of C1 cells appear to be differentially recruited by pain, hypoxia, infection/inflammation, hemorrhage, and hypoglycemia to produce a repertoire of stereotyped autonomic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses that help the organism survive physical injury and its associated cohort of acute infection, hypoxia, hypotension, and blood loss. C1 cells may also contribute to glucose and cardiovascular homeostasis in the absence of such physical stresses, and C1 cell hyperactivity may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity associated with diseases such as hypertension. PMID:23697799

  7. The HDAC inhibitor SAHA improves depressive-like behavior of CRTC1-deficient mice: Possible relevance for treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Meylan, Elsa M; Halfon, Olivier; Magistretti, Pierre J; Cardinaux, Jean-René

    2016-08-01

    Major depression is a highly complex disabling psychiatric disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, a substantial percentage of patients are unresponsive to these medications. A better understanding of the neurobiology of depression and the mechanisms underlying antidepressant response is thus critically needed. We previously reported that mice lacking CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) exhibit a depressive-like phenotype and a blunted antidepressant response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. In this study, we similarly show that Crtc1(-/-) mice are resistant to the antidepressant effect of chronic desipramine in a behavioral despair paradigm. Supporting the blunted response to this tricyclic antidepressant, we found that desipramine does not significantly increase the expression of Bdnf and Nr4a1-3 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of Crtc1(-/-) mice. Epigenetic regulation of neuroplasticity gene expression has been associated with depression and antidepressant response, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to have antidepressant-like properties. Here, we show that unlike conventional antidepressants, chronic systemic administration of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA partially rescues the depressive-like behavior of Crtc1(-/-) mice. This behavioral effect is accompanied by an increased expression of Bdnf, but not Nr4a1-3, in the prefrontal cortex of these mice, suggesting that this epigenetic intervention restores the expression of a subset of genes by acting downstream of CRTC1. These findings suggest that CRTC1 alterations may be associated with treatment-resistant depression, and support the interesting possibility that targeting HDACs may be a useful therapeutic strategy in antidepressant development. PMID:26970016

  8. Modification of an exposed loop in the C1 domain reduces immune responses to factor VIII in hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Aleksandra; van Haren, Simon D.; Herczenik, Eszter; Kaijen, Paul; Ruminska, Aleksandra; Jin, Sheng-Yu; Zheng, X. Long; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; ten Brinke, Anja; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    Development of neutralizing Abs to blood coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) provides a major complication in hemophilia care. In this study we explored whether modulation of the uptake of FVIII by APCs can reduce its intrinsic immunogenicity. Endocytosis of FVIII by professional APCs is significantly blocked by mAb KM33, directed toward the C1 domain of FVIII. We created a C1 domain variant (FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A), which showed only minimal binding to KM33 and retained its activity as measured by chromogenic assay. FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A displayed a strongly reduced internalization by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as murine BM-derived dendritic cells. We subsequently investigated the ability of this variant to induce an immune response in FVIII-deficient mice. We show that mice treated with FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A have significantly lower anti-FVIII Ab titers and FVIII-specific CD4+ T-cell responses compared with mice treated with wild-type FVIII. These data show that alanine substitutions at positions 2090, 2092, and 2093 reduce the immunogenicity of FVIII. According to our findings we hypothesize that FVIII variants displaying a reduced uptake by APCs provide a novel therapeutic approach to reduce inhibitor development in hemophilia A. PMID:22498747

  9. Modification of an exposed loop in the C1 domain reduces immune responses to factor VIII in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Wroblewska, Aleksandra; van Haren, Simon D; Herczenik, Eszter; Kaijen, Paul; Ruminska, Aleksandra; Jin, Sheng-Yu; Zheng, X Long; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; ten Brinke, Anja; Meijer, Alexander B; Voorberg, Jan

    2012-05-31

    Development of neutralizing Abs to blood coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) provides a major complication in hemophilia care. In this study we explored whether modulation of the uptake of FVIII by APCs can reduce its intrinsic immunogenicity. Endocytosis of FVIII by professional APCs is significantly blocked by mAb KM33, directed toward the C1 domain of FVIII. We created a C1 domain variant (FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A), which showed only minimal binding to KM33 and retained its activity as measured by chromogenic assay. FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A displayed a strongly reduced internalization by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as murine BM-derived dendritic cells. We subsequently investigated the ability of this variant to induce an immune response in FVIII-deficient mice. We show that mice treated with FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A have significantly lower anti-FVIII Ab titers and FVIII-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses compared with mice treated with wild-type FVIII. These data show that alanine substitutions at positions 2090, 2092, and 2093 reduce the immunogenicity of FVIII. According to our findings we hypothesize that FVIII variants displaying a reduced uptake by APCs provide a novel therapeutic approach to reduce inhibitor development in hemophilia A. PMID:22498747

  10. Curtiss SB2C-1 Helldiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Curtiss SB2C-1 Helldiver: The front canopy came off this Curtiss SB2C-1 Helldiver while it was in flight, injuring pilot Herbert H. Hoover, but he recovered the plane back to the NACA at Langley Field. SB2Cs were license-built by Fairchild as SBFs and by Canadian Car and Foundry as SBWs. Helldivers were also flown by the British and Australians.

  11. 29 CFR 2575.502c-1 - Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACT OF 1974 ADJUSTMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES UNDER ERISA TITLE I Adjustment of Civil Penalties Under ERISA Title I § 2575.502c-1 Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1). In accordance with the... section 502(c)(1) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), is...

  12. 29 CFR 2575.502c-1 - Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACT OF 1974 ADJUSTMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES UNDER ERISA TITLE I Adjustment of Civil Penalties Under ERISA Title I § 2575.502c-1 Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1). In accordance with the... section 502(c)(1) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), is...

  13. 29 CFR 2575.502c-1 - Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACT OF 1974 ADJUSTMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES UNDER ERISA TITLE I Adjustment of Civil Penalties Under ERISA Title I § 2575.502c-1 Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1). In accordance with the... section 502(c)(1) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), is...

  14. 29 CFR 2575.502c-1 - Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACT OF 1974 ADJUSTMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES UNDER ERISA TITLE I Adjustment of Civil Penalties Under ERISA Title I § 2575.502c-1 Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1). In accordance with the... section 502(c)(1) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), is...

  15. 29 CFR 2575.502c-1 - Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACT OF 1974 ADJUSTMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES UNDER ERISA TITLE I Adjustment of Civil Penalties Under ERISA Title I § 2575.502c-1 Adjusted civil penalty under section 502(c)(1). In accordance with the... section 502(c)(1) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), is...

  16. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecific potassium channel blocker (tetraethylammonium chloride [TEA]), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine [L-NMMA]), and a store-operated calcium entry inhibitor (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-APB]). Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation was also completely abolished by an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase, which suggests that the Pro C1 effects observed involved cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. Interestingly, Pro C1 significantly enhanced basal cGMP levels. Taken together, these results indicate that Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation is associated with the activation of the calcium-dependent NO/cGMP pathway, involving potassium channel activation. Thus, Pro C1 may represent a novel and potentially therapeutically relevant compound for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24971771

  17. Gonococcal infection in a nonhuman host is determined by human complement C1q.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, S; Martens, M G; Nowicki, B J

    1995-12-01

    Human C1q displayed a dose-dependent protection of gonococcal cells (GC) from the bactericidal effect of newborn rat serum. All rat pups injected with C1q-preincubated GC developed bacteremia, while none of the animals injected with GC only were infected. After clearance of bacteremia at day 6, live GC could still be recovered from tested organs, including the liver. Preincubation of GC with higher concentrations of C1q was associated with increased morbidity. In contrast to human serum as a source of C1q, rat, rabbit, and mouse sera did not increase the in vivo virulence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. C1q-deficient human serum, heat-inactivated C1q or human serum, type IV collagen, and complement C3 were inefficient in inducing infection. Experimental infection by C1q-preincubated GC was inhibited by anti-C1q antibodies in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating a causal effect of C1q function. This report demonstrates the novel finding that human C1q, a component of the human immune system with a general function for elimination of infection, may increase GC virulence and result in the development of disseminated infection in a nonhuman host.

  18. Gonococcal infection in a nonhuman host is determined by human complement C1q.

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, S; Martens, M G; Nowicki, B J

    1995-01-01

    Human C1q displayed a dose-dependent protection of gonococcal cells (GC) from the bactericidal effect of newborn rat serum. All rat pups injected with C1q-preincubated GC developed bacteremia, while none of the animals injected with GC only were infected. After clearance of bacteremia at day 6, live GC could still be recovered from tested organs, including the liver. Preincubation of GC with higher concentrations of C1q was associated with increased morbidity. In contrast to human serum as a source of C1q, rat, rabbit, and mouse sera did not increase the in vivo virulence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. C1q-deficient human serum, heat-inactivated C1q or human serum, type IV collagen, and complement C3 were inefficient in inducing infection. Experimental infection by C1q-preincubated GC was inhibited by anti-C1q antibodies in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating a causal effect of C1q function. This report demonstrates the novel finding that human C1q, a component of the human immune system with a general function for elimination of infection, may increase GC virulence and result in the development of disseminated infection in a nonhuman host. PMID:7591137

  19. Anxiety and depression with neurogenesis defects in exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2-deficient mice are ameliorated by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Prozac

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, L; Ma, S L; Yeung, P K K; Wong, Y H; Tsim, K W K; So, K F; Lam, L C W; Chung, S K

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular cAMP and serotonin are important modulators of anxiety and depression. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) also known as Prozac, is widely used against depression, potentially by activating cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through protein kinase A (PKA). However, the role of Epac1 and Epac2 (Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors, RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4, respectively) as potential downstream targets of SSRI/cAMP in mood regulations is not yet clear. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of Epac1 (Epac1−/−) or Epac2 (Epac2−/−) knockout mice by comparing them with their wild-type counterparts. Surprisingly, Epac2−/− mice exhibited a wide range of mood disorders, including anxiety and depression with learning and memory deficits in contextual and cued fear-conditioning tests without affecting Epac1 expression or PKA activity. Interestingly, rs17746510, one of the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in RAPGEF4 associated with cognitive decline in Chinese Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, was significantly correlated with apathy and mood disturbance, whereas no significant association was observed between RAPGEF3 SNPs and the risk of AD or neuropsychiatric inventory scores. To further determine the detailed role of Epac2 in SSRI/serotonin/cAMP-involved mood disorders, we treated Epac2−/− mice with a SSRI, Prozac. The alteration in open field behavior and impaired hippocampal cell proliferation in Epac2−/− mice were alleviated by Prozac. Taken together, Epac2 gene polymorphism is a putative risk factor for mood disorders in AD patients in part by affecting the hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27598965

  20. Anxiety and depression with neurogenesis defects in exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2-deficient mice are ameliorated by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Prozac.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Ma, S L; Yeung, P K K; Wong, Y H; Tsim, K W K; So, K F; Lam, L C W; Chung, S K

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular cAMP and serotonin are important modulators of anxiety and depression. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) also known as Prozac, is widely used against depression, potentially by activating cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through protein kinase A (PKA). However, the role of Epac1 and Epac2 (Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors, RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4, respectively) as potential downstream targets of SSRI/cAMP in mood regulations is not yet clear. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of Epac1 (Epac1(-/-)) or Epac2 (Epac2(-/-)) knockout mice by comparing them with their wild-type counterparts. Surprisingly, Epac2(-/-) mice exhibited a wide range of mood disorders, including anxiety and depression with learning and memory deficits in contextual and cued fear-conditioning tests without affecting Epac1 expression or PKA activity. Interestingly, rs17746510, one of the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in RAPGEF4 associated with cognitive decline in Chinese Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, was significantly correlated with apathy and mood disturbance, whereas no significant association was observed between RAPGEF3 SNPs and the risk of AD or neuropsychiatric inventory scores. To further determine the detailed role of Epac2 in SSRI/serotonin/cAMP-involved mood disorders, we treated Epac2(-/-) mice with a SSRI, Prozac. The alteration in open field behavior and impaired hippocampal cell proliferation in Epac2(-/-) mice were alleviated by Prozac. Taken together, Epac2 gene polymorphism is a putative risk factor for mood disorders in AD patients in part by affecting the hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27598965

  1. Do the mutations of C1GALT1C1 gene play important roles in the genetic susceptibility to Chinese IgA nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gui-Sen; Nie, Guang-Jun; Zhang, Hong; LV, Ji-Cheng; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2009-01-01

    Background The deficiency of β1,3 galactose in hinge region of IgA1 molecule played a pivotal role in pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Cosmc, encoded by C1GALT1C1 gene, was indispensable to β1,3 galactosylation of IgA1. We designed a serial study to investigate the relationship between the mutations of C1GALT1C1 gene and the genetic susceptibility to IgAN. Methods Nine hundred and thirty-eight subjects, including 661 patients with IgAN and 277 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Firstly, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of C1GALT1C1 gene were screened. Then the c.-347-190G>A was analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for further case-control association analysis. Secondly the somatic mutations of DNAs from peripheral blood B lymphocytes were detected in 15 patients and 7 normal controls. Results No significant association was observed between the different alleles or genotypes of c.-347-190G>A and IgAN. The patients with different genotypes of C1GALT1C1 gene did not significantly associate with clinical manifestations, including hematuria, proteinuria, and serum creatinine of patients with IgAN. There was no somatic mutation detected in total 202 clones of 22 individuals. Conclusion The c.-347-190G>A polymorphism and the somatic mutation of encoding region of C1GALT1C1 gene were not significantly related to the genetic susceptibility to IgAN in Northern Chinese population. PMID:19778426

  2. 42 CFR 52c.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.1 Applicability. The regulations in this part apply to grants (under the Minority... Service (PHS) Act (42 U.S.C. 241(a)(3)) to increase the numbers of ethnic minority faculty, students,...

  3. 42 CFR 52c.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.1 Applicability. The regulations in this part apply to grants (under the Minority... Service (PHS) Act (42 U.S.C. 241(a)(3)) to increase the numbers of ethnic minority faculty, students,...

  4. 42 CFR 52c.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.1 Applicability. The regulations in this part apply to grants (under the Minority... Service (PHS) Act (42 U.S.C. 241(a)(3)) to increase the numbers of ethnic minority faculty, students,...

  5. 42 CFR 52c.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.1 Applicability. The regulations in this part apply to grants (under the Minority... Service (PHS) Act (42 U.S.C. 241(a)(3)) to increase the numbers of ethnic minority faculty, students,...

  6. 42 CFR 52c.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.1 Applicability. The regulations in this part apply to grants (under the Minority... Service (PHS) Act (42 U.S.C. 241(a)(3)) to increase the numbers of ethnic minority faculty, students,...

  7. Protein engineering studies on C1r and C1s.

    PubMed

    Závodszky, P; Gál, P; Cseh, S; Schumaker, V N

    1993-12-01

    1. C1r and C1s cDNAs were placed downstream the strong polyhedrin promoter in the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus and the recombinant proteins were expressed in insect cells, in biologically active form. The yield of expression is high enough to get recombinant components for chemical and functional studies (5 micrograms/ml cell culture supernatant). 2. The biological activity and the post-translational modifications of the recombinant subcomponents were checked. The rC1r and rC1s proved to be biologically active in the hemolytic assay, although their glycosylations were different compared to that of the serum proteins. The insect cells are able to beta-hydroxylate the Asn residue of the EGF domain in the C1r but with a low efficiency. It is clear now, that this post-translational modification does not play a role in the Ca2+ dependent C1r-C1s interaction. 3. Two deletion mutants of C1r cDNA were constructed in order to clarify the role of domain I and II. The results show that both, domain I, and II are absolutely necessary for the tetramer formation and both have a regulatory role in the autoactivation. The autoactivation of the mutants is accelerated significantly. 4. Hybrid cDNA constructions were also made, and one of them was expressed. In the C1s alpha R hybrid the C1s alpha part cannot dimerize in presence of Ca2+, but it can form a tetramer with C1r2, that can bind to C1q. This observation indicates that the function of the C1s alpha part in the hybrid is modulated by the C1r part (gamma B) of the molecule. 5. In order to control the autoactivation process point mutant cDNAs were constructed through altering the Arg-Ile bond in the catalytic domain of the C1r. The Gln-Ile construction is a stable zymogen while the Arg-Phe mutant has a lower rate of autoactivation. These results do justify our approach of using domain-domain interchange, domain deletion and point mutations in combination, to reveal the structural background of C1 function

  8. Complimentary action: C1q increases ganglion cell survival in an in vitro model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Blom, Anna M; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2016-09-15

    Using a previously described retinal explant culture system as an acute injury model, we here explore the role of C1q, the initiator of the classical complement pathway, in neuronal cell survival and retinal homeostasis. Full-thickness adult rat retinal explants were divided into four groups, receiving the following supplementation: C1q (50nM), C1-inhibitor (C1-inh; Berinert; 500mg/l), C1q+C1-inh, and no supplementation (culture controls). Explants were kept for 12h or 2days after which they were examined morphologically and with a panel of immunohistochemical markers. C1q supplementation protects ganglion cells from degeneration within the explant in vitro system. This effect is correlated to an attenuated endogenous production of C1q, and a quiesced gliotic response. PMID:27609284

  9. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  14. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: `quenched` matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our `quenched` matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints.

  15. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong.

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: quenched' matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our quenched' matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints.

  16. Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2000-10-27

    C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F

  17. Notes on Liouville theory at c{<=}1

    SciTech Connect

    McElgin, Will

    2008-03-15

    The continuation of the Liouville conformal field theory to c{<=}1 is considered. The viability of an interpretation involving a timelike boson which is the conformal factor for two-dimensional asymptotically de Sitter geometries is examined. The conformal bootstrap leads to a three-point function with a unique analytic factor which is the same as that which appears along with the fusion coefficients in the minimal models. A corresponding nonanalytic factor produces a well-defined metric on fields only when the central charge is restricted to those of the topological minimal models, and when the conformal dimensions satisfy h>(c-1)/24. However, the theories considered here have a continuous spectrum which excludes the degenerate representations appearing in the minimal models. The c=1 theory has been investigated previously using similar techniques, and is identical to a nonrational conformal field theory (CFT) which arises as a limit of unitary minimal models. When coupled to unitary matter fields, the nonunitary theories with c{<=}-2 produce string amplitudes which are similar to those of the minimal string.

  18. Direct binding of C1q to apoptotic cells and cell blebs induces complement activation.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Alma J; Trouw, Leendert A; Daha, Mohamed R; Tijsma, Odette; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Gingras, Alexandre R; Mantovani, Alberto; Hack, Erik C; Roos, Anja

    2002-06-01

    Deficiency of early components of the classical pathway of complement, particularly C1q, predisposes to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. Several studies have suggested an association between the classical complement pathway and the clearance of apoptotic cells. Mice with a targeted deletion of the C1q gene develop a lupus-like renal disease, which is associated with the presence of multiple apoptotic bodies in the kidney. In the present study we demonstrate that highly purified C1q binds to apoptotic cells and isolated blebs derived from these apoptotic cells. Binding of C1q to apoptotic cells occurs via the globular heads of C1q and induces activation of the classical complement pathway, as shown by the deposition of C4 and C3 on the surface of these cells and on cell-derived blebs. In addition, for the first time, we demonstrate that surface-bound C1q is present on a subpopulation of microparticles isolated from human plasma. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that C1q binds directly to apoptotic cells and blebs derived therefrom and support a role for C1q, possibly in concert with C4 and C3, in the clearance of apoptotic cells and blebs by the phagocytic system.

  19. Anti-DNA antibodies cross-react with C1q.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Giovanni; Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Zhang, Jie; Diamond, Betty

    2013-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder that involves multiple organ systems and typically presents as a chronic inflammatory disease. Antibodies to double-stranded (ds) DNA are present in approximately 70% of patients and form nucleic acid containing immune complexes which activate dendritic cells through engagement of toll-like receptors, leading to a pro-inflammatory, pro-immunogenic milieu. In addition, anti-dsDNA antibodies deposit in kidneys to initiate glomerulonephritis. Antibodies to C1q have also been implicated in lupus nephritis and are found in 30-50% of patients. C1q is a known suppressor of immune activation and C1q deficiency is the strongest risk factor for SLE. We previously identified a subset of anti-DNA antibodies that binds the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. We now show that both mouse and human anti-DNA antibodies with this specificity bind C1q. These antibodies bind to Clq in glomeruli and exhibit decreased glomerular deposition in the absence of C1q. We propose that this subset of anti-DNA antibodies participates in lupus pathogenesis through direct targeting of C1q on glomeruli and also through removal of soluble C1q thereby limiting the ability of C1q to mediate immune homeostasis.

  20. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) deficient mice absorb less cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Park, Tae-Sik; Li, Yan; Pan, Xiaoyue; Iqbal, Jahangir; Lu, David; Tang, Weiqing; Yu, Liqing; Goldberg, Ira J; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sphingolipids. It has been reported that oral administration of myriocin (an SPT inhibitor) decreases plasma sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol levels, and reduces atherosclerosis in apoE knockout (KO) mice. We studied cholesterol absorption in myriocin-treated WT or apoE KO animals and found that, after myriocin treatment, the mice absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls, with no observable pathological changes in the small intestine. More importantly, we found that heterozygous Sptlc1 (a subunit of SPT) KO mice also absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls. To understand the mechanism, we measured protein levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), ABCG5, and ABCA1, three key factors involved in intestinal cholesterol absorption. We found that NPC1L1 and ABCA1 were decreased, whereas ABCG5 was increased in the SPT deficient small intestine. SM levels on the apical membrane were also measured and they were significantly decreased in SPT deficient mice, compared with controls. In conclusion, SPT deficiency might reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption by altering NPC1L1 and ABCG5 protein levels in the apical membranes of enterocytes through lowering apical membrane SM levels. This may be also true for ABCA1 which locates on basal membrane of enterocytes. Manipulation of SPT activity could thus provide a novel alternative treatment for dyslipidemia. PMID:19416652

  1. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) deficient mice absorb less cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Park, Tae-Sik; Li, Yan; Pan, Xiaoyue; Iqbal, Jahangir; Lu, David; Tang, Weiqing; Yu, Liqing; Goldberg, Ira J; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sphingolipids. It has been reported that oral administration of myriocin (an SPT inhibitor) decreases plasma sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol levels, and reduces atherosclerosis in apoE knockout (KO) mice. We studied cholesterol absorption in myriocin-treated WT or apoE KO animals and found that, after myriocin treatment, the mice absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls, with no observable pathological changes in the small intestine. More importantly, we found that heterozygous Sptlc1 (a subunit of SPT) KO mice also absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls. To understand the mechanism, we measured protein levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), ABCG5, and ABCA1, three key factors involved in intestinal cholesterol absorption. We found that NPC1L1 and ABCA1 were decreased, whereas ABCG5 was increased in the SPT deficient small intestine. SM levels on the apical membrane were also measured and they were significantly decreased in SPT deficient mice, compared with controls. In conclusion, SPT deficiency might reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption by altering NPC1L1 and ABCG5 protein levels in the apical membranes of enterocytes through lowering apical membrane SM levels. This may be also true for ABCA1 which locates on basal membrane of enterocytes. Manipulation of SPT activity could thus provide a novel alternative treatment for dyslipidemia.

  2. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  3. COOPERATIVE RESEARCH IN C1 CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2001-04-30

    Faculty and students from five universities (Kentucky, West Virginia, Utah, Pittsburgh and Auburn) are collaborating on a basic research program to develop novel C1 chemistry processes for the production of clean, high quality transportation fuel. An Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) with members from Chevron, Eastman Chemical, Energy International, Teir Associates, and the Department of Defense has been formed to provide practical guidance to the program. The program has two principal objectives. (1) Develop technology for conversion of C1 source materials (natural gas, synthesis gas, carbon dioxide and monoxide, and methanol) into clean, high efficiency transportation fuel. (2) Develop novel processes for producing hydrogen from natural gas and other hydrocarbons. Some of the principal accomplishments of the program in its first two years are: (1) The addition of acetylenic compounds in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is found to produce significant amounts of oxygenated products in FT diesel fuels. Such oxygenated products should decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. (2) Nanoscale, binary, Fe-based catalysts supported on alumina have been shown to have significant activity for the decomposition of methane into pure hydrogen and potentially valuable multi-walled carbon nanotubes. (3) Catalytic synthesis processes have been developed for synthesis of diethyl carbonate, higher ethers, and higher alcohols from C1 source materials. Testing of the effect of adding these oxygenates to diesel fuel on PM emissions has begun using a well-equipped small diesel engine test facility. (4) Supercritical fluid (SCF) FT synthesis has been conducted under SCF hexane using both Fe and Co catalysts. There is a marked effect on the hydrocarbon product distribution, with a shift to higher carbon number products. These and other results are summarized.

  4. Loss of Cellular Sialidases Does Not Affect the Sialylation Status of the Prion Protein but Increases the Amounts of Its Proteolytic Fragment C1

    PubMed Central

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Klimova, Nina; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Pan, Xuefang; Annunziata, Ida; Takahashi, Kohta; Miyagi, Taeko; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2015-01-01

    The central molecular event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC), which is a sialoglycoprotein, into the disease-associated, transmissible form denoted PrPSc. Recent studies revealed a correlation between the sialylation status of PrPSc and incubation time to disease and introduced a new hypothesis that progression of prion diseases could be controlled or reversed by altering the sialylation level of PrPC. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, the enzymes that cleave off sialic acid residues, only NEU1, NEU3 and NEU4 are expressed in the brain. To test whether cellular sialidases control the steady-state sialylation level of PrPC and to identify the putative sialidase responsible for desialylating PrPC, we analyzed brain-derived PrPC from knockout mice deficient in Neu1, Neu3, Neu4, or from Neu3/Neu4 double knockouts. Surprisingly, no differences in the sialylation of PrPC or its proteolytic product C1 were noticed in any of the knockout mice tested as compared to the age-matched controls. However, significantly higher amounts of the C1 fragment relative to full-length PrPC were detected in the brains of Neu1 knockout mice as compared to WT mice or to the other knockout mice. Additional experiments revealed that in neuroblastoma cell line the sialylation pattern of C1 could be changed by an inhibitor of sialylatransferases. In summary, this study suggests that targeting cellular sialidases is apparently not the correct strategy for altering the sialylation levels of PrPC, whereas modulating the activity of sialylatransferases might offer a more promising approach. Our findings also suggest that catabolism of PrPC involves its α-cleavage followed by desialylation of the resulting C1 fragments by NEU1 and consequent fast degradation of the desialylated products. PMID:26569607

  5. Loss of Cellular Sialidases Does Not Affect the Sialylation Status of the Prion Protein but Increases the Amounts of Its Proteolytic Fragment C1.

