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Sample records for c4997 seismic records

  1. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  2. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  3. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  4. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOEpatents

    Ober, Curtis C.; Romero, Louis A.; Ghiglia, Dennis C.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  5. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

    2007-02-28

    A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measure¬ment. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

  6. Signatures of lightning activity in seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiszely, Márta; Bór, József; Mónus, Péter; Betz, Hans-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    A thunderstorm with intense lightning activity swept through Hungary on 28th August, 2013 between 00:00-09:00 UTC from the west towards north-east. Characteristic signal patterns could be observed in the time series recorded by seismometers in Hungary during the time the thunderstorm was close to a recording station. The signal patterns occurred coherently both in the vertical and in the horizontal seismic records. The patterns are composed of a sharp spike and a longer lasting disturbance which followed the spike after a gap of several seconds. This disturbance was of increased amplitude and lasted for up to a few tens of seconds. Detection times of spikes in the seismic records were compared to occurrence times of lightning strokes in the thunderstorm. Information on the occurrence time, polarity, type (CG or IC), peak current, and geographical location (including height estimation for IC events) of lightning strokes was provided by the LINET lightning detection network which uses magnetic loop antennas sensitive in the VLF-LF radio bands. A single lightning stroke could be unambiguously associated with each spike in the seismic records. This one-to-one correspondence suggests that the spike was caused by the electromagnetic shock wave from the lightning return stroke. The longer lasting disturbance is, on the other hand, most probably the signature of the subsequent air pressure wave which induced ground waves, too. In more than half of the examined cases, the time between the spike and the detection of a wave packet (peak amplitude) in the disturbance matched the expected propagation time of sound waves between the source location given by LINET and the seismic station. The direct sound wave associated wave packet, however, was not always the first arriving one in the seismic disturbance which suggests that coupling of sound waves and ground waves may not only occur at the seismic detector. The poster shows case studies of lightning associated seismic records

  7. Downhole recordings of seismic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archuleta, Ralph J.

    At McGee Creek in the Mammoth Lakes, California region, we have put 3-component accelerometers and velocity transducers at depths of 166.5 m, 35.0 m, and 0.0 m. The glacial moraine in the region extends to a depth of 30.5 m. We have simultaneously recorded eight microearthquakes 1.0 ◊MD ◊3.0 with S-P times from 0.5 s to 2.8 S. Two larger earthquakes ML 5.7 and 4.9 have also been recorded on all 9 channels of acceleration. Analysis of the microearthquakes shows that the glacial moraine generally increases the amplitude and duration of the signal recorded at depth. However, comer frequencies of S-waves measured at depth and of the surface are very nearly the same. Based on this data we infer that the local site effect due to the glacial moraine is not the cause of the nearly constant source radius, i.e., fmax, observed for earthquakes in the region.

  8. Geyser's Eruptive Activity in Broadband Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim

    2010-05-01

    A geyser is a spring characterized by intermittent discharge of water ejected turbulently and accompanied by a vapor phase (steam). The formation of geysers is due to particular hydrogeological conditions, which exist in only a few places on Earth, so they are a fairly rare phenomenon. The reasons of geyser periodicity and specifics of the activity for every particular geyser are not completely clear yet. So almost for all known geysers it is necessary to develop the personal model. In given study we first use seismic method for detection of possible hidden feature of geyser's eruptive activity in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. Broadband seismic records of geyser generated signals were obtained in hydrothermal field. The Valley of the Geysers belongs to Kronotskiy State Natural Biosphere Reserve and the UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site "Volcanoes of Kamchatka". Neither seismological nor geophysical investigations were carried out here earlier. In September, 2009 seismic observation was organized in geyser's field by 24-bit digital output broadband seismometers (GURALP CMG-6TD flat velocity response 0.033-50 Hz). Four geysers were surveyed: the fountain type Big and Giant geysers; the cone type Pearl geyser and the short-period Gap geyser. Seismometers were set as possible close to the geyser's surface vent (usually at the distance near 3-5 m). Main parameters of the eruptions for the investigated geysers: - The Giant geyser is the most powerful among the regular active geysers in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. The height of the fountain reaches 30 meters, the mass of water erupted is about 40-60 tons. The main cycle of activity varies significantly: in 1945 the intervals between eruptions was near 3 hours, nowadays it is 5-6 hours. As a geyser of fountain type, the Giant geyser erupts from the 2*3 m2 pool of water. - The Big geyser was flooded by the lake after the natural catastrophe (giant mud-stone avalanche, formed by landslide, bed into Geiyzernaya

  9. Five-day recorder seismic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criley, Ed; Eaton, Jerry P.; Ellis, Jim

    1978-01-01

    The 10-day recorder seismic system used by the USGS since 1965 has been modified substantially to improve its dynamic range and frequency response, to decrease its power consumption and physical complexity, and to make its recordings more compatible with other NCER systems to facilitate data processing. The principal changes include: 1. increasing tape speed from 15/160 ips to 15/80 ips (reducing running time from 10 days to 5 days with a 14' reel of 1 mil tape), 2. increasing the FM center frequency by a factor of 4, from 84.4 Hz to 337.6 Hz, 3. replacing the original amplifiers and FM modulators with new low-power units, 4. replacing the chronometer with a higher quality time code generator (with IRIG-C) to permit automation of data retrieval, 5. eliminating the amplifier/WWVB radio field case by incorporating these elements, along with the new TCG, in the weatherproof tape-recorder box, 6. reducing the power consumption of the motor-drive circuit by removal of a redundant component. In the new system, the tape-recorder case houses all components except the seismometers, the WWVB antenna, the 70-amp-hour 12-VDC battery (which powers the system for 5 days), and the cables to connect these external elements to the recorder box. The objectives of this report are: 1. to describe the new 5-day-recorder seismic system in terms of its constituent parts and their functions, 2. to describe modifications to parts of the original system that were retained and to document new or replacement components with appropriate circuit diagrams and constructional details, 3. to provide detailed instructions for the correct adjustment or alignment of the system in the laboratory, and 4. to provide detailed instructions for installing and operating the system in the field.

  10. Digital processing of array seismic recordings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryall, Alan; Birtill, John

    1962-01-01

    This technical letter contains a brief review of the operations which are involved in digital processing of array seismic recordings by the methods of velocity filtering, summation, cross-multiplication and integration, and by combinations of these operations (the "UK Method" and multiple correlation). Examples are presented of analyses by the several techniques on array recordings which were obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey during chemical and nuclear explosions in the western United States. Seismograms are synthesized using actual noise and Pn-signal recordings, such that the signal-to-noise ratio, onset time and velocity of the signal are predetermined for the synthetic record. These records are then analyzed by summation, cross-multiplication, multiple correlation and the UK technique, and the results are compared. For all of the examples presented, analysis by the non-linear techniques of multiple correlation and cross-multiplication of the traces on an array recording are preferred to analyses by the linear operations involved in summation and the UK Method.

  11. Processed seismic motion records from earthquakes (1982--1993): Recorded at Scotty`s Castle, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, P K; Honda, K K

    1993-10-01

    The 8mm data tape contains the processed seismic data of earthquakes recorded at Scotty`s Castle, California. The seismic data were recorded by seismographs maintained by the DOE/NV in Southern Nevada. Four files were generated from each seismic recorder. They are ``Uncorrected acceleration time histories, 2. corrected acceleration, velocity and displacement time histories, 3. original recording, and 4. Fourier amplitude spectra of acceleration.

  12. Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Redpath, Bruce B.

    2007-04-27

    This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

  13. Design and development of digital seismic amplifier recorder

    SciTech Connect

    Samsidar, Siti Alaa; Afuar, Waldy; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    A digital seismic recording is a recording technique of seismic data in digital systems. This method is more convenient because it is more accurate than other methods of seismic recorders. To improve the quality of the results of seismic measurements, the signal needs to be amplified to obtain better subsurface images. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of measurement by amplifying the input signal. We use seismic sensors/geophones with a frequency of 4.5 Hz. The signal is amplified by means of 12 units of non-inverting amplifier. The non-inverting amplifier using IC 741 with the resistor values 1KΩ and 1MΩ. The amplification results were 1,000 times. The results of signal amplification converted into digital by using the Analog Digital Converter (ADC). Quantitative analysis in this study was performed using the software Lab VIEW 8.6. The Lab VIEW 8.6 program was used to control the ADC. The results of qualitative analysis showed that the seismic conditioning can produce a large output, so that the data obtained is better than conventional data. This application can be used for geophysical methods that have low input voltage such as microtremor application.

  14. Design and development of digital seismic amplifier recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsidar, Siti Alaa; Afuar, Waldy; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-01

    A digital seismic recording is a recording technique of seismic data in digital systems. This method is more convenient because it is more accurate than other methods of seismic recorders. To improve the quality of the results of seismic measurements, the signal needs to be amplified to obtain better subsurface images. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of measurement by amplifying the input signal. We use seismic sensors/geophones with a frequency of 4.5 Hz. The signal is amplified by means of 12 units of non-inverting amplifier. The non-inverting amplifier using IC 741 with the resistor values 1KΩ and 1MΩ. The amplification results were 1,000 times. The results of signal amplification converted into digital by using the Analog Digital Converter (ADC). Quantitative analysis in this study was performed using the software Lab VIEW 8.6. The Lab VIEW 8.6 program was used to control the ADC. The results of qualitative analysis showed that the seismic conditioning can produce a large output, so that the data obtained is better than conventional data. This application can be used for geophysical methods that have low input voltage such as microtremor application.

  15. Detecting seismic activity with a covariance matrix analysis of data recorded on seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.; Landès, M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously at the Earth's surface, providing dense spatial samples of the seismic wavefield. The aim of our study is to analyse these records with statistical array-based approaches to identify coherent time-series as a function of time and frequency. Using ideas mainly brought from the random matrix theory, we analyse the spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield from the width of the covariance matrix eigenvalue distribution. We propose a robust detection method that could be used for the analysis of weak and emergent signals embedded in background noise, such as the volcanic or tectonic tremors and local microseismicity, without any prior knowledge about the studied wavefields. We apply our algorithm to the records of the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano located at La Réunion Island and composed of 21 receivers with an aperture of ˜15 km. This array recorded many teleseismic earthquakes as well as seismovolcanic events during the year 2010. We show that the analysis of the wavefield at frequencies smaller than ˜0.1 Hz results in detection of the majority of teleseismic events from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor database. The seismic activity related to the Piton de la Fournaise volcano is well detected at frequencies above 1 Hz.

  16. Successes and failures of recording and interpreting seismic data in structurally complex area: seismic case history

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, V.C.; Johnson, J.H.; Crittenden, J.L.; Anderson, T.D.

    1986-05-01

    There are successes and failures in recording and interpreting a single seismic line across the South Owl Creek Mountain fault on the west flank of the Casper arch. Information obtained from this type of work should help explorationists who are exploring structurally complex areas. A depth cross section lacks a subthrust prospect, but is illustrated to show that the South Owl Creek Mountain fault is steeper with less apparent displacement than in areas to the north. This cross section is derived from two-dimensional seismic modeling, using data processing methods specifically for modeling. A flat horizon and balancing technique helps confirm model accuracy. High-quality data were acquired using specifically designed seismic field parameters. The authors concluded that the methodology used is valid, and an interactive modeling program in addition to cross-line control can improve seismic interpretations in structurally complex areas.

  17. Passive seismic imaging at reservoir depths using ambient seismic noise recorded at the Otway Co2 geological storage research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Nader A.; Lumley, David; Pevzner, Roman

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate rapid convergence (<60 min) of passive seismic images down to reservoir depths (∼2.0 km) at the CO2CRC Otway CO2 geological storage research facility, Australia, using ambient seismic noise recorded continuously with a buried geophone array. Our passive seismic images are created by applying seismic data processing and interferometry techniques, and show we can recover both surface and body waves from the ambient noise data. Using a recording time interval in which body waves dominate the ambient seismic noise, we generate passive seismic images that correlate well with the major reflectors imaged by conventional active-source 3D seismic data at the site. We present a mathematical model for image convergence, where the variance converges inversely proportional to recording time, and show for the first time an excellent agreement between a mathematical model and the observed convergence rate of interferometric images made from ambient seismic noise.

  18. Modeling and identification of multistory buildings with seismic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargab, Lotfi O.

    This study proposes a continuous-discrete model for one-dimensional wave propagation in a multi-story building with seismic excitation and shows its applications in forward predicting analysis and inverse system identification. In particular, the building is modeled as a series of continuous shear-beams for columns/walls in inter-stories and discrete lumped-masses for floors. Wave response at one location of the building is then derived from an impulsive motion at another location in the time and frequency domains, termed here as wave-based or generalized impulse and frequency response functions (GIRF and GFRF). The GIRF and GFRF are fundamental in relating seismic wave responses at the two locations of a building structure subjected to seismic excitation that is not fully known due to the complicated soil-structure interaction. Additionally, they play a key role in characterizing seismic structural responses, as well as in identifying dynamic parameters and subsequently diagnosing local damage of the structure. For illustration, this study examines the ten-story Millikan Library in Pasadena, California with recordings of the Yorba Linda earthquake of September 3, 2002. With the use of the proposed continuous-discrete model as well as its degenerated ones, seismic wave responses are interpreted from the perspective of wave propagation, and more importantly, validated with the recordings and pertinent discrete-model-based results. Finally, a wave-based approach for system identification with a limited number of seismic recordings is presented, which can be used to evaluate structural integrity and detect damage in post-earthquake structural condition assessment.

  19. Seismic recording of the Anatahan eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozgay, S. H.; Wiens, D. A.; Shore, P. J.; Sauter, A.; Camacho, J. T.

    2003-12-01

    The first historic eruption of Anatahan volcano was fortuitously recorded by a broadband PASSCAL seismograph installed on the island only 4 days prior to the eruption. Although covered by ash during the eruption, the seismograph continued to operate throughout the main two month period of activity on Anatahan. This seismograph, located about 6 km west of the active eastern crater, as well as a seismograph installed on Sarigan about 45 km to the north, provide a continuous record of activity during the eruption. We have manually analyzed and visually picked arrivals from the 14 day period beginning 4 days prior to the eruption, and we have implemented an automatic event identification algorithm for the rest of the eruption period that has been calibrated relative to the manually processed data. In addition, we have located many of the larger volcano tectonic (VT) earthquakes using the P and S wave arrivals at Anatahan and Sarigan as well as P wave polarization data. Although these locations are not highly accurate they serve to delineate the general spatial progression of the earthquake activity. No earthquakes occurred in the crater region during the 4 days prior to the eruption. The only significant precursory earthquake activity was a swarm of events on May 8 that were located about 15 km northeast of the island and significantly deeper than events directly associated with the eruption. The first VT event from Anatahan itself was recorded at about 02:00 hrs GMT on May 10. The number of events per hour increases dramatically between 02:00 and 07:00 GMT. A period of nearly continuous earthquake activity commences at about 06:20 GMT which corresponds well with the eruption time of 07:30 GMT estimated by the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center from satellite photos of the ash cloud. After about 36 hours of intense earthquake activity, the number of discrete earthquakes declined, and were replaced by nearly continuous volcanic tremor. Much of the later part of the eruption

  20. Detecting Seismic Activity with a Covariance Matrix Analysis of Data Recorded on Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously all around the word, with very broadband and high-sensitivity sensors. The aim of our study is to apply statistical array-based approaches to processing of these records. We use the methods mainly brought from the random matrix theory in order to give a statistical description of seismic wavefields recorded at the Earth's surface. We estimate the array covariance matrix and explore the distribution of its eigenvalues that contains information about the coherency of the sources that generated the studied wavefields. With this approach, we can make distinctions between the signals generated by isolated deterministic sources and the "random" ambient noise. We design an algorithm that uses the distribution of the array covariance matrix eigenvalues to detect signals corresponding to coherent seismic events. We investigate the detection capacity of our methods at different scales and in different frequency ranges by applying it to the records of two networks: (1) the seismic monitoring network operating on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano at La Réunion island composed of 21 receivers and with an aperture of ~15 km, and (2) the transportable component of the USArray composed of ~400 receivers with ~70 km inter-station spacing.

  1. KrakMon: Seismic signals recorded at Krakatau Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibs-von Seht, M.; Hoffmann-Rothe, A.; Kniess, R.

    2005-12-01

    A recently installed multi-parameter monitoring system on the Krakatau volcanic island complex located in the Sunda Strait (Indonesia) provides continuous broadband records of seismic data. We present here an overview of the different signal types identified and first results of an automated detection and classification procedure for volcano-seismic events recorded at Krakatau volcano. In comparison to seismic signals known from other volcanoes, an unusually high portion of high-frequency content is observed in the spectra of the Krakatau signals. This observation applies to short-term volcano-tectonic (VT) events as well as to continuous tremor signals: most VT events show significant energy at frequencies above 30Hz, harmonic signals last almost continuously for days and show spectral peaks at distinct frequencies well above15Hz. The automated detection and classification procedure bases a spectrogram analysis of volcano-seismic signals using a straight-forward pattern recognition approach: a suitable threshold operator generates a binary representation of the spectrogram which is processed by a contour finding algorithm. The resulting contour-polygons define regions in the spectrogram containing significant spectral energy and their shapes reveal information about the respective volcano-seismic signals. By the extraction of stable shape-describing properties from the polygons and their statistical analysis it is attempted to identify different classes of signal types. A comparison of the resulting signal types with those determined visually by the operator can improve classification schemes for volcano-seismic signals and contribute to defining the activity status of Krakatau and other volcanoes.

  2. A slow seismic event recorded in Pasadena

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Hiroo )

    1989-12-01

    A prominent long-period wave with a duration of 2,000 sec or longer was recorded with a very-broadband system in Pasadena on June 18, 1988. This wave was not observed elsewhere, and is considered of local origin. The acceleration amplitude is 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm/sec{sup 2} in the northwest direction, with the vertical component less than 10% of the horizontal. The horizontal acceleration can be interpreted as due to a tilt of the ground of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} radians to the radians to the northwest. A slowly propagating pressure wave with an amplitude of about 15 mbars could be the cause of the tilt; however, there were no reports suggesting such pressure changes. A more likely cause is a slow tectonic event near Pasadena. The required magnitude of such a slow event is M{sub w} = 0, 2, and 4, for a distance of 0.1, 1, and 10 km respectively. This event could be part of a tectonic episode associated with the larger earthquakes which occurred in southern California around this time, especially the December 3, 1988, Pasadena earthquake (M{sub L} = 4.9) which occurred six months later within 4 km of the Pasadena station.

  3. Extending the North Atlantic Hurricane Record using Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, C. W.; Stein, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    An ongoing debate within the climatological community centers on whether rising sea-surface temperatures due to global warming are changing the frequency of occurrence or energy of North Atlantic hurricanes. The historical record makes it difficult to answer this question because before the advent of satellite-based observations in the 1960s, storms that did not make landfall may have gone unobserved, making an undercount likely. To address this issue, we are developing a methodology to improve the record of the number and energy of North Atlantic hurricanes by analyzing their signals on decades of historical seismograms. Seismic noise—signals derived from natural sources and not related to earthquakes—is generated by atmospheric energy and so has been used as a proxy for oceanic wave climate and an indication of decadal-scale climate variability. Hence seismic noise should be usable to detect hurricanes that may have gone unobserved and to estimate their energy. As a first step in developing such a methodology, we are using digital data from the HRV (Harvard, MA) and SJG (San Juan, PR) seismic stations to calibrate seismic noise signals correlated with maximum wind speeds of well-characterized North Atlantic hurricanes and investigate the development of a hurricane discriminant. Preliminary analysis of seismic noise power shows a variation by about two orders of magnitude between the low noise levels of the summer and the high noise levels between late September and May. Although a hurricane signature is not apparent in raw HRV power data, band-pass filtering of data recorded during hurricane Andrew (August 1992) reveals a signal correlatable with Andrew’s maximum storm wind speed. Because non-hurricane storms also generate signals in this band, we are investigating a discrimination algorithm combining data from the two distant sites.

  4. Extending the North Atlantic Hurricane Record using Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Carl; Stein, Seth

    2010-05-01

    An ongoing debate within the climatological community centers on whether rising North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures attributed to anthropogenic global warming are changing the frequency or energy of hurricanes. A short and incomplete observational record makes it difficult to answer this question. Since North Atlantic hurricane records were based entirely on ship logs and land observations before aircraft reconnaissance began in 1944, it is possible that hurricanes may have gone unobserved before then. Even after the initiation of regular aircraft observation, not all areas were monitored. Hence the potential for sampling problems exists up until the advent of satellite-based observation in the mid-1960's, implying that an undercount in the historical record is likely. To address this issue, we are developing methodology to improve the record of the number of North Atlantic hurricanes through the analysis of their signals recorded on decades of historical seismograms. Ambient seismic noise--signals derived from natural sources not related to earthquakes--is generated by atmospheric energy and so has been used as a proxy for oceanic wave climate and an indication of decadal-scale climate variability. Hence ambient seismic noise should be usable to detect hurricanes that may have gone unobserved. As a first step in developing such a methodology, we are using digital data from the HRV (Harvard, Massachusetts, USA) and SJG (San Juan, Puerto Rico, USA) seismic stations to calibrate seismic noise signals correlated with maximum wind speeds of well-characterized North Atlantic hurricanes, and investigate the development of a hurricane discriminant. Although a hurricane signature is not apparent in raw HRV power data, filtering of data recorded during hurricane Andrew (August 1992) in the 5-7 second passband retrieves a signal correlatable with Andrew's maximum wind speed. An empirical hurricane discriminant based on power amplitudes in this passband demonstrates that

  5. Preliminary consideration on the seismic actions recorded during the 2016 Central Italy seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco; Nigro, Antonella; Nigro, Domenico S.; Iacovino, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    After the Mw 6.0 mainshock of August 24, 2016 at 03.36 a.m. (local time), with the epicenter located between the towns of Accumoli (province of Rieti), Amatrice (province of Rieti) and Arquata del Tronto (province of Ascoli Piceno), several activities were started in order to perform some preliminary evaluations on the characteristics of the recent seismic sequence in the areas affected by the earthquake. Ambient vibration acquisitions have been performed using two three-directional velocimetric synchronized stations, with a natural frequency equal to 0.5Hz and a digitizer resolution of equal to 24bit. The activities are continuing after the events of the seismic sequence of October 26 and October 30, 2016. In this paper, in order to compare recorded and code provision values in terms of peak (PGA, PGV and PGD), spectral and integral (Housner Intensity) seismic parameters, several preliminary analyses have been performed on accelerometric time-histories acquired by three near fault station of the RAN (Italian Accelerometric Network): Amatrice station (station code AMT), Norcia station (station code NRC) and Castelsantangelo sul Nera station (station code CNE). Several comparisons between the elastic response spectra derived from accelerometric recordings and the elastic demand spectra provided by the Italian seismic code (NTC 2008) have been performed. Preliminary results retrieved from these analyses highlight several apparent difference between experimental data and conventional code provision. Then, the ongoing seismic sequence appears compatible with the historical seismicity in terms of integral parameters, but not in terms of peak and spectral values. It seems appropriate to reconsider the necessity to revise the simplified design approach based on the conventional spectral values. Acknowledgements This study was partially funded by the Italian Department of Civil Protection within the project DPC-RELUIS 2016 - RS4 ''Seismic observatory of structures and

  6. Passive seismic imaging at reservoir depths using ambient seismic noise recorded at the Otway CO2 geological storage research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Nader A.; Lumley, David; Pevzner, Roman

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate rapid convergence (<60 min) of passive seismic images down to reservoir depths (∼2.0 km) at the CO2CRC Otway CO2 geological storage research facility, Australia, using ambient seismic noise (ASN) recorded continuously with a buried geophone array. Our passive seismic images are created by applying seismic data processing and interferometry techniques, and show we can recover both surface and body waves from the ambient noise data. Using a recording time interval in which body waves dominate the ASN, we generate passive seismic images that correlate well with the major reflectors imaged by conventional active-source 3-D seismic data at the site. We present a mathematical model for image convergence, where the variance converges inversely proportional to recording time, and show for the first time an excellent agreement between a mathematical model and the observed convergence rate of interferometric images made from ASN.

  7. Multiband array detection and location of seismic sources recorded by dense seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Natalia; Satriano, Claudio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-06-01

    We present a new methodology for detection and space-time location of seismic sources based on multiscale, frequency-selective coherence of the wave field recorded by dense large-scale seismic networks and local antennas. The method is designed to enhance coherence of the signal statistical features across the array of sensors and consists of three steps: signal processing, space-time imaging, and detection and location. The first step provides, for each station, a simplified representation of seismic signal by extracting multiscale non-stationary statistical characteristics, through multiband higher-order statistics or envelopes. This signal processing scheme is designed to account for a priori unknown transients, potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g. earthquakes, tremors), and to prepare data for a better performance in posterior steps. Following space-time imaging is carried through 3-D spatial mapping and summation of station-pair time-delay estimate functions. This step produces time-series of 3-D spatial images representing the likelihood that each pixel makes part of a source. Detection and location is performed in the final step by extracting the local maxima from the 3-D spatial images. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in detecting and locating seismic sources associated with low signal-to-noise ratio on an example of the aftershock earthquake records from local stations of International Maule Aftershock Deployment in Central Chile. The performance and potential of the method to detect, locate and characterize the energy release associated with possibly mixed seismic radiation from earthquakes and low-frequency tectonic tremors is further tested on continuous data from southwestern Japan.