    PubMed

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Klimova, Nina; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Pan, Xuefang; Annunziata, Ida; Takahashi, Kohta; Miyagi, Taeko; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V; d'Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2015-01-01

    The central molecular event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC), which is a sialoglycoprotein, into the disease-associated, transmissible form denoted PrPSc. Recent studies revealed a correlation between the sialylation status of PrPSc and incubation time to disease and introduced a new hypothesis that progression of prion diseases could be controlled or reversed by altering the sialylation level of PrPC. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, the enzymes that cleave off sialic acid residues, only NEU1, NEU3 and NEU4 are expressed in the brain. To test whether cellular sialidases control the steady-state sialylation level of PrPC and to identify the putative sialidase responsible for desialylating PrPC, we analyzed brain-derived PrPC from knockout mice deficient in Neu1, Neu3, Neu4, or from Neu3/Neu4 double knockouts. Surprisingly, no differences in the sialylation of PrPC or its proteolytic product C1 were noticed in any of the knockout mice tested as compared to the age-matched controls. However, significantly higher amounts of the C1 fragment relative to full-length PrPC were detected in the brains of Neu1 knockout mice as compared to WT mice or to the other knockout mice. Additional experiments revealed that in neuroblastoma cell line the sialylation pattern of C1 could be changed by an inhibitor of sialylatransferases. In summary, this study suggests that targeting cellular sialidases is apparently not the correct strategy for altering the sialylation levels of PrPC, whereas modulating the activity of sialylatransferases might offer a more promising approach. Our findings also suggest that catabolism of PrPC involves its α-cleavage followed by desialylation of the resulting C1 fragments by NEU1 and consequent fast degradation of the desialylated products. PMID:26569607

  6. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  7. Microbial growth on C1 compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, M. B.; Quayle, J. R.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the incorporation of carbon from [14C]formaldehyde and [14C]formate by cultures of Pseudomonas methanica growing on methane. 2. The distribution of radioactivity within the non-volatile constituents of the ethanol-soluble fractions of the cells, after incubation with labelled compounds for periods of up to 1min., has been analysed by chromatography and radioautography. 3. Radioactivity was fixed from [14C]formaldehyde mainly into the phosphates of the sugars, glucose, fructose, sedoheptulose and allulose. 4. Very little radioactivity was fixed from [14C]formate; after 1min. the only products identified were serine and malate. 5. The distribution of radioactivity within the carbon skeleton of glucose, obtained from short-term incubations with [14C]methanol of Pseudomonas methanica growing on methane, has been investigated. At the earliest time of sampling over 70% of the radioactivity was located in C-1; as the time increased the radioactivity spread throughout the molecule. 6. The results have been interpreted in terms of a variant of the pentose phosphate cycle, involving the condensation of formaldehyde with C-1 of ribose 5-phosphate to give allulose phosphate. PMID:6030306

  8. C1IV:. Gravitational Wave Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2002-09-01

    Resonant bar detectors are routinely searching for astronomical sources of gravitational waves and to setting upper limits on event rates. Interferometric detectors are beginning to operate at sensitivity levels good enough to set meaningful upper limits and begin astrophysical searches. With the long baseline interferometers scheduled to take data at unprecedented sensitivity levels the next few years will be a very exciting period for gravitational waves. In session C1iv there were talks focusing on gravitational wave searches (Krolak and Sintes), setting upper limits on astrophysical signals (Brady and Whelan), theoretical developments in modelling binary black holes (Iyer), testing general relativity with gravitational wave data (Will) and tools for gravitational wave data analysis (Schutz). There was also a one-hour round-table discussion on setting upper limits chaired by Andersson.

  9. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  10. Structure and functions of the interaction domains of C1r and C1s: keystones of the architecture of the C1 complex.

    PubMed

    Thielens, N M; Bersch, B; Hernandez, J F; Arlaud, G J

    1999-05-01

    C1r and C1s, the proteases responsible for activation and proteolytic activity of the C1 complex of complement, share similar overall structural organizations featuring five nonenzymic protein modules (two CUB modules surrounding a single EGF module, and a pair of CCP modules) followed by a serine protease domain. Besides highly specific proteolytic activities, both proteases exhibit interaction properties associated with their N-terminal regions. These properties include the ability to bind Ca2+ ions with high affinity, to associate with each other within a Ca2+-dependent C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s tetramer, and to interact with C1q upon C1 assembly. Precise functional mapping of these regions has been achieved recently, allowing identification of the domains responsible for these interactions, and providing a comprehensive picture of their structure and function. The objective of this article is to provide a detailed and up-to-date overview of the information available on these domains, which are keystones of the assembly of C1, and appear to play an essential role at the interface between the recognition function of C1 and its proteolytic activity. PMID:10408360

  11. Plasma-derived C1-INH for managing hereditary angioedema in pediatric patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Craig, Timothy J; Schneider, Lynda C; MacGinnitie, Andrew J

    2015-09-01

    Presently, medications approved for children with Hereditary Angioedema (HAE) are extremely limited. This is especially the case for children under 12 years of age. For this reason we reviewed and summarized the data on treatment of children with HAE. Available data indicate that plasma derived C1-inhibitor is a safe, effective treatment option for HAE in pediatric patients, including those below 12 years of age. Other therapies are also appear safe for the under 12 year of age, but less data are available. Importantly, home-based treatment of HAE in this age group appears to be safe and effective and can improve quality of life. These findings support current HAE consensus guidelines which strongly recommend the use of plasma derived C1-inhibitor as a first-line treatment in children and encourage home and self-treatment.

  12. Glycosylation inhibition reduces cholesterol accumulation in NPC1 protein-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Deffieu, Maika S; Lee, Peter L; Saha, Piyali; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2015-12-01

    Lysosomes are lined with a glycocalyx that protects the limiting membrane from the action of degradative enzymes. We tested the hypothesis that Niemann-Pick type C 1 (NPC1) protein aids the transfer of low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol across this glycocalyx. A prediction of this model is that cells will be less dependent upon NPC1 if their glycocalyx is decreased in density. Lysosome cholesterol content was significantly lower after treatment of NPC1-deficient human fibroblasts with benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside, an inhibitor of O-linked glycosylation. Direct biochemical measurement of cholesterol showed that lysosomes purified from NPC1-deficient fibroblasts contained at least 30% less cholesterol when O-linked glycosylation was blocked. As an independent means to modify protein glycosylation, we used Chinese hamster ovary ldl-D cells defective in UDP-Gal/UDP-GalNAc 4-epimerase in which N- and O-linked glycosylation can be controlled. CRISPR generated, NPC1-deficient ldl-D cells supplemented with galactose accumulated more cholesterol than those in which sugar addition was blocked. In the absence of galactose supplementation, NPC1-deficient ldl-D cells also transported more cholesterol from lysosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum, as monitored by an increase in cholesteryl [(14)C]-oleate levels. These experiments support a model in which NPC1 protein functions to transfer cholesterol past a lysosomal glycocalyx.

  13. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    PubMed

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation.

  14. PGK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is one of the relatively uncommon causes of hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (HNSHA). The gene encoding the erythrocyte enzyme PGK1, is X-linked. Mutations of this gene may cause chronic haemolysis with or without mental retardation and they may cause myopathies, often with episodes of myoglobinuria, or a combination of these clinical manifestations. Twenty-six families have been described and in 20 of these the mutations are known. The reason for different clinical manifestations of mutations of the same gene remains unknown. PMID:17222195

  15. Proteolytic inactivation of nuclear alarmin high-mobility group box 1 by complement protease C1s during apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, J G; Leong, J; Arkachaisri, T; Cai, Y; Teo, B H D; Tan, J H T; Das, L; Lu, J

    2016-01-01

    Effective clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytes prevents the release of intracellular alarmins and manifestation of autoimmunity. This prompt efferocytosis is complemented by intracellular proteolytic degradation that occurs within the apoptotic cells and in the efferosome of the phagocytes. Although the role of extracellular proteases in apoptotic cells clearance is unknown, the strong association of congenital C1s deficiency with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus highlights the protective nature that this extracellular protease has against autoimmunity. The archetypical role of serine protease C1s as the catalytic arm of C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2) involve in the propagation of the classical complement pathway could not provide the biological basis for this association. However, a recent observation of the ability of C1 complex to cleave a spectrum of intracellular cryptic targets exposed during apoptosis provides a valuable insight to the underlying protective mechanism. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an intracellular alarmin that is capable of inducing the formation of antinuclear autoantibodies and causes lupus-like conditions in mice, is identified as a novel potential target by bioinformatics analysis. This is verified experimentally with C1s, both in its purified and physiological form as C1 complex, cleaving HMGB1 into defined fragments of 19 and 12 kDa. This cleavage diminishes HMGB1 ability to enhance lipopolysaccharide mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines production from monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Further mass spectrometric analysis of the C1 complex treated apoptotic cellular proteins demonstrated additional C1s substrates and revealed the complementary role of C1s in apoptotic cells clearance through the proteolytic cleavage of intracellular alarmins and autoantigens. C1 complex may have evolved as, besides the bacteriolytic arm of antibodies in which it activates the complement cascade, a tissue renewal mechanism that reduces the

  16. Proteolytic inactivation of nuclear alarmin high-mobility group box 1 by complement protease C1s during apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, J G; Leong, J; Arkachaisri, T; Cai, Y; Teo, B H D; Tan, J H T; Das, L; Lu, J

    2016-01-01

    Effective clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytes prevents the release of intracellular alarmins and manifestation of autoimmunity. This prompt efferocytosis is complemented by intracellular proteolytic degradation that occurs within the apoptotic cells and in the efferosome of the phagocytes. Although the role of extracellular proteases in apoptotic cells clearance is unknown, the strong association of congenital C1s deficiency with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus highlights the protective nature that this extracellular protease has against autoimmunity. The archetypical role of serine protease C1s as the catalytic arm of C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2) involve in the propagation of the classical complement pathway could not provide the biological basis for this association. However, a recent observation of the ability of C1 complex to cleave a spectrum of intracellular cryptic targets exposed during apoptosis provides a valuable insight to the underlying protective mechanism. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an intracellular alarmin that is capable of inducing the formation of antinuclear autoantibodies and causes lupus-like conditions in mice, is identified as a novel potential target by bioinformatics analysis. This is verified experimentally with C1s, both in its purified and physiological form as C1 complex, cleaving HMGB1 into defined fragments of 19 and 12 kDa. This cleavage diminishes HMGB1 ability to enhance lipopolysaccharide mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines production from monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Further mass spectrometric analysis of the C1 complex treated apoptotic cellular proteins demonstrated additional C1s substrates and revealed the complementary role of C1s in apoptotic cells clearance through the proteolytic cleavage of intracellular alarmins and autoantigens. C1 complex may have evolved as, besides the bacteriolytic arm of antibodies in which it activates the complement cascade, a tissue renewal mechanism that reduces the

  17. Mutation of the Conserved Calcium-Binding Motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 Impacts Adhesion but Not Piliation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, James E.; Garrett, Christopher K.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we produced recombinant full-length PilC1 and a PilC1 C-terminal domain fragment. We show that, while alterations of the calcium-binding motif disrupted the ability of PilC1 to bind calcium, they did not grossly affect the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both full-length wild-type PilC1 and full-length calcium-binding-deficient PilC1 inhibited gonococcal adherence to cultured human cervical epithelial cells, unlike the truncated PilC1 C-terminal domain. Similar to PilC1 in K. kingae, but in contrast to the calcium-binding mutant of P. aeruginosa PilY1, an equivalent mutation in N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 produced normal amounts of pili. However, the N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 calcium-binding mutant still had partial defects in gonococcal adhesion to ME180 cells and genetic transformation, which are both essential virulence factors in this human pathogen. Thus, we conclude that calcium binding to PilC1 plays a critical role in pilus function in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:24002068

  18. Proteolytic inactivation of nuclear alarmin high-mobility group box 1 by complement protease C1s during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yeo, J G; Leong, J; Arkachaisri, T; Cai, Y; Teo, B H D; Tan, J H T; Das, L; Lu, J

    2016-01-01

    Effective clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytes prevents the release of intracellular alarmins and manifestation of autoimmunity. This prompt efferocytosis is complemented by intracellular proteolytic degradation that occurs within the apoptotic cells and in the efferosome of the phagocytes. Although the role of extracellular proteases in apoptotic cells clearance is unknown, the strong association of congenital C1s deficiency with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus highlights the protective nature that this extracellular protease has against autoimmunity. The archetypical role of serine protease C1s as the catalytic arm of C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2) involve in the propagation of the classical complement pathway could not provide the biological basis for this association. However, a recent observation of the ability of C1 complex to cleave a spectrum of intracellular cryptic targets exposed during apoptosis provides a valuable insight to the underlying protective mechanism. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an intracellular alarmin that is capable of inducing the formation of antinuclear autoantibodies and causes lupus-like conditions in mice, is identified as a novel potential target by bioinformatics analysis. This is verified experimentally with C1s, both in its purified and physiological form as C1 complex, cleaving HMGB1 into defined fragments of 19 and 12 kDa. This cleavage diminishes HMGB1 ability to enhance lipopolysaccharide mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines production from monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Further mass spectrometric analysis of the C1 complex treated apoptotic cellular proteins demonstrated additional C1s substrates and revealed the complementary role of C1s in apoptotic cells clearance through the proteolytic cleavage of intracellular alarmins and autoantigens. C1 complex may have evolved as, besides the bacteriolytic arm of antibodies in which it activates the complement cascade, a tissue renewal mechanism that reduces the

  19. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    PubMed

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  20. Low molecular weight C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Hannema, A J; Swaak, T J; Paardekooper, J; Hack, C E

    1985-07-01

    In sera of patients suffering from an exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), increased amounts of abnormal C1q were detected, contrasting with decreased or even undetectable levels of normal C1q in these sera. When analyzed immunochemically by double immunodiffusion, this low m.w. C1q (LMW-C1q) appeared to be identical with the defective C1q in serum of individuals with an inherited, homozygous inability to produce functional plasma C1q. These persons show a tendency to develop SLE-like syndromes. Like the genetically defective C1q, the abnormal C1q molecule in SLE sera was hemolytically inactive, did not incorporate in C1, was found in the supernatant of euglobulin-precipitated serum, and appeared in the break-through fraction of a cation-exchange column. Sucrose gradients and gel filtration analyses supported the putative identity of the molecules. SDS-PAGE and immunoblots revealed the presence of subunits that reacted with antibodies against C1q and confirmed the C1q-like nature of LMW-C1q. Low levels of LMW-C1q were also detected in serum and plasma of normal individuals. A radial immunodiffusion technique was used to measure LMW-C1q in the serum of 54 patients. Although these patients were not selected for parameters of disease activity, their levels of LMW-C1q were significantly higher than those of normal individuals and children with decreased C3 levels due to acute glomerulonephritis.

  1. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  2. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. A factor deficiency test is a device used to diagnose specific coagulation defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. A factor deficiency test is a device used to diagnose specific coagulation defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. A factor deficiency test is a device used to diagnose specific coagulation defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. A factor deficiency test is a device used to diagnose specific coagulation defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. A factor deficiency test is a device used to diagnose specific coagulation defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as...

  7. “Antihemophilic factor is not the only answer for all factor VIII deficiencies.” Case report of odontogenic infection in a patient with hemophilia A, complicated by factor VIII inhibitors, and managed by transfusion of antihemophilic factor and factor VIII inhibitor bypass activity

    PubMed Central

    Sudheesh, K. M.; Bharani, K. S. N. Siva; Kiran, H. Y.; Hanagavadi, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Dental extraction in hemophiliacs with acquired inhibitors is always a risky procedure, which often presents a lot of problems associated with bleeding. A known case of hemophilia A complicated with factor VIII inhibitors and having odontogenic infection was successfully managed by transfusion of factor VIII inhibitor bypass activity (FEIBA) and antihemophilic factor. Past medical history was significant for multiple factor VIII transfusions. Bethesda assay done to identify inhibitors revealed low titer factor VIII inhibitors. Extraction of the involved tooth was done after transfusion of FEIBA with low-dose protocols. Minimal bleeding was noted after extraction which was controlled by local measures. FEIBA was proven to be highly effective, and no side effects of the product were observed.

  8. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  9. 17 CFR 240.15c1-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 240.15c1-1... Exchange Act of 1934 Rules Relating to Over-The-Counter Markets § 240.15c1-1 Definitions. As used in any rule adopted pursuant to section 15(c)(1) of the Act: (a) The term customer shall not include a...

  10. Human genes for complement components C1r and C1s in a close tail-to-tail arrangement.

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, H; Hirosawa, S; Salier, J P; Hagen, F S; Kurachi, K

    1988-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones for human C1s were isolated from cDNA libraries that were prepared with poly(A)+ RNAs of human liver and HepG2 cells. A clone with the largest cDNA insert of 2664 base pairs (bp) was analyzed for its complete nucleotide sequence. It contained 202 bp of a 5' untranslated region, 45 bp of coding for a signal peptide (15 amino acid residues), 2019 bp for complement component C1s zymogen (673 amino acid residues), 378 bp for a 3' untranslated region, a stop codon, and 17 bp of a poly(A) tail. The amino acid sequence of C1s was 40.5% identical to that of C1r, with excellent matches of tentative disulfide bond locations conserving the overall domain structure of C1r. DNA blotting and sequencing analyses of genomic DNA and of an isolated genomic DNA clone clearly showed that the human genes for C1r and C1s are closely located in a "tail-to-tail" arrangement at a distance of about 9.5 kilobases. Furthermore, RNA blot analyses showed that both C1r and C1s genes are primarily expressed in liver, whereas most other tissues expressed both C1r and C1s genes at much lower levels (less than 10% of that in liver). Multiple molecular sizes of specific mRNAs were observed in the RNA blot analyses for both C1r and C1s, indicating that alternative RNA processing(s), likely an alternative polyadenylylation, might take place for both genes. Images PMID:2459702

  11. C1q-mediated chemotaxis by human neutrophils: involvement of gClqR and G-protein signalling mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, L E; Ghebrehiwet, B; Perera, T P; Bird, I N; Strong, P; Kishore, U; Reid, K B; Eggleton, P

    1998-01-01

    C1q, the first component of the classical pathway of the complement system, interacts with various cell types and triggers a variety of cell-specific cellular responses, such as oxidative burst, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, etc. Different biological responses are attributed to the interaction of C1q with more than one putative cell-surface C1q receptor/C1q-binding protein. Previously, it has been shown that C1q-mediated oxidative burst by neutrophils is not linked to G-protein-coupled fMet-Leu-Phe-mediated response. In the present study, we have investigated neutrophil migration brought about by C1q and tried to identify the signal-transduction pathways involved in the chemotactic response. We found that C1q stimulated neutrophil migration in a dose-dependent manner, primarily by enhancing chemotaxis (directed movement) rather than chemokinesis (random movement). This C1q-induced chemotaxis could be abolished by an inhibitor of G-proteins (pertussis toxin) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 kinase (wortmannin and LY294002). The collagen tail of C1q appeared to mediate chemotaxis. gC1qR, a C1q-binding protein, has recently been reported to participate in C1q-mediated chemotaxis of murine mast cells and human eosinophils. We observed that gC1qR enhanced binding of free C1q to adherent neutrophils and promoted C1q-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils by nearly seven-fold. Our results suggests C1q-mediated chemotaxis involves gC1qR as well as G-protein-coupled signal-transduction mechanisms operating downstream to neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:9461517

  12. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  13. C1q modulates the response to TLR7 stimulation by pristane-primed macrophages: implications for pristane-induced lupus

    PubMed Central

    Carlucci, Francesco; Ishaque, Attia; Ling, Guang Sheng; Szajna, Marta; Sandison, Ann; Donatien, Philippe; Cook, H Terence; Botto, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The complement component C1q is known to play a controversial role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Intraperitoneal injection of pristane induces a lupus-like syndrome whose pathogenesis implicates the secretion of type I IFN by CD11b+ Ly6Chigh inflammatory monocytes in a TLR7-dependent fashion. C1q has also been shown to influence the secretion of IFN-α. Herein we explored whether C1q deficiency could affect pristane-induced lupus (PIL). Surprisingly, C1qa−/− mice developed lower titres of circulating antibodies and milder arthritis compared to the controls. In keeping with the clinical scores, two weeks after pristane injection the peritoneal recruitment of CD11b+ Ly6Chigh inflammatory monocytes in the C1qa−/− mice was impaired. Furthermore, C1q-deficient pristane-primed resident peritoneal macrophages secreted significantly less CCL3, CCL2, CXCL1 and IL-6 when stimulated in vitro with TLR7 ligand. Replenishing C1q in vivo during the pristane priming phase rectified this defect. Conversely, pristane-primed macrophages from C3-deficient mice did not show any impaired cytokine production. These findings demonstrate that C1q deficiency impairs the TLR7-dependent chemokine production by pristane-primed peritoneal macrophages and suggest that C1q, and not C3, is involved in the handling of pristane by phagocytic cells which is required to trigger disease in this model. PMID:26773156

  14. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.662(c)-1 Section 1... Corpus § 1.662(c)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of an estate or trust, the amount he is required to include...

  15. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.662(c)-1 Section 1... Corpus § 1.662(c)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of an estate or trust, the amount he is required to include...

  16. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.662(c)-1 Section 1... Corpus § 1.662(c)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of an estate or trust, the amount he is required to include...

  17. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Trusts Which Distribute Current Income Only § 1.652(c)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable...

  18. Are C1 chondrites chemically fractionated - A trace element study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebihara, M.; Wolf, R.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    Six C1 chondrite samples and a C2 xenolith from the Plainview H5 chondrite were analyzed by radiochemical neutron activation for a large variety of elements, including rare earths. The sample processing is described, including the irradiation, chemical procedure, rare earths separation, counting techniques, radiochemical purity check, and chemical yields. The results of consistency checks on a number of elements are discussed. Abundances for siderophiles, volatiles, and rare earths are presented and discussed. Tests are presented for fractionation of rare earths and other refractories, compositional uniformity of C1's, and interelement correlations. There is no conclusive evidence for nebular fractionation affecting C1's. Three fractionation-prone rare earths have essentially the same relative abundances in C1's and all other chondrite classes, and hence are apparently not fractionated in C1's.

  19. [Interaction of Arenicin-1 with C1q Protein].

    PubMed

    Berlov, M N; Umnyakova, E S; Leonova, T S; Milman, B L; Krasnodembskaya, A D; Ovchinnikova, T V; Kokryakov, V N

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between arenicin-1, that is an antimicrobial peptide from polychaeta Arenicola marina, and human complement system protein C1q was studied using enzyme-linked receptor sorbent assay and ELISA. We revealed that arenicin-1 and C1q form complex that is stable in high ionic strength condition 0.5 M NaCl. The ability of C1q to interact with arenicin-1 is comparable with the binding activity of C1q towards another antimicrobial peptide, porcine cathelicidin protegrin-1, which has a similar spatial arrangement with arenicin-1. Namely, both arenicin-1 and protegrin-1 form cystine-stabilized antiparallel β-hairpin structure. PMID:27125019

  20. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or business, either as...

  1. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or...

  2. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or...

  3. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor V deficiency is caused by a ... Gailani D, Neff AT. Rare coagulation factor deficiencies. In: ... HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and ...

  4. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  5. Combination of skull traction with posterior C1-2 fusion for old C1-2 dislocations.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue Feng; Yang, Hui Lin; Jiang, Wei Min; Tang, Tian Si; Gong, Xiao Hong; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji Gang; Wang, Gen Lin

    2011-06-01

    Between January 2003 and December 2009, 23 patients who had suffered old C1-2 dislocations, were surgically treated in our orthopedics department. Fifteen patients underwent direct posterior C1-2 fusion following pre-operative reduction by skull traction. In eight patients, reduction was achieved only by skull traction under general anesthesia, facilitated by manual hyperextension of the cervical spine and maintained by simultaneous posterior C1-2 fusion. Intra-operative traction was monitored using C-arm fluoroscopy and cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials. Posterior C1-2 fixation was achieved in nine patients using C1-2 laminar hooks and in 14 patients using C1 laminar hooks with C2 pedicle screws. During the follow-up of 5 to 72 months (mean: 42.8 months), solid bony fusion was accomplished in all patients. Using Di Lorenzo's grades and Japanese Orthopedics Association scores, there was significant improvement (p<0.05). The cervical medullary angle exhibited a significant improvement of 31.7°, from 121.6° to 153.3° (p<0.05). There were no complications, including dural tears, spinal cord damage, vertebral artery damage, or breakage or loosening of implants.

  6. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System ​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned ... Scientists Identify Genetic Cause of Previously Undefined Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Signs and Symptoms DOCK8 deficiency causes persistent skin ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  8. The Crystal Structure Analysis of Group B Streptococcus Sortase C1: A Model for the ;Lid; Movement upon Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Baldeep; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Huang, I-Hsiu; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V.L.

    2012-02-07

    A unique feature of the class-C-type sortases, enzymes essential for Gram-positive pilus biogenesis, is the presence of a flexible 'lid' anchored in the active site. However, the mechanistic details of the 'lid' displacement, suggested to be a critical prelude for enzyme catalysis, are not yet known. This is partly due to the absence of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor complex crystal structures. We have recently described the crystal structures of the Streptococcus agalactiae SAG2603 V/R sortase SrtC1 in two space groups (type II and type III) and that of its 'lid' mutant and proposed a role of the 'lid' as a protector of the active-site hydrophobic environment. Here, we report the crystal structures of SAG2603 V/R sortase C1 in a different space group (type I) and that of its complex with a small-molecule cysteine protease inhibitor. We observe that the catalytic Cys residue is covalently linked to the small-molecule inhibitor without lid displacement. However, the type I structure provides a view of the sortase SrtC1 lid displacement while having structural elements similar to a substrate sorting motif suitably positioned in the active site. We propose that these major conformational changes seen in the presence of a substrate mimic in the active site may represent universal features of class C sortase substrate recognition and enzyme activation.