  8. Monitoring Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes (Kamchatka) using seismic noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, Clara; Brenguier, Florent; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Droznin, Dmitry V.; Droznina, Svetlana Y.; Chebrov, Victor N.; Gordeev, Evgenii I.

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, extraction of Green functions from seismic ambient noise has been used extensive and efficiently in different contexts and scales: from imaging to monitoring the Earth's interior and from global to local scales. By using coda waves of noise cross-correlations to estimate travel time perturbations, we can assign changes in delay times to changes in the medium's velocity. Due to this technique attribute of continuous recording of the medium, it can accurately detect very small seismic velocity changes linked to small disturbances in volcano interiors. However, cross-correlation functions (CCF) do not necessary converge to media Green function: measurements of waveforms perturbations within a volcanic edifice are affected by the noise fluctuation. The Klyuchevskoy volcanic group, located above the edge of the Pacific Plate subducting beneath Kamchatka, is one of the most active clusters of volcanoes in the word. It is characterized by strongly localized volcanic tremor sources, which often dominate the recorded wavefield. To monitor and get measurements of temporal changes of these active volcanoes, we use coda waves of daily CCF from a total of 19 seismic stations from the seismic network operated by the Kamchatka Branch of the Geophysical Service (KBGS) of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Our study period goes from January 2009 to July 2013 in which two eruptions occurred: one from the Klyuchevskoy volcano (2009-2010) and the other from the Tolbachik volcano (2012-2013). After a quality checking of the records and testing different filters, we filter data in the frequency range 0.08 - 7 Hz and we use the Moving Window Cross Spectrum (MWCS) method to measure the relative time shifts. As both eruptions are characterized by emissions of seismic tremors, we avoid the choice of an arbitrary reference CCF: we compute velocity changes between all pairs of daily CCF. We retrieve a continuous velocity change time series for each station pair using a

  9. Landslide caracteristics determination using bayesian inversion and seismic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, A.; Moretti, L.; Capdeville, Y.; Stutzmann, E.; Bodin, T.; Bouchut, F.

    2014-12-01

    Gravitational instabilities, such as landslides, avalanches, or debris flows, play a key role in erosional processes and represent one of the major natural hazards in mountainous, coastal, and volcanic regions. Despite the great amount of field, experimental and numerical work devoted to this problem, the understanding of the physical processes at work in gravitational flows is still an open issue, in particular due to the lack of observations relevant to their dynamics. In this context, the seismic signal generated by gravitational flows is a unique opportunity to obtain information on their dynamics and characteristics. Here we present the study of the 1997 Boxing Day landslide that occurred in Montserrat. We accessed the force applied by the landslide to the ground surface responsible of the seismic waves by inverting the seismic waveform recorded (force-time function). This force was then used as a constraint in a bayesian inversion problem where the forward problem is the force-time function calculation obtained by simulating the landslide with the SHALTOP model (mangeney et al., 2007). With this method, we are able to give an estimate of the rheology (friction coefficient) and the initial shape of the collapsing mass. The volume retrieved is very similar to that obtained by field observations. The friction coefficient determined is also similar to that constrained by former studies or to that predicted by empirical laws (Lucas et al., 2014). Furthermore the method permits to give an estimate of the error made on these parameters.

  10. Recording Tilt with Broadband Seismic Sensors at Erupting Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. E.; Lees, J. M.; Lyons, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    The horizontal components of broadband seismometers are known to be susceptible to gravitational acceleration due to slow tilting, and this has been successfully exploited to assess ground deformation at many volcanoes, including Anatahan (Mariana Islands), Meakan-dake (Japan), Santiaguito (Guatemala) and Stromboli (Italy). Tilt can be estimated from seismic velocity by differentiating, scaling to remove gravity, and applying an instrument correction. The fundamental assumption in estimating tilt from broadband data is that the signal recorded is the result of tilt and not translation, thus analysis of tilt require filtering below corner frequencies of seismic instruments, where the response to tilt should be flat. However, processing techniques for deriving tilt are not uniform among researchers. Filter type and passband allowance for the processing of data sets differs from case to case, and the dominant periods of tilt signals may vary from tens to hundreds of seconds. For instance, data from Santiaguito was filtered in the 600-30s passband, while at Anatahan filters spanned 13 hours to 8 minutes. In our study, we investigate tilt from seismic data sets at Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia), Fuego (Guatemala), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Tungurahua (Ecuador) to understand implementation and limitations of this tool. We examine the importance of filter-type distortion related to filtering on the seismic signal. For example, a comparison of time domain versus frequency domain implementation is explored using a variety of lowpass and bandpass filters. We also investigate the advantages and drawbacks of causal versus acausal filters. In a few cases tiltmeters have been co-located with broadband seismic sensors for direct comparison. Signals at Mt. St. Helens, Stromboli, Sakurajima, and Semeru show a correlation of tilt and seismic records, although records at Karymsky volcano suggest that no tilt is recorded on either instrument. We speculate that strong vent explosions exhibit

  11. Autonomous, continuously recording broadband seismic stations at high-latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B.; Parker, T.; Bonnett, B.; Tytgat, G.; Anderson, K.; Fowler, J.

    2009-04-01

    IRIS PASSCAL is in the third year of an NSF funded development and acquisition effort to establish a pool of cold-hardened seismic stations specifically for high-latitude broadband deployments. We have two complete years of field trials and have successfully recorded continuous seismic data during both years with data recovery rates of ~90%. Our design is premised on a 2W autonomous system recording to local media, capable of lasting two years without service. The system is composed of four new design elements: a heavily insulated station enclosure; a state-of-health (SOH) Iridium modem; a light weight, easily deployed solar panel mount; and a power system that includes power switching between primary (Lithium Thionyl Chloride) and secondary batteries. The station enclosures have proved most critical in keeping our data acquisition systems operating within manufacturer specifications and primary batteries within a 50-70% efficiency range. Enclosures with 2.5cm-thick vacuum panels and 5cm of foam insulation have kept interior enclosure temperatures 25-30°C above background (typically below -50°C). This austral summer we are deploying version three of our enclosures. Significant changes in the design include thicker vacuum panels (5cm), more robust construction, and simplified cable routing. An important aspect of our station design is easy installation and minimal weight. To simplify installation our station enclosures are packed with datalogger, SOH communications and batteries in the lab or base camp, so that access to the internal components is not necessary at the remote site. Bulkhead connectors allow a user to fully interact with the system without ever having to open the enclosure. Solar panel mounts are also fully constructed prior to deployment. Once on site, digging two large holes (one for the enclosure and one for the broadband seismometer) and constructing the site takes roughly 2 hours. A station designed to record continuously for 12-14 months is

  12. Finding Trapped Miners by Using a Prototype Seismic Recording System Made from Music-Recording Hardware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this project was to use off-the-shelf music recording equipment to build and test a prototype seismic system to listen for people trapped in underground chambers (mines, caves, collapsed buildings). Previous workers found that an array of geophones is effective in locating trapped miners; displaying the data graphically, as well as playing it back into an audio device (headphones) at high speeds, was found to be effective for locating underground tapping. The desired system should record the data digitally to allow for further analysis, be capable of displaying the data graphically, allow for rudimentary analysis (bandpass filter, deconvolution), and allow the user to listen to the data at varying speeds. Although existing seismic reflection systems are adequate to record, display and analyze the data, they are relatively expensive and difficult to use and do not have an audio playback option. This makes it difficult for individual mines to have a system waiting on the shelf for an emergency. In contrast, music recording systems, like the one I used to construct the prototype system, can be purchased for about 20 percent of the cost of a seismic reflection system and are designed to be much easier to use. The prototype system makes use of an ~$3,000, 16-channel music recording system made by Presonus, Inc., of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Other manufacturers make competitive systems that would serve equally well. Connecting the geophones to the recording system required the only custom part of this system - a connector that takes the output from the geophone cable and breaks it into 16 microphone inputs to be connected to the music recording system. The connector took about 1 day of technician time to build, using about $300 in off-the-shelf parts. Comparisons of the music recording system and a standard seismic reflection system (A 24-channel 'Geode' system manufactured by Geometrics, Inc., of San Jose, California) were carried out at two locations. Initial

  13. Seismicity in West Iberia: small scale seismicity recording from a Dense Seismic Broadband Deployment in Portugal (WILAS Project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso Dias, Nuno; Custódio, Susana; Silveira, Graça; Carrilho, Fernando; Haberland, Christian; Lima, Vânia; Rio, Inês; Góngora, Eva; Marreiros, Célia; Morais, Iolanda; Vales, Dina; Fonseca, João; Caldeira, Bento; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Over the last years several projects targeted the lithospheric structure and its correlation with the surface topography, e.g. EarthSCOPE/USArray or TOPO-EUROPE. Two projects focused on the Iberian Peninsula, one giving particular attention to the southern collision margin (TOPO-MED) and the other to the central cratonic Massif (TOPO-IBERIA/IBERArray). These projects mostly rely on deployed dense seismic broadband (BB) networks with an average inter-station spacing of 60km, which strongly increases the available network spatial coverage. The seismicity recording in such networks is critical to access current rates of lithospheric deformation. Within the scope of project WILAS - West Iberia Lithosphere and Astenosphere Structure (PTDC/CTE-GIX/097946/2008), a 3-year project funded by the Portuguese Science & Technology Foundation (FCT), we deployed a temporary network of 30 BB stations in Portugal between 2010 and 2012, doubling the total number of operating BB stations. Together with the permanent and TOPO-IBERIA stations, the resulting networks provided a full and dense coverage of the Iberian Peninsula. The majority of the permanent stations in Portugal, aimed at the seismic surveillance, are located in the southern part of the country in result of the active tectonic convergence between Iberia and Africa. Therefore, the temporary stations were mainly deployed in the north of Portugal. These temporary stations allowed an improvement of the earthquake detection threshold. The detection of seismic events was based on the analysis of daily spectrograms of the entire network, the new events detected being analysed and included in the catalogue. The new detected events are located mainly in the north, with magnitudes as low as 0.5 ML and in the offshore in the Estremadura Spur. Some additional events were also located south of Portugal, between the Gorringe Bank and the Gulf of Cadiz, in this case the lower magnitudes being ~2.0ML. Focal mechanisms will also be

  14. Chelyabinsk airburst shockwave characteristics from Korkino coal mine seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Olga; Rybnov, Yurij; Shuvalov, Valery; Jenniskens, Peter; Kharlamov, Vladimir; Usoltseva, Olga; Dyagilev, Ruslan

    The Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013, was exceptional because of the large kinetic energy of the impacting body and the airburst that was generated, creating significant damage and injuries in a densely populated area. The butterfly-shape of the damaged area (Popova et al., 2013) was explained from the fact that the energy was deposited over a range of altitudes. Some uncertainty remains about the source energy because it is not known precisely at what pressure glass is expected to break. Reasonable results were obtained for energies of 300-520 kt TNT and over pressures of 500-1000 Pa under assumption that energy release follows the light curve (Popova et al., 2013). There were no any instrumental records of overpressure in the damaged area. However, the coal mine at Korkino is situated in the damage area close to the meteoroid trajectory, almost immediately below the region of highest energy deposition. Its seismic control system with three-component geophones 3G4.5 recorded the blast wave from the meteoroid entry indirectly from its coupling to the ground. This is the only instrumental record of the airburst close to the meteoroid trajectory. Analysis of these records is presented, which allowed us to determine the source location and strength. The direction of the blast wave arrival coincides with the shortest distance to the trajectory. The amplitude of shock wave is evaluated and the measured values are in agreement with estimates of the source energy based on our numerical modeling of the glass damage area. Popova O.,Jenniskens P., Emel’yanenko V. et al. (the Chelyabinsk Airburst Consortium) Chelyabinsk Airburst, Damage Assessment, Meteorite Recovery, and Characterization, Science, 2013, 342, 1069-1073

  15. Recorded seismic response of Pacific Park Plaza. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, F.; Celebi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the second of two companion papers on the recorded seismic response of the Pacific Park Plaza building, in Emeryville, Calif., during the October 17, 1989, Ms = 7.1 (surface-wave magnitude) Loma Prieta earthquake. In this second part, the recorded data are analyzed in more detail by using system-identification techniques. The three-dimensional behavior and the coupled modes of the building are determined, and the effects of soil-structure interaction are investigated. The study shows that the response of the building is nonlinear at the beginning, and becomes linear after 17 sec into the earthquake. The dominant motion of the building follows an elliptical path oriented in the southeast-northwest direction. Some of the modes are complex, with nonproportional damping, and there are phase differences among modal response components. The fundamental mode of the building is a translation in the southeast-northwest direction at 0.4 Hz, with 13% damping. The wing displacements relative to the center core are large, about 50% of the center core displacements, and indicate significant torsion in the center core. The soil-structure interaction is characterized by a vibration at 0.7 Hz. This is believed to be the fundamental frequency of the surrounding soil medium. The rocking motions of the building are negligible.

  16. Dynamics of the Wulong landslide revealed by broadband seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyuan; Huang, Xinghui; Xu, Qiang; Yu, Dan; Fan, Junyi; Qiao, Xuejun

    2017-02-01

    The catastrophic Wulong landslide occurred at 14:51 (Beijing time, UTC+8) on 5 June 2009, in Wulong Prefecture, Southwest China. This rockslide occurred in a complex topographic environment. Seismic signals generated by this event were recorded by the seismic network deployed in the surrounding area, and long-period signals were extracted from 8 broadband seismic stations within 250 km to obtain source time functions by inversion. The location of this event was simultaneously acquired using a stepwise refined grid search approach, with an error of 2.2 km. The estimated source time functions reveal that, according to the movement parameters, this landslide could be divided into three stages with different movement directions, velocities, and increasing inertial forces. The sliding mass moved northward, northeastward and northward in the three stages, with average velocities of 6.5, 20.3, and 13.8 m/s, respectively. The maximum movement velocity of the mass reached 35 m/s before the end of the second stage. The basal friction coefficients were relatively small in the first stage and gradually increasing; large in the second stage, accompanied by the largest variability; and oscillating and gradually decreasing to a stable value, in the third stage. Analysis shows that the movement characteristics of these three stages are consistent with the topography of the sliding zone, corresponding to the northward initiation, eastward sliding after being stopped by the west wall, and northward debris flowing after collision with the east slope of the Tiejianggou valley. The maximum movement velocity of the sliding mass results from the largest height difference of the west slope of the Tiejianggou valley. The basal friction coefficients of the three stages represent the thin weak layer in the source zone, the dramatically varying topography of the west slope of the Tiejianggou valley, and characteristics of the debris flow along the Tiejianggou valley. Based on the above

  17. Wide-angle seismic recordings from the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS), western Washington and British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Parsons, Tom; Creager, Ken C.; Crosson, Robert S.; Symons, Neill P.; Spence, George D.; Zelt, Barry C.; Hammer, Philip T.C.; Hyndman, Roy D.; Mosher, David C.; Trehu, Anne M.; Miller, Kate C.; Brink, Uri S. ten; Fisher, Michael A.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Alvarez, Marcos G.; Beaudoin, Bruce C.; Louden, Keith E.; Weaver, Craig S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the acquisition and processing of deep-crustal wide-angle seismic reflection and refraction data obtained in the vicinity of Puget Lowland, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Georgia Strait, western Washington and southwestern British Columbia, in March 1998 during the Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS). As part of a larger initiative to better understand lateral variations in crustal structure along the Cascadia margin, SHIPS participants acquired 1000 km of deep-crustal multichannel seismic-reflection profiles and 1300 km of wideangle airgun shot lines in this region using the R/V Thompson and R/V Tully. The Tully was used to record airgun shots fired by the Thompson in two different geometries: (1) expanding spread profiles (ESPs) and (2) constant offset profiles (COPs). Prior to this reflection survey, we deployed 257 Reftek and 15 ocean-bottom seismic recorders to record the airgun signals at far offsets. All data were recorded digitally on large-capacity hard disks. Although most of these stations only recorded the vertical component of motion, 95 of these seismographs recorded signals from an oriented 3-component seismometer. By recording signals generated by the Thompson's marine air gun array, operated in two differing geometries having a total volume of 110 and 79 liters (6730 and 4838 cu. in.), respectively, the arrays of wide-angle recorders were designed to (1) image the crustal structure, particularly in the vicinity of crustal faults and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, (2) determine the geometry of the Moho, and (3) image the subducting Gorda and Juan de Fuca plates. Nearly 33,300 air gun shots were recorded along several seismic lines. In this report, we illustrate the expanding spread profiles acquired using the Thompson and Tully, describe the land and ocean-bottom recording of the air gun signals, discuss the processing of the land recorder data into common receiver gathers, and illustrate the processed wide

  18. Dense Seismic Recordings of Two Surface-Detonated Chemical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, K. D.; Hale, J. M.; Burlacu, R.; Goddard, K. J.; Trow, A.; Linville, L. M.; Stein, J. R.; Drobeck, D.; Leidig, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the summer of 2015 two controlled chemical explosions were carried out near Dugway, Utah. The 2 June 2015 explosion consisted of 30,000 lbs of ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and the 22 July 2015 explosion consisted of 60,000 lbs of ANFO. The explosion centroids were 1-2 m above the Earth's surface and both created significant craters in the soft desert alluvium. To better understand the seismic source associated with surface explosions, we deployed an array of wireless, three-component, short-period (5 Hz corner frequency) seismometers for several days around each shot. For the first explosion, 46 receivers were deployed in a "lollipop" geometry that had a sparse ring at a radius of 1 km, and a dense stem with 100 m spacing for distances of 0.5-4.5 km. For the second explosion, 48 receivers were deployed similarly, but with a dense ring spaced in azimuthal increments of 10 degrees at a distance of 1 km, and a sparse stem (~500 m spacing) that extended to a distance of nearly 6 km. A rich variety of phases were recorded including direct P waves, refracted and reflected P waves, nearly monochromatic air-coupled Rayleigh waves, normally dispersed fundamental mode Rayleigh waves (Rg), primary airblast arrivals, some secondary airblast arrivals, and possibly tertiary airblast arrivals. There is also evidence of converted S waves on the radial components and possibly direct S energy on the radial and transverse components, although the transverse energy does not always possess a simple, coherent move-out with distance, implying that it might have a scattering origin. To aid in the phase identification, especially of the apparent SH and Love energy, we are currently performing tau-p, f-k, and particle motion analysis.

  19. Investigations of Periodic Disturbances on Seismic Aftershock Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Knoop, Jan-Frederik; Altmann, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) runs the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect possible violations of the treaty. The seismic sensors of the IMS are set up to detect every underground explosion with a yield of 1 kT TNT equivalent or even better everywhere on the world. Under consideration of all IMS data the hypocentre of a large underground explosion is located within an area of about 1000 sq km. To verify if it was a violation of the Test-Ban Treaty the CTBTO (after CTBT entry into force) is allowed to carry out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the area of suspicion. During an OSI the hypocentre is to be located much more precisely; for this a local seismic aftershock monitoring system (SAMS) can be installed to detect small seismic events caused as a consequence of the explosion, such as relaxation of the rock around the cavity. However the magnitude of these aftershock signals is extremely weak. Other difficulties arise from other seismic signals in the inspection area, for example caused by vehicles of the inspectors, from coupling of airborne signals to the ground, or even by intended attempts to disturb the OSI. While the aftershock signals have a pulsed shape, man-made seismic signals (primarily created by engines) usually show periodic characteristics and thus are representable as a sum of sine functions and their harmonics. A mathematical expression for the Hann-windowed discrete Fourier transform of the underlying sine is used to characterise every such disturbance by the amplitude, frequency and phase. The contributions of these sines are computed and subtracted from the complex spectrum sequentially. Synthetic sines superposed to real signals, orders of magnitude stronger than the latter, can be removed successfully. Removal of periodic content from the signals of a helicopter overflight reduces the amplitude by a factor 3.3 when the frequencies are approximately constant. To reduce or prevent disturbing seismic

  20. Seismicity distribution from temporary earthquake recording networks in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongue, J. A.; Maguire, P. K. H.; Young, P. A. V.

    1992-03-01

    The seismic activity associated with the Cenozoic rift valley in Kenya generally consists of seismic events of magnitudes ML < 3, whilst that associated with the western branch of the East African Rift System includes many higher magnitude ( Ms > 4) events, indicating a difference in the manner of energy release between the eastern and western branches. This paper combines the results from recent temporary seismic networks within Kenya and analyses the coverage of small-scale seismicity to date. The seismicity distribution derived from temporary local networks is primarily associated with the Kenya Rift and the east-west-trending Nyanza trough on the western flank of the Kenya dome. There is a scattered distribution to the east of the Rift, apparently originating in regions suffering recent volcanism and possibly associated with a shallowing of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. The principal concentrations of activity are in the Nyanza trough, the Suguta valley and its continuation to the north into southern Lake Turkana, and in the Lake Bogoria region where the activity appears to be linked to the large-scale structural features of the rift. Generally, the activity can be correlated with geothermal and volcanic regions and the large-scale structural features of the main rift. The Lake Bogoria area has a higher frequency of events than other areas of the rift and has a lower b value, indicating an area of higher stress concentration. In order to determine the local fault kinematics to constrain models of the rifting process, accurate determination of the focal mechanisms of the larger events is required. This can only be achieved by deploying a larger-scale network on a more permanent basis.

  1. Monitoring seismic velocity changes caused by the 2014 Northern Aegean earthquake using continuous ambient noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, Christos; Daskalakis, Emmanouil; Tsogka, Chrysoula

    2016-04-01

    The 24 May 2014 Northern Aegean earthquake (6.9 Mw), an event on the Northern Aegean Trough (NAT), ruptured on two different fault segments with a total ruptured length of ~100 km. For the second delayed segment, rupture propagated eastward from the hypocenter for ˜65 km with a supershear velocity (5.5 km/s). Low-aftershock seismicity on the supershear segment implies a simple and linear fault geometry there. An effort to monitor temporal seismic velocity changes across the ruptured area of the Northern Aegean earthquake is underway. In recent years, neighboring seismic broadband stations near active faults have been successfully used to detect such changes. The crosscorrelation functions (CCF) of ambient noise records between stations yields the corresponding traveltimes for those inter-station paths. Moreover, the auto-correlation functions (ACF) at each station produce the seismic responce for a coincident source and receiver position. Possible temporal changes of the measured traveltimes from CCFs and ACFs correspond to seismic velocity changes. Initially, we investigate the characteristics and sources of the ambient seismic noise as recorded at permanent seismic stations installed around NAT at the surrounding islands and in mainland Greece and Turkey. The microseismic noise levels show a clear seasonal variation at all stations. The noise levels across the double frequency band (DF; period range 4-8 s) reflect the local sea-weather conditions within a range of a few hundred kilometers. Three years of continuous seismic records framing the main shock have been analysed from ~15 stations within a radius of 100 km from the epicentre. We observe a clear decrease of seismic velocities most likely corresponding to the co-seismic shaking. The spatial variation of this velocity drop is imaged from all inter-station paths that correspond to CCF measurements and for station sites that correspond to ACF measurements. Thus, we explore a possible correlation between co-seismic

  2. Near-surface Scholte wave velocities at Ekofisk from short noise recordings by seismic noise gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S. A. L.; Biondi, B. L.

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new approach for imaging the subsurface using a stochastic wavefield of interface waves present in the ambient seismic field. Unlike seismic interferometry, our technique does not rely on cross correlations to obtain the Green's function between two seismic receivers. Rather, it relies on the local measurements of phase velocity obtained directly from the ratio between second-order temporal and spatial derivatives of the wavefield. We process 10 min of ambient seismic noise recording made using a large and dense array installed over Ekofisk. We image a subsidence-induced geomechanical imprint on the Scholte wave phase velocities in the near surface. This resulting phase velocity pattern is verified by comparison to results from a seismic-noise cross-correlation tomography.

  3. Dynamics of the Wulong Landslide Revealed by Broadband Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Dan, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Long-period seismic signals are frequently used to trace the dynamic process of large scale landslides. The catastrophic WuLong landslide occurred at 14:51 on 5 June 2009 (Beijing time, UTC+8) in Wulong Prefecture, Southwest China. The topography in landslide area varies dramatically, enhancing the complexity in its movement characteristics. The mass started sliding northward on the upper part of the cliff located upon the west slope of the Tiejianggou gully, and shifted its movement direction to northeastward after being blocked by stable bedrock in front, leaving a scratch zone. The sliding mass then moved downward along the west slope of the gully until it collided with the east slope, and broke up into small pieces after the collision, forming a debris flow along the gully. We use long-period seismic signals extracted from eight broadband seismic stations within 250 km of the landslide to estimate its source time functions. Combining with topographic surveys done before and after the event, we can also resolve kinematic parameters of sliding mass, i.e. velocities, displacements and trajectories, perfectly characterizing its movement features. The runout trajectory deduced from source time functions is consistent with the sliding path, including two direction changing processes, corresponding to scratching the western bedrock and collision with the east slope respectively. Topographic variations can be reflected from estimated velocities. The maximum velocity of the sliding mass reaches 35 m/s before the collision with the east slope of the Tiejianggou gully, resulting from the height difference between the source zone and the deposition zone. What is important is that dynamics of scratching and collision can be characterized by source time functions. Our results confirm that long-period seismic signals are sufficient to characterize dynamics and kinematics of large scale landslides which occur in a region with complex topography.

  4. Preliminary Analysis of Saudi National Seismic Network Recording of the November 1999 Dead Sea Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A.

    1999-12-01

    Two large chemical explosions were detonated in the Dead Sea on November 10 and 11, 1999 for the purposes of calibrating seismic travel times to improve regional network location. These explosions were large enough to be observed with good signal-to-noise ratios by seismic stations in northwestern Saudi Arabia (distances c 500 km). In this report, we present a preliminary analysis of the recordings from these shots.

  5. Do faults preserve a record of seismic slip: A second opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Christie D.; Griffith, W. Ashley

    2015-09-01

    Exhumed fault zones offer insights into deformation processes associated with earthquakes in unparalleled spatial resolution; however it can be difficult to differentiate seismic slip from slow or aseismic slip based on evidence in the rock record. Fifteen years ago, Cowan (1999) defined the attributes of earthquake slip that might be preserved in the rock record, and he identified pseudotachylyte as the only reliable indicator of past earthquakes found in ancient faults. This assertion was based on models of frictional heat production (Sibson, 1975, 1986) providing evidence for fast slip. Significant progress in fault rock studies has revealed a range of reaction products which can be used to detect frictional heating at peak temperatures less than the melt temperature of the rock. In addition, features formed under extreme transient stress conditions associated with the propagating tip of an earthquake rupture can now be recognized in the rock record, and are also uniquely seismic. Thus, pseudotachylyte is no longer the only indicator of fossilized earthquake ruptures. We review the criteria for seismic slip defined by Cowan (1999), and we determine that they are too narrow. Fault slip at rates in the range 10-4-101 m/s is almost certainly dynamic. This implies that features reproduced in experiments at rates as low as 10-4 m/s may be indicators of seismic slip. We conclude with a summary of the rock record of seismic slip, and lay out the current challenges in the field of earthquake geology.

  6. Analysis of seismic noise recorded by temporary seismic array near the Pyhäsalmi underground mine in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, Nikita; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Narkilahti, Janne; Nevalainen, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    The Pyhäsalmi mine is an underground copper and zinc mine located in central Finland. It is one of the oldest and deepest underground mines in Europe, in which ore is excavated from the depth of about 1450 m. Due to the large amount of heavy machinery, the mine itself is a source of strong seismic and acoustic noise. This continuous noise creates a problem for high-resolution active source seismic experiments. That is why in out study we investigated the opportunity to use this seismic noise for studying structure of the uppermost crust. For this we installed 24 3-component DSU-SA MEMS seismic sensors with the autonomous RAUD eX data acquisition units produced by Sercel Ltd. along a 10 km long line crossing the mine area. The array recorded continuous seismic data from 29.10.2013 to 1.11.2013 with the sampling rate of 500 sps. The continuous data for the period 5 days were processed in several steps including single station data analysis, pre-filtering and time-domain stacking. The processed data set was used to estimate empirical Green's functions (EGF) between pairs of stations in the frequency band of 1-100 Hz. We developed our own procedure of stacking EGF in time-domain and, as a result, we were able to extract not only Rayleigh, but also refracted P-waves. Finally, we calculated surface wave dispersion curves and solved inversion problems for surface waves and refracted waves. In our paper we concentrate mainly on details of our data processing routine and its influence on quality of results of EGF extraction. The study is a part of SEISLAB project funded by he European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), Council of Oulu region (Finland) and Pyhäsalmi Mine Oy.

  7. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  8. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  9. A 15 year record of frontal glacier ablation rates estimated from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Andreas; Nuth, Christopher; Kohler, Jack; Berthier, Etienne; Weidle, Christian; Schweitzer, Johannes

    2016-12-01

    We present a unique time series of continuous glacier frontal ablation rates with weekly resolution over 15 years estimated from seismic calving observations at Kronebreen, Svalbard. Using linear statistical models, we calibrate the seismic record with 7 years of satellite-derived frontal ablation measurements. The two basic input parameters required for our models are the cumulative duration of individual seismic calving events and the incompleteness of the seismic record to correct for the effect of seismic background noise. Frontal ablation follows the seasonal glacier speedup, peaking 1-2 months after the melt season maximum. Short-lived peaks are associated with melt and rain events. Cumulative frontal ablation of Kronebreen between 2001 and 2015 is about 4.0 km3 (3.7 Gt), with the greatest annual loss (0.45 km3) between 2013 and 2014 at the onset of the recent accelerated retreat of the glacier. Our approach provides a potential method for monitoring tidewater glaciers worldwide that have sufficiently close seismic instrumentation.

  10. SLAMMER: Seismic LAndslide Movement Modeled using Earthquake Records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, Randall W.; Rathje, Ellen M.; Jibson, Matthew W.; Lee, Yong W.

    2013-01-01

    This program is designed to facilitate conducting sliding-block analysis (also called permanent-deformation analysis) of slopes in order to estimate slope behavior during earthquakes. The program allows selection from among more than 2,100 strong-motion records from 28 earthquakes and allows users to add their own records to the collection. Any number of earthquake records can be selected using a search interface that selects records based on desired properties. Sliding-block analyses, using any combination of rigid-block (Newmark), decoupled, and fully coupled methods, are then conducted on the selected group of records, and results are compiled in both graphical and tabular form. Simplified methods for conducting each type of analysis are also included.

  11. Unsupervised pattern recognition in continuous seismic wavefield records using Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Andreas; Ohrnberger, Matthias; Scherbaum, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Modern acquisition of seismic data on receiver networks worldwide produces an increasing amount of continuous wavefield recordings. In addition to manual data inspection, seismogram interpretation requires therefore new processing utilities for event detection, signal classification and data visualization. The use of machine learning techniques automatises decision processes and reveals the statistical properties of data. This approach is becoming more and more important and valuable for large and complex seismic records. Unsupervised learning allows the recognition of wavefield patterns, such as short-term transients and long-term variations, with a minimum of domain knowledge. This study applies an unsupervised pattern recognition approach for the discovery, imaging and interpretation of temporal patterns in seismic array recordings. For this purpose, the data is parameterized by feature vectors, which combine different real-valued wavefield attributes for short time windows. Standard seismic analysis tools are used as feature generation methods, such as frequency-wavenumber, polarization and spectral analysis. We use Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) for a data-driven feature selection, visualization and clustering procedure. The application to continuous recordings of seismic signals from an active volcano (Mount Merapi, Java, Indonesia) shows that volcano-tectonic and rockfall events can be detected and distinguished by clustering the feature vectors. Similar results are obtained in terms of correctly classifying events compared to a previously implemented supervised classification system. Furthermore, patterns in the background wavefield, that is the 24-hr cycle due to human activity, are intuitively visualized by means of the SOM representation. Finally, we apply our technique to an ambient seismic vibration record, which has been acquired for local site characterization. Disturbing wavefield patterns are identified which affect the quality of Love wave dispersion

  12. Application of seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution to ambient seismic noise recorded in Malargüe, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganov, D.; Weemstra, C.; Ruigrok, E.; Huniziker, J.; Gomez, M.; Wapenaar, C. P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Obtaining new seismic responses from existing recordings is generally referred to as seismic interferometry (SI). Conventionally, these seismic interferometric responses are retrieved by simple crosscorrelation of recordings made by separate receivers: a first receiver acts as a 'virtual source' whose response is retrieved at the other receivers. When surface waves are retrieved, the newly retrieved responses can be used to extract receiver-receiver phase velocities. These phase velocities often serve as input parameters for tomographic inverse problems. Another application of SI exploits the temporal stability of the multiply scattered arrivals (the coda). For all applications, however, the accuracy of the retrieved responses is paramount. In practice, this accuracy is often degraded by irregularities in the illumination pattern: correct response retrieval relies on a uniform illumination of the receivers. Reformulating the theory underlying seismic interferometry by crosscorrelation as a multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) process, allows for correction of these non-uniform illumination patterns by means of a so-called point-spread function (PSF). We apply SI by MDD to surface-wave data recorded by the Malargüe seismic array in western Argentina. The aperture of the array is approximately 60 km and it is located on a plateau just east of the Andean mountain range. The array has a T-shape, which makes it very well suited for the application of SI by MDD. We select time windows dominated by surface-wave noise traveling in a favorable direction, that is, traversing the line of virtual sources before arriving at the receivers at which we aim to retrieve the virtual-source responses. These time windows are selected based upon the slownesses along the two receiver lines. From the selected time windows, virtual-source responses are retrieved by computation of ensemble-averaged crosscorrelations. Similarly, ensemble-averaged crosscorrelations between the positions of

  13. Rupture Process for Hayward Microearthquakes Inferred from Borehole Seismic Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.; Dreger, D. S.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Hayward fault (HF) in the San Francisco Bay Area, California is one of the major strands of the San Andreas fault system, extending for about 70 km. Crustal deformation along the HF is characterized by a wide variety of fault slip behaviors from aseismic creep to stick-slip earthquake including a Mw ~6.8 earthquake in 1868. We here document the high-resolution imaging of the rupture models for the recent M 3+ HF earthquakes by making use of waveforms from the Hayward Fault Network (HFN). The HFN is an array of borehole seismic instrumentation and provides an unprecedented high-resolution coverage of the earthquake source study for HF earthquakes. Using the finite-source rupture inversion with an empirical Green's function approach, we find a variety of rupture propagations including subevents, directivity, and high stress drop. Our finite-source modeling reveals a complex slip distribution for the 2013 Mw 3.2 Orinda earthquake that is characterized by a patch of slip with a maximum slip of 4 cm concentrated near the hypocenter at about 6.6 km depth, with a large secondary patch of slip (peak slip of 2 cm) centered up-dip and southeast from the hypocenter at a distance of about 400 m away. The two subevents release 43% and 23% of the total seismic moment (6.7 x 1013 N m) and the inferred peak stress drops are 18 MPa and 10 MPa. The 2011 Mw 4.0 Berkeley and 2012 Mw 4.0 El Cerrito earthquakes are marked by high stress drop. The inferred peak and mean stress drops are about 130-165 MPa and 45 MPa, respectively, which suggests that there are locally high levels of the fault strength on the HF. Our finite-source modeling suggests that the radiation efficiency determined for these two earthquakes is very low (< 0.1) and implies that majority of energy is dissipated during the earthquake rupture process.

  14. Performance of an island seismic station for recording T-phases

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J. A., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    As part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) a worldwide hydroacoustic network consisting of 6 hydrophone and 5 island seismic stations has been planned which will monitor for underwater or low altitude atmospheric explosions. Data from this network is to be integrated with other IMS networks monitoring the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. The seismic (T-phase) stations are significantly less sensitive than hydrophones to ocean borne acoustic waves. T-phase signal strength at seismic stations depends on the amplitude of the signal in the water column, the hydroacoustic-seismic conversion efficiency, and loss on the seismic portion of the path through the island. In order to understand how these factors influence the performance of T-phase stations seismic and hydroacoustic data are examined from instruments currently deployed on or around Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. T-phase recordings for the last 3 years have been collected from the GSN seismic station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surrounding the island are 5 hydrophones which are part of the U.S. Air Force Missile Impact Locating System (MILS). Data from this system have been obtained for some of the events observed at ASCN. Four of the hydrophones are located within 30 km of the coast while the fifth instrument is 100 km to the south. Amplitude spectral estimates of the signal-to-noise levels (SNL) are computed and generally peak between 3 and 8 Hz for both the seismometer and hydrophone data. The seismic SNL generally decays to 1 between 10 and 15 Hz while the hydrophone SNL is still large well above 20 Hz. The ratios of the hydrophone-to-seismometer SNL, at their peak in energy, range between 10 and 100 (20-40 dB) unless a hydrophone is partially blocked by the Ascension Island landmass.

  15. On the importance of changes in the gravity field on seismic recording at ultralong periods

    PubMed Central

    Okal, Emile A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of changes in gravity induced by the Earth's deformation on seismic recording at ultralong periods is studied quantitatively for the low-order spheroidal modes of the Earth. Because this effect can either enhance or reduce the recorded amplitude of a mode, depending on its geometry, it may become nontrivial at the longest free-oscillation periods, and contribute to relative deviations of up to 17%. PMID:16592943

  16. Application of seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution to ambient seismic noise recorded in Malargüe, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weemstra, Cornelis; Draganov, Deyan; Ruigrok, Elmer N.; Hunziker, Jürg; Gomez, Martin; Wapenaar, Kees

    2016-11-01

    Obtaining new seismic responses from existing recordings is generally referred to as seismic interferometry (SI). Conventionally, the SI responses are retrieved by simple crosscorrelation of recordings made by separate receivers: one of the receivers acts as a `virtual source' whose response is retrieved at the other receivers. When SI is applied to recordings of ambient seismic noise, mostly surface waves are retrieved. The newly retrieved surface-wave responses can be used to extract receiver-receiver phase velocities. These phase velocities often serve as input parameters for tomographic inverse problems. Another application of SI exploits the temporal stability of the multiply scattered arrivals of the newly retrieved surface-wave responses. Temporal variations in the stability and/or arrival time of these multiply scattered arrivals can often be linked to temporally varying parameters such as hydrocarbon production and precipitation. For all applications, however, the accuracy of the retrieved responses is paramount. Correct response retrieval relies on a uniform illumination of the receivers: irregularities in the illumination pattern degrade the accuracy of the newly retrieved responses. In practice, the illumination pattern is often far from uniform. In that case, simple crosscorrelation of separate receiver recordings only yields an estimate of the actual, correct virtual-source response. Reformulating the theory underlying seismic interferometry by crosscorrelation as a multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) process, allows this estimate to be improved. SI by MDD corrects for the non-uniform illumination pattern by means of a so-called point-spread function (PSF), which captures the irregularities in the illumination pattern. Deconvolution by this PSF removes the imprint of the irregularities on the responses obtained through simple crosscorrelation. We apply SI by MDD to surface-wave data recorded by the Malargüe seismic array in western Argentina. The

  17. The Non-Proliferation Experiment recorded at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.

    1994-12-31

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment was recorded by five different seismic stations operated by Sandia National Laboratories at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility, approximately 7.6{degrees} from the Nevada Test Site. Two stations are different versions of the Deployable Seismic Verification System developed by the Department of Energy to provide seismic data to verify compliance with a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. Vault and borehole versions of the Designated Seismic Stations also recorded the event. The final station is test instrumentation located at depths of 10, 40 and 1200 feet. Although the event is seen clearly at all the stations, there are variations in the raw data due to the different bandwidths and depths of deployment. One Deployable Seismic Verification System has been operating at Pinedale for over three years and in that time recorded 14 nuclear explosions and 4 earthquakes from the Nevada Test Site, along with numerous other western U.S. earthquakes. Several discriminants based on the work by Taylor et al. (1989) have been applied to this data. First the discriminants were tested by comparing the explosions only to the 4 earthquakes located on the Test Site. Only one discriminant, log(L{sub g}/P{sub g}), did not show clear separation between the earthquakes and nuclear explosions. When other western U.S. events are included, only the M{sub b} vs. M{sub s} discriminant separated the event. In all cases where discrimination was possible, the Non-Proliferation Experiment was indistinguishable from a nuclear explosion.

  18. Full Wavefield Recordings of Oklahoma Seismicity from an IRIS-led Community Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Woodward, R.; Sweet, J. R.; Bilek, S. L.; Brudzinski, M.; Chen, X.; DeShon, H. R.; Karplus, M. S.; Keranen, K. M.; Langston, C. A.; Lin, F. C.; Magnani, M. B.; Stump, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    In June 2016, a field crew of students, faculty, industry personnel and IRIS staff deployed several hundred stations above an active seismic lineament in north-central Oklahoma, with the goal to advance our understanding of general seismicity and earthquake source processes using arrays designed to capture full wavefield seismic data. In addition, we used this as an educational opportunity to extend the experience with nodal type experiment planning and execution. IRIS selected 30 graduate students from 18 different US and foreign based institutions to participate in the deployment. In addition, IRIS was pleased to have the assistance of several individuals from the Oklahoma Geological Survey. The crew deployed 363 3C 5Hz Generation 2 Fairfield Z-Land nodes along three seismic lines and in a seven-layer nested gradiometer array. The seismic lines spanned a region 13 km long by 5 km wide. The nested gradiometer was designed to measure the full seismic wavefield using standard frequency-wavenumber techniques and spatial wave gradients. A broadband, 18 station "Golay 3x6" array was deployed around the gradiometer and seismic lines with an aperture of approximately 5 km to collect waveform data from local and regional events. In addition, 9 infrasound stations were deployed in order to capture and identify acoustic events that might be recorded by the seismic arrays and to quantify the wind acoustic noise effect on co-located broadband stations. The variety of instrumentation used in this deployment was chosen to capture the full seismic wavefield generated by the local and regional seismicity beneath the array and the surrounding region. A demobilization team returned to the sites in mid-July to recover the nodes, after a full month of deployment. The broadband and infrasound stations will remain in place through September to capture any additional local and regional seismicity. This experiment was designed by and for the seismological community. The experiment was

  19. Mid-continental Seismicity in the U.S. as recorded by the USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, F.; Astiz, L.; Martynov, V. G.; Karasu, G.; Tytell, J.; Cox, T. A.; Eakins, J. A.; Newman, R. L.; Reyes, J. C.; Davis, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    In contrast to the seismically well-instrumented Pacific region (i.e. California, Oregon and Washington states), the intercontinental regions of the U.S. have been more sparsely monitored. Thus as the Transportable Array (TA) stations started rolling eastward with its uniform deployment grid, an systematic view of seismic activity in the USArray deployment region became possible. The Array Network Facility (ANF) uses the Antelope environmental monitoring software developed by Boulder Real Time Technologies (BRTT) to acquire and locate seismic events. To maintain a consistent methodology across diverse tectonic regions, the iasp91 velocity model is used for all automatic and analyst reviewed locations. All events are associated with corresponding solutions from available regional network and global seismic bulletins. We note that although about 50% of all events located by the ANF until June 2012 have not been reported by any other regional seismic bulletin, many of these could be quarry blasts that are excluded from published regional network bulletins. The ANF seismic bulletin is complete to Ml ~ 2.0 and does not distinguish between earthquakes and blasts. By analyzing the time of day in which seismic events located by ANF occur, as well as establishing locations of mining operations, we have confirmed that the majority of events in the intermontane plateaus can likely be associated with blasting, mostly of large surface coal and precious metals mines. However, not all events recorded in the intermontane region are blasts. The USArray has recorded felt minor earthquakes in Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, South Dakota and Ohio as well as the swarms in Yellowstone, Oklahoma and Arkansas. Notable events recorded by the TA are the 2008 Wells Nevada earthquake, the April 2008 Illinois earthquake and the more recently the August 2011 Colorado and the Virginia earthquakes. By far, the most seismically active region in the mid-continental region during the USArray

  20. Seismic reading taken at MSC recording impact of Apollo 13 S-IVB with surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A seismic reading taken from instruments at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) recording impact of the Apollo 13 S-IVB/Instrument Unit with lunar surface. The expended Saturn third stage and instrument unit impacted the lunar surface at 7:09 p.m., April 14, 1970. The location of the impact was 2.4 degrees south latitude and 27.9 degrees west longitude, about 76 nautical miles west-northwest of the Apollo 12 Lunar Surface Experiment package deployment site. The S-IVB/IU impact was picked up by the Passive Seismic Experiment, a component of the package and transmitted to instruments at the Mission Control Center.

  1. Development and programming of Geophonino: A low cost Arduino-based seismic recorder for vertical geophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler-Llorens, J. L.; Galiana-Merino, J. J.; Giner-Caturla, J.; Jauregui-Eslava, P.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; Rosa-Herranz, J.

    2016-09-01

    The commercial data acquisition systems used for seismic exploration are usually expensive equipment. In this work, a low cost data acquisition system (Geophonino) has been developed for recording seismic signals from a vertical geophone. The signal goes first through an instrumentation amplifier, INA155, which is suitable for low amplitude signals like the seismic noise, and an anti-aliasing filter based on the MAX7404 switched-capacitor filter. After that, the amplified and filtered signal is digitized and processed by Arduino Due and registered in an SD memory card. Geophonino is configured for continuous registering, where the sampling frequency, the amplitude gain and the registering time are user-defined. The complete prototype is an open source and open hardware system. It has been tested by comparing the registered signals with the ones obtained through different commercial data recording systems and different kind of geophones. The obtained results show good correlation between the tested measurements, presenting Geophonino as a low-cost alternative system for seismic data recording.

  2. Historic and Instrumental Records of Repeating Seismicity in the Gyeongju Area, Southeastern Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HAN, M.; Kim, K. H.; Kang, S. Y.; Son, M.; Park, J. H.; LI, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Gyeongju area located in southeastern Korea has experienced repeated seismicity. Historic records during the last 2000 years in the area indicate the earthquake with magnitude 6.7 caused damages of human life and property in 779. During the period of modern instrumental seismic records, the area also experienced numerous small- and moderate-magnitude earthquakes. For example, an earthquake with magnitude 4.3 occurring in 1997 provided a chance for nationwide evaluations of earthquake safety and the renewal of earthquake monitoring system in Korea. The area is still experiencing small earthquakes including magnitude 3.5 in September 2014. We applied waveform correlation detector to continuously recorded seismic data from July 2014 to December 2014 to identify any repeating earthquakes. Detected waveforms are carefully inspected and more than 230 potential events are identified. Eighty three earthquakes among them have been selected for precise determination of earthquake hypocenters. Focal mechanism solutions for representative events were also determined. We further compared the results with those obtained using earthquakes prior to 2013. It has been confirmed the earthquakes in the area are clustered in space. Similar waveforms, earthquake locations, and focal mechanism solutions identified in the study indicates an active faults in the area. Since the area hosts many critical infra-structures, micro-seismicity in the area requires extensive study to address earthquake hazard issues.

  3. UK National Data Centre archive of seismic recordings of (presumed) underground nuclear tests 1964-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John; Peacock, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    The year 1996 has particular significance for forensic seismologists. This was the year when the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) was signed in September at the United Nations, setting an international norm against nuclear testing. Blacknest, as a long time seismic centre for research into detecting and identifying underground explosions using seismology, provided significant technical advice during the CTBT negotiations. Since 1962 seismic recordings of both presumed nuclear explosions and earthquakes from the four seismometer arrays Eskdalemuir, Scotland (EKA), Yellowknife, Canada (YKA), Gauribidanur, India (GBA), and Warramunga, Australia (WRA) have been copied, digitised, and saved. There was a possibility this archive would be lost. It was decided to process the records and catalogue them for distribution to other groups and institutions. This work continues at Blacknest but the archive is no longer under threat. In addition much of the archive of analogue tape recordings has been re-digitised with modern equipment, allowing sampling rates of 100 rather than 20 Hz.

  4. Spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield continuously recorded by the USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; Rosny, J.; Landès, M.

    2016-09-01

    We use a method based on the array covariance matrix eigenvalues to study the level of spatial coherence and of isotropy of the seismic wavefield continuously recorded during 2010 by the USArray. First, we observe that the raw data are often dominated by local sources. To remove their influence, we apply spectral and temporal normalizations to the input signals. We notice that this widely used preprocessing in ambient-noise seismology does not fully homogenize the seismic wavefield and that some strongly coherent arrivals persist. Among these persistent signals generated by teleseismic sources we detect (1) seismic waves emitted by strong earthquakes, (2) a nearly continuous quasi-monochromatic signal at 26 s period, and (3) multiday coherent wave trends in the spectral band of oceanic microseisms (0.07-0.2 Hz). For the latter, beamforming analysis shows that while most of the signals are composed of surface waves, some are dominated by body waves likely generated in the deep ocean.