  9. In silico structural characteristics and α-amylase inhibitory properties of Ric c 1 and Ric c 3, allergenic 2S albumins from Ricinus communis seeds.

    PubMed

    Do Nascimento, Viviane Veiga; Castro, Helena Carla; Abreu, Paula Alvarez; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amâncio; Fernandez, Jorge Hernandez; Araújo, Jucélia Da Silva; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares

    2011-05-11

    The major Ricinus communis allergens are the 2S albumins, Ric c 1 and Ric c 3. These proteins contain a trypsin/α-amylase inhibitor family domain, suggesting that they have a role in insect resistance. In this study, we verified that Ric c 1 and Ric c 3 inhibited the α-amylase activity of Callosobruchus maculatus, Zabrotes subfasciatus, and Tenebrio molitor (TMA) larvae as well as mammalian α-amylase. The toxicity of 2S albumin was determined through its incorporation in C. maculatus larvae as part of an artificial diet. Bioassays revealed that 2S albumin reduced larval growth by 20%. We also analyzed the tridimensional structures of Ric c 1 and Ric c 3 by (a) constructing a comparative model of Ric c 1 based on Ric c 3 NMR structure and (b) constructing the theoretical structure of the Ric c 1-TMA and Ric c 3-TMA complexes. Our biological and theoretical results revealed that Ric c 1 and Ric c 3 are a new class of α-amylase inhibitors. They could potentially be used to help design inhibitors that would be useful in diverse fields, ranging from diabetes treatment to crop protection.

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 Inhibits the Classical Pathway by Blocking Activation of the C1 Complement Complex.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zhi, Hui; Wager, Beau; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens that traffic in blood, lymphatics, or interstitial fluids must adopt strategies to evade innate immune defenses, notably the complement system. Through recruitment of host regulators of complement to their surface, many pathogens are able to escape complement-mediated attack. The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces a number of surface proteins that bind to factor H related molecules, which function as the dominant negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement. Relatively less is known about how B. burgdorferi evades the classical pathway of complement despite the observation that some sensu lato strains are sensitive to classical pathway activation. Here we report that the borrelial lipoprotein BBK32 potently and specifically inhibits the classical pathway by binding with high affinity to the initiating C1 complex of complement. In addition, B. burgdorferi cells that produce BBK32 on their surface bind to both C1 and C1r and a serum sensitive derivative of B. burgdorferi is protected from killing via the classical pathway in a BBK32-dependent manner. Subsequent biochemical and biophysical approaches localized the anti-complement activity of BBK32 to its globular C-terminal domain. Mechanistic studies reveal that BBK32 acts by entrapping C1 in its zymogen form by binding and inhibiting the C1 subcomponent, C1r, which serves as the initiating serine protease of the classical pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of a spirochetal protein acting as a direct inhibitor of the classical pathway and is the only example of a biomolecule capable of specifically and noncovalently inhibiting C1/C1r. By identifying a unique mode of complement evasion this study greatly enhances our understanding of how pathogens subvert and potentially manipulate host innate immune systems.

  11. Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 Inhibits the Classical Pathway by Blocking Activation of the C1 Complement Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Beau; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens that traffic in blood, lymphatics, or interstitial fluids must adopt strategies to evade innate immune defenses, notably the complement system. Through recruitment of host regulators of complement to their surface, many pathogens are able to escape complement-mediated attack. The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces a number of surface proteins that bind to factor H related molecules, which function as the dominant negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement. Relatively less is known about how B. burgdorferi evades the classical pathway of complement despite the observation that some sensu lato strains are sensitive to classical pathway activation. Here we report that the borrelial lipoprotein BBK32 potently and specifically inhibits the classical pathway by binding with high affinity to the initiating C1 complex of complement. In addition, B. burgdorferi cells that produce BBK32 on their surface bind to both C1 and C1r and a serum sensitive derivative of B. burgdorferi is protected from killing via the classical pathway in a BBK32-dependent manner. Subsequent biochemical and biophysical approaches localized the anti-complement activity of BBK32 to its globular C-terminal domain. Mechanistic studies reveal that BBK32 acts by entrapping C1 in its zymogen form by binding and inhibiting the C1 subcomponent, C1r, which serves as the initiating serine protease of the classical pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of a spirochetal protein acting as a direct inhibitor of the classical pathway and is the only example of a biomolecule capable of specifically and noncovalently inhibiting C1/C1r. By identifying a unique mode of complement evasion this study greatly enhances our understanding of how pathogens subvert and potentially manipulate host innate immune systems. PMID:26808924

  12. Relative adrenal insufficiency in mice deficient in 5α-reductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Dawn E W; Di Rollo, Emma M; Yang, Chenjing; Codrington, Lucy E; Mathews, John A; Kara, Madina; Hughes, Katherine A; Kenyon, Christopher J; Walker, Brian R; Andrew, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Patients with critical illness or hepatic failure exhibit impaired cortisol responses to ACTH, a phenomenon known as ‘relative adrenal insufficiency’. A putative mechanism is that elevated bile acids inhibit inactivation of cortisol in liver by 5α-reductases type 1 and type 2 and 5β-reductase, resulting in compensatory downregulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and adrenocortical atrophy. To test the hypothesis that impaired glucocorticoid clearance can cause relative adrenal insufficiency, we investigated the consequences of 5α-reductase type 1 deficiency in mice. In adrenalectomised male mice with targeted disruption of 5α-reductase type 1, clearance of corticosterone was lower after acute or chronic (eightfold, P<0.05) administration, compared with WT control mice. In intact 5α-reductase-deficient male mice, although resting plasma corticosterone levels were maintained, corticosterone responses were impaired after ACTH administration (26% lower, P<0.05), handling stress (2.5-fold lower, P<0.05) and restraint stress (43% lower, P<0.05) compared with WT mice. mRNA levels of Nr3c1 (glucocorticoid receptor), Crh and Avp in pituitary or hypothalamus were altered, consistent with enhanced negative feedback. These findings confirm that impaired peripheral clearance of glucocorticoids can cause ‘relative adrenal insufficiency’ in mice, an observation with important implications for patients with critical illness or hepatic failure, and for patients receiving 5α-reductase inhibitors for prostatic disease. PMID:24872577

  13. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of the trust, the amount he is required to include in gross income in accordance with...

  14. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of the trust, the amount he is required to include in gross income in accordance with...

  15. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.662(c)-1 Section 1...)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of an estate or trust, the amount he is required to include in...

  16. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of the trust, the amount he is required to include in gross income in accordance with...

  17. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of the trust, the amount he is required to include in gross income in accordance with...

  18. 26 CFR 1.678(c)-1 - Trusts for support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(c)-1 Trusts for support... cotrustee, to apply the income of the trust to the support or maintenance of a person whom the holder is obligated to support, except to the extent the income is so applied. See paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of §...

  19. C1q Nephropathy: The Unique Underrecognized Pathological Entity

    PubMed Central

    Devasahayam, Joe; Erode-Singaravelu, Gowrishankar; Bhat, Zeenat; Oliver, Tony; Chandran, Arul; Zeng, Xu; Dakshinesh, Paramesh; Pillai, Unni

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy is a rare glomerular disease with characteristic mesangial C1q deposition noted on immunofluorescence microscopy. It is histologically defined and poorly understood. Light microscopic features are heterogeneous and comprise minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and proliferative glomerulonephritis. Clinical presentation is also diverse, and ranges from asymptomatic hematuria or proteinuria to frank nephritic or nephrotic syndrome in both children and adults. Hypertension and renal insufficiency at the time of diagnosis are common findings. Optimal treatment is not clear and is usually guided by the underlying light microscopic lesion. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment, with immunosuppressive agents reserved for steroid resistant cases. The presence of nephrotic syndrome and FSGS appear to predict adverse outcomes as opposed to favorable outcomes in those with MCD. Further research is needed to establish C1q nephropathy as a universally recognized distinct clinical entity. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of pathogenesis, histopathology, clinical features, therapeutic options, and outcomes of C1q nephropathy. PMID:26640759

  20. PRD125, a potent and selective inhibitor of sterol O-acyltransferase 2 markedly reduces hepatic cholesteryl ester accumulation and improves liver function in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Adam M; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Posey, Kenneth S; Ohshiro, Taichi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Rudel, Lawrence L; Turley, Stephen D

    2015-11-01

    In most organs, the bulk of cholesterol is unesterified, although nearly all possess a varying capability of esterifying cholesterol through the action of either sterol O-acyltransferase (SOAT) 1 or, in the case of hepatocytes and enterocytes, SOAT2. Esterified cholesterol (EC) carried in plasma lipoproteins is hydrolyzed by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) when they are cleared from the circulation. Loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene that encodes LAL, result in Wolman disease or cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). Hepatomegaly and a massive increase in tissue EC levels are hallmark features of both disorders. While these conditions can be corrected with enzyme replacement therapy, the question arose as to whether pharmacological inhibition of SOAT2 might reduce tissue EC accretion in CESD. When weaned at 21 days, Lal(-/-) mice, of either gender, had a whole liver cholesterol content that was 12- to 13-fold more than that of matching Lal(+/+) littermates (23 versus 1.8 mg, respectively). In Lal(-/-) males given the selective SOAT2 inhibitor PRD125 1,11-O-o-methylbenzylidene-7-O-p-cyanobenzoyl-1,7,11-trideacetylpyripyropene A in their diet (∼10 mg/day per kg body weight) from 21 to 53 days, whole liver cholesterol content was 48.6 versus 153.7 mg in untreated 53-day-old Lal(-/-) mice. This difference reflected a 59% reduction in hepatic EC concentration (mg/g), combined with a 28% fall in liver mass. The treated mice also showed a 63% reduction in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, in parallel with decisive falls in hepatic mRNA expression levels for multiple proteins that reflect macrophage presence and inflammation. These data implicate SOAT2 as a potential target in CESD management. PMID:26283692

  1. Complement deficiency states and infection: epidemiology, pathogenesis and consequences of neisserial and other infections in an immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ross, S C; Densen, P

    1984-09-01

    Inherited deficiencies of the complement proteins are rare in unselected populations. Examination of patients with the clinical correlates of complement deficiency (autoimmune disease and certain bacterial infections) shows the frequency of inherited complement deficiency to rise enormously (5.9% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 10 to 25% of adults with sporadic meningococcal disease). Autoimmune diseases of all types, but especially systemic lupus erythematosus, discoid lupus and glomerulonephritis, are seen in all categories of complement deficiency, most typically in those of the early classical pathway (C1, C4, C2). Pneumococcal infections are characteristic of deficiencies of the early classical pathway, as well. Deficiencies of C3 are associated with severe disease including autoimmune phenomena, pneumococcal and neisserial infections. C3-deficient patients become ill substantially earlier in life. Infections with N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae are most typical of the late component deficiencies, with over 40% of homozygotes affected. Despite the presence of this deficiency from birth and the peak age-specific incidence of meningococcal disease in the general population at ages 3-8 months, the median age of first infection in the late component-deficient patients is 17 years. Relapse of infection is ten times more common in these patients, and discrete recurrences are seen in 45% of affected individuals. An unusual and unexplained predilection for infection with serogroup Y N. meningitidis exists. Despite an immune deficiency, and problems with ascertainment bias, it appears that persons with late component complement deficiency enjoy less mortality than normals who contract meningococcal disease. Attempts to explain the pathogenesis of neisserial infection in late component deficiencies have focused on the concept that normally non-pathogenic serum-sensitive bacteria are etiologic in the absence of serum bactericidal activity. Data to

  2. [delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Ishida, N; Akagi, R

    1995-06-01

    delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD: E. C. 4.2.1.24), the second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, condenses two moles of delta-aminolevulinic acid to form porphobilinogen. ALAD deficiency is well known to develop signs and symptoms of typical hepatic porphyria, and classified into three categories as follows: (i) ALAD porphyria, a genetic defect of the enzyme, (ii) tyrosinemia type I, a genetic defect of fumarylacetoacetase in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, producing succinylacetone (a potent inhibitor of ALAD), and (iii) ALAD inhibition by environmental hazards, such as lead, trichloroethylene, and styrene. In the present article, we will describe molecular and biochemical mechanisms to cause the enzyme defect to discuss the significance of ALAD defect on human health.

  3. Complement Component C1q Programs a Pro-Efferocytic Phenotype while Limiting TNFα Production in Primary Mouse and Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hulsebus, Holly J.; O’Conner, Sean D.; Smith, Emily M.; Jie, Chunfa; Bohlson, Suzanne S.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency in complement component C1q is associated with an inability to clear apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and aberrant inflammation in lupus, and identification of the pathways involved in these processes should reveal important regulatory mechanisms in lupus and other autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In this study, C1q-dependent regulation of TNFα/IL-6 expression and efferocytosis was investigated using primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. C1q downregulated LPS-dependent TNFα production in mouse and human macrophages. While prolonged stimulation with C1q (18 h) was required to elicit a dampening of TNFα production from mouse macrophages, the human macrophages responded to C1q with immediate downregulation of TNFα. IL-6 production was unchanged in mouse and upregulated by human macrophages following prolonged stimulation with C1q. Our previous studies indicated that C1q programmed enhanced efferocytosis in mouse macrophages by enhancing expression of Mer tyrosine kinase and its ligand Gas6, a receptor–ligand pair that also inhibits proinflammatory signaling. Here, we demonstrated that C1q-dependent programming of human macrophage efferocytosis required protein synthesis; however, neither Mer nor the related receptor Axl was upregulated in human cells. In addition, while the C1q-collagen-like tails are sufficient for promoting C1q-dependent phagocytosis of antibody-coated targets, the C1q-tails failed to program enhanced efferocytosis or dampen TNFα production. These data further elucidate the mechanisms by which C1q regulates proinflammatory signaling and efferocytosis in macrophages, functions that are likely to influence the progression of autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. PMID:27379094

  4. Isolation and mode of action of bacteriocin BacC1 produced by nonpathogenic Enterococcus faecium C1.

    PubMed

    Goh, H F; Philip, K

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are present in fermented food products and help to improve shelf life and enhance the flavor of the food. They also produce metabolites such as bacteriocins to prevent the growth of undesirable or pathogenic bacteria. In this study, Enterococcus faecium C1 isolated from fermented cow milk was able to produce bacteriocin BacC1 and inhibit the growth of selected food-spoilage bacteria. The bacteriocin was purified through 4 steps: ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydrophobic interaction column, a series of centrifugal steps, and finally reversed-phase HPLC. A membrane permeability test using SYTOX green dye (Invitrogen, Grand Island, NY) showed that the bacteriocin caused significant disruptions to the test bacterial membrane, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. The molecular weight of the BacC1 obtained from SDS-PAGE was around 10kDa, and N-terminal sequencing revealed a partial amino acid sequence of BacC1: GPXGPXGP. The bacterial strain was nonhemolytic and not antibiotic resistant. Therefore, it has high potential for application in the food industry as an antimicrobial agent to extend the shelf life of food products.

  5. Isolation and mode of action of bacteriocin BacC1 produced by nonpathogenic Enterococcus faecium C1.

    PubMed

    Goh, H F; Philip, K

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are present in fermented food products and help to improve shelf life and enhance the flavor of the food. They also produce metabolites such as bacteriocins to prevent the growth of undesirable or pathogenic bacteria. In this study, Enterococcus faecium C1 isolated from fermented cow milk was able to produce bacteriocin BacC1 and inhibit the growth of selected food-spoilage bacteria. The bacteriocin was purified through 4 steps: ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydrophobic interaction column, a series of centrifugal steps, and finally reversed-phase HPLC. A membrane permeability test using SYTOX green dye (Invitrogen, Grand Island, NY) showed that the bacteriocin caused significant disruptions to the test bacterial membrane, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. The molecular weight of the BacC1 obtained from SDS-PAGE was around 10kDa, and N-terminal sequencing revealed a partial amino acid sequence of BacC1: GPXGPXGP. The bacterial strain was nonhemolytic and not antibiotic resistant. Therefore, it has high potential for application in the food industry as an antimicrobial agent to extend the shelf life of food products. PMID:26004828

  6. Practical approach to self-administration of intravenous C1-INH concentrate: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Symons, C; Rossi, O; Magerl, M; Andritschke, K

    2013-01-01

    At an international hereditary angioedema (HAE) expert meeting, results from a survey were used to guide discussion on how best to advise patients on self-administering intravenous C1 esterase inhibitor therapy. Treatment differences across Europe were highlighted, together with the practicalities of self-administration and useful resources for patients in the future. The international HAE experts noted an increase in the uptake of self-administration, with patients being trained by nursing staff. All patients who are willing and able to self-administer should be offered this treatment option and patients should be encouraged to treat attacks early. Several initiatives were suggested regarding support for patients who self-administer therapy, including a 24-hour helpline and home care agencies.

  7. Hyperlipidemia and cutaneous abnormalities in transgenic mice overexpressing human apolipoprotein C1.

    PubMed

    Jong, M C; Gijbels, M J; Dahlmans, V E; Gorp, P J; Koopman, S J; Ponec, M; Hofker, M H; Havekes, L M

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated with different levels of human apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) expression in liver and skin. At 2 mo of age, serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and FFA were strongly elevated in APOC1 transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. These elevated levels of serum cholesterol and TG were due mainly to an accumulation of VLDL particles in the circulation. In addition to hyperlipidemia, APOC1 transgenic mice developed dry and scaly skin with loss of hair, dependent on the amount of APOC1 expression in the skin. Since these skin abnormalities appeared in two independent founder lines, a mutation related to the specific insertion site of the human APOC1 gene as the cause for the phenotype can be excluded. Histopathological analysis of high expressor APOC1 transgenic mice revealed a disorder of the skin consisting of epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, and atrophic sebaceous glands lacking sebum. In line with these results, epidermal lipid analysis showed that the relative amounts of the sebum components TG and wax diesters in the epidermis of high expressor APOC1 transgenic mice were reduced by 60 and 45%, respectively. In addition to atrophic sebaceous glands, the meibomian glands were also found to be severely atrophic in APOC1 transgenic mice. High expressor APOC1 transgenic mice also exhibited diminished abdominal adipose tissue stores (a 60% decrease compared with wild-type mice) and a complete deficiency of subcutaneous fat. These results indicate that, in addition to the previously reported inhibitory role of apoC1 on hepatic remnant uptake, overexpression of apoC1 affects lipid synthesis in the sebaceous gland and/or epidermis as well as adipose tissue formation. These APOC1 transgenic mice may serve as an interesting in vivo model for the investigation of lipid homeostasis in the skin.

  8. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  9. Colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  10. The effect of excision of the posterior arch of C1 on C1/C2 fusion using transarticular screws.

    PubMed

    Chang, K C; Samartzis, D; Fuego, S M; Dhatt, S S; Wong, Y W; Cheung, W Y; Luk, K D K; Cheung, K M C

    2013-07-01

    Transarticular screw fixation with autograft is an established procedure for the surgical treatment of atlantoaxial instability. Removal of the posterior arch of C1 may affect the rate of fusion. This study assessed the rate of atlantoaxial fusion using transarticular screws with or without removal of the posterior arch of C1. We reviewed 30 consecutive patients who underwent atlantoaxial fusion with a minimum follow-up of two years. In 25 patients (group A) the posterior arch of C1 was not excised (group A) and in five it was (group B). Fusion was assessed on static and dynamic radiographs. In selected patients CT imaging was also used to assess fusion and the position of the screws. There were 15 men and 15 women with a mean age of 51.2 years (23 to 77) and a mean follow-up of 7.7 years (2 to 11.6). Stable union with a solid fusion or a stable fibrous union was achieved in 29 patients (97%). In Group A, 20 patients (80%) achieved a solid fusion, four (16%) a stable fibrous union and one (4%) a nonunion. In Group B, stable union was achieved in all patients, three having a solid fusion and two a stable fibrous union. There was no statistically significant difference between the status of fusion in the two groups. Complications were noted in 12 patients (40%); these were mainly related to the screws, and included malpositioning and breakage. The presence of an intact or removed posterior arch of C1 did not affect the rate of fusion in patients with atlantoaxial instability undergoing C1/C2 fusion using transarticular screws and autograft.

  11. α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Umur; Stoller, James K

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant condition that predisposes to emphysema and cirrhosis. The condition is common but grossly under-recognized. Identifying patients' α1-antitrypsin deficiency has important management implications (ie, smoking cessation, genetic and occupational counseling, and specific treatment with the infusion of pooled human plasma α1-antitrypsin). The weight of evidence suggests that augmentation therapy slows the progression of emphysema in individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27514595

  12. The C1s core line in irradiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giorgio; Minati, Luca; Anderle, Mariano

    2007-08-15

    Recently, plasma deposited amorphous carbon films have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations aimed at correlating their electronic, structural, and mechanical properties to growth parameters. To investigate these properties, different spectral parameters reflecting the electronic structure of carbon-based materials are proposed in literature. The effects of various electronic configurations on the carbon photoelectron spectra are analyzed here with particular attention to C1s core line with the aim to better interpret its structure. The latter is commonly fitted under the assumption that it can be described by using just two spectral components related to sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybrids. Their relative intensities are then used to estimate the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} phases. We show that, in the presence of an amorphous network, the C1s line shape is the result of a more complex mixture of electronic states. Ar{sup +} irradiated graphite and successive oxidation was used to identify spectral features to better describe the C1s line shape.

  13. The Enteropathy of Prostaglandin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Phillips, John A.; Cogan, Joy D.; Iverson, Tina M.; Stein, Jeffrey A.; Brenner, David A.; Morrow, Jason D.; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Small intestinal ulcers are frequent complications of therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We present here a genetic deficiency of eicosanoid biosynthesis that illuminates the mechanism of NSAID-induced ulcers of the small intestine. Methods Eicosanoids and metabolites were measured by isotope-dilution with mass spectrometry. cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription and sequenced following amplification with RT-PCR. Results We investigated the cause of chronic recurrent small intestinal ulcers, small bowel perforations, and gastrointestinal blood loss in a 45 year old male who was not taking any cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Prostaglandin metabolites in urine were significantly depressed. Serum thromboxane B2 (TxB2) production was 4.6% of normal controls (p<0.006) and serum 12-HETE was 1.3% of controls (p<0.005). Optical platelet aggregation with simultaneous monitoring of ATP release demonstrated absent granule secretion in response to ADP and a blunted aggregation response to ADP and collagen, but normal response to arachidonic acid (AA). LTB4 biosynthesis by ionophore activated leukocytes was only 3% of controls and urinary LTE4 was undetectable. These findings suggested deficient AA release from membrane phospholipids by cytosolic phospholipase A2-α (cPLA2-α) which regulates cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase mediated eicosanoid production by catalyzing the release of their substrate, AA. Sequencing of cPLA2-α cDNA demonstrated 2 heterozygous non-synonymous single base pair mutations: Ser111Pro (S111P) and Arg485His (R485H), as well as a known SNP: Lys651Arg (K651R). Conclusion Characterization of this cPLA2-α deficiency provides support for the importance of prostaglandins in protecting small intestinal integrity, and indicates that loss of prostaglandin biosynthesis is sufficient to produce small intestinal ulcers. PMID:19148786

  14. Tob deficiency superenhances osteoblastic activity after ovariectomy to block estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Michihiko; Yoshida, Yutaka; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Oikawa, Kaoru; Miyazono, Kohei; Ishikawa, Isao; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Nifuji, Akira; Noda, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Tob (transducer of erbB2) is a member of antiproliferative family proteins and acts as a bone morphogenic protein inhibitor as well as a suppressor of proliferation in T cells, which have been implicated in postmenopausal bone loss. To determine the effect of Tob deficiency on estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss, we analyzed bone metabolism after ovariectomy or sham operation in Tob-deficient mice. Ovariectomy in WT mice decreased trabecular bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) as expected. In Tob-deficient mice, ovariectomy reduced bone volume and BMD. However, even after ovariectomy, both trabecular bone volume and BMD levels in Tob-deficient bone were comparable to those in sham-operated WT bones. Bone formation parameters (mineral apposition rate and bone formation rate) in the ovariectomized Tob-deficient mice were significantly higher than those in the ovariectomized WT mice. In contrast, the ovariectomy-induced increase in the bone resorption parameters, osteoclast surface, and osteoclast number was similar between Tob-deficient mice and WT mice. Furthermore, in ex vivo nodule formation assay, ovariectomy-induced enhancement of nodule formation was significantly higher in the bone marrow cells from Tob-deficient mice than in the bone marrow cells from ovariectomized WT mice. Both Tob and estrogen signalings converge at bone morphogenic protein activation of alkaline phosphatase and GCCG-reporter gene expression in osteoblasts, revealing interaction between the two signals. These data indicate that Tob deficiency prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss through the superenhancement of osteoblastic activities in bone and that this results in further augmentation in the bone formation rate and the mineral apposition rate after ovariectomy in vivo. PMID:15100414

  15. [Cerebral venous thrombosis and hereditary protein C deficiency].

    PubMed

    Massons, J; Arboix, A; Oliveres, M; Besses, C; Muñoz, C; Titus, F

    1992-01-01

    Protein C together with its plasmatic cofactor protein S and antithrombin III probably represent the most important plasmatic inhibitor in coagulation. Protein C deficiency constitutes a high risk factor for venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous thrombosis is a manifestation which is scarcely referred to in protein C deficiency. The case of a 32 year old patient with protein C deficiency is presented. The patient was admitted for an endocraneal hypertension syndrome. CT and MR demonstrated multiple hemorrhagic cerebral infarctions. Arteriography confirmed vertebral venous thrombosis. Only six cases sufficiently documenting cerebral venous thrombosis due to protein C deficiency were found in the literature. In most cases coadjuvant factors exist predisposing thromboembolic disease. The present clinical case demonstrates the importance of considering protein C deficiency in the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in young adults.