  5. Catalogs of micro-seismicity recorded at the Pechgraben landslide (Upper Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Floriane; Hibert, Clément; Vouillamoz, Naomi; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Ottowitz, David; Jochum, Birgit

    2017-04-01

    The microseismicity activity of soft-rock landslides (i.e. developed in clays and clay-shales) present various types of seismic event associated with the slope deformation. They are assumed to be linked to the slip at the interface with the bedrock or at the boundaries of the landslide, to material failures, to fissure openings or to fluid transfers within the medium. It is currently necessary to document the microseismicity generated by soft-rock landslides on a larger amount of instrumented slopes in order to validate the current seismic typology and understand the source mechanisms in relation with the deformation. Previous studies have shown the interest of the Pechgraben (Upper Austria) clay-shale landslide for such documentation. This landslide was reactivated in summer 2013 after heavy rainfalls and is characterized by a shallow bedrock (<10m) and varying displacement rates in space and time (from mm.day-1 to cm.day-1). A short pilot seismic campaign (<9 days) was carried out in 2015 and micro-earthquakes as well as episodic tremor-like signals were recorded. A new passive seismic campaign was conducted during one month in November-December 2016. Two broadband three-component seismometers were installed facing each other on the two stable borders of the slope with one tripartite seismic array deployed in the center, on top of the most active area of the landslide. The deformation pattern of the slope was monitored remotely with a ground-based InSAR at a high frequency (10 min). This study aims to present the variety of seismic sources generated by the landslide, using supervised machine learning algorithms for event detection and classification, and to correlate the resulting micro-seismic catalog with the changes in time of the slope deformation.

  6. A Database of Deep Seismic Sounding Peaceful Nuclear Explosion Recordings for Seismic Monitoring of Northern Eurasia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    now includes 19 PNEs recorded along 7 long-range refraction/reflection profiles: QUARTZ, CRATON, KIMBERLITE , RIFT, METEORITE, and two lines of...University of Wyoming: QUARTZ, CRATON, KIMBERLITE , RIFT, METERORITE, and RUBY (two lines, obtained recently). Large stars are the PNEs; small stars (for

  7. Application of seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution to ambient seismic noise recorded in Malargüe, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weemstra, Cornelis; Draganov, Deyan; Ruigrok, Elmer N.; Hunziker, Jürg; Gomez, Martin; Wapenaar, Kees

    2017-02-01

    Obtaining new seismic responses from existing recordings is generally referred to as seismic interferometry (SI). Conventionally, the SI responses are retrieved by simple crosscorrelation of recordings made by separate receivers: one of the receivers acts as a `virtual source' whose response is retrieved at the other receivers. When SI is applied to recordings of ambient seismic noise, mostly surface waves are retrieved. The newly retrieved surface wave responses can be used to extract receiver-receiver phase velocities. These phase velocities often serve as input parameters for tomographic inverse problems. Another application of SI exploits the temporal stability of the multiply scattered arrivals of the newly retrieved surface wave responses. Temporal variations in the stability and/or arrival time of these multiply scattered arrivals can often be linked to temporally varying parameters such as hydrocarbon production and precipitation. For all applications, however, the accuracy of the retrieved responses is paramount. Correct response retrieval relies on a uniform illumination of the receivers: irregularities in the illumination pattern degrade the accuracy of the newly retrieved responses. In practice, the illumination pattern is often far from uniform. In that case, simple crosscorrelation of separate receiver recordings only yields an estimate of the actual, correct virtual-source response. Reformulating the theory underlying SI by crosscorrelation as a multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) process, allows this estimate to be improved. SI by MDD corrects for the non-uniform illumination pattern by means of a so-called point-spread function (PSF), which captures the irregularities in the illumination pattern. Deconvolution by this PSF removes the imprint of the irregularities on the responses obtained through simple crosscorrelation. We apply SI by MDD to surface wave data recorded by the Malargüe seismic array in western Argentina. The aperture of the array

  8. Shear wave velocity versus quality factor: results from seismic noise recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxberger, Tobias; Pilz, Marco; Parolai, Stefano

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of the shear wave velocity (vs) and shear wave quality factor (Qs) for the shallow structure below a site is necessary to characterize its site response. In the past, methods based on the analysis of seismic noise have been shown to be very efficient for providing a sufficiently accurate estimation of the vs versus depth at reasonable costs for engineering seismology purposes. In addition, a slight modification of the same method has proved to be able to provide realistic Qs versus depth estimates. In this study, data sets of seismic noise recorded by microarrays of seismic stations in different geological environments of Europe and Central Asia are used to calculate both vs and Qs versus depth profiles. Analogous to the generally adopted approach in seismic hazard assessment for mapping the average shear wave velocity in the uppermost 30 m (vs30) as a proxy of the site response, this approach was also applied to the quality factor within the uppermost 30 m (Qs30). A slightly inverse correlation between both parameters is found based on a methodological consistent determination for different sites. Consequently, a combined assessment of vs and Qs by seismic noise analysis has the potential to provide a more comprehensive description of the geological structure below a site.

  9. United States Geological Survey (USGS) FM cassette seismic-refraction recording system

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.

    1988-12-31

    In this two chapter report, instrumentation used to collect seismic data is described. This data acquisition system has two parts: (1) portable anolog seismic recorders and related ``hand-held-testers`` (HHT) and (2) portable digitizing units. During the anolog recording process, ground motion is sensed by a 2-Hz vertical-component seismometer. The voltage output from the seismometer is split without amplification and sent to three parallel amplifier circuit boards. Each circuit board amplifiers the seismic signal in three stages and then frequency modulates the signal. Amplification at the last two stages can be set by the user. An internal precision clock signal is also frequency modulated. The three data carrier frequencies, the clock carrier frequency, and a tape-speed compensation carrier frequency are summed and recorded on a recorded on a cassette tape. During the digitizing process, the cassette tapes are played back and the signals are demultiplexed and demodulated. An anolog-to-digital converter converts the signals to digital data which are stored on 8-inch floppy disks. 7 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Implementing Dense Arrays of Single-Channel Seismic Recorders to Detect Global Teleseism Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, C. T.; Sheehan, A. F.; Yang, Z.; Harder, S. H.; Miller, K. C.; Worthington, L. L.

    2010-12-01

    Single-Channel Reftek RT125A (Texan) seismic recorders have frequently been used to detect active-source seismic events (blasts). However, they have been thought to be inefficient for recording global seismicity over long time scales because of short battery life (days), single-channel capability, and typically high frequency response of associated geophones. The goal of this research is to determine just how effective Texan recorders can be for passive teleseism detection. An array of >800 Reftek RT125A recorders and geophones (OYO Geospace 4.5Hz) was recently deployed across the Bighorn Mountain Range in northern Wyoming as part of the EarthScope Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE) Flexible Array experiment. In addition, 38 broadband and 172 short-period 3-component seismic stations were interspersed in the array, which we hope will aid in the detection of S wave arrival. Each RT125A was swapped every 4 days to replace batteries and offload data, allowing for a continuous data record over 15 days and potentially recording several global events per day. Because the array is densely spaced (~1km) we expect to be able to image the subsurface with a higher precision than was possible with wider arrays. Preliminary results have shown that M~5.0 events were discernable up to 8,000 km distance, and several M>6.0 were observable from any distance. For example the P, PP and S waves from a magnitude 6.4 earthquake in the Aleutian Islands, AK (12:58GMT Aug 4 2010, depth 27km) can be seen clearly across the entire array. Despite the fact that the geophones are 4.5 Hz instruments, quality signals up to 3 s are observed for teleseisms with no special processing. Regional and local events are also well recorded, including a magnitude 4.8 earthquake near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, associated aftershocks of the Jackson Hole earthquake, and over 200 local mine blasts. The mine blasts were large enough to be recorded by the USArray Array Network Facility (ANF), requiring usable

  11. The Ocean-Continent Boundary Effect on Seismic Noise Recorded on Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, E.; Gualtieri, L.; Capdeville, Y.; Farra, V.; Mangeney, A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic noise in the period band 3-10s is generated at the surface of the ocean by the interaction of ocean gravity waves. Noise signal is dominated by Rayleigh waves and is recorded worldwide, both on the ocean seafloor and on continent. Microseismic Rayleigh waves, like any other elastic wave, loose energy when traveling from the ocean to the continent. Thus, the noise records on continent are affected by the propagation of microseismic waves, especially across the boundary between the ocean and the continent, the main structural boundary along the source-receiver path. At the ocean-continent boundary, Rayleigh waves dissipate a significant amount of energy (e.g. McGarr, 1969) and noise Love waves may be generated (e.g. Gregersen, 1977). In order to investigate the effect of the ocean-continent boundary on seismic noise records, we simulate the propagation of the seismic wavefield across the seafloor using the spectral-element method in the secondary microseismic period band (3-10s). A single noise source is located at the surface of the ocean and the signal is recorded at the seafloor, both in deep and shallow ocean regions and on continent. The seismograms computed in a model with continental slope are compared to those computed in a model with flat seafloor, for varying periods and slopes. In the presence of the continental slope, the seismic records are affected by a secondary virtual source, generated by the seafloor topography. The effect of the spatial distribution of noise sources is also investigated.

  12. Exploring tsunamis with non-traditional dataset: array recordings from temporary ocean-bottom seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, A. F.; Yang, Z.; Nicolsky, D.; Mungov, G.; Eakins, B.

    2011-12-01

    We observe clear tsunami signals generated by the July 15, 2009 magnitude 7.8 Dusky Sound (Fiordland) New Zealand earthquake on seafloor differential pressure gauges (DPGs). The dataset was collected during the ocean-bottom seismic experiment, Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA). This experiment deployed 30 broadband ocean-bottom seismometers (Trillium 240) and differential pressure gauges (DPGs) for a year (2009/01-2010/02) both in deep ocean (greater than 4000 m water depth) and on the continental shelf (550 m to 1300 m) offshore of the South Island of New Zealand. The DPGs are used in many US National Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool (OBSIP) experiments and are designed to record seismic signals. In this study, we demonstrate that DPGs can effectively record open-ocean tsunami signals and the tsunami signals on DPG records can be used for tsunami studies. We carry out waveform and spectral analysis for DPG data recordings of the Fiordland tsunami event. The arrival times of tsunami signals on DPG recordings can be directly used to constrain tsunami wave propagation models. We calibrate the DPGs to obtain better control on the amplitude of the tsunami signals on the DPG records. Calibrations are done over frequency bands of both Rayleigh wave and tidal signals. Synthetic pressure waveforms are calculated to be compared with the DPG recorded signals.

  13. Catalog of seismic records obtained in support of the ERDA/Nevada Operations Office, October 1963 through June 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Navarro, R.; Sembera, E.D.; Jungblut, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS), Branch of Earthquake Hazards (BEH), Las Vegas, Nevada has provided ERDA, Nevada Operations Office, with seismic monitoring support to the underground nuclear weapons test program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since September 1961. Activities from September 15, 1961 to September 13, 1963 are summarized in the report, "Seismic Dats Summary Nuclear Detonation Program, 1961 thru 1963", (Mickey and Shugart 1964) which lists seismic records obtained from all announced underground nuclear tests conducted during that period.

  14. Lake sediments as systematic recorders of seismic shaking: potential and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moernaut, Jasper; Van Daele, Maarten; Strasser, Michael; De Batist, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Instrumental and written records of past earthquakes generally do not extend further back in time than a few hundred years. This is often insufficient to provide reliable information on earthquake recurrence patterns, information that is indispensable for a reliable seismic hazard assessment. Seismically-induced sedimentary features have been found in many lake records worldwide. This encompasses features created during and shortly after the earthquake such as in-situ deformations, liquefaction features, sublacustrine landslides, turbidites and subaerial landslides which propagated into the lake. Also, sedimentary imprints of long-term postseismic effects can be present, such as increased sedimentation rates, outburst floods, changes in water level and chemistry, etc. Up to now, only few comparative studies have been conducted to determine in which ways and how reliably lacustrine sediment sequences can register strong seismic shaking. Therefore, effectively quantifing paleo-earthquake parameters such as magnitude, rupture type and location based on lacustrine sedimentary archives remains a challenging task. Here, we present a comparative overview of relatively recent studies on earthquake-induced sedimentary features in different types of modern lakes in different tectonic settings and discuss the criteria used to single out earthquake shaking as their causative mechanism. Landslide records in Switzerland and turbidite records in Chile and Japan pointed out that the occurrence and/or scale of subaquatic slope failures can correlate with seismic intensity. It also seems that the continuity and type of the paleoseismic record is strongly dependent on lithology, sedimentation rate and slope morphology within the lake basins. Especially in settings with high frequency of strong earthquakes, this can lead to an underrepresentation of paleoseismic events in the records. However, for lake systems which exhibit ideal characteristics, a single coring site can be sufficient

  15. Frequency Dependent Polarization Analysis of Ambient Seismic Noise Recorded at Broadband Seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, K.; Hawley, V.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of ambient seismic noise is becoming increasingly relevant to modern seismology. Advances in computational speed and storage have made it feasible to analyze years and even decades of continuous seismic data in short amounts of time. Therefore, it is now possible to perform longitudinal studies of station performance in order to identify degradation or mis-installation of seismic equipment. Long-term noise analysis also provides insight into the evolution of the ocean wave climate, specifically whether the frequency and intensity of storms have changed as global temperatures have changed. Here we present a new approach to polarization analysis of seismic noise recorded by three-component seismometers. Essentially, eigen-decomposition of the 3-by-3 Hermitian spectral matrix associated with a sliding window of data is applied to yield various polarization attributes as a function of time and frequency. This in turn yields fundamental information about the composition of seismic noise, such as the extent to which it is polarized, its mode of propagation, and the direction from which it arrives at the seismometer. The polarization attributes can be viewed as function of time or binned over 2D frequency-time space to deduce regularities in the ambient noise that are unbiased by transient signals from earthquakes and explosions. We applied the algorithm to continuous data recorded in 2009 by the seismic station SLM, located in central North America. A rich variety of noise sources was observed. At low frequencies (<0.05 Hz) we observed a tilt-related signal that showed some elliptical motion in the horizontal plane. In the microseism band of 0.05-0.25 Hz, we observed Rayleigh energy arriving from the northeast, but with three distinct peaks instead of the classic single and double frequency peaks. At intermediate frequencies of 0.5-2.0 Hz, the noise was dominated by non-fundamental-mode Rayleigh energy, most likely P and Lg waves. At the highest frequencies (>3

  16. Large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture, seismic profiling on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Jarchow, C.M. . Dept. of Geophysics); Catchings, R.D.; Lutter, W.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Clear subsurface seismic images have been obtained at low cost on the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The Columbia Plateau is perhaps the most notorious of all bad-data'' areas because large impedance contrasts in surface flood basalts severely degrade the seismic wavefield. This degradation was mitigated in this study via a large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture shooting method. The shooting method emphasizes the wide-angle portion of the wavefield, where Fermat's principle guarantees reverberation will not interfere with the seismic manifestations of crucial geologic interfaces. The basalt diving wave, normally discarded in standard common midpoint (CMP) seismic profiling, can be used to image basalt velocity structure via travel-time inversion. Maximum depth-penetration of the diving wave tightly constrains basalt-sediment interface depth. An arrival observed only at shot-receiver offsets greater than 15 km can be used to determine the velocity and geometry of basement via simultaneous inversion. The results from this study suggest that previous geologic hypotheses and hydrocarbon play concepts for the Columbia Plateau may have been in error.

  17. Large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture, seismic profiling on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarchow, Craig M.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Lutter, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Clear subsurface seismic images have been obtained at low cost on the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The Columbia Plateau is perhaps the most notorious of all 'bad-data' areas because large impedance contrasts in surface flood basalts severely degrade the seismic wavefield. This degradation was mitigated in this study via a large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture shooting method.The shooting method emphasizes the wide-angle portion of the wavefield, where Fermat's principle guarantees reverberation will not interfere with the seismic manifestations of crucial geologic interfaces. The basalt diving wave, normally discarded in standard common midpoint (CMP) seismic profiling, can be used to image basalt velocity structure via traveltime inversion. Maximum depth-penetration of the diving wave tightly constrains basalt-sediment interface depth. An arrival observed only at shot-receiver offsets greater than 15 km can be used to determine the velocity and geometry of basement via simultaneous inversion.The results from this study suggest that previous geologic hypotheses and hydrocarbon play concepts for the Columbia Plateau may have been in error.

  18. Weather-related Ground Motions Recorded by Taiwan Broadband Seismic Network Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. F.; Chi, W. C.; Lai, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    Broadband seismometers record ground motions, which can be induced by weather-related processes. Analyzing such signals might help to better understand those natural processes. Here, we used continuous seismic data, meteorological data and stream data to analyze the weather-related ground motions during typhoon cases and rainy season case in Taiwan. We detected some long period seismic signals at the station Mahsi (MASB) during three meteorological cases (Typhoon Kalmaegi in 2008, Typhoon Morakot in 2009 and the East Asian rainy season in 2012). The amplitude of the seismic waveform correlated with the amount of the precipitation and the derivative of water level and discharge in the nearby river. According to the relationships of waveforms in main and minor rainfall events, we derived apparent source time functions (ASTFs) and used the ASTFs to estimate and quantify the precipitation of main rainfall events in the cases. The estimated precipitation has high correlation coefficients (> 0.82) with the observation. It shows that the long period seismic data may be applied to rainfall monitoring.

  19. Seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution applied to ambient noise recorded in Malargüe, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weemstra, Cornelis; Draganov, Deyan; Ruigrok, Elmer; Wapenaar, Kees; Gomez, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Seismic interferometry refers to the principle of generating new responses. These new responses are conventionally obtained by simple crosscorrelation of recordings made by separate receivers: a first receiver acts as `virtual source' whose response is retrieved at the other receivers. The recorded wavefields may be passive (e.g. seismic noise) or active (e.g. in an industrial context). The newly retrieved responses can be used to extract receiver-receiver phase velocities, which often serve as input parameter for tomographic inverse problems. More recently, the coda of the newly retrieved responses have been found to correlate with temporally varying parameters such as hydrocarbon production and precipitation. For all applications, however, the accuracy of the retrieved responses is of great importance. Irregularities in the illumination patttern often degrade this accuracy: correct response retrieval relies on a uniform illumination of the receivers. Reformulating the theory underlying seismic interferometry by crosscorrelation as a multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) process, allows the removal of the imprint of the illumination pattern on the retrieved responses by means of a so-called point-spread function (PSF). We use a seismic array in Malargüe, Argentina, to assess the feasibility of SI by MDD on ambient seismic noise recordings. The array, which has an aperture of approximately 60 km, is located just east of the Andean mountain range. The shape of the array lends itself well for the application of SI by MDD: its T-shape allows the construction of a PSF along one of the two receiver lines. These receivers act as the virtual sources and their responses are retrieved by the receivers along the other (perpendicular) line of receivers. A frequency-dependent analysis of the slowness along both lines allows us to select time windows during which most ambient seismic surface waves propagate in a favorable direction, that is, traversing the line of virtual

  20. Paleoseismic potential of sublacustrine landslide records in a high-seismicity setting (south-central Alaska)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Praet, Nore; Moernaut, Jasper; Van Daele, Maarten; Boes, Evelien; Haeussler, Peter J.; Strupler, Michael; Schmidt, Sabine; Loso, Michael G.; De Batist, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Sublacustrine landslide stratigraphy is considered useful for quantitative paleoseismology in low-seismicity settings. However, as the recharging of underwater slopes with sediments is one of the factors that governs the recurrence of slope failures, it is not clear if landslide deposits can provide continuous paleoseismic records in settings of frequent strong shaking. To test this, we selected three lakes in south-central Alaska that experienced a strong historical megathrust earthquake (the 1964 Mw9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake) and exhibit high sedimentation rates in their main basins (0.2 cm yr-1 -1.0 cm yr-1). We present high-resolution reflection seismic data (3.5 kHz) and radionuclide data from sediment cores in order to investigate factors that control the establishment of a reliable landslide record. Seismic stratigraphy analysis reveals the presence of several landslide deposits in the lacustrine sedimentary infill. Most of these landslide deposits can be attributed to specific landslide events, as multiple landslide deposits sourced from different lacustrine slopes occur on a single stratigraphic horizon. We identify numerous events in the lakes: Eklutna Lake proximal basin (14 events), Eklutna Lake distal basin (8 events), Skilak Lake (7 events) and Kenai Lake (7 events). The most recent event in each basin corresponds to the historic 1964 megathrust earthquake. All events are characterized by multiple landslide deposits, which hints at a regional trigger mechanism, such as an earthquake (the synchronicity criterion). This means that the landslide record in each basin represents a record of past seismic events. Based on extrapolation of sedimentation rates derived from radionuclide dating, we roughly estimate a mean recurrence interval in the Eklutna Lake proximal basin, Eklutna Lake distal basin, Skilak Lake and Kenai Lake, at ~ 250 yrs, ~ 450 yrs, ~ 900 yrs and ~ 450 yrs, respectively. This distinct difference in recording can be explained by variations

  1. Impact of wind on ambient noise recorded by seismic array in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, Simone; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Grad, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Seismic interferometry and beam-forming techniques were applied to the ambient noise recorded during January 2014 at the `13 BB star' array composed of thirteen seismic stations located in northern Poland. The circular and symmetric geometry of the array allowed the evaluation of the azimuths of noise sources and the velocities of recovered surface waves with a good reliability. After having pre-processed the raw records of the ambient noise in time- and frequency-domain, we studied the associated power spectral density to identify the frequency bands suitable for the recovery of the surface waves. Then the cross-correlation was performed between all the station pairs of the array to retrieve the Green's function, from which the velocity range of the surface waves can be determined. Making use of that analysis, the direction of the noise wavefield was linked to the maximum amplitude of the beam-power, estimated by the mixing in the frequency-domain of all the corresponding noise records. The results were related day by day to the mean wind velocity around Europe at 10 m above ground level obtained from global surveys carried out during the same month. Significant correlation between the direction of maximum beam-power associated to the ambient noise recorded at `13 BB star' and the average wind velocity was found.

  2. Recordings from the deepest borehole in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.; Woolery, E.W.

    2006-01-01

    The recordings at the deepest vertical strong-motion array (VSAS) from three small events, the 21 October 2004 Tiptonville, Tennessee, earthquake; the 10 February 2005 Arkansas earthquake; and the 2 June 2005 Ridgely, Tennessee, earthquake show some interesting wave-propagation phenomena through the soils: the S-wave is attenuated from 260 m to 30 m depth and amplified from 30 m to the surface. The S-wave arrival times from the three events yielded different shear-wave velocity estimates for the soils. These different estimates may be the result of different incident angles of the S-waves due to different epicentral distances. The epicentral distances are about 22 km, 110 km, and 47 km for the Tiptonville, Arkansas, and Ridgely earthquakes, respectively. These recordings show the usefulness of the borehole strong-motion array. The vertical strong-motion arrays operated by the University of Kentucky have started to accumulate recordings that will provide a database for scientists and engineers to study the effects of the near-surface soils on the strong ground motion in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. More information about the Kentucky Seismic and Strong-Motion Network can be found at www.uky.edu/KGS/geologichazards. The digital recordings are available at ftp://kgsweb.uky.edu.

  3. Mapping the sources of the seismic wave field at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, using data recorded on multiple seismic Antennas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendros, J.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.; Huber, Caleb G.

    2002-01-01

    Seismic antennas constitute a powerful tool for the analysis of complex wave fields. Well-designed antennas can identify and separate components of a complex wave field based on their distinct propagation properties. The combination of several antennas provides the basis for a more complete understanding of volcanic wave fields, including an estimate of the location of each individual wave-field component identified simultaneously by at least two antennas. We used frequency-slowness analyses of data from three antennas to identify and locate the different components contributing to the wave fields recorded at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in February 1997. The wave-field components identified are (1) a sustained background volcanic tremor in the form of body waves generated in a shallow hydrothermal system located below the northeastern edge of the Halemaumau pit crater; (2) surface waves generated along the path between this hydrothermal source and the antennas; (3) back-scattered surface wave energy from a shallow reflector located near the southeastern rim of Kilauea caldera; (4) evidence for diffracted wave components originating at the southeastern edge of Halemaumau; and (5) body waves reflecting the activation of a deeper tremor source between 02 hr 00 min and 16 hr 00 min Hawaii Standard Time on 11 February.

  4. Earthquake recordings from the 2002 Seattle Seismic Hazard Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS), Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Thomas L.; Meagher, Karen L.; Brocher, Thomas M.; Yelin, Thomas; Norris, Robert; Hultgrien, Lynn; Barnett, Elizabeth; Weaver, Craig S.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes seismic data obtained during the fourth Seismic Hazard Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiment, termed Seattle SHIPS . The experiment was designed to study the influence of the Seattle sedimentary basin on ground shaking during earthquakes. To accomplish this, we deployed seismometers over the basin to record local earthquakes, quarry blasts, and teleseisms during the period of January 26 to May 27, 2002. We plan to analyze the recordings to compute spectral amplitudes at each site, to determine the variability of ground motions over the basin. During the Seattle SHIPS experiment, seismometers were deployed at 87 sites in a 110-km-long east-west line, three north-south lines, and a grid throughout the Seattle urban area (Figure 1). At each of these sites, an L-22, 2-Hz velocity transducer was installed and connected to a REF TEK Digital Acquisition System (DAS), both provided by the Program for Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL) of the Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology (IRIS). The instruments were installed on January 26 and 27, and were retrieved gradually between April 18 and May 27. All instruments continuously sampled all three components of motion (velocity) at a sample rate of 50 samples/sec. To ensure accurate computations of amplitude, we calibrated the geophones in situ to obtain the instrument responses. In this report, we discuss the acquisition of these data, we describe the processing and merging of these data into 1-hour long traces and into windowed events, we discuss the geophone calibration process and its results, and we display some of the earthquake recordings.