  16. Complement protein C1q bound to apoptotic cells suppresses human macrophage and dendritic cell-mediated Th17 and Th1 T cell subset proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Elizabeth V.; Weist, Brian M.; Walsh, Craig M.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2015-01-01

    A complete genetic deficiency of the complement protein C1q results in SLE with nearly 100% penetrance in humans, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for this association have not yet been fully determined. C1q opsonizes ACs for enhanced ingestion by phagocytes, such as Mϕ and iDCs, avoiding the extracellular release of inflammatory DAMPs upon loss of the membrane integrity of the dying cell. We previously showed that human monocyte-derived Mϕ and DCs ingesting autologous, C1q-bound LALs (C1q-polarized Mϕ and C1q-polarized DCs), enhance the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and reduce proinflammatory cytokines relative to Mϕ or DC ingesting LAL alone. Here, we show that C1q-polarized Mϕ have elevated PD-L1 and PD-L2 and suppressed surface CD40, and C1q-polarized DCs have higher surface PD-L2 and less CD86 relative to Mϕ or DC ingesting LAL alone, respectively. In an MLR, C1q-polarized Mϕ reduced allogeneic and autologous Th17 and Th1 subset proliferation and demonstrated a trend toward increased Treg proliferation relative to Mϕ ingesting LAL alone. Moreover, relative to DC ingesting AC in the absence of C1q, C1q-polarized DCs decreased autologous Th17 and Th1 proliferation. These data demonstrate that a functional consequence of C1q-polarized Mϕ and DC is the regulation of Teff activation, thereby “sculpting” the adaptive immune system to avoid autoimmunity, while clearing dying cells. It is noteworthy that these studies identify novel target pathways for therapeutic intervention in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25381385

  17. Lack of activation of C1, despite circulating immune complexes detected by two C1q methods, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Lim, U G; Haverman, J; Aalberse, R C

    1984-01-01

    The activation of C1 by circulating immune complexes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was investigated. C1rC1s(C1-In)2 complexes in EDTA-plasma, reflecting C1 activation in vivo, were slightly raised in 35 of 57 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, though most patients had elevated levels of circulating immune complexes as measured with either the 125I-C1q binding test or the C1q solid phase assay. The activation of C1 by circulating immune complexes in vitro was investigated by measuring the generation of C1rC1s(C1-In)2 complexes during 60 minutes at 37 degrees C in diluted recalcified EDTA-plasma. In 16 of the 57 patients, a slightly increased C1 activation in vitro was observed. These patients tended to have high levels of circulating immune complexes. However, the majority of the patients with high levels of circulating immune complexes showed a normal C1 activation in vitro. Therefore, it was concluded that measurement of circulating immune complexes by either of the two C1q methods in patients with rheumatoid arthritis does not imply that these circulating immune complexes are able to activate C1.

  18. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 1 Regulates Resistance to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Marie Mei; Yoon, Bong-June; Osiewicz, Keith; Preston, Michael; Bundy, Brian; van Heeckeren, Anna M.; Werb, Zena; Soloway, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1)-deficient mice are resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal infections. Corneas healed completely in TIMP-1-deficient mice, and infections were cleared faster in TIMP-1-deficient mice than in wild-type littermates. Genetic suppression studies using matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-deficient mice showed that MMP-9, MMP-3, and MMP-7 but not MMP-2 or MMP-12 are needed for resistance. Increased resistance was also seen during pulmonary infections. These results identify a novel pathway regulating infection resistance. PMID:15618213

  19. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  20. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  1. Iron deficiency: beyond anemia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dinesh; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder affecting at least one third of world's population. Though anemia is common manifestation of iron deficiency, other effects of iron deficiency on various tissues, organs and systems are usually under recognized. Impaired brain development and cognitive, behavioural and psychomotor impairment are most worrisome manifestations of iron deficiency. Studies have demonstrated that some of these changes occurring during period of brain growth spurt (<2 years age) may be irreversible. Association of iron deficiency with febrile seizures, pica, breath holding spells, restless leg syndrome and thrombosis is increasingly being recognized. Impaired cell-mediated immunity and bactericidal function are generally noted in iron-deficient persons; however, the findings are inconsistent. Despite proven reversible functional immunological defects in vitro studies, a clinically important relationship between states of iron deficiency and susceptibility to infections remains controversial. Studies from malaria endemic regions have reported increased incidence of malaria in association with iron supplementation. These and some other aspects of iron deficiency are reviewed in this article.

  2. Iodine-deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Jooste, Pieter L; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2008-10-01

    2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. Assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goitre, newborn thyroid-stimulating hormone, and blood thyroglobulin. In nearly all countries, the best strategy to control iodine deficiency is iodisation of salt, which is one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When iodisation of salt is not possible, iodine supplements can be given to susceptible groups. Introduction of iodised salt to regions of chronic iodine-deficiency disorders might transiently increase the proportion of thyroid disorders, but overall the small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. International efforts to control iodine-deficiency disorders are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges. PMID:18676011

  3. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  4. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  5. Multiple congenital coagulation deficiencies.

    PubMed

    BONNIN, J A; HICKS, N D; INNIS, M D; SIMPSON, D A

    1960-07-01

    A 6-week-old infant is presented who suffered from a congenital haemorrhagic disorder which caused death from subdural haemorrhage following mild trauma. Haematological investigation revealed deficiencies of factor VII and Christmas factor. Prower-Stuart factor was probably also deficient although investigation of this clotting factor was carried out only on serum obtained at necropsy.

  6. Surface-bound capsular polysaccharide of type Ia group B Streptococcus mediates C1 binding and activation of the classic complement pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, N.J.; Kasper, D.L.

    1986-06-01

    The role of surface-bound type Ia group B Streptococcus (GBS) capsular polysaccharide in anti-body-independent binding of C1 and activation of the classic component pathway was investigated. In a radiolabeled bacterial-polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) association assay, a measure of bacterial opsonization, preincubation of /sup 3/H-type Ia GBS with purified F(ab')/sub 2/ to the organism blocked the association of the bacteria with PMN', and the inhibitory effect was dose dependent. The specificity of F(ab')/sub 2/ blocking was shown after adsorption of F(ab')/sub 2/ with type Ia polysaccharide-sensitized erythrocytes. Polysaccharide-adsorbed F(ab')/sub 2/ had a 70% decrease in ability to block the association of bacteria with PMN. Neuraminidase digestion removed 80% of the terminal sialic acid residues from the native polysaccharide. These neuraminidase-digested organisms had a 72% decrease in binding and transfer of purified C1 compared with non-enzyme-treated organisms. Type Ia capsular polysaccharide bound to sheep erythrocytes promoted classic complement pathway-mediated hemolysis of the cells. The role of C1 inhibitor (INH) in modulation of C1 activation by the organisms was investigated. The possibility existed that the C1 INH could be bound by the bacteria, allowing C1 activation to occur in the fluid phase. The inhibitor was purified from human serum, and its activity was measured before and after incubation with type Ia GBS. The organisms had no effect on C1 INH activity. Thus surface-bound capsular polysacchardie of type Ia GBS mediates C1 binding and classic pathway activation, and this does not involve the C1 INH.

  7. Centrosomal localisation of the cancer/testis (CT) antigens NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 is regulated by proteasome activity in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Pagotto, Anna; Caballero, Otavia L; Volkmar, Norbert; Devalle, Sylvie; Simpson, Andrew J G; Lu, Xin; Christianson, John C

    2013-01-01

    The Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen family of genes are transcriptionally repressed in most human tissues but are atypically re-expressed in many malignant tumour types. Their restricted expression profile makes CT antigens ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. As little is known about whether CT antigens may be regulated by post-translational processing, we investigated the mechanisms governing degradation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 in selected cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of proteasome-mediated degradation induced the partitioning of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 into a detergent insoluble fraction. Moreover, this treatment also resulted in increased localisation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 at the centrosome. Despite their interaction, relocation of either NY-ESO-1 or MAGE-C1 to the centrosome could occur independently of each other. Using a series of truncated fragments, the regions corresponding to NY-ESO-1(91-150) and MAGE-C1(900-1116) were established as important for controlling both stability and localisation of these CT antigens. Our findings demonstrate that the steady state levels of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 are regulated by proteasomal degradation and that both behave as aggregation-prone proteins upon accumulation. With proteasome inhibitors being increasingly used as front-line treatment in cancer, these data raise issues about CT antigen processing for antigenic presentation and therefore immunogenicity in cancer patients.

  8. Molecular analysis of protein domain function encoded by the myb-homologous maize genes C1, Zm 1 and Zm 38.

    PubMed

    Franken, P; Schrell, S; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H; Wienand, U

    1994-07-01

    Two maize genes, Zm 1 and Zm 38, related to the regulatory anthocyanin gene C1 were analyzed molecularly and used for fusion constructs in transient domain swapping experiments with the C1 wild-type gene. It was shown that both genes (Zm 1 and Zm 38) influence the expression of the A1 locus, a target gene for C1. Zm 1 activates the A1 promoter, however it does not turn on the whole anthocyanin pathway. The Zm 38 gene product shows functions similar to C1-I, a dominant inhibitor of the C1 wild-type gene. Concerning the trans-inhibition by C1-I two effects seem to be involved, competition for binding and formation of heterodimers. Further analysis of C1 function was carried out by a fine structure analysis of C1 mutants induced by the insertion and excision of transposable elements. These experiments indicate that for the activating domain of the protein, the formation of an alpha helix seems to be more important than a high negative charge.

  9. Reduction of CO2 to C1 products and fuel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mill, T.; Ross, D.

    2002-01-01

    Photochemical semiconductor processes readily reduced CO2 to a broad range of C1 products. However the intrinsic and solar efficiencies for the processes were low. Improved quantum efficiencies could be realized utilizing quantum-sized particles, but at the expense of using less of the visible solar spectrum. Conversely, semiconductors with small bandgaps used more of the visible solar spectrum at the expense of quantum efficiency. Thermal reduction of CO2 with Fe(II) was thermodynamically favored for forming many kinds of organic compounds and occurred readily with olivine and other Fe(II) minerals above 200??C to form higher alkanes and alkenes. No added hydrogen was required.

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz TG, Hamilton GC. Anemia, polycythemia, and white blood cell disorders. In: Marx ...

  11. C-23 Hydroxylation by Arabidopsis CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 Reveals a Novel Shortcut in Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis[W

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Szatmari, Anna-Maria; Watanabe, Bunta; Fujita, Satomi; Bancos, Simona; Koncz, Csaba; Lafos, Marcel; Shibata, Kyomi; Yokota, Takao; Sakata, Kanzo; Szekeres, Miklos; Mizutani, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are biosynthesized from campesterol via several cytochrome P450 (P450)–catalyzed oxidative reactions. We report the functional characterization of two BR-biosynthetic P450s from Arabidopsis thaliana: CYP90C1/ROTUNDIFOLIA3 and CYP90D1. The cyp90c1 cyp90d1 double mutant exhibits the characteristic BR-deficient dwarf phenotype, although the individual mutants do not display this phenotype. These data suggest redundant roles for these P450s. In vitro biochemical assays using insect cell-expressed proteins revealed that both CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 catalyze C-23 hydroxylation of various 22-hydroxylated BRs with markedly different catalytic efficiencies. Both enzymes preferentially convert 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone, (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5α-ergostan-3-one, and (22S,24R)-22-hydroxyergost-4-en-3-one to 23-hydroxylated products, whereas they are less active on 6-deoxocathasterone. Likewise, cyp90c1 cyp90d1 plants were deficient in 23-hydroxylated BRs, and in feeding experiments using exogenously supplied intermediates, only 23-hydroxylated BRs rescued the growth deficiency of the cyp90c1 cyp90d1 mutant. Thus, CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 are redundant BR C-23 hydroxylases. Moreover, their preferential substrates are present in the endogenous Arabidopsis BR pool. Based on these results, we propose C-23 hydroxylation shortcuts that bypass campestanol, 6-deoxocathasterone, and 6-deoxoteasterone and lead directly from (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5α-ergostan-3-one and 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone to 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone and 6-deoxotyphasterol. PMID:17138693

  12. C-23 hydroxylation by Arabidopsis CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 reveals a novel shortcut in brassinosteroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Szatmari, Anna-Maria; Watanabe, Bunta; Fujita, Satomi; Bancos, Simona; Koncz, Csaba; Lafos, Marcel; Shibata, Kyomi; Yokota, Takao; Sakata, Kanzo; Szekeres, Miklos; Mizutani, Masaharu

    2006-11-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are biosynthesized from campesterol via several cytochrome P450 (P450)-catalyzed oxidative reactions. We report the functional characterization of two BR-biosynthetic P450s from Arabidopsis thaliana: CYP90C1/ROTUNDIFOLIA3 and CYP90D1. The cyp90c1 cyp90d1 double mutant exhibits the characteristic BR-deficient dwarf phenotype, although the individual mutants do not display this phenotype. These data suggest redundant roles for these P450s. In vitro biochemical assays using insect cell-expressed proteins revealed that both CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 catalyze C-23 hydroxylation of various 22-hydroxylated BRs with markedly different catalytic efficiencies. Both enzymes preferentially convert 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone, (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5alpha-ergostan-3-one, and (22S,24R)-22-hydroxyergost-4-en-3-one to 23-hydroxylated products, whereas they are less active on 6-deoxocathasterone. Likewise, cyp90c1 cyp90d1 plants were deficient in 23-hydroxylated BRs, and in feeding experiments using exogenously supplied intermediates, only 23-hydroxylated BRs rescued the growth deficiency of the cyp90c1 cyp90d1 mutant. Thus, CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 are redundant BR C-23 hydroxylases. Moreover, their preferential substrates are present in the endogenous Arabidopsis BR pool. Based on these results, we propose C-23 hydroxylation shortcuts that bypass campestanol, 6-deoxocathasterone, and 6-deoxoteasterone and lead directly from (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5alpha-ergostan-3-one and 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone to 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone and 6-deoxotyphasterol.

  13. Polyethylene glycol enhances the binding of C1q to circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Hannema, A J; Out, T A; Aalberse, R C

    1981-01-01

    By radioimmunoassay we measured the amount of endogenous C1q that was precipitated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) under the conditions of the 125I-C1q-binding test (C1q-BT). We found a linear correlation between the percentage endogenous C1q that was precipitated and the 125I-C1q-binding activity (C1q-BA). We concluded that the 125I-C1q behaves like the endogenous C1q. To detect circulating immune complexes (CIC) which had already bound C1q, human sera were added to tubes coated with anti-C1q. Under the conditions used, no C1q-bearing CIC were detected. In addition, 7 sera from patients with high C1q-BA were analyzed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation. No C1q was found in the fast sedimenting fractions, although C1q-BA was detected in these fractions. With IgG-coated tubes we observed that PEG enhanced the binding of 125I-C1q as well as endogenous C1q to aggregated and monomeric IgG. PEG also enhanced the binding of CIC to C1q-coated tubes. The results suggest that CIC detected by the C1q-BT do not bear C1q in significant amounts in the circulation and that these CIC become detectable only in the presence of PEG.

  14. Microbial growth on C1 compounds. Incorporation of C1 units into allulose phosphate by extracts of Pseudomonas methanica

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, M. B.; Quayle, J. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. Incubation of cell-free extracts of methane- or methanol-grown Pseudomonas methanica with [14C]formaldehyde and d-ribose 5-phosphate leads to incorporation of radioactivity into a non-volatile product, which has the chromatographic properties of a phosphorylated compound. 2. Treatment of this reaction product with a phosphatase, followed by chromatography, shows the presence of two compounds whose chromatographic properties are consistent with their being free sugars. 3. The minor component of the dephosphorylated products has been identified as fructose. The major component has been identified as allulose (psicose) on the basis of co-chromatography, co-crystallization of the derived phenylosazone and dinitrophenylosazone with authentic derivatives of allulose and behaviour towards oxidation with bromine water. 4. It is suggested that the bacterial extracts catalyse the condensation of a C1 unit identical with, or derived from, formaldehyde with ribose 5-phosphate to give allulose 6-phosphate. 5. Testing of hexose phosphates and pentose phosphates as substrates has so far shown the reaction to be specific for ribose 5-phosphate. 6. The condensation reaction is not catalysed by extracts of methanol-grown Pseudomonas AM1. 7. A variant of the pentose phosphate cycle, involving this condensation reaction, is suggested as an explanation for the net synthesis of C3 compounds from C1 units by P. methanica. PMID:5965346

  15. [C1Q NEPHROPATHY: CASE REPORTS AND LITERATURE REVIEW].

    PubMed

    Galešić, Krešimir; Horvatić, Ivica; Batinić, Danica; Milošević, Danko; Saraga, Marijan; Durdov, Merica Glavina; Ljubanović, Danica Galešić

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy is considered a form of glomerulonephritis, defined by histological findings of dominant Clq immune deposits in renal biopsy. It is a rare disease, most often manifested in children and young adults. The most common clinical manifestation of the disease is nephrotic syndrome, but other renal syndromes could also be found. The cause of the disease is not known, but the immune pathogenesis could be assumed. Often, resistance to glucocorticoid or other immunosuppressive therapy is present, potentially leading to chronic renal insufficiency. We present ten patients with renal biopsy and clinical findings of Clq nephropathy. None of the patients had clinical or serological manifestations of systemic lupus. All patients had normal findings of C3 and C4 components of complement, as well as normal ANF, anti-dsD-NA and ANCA antibodies. PMID:26749950

  16. A Selection of Recent Advances in C1 Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mesters, Carl

    2016-06-01

    This review presents a selection of recent publications related to the chemistry and catalysis of C1 molecules, including methane, methanol, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. These molecules play an important role in the current supply of energy and chemicals and will likely become even more relevant because of the need to decarbonize fuels (shift from coal to natural gas) in line with CO2 capture and use to mitigate global warming, as well as a gradual shift on the supply side from crude oil to natural gas. This review includes both recent industrial developments, such as the huge increase in methanol-to-olefins-capacity build in China and the demonstration of oxidative coupling of methane, and scientific developments in these chemistries facilitated by improved capabilities in, for example, analytical tools and computational modeling.

  17. Plasma enhanced C1 chemistry for green technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2013-09-01

    Plasma catalysis is one of the innovative next generation green technologies that meet the needs for energy and materials conservation as well as environmental protection. Non-thermal plasma uniquely generates reactive species independently of reaction temperature, and these species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than normal thermochemical reactions. Non-thermal plasma thus broadens the operation window of existing chemical conversion processes, and ultimately allows modification of the process parameters to minimize energy and material consumption. We have been specifically focusing on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) as one of the viable non-thermal plasma sources for practical fuel reforming. In the presentation, room temperature one-step conversion of methane to methanol and hydrogen using a miniaturized DBD reactor (microplasma reactor) is highlighted. The practical impact of plasma technology on existing C1-chemistry is introduced, and then unique characteristics of plasma fuel reforming such as non-equilibrium product distribution is discussed.

  18. A Selection of Recent Advances in C1 Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mesters, Carl

    2016-06-01

    This review presents a selection of recent publications related to the chemistry and catalysis of C1 molecules, including methane, methanol, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. These molecules play an important role in the current supply of energy and chemicals and will likely become even more relevant because of the need to decarbonize fuels (shift from coal to natural gas) in line with CO2 capture and use to mitigate global warming, as well as a gradual shift on the supply side from crude oil to natural gas. This review includes both recent industrial developments, such as the huge increase in methanol-to-olefins-capacity build in China and the demonstration of oxidative coupling of methane, and scientific developments in these chemistries facilitated by improved capabilities in, for example, analytical tools and computational modeling. PMID:27276549

  19. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver from damage. The condition can lead to emphysema and liver disease . ... descent. Adults with severe AAT deficiency will develop emphysema , often before age 40. Smoking can increase the ...

  20. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  1. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  2. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency can lead to a loss of bone density (size and strength), broken bones (fractures), muscle weakness, ... get too much calcium in their blood or urine. Careful monitoring of blood vitamin D levels will ...

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right shape, they get stuck in the liver cells and can't reach the lungs. Symptoms of AAT deficiency include Shortness of breath and wheezing Repeated lung ... or delay lung symptoms. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  4. C(1) metabolism and CVD outcomes in older adults.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Helene; Strain, J J; Pentieva, Kristina; Ward, Mary

    2012-05-01

    CVD is the most common cause of death in people over 65 years. This review considers the latest evidence for a potential protective effect of C(1) donors (folate and the metabolically related B-vitamins) in CVD. Such an effect may or may not be mediated via the role of these nutrients in maintaining plasma homocysteine concentrations within a desirable range. Despite predictions from epidemiological studies that lowering plasma homocysteine would reduce cardiovascular risk, several secondary prevention trials in at-risk patients published since 2004 have failed to demonstrate a benefit of homocysteine-lowering therapy with B-vitamins on CVD events generally. All these trials were performed in CVD patients with advanced disease; thus current evidence suggests that intervention with high-dose folic acid is of no benefit in preventing another event, at least in the case of heart disease. The evidence at this time, however, is stronger for stroke, with meta-analyses of randomised trials showing that folic acid reduces the risk of stroke, particularly in people with no history of stroke. Genetic studies provide convincing evidence to support a causal relationship between sub-optimal B-vitamin status and CVD. People homozygous for the common C677T variant in the gene encoding the folate-metabolising enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), typically have a 14-21% higher risk of CVD. Apart from folate, riboflavin is required as a co-factor for MTHFR. New evidence shows that riboflavin intervention results in marked lowering of blood pressure, specifically in patients with the MTHFR 677TT genotype. This novel gene-nutrient interaction may provide insights as to the mechanism that links C(1) metabolism with CVD outcomes. PMID:22152927

  5. Clearance of human factor XIa-inhibitor complexes in rats.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; Bleeker, W K; Agterberg, J; Rigter, G; ten Cate, H; Hack, C E

    1996-06-01

    The serpins C1 esterase inhibitor (C1Inh), antithrombin (AT), alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) and alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2AP) are known inhibitors of coagulation factor XIa (FXIa). Although initial studies suggested alpha 1AT to be the main inhibitor of FXIa, we recently demonstrated C1Inh to be a predominant inhibitor of FXIa in vitro in human plasma. The present study was performed to investigate the plasma elimination kinetics of preformed human FXIa-FXIa inhibitor complexes injected in rats. The amounts of complexes remaining in circulation were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The plasma half-life time of clearance (t1/2) was 98 min for FXIa-alpha 1AT complexes, whereas it was considerably shorter, i.e. 19, 18 and 15 min for FXIa-C1Inh, FXIa-alpha 2AP and FXIa-AT complexes, respectively. Thus, due to this different plasma t1/2, preferentially FXIa-alpha 1AT complexes may be detected in clinical samples. Furthermore, measuring FXIa-FXIa inhibitor complexes in patient samples may not help to clarify the relative contribution of the individual serpins to inactivation of FXIa in vivo.

  6. Targeting Atp6v1c1 Prevents Inflammation and Bone Erosion Caused by Periodontitis and Reveals Its Critical Function in Osteoimmunology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Lu, Yun; Li, Qian; Zhu, Zheng; Shao, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (Periodontitis) is a serious disease that affects a majority of adult Americans and is associated with other systemic diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this pervasive and destructive disease. In this study, we utilized novel adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown gene therapy to treat bone erosion and inflammatory caused by periodontitis in mouse model. Atp6v1c1 is a subunit of the V-ATPase complex and regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex. We demonstrated previously that Atp6v1c1 has an essential function in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. We hypothesized that Atp6v1c1 may be an ideal target to prevent the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis. To test the hypothesis, we employed AAV RNAi knockdown of Atp6v1c1 gene expression to prevent bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously. We found that lesion-specific injection of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 into the periodontal disease lesions protected against bone erosion (>85%) and gingival inflammation caused by P. gingivalis W50 infection. AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown dramatically reduced osteoclast numbers and inhibited the infiltration of dendritic cells and macrophages in the bacteria-induced inflammatory lesions in periodontitis. Silencing of Atp6v1c1 expression also prevented the expressions of osteoclast-related genes and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Our data suggests that AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 treatment can significantly attenuate the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis, indicating the dual function of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 as an inhibitor of bone erosion mediated by osteoclasts, and as an inhibitor of inflammation through down-regulation of pro

  7. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae endopeptidase O (PepO) to complement component C1q modulates the complement attack and promotes host cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2014-05-30

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen.

  8. Fluorescence induction characteristics of iron deficient cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.; Guikema, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    The fluorescence induction characteristics of Anacystis nidulans were examined after cultures were stressed with iron deficiency. When these cells were illuminated with 620 nm light to excite phycocyanin, a fluorescence induction transient was observed which was not present in normal cells. The transient had a rise time of approximately 3-4 sec, and was abolished when cells were preilluminated with 620 nm light. One goal of this work was to ascertain the role of electron transfer between PSII and either PSI or the respiratory system in causing the fluorescence transient. The effects of electron transport inhibitors and uncouplers on fluorescence induction were examined. Respiratory inhibitors, such as KCN, had little or no effect on the fluorescence transient. p-Chloromercuribenzoic acid, at concentrations below 0.5 mM, delayed the transient rise time without causing a decrease in the extent. Uncouplers, such as gramicidin and CCCP, caused a decrease in the extent of the transient.

  9. VERMILION-DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C B

    1919-07-20

    In May, 1916, a culture of Drosophila melanogaster showed that a new sex-linked lethal had arisen. The linkage relations indicated that the position of the lethal was in the neighborhood of the sex-linked recessive "vermilion," whose locus in the X chromosome is at 33.0. When females heterozygous for the lethal were outcrossed to vermilion males, all the daughters that received the lethal-bearing chromosome showed vermilion eye-color, though, from the pedigree, vermilion was known to be absent from the ancestry of the mother. The lethal action and the unexpected appearance of vermilion both suggested that this was another instance of the phenomenon called "deficiency;" that is, the loss or "inactivation" of the genes of a section of the X chromosome. The lethal action would then be due to the deficient region including one or more genes necessary for the life of the individual. The appearance of vermilion in females carrying only one vermilion gene would be explainable on the ground that the deficient-bearing females are virtually haploid for the region including the vermilion locus. Linkage tests showed that the amount of crossing over in the neighborhood of the deficiency was cut down by about five units. Part of this may be attributed to the actual length of the "deficient" region, within which it is probable that no crossing over occurs, and part (probably most) to an alteration in the synaptic relations in the regions immediately adjacent. In more remote regions there was no disturbance or perhaps a slight rise in the frequency of crossing over. Both the local fall and the possible rise in more distant regions would seem to argue that a "pucker" at synapsis had been caused by an actual shortening of the deficient chromosome. That the deficient region extends to the left of the locus of vermilion was indicated by a test in which it was observed that the presence of an extra piece of chromosome including the loci for vermilion and sable ("vermilion

  10. HDAC Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olzscha, Heidi; Bekheet, Mina E; Sheikh, Semira; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is one of the most abundant posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic homeostasis of lysine acetylation and deacetylation is dictated by the action of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Important substrates for HATs and HDACs are histones, where lysine acetylation generally leads to an open and transcriptionally active chromatin conformation. Histone deacetylation forces the compaction of the chromatin with subsequent inhibition of transcription and reduced gene expression. Unbalanced HAT and HDAC activity, and therefore aberrant histone acetylation, has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression of malignancy in different types of cancer. Therefore, the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as therapeutic agents against cancer is of great interest. However, treatment with HDIs can also affect the acetylation status of many other non-histone proteins which play a role in different pathways including angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, autophagy and apoptosis. These effects have led HDIs to become anticancer agents, which can initiate apoptosis in tumor cells. Hematological malignancies in particular are responsive to HDIs, and four HDIs have already been approved as anticancer agents. There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to predict the response to HDI treatment. This chapter provides information on how to assess HDAC activity in vitro and determine the potency of HDIs on different HDACs. It also gives information on how to analyze cellular markers following HDI treatment and to analyze tissue biopsies from HDI-treated patients. Finally, a protocol is provided on how to detect HDI sensitivity determinants in human cells, based on a pRetroSuper shRNA screen upon HDI treatment. PMID:27246222

  11. Near-ultraviolet spectroscopy of Comet Austin (1989c1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valk, Jacobus H.; O'Dell, C. R.; Cochran, Anita L.; Cochran, William D.; Opal, Chet B. S.; Barker, Edwin S.

    1992-01-01

    Comet Austin (1989c1) was observed post-perihelion at a heliocentric distance near 1.25 AU. The wavelength range was from the atmospheric cutoff at 3000 to 4000 A. The coma spectra were calibrated into flux units and the contaminating sky spectrum and solar scattered light continuum were subtracted, leaving an ultraviolet spectrum of about 1.5-A resolution and excellent signal-to-noise ratio. The spectrum is dominated by emissions from OH, NH, CH, C3, and CN, some of the weaker emissions of which are seen here for the first time. More bands of CO(2+) were found than in any previous investigation and several intensity anomalies were noted; H2CO, OH(+), NCN, N(2+), and CN(+) may be present. Several emission features well above the noise level remain unidentified. The relative intensities of the OH and CN bands agree with the predictions of resonance fluorescence when one considers the potential effects of contamination by other molecules. The effects of the ozone absorption spectrum are not fully removed by the data-reduction process, although this does not affect these results.

  12. Structure of human Niemann-Pick C1 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Jiawei; Coutavas, Elias; Shi, Hang; Hao, Qi; Blobel, Günter

    2016-07-19

    Niemann-Pick C1 protein (NPC1) is a late-endosomal membrane protein involved in trafficking of LDL-derived cholesterol, Niemann-Pick disease type C, and Ebola virus infection. NPC1 contains 13 transmembrane segments (TMs), five of which are thought to represent a "sterol-sensing domain" (SSD). Although present also in other key regulatory proteins of cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and signaling, the structure and mechanism of action of the SSD are unknown. Here we report a crystal structure of a large fragment of human NPC1 at 3.6 Å resolution, which reveals internal twofold pseudosymmetry along TM 2-13 and two structurally homologous domains that protrude 60 Å into the endosomal lumen. Strikingly, NPC1's SSD forms a cavity that is accessible from both the luminal bilayer leaflet and the endosomal lumen; computational modeling suggests that this cavity is large enough to accommodate one cholesterol molecule. We propose a model for NPC1 function in cholesterol sensing and transport. PMID:27307437

  13. Structure of human Niemann–Pick C1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Jiawei; Coutavas, Elias; Shi, Hang; Hao, Qi; Blobel, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick C1 protein (NPC1) is a late-endosomal membrane protein involved in trafficking of LDL-derived cholesterol, Niemann–Pick disease type C, and Ebola virus infection. NPC1 contains 13 transmembrane segments (TMs), five of which are thought to represent a “sterol-sensing domain” (SSD). Although present also in other key regulatory proteins of cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and signaling, the structure and mechanism of action of the SSD are unknown. Here we report a crystal structure of a large fragment of human NPC1 at 3.6 Å resolution, which reveals internal twofold pseudosymmetry along TM 2–13 and two structurally homologous domains that protrude 60 Å into the endosomal lumen. Strikingly, NPC1's SSD forms a cavity that is accessible from both the luminal bilayer leaflet and the endosomal lumen; computational modeling suggests that this cavity is large enough to accommodate one cholesterol molecule. We propose a model for NPC1 function in cholesterol sensing and transport. PMID:27307437

  14. Prostaglandin E₂ is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation. PMID:24131900

  15. Prostaglandin E₂ is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-10-17

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation.

  16. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  17. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  18. Studies on the haemolytic activity of circulating C1q-C3/C4 complexes.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diana; Brouwer, Mieke C; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2008-04-01

    During classical complement pathway activation, the internal thio-ester of both C3 and C4 becomes exposed which enables C3 and C4 to bind covalently to nearby molecules. Recently, we described that C3 and C4 bind to C1q, the recognition molecule of the classical pathway, upon activation of this pathway. Covalently linked complexes between C1q and activated C4 (C1q-C4 complexes) are specific markers for classical complement pathway activation. In the present study we further investigated the molecular characteristics of complexes between C1q and activated C3 or C4 that occur in vivo. In human serum only complexes of C1q with C3d or C4d fragments were detected but not those with the larger C3b/bi or C4b/bi fragments. We identified that C1q-C4 complexes circulate as part of the intact C1 complex instead of as free C1q. Finally, we investigated whether deposited C3d or C4d affect C1 haemolytic activity. We observed that both C1q-C3 and C1q-C4 complexes are significantly (P<0.05) less active in a C1q-haemolytic assay than non-complexed C1q. Thus, the dominant types of C1q complexes that circulate in vivo are C1q-C3d and C1q-C4d complexes. These complexes are still able to interact with C1r and C1s to form a C1 complex, but seem to have a reduced activity as compared to C1q not carrying C3- or C4-fragments.

  19. Structure and function of the serine-protease subcomponents of C1: protein engineering studies.

    PubMed

    Gál, P; Závodszky, P

    1998-08-01

    Our protein engineering studies on human C1r and C1s revealed important characteristics of the individual domains of these multidomain serine-proteases, and supplied evidence about the cooperation of the domains to create binding sites, and to control the activation process. We expressed the recombinant subcomponents in the baculovirus-insect cell system and checked the biological activity. Deletions and point mutants of C1r were constructed and C1r-C1s chimeras were also produced. Our deletion mutants demonstrated that the N-terminal CUB domain and the EGF-like domain of C1r together are responsible for the calcium dependent C1r-C1s interaction. It seems very likely that these two modules form the calcium-binding site of the C1r alpha-fragment and participate in the tetramer formation. The deletion mutants also demonstrated that the N-terminal region of the C1r molecule contains essential elements involved in the control of activation of the serine-protease module. The substrate specificity of the serine-protease is also determined by the five N-terminal noncatalytic domain of C1r/C1s chimera, which contains the catalytic domain of C1s preceded by the N-terminal region of C1r, could replace the C1r in the hemolytically active C1 complex. The C1s/C1r chimera, in which the alpha-fragment of the C1r was replaced for that of the C1s exibits both C1r- and C1s-like characteristics. We stabilized the zymogen form of human C1r by mutating the Arg(463)-Ile(464) bond. Using our stable zymogen C1r we showed that one active C1r in the C1 complex is sufficient for the full activity of the entire complex. Further experiment with this mutant could provide us with important information about the structure of the C1 complex. PMID:9777415

  20. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  1. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  2. Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) an intestinal sterol transporter.

    PubMed

    Davis, Harry R; Altmann, Scott W

    2009-07-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) has been identified and characterized as an essential protein in the intestinal cholesterol absorption process. NPC1L1 localizes to the brush border membrane of absorptive enterocytes in the small intestine. Intestinal expression of NPC1L1 is down regulated by diets containing high levels of cholesterol. While otherwise phenotypically normal, Npc1l1 null mice exhibit a significant reduction in the intestinal uptake and absorption of cholesterol and phytosterols. Characterization of the NPC1L1 pathway revealed that cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe specifically binds to an extracellular loop of NPC1L1 and inhibits its sterol transport function. Npc1l1 null mice are resistant to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia, and when crossed with apo E null mice, are completely resistant to the development of atherosclerosis. Intestinal gene expression studies in Npc1l1 null mice indicated that no exogenous cholesterol was entering enterocytes lacking NPC1L1, which resulted in an upregulation of intestinal and hepatic LDL receptor and cholesterol biosynthetic gene expression. Polymorphisms in the human NPC1L1 gene have been found to influence cholesterol absorption and plasma low density lipoprotein levels. Therefore, NPC1L1 is a critical intestinal sterol uptake transporter which influences whole body cholesterol homeostasis.

  3. Necroptosis in Niemann–Pick disease, type C1: a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Cougnoux, A; Cluzeau, C; Mitra, S; Li, R; Williams, I; Burkert, K; Xu, X; Wassif, C A; Zheng, W; Porter, F D

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder due to mutation of the NPC1 gene. The NPC1 phenotype is characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction, including cerebellar ataxia and dementia. There is histological evidence of neuroinflammation and progressive neuronal loss, with cerebellar Purkinje cells particularly vulnerable to loss of NPC1 function. Necroptosis was evaluated as a mechanism of neuronal loss. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) and RIP3 are key components of the necrosomal complex that regulates necroptotic cell death. We report increased expression of RIP1 and RIP3 in NPC1 fibroblasts, NPC1 iPS cell-derived neuronal precursors, and in cerebellar tissue from both NPC1 mice and patients. Our data suggest a positive correlation between NPC1 neurological disease severity and assembly of the necrosome complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 decreases cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of Npc1-mutant mice with necrostatin-1, an allosteric inhibitor of RIP1, significantly delayed cerebellar Purkinje cell loss, progression of neurological symptoms, and death. Collectively, our data identified necroptosis as a key component of the molecular network that contributes to neuronal loss in NPC1 and establish that inhibition of necroptosis is a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:26986514

  4. Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure of NAD+-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Bacterium Moraxella sp. C-1

    PubMed Central

    Shabalin, I.G.; Polyakov, K.M.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of the ternary complex of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from the methylotrophic bacterium Moraxella sp. C-1 with the cofactor (NAD+) and the inhibitor (azide ion) was established at 1.1 A resolution. The complex mimics the structure of the transition state of the enzymatic reaction. The structure was refined with anisotropic displacitalicents parameters for non-hydrogen atoms to a R factor of 13.4%. Most of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon atoms were distinguished based on the analysis of the titalicperature factors and electron density peaks, with the result that side-chain rotamers of histidine residues and most of asparagine and glutamine residues were unambiguously determined. A comparative analysis of the structure of the ternary complex determined at the atomic resolution and the structure of this complex at 1.95 A resolution was performed. In the atomic resolution structure, the covalent bonds in the nicotinamide group are somewhat changed in agreitalicent with the results of quantum mechanical calculations, providing evidence that the cofactor acquires a bipolar form in the transition state of the enzymatic reaction. PMID:22649619

  5. Inhibitors of Kallikrein in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, David J.

    1972-01-01

    Human plasma was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration to determine which method would give the greatest number of clearly separable kallikrein inhibitory peaks. With G-200 gel filtration three peaks could be separated which were demonstrated to contain α2-macroglobulin, C1̄ inactivator, and α1-antitrypsin. No other kallikrein inhibitors could be identified. The fractions containing C1̄ inactivator and α2-macroglobulin appeared to be more effective against kallikrein than that containing α1-antitrypsin. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema was shown to have an abnormal C1̄ inactivator protein capable of interfering with kallikrein's biologic, but not its esterolytic activity. Heat-treated human plasma, a commonly used source of kininogen for experiments with kallikrein, was shown to have kallikrein inhibitory activity. PMID:4113391

  6. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Ray Chaudhuri, Arnab; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia; Gogola, Ewa; Duarte, Alexandra A; Lee, Ji-Eun; Wong, Nancy; Lafarga, Vanessa; Calvo, Jennifer A; Panzarino, Nicholas J; John, Sam; Day, Amanda; Crespo, Anna Vidal; Shen, Binghui; Starnes, Linda M; de Ruiter, Julian R; Daniel, Jeremy A; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Cortez, David; Cantor, Sharon B; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Ge, Kai; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Sharan, Shyam K; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-07-21

    Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3/4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11 nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations. Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of replication fork protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumour cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance. PMID:27443740

  7. Does ethylene mediate cluster root formation under iron deficiency?

    PubMed

    Zaid, H; El Morabet, R; Diem, H G; Arahou, M

    2003-11-01

    Casuarina glauca develops proteoid (cluster) roots in response to Fe deficiency. This study set out to investigate the possible involvement of ethylene in the initiation and/or the morphogenesis of cluster roots (CR). For this purpose, the effect of Ag+ added as silver thiosulfate, an inhibitor of ethylene action has been studied in plants growing hydroponically. No CR formation was observed in these growth conditions. Inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis by aminoethoxyvinylglycine, 1- aminoisobutyric acid, aminoxyacetic acid or cobalt chloride also eliminated the positive effect of Fe deficiency on CR formation in C. glauca. CR were not formed in Fe- deficient roots in the presence of ethylene inhibitors, suggesting a role for ethylene in the morphological responses to Fe deficiency. Interestingly, treatment of Casuarina plants with the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid stimulated significantly the formation of CR, even if plants are supplied with Fe. However, this stimulation did not reach the level of CR obtained in Fe-deficient plants. These results suggest that an ethylene-mediated signalling pathway is involved in CR formation process in C. glauca. PMID:12967908

  8. Microwave spectra for the three 13C1 isotopologues of propene and new rotational constants for propene and its 13C1 isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Groner, Peter; Conrad, Andrew R.; Gurusinghe, Ranil; Tubergen, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    New measurements of microwave lines (A and E) of propene and its three 13C1 isotopologues have been made in the 10-22 GHz region with FT accuracy. The revised lines for propene along with many hundreds from the literature were fitted with the ERHAM program for internal rotors to give improved rotational constants. The new constants are A0 = 46280.2904(16), B0 = 9305.24260(30), and C0 = 8134.22685(28) MHz. Lines for the 3-13C1 species were observed in a pure sample; lines for the 1-13C1 and 2-13C1 species were observed in natural abundance. In fitting the limited sets of lines for the 13C1 species, many of the centrifugal distortion constants and most of the tunneling parameters were transferred from the fit of propene itself with 27 parameters. Improved rotational constants for the 13C1 species are reported.

  9. C1q Differentially Modulates Phagocytosis and Cytokine Responses during Ingestion of Apoptotic Cells by Human Monocytes, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Deborah A.; Laust, Amanda K.; Nelson, Edward L.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    C1q, the first component of the classical complement pathway, is also a pattern recognition receptor involved in the recognition and clearance of apoptotic cells. C1q deficiency in humans leads to development of lupus-like autoimmune disease, and it has been speculated that impaired clearance of apoptotic cells may contribute to disease development. Since phagocytes initiate specific and appropriate immune responses as a result of initial ligand-receptor interactions, regulation of gene expression by C1q may also contribute to the sculpting of an immune response to the ingested “self-Ags.” In this study, the role of C1q in apoptotic cell clearance and subsequent modulation of cytokine release by phagocytes was assessed including donor matched human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs), and dendritic cells (DCs). First, C1q binding is much greater to late compared with early apoptotic cells. Second, C1q binding to apoptotic cells significantly enhanced the levels of ingestion by monocytes but had no effect on HMDM and DC uptake. Third, in the presence of serum, C1q bound to apoptotic cells, activated the complement pathway, leading to C3b deposition, and enhancement of uptake of apoptotic cells by monocytes, HMDMs, and DCs. Finally, although C1q, either immobilized on a plate or bound to apoptotic cells, modulates the LPS-induced cytokine levels released by human monocytes, HMDMs, and DCs toward a more limited immune response, both the degree and direction of modulation differed significantly depending on the differentiation state of the phagocyte, providing further evidence of the integration of these cell- and environment-specific signals in determining appropriate immune responses. PMID:19864605

  10. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes. PMID:26467175

  11. Immune Deficiency Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for IDF Join our nationwide network of volunteers Resources For Patients & Families Peer Support Speak with someone who understands Locate a Physician ... secure Legacy Giving Establish your personal legacy and support IDF 'Immune Deficiency Foundation Remembers' Plaque Pay tribute to ... Educational Resources Find a wealth of IDF educational publications and ...

  12. Selective kallikrein inhibitors alter human neutrophil elastase release during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Kettner, C; Reilly, T M; Knabb, R M; Bischoff, R; Tschesche, H; Wenzel, H; Kucich, U

    1995-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass causes hemorrhagic complications and initiates a biochemical and cellular "whole body inflammatory response." This study investigates whether a variety of selective inhibitors of the contact pathway of intrinsic coagulation modulate complement and neutrophil activation during simulated extracorporeal circulation. After 60 min of recirculation in the presence of the slow tight-binding boronic acid inhibitor, Bz-Pro-Phe-boroArg-OH (10.7 microM), complete inhibition of kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complex formation and marked inhibition of C1-C1-inhibitor complex formation and the release of human neutrophil elastase were observed. Arg15-aprotinin (3.1 microM), Ala357,Arg358 alpha 1-antitrypsin (2.6 microM), and soybean trypsin inhibitor (48.0 microM) either completely or partially inhibited the generation of kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes but were less effective inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase release. The second-order rate constants for the inhibition of kallikrein in purified systems are consistent with the order of effectiveness of the inhibitors in blocking human neutrophil elastase release in heparinized blood. Our results suggest that low-molecular-weight selective inhibitors of kallikrein may be effective agents in the attenuation of the contact-mediated inflammatory response in cardiopulmonary bypass.

  13. Homologous recombination deficiency: Exploiting the fundamental vulnerability of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) exhibit defective DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR) due to genetic and epigenetic alterations of HR pathway genes. Defective HR is an important therapeutic target in EOC as exemplified by the efficacy of platinum analogues in this disease, as well as the advent of poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors which exhibit synthetic lethality when applied to HR deficient cells. Here, we describe the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of HR deficient EOCs, discuss current and emerging approaches for targeting these tumors, and present challenges associated with these approaches focusing on development and overcoming resistance. PMID:26463832

  14. Molecular characterization of the complement C1q, C2 and C4 genes in Brazilian patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liphaus, Bernadete L; Umetsu, Natalia; Jesus, Adriana A; Bando, Silvia Y; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a molecular characterization of the C1q, C2 and C4 genes in patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: Patient 1 (P1) had undetectable C1q, patient 2 (P2) and patient 3 (P3) had decreased C2 and patient 4 (P4) had decreased C4 levels. All exons and non-coding regions of the C1q and C2 genes were sequenced. Mononuclear cells were cultured and stimulated with interferon gamma to evaluate C1q, C2 and C4 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: C1q sequencing revealed heterozygous silent mutations in the A (c.276 A>G Gly) and C (c.126 C>T Pro) chains, as well as a homozygous single-base change in the 3′ non-coding region of the B chain (c*78 A>G). C1qA mRNA expression without interferon was decreased compared with that of healthy controls (p<0.05) and was decreased after stimulation compared with that of non-treated cells. C1qB mRNA expression was decreased compared with that of controls and did not change with stimulation. C1qC mRNA expression was increased compared with that of controls and was even higher after stimulation. P2 and P3 had Type I C2 deficiency (heterozygous 28 bp deletion at exon 6). The C2 mRNA expression in P3 was 23 times lower compared with that of controls and did not change after stimulation. The C4B mRNA expression of P4 was decreased compared with that of controls and increased after stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Silent mutations and single-base changes in the 3′ non-coding regions may modify mRNA transcription and C1q production. Type I C2 deficiency should be evaluated in JSLE patients with decreased C2 serum levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of decreased C4B mRNA expression in JSLE pathogenesis. PMID:26017655

  15. Influence of ionic strength, EDTA concentration, endogenous C1q and polyanions on the 125I-C1q-binding test.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Huijbregts, C C; Paardekooper, J

    1984-08-01

    Several parameters of the 125I-C1q-binding test were investigated: ionic strength, pH, concentration of EDTA, influence of serum C1q and the possibility of interference by polyanions. Lowering the ionic strength of the borate buffer resulted in increased precipitation of 125I-C1q in normal human serum. This increase was dependent on the presence of serum proteins, probably immunoglobulins. When the concentration of the EDTA was decreased, increased precipitation of 125I-C1q in normal human serum was also observed. This was prevented by adding NaCl to the EDTA solution. However at very low concentrations of EDTA (too low to chelate all calcium ions in the serum), increased precipitation of 125I-C1q in normal human serum was observed even in the presence of added NaCl. Addition of purified C1q to sera from patients with very low C1q levels had varying effects on the results of the C1q-binding test: (a) it decreased the C1q-binding activity of some sera, probably by competition with 125I-C1q for binding sites on the immune complexes; (b) it increased the C1q-binding activity of other sera, probably by enhancing the precipitation of immune complexes as a consequence of the cross-linking effect of C1q; or (c) it had no influence, possibly due to the opposite effects of (a) and (b). The addition of dextran sulphate resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the 125I-C1q-binding activity of normal human serum. This effect was dependent on the interaction of dextran sulphate with either C1q or low-density lipoproteins and was prevented by addition of polybrene to the assay. However, addition of polybrene to sera with a high C1q-binding activity scarcely influenced binding activity.

  16. Significance of low molecular weight C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Swaak, A J; Brouwer, M C; van Rooijen, A; Nieuwenhuys, E J; Hack, C E

    1990-09-01

    The significance of high serum concentrations of low molecular weight C1q (LMW-C1q) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was studied. Concentrations of LMW-C1q were increased in SLE, but not in rheumatoid arthritis or acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Concentrations of LMW-C1q in SLE serum samples correlated with titres of anti-dsDNA and were inversely related to concentrations of normal C1q and C3. Serial studies in six patients, who had rising anti-dsDNA titres and who developed a major exacerbation requiring admission to hospital, showed that LMW-C1q increased in parallel with anti-dsDNA, reaching peak values of more than 2000% of normal just before or at the time of clinical relapse and decreasing during convalescence. Most marked increases in LMW-C1q were noted in the three patients in whom C1q concentrations remained normal, whereas increases were less in the three patients who had strongly depressed concentrations of normal C1q. A study of C1q biosynthesis by macrophages cultured from patients with SLE and high serum concentrations of LMW-C1q did not show impaired secretion of normal C1q in favour of LMW-C1q, but indicated that serum concentrations of LMW-C1q may reflect the synthetic rate of C1q in vivo. The results show that increased serum concentrations of LMW-C1q may be helpful in diagnosing SLE and suggest that serial determination of LMW-C1q in serum may have predictive value in monitoring patients with SLE.

  17. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube. Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Exams and Tests Factor XII deficiency is most often found when ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: pseudocholinesterase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is a condition that results in increased sensitivity to certain muscle relaxant drugs used during general ... People with pseudocholinesterase deficiency may also have increased sensitivity to certain other drugs, including the local anesthetic ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aydin HI, Sennaroğlu L, Belgin E, Jensen K, Wolf B. Hearing loss in biotinidase deficiency: genotype-phenotype ... corrected to Aydin, Halil Ibrahim]. Citation on PubMed Wolf B. Biotinidase deficiency: "if you have to have ...

  20. Complete complement deficiency in a large cohort of familial systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rachna; Sestak, Andrea L; Souza, Anil D’; Dillon, Skyler P.; Namjou, Bahram; Scofield, R Hal

    2010-01-01

    Genetic complete deficiency of the early complement components such as C1, C2 and C4 commonly results in a monogenetic form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, previous studies have examined groups of complete complement deficient subjects for SLE, while a familial SLE cohort has not been studied for deficiencies of complement. Thus, we undertook the present study to determine the frequency of hereditary complete complement deficiencies among families with two or more SLE patients. All SLE patients from 544 such families had CH50 determined. Medical records were examined for past CH50 values. There were 66 individuals in whom all available CH50 values were zero. All but four of these had an SLE-affected relative with a non-zero CH50; thus, these families did not have monogenic complement deficient related SLE. The four remaining SLE-affected subjects were in fact two sets of siblings in which 3 of the 4 SLE patients had onset of disease at <18 years of age. Both patients in one of these families had been determined to have C4 deficiency, while the other family had no clinical diagnosis of complement deficiency. In this second family, one of the SLE patients had had normal C4 and C3 values, indicating that either C1q or C2 deficiency was possible. Thus, only 2 of 544 SLE families had definite or possible complement deficiency; however, 1 of 7 families in which all SLE patients had pediatric onset and 2 of 85 families with at least 1 pediatric-onset SLE patent had complete complement deficiency. SLE is found commonly among families with hereditary complement deficiency but the reverse is not true. Complete complement deficiency is rare among families with two or more SLE patients, but is concentrated among families with onset of SLE prior to age 18. PMID:19910391

  1. Decorin deficiency promotes hepatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Zsolt; Kovalszky, Ilona; Fullár, Alexandra; Kiss, Katalin; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Iozzo, Renato V.; Baghy, Kornélia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma represents one of the most-rapidly spreading cancers in the world. In the majority of cases, an inflammation-driven fibrosis or cirrhosis precedes the development of the tumor. During malignant transformation, the tumor microenvironment undergoes qualitative and quantitative changes that modulate the behavior of the malignant cells. A key constituent for the hepatic microenvironment is the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin, known to interfere with cellular events of tumorigenesis mainly by blocking various receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) such as EGFR, Met, IGF-IR, PDGFR and VEGFR2. In this study, we characterized cell signaling events evoked by decorin deficiency in two experimental models of hepatocarcinogenesis using thioacetamide or diethyl nitrosamine as carcinogens. Genetic ablation of decorin led to enhanced tumor occurrence as compared to wild-type animals. These findings correlated with decreased levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and a concurrent elevation in retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation via cyclin dependent kinase 4. Decreased steady state p21Waf1/Cip1 levels correlated with enhanced expression of transcription factor AP4, a known transcriptional repressor of p21Waf1/Cip1, and enhanced c-Myc protein levels. In addition, translocation of β-catenin was a typical event in diethyl nitrosamine-evoked tumors. In parallel, decreased phosphorylation of both c-Myc and β-catenin was observed in Dcn−/− livers likely due to the hindered GSK3β-mediated targeting of these proteins to proteasomal degradation. We discovered that in a genetic background lacking decorin, four RTKs were constitutively activated (phosphorylated), including three known targets of decorin such as PDGFRα, EGFR, IGF-IR, and a novel RTK MSPR/RON. Our findings provide powerful genetic evidence for a crucial in vivo role of decorin during hepatocarcinogenesis as lack of decorin in the liver and hepatic stroma facilitates

  2. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1.