  5. Empirical analysis of seismic records for eleven nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.L.; Springer, D.L.; Vergino, E.S.

    1982-08-09

    Regional seismic records for eleven underground nuclear explosions were processed and analyzed (empirically) in a search for source and path related patterns in the signals. These nuclear tests were conducted between August, 1979 and April, 1980; all were located in Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The seismic signals generated by these explosions were recorded on the LLNL four-station network, located at distances of 200 to 400 km from the NTS. Amplitudes were measured for consistently recorded vertical component body waves, and for vertical and transverse components of surface waves. Correlation between phase amplitudes was statistically determined, and amplitude ratios were compared for four stations for the same event, and at a single station for the complete set of events. Previous studies have shown that certain amplitude ratios are relatively unaffected by the size of the explosion but sensitive to propagation effects. For this set of events, we do not find a statistically significant change in the ratio of Pg:Lg due to different propagation paths to the four stations. We do, however, find increased variability in the amplitude measurements for the smaller events in the population considered in this study.

  6. Correlation between calculated stress distribution and recorded seismicity in Northern Israel and its surrounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzler, N.; Kurzon, I.; Rosenthal, M.; Segev, A.; Rybakov, M.; Ben-Avraham, Z.; Lyakhovsky, V.

    2015-12-01

    We study the relationship between crustal structure, tectonic slip, and seismicity. A detailed 3-D layered crustal model is constructed including the geometry and mechanical properties of the main geological units of the study area, Northern Israel and its surrounding. Boundary condition of the 3-D model had been set according to the regional GPS measurements and including localized weak zones extrapolated from the mapped faults. The regional crustal model is converted to 1-D seismic velocity model that was applied in second order relocation software (hypoDD), to obtain more accurate earthquake location. We compare earthquake record of the past 30 years with areas of uplifted shear stress in the crustal model, and compare it with a reference 3-D model with flat layers and similar rock properties. Numerical simulation shows spatial distribution of the zones with increased shear stress associated with differential gravitational load, weak zones geometry, and tectonic load. The obtained zones with high stress are well correlated with earthquake locations. Our results and interpretation highlight the importance and advantages of utilizing detailed crustal structure for assessment of regional seismic hazards.

  7. Processed seismic motion records from earthquakes, 1982-1993: Recorded at Scotty's Castle, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, P. K.; Honda, K. K.

    1993-10-01

    As part of the contract with the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), URS/John A. Blume & Associates, Engineers (URS/Blume) maintained a network of seismographs to monitor the ground motion generated by the underground nuclear explosions (UNE's) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The seismographs were located in the communities surrounding the NTS and the Las Vegas valley. When these seismographs were not used for monitoring the UNE generated motions, a limited number of seismographs were maintained for monitoring motion generated by other than UNE's (e.g. motion generated by earthquakes, wind, blast). Scotty's Castle was one of the selected earthquake monitoring stations. During the period from 1982 through 1993, numerous earthquakes which varied in magnitudes and distances were recorded at Scotty's Castle. The records from 24 earthquakes were processed and included in this report. The processed earthquakes are listed in chronological order and in the order of epicentral distances, respectively. These epicenters and magnitudes are shown. Due to the potential benefit of these data for the scientific community, DOE/NV and the National Park Service authorize the release of these records.

  8. Processed seismic motion records from earthquakes (1982--1993): Recorded at Scotty`s Castle, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, P.K.; Honda, K.K.

    1993-10-01

    As part of the contract with the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), URS/John A. Blume & Associates, Engineers (URS/Blume) maintained a network of seismographs to monitor the ground motion generated by the underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The seismographs were located in the communities surrounding the NTS and the Las Vegas valley. When these seismographs were not used for monitoring the UNE generated motions, a limited number of seismographs were maintained for monitoring motion generated by other than UNEs (e.g. motion generated by earthquakes, wind, blast). Scotty`s Castle was one of the selected earthquake monitoring station. During the period from 1982 through 1993, numerous earthquakes with varied in magnitudes and distances were recorded at Scotty`s Castle. The records from 24 earthquakes were processed and included in this report. Tables 1 and 2 lists the processed earthquakes in chronological order and in the order of epicentral distances, respectively. Figure 1 shows these epicenters and magnitudes. Due to the potential benefit of these data for the scientific community, DOE/NV and the National Park Service authorize the release of these records.

  9. Factors limiting the sensitivity and dynamic range of a seismic system employing analog magnetic tape recording and a seismic amplifier with adjustable gain settings and several output levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.; Van Schaack, John R.

    1977-01-01

    In the course of modernizing the low-speed-tape-recorder portable seismic systems and considering the possibilities for the design of a cassette-tape-recorder seismic refraction system, the factors that limit the sensitivity and dynamic range of such systems have been reviewed. These factors will first be stated briefly, and then their influence on systems such as the new 5-day-tape seismic system will be examined in more detail. To fix ideas, we shall assume that the system consists of the following elements: 1. A seismic sensor: usually a moving coil inertial seismometer with a period of about 1 second, a coil resistance of about 5000 ohms, and an effective motor constant of 1.0 V/cm/sec (across a 10K load terminating the seismometer sensitivity-and-damping-adjustment resistive network). 2. A seismic amplifier/voltage controlled oscillator unit made up of the following components: a) A fixed gain preamplifier with an input resistance of 10K and an internal noise level of 0.5 muVpp referred to the preamp input (0.1 Hz <= freq. <= 30 hz). b) An adjustable gain (0 to 42 db in 6 db steps) intermediate amplifier c) One or more fixed gain output amplifiers. d) Two sections of 6 db/octave bandpass filter serving to couple the 3 amplifier stages together. e) Voltage controlled oscillators for each output amplifier to produce modulated FM carriers for recording on separate tape tracks or modulated FM subcarriers for subsequent multiplexing and direct recording on tape in the California Network format. 3. An analog magnetic tape recorder: e.g. the PI 5100 (15/80 ips recording in the FM mode or in the direct mode with the 'broad-band' variant-of the Cal Net multiplex system, or 15/16 ips recording in the direct mode with the standard Cal Net multiplex system), or the Sony TC-126 cassette recorder operating in the direct record mode with the standard Cal Net multiplex system. 4. Appropriate magnetic tape playback equipment: e.g., the Bell and Howell 3700-B for the PI-5100 or

  10. SHAKE modelling of seismic site effects based on data recorded in Bucharest City, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, A.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Hannich, D.; Balan, St.

    2009-04-01

    motion incident at the bottom of each 1D model. Because of the lack of outcropping bedrock in the Bucharest area, a seismic signal recorded in a borehole (PRI station, 52 m depth) at a moderate earthquake (Mw= 6), is used as input for the entire study area. Based on 1D models, a map with variation of the spectral acceleration was constructed for the central area of the city, where great variation in the PGA values were recorded at the last moderate Vrancea earthquake from 27.10.2004.

  11. Converted seismic wave analysis in the Gulf of Corinth region by using local eartquake records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, D.; Virieux, J.; Monfret, T.; Monteiller, V.; Got, J.-L.; Lyon-Caen, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the framework of the 3F Corinth project, we have analyzed seismograms of passive tomographic experiments deployed previously around the Aigion area in the western Gulf of Corinth. We have successfully tracked possible converted PS and SP phases. These phases might bring constraints in tectonic and geometrical description of this extension zone. Seismic data recorded by both a two months passive tomographic experiment in 1991 and an aftershock study in 1995 have been organized for converted phase analysis. In order to do so, obtaining an accurate background smooth velocity structure was essential. Therefore we have developed both a seismic tomographic linearized inversion and a global search investigation of converted phases on an arbitrary interface using the same interpolation of velocity structure, travel-time estimation and partial differential kernel for the tomographic part. A smooth velocity structure is deduced from our data set which reproduces globally previous tomographic results. We introduced a curved interface described by a B-spline interpolation without any modification of the background velocity structure. Transmitted as well as reflected PS and SP theoretical travel-times are computed for different interface geometries and depths. Move-out and mutes of seismograms are performed by using these theoretical travel-times. On these windows, different signal processing techniques, based on component rotation, component product, polarization analysis and stacking techniques, are applied in order to emphasize seismic wave energy associated with converted phases. We have detected an important concentration of seismic wave energy associated with a sub-horizontal interface lying between 5 km and 8 km in relation with our background structure. Sensibility of energy concentration with respect to the shape on the interface will be presented and discussed. The detection of possible flat interface at the bottom of the superficial crust will introduce

  12. Composition and variation of noise recorded at the Yellowknife Seismic Array, 1991-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koper, K.D.; De Foy, B.; Benz, H.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze seismic noise recorded on the 18 short-period, vertical component seismometers of the Yellowknife Seismic Array (YKA). YKA has an aperture of 23 km and is sited on cratonic lithosphere in an area with low cultural noise. These properties make it ideal for studying natural seismic noise at periods of 1-3 s. We calculated frequency-wave number spectra in this band for over 6,000 time windows that were extracted once per day for 17 years (1991-2007). Slowness analysis reveals a rich variety of seismic phases originating from distinct source regions: Rg waves from the Great Slave Lake; Lg waves from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic Oceans; and teleseismic P waves from the north Pacific and equatorial mid-Atlantic regions. The surface wave energy is generated along coastlines, while the body wave energy is generated at least in part in deep-water, pelagic regions. Surface waves tend to dominate at the longer periods and, just as in earthquake seismograms, Lg is the most prominent arrival. Although the periods we study are slightly shorter than the classic double-frequency microseismic band of 4-10 s, the noise at YKA has clear seasonal behavior that is consistent with the ocean wave climate in the Northern Hemisphere. The temporal variation of most of the noise sources can be well fit using just two Fourier components: yearly and biyearly terms that combine to give a fast rise in microseismic power from mid-June through mid-October, followed by a gradual decline. The exception is the Rg energy from the Great Slave Lake, which shows a sharp drop in noise power over a 2-week period in November as the lake freezes. The L g noise from the east has a small but statistically significant positive slope, perhaps implying increased ocean wave activity in the North Atlantic over the last 17 years. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. The CSMS (Configurable Seismic Monitoring System) Poorboy deployment: Seismic recording in Pinedale, Wyoming, of the Bullion NTS (Nevada Test Site) nuclear test under the verification provisions of the new TTBT protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.E.; Rock, D.W.; Carlson, R.C.

    1990-07-10

    The Configurable Seismic Monitoring System (CSMS), developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was deployed in a 13-m deep vault on the AFTAC facility at Pinedale, Wyoming to record the Bullion nuclear test. The purpose of the exercise was to meet all provisions of the new TTBT protocol on in-country seismic recording at a Designated Seismic Station (DSS). The CSMS successfully recorded the Bullion event consistent with and meeting all requirements in the new treaty protocol. In addition, desirable seismic system features not specified in the treaty protocol were determined; treaty protocol ambiguities were identified, and useful background noise recordings at the Pinedale site were obtained. 10 figs.

  14. Pyrometamorphism of Fault Zone Rocks Induced by Frictional Heating in High-velocity Friction Tests: Reliable Records of Seismic Slip?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ree, J.; Ando, J.; Kim, J.; Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-12-01

    Recognition of seismic slip zone is important for a better understanding of earthquake generation processes in fault zones and paleoseismology. However, there has been no reliable record of ancient seismic slip except pseudotachylyte. Recently, it has been suggested that decomposition (dehydration or decarbonation) products due to frictional heating can be used as a seismic slip record. The decomposition products, however, can be easily rehydrated or recarbonated with pervasive fluid migration in the fault zone after seismic slip, raising some question about their stability as a seismic slip record. Here, we review microstructural and mineralogical changes of the simulated fault zones induced by frictional heating (pyrometamorphism) from high-velocity friction tests (HVFT) on siltstone, sandstone and carbonates at seismic slip rates, and discuss on their stability after seismic slip. HVFT on siltstone generates pseuodotachylyte in the principal slip zone (0.30-0.75 mm thick) with 'damage' layer (0.1-0.2 mm thick) along its margins. Chlorite in the damage layer suffers an incipient dehydration with many voids (0.2-1.0 μm in diameter) in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), appearing as dark tiny spots both in plane-polarized light and back-scattered electron (BSE) photomicrographs. HVFT on brown sandstone induces a color change of wall rocks adjacent to the principal slip zone (brown to red) due to the dehydration of iron hydroxides with frictional heating. These dehydration products in siltstone and sandstone due to frictional heating may be unstable since they would be easily rehydrated with fluid infiltration after a seismic slip. HVFT on carbonates including Carrara marble and siderite-bearing gouges produces decarbonation products of nano-scale lime (CaO) and magnetite (Fe3O4), respectively. Lime is a very unstable phase whereas magnetite is a stable and thus may be used as an indicator of seismic slip. The simulated fault zones of Carrara marble contain

  15. Ship Noise in the SW Indian Ocean Recorded by Ocean Bottom Seismic and Hydroacoustic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barruol, G.; Dreo, R.; Fontaine, F. R.; Scholz, J. R.; Sigloch, K.

    2016-12-01

    In the frame of the RHUM-RUM project (Réunion Hotspot and Upper Mantle - Réunions Unterer Mantel, www.rhum-rum.net), a network of 57 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) has been installed on the ocean floor around La Réunion Island, but also on the neighbouring Southwest and Central Indian Ridges. The OBS were equipped by wide- and broad-band three-components seismic and hydroacoustic sensors. They were deployed in Nov. 2012, and depending on the configuration, they recorded for 8 to 13 months. Interestingly, part of the network was located beneath a NE-SW trending lane of very dense ship traffic connecting SE-Asia and the South-Atlantic region. By combining the vessel position - provided by AIS GPS data - and our geophysical data recorded on the ocean floor, we analyze the seismic and hydroacoustic ship signatures. From spectral analyzes, we show clear signals over the whole high-frequency range available from our instruments (between 1 and 50 Hz). The RHUM-RUM network covering latitude between 17 and 34° South, this allows to detect numerous vessels and to compare the noise characteristics (frequency content, polarization) of each vessel. We also investigate the possibility of using the polarization of the noise emitted by ships passing above an ocean-bottom seismometer, to help retrieving the orientation of the OBS horizontal components on the ocean floor in the geographic reference frame.

  16. Detection and identification of seismic signals recorded at Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibs-von Seht, M.

    2008-10-01

    The Anak Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) has been monitored by a multi-parametric system since 2005. A variety of signal types can be observed in the records of the seismic stations installed on the island volcano. These include volcano-induced signals such as LP, VT, and tremor-type events as well as signals not originating from the volcano such as regional tectonic earthquakes and transient noise signals. The work presented here aims at the realization of a system that automatically detects and identifies the signals in order to estimate and monitor current activity states of the volcano. An artificial neural network approach was chosen for the identification task. A set of parameters was defined, describing waveform and spectrogram properties of events detected by an amplitude-ratio-based (STA/LTA) algorithm. The parameters are fed into a neural network which is, after a training phase, able to generalize input data and identify corresponding event types. The success of the identification depends on the network architecture and training strategy. Several tests have been performed in order to determine appropriate network layout and training for the given problem. The performance of the final system is found to be well suited to get an overview of the seismic activity recorded at the volcano. The reliability of the network classifier, as well as general drawbacks of the methods used, are discussed.

  17. Seismic and acoustic recordings of an unusually large rockfall at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Matoza, R. S.; Garcés, M. A.; Hedlin, M. A. H.; Bowers, D.; Scott, W. E.; Sherrod, D. R.; Vallance, J. W.

    2008-10-01

    On 29 May 2006 a large rockfall off the Mount St. Helens lava dome produced an atmospheric plume that was reported by airplane pilots to have risen to 6,000 m above sea level and interpreted to be a result of an explosive event. However, subsequent field reconnaissance found no evidence of a ballistic field, indicating that there was no explosive component. The rockfall produced complex seismic and infrasonic signals, with the latter recorded at sites 0.6 and 13.4 km from the source. An unusual, very long-period (50 s) infrasonic signal was recorded, a signal we model as the result of air displacement. Two high-frequency infrasonic signals are inferred to result from the initial contact of a rock slab with the ground and from interaction of displaced air with a depression at the base of the active lava dome.

  18. Seismic and acoustic recordings of an unusually large rockfall at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Matoza, R.S.; Garces, M.A.; Hedlin, M.A.H.; Bowers, D.; Scott, W.E.; Sherrod, D.R.; Vallance, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    On 29 May 2006 a large rockfall off the Mount St. Helens lava dome produced an atmospheric plume that was reported by airplane pilots to have risen to 6,000 m above sea level and interpreted to be a result of an explosive event. However, subsequent field reconnaissance found no evidence of a ballistic field, indicating that there was no explosive component. The rockfall produced complex seismic and infrasonic signals, with the latter recorded at sites 0.6 and 13.4 km from the source. An unusual, very long-period (50 s) infrasonic signal was recorded, a signal we model as the result of air displacement. Two high-frequency infrasonic signals are inferred to result from the initial contact of a rock slab with the ground and from interaction of displaced air with a depression at the base of the active lava dome. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Synthesizing ocean bottom pressure records including seismic wave and tsunami contributions: Toward realistic tests of monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tatsuhiko; Tsushima, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    The present study proposes a method for synthesizing the ocean bottom pressure records during a tsunamigenic earthquake. First, a linear seismic wave simulation is conducted with a kinematic earthquake fault model as a source. Then, a nonlinear tsunami simulation is conducted using the sea bottom movement calculated in the seismic wave simulation. By using these simulation results, this method can provide realistic ocean bottom pressure change data, including both seismic and tsunami contributions. A simple theoretical consideration indicates that the dynamic pressure change caused by the sea bottom acceleration can contribute significantly until the duration of 90 s for a depth of 4000 m in the ocean. The performance of a tsunami monitoring system was investigated using the synthesized ocean bottom pressure records. It indicates that the system based on the hydrostatic approximation could not measure the actual tsunami height when the time does not elapse enough. The dynamic pressure change and the permanent sea bottom deformation inside the source region break the condition of a simple hydrostatic approximation. A tsunami source estimation method of tFISH is also examined. Even though the synthesized records contain a large dynamic pressure change, which is not considered in the algorithm, tFISH showed a satisfactory performance 5 min after the earthquake occurrence. The pressure records synthesized in this study, including both seismic wave and tsunami contributions, are more practical for evaluating the performance of our monitoring ability, whereas most tsunami monitoring tests neglect the seismic wave contribution.

  20. The Katla volcanic system imaged using local earthquakes recorded with a temporary seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeddi, Zeinab; Tryggvason, Ari; Gudmundsson, Ólafur

    2016-10-01

    Katla is one of the most active subglacial volcanoes in Iceland. A temporary seismic network was operated on and around Katla for 2.5 years. A subset of 800 analyzed local earthquakes clustered geographically in four regions: (1) the caldera, (2) the western region, (3) the southern rim, and (4) the eastern rim of the glacier. Based on the frequency content of recorded seismograms, each event was labeled as volcano tectonic (VT), long period (LP), or `Mixed'. The southern cluster consists of LP events only, and the eastern cluster consists of VT events, while the western cluster is `Mixed' although primarily LP. The caldera seismicity is confined to a subregion centered in the northeastern part of the caldera above 1 km below sea level (bsl) and gradually deepens away from its center to about 4 km depth. Deeper events are almost all VT, whereas LP events in the center of caldera locate at shallow depths. This is also where the velocities are lowest in the top 3 km of the crust of our 3-D tomographic model. A high-velocity core ( 6.5 km/s) is found at 4 km bsl beneath this low-velocity zone. We propose that a "subcaldera" may be developing within the present caldera and suggest a conceptual model for Katla volcano with a thin volume ( 1 km thick) that may host hot rhyolitic material in the shallow crust below the relocated seismic activity and above the high-velocity core. We interpret this core to consist of mafic cumulates resulting from fractionation of mafic intrusions and partial melting of subsiding hydrothermally altered rocks.

  1. Detection of Temporally and Spatially Limited Periodic Earthquake Recurrence in Synthetic Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Arrowsmith, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of fault behavior are dominated by complex interactions among the multiple processes controlling the system. For example, temporal and spatial variations in pore pressure, healing effects, and stress transfer cause significant heterogeneities in fault properties and the stress-field at the sub-fault level. Numerical and laboratory fault models show that the interaction of large systems of fault elements causes the entire system to develop into a state of self-organized criticality. Once in this state, small perturbations of the system may result in chain reactions (i.e., earthquakes) which can affect any number of fault segments. This sensitivity to small perturbations is strong evidence for chaotic fault behavior, which implies that exact event prediction is not possible. However, earthquake prediction with a useful accuracy is nevertheless possible. Studies of other natural chaotic systems have shown that they may enter states of metastability, in which the system's behavior is predictable. Applying this concept to earthquake faults, these windows of metastable behavior should be characterized by periodic earthquake recurrence. The observed periodicity of the Parkfield, CA (M= 6) events may resemble such a window of metastability. I am statistically analyzing numerically generated seismic records to study these phases of periodic behavior. In this preliminary study, seismic records were generated using a model introduced by Nakanishi [Phys. Rev. A, 43, 6613-6621, 1991]. It consists of a one-dimensional chain of blocks (interconnected by springs) with a relaxation function that mimics velocity-weakened frictional behavior. The earthquakes occurring in this model show generally a power-law frequency-size distribution. However, for large events the distribution has a shoulder where the frequency of events is higher than expected from the power law. I have analyzed time-series of single block motions within the system. These time-series include

  2. Rupture process of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake from near-fault seismic waveform and geodetic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ahyi; Dreger, Douglas S.

    2008-07-01

    The 28 September 2004 Parkfield earthquake, arguably the best recorded earthquake ever, allows for detailed investigation of finite-source models and their resolution. We have developed finite-source models using GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar geodetic data and seismic strong motion waveform data (f ≤ 0.5 Hz) both independently and combined. The preferred model shows that the rupture is predominantly unilateral to the NW with a small component to the SE. Slip is concentrated into two primary patches, one near the hypocenter and the other between 10 and 23 km to the NW within a narrow depth range (5-13 km). The scalar seismic moment is 1.3 × 1018 N m (Mw 6.0), the overall rupture length is 23 km, the peak slip is 0.45 m, and the rupture velocity is 2.6 km/s. The average static stress drop obtained from the spatially distributed slip model is 2.3 MPa, and peak values are 10 MPa. A detailed sensitivity and resolution analysis shows that the recovered slip, the average rupture velocity, risetime, and slip velocity are well resolved.

  3. Infrasound and seismic signals from Baikonur spaceport rocket launches recorded by Kazakh stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexandr; Sokolova, Inna; Mikhailova, Natalya

    2015-04-01

    The monitoring network of the Institute of Geophysical Researches, Kazakhstan consists of 2 infrasound arrays, 8 seismic arrays and 7 3C stations. 5 of these stations are a part of IMS CTBTO. The Institute of Geophysical Researches monitors round-the-clock many sorts of seismoacoustic events. Tens of rockets are launched every year from Baikonur spaceport located in Central Kazakhstan. Baikonur rockets fly over several regions of Kazakhstan. Kazakh monitoring stations record launches, rocket stage falls, satellite recovery and sometimes accidents. A catalog of events associated with such activity is built. Some waveform features are collected. The catalog also contains some kinematic and dynamic parameters of the events sources. The signals from accidents of Dnepr rocket of July 26, 2006 and Proton rocket of September 5, 2007 and of July 2, 2013 were studied in details. Discrimination of the events associated with spaceport activity and its exclusion from seismic bulletins allows improving the bulletins quality. And in case of accident this information helps to estimate the event parameters and to start recovery procedures in proper time.

  4. Structure of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge from seismic reflection records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Janet L.; Sleep, Norman H.; Normark, William R.; Tompkins, Donald H.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four-channel seismic reflection records were obtained from the axial region of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. Two profiles are normal to the strike of the spreading center and intersect the ridge at latitude 44°40′N and 45°05′N; a third profile extends south along the ridge axis from latitude 45°20′N and crosses the Blanco Fracture Zone. Processing of the axial portions of the cross-strike lines resolved a weak reflection centered beneath the axis. The reflector is at a depth similar to seismically detected magma chambers on the East Pacific Rise and a Lau Basin spreading center; we suggest that the reflector represents the top of an axial magma chamber. In the migrated sections the top of the probable magma chamber is relatively flat and 1–2 km wide, and the subbottom depth of the chamber is greater where the depth to the ridge axis is greater.

  5. Seismicity in 2010 and major earthquakes recorded and located in Costa Rica from 1983 until 2012, by the local OVSICORI-UNA seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronnie, Q.; Segura, J.; Burgoa, B.; Jimenez, W.; McNally, K. C.