  3. [α1-Antitrypsin deficiency].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Toyohiro

    2016-05-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is the commonest genetic risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In 2015, AATD has been categorized as one of intractable diseases called "Nanbyo" in Japan. The prevalence of AATD is extremely low in Japanese compared with Caucasians in North America and Europe. According to recent nationwide epidemiological survey, the prevalence of AATD in Japan was estimated to be 24 patients with a 95% confidence interval. The mutation PI*S(iiyama) is commonly found in the Japanese patients with AATD, whereas PI*Z is the most frequent mutation associated with severe deficiency in Caucasians. The availability of AAT augmentation therapy in Japan is expected. This paper reviews the diagnosis and treatment in AATD. PMID:27254961

  4. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  5. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  6. Biochemical and functional characterization of the interaction between pentraxin 3 and C1q.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Alma J; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Salvatori, Giovanni; Kishore, Uday; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Gingras, Alexandre R; Tzima, Sotiria; Vivanco, Fernando; Egido, Jesús; Tijsma, Odette; Hack, Erik C; Daha, Mohamed R; Roos, Anja

    2003-02-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a recently characterized member of the pentraxin family of acute-phase proteins produced during inflammation. Classical short pentraxins, C-reactive protein, and serum amyloid P component can bind to C1q and thereby activate the classical complement pathway. Since PTX3 can also bind C1q, the present study was designed to define the interaction between PTX3 and C1q and to examine the functional consequences of this interaction. A dose-dependent binding of both C1q and the C1 complex to PTX3 was observed. Experiments with recombinant globular head domains of human C1q A, B, and C chains indicated that C1q interacts with PTX3 via its globular head region. Binding of C1q to immobilized PTX3 induced activation of the classical complement pathway as assessed by C4 deposition. Furthermore, PTX3 enhanced C1q binding and complement activation on apoptotic cells. However, in the fluid-phase, pre-incubation of PTX3 with C1q resulted in inhibition of complement activation by blocking the interaction of C1q with immunoglobulins. These results indicate that PTX3 can both inhibit and activate the classical complement pathway by binding C1q, depending on the way it is presented. PTX3 may therefore be involved in the regulation of the innate immune response.

  7. 26 CFR 1.673(c)-1 - Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. 1.673(c)-1 Section 1.673(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Substantial Owners § 1.673(c)-1 Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. The subject matter...

  8. 26 CFR 1.673(c)-1 - Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. 1.673(c)-1 Section 1.673(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Substantial Owners § 1.673(c)-1 Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. The subject matter...

  9. 26 CFR 1.673(c)-1 - Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. 1.673(c)-1 Section 1.673(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Substantial Owners § 1.673(c)-1 Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. The subject matter...

  10. 26 CFR 1.415(c)-1 - Limitations for defined contribution plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations for defined contribution plans. 1.415(c)-1 Section 1.415(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(c)-1 Limitations for defined contribution...

  11. 17 CFR 270.22c-1 - Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) (17 CFR 270.14a-3(b))) from selling or repurchasing Trust units in a secondary market at a price based... securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase. 270.22c-1 Section 270.22c-1 Commodity and Securities... 1940 § 270.22c-1 Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase. (a)...

  12. 17 CFR 270.22c-1 - Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) (17 CFR 270.14a-3(b))) from selling or repurchasing Trust units in a secondary market at a price based... securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase. 270.22c-1 Section 270.22c-1 Commodity and Securities... 1940 § 270.22c-1 Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase. (a)...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6323(c)-1 - Protection for commercial transactions financing agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... financing agreements. 301.6323(c)-1 Section 301.6323(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... General Provisions § 301.6323(c)-1 Protection for commercial transactions financing agreements. (a) In... financing agreement entered into before the tax lien filing, and (3) Is protected under local law against...

  14. 26 CFR 1.179C-1T - Election to expense certain refineries (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Election to expense certain refineries (temporary). 1.179C-1T Section 1.179C-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations (continued) § 1.179C-1T Election to...

  15. 26 CFR 1.503(c)-1 - Future status of organizations denied exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Future status of organizations denied exemption. 1.503(c)-1 Section 1.503(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.503(c)-1 Future status of organizations denied exemption. (a)...

  16. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.509(c)-1 Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. (a) In...

  17. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.509(c)-1 Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. (a) In...

  18. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.509(c)-1 Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. (a) In...

  19. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.509(c)-1 Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. (a) In...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  1. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  2. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. PMID:25419131

  3. Proteasome-mediated degradation antagonizes critical levels of the apoptosis-inducing C1D protein

    PubMed Central

    Rothbarth, Karsten; Stammer, Hermann; Werner, Dieter

    2002-01-01

    The C1D gene is expressed in a broad spectrum of mammalian cells and tissues but its product induces apoptotic cell death when exceeding a critical level. Critical levels are achieved in a fraction of cells by transient transfection with EGFP-tagged C1D expression constructs. However, transfected cells expressing sub-critical levels of C1D(EGFP) escape apoptotic cell death by activation of a proteasome-mediated rescue mechanism. Inhibition of the proteasome-dependent degradation of the C1D(EGFP) protein results in a parallel increase of the intracellular C1D level and in the fraction of apoptotic cells. PMID:12379155

  4. Iatrogenic angioedema associated with ACEi, sitagliptin, and deficiency of 3 enzymes catabolizing bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Beaudouin, E; Defendi, F; Picaud, J; Drouet, C; Ponard, D; Moneret-Vautrin, D A

    2014-05-01

    New concepts of idiopathic and iatrogenic angioedema underline the role of bradykinin, and the importance of catabolizing enzymes. A case is described of Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) and sitagliptin induced angioedema, where AO attacks decreased after the withdrawal of lisinopril but resolved only after the withdrawal of sitagliptin, an inhibitor of dipeptylpeptidase IV. ACE, aminopeptidase P and carboxypeptidase N were decreased down to 17%, 42%, 64% of median references values, and remained low one year after the interruption of these drugs: 56%, 28% and 50%, respectively. The combined deficiency of APP and CPN might enhance the inhibiting effect of the DPP IV inhibitor. The fact that this triple deficiency remained latent before and after the treatment indicates that searching for latent enzyme deficiencies should be carried out when there is intention to treat with a combination of drugs interfering with the bradykinin metabolism. PMID:24853572

  5. Complement components C1r/C1s, bone morphogenic protein 1 and Xenopus laevis developmentally regulated protein UVS.2 share common repeats.

    PubMed

    Bork, P

    1991-04-22

    Property patterns were constructed, based on an alignment of related domains in human complement subcomponents C1r and C1s as well as in the sea urchin protein uEGF. This kind of consensus pattern was able to identify similar domains in a human bone morphogenic protein, in a Xenopus laevis embryonal protein involved in dorsoanterior development and in a calcium-dependent serine protease secreted from malignant hamster embryo fibroblast cells. Because of the high level of overall sequence homology this protease may be the hamsters' equivalent of the human complement subcomponent C1s. The resulting multiple alignment of all studied domains suggests functionally and structurally important regions.

  6. C2 Deficiency DEVELOPMENT OF LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Day, Noorbibi K.; Geiger, H.; McLean, R.; Michael, A.; Good, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The study of serum from a patient with C2 deficiency is described. The patient had an episode of pneumococcal meningitis at 5 mo of age with seizures and transient hemiparesis and apparent purpuric skin lesions. He was first admitted to the University of Minnesota Hospitals at 10 yr of age following the discovery of proteinuria accidentally by his mother. Since then he has been admitted repeatedly to this hospital with numerous clinical findings including arthralgia, recurrent abdominal pain, proteinuria, membranous nephropathy, malar butterfly rash, seizures, personality aberrations, and recurrent fever. In June 1971, the patient developed positive DNA and DNP antibodies and positive LE cells. When the C profile was studied before and after recognition of lupus, C1q, C1s, and C4 dropped. C3 levels were elevated as were C5, C6, and C7, C3 proactivator had been reduced in the patient even before he developed lupus. Also because of a traumatic renal biopsy leading to a perirenal hematoma, he required surgery and a blood transfusion. 1 h after blood transfusion, a C2 titer of 23 hemolytic units was detected. Almost immediately levels of C3, C5, C6, and C7 dropped, C8 and C9 remained elevated. The addition of C2 from normal blood permitted dramatic activation of C3. These findings support the view that the rare deficiency in production of C2 predisposes to serious susceptibility to infection, vascular and mesenchymal disease as well as to renal disease and a lupus syndrome. Images PMID:4578155

  7. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  8. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  9. Disialotransferrin developmental deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansson, B; Andersson, M; Tonnby, B; Hagberg, B

    1989-01-01

    Seven mentally deficient children and adolescents (three pairs of siblings and one singleton) were studied. A peculiar external appearance, a characteristic neurohepatosubcutaneous tissue impairment syndrome and, as a biological marker, an abnormal sialic acid transferrin pattern were characteristic features. All seven seemed odd from birth and prone to acute cerebral dysfunction during catabolic states. Abnormal lower neurone, cerebellar, and retinal functions dominated from later childhood. The disialotransferrin pattern found in serum and cerebrospinal fluid is thought to be the biological marker of a newly discovered inborn error of glycoprotein metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 p74-b PMID:2466439

  10. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  11. New Compounds Induce Brassinosteroid Deficient-like Phenotypes in Rice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tadashi; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Ikuko; Yoshizawa, Yuko; Oh, Keimei

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroidal plant hormones with potent plant growth promoting activity. Because BR-deficient mutants of rice exhibit altered plant architecture and important agronomic traits, we conducted a systemic search for specific inhibitors of BR biosynthesis to manipulate the BR levels in plant tissues. Although previous studies have been conducted with BR biosynthesis inhibitors in dicots, little is known regarding the effects of BR biosynthesis inhibition in monocot plants. In this work, we used potent inhibitors of BR biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, and we performed a hydroponic culture of rice seedlings to evaluate the effects of BR biosynthesis inhibition. Among the test compounds, we found that 1-[[2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-4-(phenoxymethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl]methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole (1) is a potent inhibitor that could induce phenotypes in rice seedlings that were similar to those observed in brassinosteroid deficient plants. The IC50 value for the retardation of plant growth in rice seedlings was approximately 1.27 ± 0.43 μM. The IC50 value for reducing the bending angle of the lamina joint was approximately 0.55 ± 0.15 μM. PMID:27137391

  12. CT-based morphometric analysis of C1 laminar dimensions: C1 translaminar screw fixation is a feasible technique for salvage of atlantoaxial fusions

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Andrew; Lu, Derek; Lu, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Translaminar screw fixation has become an alternative in the fixation of the axial and subaxial cervical spine. We report utilization of this approach in the atlas as a salvage technique for atlantoaxial stabilization when C1 lateral mass screws are precluded. To assess the feasibility of translaminar fixation at the atlas, we have characterized the dimensions of the C1 lamina in the general adult population using computed tomography (CT)-based morphometry. Methods: A 46-year-old male with symptomatic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum underwent bilateral C1 and C2 translaminar screw/rod fixation as C1 lateral mass fixation was precluded by an anomalous vertebral artery. The follow-up evaluation 2½ years postoperatively revealed an asymptomatic patient without recurrent neck/shoulder pain or clinical signs of instability. To better assess the feasibility of utilizing this approach in the general population, we retrospectively analyzed 502 consecutive cervical CT scans performed over a 3-month period in patients aged over 18 years at a single institution. Measurements of C1 bicortical diameter, bilateral laminar length, height, and angulation were performed. Laminar and screw dimensions were compared to assess instrumentation feasibility. Results: Review of CT imaging found that 75.9% of C1 lamina had a sufficient bicortical diameter, and 63.7% of C1 lamina had sufficient height to accept bilateral translaminar screw placement. Conclusions: CT-based measurement of atlas morphology in the general population revealed that a majority of C1 lamina had sufficient dimensions to accept translaminar screw placement. Although these screws appear to be a feasible alternative when lateral mass screws are precluded, further research is required to determine if they provide comparable fixation strength versus traditional instrumentation methods. PMID:26005585

  13. Biodegradation and adsorption of C1- and C2-phenanthrenes and C1- and C2-dibenzothiophenes in the presence of clay minerals: effect on forensic diagnostic ratios.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Head, Ian M; Manning, David A C

    2014-07-01

    The impact of modified montmorillonites on adsorption and biodegradation of crude oil C1-phenanthrenes, C1-dibenzothiophenes, C2-phenanthrenes and C2-dibenzothiophenes was investigated in aqueous clay/oil microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. Consequently, the effect on C1-dibenzothiophenes/C1-phenanthrenes, C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes, 2+3-methyldibenzothiophene/4-methyldibenzothiophene and 1-methyldibenzothiophene/4-methyldibenzothiophene ratios commonly used as diagnostic ratios for oil forensic studies was evaluated. The clay mineral samples were treated to produce acid activated montmorillonite, organomontmorillonite and homoionic montmorillonite which were used in this study. The different clay minerals (modified and unmodified) showed varied degrees of biodegradation and adsorption of the C1-phenanthrenes, C1-dibenzothiophenes, C2-phenanthrenes and C2-dibenzothiophenes. The study indicated that as opposed to biodegradation, adsorption has no effect on the diagnostic ratios. Among the diagnostic ratios reviewed, only C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes ratio was neither affected by adsorption nor biodegradation making this ratio very useful in forensic studies of oil spills and oil-oil correlation.

  14. C1 metabolism plays an important role during formaldehyde metabolism and detoxification in petunia under liquid HCHO stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tang, Lijuan; Sun, Huiqun; Han, Shuang; Wang, Xinjia; Zhou, Shengen; Li, Kunzhi; Chen, Limei

    2014-10-01

    Petunia hybrida is a model ornamental plant grown worldwide. To understand the HCHO-uptake efficiency and metabolic mechanism of petunia, the aseptic petunia plants were treated in HCHO solutions. An analysis of HCHO-uptake showed that petunia plants effectively removed HCHO from 2, 4 and 6 mM HCHO solutions. The (13)C NMR analyses indicated that H(13)CHO was primarily used to synthesize [5-(13)C]methionine (Met) via C1 metabolism in petunia plants treated with 2 mM H(13)CHO. Pretreatment with cyclosporin A (CSA) or l-carnitine (LC), the inhibitors of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, did not affect the synthesis of [5-(13)C]Met in petunia plants under 2 mM H(13)CHO stress, indicating that the Met-generated pathway may function in the cytoplasm. Under 4 or 6 mM liquid H(13)CHO stress, H(13)CHO metabolism in petunia plants produced considerable amount of H(13)COOH and [2-(13)C]glycine (Gly) through C1 metabolism and a small amount of [U-(13)C]Gluc via the Calvin Cycle. Pretreatment with CSA or LC significantly inhibited the production of [2-(13)C]Gly in 6 mM H(13)CHO-treated petunia plants, which suggests that chloroplasts and peroxisomes might be involved in the generation of [2-(13)C]Gly. These results revealed that the C1 metabolism played an important role, whereas the Calvin Cycle had only a small contribution during HCHO metabolism and detoxification in petunia under liquid HCHO stress.

  15. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies.

  16. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies. PMID:8427203

  17. The importance of polarizability: comparison of models of carbon disulphide in the ionic liquids [C1C1im][NTf2] and [C4C1im][NTf2].

    PubMed

    Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Quitevis, Edward L

    2016-06-28

    The local environment of CS2 and in solution in two ionic liquids ([C1C1im][NTf2] and [C4C1im][NTf2]) are investigated by atomistic simulation and compared with that in neat CS2. The intermolecular vibrational densities of states of CS2 are calculated and compared with experimental OHD-RIKES spectra. The fair agreement of the results from solutions but poor agreement of the results from neat CS2 suggest that while collective effects are unimportant in solutions, they have a major effect on the OHD-RIKES spectrum of neat CS2. Comparing polarizable and unpolarizable models for CS2 emphasizes the importance of polarizability in determining local structure.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three ``D's'': diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation.

  19. Familial apolipoprotein E deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, E J; Gregg, R E; Ghiselli, G; Forte, T M; Ordovas, J M; Zech, L A; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    A unique kindred with premature cardiovascular disease, tubo-eruptive xanthomas, and type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) associated with familial apolipoprotein (apo) E deficiency was examined. Homozygotes (n = 4) had marked increases in cholesterol-rich very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL), which could be effectively lowered with diet and medication (niacin, clofibrate). Homozygotes had only trace amounts of plasma apoE, and accumulations of apoB-48 and apoA-IV in VLDL, IDL, and low density lipoproteins. Radioiodinated VLDL apoB and apoE kinetic studies revealed that the homozygous proband had markedly retarded fractional catabolism of VLDL apoB-100, apoB-48 and plasma apoE, as well as an extremely low apoE synthesis rate as compared to normals. Obligate heterozygotes (n = 10) generally had normal plasma lipids and mean plasma apoE concentrations that were 42% of normal. The data indicate that homozygous familial apoE deficiency is a cause of type III HLP, is associated with markedly decreased apoE production, and that apoE is essential for the normal catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein constituents. Images PMID:3771793

  20. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  1. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  2. HvPap-1 C1A Protease and HvCPI-2 Cystatin Contribute to Barley Grain Filling and Germination.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Dominguez-Figueroa, Jose D; Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; Cambra, Ines; Gonzalez-Melendi, Pablo; Lopez-Gonzalvez, Angeles; Garcia, Antonia; Hensel, Goetz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Proteolysis is an essential process throughout the mobilization of storage proteins in barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains during germination. It involves numerous types of enzymes, with C1A Cys proteases the most abundant key players. Manipulation of the proteolytic machinery is a potential way to enhance grain yield and quality, and it could influence the mobilization of storage compounds along germination. Transgenic barley plants silencing or over-expressing the cathepsin F-like HvPap-1 Cys protease show differential accumulation of storage molecules such as starch, proteins, and free amino acids in the grain. It is particularly striking that the HvPap-1 artificial microRNA lines phenotype show a drastic delay in the grain germination process. Alterations to the proteolytic activities in the over-expressing and knock-down grains associated with changes in the level of expression of several C1A peptidases were also detected. Similarly, down-regulating cystatin Icy-2, one of the proteinaceous inhibitors of the cathepsin F-like protease, also has important effects on grain filling. However, the ultimate physiological influence of manipulating a peptidase or an inhibitor cannot be always predicted, since the plant tries to compensate the modified proteolytic effects by modulating the expression of some other peptidases or their inhibitors.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency in HIV: a shadow on long-term management?

    PubMed

    Orkin, Chloe; Wohl, David A; Williams, Andrew; Deckx, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency in HIV infection has attracted much interest. The best known clinical outcomes of vitamin D deficiency are rickets (children) and osteomalacia (adults). Several non-skeletal disorders have also been linked to suboptimal vitamin D levels in the general population. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency varies widely (6-100%) across diverse patient populations, with no evidence that it is higher in HIV-positive versus noninfected adults. Vitamin D deficiency may blunt immune restoration and exacerbate HIV complications (e.g. opportunistic infections, poor perinatal outcomes, wasting, HIV disease progression, AIDS events, and death). The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz was associated with a relatively high risk of vitamin D deficiency; nevirapine, etravirine, and rilpivirine were noted to have less or no impact on vitamin D versus efavirenz in the limited data available. Protease inhibitors have either no or a low association with vitamin D deficiency. Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (with the possible exception of zidovudine) also did not appear to be associated with vitamin D deficiency. Management of vitamin D deficiency in HIV-positive adults has not been rigorously evaluated; some guidelines recommend more vitamin D supplementation for HIV-positive adults on antiretrovirals versus the general population (e.g. 2-3 times higher vitamin D daily intake for the age group; loading dose up to 10,000 IU/day for 8-10 weeks and a maintenance dose of 800-2,000 IU/day). In conclusion, although vitamin D deficiency in HIV-positive adults can be prevalent, current evidence for its causes and impact is relatively weak. More data, particularly from large, controlled, long-term trials, regarding the benefits of correcting vitamin D levels in HIV-positive adults are needed.

  4. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Deficiencies of Early Components of the Complement Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Catarina Lunz; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the innate and acquired immune response against pathogens. It consists of more than 30 proteins found in soluble form or attached to cell membranes. Most complement proteins circulate in inactive forms and can be sequentially activated by the classical, alternative, or lectin pathways. Biological functions, such as opsonization, removal of apoptotic cells, adjuvant function, activation of B lymphocytes, degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and solubilization and clearance of immune complex and cell lysis, are dependent on complement activation. Although the activation of the complement system is important to avoid infections, it also can contribute to the inflammatory response triggered by immune complex deposition in tissues in autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, the deficiency of early complement proteins from the classical pathway (CP) is strongly associated with development of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) – mainly C1q deficiency (93%) and C4 deficiency (75%). The aim of this review is to focus on the deficiencies of early components of the CP (C1q, C1r, C1s, C4, and C2) proteins in SLE patients. PMID:26941740

  5. [Vitamin deficiencies in breastfed children due to maternal dietary deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kollée, L A A

    2006-03-01

    Dietary deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation may result in health problems in exclusively breastfed infants. Vitamin-B12 deficiency in these infants results in irritability, anorexia and failure to thrive during the first 4-8 months of life. Severe and permanent neurodevelopmental disturbances may occur. The most at risk for vitamin-B12 deficiency are breast-fed infants ofveganist and vegetarian mothers. Mothers who cover their skin prevent exposure to the sun and may consequently be at risk for vitamin-D deficiency, as well as putting their offspring at risk. In prenatal and perinatal care, it is important to take the maternal dietary history in order to be able to prevent or treat these disorders. Guidelines for obstetrical and neonatal care should include the topic of vitamin deficiency.

  6. 3-Ketothiolase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Middleton, B; Bartlett, K; Romanos, A; Gomez Vazquez, J; Conde, C; Cannon, R A; Lipson, M; Sweetman, L; Nyhan, W L

    1986-04-01

    Two patients have been studied in whom the activity of the short chain-length-specific mitochondrial 3-ketothiolase was found to be deficient. Use of a range of 3-ketoacyl-CoA substrates showed that the other 3-ketothiolase isoenzymes were normal in each case. Both patients had episodic ketosis and metabolic acidosis. One patient had substantial evidence of damage to the central nervous system and two siblings who had died of the disease. The organic aciduria was characterized by the excretion of 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyric acid and tiglyglycine. In one patient the organic aciduria was very subtle and was masked during the presence of ketosis, but it was clarified by an isoleucine load after recovery from ketosis.

  7. Hereditary galactokinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. G. H.; Don, N. A.; Mann, Trevor P.

    1971-01-01

    A baby with galactokinase deficiency, a recessive inborn error of galactose metabolism, is described. The case is exceptional in that there was no evidence of gypsy blood in the family concerned. The investigation of neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia led to the discovery of galactosuria. As noted by others, the paucity of presenting features makes early diagnosis difficult, and detection by biochemical screening seems desirable. Cataract formation, of early onset, appears to be the only severe persisting complication and may be due to the biosynthesis and accumulation of galactitol in the lens. Ophthalmic surgeons need to be aware of this enzyme defect, because with early diagnosis and dietary treatment these lens changes should be reversible. PMID:5109408

  8. Peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P A; Chen, W W; Harris, C J; Hoefler, G; Hoefler, S; Blake, D C; Balfe, A; Kelley, R I; Moser, A B; Beard, M E

    1989-01-01

    Peroxisomal function was evaluated in a male infant with clinical features of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Very long chain fatty acid levels were elevated in both plasma and fibroblasts, and beta-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids in cultured fibroblasts was significantly impaired. Although the level of the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycoprostanoic acid was slightly elevated in plasma, phytanic acid and L-pipecolic acid levels were normal, as was plasmalogen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts. The latter three parameters distinguish this case from classical neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. In addition, electron microscopy and catalase subcellular distribution studies revealed that, in contrast to neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, peroxisomes were present in the patient's tissues. Immunoblot studies of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes revealed that the bifunctional enzyme (enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) was deficient in postmortem liver samples, whereas acyl-CoA oxidase and the mature form of beta-ketothiolase were present. Density gradient centrifugation of fibroblast homogenates confirmed that intact peroxisomes were present. Immunoblots of fibroblasts peroxisomal fractions showed that they contained acyl-CoA oxidase and beta-ketothiolase, but bifunctional enzyme was not detected. Northern analysis, however, revealed that mRNA coding for the bifunctional enzyme was present in the patient's fibroblasts. These results indicate that the primary biochemical defect in this patient is a deficiency of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme. It is of interest that the phenotype of this patient resembled neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and would not have been distinguished from this disorder by clinical study alone. Images PMID:2921319

  9. Functional C1q is present in the skin mucus of Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunxin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xuguang; Song, Jiakun

    2015-01-01

    The skin mucus of fish acts as the first line of self-protection against pathogens in the aquatic environment and comprises a number of innate immune components. However, the presence of the critical classical complement component C1q, which links the innate and adaptive immune systems of mammalians, has not been explored in a primitive actinopterygian fish. In this study, we report that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii). The skin mucus was able to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli. The bacteriostatic activity of the skin mucus was reduced by heating and by pre-incubation with EDTA or mouse anti-human C1q antibody. We also detected C1q protein in skin mucus using the western blot procedure and isolated a cDNA that encodes the Siberian sturgeon C1qC, which had 44.7-51.4% identity with C1qCs in teleosts and tetrapods. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Siberian sturgeon C1qC lies at the root of the actinopterygian branch and is separate from the tetrapod branch. The C1qC transcript was expressed in many tissues as well as in skin. Our data indicate that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon to protect against water-borne bacteria, and the C1qC found in the sturgeon may represent the primitive form of teleost and tetrapod C1qCs.

  10. The C1q Family of Proteins: Insights into the Emerging Non-Traditional Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage-modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders – including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia, and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh et al. (2011) showing that pregnant C1q−/− mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q−/− mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al. (2009) which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1) and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand, enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNF-α-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the tumor necrosis factor family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral “cytokine-like” activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions. PMID:22536204

  11. Multiple mechanisms limit the accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in the small intestine of mice deficient in both ACAT2 and ABCA1.

    PubMed

    Turley, Stephen D; Valasek, Mark A; Repa, Joyce J; Dietschy, John M

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis in the enterocyte is regulated by the interplay of multiple genes that ultimately determines the net amount of cholesterol reaching the circulation from the small intestine. The effect of deleting these genes, particularly acyl CoA:cholesterol acyl transferase 2 (ACAT2), on cholesterol absorption and fecal sterol excretion is well documented. We also know that the intestinal mRNA level for adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) increases in Acat2(-/-) mice. However, none of these studies has specifically addressed how ACAT2 deficiency impacts the relative proportions of esterified and unesterified cholesterol (UC) in the enterocyte and whether the concurrent loss of ABCA1 might result in a marked buildup of UC. Therefore, the present studies measured the expression of numerous genes and related metabolic parameters in the intestine and liver of ACAT2-deficient mice fed diets containing either added cholesterol or ezetimibe, a selective sterol absorption inhibitor. Cholesterol feeding raised the concentration of UC in the small intestine, and this was accompanied by a significant reduction in the relative mRNA level for Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and an increase in the mRNA level for both ABCA1 and ABCG5/8. All these changes were reversed by ezetimibe. When mice deficient in both ACAT2 and ABCA1 were fed a high-cholesterol diet, the increase in intestinal UC levels was no greater than it was in mice lacking only ACAT2. This resulted from a combination of compensatory mechanisms including diminished NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake, increased cholesterol efflux via ABCG5/8, and possibly rapid cell turnover.

  12. SOCS1 and SOCS3 Are Targeted by Hepatitis C Virus Core/gC1qR Ligation To Inhibit T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi Qiang; Waggoner, Stephen N.; Cruise, Michael W.; Hall, Caroline; Xie, Xuefang; Oldach, David W.; Hahn, Young S.

    2005-01-01

    T cells play an important role in the control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We have previously demonstrated that the HCV core inhibits T-cell responses through interaction with gC1qR. We show here that core proteins from chronic and resolved HCV patients differ in sequence, gC1qR-binding ability, and T-cell inhibition. Specifically, chronic core isolates bind to gC1qR more efficiently and inhibit T-cell proliferation as well as gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production more profoundly than resolved core isolates. This inhibition is mediated by the disruption of STAT phosphorylation through the induction of SOCS molecules. Silencing either SOCS1 or SOCS3 by small interfering RNA dramatically augments the production of IFN-γ in T cells, thereby abrogating the inhibitory effect of core. Additionally, the ability of core proteins from patients with chronic infections to induce SOCS proteins and suppress STAT activation greatly exceeds that of core proteins from patients with resolved infections. These results suggest that the HCV core/gC1qR-induced T-cell dysfunction involves the induction of SOCS, a powerful inhibitor of cytokine signaling, which represents a novel mechanism by which a virus usurps the host machinery for persistence. PMID:16306613

  13. Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and basic skills deficiencies are discussed in 12 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching. Titles and authors are as follows: "Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies" (Susanne D. Roueche, with responses by Gary B. Donart, Betty Harris, and James Nordyke); "Is Higher Education an…

  14. Aromatase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Hero, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Reports published in the 1990s of men with estrogen deficiency caused by defective aromatase or estrogen resistance due to a defective estrogen receptor α confirmed the crucial role of estrogen in bone maturation, closure of the epiphyses and cessation of statural growth. Based on these findings, it became reasonable to postulate that selective inhibition of estrogen synthesis with aromatase inhibitors could increase adult height by delaying bone maturation and prolonging the period of growth in males. To date, aromatase inhibitors have been employed in rare pediatric conditions associated with sex steroid excess, and in randomized controlled trials involving boys with short stature and/or constitutional delay of puberty. Findings from these randomized trials suggest that potent aromatase inhibitors increase predicted height, but final adult height data are scarce. Moreover, several safety issues remain inadequately studied. In this paper, published findings on the use of aromatase inhibitors in growth indications are reviewed with emphasis on treatment efficacy and safety.

  15. Committee Opinion No. 663 Summary: Aromatase Inhibitors in Gynecologic Practice.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, ovulation induction, endometriosis, and other estrogen-modulated conditions. For women with breast cancer, bone mineral density screening is recommended with long-term aromatase inhibitor use because of risk of osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency. Based on long-term adverse effects and complication safety data, when compared with tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors are associated with a reduced incidence of thrombosis, endometrial cancer, and vaginal bleeding. For women with polycystic ovary syndrome and a body mass index greater than 30, letrozole should be considered as first-line therapy for ovulation induction because of the increased live birth rate compared with clomiphene citrate. Lifestyle changes that result in weight loss should be strongly encouraged. Aromatase inhibitors are a promising therapeutic option that may be helpful for the management of endometriosis-associated pain in combination therapy with progestins. PMID:27214185

  16. Committee Opinion No. 663: Aromatase Inhibitors in Gynecologic Practice.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, ovulation induction, endometriosis, and other estrogen-modulated conditions. For women with breast cancer, bone mineral density screening is recommended with long-term aromatase inhibitor use because of risk of osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency. Based on long-term adverse effects and complication safety data, when compared with tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors are associated with a reduced incidence of thrombosis, endometrial cancer, and vaginal bleeding. For women with polycystic ovary syndrome and a body mass index greater than 30, letrozole should be considered as first-line therapy for ovulation induction because of the increased live birth rate compared with clomiphene citrate. Lifestyle changes that result in weight loss should be strongly encouraged. Aromatase inhibitors are a promising therapeutic option that may be helpful for the management of endometriosis-associated pain in combination therapy with progestins. PMID:27214191

  17. Differential diagnosis of human ascites: inhibitors of the contact system and total proteins.

    PubMed

    Buø, L; Karlsrud, T S; Dyrhaug, G; Jacobsen, M B; Bell, H; Johansen, H T; Aasen, A O

    1993-09-01

    To assess their accuracies as markers for malignancy, we assayed alpha 2-macroglobulin, C1-inhibitor, alpha 1-protease inhibitor, and total proteins in ascites and plasma from patients with gastrointestinal cancer (n = 15) and non-malignant liver disease (n = 13), using functional and immunologic assays. For all inhibitors and total proteins determined in ascites, the values in the cancer group were significantly higher than the corresponding values in the group with non-malignant liver disease. The diagnostic accuracy for differentiating malignancy-related from non-malignant ascites was 93% for a alpha 1-protease inhibitor value > or = 50% of the pool plasma value and 90% for alpha 2-macroglobulin > or = 16%, C1-inhibitor > or = 40% (all functional assays), and total proteins > or = 20 g/l (biuret). In conclusion, functional assays for alpha 2-macroglobulin, C1-inhibitor, and alpha 1-protease inhibitor and determination of total proteins in ascites appeared to be very informative tests for the differential diagnosis of ascites. The test for alpha 1-protease inhibitor gave higher specificity (92% versus 77%) and likelihood ratio for a positive test (12 versus 4) compared with the other tests.

  18. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(1)-1 - Agricultural labor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agricultural labor. 31.3306(c)(1)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) §...

  19. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(1)-1 - Agricultural labor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agricultural labor. 31.3306(c)(1)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) §...

  20. 17 CFR 240.15c1-9 - Use of pro forma balance sheets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Use of pro forma balance sheets. 240.15c1-9 Section 240.15c1-9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... pro forma balance sheets. The term manipulative, deceptive, or other fraudulent device or...

  1. 17 CFR 240.15c1-9 - Use of pro forma balance sheets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of pro forma balance sheets. 240.15c1-9 Section 240.15c1-9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... pro forma balance sheets. The term manipulative, deceptive, or other fraudulent device or...

  2. 17 CFR 240.15c1-9 - Use of pro forma balance sheets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of pro forma balance sheets. 240.15c1-9 Section 240.15c1-9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... pro forma balance sheets. The term manipulative, deceptive, or other fraudulent device or...

  3. 17 CFR 240.15c1-9 - Use of pro forma balance sheets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of pro forma balance sheets. 240.15c1-9 Section 240.15c1-9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... pro forma balance sheets. The term manipulative, deceptive, or other fraudulent device or...

  4. 17 CFR 240.15c1-9 - Use of pro forma balance sheets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of pro forma balance sheets. 240.15c1-9 Section 240.15c1-9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... pro forma balance sheets. The term manipulative, deceptive, or other fraudulent device or...

  5. Hawking’s singularity theorem for C1,1-metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunzinger, Michael; Steinbauer, Roland; Stojković, Milena; Vickers, James A.

    2015-04-01

    We provide a detailed proof of Hawking’s singularity theorem in the regularity class {{C}1,1}, i.e., for spacetime metrics possessing locally Lipschitz continuous first derivatives. The proof uses recent results in {{C}1,1}-causality theory and is based on regularisation techniques adapted to the causal structure.

  6. Generalized van der Waals Hamiltonian: periodic orbits and C1 nonintegrability.

    PubMed

    Guirao, Juan L G; Llibre, Jaume; Vera, Juan A

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the periodic orbits of the generalized van der Waals Hamiltonian system. The tool for studying such periodic orbits is the averaging theory. Moreover, for this Hamiltonian system we provide information on its C(1) nonintegrability, i.e., on the existence of a second first integral of class C(1).

  7. 26 CFR 1.503(c)-1 - Future status of organizations denied exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Future status of organizations denied exemption. 1.503(c)-1 Section 1.503(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... notified the Commissioner that it is applying for recognition of its exempt status under section 508(a)...

  8. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... recognition of section 501(c)(3) status pursuant to the provisions of section 508(a). (b) Effect upon...

  9. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-1 - Electing small business trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electing small business trust. 1.641(c)-1... small business trust. (a) In general. An electing small business trust (ESBT) within the meaning of... meaning of section 642(c)(1). The limitations of section 681, regarding unrelated business income,...

  10. Variation of NimC1 expression in Drosophila stocks and transgenic strains

    PubMed Central

    Honti, Viktor; Cinege, Gyöngyi; Csordás, Gábor; Kurucz, Éva; Zsámboki, János; Evans, Cory J; Banerjee, Utpal; Andó, István

    2013-01-01

    The NimC1 molecule has been described as a phagocytosis receptor, and is being used as a marker for professional phagocytes, the plasmatocytes, in Drosophila melanogaster. In studies including tumor-biology, developmental biology, and cell mediated immunity, monoclonal antibodies (P1a and P1b) to the NimC1 antigen are used. As we observed that these antibodies did not react with plasmatocytes of several strains and genetic combinations, a molecular analysis was performed on the structure of the nimC1 gene. In these strains we found 2 deletions and an insertion within the nimC1 gene, which may result in the production of a truncated NimC1 protein. The NimC1 positivity was regained by recombining the mutation with a wild-type allele or by using nimC1 mutant lines under heterozygous conditions. By means of these procedures or using the recombined stock, NimC1 can be used as a marker for phagocytic cells in the majority of the possible genetic backgrounds. PMID:23899817

  11. 17 CFR 270.23c-1 - Repurchase of securities by closed-end companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Repurchase of securities by closed-end companies. 270.23c-1 Section 270.23c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Repurchase of securities by closed-end companies. (a) A registered closed-end company may purchase for cash...

  12. 17 CFR 270.23c-1 - Repurchase of securities by closed-end companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Repurchase of securities by closed-end companies. 270.23c-1 Section 270.23c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Repurchase of securities by closed-end companies. (a) A registered closed-end company may purchase for cash...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6104(c)-1 - Disclosure of certain information to State officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure of certain information to State officers. 301.6104(c)-1 Section 301.6104(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...) of this section, the Internal Revenue Service will notify the Attorney General and the principal...

  14. 26 CFR 1.475(c)-1 - Definitions-dealer in securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions-dealer in securities. 1.475(c)-1 Section 1.475(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... a manner that allows recognition of unrealized gains or losses or deductions for additions to...

  15. 26 CFR 1.267(c)-1 - Constructive ownership of stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constructive ownership of stock. 1.267(c)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.267(c)-1 Constructive ownership of stock. (a) In general. (1) The determination of stock ownership for purposes of section 267(b) shall be...

  16. DYX1C1 is required for axonemal dynein assembly and ciliary motility

    PubMed Central

    Tarkar, Aarti; Loges, Niki T.; Slagle, Christopher E.; Francis, Richard; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Tamayo, Joel V.; Shook, Brett; Cantino, Marie; Schwartz, Daniel; Jahnke, Charlotte; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Raidt, Johanna; Pennekamp, Petra; Abouhamed, Marouan; Hjeij, Rim; Köhler, Gabriele; Griese, Matthias; Li, You; Lemke, Kristi; Klena, Nikolas; Liu, Xiaoqin; Gabriel, George; Tobita, Kimimasa; Jaspers, Martine; Morgan, Lucy C.; Shapiro, Adam J.; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Mans, Dorus A.; Carson, Johnny L.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Wolf, Whitney E.; Chen, Serafine; Lucas, Jane S.; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Plagnol, Vincent; Schmidts, Miriam; Boldt, Karsten; Roepman, Ronald; Zariwala, Maimoona; Lo, Cecilia W.; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Knowles, Michael R.; Burdine, Rebecca D.; LoTurco, Joseph J.; Omran, Heymut

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dyx1c1 has been associated with dyslexia and neuronal migration in the developing neocortex. Unexpectedly, we found that deletion of Dyx1c1 exons 2–4 in mice caused a phenotype resembling primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by chronic airway disease, laterality defects, and male infertility. This phenotype was confirmed independently in mice with a Dyx1c1c.T2A start codon mutation recovered from an ENU mutagenesis screen. Morpholinos targeting dyx1c1 in zebrafish also created laterality and ciliary motility defects. In humans, recessive loss-of-function DYX1C1 mutations were identified in twelve PCD individuals. Ultrastructural and immunofluorescence analyses of DYX1C1-mutant motile cilia in mice and humans revealed disruptions of outer and inner dynein arms (ODA/IDA). DYX1C1 localizes to the cytoplasm of respiratory epithelial cells, its interactome is enriched for molecular chaperones, and it interacts with the cytoplasmic ODA/IDA assembly factor DNAAF2/KTU. Thus, we propose that DYX1C1 is a newly identified dynein axonemal assembly factor (DNAAF4). PMID:23872636

  17. 18 CFR 1c.1 - Prohibition of natural gas market manipulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prohibition of natural gas market manipulation. 1c.1 Section 1c.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES PROHIBITION OF ENERGY MARKET MANIPULATION §...

  18. 18 CFR 1c.1 - Prohibition of natural gas market manipulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prohibition of natural gas market manipulation. 1c.1 Section 1c.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES PROHIBITION OF ENERGY MARKET MANIPULATION §...

  19. 18 CFR 1c.1 - Prohibition of natural gas market manipulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prohibition of natural gas market manipulation. 1c.1 Section 1c.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES PROHIBITION OF ENERGY MARKET MANIPULATION §...

  20. 18 CFR 1c.1 - Prohibition of natural gas market manipulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibition of natural gas market manipulation. 1c.1 Section 1c.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES PROHIBITION OF ENERGY MARKET MANIPULATION §...

  1. Assessment of the relative contribution of different protease inhibitors to the inhibition of plasmin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Roem, D; Kamp, A M; de Boer, J P; Hack, C E; ten Cate, J W

    1993-02-01

    It has been shown that the most important inhibitor of plasmin is alpha 2-antiplasmin, however, other protease inhibitors are able to inhibit this proteolytic enzyme as well. The contribution of the various protease inhibitors to the inhibition of plasmin in vivo has never been quantitatively assessed. To assess the relative contribution of the different protease inhibitors on the inhibition of plasmin we developed a series of sensitive immunoassays for the detection of complexes between plasmin and the protease inhibitors alpha 2-antiplasmin, alpha 2-macroglobulin, antithrombin III, alpha 1-antitrypsin and C1-inhibitor, utilizing monoclonal antibodies that are specifically directed against complexed protease inhibitors and a monoclonal antibody against plasmin. It was confirmed that alpha 2-antiplasmin is the most important inhibitor of plasmin in vivo, however, complexes of plasmin with alpha 2-macroglobulin, antithrombin III, alpha 1-antitrypsin- and C1-inhibitor were also detected. Particularly during activation of fibrinolysis complexes between plasmin and inhibitors other than alpha 2-antiplasmin were detected. It was observed that during different situations the inhibition profile of plasmin was not constant e.g. in patients with diffuse intravascular coagulation plasma levels of plasmin-alpha 1-antitrypsin and plasmin-C1-inhibitor were increased whereas in plasma from patients who were treated with thrombolytic agents complexes of plasmin with alpha 2-macroglobulin and with antithrombin III were significantly elevated. In conclusion, we confirmed the important role of alpha 2-antiplasmin in the inhibition of plasmin, however, in situations in which fibrinolysis is activated other protease inhibitors also account for the inhibition of plasmin in vivo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Urease Inhibitor Drug Treatment for Urea Cycle Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency; Argininosuccinate Synthetase Deficiency (Citrullinemia); Argininosuccinic Acid Lyase Deficiency (Argininosuccinic Aciduria); Carbamyl-Phosphate Synthase I Deficiency

  3. Frequency of specific coagulation inhibitors and antiphospholipid antibodies in Tunisian haemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    Kraiem, Imen; Hadhri, Samira; El Omri, Halima; Sassi, Raja; Chaabani, Wiem; Ennabli, Souad; Skouri, Hadef

    2012-01-01

    Production of factor VIII or factor IX inhibitors is a major complication limiting the efficiency of substitutive therapy in haemophiliacs. Moreover, viral infections, the second serious complication of replacement therapy, may be associated to the occurrence of antiphospholipid antibodies which paradoxically lead to thrombosis. We investigated the prevalence of coagulation inhibitors (factor VIII and factor IX inhibitors, antiphospholipid antibodies) in Tunisian haemophiliacs, and we assessed concomitant coagulation factor deficiencies. Thirty-two previously treated haemophiliacs (20 haemophiliacs A; 12 haemophiliacs B) were screened for factor VIII and factor IX inhibitors by APTT mixing study, Bethesda test and modified Nijmegen method, and investigated for the presence of anticardiolipin, anti-β2 glycoprotein I, lupus anticoagulant and associated coagulation factors deficiencies. The frequency of factor VIII and factor IX inhibitors was low (5%) in contrast to the high prevalence of antiphospholipid antibodies (28.1%). Four and nine patients were positive for anticardiolipin and anti-β2 glycoprotein I, respectively. No lupus anticoagulant was detected. The prevalence of antiphospholipid antibodies was higher in patients with positive hepatitis C virus infection serology as compared to patients with negative serology (41.6% vs. 20%). Concomitant factor VII and/or factor V deficiency was found in 10 patients. In conclusion, the occurrence of factor VIII and factor IX inhibitors is rare among Tunisian haemophiliacs. The clinical relevance of antiphospholipid antibodies requires further investigations. We emphasize the importance of screening for concomitant deficiencies in haemophiliacs when the clinical presentation is suggestive. PMID:23207810

  4. Developmental delay in motor skill acquisition in Niemann-Pick C1 mice reveals abnormal cerebellar morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Paola; Bruno, Francesco; Palladino, Giampiero; Dragotto, Jessica; Petrosini, Laura; Mangia, Franco; Erickson, Robert P; Canterini, Sonia; Fiorenza, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by defective intracellular trafficking of exogenous cholesterol. Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration is the main sign of cerebellar dysfunction in both NPC1 patients and animal models. It has been recently shown that a significant decrease in Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression reduces the proliferative potential of granule neuron precursors in the developing cerebellum of Npc1 (-/-) mice. Pursuing the hypothesis that this developmental defect translates into functional impairments, we have assayed Npc1-deficient pups belonging to the milder mutant mouse strain Npc1 (nmf164) for sensorimotor development from postnatal day (PN) 3 to PN21. Npc1 (nmf164) / Npc1 (nmf164) pups displayed a 2.5-day delay in the acquisition of complex motor abilities compared to wild-type (wt) littermates, in agreement with the significant disorganization of cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture observed between PN11 and PN15. Compared to wt, Npc1 (nmf164) homozygous mice exhibited a poorer morphological differentiation of Bergmann glia (BG), as indicated by thicker radial shafts and less elaborate reticular pattern of lateral processes. Also BG functional development was defective, as indicated by the significant reduction in GLAST and Glutamine synthetase expression. A reduced VGluT2 and GAD65 expression also indicated an overall derangement of the glutamatergic/GABAergic stimulation that PCs receive by climbing/parallel fibers and basket/stellate cells, respectively. Lastly, Npc1-deficiency also affected oligodendrocyte differentiation as indicated by the strong reduction of myelin basic protein. Two sequential 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin administrations at PN4 and PN7 counteract these defects, partially preventing functional impairment of BG and fully restoring the normal patterns of glutamatergic/GABAergic stimulation to PCs.These findings indicate that in Npc1 (nmf164) homozygous mice the derangement of synaptic

  5. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  6. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. )

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  7. Complete genome sequence and transcription profiles of the rock bream iridovirus RBIV-C1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-Cun; Zhang, Min; Sun, Bo-Guang; Fang, Yong; Xiao, Zhi-Zhong; Sun, Li

    2013-06-13

    The family Iridoviridae consists of 5 genera of double-stranded DNA viruses, including the genus Megalocytivirus, which contains species that are important fish pathogens. In a previous study, we isolated the first rock bream iridovirus from China (RBIV-C1) and identified it as a member of the genus Megalocytivirus. In this report, we determined the complete genomic sequence of RBIV-C1 and examined its in vivo expression profiles. The genome of RBIV-C1 is 112333 bp in length, with a GC content of 55% and a coding density of 92%. RBIV-C1 contains 4584 simple sequence repeats, 89.8% of which are distributed among coding regions. A total of 119 potential open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in RBIV-C1, including the 26 core iridovirus genes; 41 ORFs encode proteins that are predicted to be associated with essential biological functions. RBIV-C1 exhibits the highest degree of sequence conservation and colinear arrangement of genes with orange-spotted grouper iridovirus (OSGIV) and rock bream iridovirus (RBIV). The pairwise nucleotide identities are 99.49% between RBIV-C1 and OSGIV and 98.69% between RBIV-C1 and RBIV. Compared to OSGIV, RBIV-C1 contains 11 insertions, 13 deletions, and 103 single nucleotide mutations. Whole-genome transcription analysis showed that following experimental infection of rock bream with RBIV-C1, all but 1 of the 119 ORFs were expressed at different time points and clustered into 3 hierarchical groups based on their expression patterns. These results provide new insights into the genetic nature and gene expression features of megalocytiviruses.

  8. Interaction between complement subcomponent C1q and the Klebsiella pneumoniae porin OmpK36.

    PubMed Central

    Albertí, S; Marqués, G; Hernández-Allés, S; Rubires, X; Tomás, J M; Vivanco, F; Benedí, V J

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between C1q, a subcomponent of the complement classical pathway component C1, and OmpK36, a porin protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae, was studied in a solid-phase direct-binding assay, inhibition assays with the purified globular and collagen-like regions of C1q, and cross-linking experiments. We have shown that the binding of C1q to the OmpK36 porin of the serum-sensitive strain K. pneumoniae KT707 occurs in an in vivo situation and that this binding leads to activation of the complement classical pathway and the subsequent deposition of complement components C3b and C5b-9 on the OmpK36 porin. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [125I]C1q to the OmpK36 porin showed two binding sites with dissociation constants of 1.5 and 75 nM. The decrease of [125I]C1q binding to the OmpK36 porin in buffer with increasing salt concentrations and the pIs of the C1q subcomponent (10.3) and OmpK36 porin (4.5) suggest that charged amino acids are involved in the binding phenomenon. In inhibition assays, only the globular regions of C1q inhibited the interaction between C1q and OmpK36 porin, demonstrating that C1q binds to porin through its globular region and not through the collagen-like stalks. PMID:8890231

  9. Exponential Decay of Correlations for Nonuniformly Hyperbolic Flows with a ${{C(1+alpha}}) $ C 1 + α Stable Foliation, Including the Classical Lorenz Attractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Vitor; Melbourne, Ian

    2016-11-01

    We prove exponential decay of correlations for a class of $C^{1+\\alpha}$ uniformly hyperbolic skew product flows, subject to a uniform nonintegrability condition. In particular, this establishes exponential decay of correlations for an open set of geometric Lorenz attractors. As a special case, we show that the classical Lorenz attractor is robustly exponentially mixing.

  10. 75 FR 34956 - Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... AD would require a one-time inspection of the flap operating system for an unauthorized latch plate design installation. This proposed AD results from a report of a latch plate failing in service that was.... Discussion We have received a report of a latch plate supplied under part number (P/N) C1-CF-1489 failing...

  11. Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02-silenced transgenic carrot plants show reduced allergenicity to patients with carrot allergy.

    PubMed

    Peters, Susanna; Imani, Jafargholi; Mahler, Vera; Foetisch, Kay; Kaul, Susanne; Paulus, Kathrin E; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2011-06-01

    Pathogenesis-related protein-10 (PR10) is a ubiquitous small plant protein induced by microbial pathogens and abiotic stress that adversely contributes to the allergenic potency of many fruits and vegetables, including carrot. In this plant, two highly similar genes encoding PR10 isoforms have been isolated and designated as allergen Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02. The aim of the study was to generate PR10-reduced hypoallergenic carrots by silencing either one of these genes in transgenic carrots by means of RNA interference (RNAi). The efficiency of gene silencing by stably expressed hairpin RNA (hnRNA) was documented by means of quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) and immunoblotting. Quantification of the residual protein revealed that PR10 accumulation was strongly decreased compared with untransformed controls. Treatment of carrot plants with the PR protein-inducing chemical salicylic acid resulted in an increase of PR10 isoforms only in wild-type but not in Dau c 1-silenced mutants. The decrease of the allergenic potential in Dau c 1-silenced plants was sufficient to cause a reduced allergenic reactivity in patients with carrot allergy, as determined with skin prick tests (SPT). However, simultaneous silencing of multiple allergens will be required to design hypoallergenic carrots for the market. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of creating low-allergenic food by using RNAi. This constitutes a reasonable approach to allergen avoidance.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  14. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an inherited disease. "Inherited" ... have AAT deficiency inherit two faulty AAT genes, one from each parent. These genes tell cells in ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein C deficiency protein C deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein C deficiency is a disorder that increases the ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: protein S deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein S deficiency protein S deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein S deficiency is a disorder of blood clotting. People ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  18. Acute mesenteric and aortic thrombosis associated with antithrombin deficiency: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Domenico; Martin, Jeremiah T; Ferneini, Antoine M; De Natale, Ralph W

    2010-04-01

    Antithrombin is a potent inhibitor of the coagulation cascade exerting its primary effects on activated factors X, IX and II. It is the mechanism by which heparin and low-molecular weight heparin cause anti-coagulation. Deficiency of antithrombin presents as a hypercoagulable state, and may result in unexplained deep venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis and systemic embolization.