    2013-05-01

    This work is the result of the analysis of existing information in the earthquake database of the Observatorio Sismológico y Vulcanológico de Costa Rica, Universidad Nacional (OVSICORI-UNA), and seeks disclosure of basic seismological information recorded and processed in 2010. In this year there was a transition between the software used to record, store and locate earthquakes. During the first three months of 2010, we used Earthworm (http://folkworm.ceri.memphis.edu/ew-doc), SEISAN (Haskov y Ottemoller, 1999) and Hypocenter (Lienert y Haskov, 1995) to capture, store and locate the earthquakes, respectively; in April 2010, ANTELOPE (http://www.brtt.com/software.html) start to be used for recording and storing and GENLOC (Fan at al, 2006) and LOCSAT (Bratt and Bache 1988), to locate earthquakes. GENLOC was used for local events and LOCSAT for regional and distant earthquakes. The local earthquakes were located using the 1D velocity model of Quintero and Kissling (2001) and for regional and distant earthquakes IASPEI91 (Kennett and Engdahl, 1991) was used. All the events for 2010 and shown in this work were rechecked by the authors. We located 3903 earthquakes in and around Costa Rica and 746 regional and distant seismic events were recorded (see Figure 1). In this work we also give a summary of major earthquakes recorded and located by OVSICORI-UNA network between 1983 and 2012. Seismicity recorded by OVSICORI-UNA network in 2010

  6. Writing user selectable data on the extended header of seismic recordings made on the Texas Instruments DFS-V

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    A circuit has been developed to allow the writing of up to 192 digits of user-selectable data on a portion of tape called extended header, which is always available for use before each DFS-V seismic record is written. Such data could include navigation information, air gun and streamer depth and shot times.

  7. Paleogeodetic records of seismic and aseismic subduction from central Sumatran microatolls, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Natawidjaja, D.H.; Sieh, K.; Ward, S.N.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Galetzka, J.; Suwargadi, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    We utilize coral microatolls in western Sumatra to document vertical deformation associated with subduction. Microatolls are very sensitive to fluctuations in sea level and thus act as natural tide gauges. They record not only the magnitude of vertical deformation associated with earthquakes (paleoseismic data), but also continuously track the long-term aseismic deformation that occurs during the intervals between earthquakes (paleogeodetic data). This paper focuses on the twentieth century paleogeodetic history of the equatorial region. Our coral paleogeodetic record of the 1935 event reveals a classical example of deformations produced by seismic rupture of a shallow subduction interface. The site closest to the trench rose 90 cm, whereas sites further east sank by as much as 35 cm. Our model reproduces these paleogeodetic data with a 2.3 m slip event on the interface 88 to 125 km from the trench axis. Our coral paleogeodetic data reveal slow submergence during the decades before and after the event in the areas of coseismic emergence. Likewise, interseismic emergence occurred before and after the 1935 event in areas of coseismic submergence. Among the interesting phenomenon we have discovered in the coral record is evidence of a large aseismic slip or "silent even" in 1962, 27 years after the 1935 event. Paleogeodetic deformation rates in the decades before, after, and between the 1935 and 1962 events have varied both temporally and spatially. During the 25 years following the 1935 event, submergence rates were dramatically greater than in prior decades. During the past four decades, however, rates have been lower than in the preceding decades, but are still higher than they were prior to 1935. These paleogeodetic records enable us to model the kinematics of the subduction interface throughout the twentieth century. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Design and implementation of a low-cost multichannel seismic noise recorder for array measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler-Llorens, Juan Luis; Juan Giner-Caturla, Jose; Molina-Palacios, Sergio; Galiana-Merino, Juan Jose; Rosa-Herranz, Julio; Agea-Medina, Noelia

    2017-04-01

    Soil characterization is the starting point for seismic hazard studies. Currently, the methods based on ambient noise measurements are very used because they are non-invasive methods and relatively easy to implement in urban areas. Among these methods, the analysis of array measurements provides the dispersion curve and subsequently the shear-wave velocity profile associated to the site under study. In this case, we need several sensors recording simultaneously and a data acquisition system with one channel by sensor, what can become the complete equipment unaffordable for small research groups. In this work, we have designed and implemented a low-cost multichannel ambient noise recorder for array measurements. The complete system is based on Arduino, an open source electronic development platform, which allows recording 12 differential input channels simultaneously. Besides, it is complemented with a conditioning circuit that includes an anti-aliasing filter and a selectable gain between 0 and 40dB. The data acquisition is set up through a user-friendly graphical user interface. It is important to note that the electronic scheme as well as the programming code are open hardware and software, respectively, so it allows other researchers to suite the system to their particular requirements. The developed equipment has been tested at several sites around the province of Alicante (southeast of Spain), where the soil characteristics are well-known from previous studies. Array measurements have been taken and after that, the recorded data have been analysed using the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) and the extended spatial autocorrelation (ESAC) methods. The comparison of the obtained dispersion curves with the ones obtained in previous studies shows the suitability of the implemented low-cost system for array measurements.

  9. Matlab software for the analysis of seismic waves recorded by three-element arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatelli, A.; Giuntini, A.; Console, R.

    2008-07-01

    We develop and implement an algorithm for inverting three-element array data on a Matlab platform. The algorithm allows reliable estimation of back azimuth and apparent velocity from seismic records under low signal-to-noise conditions. We start with a cubic spline interpolation of the waveforms and determine the differences between arrival times at pairs of array elements. The time differences are directly computed from cross-correlation functions. The advantages of this technique are (a) manual picking of the onset of each arrival is not necessary at each array element; (b) interpolation makes it possible to estimate time differences at a higher resolution than the sampling rate of the digital waveforms; (c) consistency among three independent determinations provides a reliability check; and (d) the value of apparent velocity indicates the nature of the recorded wavelet and physically checks the results. The algorithm was tested on data collected by a tri-partite array (with an aperture of ˜250 m) deployed in 1998 by the National Data Center of Israel, during a field experiment in southern Israel, 20 km southwest of the Dead Sea. The data include shallow explosions and natural earthquakes under both high and low signal-to-noise conditions. The procedure developed in this study is considered suitable for searching of small aftershocks subsequent to an underground explosion, in the context of on-site inspections according to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT).

  10. Analysis of Background Seismic Noise Recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Aster, R.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Butler, R.

    2006-12-01

    station. Therefore, encroachment of any of these noise sources into the Quiet Sector will adversely affect the signal-to-noise ratio in the frequencies above 1 Hz for seismograms recorded at QSPA. At this point, QSPA is by far the quietest seismic station in the world at these high frequencies. We hope that we can preserve these low background noise levels and keep the QSPA one of the quietest places on Earth.

  11. Seismic slip recorded in tourmaline fault mirrors from Elba Island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, C.; Brogi, A.; Liotta, D.; Mugnaioli, E.; Spiess, R.; Dini, A.; Zucchi, M.; Vannuccini, G.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the first example of fault mirrors developed in an unusual protolith, consisting of tourmaline crystals with interstitial goethite. The deformation mechanisms active in the fault zone have been investigated from the outcrop to the nanoscale, aiming to identify possible traces of frictional heating at seismic slip rate, as observed for other fault mirrors in different protoliths. The investigation revealed the superposition of two main deformational stages. The first was dominated by brittle processes and produced a cataclastic/ultracataclastic principal slip zone, a few mm thick; the second was associated with seismic slip and produced a sharp discontinuity (the principal slip surface) within the cataclastic/ultracataclastic zone. The mirror-like coating, a few microns thick, occurs on the principal slip surface, and is characterized by 1) absence of interstitial goethite; 2) occurrence of truncated tourmaline crystals; 3) highly variable grain size, from 200 μm to 200 nm; 4) tourmaline close packing with interlobate grain boundaries, and 5) tourmaline random crystallographic orientation. Micro and nanostructural investigations indicate the occurrence of thermally-activated processes, involving both interstitial goethite and tourmaline. In particular, close to the principal slip surface, goethite is completely decomposed, and produced an amorphous porous material, with local topotactic recrystallization of hematite. Tourmaline clasts are typically characterized by strongly lobate boundaries, indicative of reaction and partial decomposition at grain boundaries. TEM observations revealed the occurrence of tourmaline nanograins, a few tens of nm in size, characterized by rounded shape and fading amorphous boundaries, that cannot be obtained by brittle processes. Lastly, the peculiar interlobate microstructure of the mirror surface is interpreted as the result of grain boundary recrystallization processes taking place by deformation at high

  12. Recorded earthquake responses from the integrated seismic monitoring network of the Atwood Building, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated seismic monitoring system with a total of 53 channels of accelerometers is now operating in and at the nearby free-field site of the 20-story steel-framed Atwood Building in highly seismic Anchorage, Alaska. The building has a single-story basement and a reinforced concrete foundation without piles. The monitoring system comprises a 32-channel structural array and a 21-channel site array. Accelerometers are deployed on 10 levels of the building to assess translational, torsional, and rocking motions, interstory drift (displacement) between selected pairs of adjacent floors, and average drift between floors. The site array, located approximately a city block from the building, comprises seven triaxial accelerometers, one at the surface and six in boreholes ranging in depths from 15 to 200 feet (???5-60 meters). The arrays have already recorded low-amplitude shaking responses of the building and the site caused by numerous earthquakes at distances ranging from tens to a couple of hundred kilometers. Data from an earthquake that occurred 186 km away traces the propagation of waves from the deepest borehole to the roof of the building in approximately 0.5 seconds. Fundamental structural frequencies [0.58 Hz (NS) and 0.47 Hz (EW)], low damping percentages (2-4%), mode coupling, and beating effects are identified. The fundamental site frequency at approximately 1.5 Hz is close to the second modal frequencies (1.83 Hz NS and 1.43 EW) of the building, which may cause resonance of the building. Additional earthquakes prove repeatability of these characteristics; however, stronger shaking may alter these conclusions. ?? 2006, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  13. Coupling Hydrodynamic and Wave Propagation Codes for Modeling of Seismic Waves recorded at the SPE Test.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmat, C. S.; Rougier, E.; Delorey, A.; Steedman, D. W.; Bradley, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to bring empirical and theoretical advances to the problem of detection and identification of underground nuclear explosions. For this, the SPE program includes a strong modeling effort based on first principles calculations with the challenge to capture both the source and near-source processes and those taking place later in time as seismic waves propagate within complex 3D geologic environments. In this paper, we report on results of modeling that uses hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus and CASH) coupled with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. For modeling the near source region, we employ a fully-coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) modeling capability with a new continuum-based visco-plastic fracture model for simulation of damage processes, called AZ_Frac. These capabilities produce high-fidelity models of various factors believed to be key in the generation of seismic waves: the explosion dynamics, a weak grout-filled borehole, the surrounding jointed rock, and damage creation and deformations happening around the source and the free surface. SPECFEM3D, based on the Spectral Element Method (SEM) is a direct numerical method for full wave modeling with mathematical accuracy. The coupling interface consists of a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated inside of the hydrodynamic code's domain. Displacement time series at these points are computed using output data from CASH or Abaqus (by interpolation if needed) and fed into the time marching scheme of SPECFEM3D. We will present validation tests with the Sharpe's model and comparisons of waveforms modeled with Rg waves (2-8Hz) that were recorded up to 2 km for SPE. We especially show effects of the local topography, velocity structure and spallation. Our models predict smaller amplitudes of Rg waves for the first five SPE shots compared to pure elastic models such as Denny &Johnson (1991).

  14. Variations of local seismic response in Benevento (Southern Italy) using earthquakes and ambient noise recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Improta, Luigi; di Giulio, Giuseppe; Rovelli, Antonio

    The city of Benevento (Southern Italy) has been repeatedly struck by large historical earthquakes. A heterogeneous geologic structure and widespread soft soil conditions make the estimation of site effects crucial for the seismic hazard assessment of the city. From 2000 until 2004, we installed seismic stations to collect earthquake data over zones with different geological conditions. Despite the high level of urban noise, we recorded more than 150 earthquakes at twelve sites. This data set yields the first, well documented experimental evidence for weak to moderate local amplifications. We investigated site effects primarily by the classical spectral ratio technique (CSR) using a rock station placed on the Benevento hill as reference. All sites in the Calore river valley and in the eastern part of the Benevento hill show a moderate high-frequency (f > 4 Hz) amplification peak. Conversely, sites in the Sabato river valley share weak-to-moderate amplification in a wide frequency band (from 1-2 to 7-10 Hz), without evident frequency peaks. Application of no-reference-site techniques to earthquake and noise data confirms the results of the CSRs in the sites of the Calore river valley and of the eastern part of the Benevento hill, but fails in providing indications for site effects in the Sabato river valley, being the H/V ratios nearly flat. One-dimensional modeling indicates that the ground motion amplification can be essentially explained in terms of a vertically varying geologic structure. High-frequency narrow peaks are caused by the strong impedance contrast existing between near-surface soft deposits and stiff cemented conglomerates. Conversely, broad-band amplifications in the Sabato river valley are likely due to a more complex layering with weak impedance contrasts both in the shallow and deep structure of the valley.

  15. Transient Creep and Mechanical Instabilities - Microstructural Records of Aseismic to Seismic Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Within the overall framework of a layered seismic-aseismic crust, mixed-mode brittle-ductile deformation along faults and shear zones occurs at all crustal depths regardless of the ambient pressure and temperature; earthquake rupture occurs in the deepest crust, while upper crustal faults evolve to aseismic shear zones. The mechanics of this transition at a local scale have implications for the evolution of crustal-scale phenomena. These include the periodicity of seismic events, whether ductile shear at depth drives upper crustal earthquakes or vice versa and the rupture history of apparently weak faults. Transitions from ductile flow to brittle rupture at a range of crustal levels exhibit microstructural commonalities e.g. plagioclase and pyroxene in granulites, calcite in sub-greenschist rocks. The primary difficulty in elucidating these microstructural transitions resides in the tendency of ductile and brittle effects to destroy evidence of the other. Given the latter issue, the diversity of deformation histories preserved in the rock record present a fruitful ground for study. Several field examples are described where steady-state dislocation creep (glide + climb) substructures typical of the background deformation are replaced by a predominance of dislocation glide and recrystallization, reflecting the inability of recovery processes to match the strain hardening rate of interacting dislocations. The dominance of dislocation glide (crystal plasticity) in a Peierls or cross-slip deformation regime is particularly significant because of its role in enhancing the thermo-mechanical feedback that favors ductile localization during the lead up to discrete rupture. Localization can in many cases be initiated by material changes in the form of introduction of weaker rocks such as coarse-grained pegmatites and veins.

  16. 15/16 ips Operation of the Precision Instrument Company Model P15100 tape recorder to record the standard (30 Hz) NCER seismic data multiplex system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1976-01-01

    In recent months the need has arisen to record special seismic networks consisting of a dozen or more standard NCER seismic systems telemetered to a central collection point on a reliable, portable, low-power tape recorder. Because of its simplicity and the ease with which it can be adapted for the purpose, the PI 5100 field recorder should be considered for such use. In the tests described here, a PI 5100 was speeded up to run at 15/16 inches per second (ips) and signals from the standard multiplex system test modulator bank were recorded on one tape track by means of a simple, improvised AM record amplifier. The results of these tests are extremely encouraging: the dynamic range of the system when played back on the Bell and Howell Model 3700 B reproduce machine, with subtractive compensation, is nearly as high as for the system employing the B&H 3700 B for recording. These notes indicate the principle employed to speed up the recorder, outline the circuit required to drive the tape heads in the AM record mode, and describe the tests carried out to evaluate the system's performance.

  17. Seismic Site Effects from the Seafloor Motion Recorded by the Short-period Ocean Bottom Seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Cheng, W. B.; Chin, S. J.; Hsu, S. K.; Dong, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    For decades, it has been mentioned that submarine slope failures are spatially linked to the presence of gas hydrates/gas-charged sediments. When triggered by earthquakes, oversteepen and instable sediments may prompt breakouts of the slopes containing gas hydrates and cause submarine landslides and tsunamis. Widely distributed BSRs have been observed in the area offshore of southwestern Taiwan where the active accretionary complex meets with the passive China continental margin. In the region, large or small scale landslides were also reported based on seismic interpretations. In order to clarify the link between earthquake, landslide and the presence of gas hydrate, we evaluate the response of seafloor sediments in regard to passive dynamic loads. Horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratios are used to characterize the local sediment response. Ambient noise as well as distant earthquakes are used as generators of the passive dynamic loads. Based on this study, we aim to characterize the site in terms of its physical properties and the local site effect produced by shallow marine sediments. The results show that the maximum H/V ratios appeared in the range of 5-10 Hz, where the horizontal amplitudes increased by an order of magnitude relative to the vertical amplitude. The stations located in the northwestern part of study area were characterized by another relatively small peak at proximately 2 Hz, which may indicates the presence of a discontinuity of sediments. For most stations, the H/V ratios estimated based on the earthquake (i.e. strong input signal) and noise (background, micro-seismic noise) records were characterized by different pattern. No distinct peak is observed for the H/V pattern calculated during earthquakes. This phenomenon may suggest that no clear sedimentary boundary exist when a stronger motion applies. Estimating H/V spectral ratios of data recorded by the seven short period OBSs (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) deployed in the southwest Taiwan

  18. High-Resolution Seismic Tomography from Dense Array Recordings of the August 23, 2011 Central Virginia Earthquake Aftershock Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, K.; Hole, J. A.; Chapman, M. C.; Han, L.; Quiros, D. A.; Brown, L. D.; Mooney, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    The M 5.8 earthquake on August 23, 2011 in Louisa Co. Virginia is the largest event recorded in the Central Virginia Seismic Zone. This intraplate seismic zone is comprised of many poorly-defined seismogenic structures. Specific faults responsible for earthquakes in the CVSZ and other eastern US seismic zones are usually not identified due to relatively low strain rates and sparse seismic networks. The August 23, 2011 event provided an opportunity to test a novel type of high-density aftershock deployment that will define the associated fault structures at higher resolution than traditional aftershock networks. The AIDA (Aftershock Imaging with Dense Arrays) survey was designed to record wavefields at sufficiently dense spacing to minimize spatial aliasing and lower the event detection threshold. This use of array methods will allow the location of aftershocks with high precision and the imaging of geologic structure with resolution on par with typical controlled-source crustal surveys. Beginning August 27, AIDA deployed 201 stations in three phases, including lines with 200-m station spacing above the aftershock zone and a 60-km profile of three-component sensors to quantify regional attenuation characteristics. Preliminary work has focused on joint tomography for seismic velocity and hypocenter locations, vertical seismic profile event stacking, and ambient noise imaging. Preliminary aftershock locations define a best-fitting plane striking ~25° and dipping 55° E, consistent with the moment tensor solution for the main shock. Work in progress includes locating more of the >1000 events that have high signal-to-noise, event imaging using reverse-time waveform migration, and applying interferometry methods to image earth structure. The resulting high-resolution subsurface images and aftershock characterization will help constrain the geologic model of the region, and provide a template for future high-density aftershock deployments.

  19. Automatic Detection and Identification of Seismic Signals Recorded at Krakatau Volcano (Indonesia) Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibs-von Seht, M.; Kniess, R.

    2006-12-01

    A number of different event types can be observed in the records of seismic stations operated on Krakatau volcano (Indonesia). These include volcano-induced signals such as LP, VT, and hybrid-type events as well as signals not originating from the volcano such as local and regional tectonic earthquakes and transient noise signals. The work presented here aims at the realization of a system that automatically detects and identifies the signals in order to estimate and monitor current activity states of the volcano. An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was chosen for the identification task. A set of parameters were defined, describing waveform and spectrogram properties of events detected by an STA/LTA algorithm. The parameters are fed into an ANN which is, after a training phase, able to generalize input data and identify corresponding event types. The success of the identification depends on the network architecture and training strategy. Several tests have been performed in order to determine an appropriate network layout and training intensity for the given problem. The resulting network shows a good performance. A practical implementation of the system for the volcano observatory routine is sketched.

  20. Low-frequency whale and seismic airgun sounds recorded in the mid-Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Nieukirk, Sharon L; Stafford, Kathleen M; Mellinger, David K; Dziak, Robert P; Fox, Christopher G

    2004-04-01

    Beginning in February 1999, an array of six autonomous hydrophones was moored near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35 degrees N-15 degrees N, 50 degrees W-33 degrees W). Two years of data were reviewed for whale vocalizations by visually examining spectrograms. Four distinct sounds were detected that are believed to be of biological origin: (1) a two-part low-frequency moan at roughly 18 Hz lasting 25 s which has previously been attributed to blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus); (2) series of short pulses approximately 18 s apart centered at 22 Hz, which are likely produced by fin whales (B. physalus); (3) series of short, pulsive sounds at 30 Hz and above and approximately 1 s apart that resemble sounds attributed to minke whales (B. acutorostrata); and (4) downswept, pulsive sounds above 30 Hz that are likely from baleen whales. Vocalizations were detected most often in the winter, and blue- and fin whale sounds were detected most often on the northern hydrophones. Sounds from seismic airguns were recorded frequently, particularly during summer, from locations over 3000 km from this array. Whales were detected by these hydrophones despite its location in a very remote part of the Atlantic Ocean that has traditionally been difficult to survey.

  1. Low-frequency whale and seismic airgun sounds recorded in the mid-Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieukirk, Sharon L.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Mellinger, David K.; Dziak, Robert P.; Fox, Christopher G.

    2004-04-01

    Beginning in February 1999, an array of six autonomous hydrophones was moored near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35 °N-15 °N, 50 °W-33 °W). Two years of data were reviewed for whale vocalizations by visually examining spectrograms. Four distinct sounds were detected that are believed to be of biological origin: (1) a two-part low-frequency moan at roughly 18 Hz lasting 25 s which has previously been attributed to blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus); (2) series of short pulses approximately 18 s apart centered at 22 Hz, which are likely produced by fin whales (B. physalus); (3) series of short, pulsive sounds at 30 Hz and above and approximately 1 s apart that resemble sounds attributed to minke whales (B. acutorostrata); and (4) downswept, pulsive sounds above 30 Hz that are likely from baleen whales. Vocalizations were detected most often in the winter, and blue- and fin whale sounds were detected most often on the northern hydrophones. Sounds from seismic airguns were recorded frequently, particularly during summer, from locations over 3000 km from this array. Whales were detected by these hydrophones despite its location in a very remote part of the Atlantic Ocean that has traditionally been difficult to survey.

  2. Seismic source associated with the repetitive events recorded at the Nevado del Huila volcano - Colombia in November 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, N.; Valdes-González, C. M.; White, R.; Dawson, P. B.; McCausland, W. A.; Santacoloma, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Nevado del Huila Volcano recorded an eruption on November 21st, 2008. This eruptive event was preceded by approximately 11,200 seismic events associated to fluids dynamic inside volcanic conduits. These seismic signals were classified as Hybrid events (HB), Long Period events (LP) and Drumbeat events, and they presented as fundamental characteristic, great regularity in the time, i. e. their waveforms and their bandwidths were very similar to each other. Cardona et al. (2009) made a first analysis of these signals and proposed the existence of two seismic families: the first integrated by LP events and HB events registered in the period, November 9th to November 21st; and second family composed by the Drumbeats events registered between November 20th and 21st. Our project took as starting point the work of Cardona et al. (2009); we establish the degree of similarity between events of each of the two families proposed by Cardona et al. (2009). First, we made a temporal analysis by using the Hilbert Transform, and then applied the cross-correlation technique. Finally a stacking of the signals with correlation coefficients > 0.9, was obtained. The results were: 8000 events with correlation coefficients > 0.9 and the existence of six possible seismic families. A detailed analysis of the seismic signals obtained through the stacking allowed us to conclude the existence of four families, the first one recorded between the 4th to 18th of November, the second one for the drumbeat events recorded on November 11th, the third one for the seismicity recorded between the 14th and 21st of November, and the four one for the drumbeat events registered on November 20th and 21st. We suggest that each of these families was associated with a different seismic source; so, the first and third families were possibly associated to mechanisms like brittle fracturing that can occur in weak areas where cracks or conduits intersect, and where acoustic resonance can occur, and the second

  3. Surface seismic measurements of near-surface P-and S-wave seismic velocities at earthquake recording stations, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Frankel, A.D.; Odum, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    We measured P-and S-wave seismic velocities to about 40-m depth using seismic-refraction/reflection data on the ground surface at 13 sites in the Seattle, Washington, urban area, where portable digital seismographs recently recorded earthquakes. Sites with the lowest measured Vs correlate with highest ground motion amplification. These sites, such as at Harbor Island and in the Duwamish River industrial area (DRIA) south of the Kingdome, have an average Vs in the upper 30 m (V??s30) of 150 to 170 m/s. These values of V??s30 place these sites in soil profile type E (V??s30 < 180 m/s). A "rock" site, located at Seward Park on Tertiary sedimentary deposits, has a V??S30 of 433 m/s, which is soil type C (V??s30: 360 to 760 m/s). The Seward Park site V??s30 is about equal to, or up to 200 m/s slower than sites that were located on till or glacial outwash. High-amplitude P-and S-wave seismic reflections at several locations appear to correspond to strong resonances observed in earthquake spectra. An S-wave reflector at the Kingdome at about 17 to 22 m depth probably causes strong 2-Hz resonance that is observed in the earthquake data near the Kingdome.

  4. Snap, Crackle, Pop: Dilational fault breccias record seismic slip below the brittle-plastic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, Ben L.; Rowe, Christie D.; Smit, Louis; Groenewald, Conrad; Lambert, Christopher W.; Macey, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Off-fault dynamic tensile cracks form behind an earthquake rupture front with distinct orientation and spacing. These cracks explode the wall rock and create breccias, which we hypothesize will preserve a unique fingerprint of dynamic rupture. Identification of these characteristic breccias may enable a new tool for identifying paleoseismic slip surfaces in the rock record. Using previous experimental and theoretical predictions, we develop a field-based model of dynamic dilational breccia formation. Experimental studies find that secondary tensile fracture networks comprise closely spaced fractures at angles of 70-90° from a slip surface, as well as fractures that branch at angles of ∼30° from a primary mode I fracture. The Pofadder Shear Zone, in Namibia and South Africa, preserves breccias formed in the brittle-ductile transition zone displaying fracture patterns consistent with those described above. Fracture spacing is approximately two orders of magnitude less than predicted by quasi-static models. Breccias are clast-supported, monomict and can display an abrupt transition from fracture network crackle breccia to mosaic breccia textures. Brecciation occurs by the intersection of off-fault dynamic fractures and wall rock fabric; this is in contrast to previous models of fluid pressure gradient-driven failure “implosion breccias”. This mechanism tends to form many similar sized clasts with particle size distributions that may not display self-similarity; where self-similarity is observed the distributions have relatively low D-values of 1.47±0.37, similar to other studies of dynamic processes. We measure slip distances at dilational breccia stepovers, estimating earthquake magnitudes between Mw 2.8-5.8 and associated rupture lengths of 0.023-3.3 km. The small calculated rupture dimensions, in combination with our geologic observations, suggest that some earthquakes nucleated within the quartz-plastic transitional zone and potentially record deep

  5. Cataloguing Seismic Waveform Properties Recorded With a 3D Network in a Gold Mine in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, J.; Nyblade, A. A.; Gok, R.; Walter, W. R.; Linzer, L.; Durrheim, R. J.; Dirks, P.

    2007-12-01

    The SAVUKA gold mine is located in the northwestern edge of the Witwatersrand basin, a Late Archean (3.07- 2.71~Ga) intracratonic basin in South Africa that hosts the largest known gold-uranium-pyrite ore deposits in the world. Seismic events related to the mine activity span several orders of magnitude through a variety of sources that include mine blasts, pillar collapses, and faulting events. These events are systematically recorded and catalogued through an in-mine, 3D seismic network consisting of 20, three-component, short-period stations with natural frequencies ranging between 4.5 and 28.0~Hz and deployed as deep as ~3.5 km. After 5 months of seismic monitoring of the mine, we have been able to assemble a database of over 6000 events spanning magnitudes in the -2.5 < ML < 4.4 range. The potential of this unique data set for characterizing the detailed seismic properties of the basin and studying source properties of non-double couple events is explored through simple, first-pass analysis on the recorded waveforms. Moreover, the in-mine network is complemented by a small array of 4 broadband stations interspaced ~10~km apart on the surface of the mine, and by a number of AfricaArray stations in South Africa and neighboring countries located at regional distances (50- 1000~km) from the mine. The largest mine-induced events are clearly recorded at distances as far away from the mine as 450~km and provide a unique opportunity for studying the regional propagation of seismic phases as well as the structure of the cratonic crust underlying the basin.

  6. Evaluation of the southern California seismic velocity models through simulation of recorded events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Khoshnevis, Naeem; Cheng, Keli

    2016-06-01

    Significant effort has been devoted over the last two decades to the development of various seismic velocity models for the region of southern California, United States. These models are mostly used in forward wave propagation simulation studies, but also as base models for tomographic and source inversions. Two of these models, the community velocity models CVM-S and CVM-H, are among the most commonly used for this region. This includes two alternative variations to the original models, the recently released CVM-S4.26 which incorporates results from a sequence of tomographic inversions into CVM-S, and the user-controlled option of CVM-H to replace the near-surface profiles with a VS30-based geotechnical model. Although either one of these models is regarded as acceptable by the modeling community, it is known that they have differences in their representation of the crustal structure and sedimentary deposits in the region, and thus can lead to different results in forward and inverse problems. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of these models when used to predict the ground motion in the greater Los Angeles region by means of an assessment of a collection of simulations of recent events. In total, we consider 30 moderate-magnitude earthquakes (3.5 < Mw < 5.5) between 1998 and 2014, and compare synthetics with data recorded by seismic networks during these events. The simulations are done using a finite-element parallel code, with numerical models that satisfy a maximum frequency of 1 Hz and a minimum shear wave velocity of 200 m s-1. The comparisons between data and synthetics are ranked quantitatively by means of a goodness-of-fit (GOF) criteria. We analyse the regional distribution of the GOF results for all events and all models, and draw conclusions from the results and how these correlate to the models. We find that, in light of our comparisons, the model CVM-S4.26 consistently yields better results.

  7. Effect of newly refined hypocenter locations on the seismic activity recorded during the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Tomoko Elizabeth; Matsubara, Makoto

    2017-05-01

    We present the results of relocating 17,544 hypocenters determined from data recorded during the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake sequence, during the interval between April 14, 2016, and August 31, 2016. For this, we used a double-difference relocation method to constrain high-resolution hypocenter locations by cross-correlation differential times as well as the NIED Hi-net catalog differential times. The sequence included two large events (on 14 April: M JMA6.5 and on 16 April: M JMA7.3) that occurred in a complicated region where the Hinagu and Futagawa faults meet. By comparing these high-resolution earthquake locations in three different periods [(P1) between 2001 and 2012; (P2) between M JMA6.5 and M JMA7.3; and (P3) between M JMA7.3 and August 31, 2016], we present the significant seismicity after the mainshock relative to the background seismicity. Events during the Kumamoto Earthquake sequence occurred generally within the same sites of known faults and background seismicity. For an example, the seismicity during period P2 formed a sharp linear shape along the northern part of the Hinagu fault for about 20 km. A series of linear seismicity events occurred during period P3 along the Futagawa fault to the east (for about 28 km), in the northern part of the Aso caldera, and in the Oita region around the Beppu-Haneyama fault zone. These events also extended to the mid- and southern parts of the Hinagu fault zone and were shaped only after the M7.3 event. Moreover, high-resolution hypocenter locations also allowed us to identify some clusters of events that occurred in regions where background seismicity has not been confirmed. For instance, activity on the northwestern edge of the Aso caldera and in small areas within the Beppu-Haneyama fault zone became apparent with new seismic activity. We also demonstrate herein the absence of seismicity between the northeast extension of the Futagawa fault zone and the Aso caldera region, which became clearly shown after the M7

  8. Insights into water level response to seismic waves: A 24 year high-fidelity record of global seismicity at Devils Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Matthew; Ge, Shemin

    2014-01-01

    We studied the 24 year record of water level responses in Devils Hole, Death Valley National Park, NV, to dynamic crustal stresses from earthquakes. The continuous water level record exhibited 219 responses from earthquakes around the world, displaying hydroseismogram and coseismic offset types of response. We found that the water level in Devils Hole is extremely sensitive to earthquakes, and the seismic energy density required to initiate both hydroseismogram and coseismic offset responses is e ~ 10-6 J/m3, 2 orders of magnitude smaller than previously documented. Multiple mechanisms at Devils Hole may be responsible for observed water level responses to distant earthquakes. The hydroseismogram-type responses are best explained by poroelastic deformation, while coseismic offset responses are likely the result of localized permeability changes. This study could have implication to studying dynamic triggering of earthquakes, as remote earthquakes can lead to pore pressure changes and consequently effective stress changes in fluid-filled fault zones.

  9. A tree fell in the forest, and SPREE heard it: seismic recording of the 2011 St. Croix Valley Blowdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, E.; van der Lee, S.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the Superior Province Rifting Earthscope Experiment (SPREE), 82 broadband seismic stations from the EarthScope Flexible Array pool were deployed by the SPREE team from April 2011 through October 2013, to explore the deep structure of the Mid-Continent Rift System (Stein et al., 2011). The deployment included two crosslines with approximate station spacing of 10 km centered near the northern Minnesota-Wisconsin border. Analysis of long-period noise reveals strong seasonal and diurnal variations (Wolin et al., 2015). On 1 July 2011, a severe thunderstorm system swept over the St. Croix Valley, passing directly over the dense SPREE array. This storm system was accompanied by a series of downbursts that generated straight-line winds in excess of 100 km/hr, resulting in extensive damage to hundreds of thousands of acres of forest. Seven SPREE stations were located in the path of the storm, with two stations in the center of areas that were heavily damaged by downbursts. The stations remained in operation throughout this extreme weather event, capturing a unique record of ground noise generated by the storm system. We compare available radar reflectivity data with seismic noise power spectra throughout the event and show that storm cells generated significant broadband seismic signals as they passed over the region. Relative to typical background seismic noise levels, power between 0.05-10 Hz increased by 5-20 dB during the storm. Seismic noise levels can be compared to available wind speed data to provide a detailed record of wind speeds during the weather event. We also explore the long-period coherence of energy across the array, which is potentially useful to help constrain near-surface velocity structure at the array sites as well as to better characterize how atmospheric processes couple into the solid earth during severe weather events.

  10. A Precursory Phase to a Sudden Enhanced Activity at Yasur volcano (Vanuatu) : Insights from Simultaneous Infrasonic and Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergniolle, S.; Zielinski, C.; Battaglia, J.; Metaxian, J. P.; Bani, P.; LE Pichon, A.; Lardy, M.; Millier, P.; Frogneux, M.; Gallois, F.; Herry, P.; Todman, S.; Garaebiti, E.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent activity at Yasur (Vanuatu), characterised by a close series of Strombolian explosions, is analysed using simultaneous infrasonic and seismic recordings (6-25 Nov 2008) close to the vents. The RMS amplitudes per hour, the number of explosions and the peak-to-peak amplitudes of each signal show that the initial quiet phase (11 days) is followed by a precursory phase (7 days) prior to an enhanced activity (17 hours). Three periods exist during the strong activity: (1) a rapid increase leading to the paroxysm (3 hours), (2) a first (5 hours) and (3) a second decrease (9 hours), each having an excellent correlation between seismic and infrasonic RMS amplitudes per hour (correlation coefficient > 0.96) when using the band associated to explosions (1-5 Hz and 1.8-4 Hz for seismic and infrsonic recordings, respectively). The ratio between infrasonic and seismic RMS amplitudes, assumed to be a proxy for the magma level, increases strongly during the week before the paroxysm. This is explained by the arrival of an additional gas flux at the top of the reservoir. The foam accumulated there, whose partial coalescence and spreading towards the conduit are responsible for the permanent Strombolian activity, thickens. This enhances both the viscous massive foam coalescence and the foam spreading. This leads to an increase in the gas flux in the conduit, ultimately responsible for the formation of a shallow foam at the surface. This foam acts as a viscous cap overlying the magma column, thereby increasing the radiated infrasonic pressure and the strength of the explosions. The first decrease in the relationship between infrasonic and seismic RMS amplitudes is associated with the stopping of the additionnal gas flux in the magma reservoir and the rapid decrease of the top of the magma column due to the previous intense degassing. The second decrease corresponds to the time neccessary to restore the convective motions in the conduit at their normal velocities.

  11. An Open Hardware seismic data recorder - a solid basis for citizen science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertl, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    "Ruwai" is a 24-Bit Open Hardware seismic data recorder. It is built up of four stackable printed circuit boards fitting the Arduino Mega 2560 microcontroller prototyping platform. An interface to the BeagleBone Black single-board computer enables extensive data storage, -processing and networking capabilities. The four printed circuit boards provide a uBlox Lea-6T GPS module and real-time clock (GPS Timing shield), an Texas Instruments ADS1274 24-Bit analog to digital converter (ADC main shield), an analog input section with a Texas Instruments PGA281 programmable gain amplifier and an analog anti-aliasing filter (ADC analog interface pga) and the power conditioning based on 9-36V DC input (power supply shield). The Arduino Mega 2560 is used for controlling the hardware components, timestamping sampled data using the GPS timing information and transmitting the data to the BeagleBone Black single-board computer. The BeagleBone Black provides local data storage, wireless mesh networking using the optimized link state routing daemon and differential GNSS positioning using the RTKLIB software. The complete hardware and software is published under free software - or open hardware licenses and only free software (e.g. KiCad) was used for the development to facilitate the reusability of the design and increases the sustainability of the project. "Ruwai" was developed within the framework of the "Community Environmental Observation Network (CEON)" (http://www.mertl-research.at/ceon/) which was supported by the Internet Foundation Austria (IPA) within the NetIdee 2013 call.

  12. Implosion, earthquake, and explosion recordings from the 2000 Seattle Kingdome Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS), Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Snelson, Catherine M.; Frankel, Arthur D.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes seismic data obtained in Seattle, Washington, March 24-28, 2000, during a Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS). The seismic recordings obtained by this SHIPS experiment, nicknamed Kingdome SHIPS, were designed to (1) measure site responses throughout Seattle and to (2) help define the location of the Seattle fault. During Kingdome SHIPS, we recorded the Kingdome implosion, four 150-lb (68-kg) shots, and a Mw = 7.6 teleseism using a dense network of seismographs deployed throughout Seattle. The seismographs were deployed at a nominal spacing of 1 km in a hexagonal grid extending from Green Lake in the north to Boeing Field in the south. The Seattle Kingdome was a domed sports stadium located in downtown Seattle near the Seattle fault. The Seattle Kingdome was imploded (demolished) at 8:32 AM local time (16:32 UTC) on March 26 (JD 086), 2000. The seismic energy produced by implosion of the Kingdome was equivalent to a local earthquake magnitude of 2.3. Strong impacts produced by the implosion of the Kingdome generated seismic arrivals to frequencies as low as 0.1 Hz. Two shots located north of the Seattle fault, where the charges were detonated within the ground water column (Discovery and Magnuson Parks), were much more strongly coupled than were the two shots to the south of the Seattle fault, where the shots were detonated above the water table (Lincoln and Seward Parks). Thirty-eight RefTek stations, scattered throughout Seattle, recorded the Mw = 7.6 Japan Volcano Islands earthquake (22.4°N, 143.6°E, 104 km depth) of 28 March 2000 (JD 088). This teleseism produced useful signals for periods between 4 and 7 seconds. Only a few recordings of small magnitude local earthquakes were made, and these recordings are not presented. In this report, we describe the acquisition of these data, discuss the processing and merging of the data into common shot gathers, and illustrate the acquired data. We also describe the format and

  13. Establishment of data base of regional seismic recordings from earthquakes, chemical explosions and nuclear explosions in the Former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolenko, N.A.; Kopnichev, Yu.F.; Kunakov, V.G.; Kunakova, O.K.; Rakhmatullin, M.Kh.; Sokolova, I.N.; Vybornyy, Zh.I.

    1995-06-01

    In this report results of work on establishment of a data base of regional seismic recordings from earthquakes, chemical explosions and nuclear explosions in the former Soviet Union are described. This work was carried out in the Complex Seismological Expedition (CSE) of the Joint Institute of Physics of the Earth of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The recording system, methods of investigations and primary data processing are described in detail. The largest number of digital records was received by the permanent seismic station Talgar, situated in the northern Tien Shan, 20 km to the east of Almaty city. More than half of the records are seismograms of underground nuclear explosions and chemical explosions. The nuclear explosions were recorded mainly from the Semipalatinsk test site. In addition, records of the explosions from the Chinese test site Lop Nor and industrial nuclear explosions from the West Siberia region were obtained. Four records of strong chemical explosions were picked out (two of them have been produced at the Semipalatinsk test site and two -- in Uzbekistan). We also obtained 16 records of crustal earthquakes, mainly from the Altai region, close to the Semipalatinsk test site, and also from the West China region, close to the Lop Nor test site. In addition, a small number of records of earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions, received by arrays of temporary stations, that have been working in the southern Kazakhstan region are included in this report. Parameters of the digital seismograms and file structure are described. Possible directions of future work on the digitizing of unique data archive are discussed.

  14. Analysis of recently digitized continuous seismic data recorded during the March-May, 1980, eruption sequence at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Malone, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) was an historic event, both for society and for the field of volcanology. However, our knowledge of the eruption and the precursory period leading up it is limited by the fact that most of the data, particularly seismic recordings, were not kept due to severe limitations in the amount of digital data that could be handled and stored using 1980 computer technology. Because of these limitations, only about 900 digital event files have been available for seismic studies of the March-May seismic sequence out of a total of more than 4,000 events that were counted using paper records. Fortunately, data from a subset of stations were also recorded continuously on a series of 24 analog 14-track IRIG magnetic tapes. We have recently digitized these tapes and time-corrected and cataloged the resultant digital data streams, enabling more in-depth studies of the (almost) complete pre-eruption seismic sequence using modern digital processing techniques. Of the fifteen seismic stations operating near MSH for at least a part of the two months between March 20 and May 18, six stations have relatively complete analog recordings. These recordings have gaps of minutes to days because of radio noise, poor tape quality, or missing tapes. In addition, several other stations have partial records. All stations had short-period vertical-component sensors with very limited dynamic range and unknown response details. Nevertheless, because the stations were at a range of distances and were operated at a range of gains, a variety of earthquake sizes were recorded on scale by at least one station, and therefore a much more complete understanding of the evolution of event types, sizes and character should be achievable. In our preliminary analysis of this dataset we have found over 10,000 individual events as recorded on stations 35-40 km from MSH, spanning a recalculated coda-duration magnitude range of ~1.5 to 4.1, including many M < 3

  15. Infrasound and Seismic Recordings of a US Airstrike on an ISIS Car Bomb Factory on June 3, 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleqabi, G. I.; Ghalib, H. A. A.; Wysession, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Concurrent infrasound and seismic records of a jet airstrike in Iraq are presented. Media reports stated that US jets carried out a large airstrike on June 3, 2015, just after midnight local time, that targeted and destroyed an ISIS car bomb factory in Hawija, Iraq, just south of the city of Kirkuk, Iraq. The resulting explosion was felt within Kirkuk and at other locations as far as 34 km away from the Hawija factory. Seismic broadband stations located in northern Iraq, at a distance of about 160 km, show clear simultaneous signals of infrasound waves on the seismometers as well as on collocated infrasound equipment. From an analysis of the body waves, the Pg to Lg time difference is nearly ~20 sec, with a back azimuth of 250o to 260o, which is consistent with explosion location. The time difference between the Pg and infrasound signals is just over 7 minutes, consistent with sound speed in the atmosphere. No clear Rg wave was observed. As was demonstrated by Aleqabi, Wysession, and Ghalib [2015, BSSA, in press], broadband seismic recordings are able to identify and distinguish between several different kinds of MOUT (military operations in urban terrain) and even determine the magnitudes of ordinance used in certain blasts. The addition of collocated infrasound equipment provides additional constraints that can be used in the analysis of the size and form of the MOUT.

  16. Focal mechanism analysis of seismic swarm recorded during 23 September -12 November 2013 in Galati area, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craiu, Andreea; Craiu, Marius; Diaconescu, Mihail

    2014-05-01

    The seismic swarm started on 23 September 2013 near the town of Galati, in Izvoarele region (Romania), an extended in time until 12 November 2013: 406 seismic events were recorded in several stages. The magnitude ML was always below 4, with three shocks of magnitude 3.9, accompanied by specific seismicity bursts. N-W Galati area is crossed in the northern part by the Sf. Gheorghe fault (situated at the limit of the Scythian Platform in North Dobrogea) and in the southern part by Peceneaga Camena fault which separates North Dobrogea block from the Moesian Platform. The epicentral zone is a very complicated tectonic area in which, sedimentary fault (normal and strike slip fault) is going down into the crystalin basement and linked in to normal fault. The epicenters of this seismic swarm are aligned on a NE-SW direction, fiting the alignement of a known fault system in the area, which is perpendicular to the dominant fault system lying NE-SW, between the Peceneaga Camena in the southern part and the Sf. Gheorghe fault in the northern part. The focal mechanisms are determined by SEISAN algorithm (Havskov and Ottemoller 2001) using P-wave polarities. In all cases, they show normal slip with the fault plane oriented on the NE-SW direction , main vertical compression axis (P) and main horizontal extension axis (T), oriented on the NE-SW direction. The results are discussed and interpreted in correlation with the regional seismotectonics and having in view new elements and implications for seismic hazard evaluation in the Galati area.

  17. Ultra-Deep Seismic Reflection Profiles of the Western U.S. from Autocorrelation of USArray Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabolova, A.; Brown, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    A core tenet of the emerging field of seismic interferometry is that autocorrelation of the transmission response recorded at a given seismic station is equivalent to its reflection response. This relation holds true for both specific (earthquake) and distributed (ambient noise) sources. In principle therefore one should be able to reconstruct the equivalent of a zero-offset, surface source-receiver reflection profile from simply autocorrelating the recordings of "natural" sources along a line of seismograph stations. In practice summation of a number of sources from an adequate spatial distribution of quasi random sources is needed to suppress artifacts and enhance the desired reflection response. Recently Ruigrok and Wapennar (2012) reported a lithospheric P-wave reflectivity profile by applying this technique to PKP, PKiKP and PKIKP phases of arthquakes recorded on Hi-CLIMB receivers crossing the Himalaya and southern Tibetan Plateau. Here we show the results of applying similar autocorrelation techniques to both ambient noise and earthquake suites recorded by USArray stations in New Mexico and Arizona to produce P and S wave reflection profiles of lithospheric structure. Our results demonstrate that while this novel approach can provide new (albeit low resolution compared to controlled source surveys) , reflection profiles of lithospheric structure, care must be used to discriminate true reflectivity from artifacts generate by the limited distribution of source regions. However, since the quality of the image is related to stacking fold, results from permanent or long term stations can only improve in clarity and resolution with time.

  18. Imaging a Fault Boundary System Using Controlled-Source Data Recorded on a Large-N Seismic Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschall, O. C.; Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Ralston, M. D.; Rowe, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is a series of chemical explosions conducted in southern Nevada with an objective of improving nuclear explosion monitoring. Five chemical explosions have occurred thus far in granite, the most recent being SPE-5 on April 26, 2016. The SPE series will improve our understanding of seismic wave propagation (primarily S-waves) due to explosions, and allow better discrimination of background seismicity such as earthquakes and explosions. The Large-N portion of the project consists of 996 receiver stations. Half of the stations were vertical component and the other half were three-component geophones. All receivers were deployed for 30 days and recorded the SPE-5 shot, earthquakes, noise, and an additional controlled-source: a large weight-drop, which is a 13,000 kg modified industrial pile driver. In this study, we undertake reflection processing of waveforms from the weight-drop, as recorded by a line of sensors extracted from the Large-N array. The profile is 1.2 km in length with 25 m station spacing and 100 m shot point spacing. This profile crosses the Boundary Fault that separates granite body and an alluvium basin, a strong acoustic impedance boundary that scatters seismic energy into S-waves and coda. The data were processed with traditional seismic reflection processing methods that include filtering, deconvolution, and stacking. The stack will be used to extract the location of the splays of the Boundary Fault and provide geologic constraints to the modeling and simulation teams within the SPE project.

  19. Seismic anisotropy and slab dynamics from SKS splitting recorded in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, Robert W.; Becker, Thorsten W.; Monsalve, Gaspar

    2014-12-01

    The Nazca, Caribbean, and South America plates meet in northwestern South America where the northern end of the Andean volcanic arc and Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity indicate ongoing subduction. However, the termination of Quaternary volcanism at ~5.5°N and eastward offset in seismicity underneath Colombia suggest the presence of complex slab geometry. To help link geometry to dynamics, we analyze SKS splitting for 38 broadband stations of the Colombian national network. Measurements of fast polarization axes in western Colombia close to the trench show dominantly trench-perpendicular orientations. Orientations measured at stations in the back arc, farther to the east, however, abruptly change to roughly trench parallel anisotropy. This may indicate along-arc mantle flow, possibly related to the suggested "Caldas" slab tear, or a lithospheric signature, but smaller-scale variations in anisotropy remain to be explained. Our observations are atypical globally and challenge our understanding of the complexities of subduction zone seismic anisotropy.

  20. Seismic Strong Motion Array Project (SSMAP) to Record Future Large Earthquakes in the Nicoya Peninsula area, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simila, G.; McNally, K.; Quintero, R.; Segura, J.