  19. Four C1q domain-containing proteins involved in the innate immune response in Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling-Ling; Jin, Min; Li, Xin-Cang; Ren, Qian; Lan, Jiang-Feng

    2016-08-01

    C1q is a key subcomponent of the complement C1 complex. This subcomponent contains a globular C1q (gC1q) domain with remarkable ligand binding properties. C1q domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins are composed of all proteins with a gC1q domain. C1qDC proteins exist in many invertebrates and recognize non-self-ligands. In our study, four C1qDC genes, namely, HcC1qDC1-HcC1qDC4, were identified from Hyriopsis cumingii. HcC1qDC1-HcC1qDC4 encode a protein of 224, 204, 305, and 332 amino acids, respectively. All C1qDC proteins consist of a gC1q domain at the C terminal. In addition to the gC1q domain, a coiled-coil region is found in HcC1qDC4. Multiple alignments and phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the C1qDC proteins highly differ from one another. Tissue distribution analysis demonstrated that HcC1qDC1-HcC1qDC4 are widely distributed in hemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, mantle, and foot. These C1qDC genes are regulated by bacteria to varying degrees. These recombinant HcC1qDC proteins exhibit a binding activity against different bacterial species. Our results may suggest the roles of HcC1qDC genes in anti-bacterial immune defense. PMID:27288256

  20. [Iodine deficiency during pregnancy ].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D A; Aller, R; Izaola, O

    2005-09-01

    Iodine is an essential micronutrient, it would be administered every day with our diet. The main role of this micronutrient is the synthesis of thyroid hormone. Thyroid hormones are related with brain development and metabolic regulation. Iodine deficit is related with goitre, and an important problem "diseases related with iodine deficiency", including high rate of neonatal mortality, decrease of intelligence, delayed of growth, high rate of aborts and congenital abnormalities.A risk group is pregnant women. Some authors have been demonstrated the utility of iodine supplementation during pregnancy. A systematic review of Cochrane group has shown that iodine supplementation during pregnancy decreased neonatal mortality RR 0.71 (0.56-0.9), and decrease the incidence of cretinism in children under 4 years RR 0.27 (0.12-0.6). As final recommendations, a program in pregnant women must be development to treat with iodine such as we make with folic acid. Pills with iron and iodine (1 mg iron and 25 ug iodine) have been demonstrated better results that pills with iodine. Tablets are the main presentation due to the role of the women in our Society and the work time. Programs of iodine enriched salt have been demonstrated a follow up of 50%. PMID:16386080

  1. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Greene, Catherine M; Marciniak, Stefan J; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Brantly, Mark L; Lomas, David A; Stoller, James K; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in SERPINA1, leading to liver and lung disease. It is not a rare disorder but frequently goes underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or cryptogenic liver disease. The most frequent disease-associated mutations include the S allele and the Z allele of SERPINA1, which lead to the accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin in hepatocytes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, low circulating levels of α1-antitrypsin and liver disease. Currently, there is no cure for severe liver disease and the only management option is liver transplantation when liver failure is life-threatening. A1ATD-associated lung disease predominately occurs in adults and is caused principally by inadequate protease inhibition. Treatment of A1ATD-associated lung disease includes standard therapies that are also used for the treatment of COPD, in addition to the use of augmentation therapy (that is, infusions of human plasma-derived, purified α1-antitrypsin). New therapies that target the misfolded α1-antitrypsin or attempt to correct the underlying genetic mutation are currently under development. PMID:27465791

  2. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  3. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  4. Betaine Deficiency in Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Lerma, Claudia; Rich, Patrick J.; Ju, Grace C.; Yang, Wen-Ju; Hanson, Andrew D.; Rhodes, David

    1991-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency (D Rhodes, PJ Rich [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 102-108). This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline → betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde. PMID:16668098

  5. Prolidase deficiency breaks tolerance to lupus-associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Dsouza, Anil; Kurien, Biji T.; Bruner, Benjamin F.; Gross, Timothy; James, Judith A; Targoff, Ira N.; Maier-Moore, Jacen S.; Harley, Isaac T.W.; Wang, Heng; Scofield, R. Hal

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolidase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease in which one of the last steps of collagen metabolism, cleavage of proline-containing dipeptides, is impaired. Only about 93 patients have been reported with about 10% also having systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods We studied a large extended Amish pedigree with four prolidase deficiency patients and three heterozygous individuals for lupus-associated autoimmunity. Eight unaffected Amish children served as normal controls. Prolidase genetics and enzyme activity were confirmed. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were determined using indirect immunofluorescence and antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens were determined by various methods, including double immunodiffusion, immunoprecipitation and multiplex bead assay. Serum C1q levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Two of the four homozygous prolidase deficiency subjects had a positive ANA. One had anti-double-stranded DNA, while another had precipitating anti-Ro. By the simultaneous microbead assay, three of the four had anti-Sm and anti-chromatin. One of the three heterozygous subjects had a positive ANA and immunoprecipitation of a 75 000 molecular weight protein. The unaffected controls had normal prolidase activity and were negative for autoantibodies. Conclusions Prolidase deficiency may be associated with the loss of immune tolerance to lupus-associated autoantigens even without clinical SLE. PMID:24330273

  6. Survival of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A after prolonged air exposure.

    PubMed

    Struchtemeyer, Christopher G; Ranganathan, Abhaya; Couger, M B; Liggenstoffer, Audra S; Youssef, Noha H; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are efficient plant biomass degraders and represent promising agents for a variety of biotechnological applications. We evaluated the tolerance of an anaerobic fungal isolate, Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A, to air exposure in liquid media using soluble (cellobiose) and insoluble (dried switchgrass) substrates. Strain C1A grown on cellobiose survived for 11, and 13.5 hours following air exposure when grown under planktonic, and immobilized conditions, respectively. When grown on switchgrass media, strain C1A exhibited significantly enhanced air tolerance and survived for 168 hours. The genome of strain C1A lacked a catalase gene, but contained superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase genes. Real time PCR analysis indicated that superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase, exhibits a transient increase in expression level post aeration. Interestingly, the C1A superoxide dismutase gene of strain C1A appears to be most closely related to bacterial SODs, which implies its acquisition from a bacterial donor via cross kingdom horizontal gene transfer during Neocallimastigomycota evolution. We conclude that strain C1A utilizes multiple mechanisms to minimize the deleterious effects of air exposure such as physical protection and the production of oxidative stress enzymes. PMID:25367149

  7. Atomic resolution model of the antibody Fc interaction with the complement C1q component.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin

    2012-05-01

    The globular C1q heterotrimer is a subunit of the C1 complement factor. Binding of the C1q subunit to the constant (Fc) part of antibody molecules is a first step and key event of complement activation. Although three-dimensional structures of C1q and antibody Fc subunits have been determined experimentally no atomic resolution structure of the C1q-Fc complex is known so far. Based on systematic protein-protein docking searches and Molecular Dynamics simulations a structural model of the C1q-IgG1-Fc-binding geometry has been obtained. The structural model is compatible with available experimental data on the interaction between the two partner proteins. It predicts a binding geometry that involves mainly the B-subunit of the C1q-trimer and both subunits of the IgG1-Fc-dimer with small conformational adjustments with respect to the unbound partners to achieve high surface complementarity. In addition to several charge-charge and polar contacts in the rim region of the interface it also involves nonpolar contacts between the two proteins and is compatible with the carbohydrate moiety of the Fc subunit. The model for the complex structure provides a working model for rationalizing available biochemical data on this important interaction and can form the basis for the design of Fc variants with a greater capacity to activate the complement system for example on binding to cancer cells or other target structures.

  8. Survival of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A after prolonged air exposure

    PubMed Central

    Struchtemeyer, Christopher G.; Ranganathan, Abhaya; Couger, M. B.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Youssef, Noha H.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are efficient plant biomass degraders and represent promising agents for a variety of biotechnological applications. We evaluated the tolerance of an anaerobic fungal isolate, Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A, to air exposure in liquid media using soluble (cellobiose) and insoluble (dried switchgrass) substrates. Strain C1A grown on cellobiose survived for 11, and 13.5 hours following air exposure when grown under planktonic, and immobilized conditions, respectively. When grown on switchgrass media, strain C1A exhibited significantly enhanced air tolerance and survived for 168 hours. The genome of strain C1A lacked a catalase gene, but contained superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase genes. Real time PCR analysis indicated that superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase, exhibits a transient increase in expression level post aeration. Interestingly, the C1A superoxide dismutase gene of strain C1A appears to be most closely related to bacterial SODs, which implies its acquisition from a bacterial donor via cross kingdom horizontal gene transfer during Neocallimastigomycota evolution. We conclude that strain C1A utilizes multiple mechanisms to minimize the deleterious effects of air exposure such as physical protection and the production of oxidative stress enzymes. PMID:25367149

  9. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ran; Zhao, Xi; Wang, Zixia; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Limei; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host’s immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated. Methods and Findings The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy) to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs) elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration. Conclusion Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9. PMID:26720603

  10. Maize anthocyanin regulatory gene pl is a duplicate of c1 that functions in the plant.

    PubMed

    Cone, K C; Cocciolone, S M; Burr, F A; Burr, B

    1993-12-01

    Genetic studies in maize have identified several regulatory genes that control the tissue-specific synthesis of purple anthocyanin pigments in the plant. c1 regulates pigmentation in the aleurone layer of the kernel, whereas pigmentation in the vegetative and floral tissues of the plant body depends on pl. c1 encodes a protein with the structural features of eukaryotic transcription factors and functions to control the accumulation of transcripts for the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. Previous genetic and molecular observations have prompted the hypothesis that c1 and pl are functionally duplicate, in that they control the same set of anthocyanin structural genes but in distinct parts of the plant. Here, we show that this proposed functional similarity is reflected by DNA sequence homology between c1 and pl. Using a c1 DNA fragment as a hybridization probe, genomic and cDNA clones for pl were isolated. Comparison of pl and c1 cDNA sequences revealed that the genes encode proteins with 90% or more amino acid identity in the amino- and carboxyl-terminal domains that are known to be important for the regulatory function of the C1 protein. Consistent with the idea that the pl gene product also acts as a transcriptional activator is our finding that a functional pl allele is required for the transcription of at least three structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. PMID:8305872

  11. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  12. Myeloperoxidase deficiency ameliorates progression of chronic kidney disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Lehners, Alexander; Lange, Sascha; Niemann, Gianina; Rosendahl, Alva; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Oh, Jun; Stahl, Rolf; Ehmke, Heimo; Benndorf, Ralf; Klinke, Anna; Baldus, Stephan; Wenzel, Ulrich Otto

    2014-08-15

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme expressed in neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Beside its well-defined role in innate immune defence, it may also be responsible for tissue damage. To identify the role of MPO in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), we investigated CKD in a model of renal ablation in MPO knockout and wild-type mice. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. Mice were followed for 10 wk to evaluate the impact of MPO deficiency on renal morbidity. Renal ablation induced CKD in wild-type mice with increased plasma levels of MPO compared with controls. No difference was found between MPO-deficient and wild-type mice regarding albuminuria 1 wk after renal ablation, indicating similar acute responses to renal ablation. Over the next 10 wk, however, MPO-deficient mice developed significantly less albuminuria and glomerular injury than wild-type mice. This was accompanied by a significantly lower renal mRNA expression of the fibrosis marker genes plasminogen activator inhibitor-I, collagen type III, and collagen type IV as well as matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. MPO-deficient mice also developed less renal inflammation after renal ablation, as indicated by a lower infiltration of CD3-positive T cells and F4/80-positive monocytes/macrophages compared with wild-type mice. In vitro chemotaxis of monocyte/macrophages isolated from MPO-deficient mice was impaired compared with wild-type mice. No significant differences were observed for mortality and blood pressure after renal ablation. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that MPO deficiency ameliorates renal injury in the renal ablation model of CKD in mice.

  13. Cytokines alter IgA1 O-glycosylation by dysregulating C1GalT1 and ST6GalNAc-II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Raska, Milan; Yamada, Koshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Julian, Bruce A; Wyatt, Robert J; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Gharavi, Ali G; Novak, Jan

    2014-02-21

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common primary glomerulonephritis, is characterized by renal immunodeposits containing IgA1 with galactose-deficient O-glycans (Gd-IgA1). These immunodeposits originate from circulating immune complexes consisting of anti-glycan antibodies bound to Gd-IgA1. As clinical disease onset and activity of IgAN often coincide with mucosal infections and dysregulation of cytokines, we hypothesized that cytokines may affect IgA1 O-glycosylation. We used IgA1-secreting cells derived from the circulation of IgAN patients and healthy controls and assessed whether IgA1 O-glycosylation is altered by cytokines. Of the eight cytokines tested, only IL-6 and, to a lesser degree, IL-4 significantly increased galactose deficiency of IgA1; changes in IgA1 O-glycosylation were robust for the cells from IgAN patients. These cytokines reduced galactosylation of the O-glycan substrate directly via decreased expression of the galactosyltransferase C1GalT1 and, indirectly, via increased expression of the sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc-II, which prevents galactosylation by C1GalT1. These findings were confirmed by siRNA knockdown of the corresponding genes and by in vitro enzyme reactions. In summary, IL-6 and IL-4 accentuated galactose deficiency of IgA1 via coordinated modulation of key glycosyltransferases. These data provide a mechanism explaining increased immune-complex formation and disease exacerbation during mucosal infections in IgAN patients.

  14. Cytokines Alter IgA1 O-Glycosylation by Dysregulating C1GalT1 and ST6GalNAc-II Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Raska, Milan; Yamada, Koshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Julian, Bruce A.; Wyatt, Robert J.; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Gharavi, Ali G.; Novak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common primary glomerulonephritis, is characterized by renal immunodeposits containing IgA1 with galactose-deficient O-glycans (Gd-IgA1). These immunodeposits originate from circulating immune complexes consisting of anti-glycan antibodies bound to Gd-IgA1. As clinical disease onset and activity of IgAN often coincide with mucosal infections and dysregulation of cytokines, we hypothesized that cytokines may affect IgA1 O-glycosylation. We used IgA1-secreting cells derived from the circulation of IgAN patients and healthy controls and assessed whether IgA1 O-glycosylation is altered by cytokines. Of the eight cytokines tested, only IL-6 and, to a lesser degree, IL-4 significantly increased galactose deficiency of IgA1; changes in IgA1 O-glycosylation were robust for the cells from IgAN patients. These cytokines reduced galactosylation of the O-glycan substrate directly via decreased expression of the galactosyltransferase C1GalT1 and, indirectly, via increased expression of the sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc-II, which prevents galactosylation by C1GalT1. These findings were confirmed by siRNA knockdown of the corresponding genes and by in vitro enzyme reactions. In summary, IL-6 and IL-4 accentuated galactose deficiency of IgA1 via coordinated modulation of key glycosyltransferases. These data provide a mechanism explaining increased immune-complex formation and disease exacerbation during mucosal infections in IgAN patients. PMID:24398680

  15. Short prolactin profile for monitoring treatment in BH4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Porta, Francesco; Ponzone, Alberto; Spada, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency causes hyperphenylalaninemia and impaired synthesis of serotonin and dopamine, leading to brain degeneration and early death if left untreated. Replacement therapy with neurotransmitters precursors is the cornerstone of treatment, relying on 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-dopa administration. Effective restoration of dopaminergic activity is thickened, like in Parkinson's disease, by the pulsatile pharmacokinetic profile of L-dopa. Monitoring of L-dopa therapy in BH4 deficiency is generally based upon clinical observation and periodical measurement of homovanillic acid (HVA) concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). According to the finding that dopamine is the natural inhibitor of prolactin (PRL) incretion, we introduced the use of peripheral PRL measurement as an index of dopaminergic homeostasis, so avoiding the need of repeated lumbar punctures in patients with BH4 deficiency. As a single PRL evaluation can be misleading, due to the dependency of PRL fluctuations on L-dopa administration schedule, here we show that a short PRL profile is suitable for monitoring these patients. Together with the assessment of patients' clinical symptoms, this standardized tool will ensure an objective non-invasive reference to the management of dopaminergic replacement therapy in BH4 deficiency, even in patients treated with dopamine agonists.

  16. Hereditary deficiency of the seventh component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, J T; Gall, E P; Norman, M E; Nilsson, U R; Zimmerman, T S

    1975-01-01

    Deficiency of the seventh component of complement has been found in the serum of a 42-yr-old Caucasian woman who has Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia. Partial deficiency was found in the serum of the patient's parents and children, indicating a pattern of inheritance of autosomal codominance. Transfusion experiments indicated that exogenous C7 had a 91-h halk-life in the patient. There was no evidence for C7 synthesis after transfusion. No C7 inhibitors were detected in the patient's serum. The patient's serum was found to support the activation of complement by both the classical and properdin pathways to the C7 stage. The addition of C7 to the patient's serum permitted it to support hemolytic reactions initiated by either pathway. No defects could be detected in plasma or whole blood coagulation. The patient's serum was deficient in opsonizing unsensitized yeast particles in serum and in the generation of chemotactic factor by antigen-antibody complexes and endotoxin. Both deficiencies were corrected by the addition of C7. These observations suggest a key role for C7 for in vitro yeast phagocytosis and chemotaxis generation. However, the patient's lack of infections indicates a relatively minor role for C7 in human resistance to infection. PMID:1099121

  17. Genetics Home Reference: tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3. Citation on PubMed Liu TT, Chiang SH, Wu SJ, Hsiao KJ. Tetrahydrobiopterin-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia in the ... Citation on PubMed Wang L, Yu WM, He C, Chang M, Shen M, Zhou Z, Zhang Z, ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes the amino acid arginine (a building block of proteins) and ammonia ... links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders Health ...

  19. [Judicial aspect of mental deficiency].

    PubMed

    Viret, M J

    1979-01-01

    The author examines the different laws on mental deficiency with particular references to protective measures such as: different forms of guardianship and legal advice. The provisions of the laws on guardianship which do offer an effectual protection, often remain unrecognized.

  20. Detecting Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a widely underrecognized condition, with evidence of persisting long diagnostic delays and patients' frequent need to see multiple physicians before initial diagnosis. Reasons for underrecognition include inadequate understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency by physicians and allied health care providers; failure to implement available, guideline-based practice recommendations; and the belief that effective therapy is unavailable. Multiple studies have described both the results of screening and targeted detection of individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, with both varying strategies employed to identify at-risk individuals and varying results of testing. Also, various strategies to enhance detection of affected individuals have been examined, including use of the electronic medical record to prompt testing and empowerment of allied health providers, especially respiratory therapists, to promote testing for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Such efforts are likely to enhance detection with the expected result that the harmful effects of delayed diagnosis can be mitigated. PMID:27564667

  1. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  2. Genetics Home Reference: prekallikrein deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... a role in a process called the intrinsic coagulation pathway (also called the contact activation pathway). This ... functional plasma kallikrein, which likely impairs the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Researchers suggest that this lack (deficiency) of ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: prothrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients and Caregivers: How Blood Clots Orphanet: Congenital factor II deficiency University of Iowa Health Care: Prothrombin Gene Mutation Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Canadian Hemophilia Society National Hemophilia Foundation: Factor II ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Prothrombin ...

  4. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity.

  5. Purine nucleoside metabolism in the erythrocytes of patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, R P; Crabtree, G W; Parks, R E; Nelson, J A; Keightley, R; Parkman, R; Rosen, F S; Stern, R C; Polmar, S H

    1976-01-01

    Deficiency of erythrocytic and lymphocytic adenosine deaminase (ADA) occurs in some patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). SCID with ADA deficiency is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. ADA is markedly reduced or undetectable in affected patients (homozygotes), and approximately one-half normal levels are found in individuals heterozygous for ADA deficiency. The metabolism of purine nucleosides was studied in erythrocytes from normal individuals, four ADA-deficiency patients, and two heterozygous individuals. ADA deficiency in intake erythrocytes was confirmed by a very sensitive ammonia-liberation technique. Erythrocytic ADA activity in three heterozygous individuals (0.07,0.08, and 0.14 mumolar units/ml of packed cells) was between that of the four normal controls (0.20-0.37 mumol/ml) and the ADA-deficient patients (no activity). In vitro, adenosine was incorporated principally into IMP in the heterozygous and normal individuals but into the adenosine nucleotides in the ADa-deficient patients. Coformycin (3-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-6,7,8-trihydroimidazo[4,5-4] [1,3] diazepin-8 (R)-ol), a potent inhibitor of ADA, made possible incorporation of adenosine nucleotides in the ADA-deficient patients... PMID:947948

  6. Numb-deficient satellite cells have regeneration and proliferation defects.

    PubMed

    George, Rajani M; Biressi, Stefano; Beres, Brian J; Rogers, Erik; Mulia, Amanda K; Allen, Ronald E; Rawls, Alan; Rando, Thomas A; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne

    2013-11-12

    The adaptor protein Numb has been implicated in the switch between cell proliferation and differentiation made by satellite cells during muscle repair. Using two genetic approaches to ablate Numb, we determined that, in its absence, muscle regeneration in response to injury was impaired. Single myofiber cultures demonstrated a lack of satellite cell proliferation in the absence of Numb, and the proliferation defect was confirmed in satellite cell cultures. Quantitative RT-PCR from Numb-deficient satellite cells demonstrated highly up-regulated expression of p21 and Myostatin, both inhibitors of myoblast proliferation. Transfection with Myostatin-specific siRNA rescued the proliferation defect of Numb-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, overexpression of Numb in satellite cells inhibited Myostatin expression. These data indicate a unique function for Numb during the initial activation and proliferation of satellite cells in response to muscle injury. PMID:24170859

  7. Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, characterized by low plasma levels of the serine protease inhibitor AAT, is associated with emphysema secondary to insufficient protection of the lung from neutrophil proteases. Although AAT augmentation therapy with purified AAT protein is efficacious, it requires weekly to monthly intravenous infusion of AAT purified from pooled human plasma, has the risk of viral contamination and allergic reactions, and is costly. As an alternative, gene therapy offers the advantage of single administration, eliminating the burden of protein infusion, and reduced risks and costs. The focus of this review is to describe the various strategies for AAT gene therapy for the pulmonary manifestations of AAT deficiency and the state of the art in bringing AAT gene therapy to the bedside. PMID:27564673

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Beyond the Protease/Antiprotease Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cosio, Manuel G; Bazzan, Erica; Rigobello, Chiara; Tinè, Mariaenrica; Turato, Graziella; Baraldo, Simonetta; Saetta, Marina

    2016-08-01

    From the discovery that alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) was an effective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase originated the classic paradigm of protease/antiprotease imbalance, linking lung destruction to the unopposed effect of proteases in patients with the deficiency. Notwithstanding its importance as an antiprotease, it has become evident that alpha-1 antitrypsin has important antiinflammatory and immune-regulatory activities, which may be critically involved in lung destruction. We review here recent evidence showing that, indeed, an important adaptive immune reaction is present in lungs with AAT deficiency, similar to the one seen in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with normal AAT. On the basis of recent evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and pathogenetic studies, it is likely time to move on from the original protease/antiprotease hypothesis for the production of emphysema toward a more complex paradigm, involving the antiinflammatory and immune modulating functions of AAT. PMID:27564665

  9. 26 CFR 1.412(c)(1)-1 - Determinations to be made under funding method-terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-terms defined. 1.412(c)(1)-1 Section 1.412(c)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Plans, Etc. § 1.412(c)(1)-1 Determinations to be made under funding method—terms defined. (a) Actuarial... bargained plans, see § 1.412(c)(1)-2; for principles applicable to funding methods in general,...

  10. Development of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) for NPOESS C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brann, C.; Kunkee, D.

    2008-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is planned for flight on the first NPOESS mission (C1) in 2013. The C1 ATMS will be the second instrument of the ATMS series and will provide along with the companion Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles for NPOESS. The first flight of the ATMS is scheduled in 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, which is an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. This poster will focus on the development of the ATMS for C1 including aspects of the sensor calibration, antenna beam and RF characteristics and scanning. New design aspects of the C1 ATMS, required primarily by parts obsolescence, will also be addressed in this poster.

  11. C1A cysteine protease-cystatin interactions in leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; González-Melendi, Pablo; Martínez, Manuel; Díaz, Isabel

    2014-07-01

    Senescence-associated proteolysis in plants is a crucial process to relocalize nutrients from leaves to growing or storage tissues. The massive net degradation of proteins involves broad metabolic networks, different subcellular compartments, and several types of proteases and regulators. C1A cysteine proteases, grouped as cathepsin L-, B-, H-, and F-like according to their gene structures and phylogenetic relationships, are the most abundant enzymes responsible for the proteolytic activity during leaf senescence. Besides, cystatins as specific modulators of C1A peptidase activities exert a complex regulatory role in this physiological process. This overview article covers the most recent information on C1A proteases in leaf senescence in different plant species. Particularly, it is focussed on barley, as the unique species where the whole gene family members of C1A cysteine proteases and cystatins have been analysed.

  12. 26 CFR 1.860C-1 - Taxation of holders of residual interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860C-1 Taxation of holders... below zero) by— (i) First, the amount of any cash or the fair market value of any property...

  13. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  14. Update on TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerdel, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors dramatically improved the management of psoriasis. Some newer or investigational biologics with different mechanisms of action have demonstrated noninferiority or superiority to etanercept, the first self-injectable anti-TNF-α agent to become available in the United States. Nonetheless, TNF-α inhibitors are likely to remain a mainstay of therapy for many years.

  15. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  16. Anti-C1q autoantibodies are linked to autoimmune thyroid disorders in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Vitkova, H; Jiskra, J; Springer, D; Limanova, Z; Telicka, Z; Bartakova, J; Trendelenburg,