    2006-12-01

    The seismic strong motion array project (SSMAP) for the Nicoya Peninsula in northwestern Costa Rica is composed of 10 13 sites including Geotech A900/A800 accelerographs (three-component), Ref-Teks (three- component velocity), and Kinemetric Episensors. The main objectives of the array are to: 1) record and locate strong subduction zone mainshocks [and foreshocks, "early aftershocks", and preshocks] in Nicoya Peninsula, at the entrance of the Nicoya Gulf, and in the Papagayo Gulf regions of Costa Rica, and 2) record and locate any moderate to strong upper plate earthquakes triggered by a large subduction zone earthquake in the above regions. Our digital accelerograph array has been deployed as part of our ongoing research on large earthquakes in conjunction with the Earthquake and Volcano Observatory (OVSICORI) at the Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica. The country wide seismographic network has been operating continuously since the 1980's, with the first earthquake bulletin published more than 20 years ago, in 1984. The recording of seismicity and strong motion data for large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench (MAT) has been a major research project priority over these years, and this network spans nearly half the time of a "repeat cycle" (50 years) for large (Ms 7.5- 7.7) earthquakes beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, with the last event in 1950. Our long time co-collaborators include the seismology group OVSICORI, with coordination for this project by Dr. Ronnie Quintero and Mr. Juan Segura. Numerous international investigators are also studying this region with GPS and seismic stations (US, Japan, Germany, Switzerland, etc.). Also, there are various strong motion instruments operated by local engineers, for building purposes and mainly concentrated in the population centers of the Central Valley. The major goal of our project is to contribute unique scientific information pertaining to a large subduction zone earthquake and its related seismic activity when

  1. Seismic stratigraphy of the East Antarctic margin: a record of Cenozoic environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leychenkov, German; Guseva, Julia

    2010-05-01

    We have analyzed more than 120000 km of MCS sections collected on the East Antarctic margin (EAM) from 7E to 142E to correlate seismic stratigraphy with Antarctic glacial history predicted from drilling data and deep-sea proxy records, and to estimate what sort of information about ice sheet behavior and paleoceanographic conditions is contained in seismic records. Most of analyzed MCS lines are located on the continental rise and only the Prydz Bay (PB) shelf was studied in details. Five mayor horizons numbered up-section from "1" to "5" are identified in sedimentary cover of deep water EAM (continental rise). Horizon "1" and "2" are correlated with asynchronous Gondwana breakup and early post-breakup events, respectively; horizons "3", "4" and "5" are proposed to be isochronous surfaces related to Late Cenozoic paleoenvironmental transitions. The distinguishing feature of EAM sedimentary cover is the clear upward change in reflection pattern across horizons "3" and "4" that separates a lower sedimentary unit with mostly parallel reflectors from an upper one consisting of variety of acoustic facies typical of active down-slope and along slope processes. This change is associated with the arrival of the ice sheet to the Antarctic margin and significant increase in sedimentary input to deep water regions. Major results of our study are following: 1) Widespread development of channel-levee systems and other facies related to mass-wasting on the EAM is observed above horizon "4" and this interface is proposed to mark continental-scale Antarctic glaciation in the Early Oligocene. However, earliest signs of active down-slope processes are revealed on the Wilkes Land margin (WLM) above horizon "3" and we infer that this margin was glaciated first, probably in the Late Eocene. Under the temperate climate condition debris was delivered to the slope and rise by glaciers (which flowed from central Antarctica via Aurora Subglacial Basin) and abundant melt-water. The rate of

  2. Investigations of the low frequency seismic waves recorded at near-regional distances from the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic waves recorded at near-regional distances are used to characterize the source of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) and three selected nuclear explosions detonated in N-tunnel on Rainier Mesa. For periods longer than 5 sec, the signal-to-noise ratio is poor on most recordings of the NPE. A seismogram-stacking method is used in order to reduce background noise in coherent arrivals of Rayleigh waves. This method requires equalization of path dispersion and attenuation, which is accomplished in this study with empirical Green`s functions. The stacked, equalized Rayleigh-wave spectra are inverted, along with the spectral amplitudes of Lg waves with periods of 2-5 sec, for estimates of the seismic moment tensor. The NPE isotropic moment is 1.6 x 10{sup 14} Nt-m. The inferred static level of the reduced displacement potential is 825 m{sup 3}, which is about two times smaller than the estimate from free-field data recorded within 1 km of the NPE. Moment tensors of the NPE and nuclear explosions are asymmetric, describing prolate ellipsoids of rotation with the long axis in the vertical direction. The asymmetries are among the largest for explosions on Pahute and Rainier Mesa. The non-isotropic component is a compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD), which may represent driven block motions occurring within a conical volume of material extending from the shot point (apex) to the free surface. The CLVD source can help explain some observations of scalloping in the spectra of Lg waves and Lg spectral ratios. Seismic radiation from the NPE is virtually indistinguishable from that of nearby nuclear explosions for frequencies below 1 Hz.

  3. Seismic cycles recorded in late Quaternary calcite veins: Geochronological, geochemical and microstructural evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, I. Tonguç; Feng, Yue-xing; Zhao, Jian-xin; Bolhar, Robert; Işik, Veysel; Baublys, Kim A.; Yago, Anya; Golding, Suzanne D.

    2011-02-01

    Southwest Turkey is seismically active as a result of the Hellenic subduction process in the Eastern Mediterranean. We conducted high-resolution micro-sampling, high-precision U-series dating and microchemical analysis on an extensional vein system in a tectonically active but non-hydrothermal area. U/Th age data and microscopic observations provide evidence of repeated fracturing of a previously sealed crack system followed by a new increment of veining. Repeated injection of veinlets suggests that the vein system was formed by the crack-seal mechanism. Four major U/Th age groups for the emplacement of the vein system fall between 23.9 ± 0.2 ka and 23.2 ± 0.4 ka, 21.7 ± 0.4 ka and 19.2 ± 0.2 ka, 17.3 ± 0.1 ka and 16.2 ± 0.3 ka, and at 11.8 ± 0.2 ka. Stable and Sr isotope geochemistry of the calcite vein samples indicates that surface water interacting with the soil cover was the major component of the groundwater system from which the extensional veins precipitated. Trace element and O isotope data of the vein system are interpreted to reflect carbonate precipitation associated with seismic cycles involving fluids with different trace element compositions and CO 2 contents. Initial carbonate precipitation during a single seismic cycle occurred from CO 2-dominated fluids that were degassed from the original CO 2-water mixture. This was followed consecutively by carbonate precipitation from the remaining water, which was relatively impure with higher trace element contents. Millimetre to submillimetre-scale U-series dating in conjunction with geochemistry of carbonate veins related to active tectonism offers an innovative means of constraining the absolute timing of late Quaternary seismic and inter-seismic events.

  4. Seismicity in the Raton Basin of Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico, USA, as Recorded by a Local Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macartney, H.

    2013-12-01

    Microseismic events (recorded by a dense network of seismometers deployed in the Raton Basin of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico, USA, over a period of 18 months following the occurrence of a 5.3 magnitude event near Trinidad CO in August, 2011. Micro-seismicity was observed in the region, concentrated in six clusters at depths of 6-12 km below the surface, deep in the basement, and 4-10 km below zones used for fluid disposal from an overlying coalbed methane natural gas field. Clusters are separated from disposal zones by large aseismic intervals. The clusters are mixed in character; both planar and elongate amorphous swarms, some continually active and some as short-lived bursts, with larger initial events tending to occur deeper and smaller after-shocks propagating upward and away from the nucleating events. Magnitudes range between 0 and 3, with the vast majority being less than 1.5M. Most of the clusters have no disposal wells above and no seismic activity was correlated with changes in fluid disposal. No seismicity was detected from hydraulic fracturing operations.

  5. Imaging and Analyzing the Upper Lithosphere Beneath the Southern Appalachians using Global Seismic Phases Recorded by the SESAME Broadband Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, E.; Verellen, D.; Parker, H., Jr.; Hawman, R. B.; Fischer, K. M.; Wagner, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    Global-phase seismic interferometry (GloPSI) is a seismic method that allows for the extraction of zero-offset reflections. We use the global seismic phase PKIKP as a virtual source to generate reflection profiles along three survey lines of the Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment (SESAME). The broadband recordings provide constraints on long-wavelength structure that complement the higher-frequency images obtained along Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) lines. Targets include structures associated with Paleozoic collision and Mesozoic extension. We focus in particular on the nature of the Southern Appalachian detachment, the Alleghanian suture and its possible relation to a zone of prominent south-dipping reflections observed on COCORP profiles, and estimating the volume of mafic intrusions added to the basement beneath the Coastal Plain. The broadband profiles also provide additional constraints on the thickness and lateral extent of Triassic sediments. Relative reflection amplitudes are used to estimate impedance contrasts to constrain the nature of major discontinuities. Over the Coastal Plain, we experiment with a number of approaches for suppressing multiple reflections generated by very low-velocity, unconsolidated sediments and poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. The resulting improvement in image quality should allow us to better evaluate the continuity of the detachment and other orogen-wide structures.

  6. Recording and processing procedures for multi-channel seismic-reflection data collected in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dadisman, Shawn V.; Ryan, Holly F.; Mann, Dennis M.

    1987-01-01

    During 1984, over 2300 km of multichannel seismic-reflection data were recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey in the western Ross Sea and Iselin Bank regions.  A temporary loss and sinking of the streamer led to increasing the streamer tow depth to 20 m, which resulted in some attenuation of frequencies in the 30-50 Hz range but no significant difference in resolution of the stacked data.  Severe water bottom multiples were encountered and removed by dip-filtering, weighted stacking, and severe post-NMO muting.

  7. The footprints of typhoons on seismic records and their implications on small-scale coupling mechanisms in South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Xue, M.; Yang, T.; Liu, C.; Hua, Q.; Xia, S.; Huang, H.; Le, B. M.; Huo, D.; Pan, M.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    By investigating the footprints of typhoons on seismic records, we can understand their contributions to seismic noises as well as to small-scale coupling mechanisms of typhoon-land and typhoon-ocean-land. We analyze the signatures of typhoon KAI-TAK and BOPHA using seismic data from the ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed in the central basin of South China Sea by Tongji University in 2012 as well as seismic stations (IC.QIZ,HK.HKPS and RM.SZP) on lands.Our preliminary results show that typhoons mainly enhance microseisms at the frequency band of ~0.1-0.5 Hz, including both long period double frequency (LPDF) and short period double frequency (SPDF) microseisms. A positive correlation observed between the amplitude of microseisms and the height of local ocean waves. Because OBSs are deployed at the bottom of ocean, single frequency (SF) microseisms are not prominent on them due to their fast attenuation with depth. During the typhoon KAI-TAK, the increase of LPDF energy is very small in OBSs while that is very high on land stations, indicating that LPDF microseisms are generated at nearby shorelines and can propagate towards the sea through the solid earth. However, the increase of SPDF energy is almost the same level for both OBSs and land stations indicating that the generation of SPDF is probably local.However, we also observe a small amount of energy arrives before the increases of the wave heights at the land station HK.HKPS. We derive that this energy may from a source that is not local: while LPDF can be generated at nearby shorelines and SPDF can be generated everywhere locally, they can both transmit through the solid part of the Earth to a station some distance away, i.e. HK.HKPS. In addition, we find that typhoons enhance not only the microseisms as expected but also the seismic energy from higher frequency bands. The spectrum amplitude during Typhoon periods, normalized by that of no-storm periods, shows that land stations produce stronger higher

  8. East Antarctic intraplate earthquakes recorded by the AGAP/GAMSEIS temporary seismic array delineate possible ancient rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, A. C.; Wiens, D.; Nyblade, A.

    2016-12-01

    East Antarctica is primarily a stable craton and thus little deformation as is seen in geodetic observations. Although Antarctica was once thought to be aseismic, small events have been detected teleseismically. In 2009 the AGAP/GAMSEIS project operated a network of 26 broadband seismic stations that recorded 27 seismic events (ML 1.74-3.43) The majority of events are 10-30 km deep indicating a tecontic origin. Most events occur beneath subglacial topographic depressions that border the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM). 16 events follow a linear chain of depressions between the GSM and the Vostok Subglacial Highlands (VSH) that link the Polar Subglacial Basin to the Lambert Graben. This particular feature was identified as an ancient 'rift' by Ferraccioli et al. (2011). Gravity data in the 'rift' is distinct from surrounding areas with high Bouger and low free air gravity anomalies in the 'rift', in contrast to the GSM and VSH (Ferraccioli et al., 2011). The `rift' is embedded in the seismically fast East Antarctic cratonic mantle (Heeszel et al., 2013), but it shows a narrow region of lower velocities (Lloyd et al., 2013) and has thinner continental crust (Hansen et al., 2010) than surrounding regions. The feature potentially represents a terrain boundary between the Mawson and Crohn cratons (Boger, 2011) or could be a failed continental rift. One year of data cannot fully constrain the underlying cause of the seismicity. To further characterize the tectonics we calculate first motion double couple focal mechanisms for events showing impulsive body wave arrivals and good azimuthal station coverage. Preliminary results show the majority of fault plane solutions are extensional with fault planes that orient parallel or subparallel to the strike of the 'rift'. We compute synthetic waveforms to further test the robustness of our fault plane solutions. We propose the events are intraplate earthquakes located in zones of weakness associated with a failed

  9. On the seismic response of instable rock slopes based on ambient vibration recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinbrod, Ulrike; Burjánek, Jan; Fäh, Donat

    2017-09-01

    Rock slope failures can lead to huge human and economic loss depending on their size and exact location. Reasonable hazard mitigation requires thorough understanding of the underlying slope driving mechanisms and its rock mass properties. Measurements of seismic ambient vibrations could improve the characterization and detection of rock instabilities since there is a link between seismic response and internal structure of the unstable rock mass. An unstable slope near the village Gondo has been investigated. The unstable part shows strongly amplified ground motion with respect to the stable part of the rock slope. The amplification values reach maximum factors of 70. The seismic response on the instable part is highly directional and polarized. Re-measurements have been taken 1 year later showing exactly the same results as the original measurements. Neither the amplified frequencies nor the amplification values have changed. Therefore, ambient vibration measurements are repeatable and stay the same, if the rock mass has not undergone any significant change in structure or volume, respectively. Additionally, four new points have been measured during the re-measuring campaign in order to better map the border of the instability.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Wide-angle seismic recording from the 2002 Georgia Basin Geohazards Initiative, northwestern Washington and British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Spence, George D.; Riedel, Michael; Hyndman, Roy D.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the acquisition and processing of shallow-crustal wide-angle seismicreflection and refraction data obtained during a collaborative study in the Georgia Strait, western Washington and southwestern British Columbia. The study, the 2002 Georgia Strait Geohazards Initiative, was conducted in May 2002 by the Pacific Geoscience Centre, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of Victoria. The wide-angle recordings were designed to image shallow crustal faults and Cenozoic sedimentary basins crossing the International Border in southern Georgia basin and to add to existing wide-angle recordings there made during the 1998 SHIPS experiment. We recorded, at wide-angle, 800 km of shallow penetration multichannel seismic-reflection profiles acquired by the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Tully using an air gun with a volume of 1.967 liters (120 cu. in.). Prior to this reflection survey, we deployed 48 Refteks onshore to record the airgun signals at wide offsets. Three components of an oriented, 4.5 Hz seismometer were digitally recorded at all stations. Nearly 160,300 individual air gun shots were recorded along 180 short seismic reflection lines. In this report, we illustrate the wide-angle profiles acquired using the CCGS Tully, describe the land recording of the air gun signals, and summarize the processing of the land recorder data into common-receiver gathers. We also describe the format and content of the archival tapes containing the SEGY-formated, common-receiver gathers for the Reftek data. Data quality is variable but the experiment provided useful data from 42 of the 48 stations deployed. Three-fourths of all stations yielded useful first-arrivals to source-receiver offsets beyond 10 km: the average maximum source-receiver offset for first arrivals was 17 km. Six stations yielded no useful data and useful firstarrivals were limited to offsets less than 10 km at five stations. We separately archived our recordings of 86 local and regional

  11. Seismic Strong Motion Array Project (SSMAP) to Record Future Large Earthquakes in the Nicoya Peninsula area, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simila, G.; Lafromboise, E.; McNally, K.; Quintereo, R.; Segura, J.

    2007-12-01

    The seismic strong motion array project (SSMAP) for the Nicoya Peninsula in northwestern Costa Rica is composed of 10 - 13 sites including Geotech A900/A800 accelerographs (three-component), Ref-Teks (three- component velocity), and Kinemetric Episensors. The main objectives of the array are to: 1) record and locate strong subduction zone mainshocks [and foreshocks, "early aftershocks", and preshocks] in Nicoya Peninsula, at the entrance of the Nicoya Gulf, and in the Papagayo Gulf regions of Costa Rica, and 2) record and locate any moderate to strong upper plate earthquakes triggered by a large subduction zone earthquake in the above regions. Our digital accelerograph array has been deployed as part of our ongoing research on large earthquakes in conjunction with the Earthquake and Volcano Observatory (OVSICORI) at the Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica. The country wide seismographic network has been operating continuously since the 1980's, with the first earthquake bulletin published more than 20 years ago, in 1984. The recording of seismicity and strong motion data for large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench (MAT) has been a major research project priority over these years, and this network spans nearly half the time of a "repeat cycle" (~ 50 years) for large (Ms ~ 7.5- 7.7) earthquakes beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, with the last event in 1950. Our long time co- collaborators include the seismology group OVSICORI, with coordination for this project by Dr. Ronnie Quintero and Mr. Juan Segura. The major goal of our project is to contribute unique scientific information pertaining to a large subduction zone earthquake and its related seismic activity when the next large earthquake occurs in Nicoya. We are now collecting a database of strong motion records for moderate sized events to document this last stage prior to the next large earthquake. A recent event (08/18/06; M=4.3) located 20 km northwest of Samara was recorded by two stations (Playa Carrillo

  12. Active Seismicity and Tectonics in Central Asia from Seismological Data Recorded in the Pamir and Tien Shan Mountain Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Schurr, Bernd; Schneider, Felix M.; Yuan, Xiaohui; Mechie, James; Minaev, Vladislav; Abdybachaev, Ulan A.; Gadoev, Mustafo; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon

    2010-05-01

    Active tectonics in the Pamir mountains in central Asia, the westernmost part of the India-Eurasia collision zone, are controlled by ongoing convergence (about 20 mm/yr), causing substantial crustal shortening and compressional deformation. This leads to high seismicity rates throughout the region. Whereas seismic activity along the rim of the Pamir plateau is mostly compressional and concentrated along the Main Pamir Thrust, the distribution and focal mechanisms of earthquakes in its interior are more diffuse, with extensional events occurring along North-South trending rift zones (Kara Kul, Wachan). Seismicity in the south-western Pamir and in the Hindu Kush features frequent intermediate-depth earthquakes, reaching hypocentral depths of 300 km, which is rare for regions not obviously related to active subduction of oceanic lithosphere. These mantle earthquakes, which are not observed beneath the Himalayas and Tibet further east, form a rather well-defined Wadati-Benioff zone that was readily interpreted as subducted lithosphere present below the current collisional orogen. Earlier seismological studies showed the presence of a northward-dipping lithospheric slab under the Hindu Kush and a southward-dipping one beneath the Pamirs, with a small seismic gap in-between. Different hypotheses concerning the nature of these slabs (oceanic or continental lithosphere) and tectonic geometry in general (two slabs subducting in opposite directions or a single, hugely contorted slab) have been proposed in literature. Political instability in the region in the last two decades hampered on-site studies and field work, leaving many key issues poorly understood. In the framework of the multidisciplinary project TIPAGE (Tien Shan Pamir Geodynamic Programme), for the first time, new field campaigns collecting high quality data have been made possible. Local seismicity in the Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges (Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan) is currently being recorded by a temporary

  13. Tilt prior to explosions and the effect of topography on ultra-long-period seismic records at Fuego volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, John J.; Waite, Gregory P.; Ichihara, Mie; Lees, Jonathan M.

    2012-04-01

    Ground tilt is measured from broadband seismic records prior to frequent explosions at Fuego volcano, Guatemala. We are able to resolve tilt beginning 20-30 minutes prior to explosions, followed by a rapid reversal in deformation coincident with explosion onsets. The tilt amplitude and polarity recorded on the horizontal channels vary from station to station such that the steep and unusual topography of the upper cone of Fuego appears to affect the ultra-long-period signals. We account for the effect of topography and attempt to constrain the tilt source depth and geometry through finite-difference modeling. The results indicate a shallow spherical pressure source, and that topography must be considered when attempting to model tilt sources at volcanoes with steep topography. The tilt signals are interpreted as pressurization of the shallow conduit beneath a crystallized plug followed by elastic deflation concurrent with explosive pressure release.

  14. Data quality of seismic records from the Tohoku, Japan earthquake as recorded across the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, A.T.; Gee, L.S.; Marshall, B.; Hutt, C.R.; Storm, T.

    2012-01-01

    Great earthquakes recorded across modern digital seismographic networks, such as the recent Tohoku, Japan, earthquake on 11 March 2011 (Mw = 9.0), provide unique datasets that ultimately lead to a better understanding of the Earth's structure (e.g., Pesicek et al. 2008) and earthquake sources (e.g., Ammon et al. 2011). For network operators, such events provide the opportunity to look at the performance across their entire network using a single event, as the ground motion records from the event will be well above every station's noise floor.

  15. Full moment tensor inversion of mining induced seismic events recorded at the Legnica-Glogow Underground Mining Induced Earthquale Observing System (LUMINEOS), Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Cesca, Simone; Lizurek, Grzegorz

    2014-05-01

    Since January 2013 a new surface seismic network LUMINEOS (Legnica-Glogow Underground Mining INduced Earthquake Observing System) is in operation to monitor induced seismicity around the mining district of Legnica Glogow Copper District (LGCP), Poland. The network belongs to the Institute of Geophysics of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The network is located above the deep copper mine "Rudna". It consists of nine three-axis short period seismometers and continuously records seismic events connected with intensive copper ore excavation at close by mines. In parallel, the mining company operates an in-mine underground seismic network, consisting of 32 short period vertical sensors. During 2013 several strong induced seismic events with M > 2.5 were recorded on both networks. The collected data set provides an opportunity to analyze their focal mechanisms. In this work we present the first results of full moment tensor inversion for mining induced seismic events, using both recording systems. LUMINEOS results were obtained with waveforms inversion using the Kiwi tool package (http://kinherd.org), while for the in-mine network, we used a first amplitude P-wave inversions. Our results suggest that both systems can be used complementary in cases of strong mining events, providing a well constrained focal mechanism and information on the rupture processes in the mine.

  16. Retrieving Source-Time Function and Seismic Moment Tensor From Near Field Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Catalina; Ruiz, Javier A.; Ortega, Francisco; Rivera, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Retrieve earthquake source parameters from seismological or geodetic data is an important aspect in the rapid characterization of the earthquake source, which is particularly relevant in real-time operations. The inversion of seismic moment tensors and slip distributions of large earthquakes is a recurrent and important topic in seismology because it allows to know the source properties and rupture process. Several methodologies allow to make these inferences assuming different levels of complexity of the earthquake source, for instance, the Global Centroid Moment Tensor compute routinely the centroid moment tensor from global seismic data, on the other hand, agencies such as the National Earthquake Information Center have implemented methodologies to retrieve the moment tensor in real-time (e.g the W-Phase). However, the joint inversion of the moment tensor and the source-time function using regional and near-field data is a promising approach to characterize source parameters. Several methodologies allow to invert the seismic moment tensor using broadband regional data assuming a simple source-time function (e.g. impulsive, or with a triangular shape), but are usually limited because broadband stations get saturated near the source for moderate and large earthquakes. Yagi and Nishimura (2011) proposed a method that inverts the moment tensor and the half duration using strong motion data. Weber (2009) computes the seismic moment tensor as a function of time using broadband regional data, applying a inverse method that minimize the L1-norm, and then retrieves the source-time function. The aim of this study is to develop a method and a computational tool that allows to jointly invert the moment tensor and the source-time function using strong motion and broadband regional data. The inverse method is applied in two steps, (1) we invert the moment tensor assuming a triangular source-time function and, (2) minimizing the L2-norm, we invert the amplitude of a series of

  17. Processed seismic motion records from Big Bear, California earthquake of June 28, 1992, recorded at seismograph stations in southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, P.K.; Honda, K.K.

    1993-04-01

    As part of the contract with the US Department of Energy, Nevada Field office (DOE/NV), URS/John A. Blume & Associates, Engineers (URS/Blume) maintains a network of seismographs in southern Nevada to monitor the ground motion generated by the underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The seismographs are located in the communities surrounding the NTS and the Las Vegas valley. When these seismographs are not used for monitoring the UNE generated motions, a limited number of seismographs are maintained for monitoring motion generated by other than UNEs (e.g. motion generated by earthquakes, wind, blast). During the subject earthquake of June 28, 1992, a total of 15 of these systems recorded the earthquake motions. This report contains the recorded data.

  18. Rupture process for micro-earthquakes inferred from borehole seismic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Dreger, Douglas S.; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the spatial extent of rupture and variability in fault slip for micro-earthquakes by inverting seismic moment rate functions derived from empirical Green's function deconvolution. By using waveforms from an array of borehole seismometers, we determine the spatial distributions of fault slip for M 3+ earthquakes that occurred along the Hayward fault in central California and identify a variety of slip behaviors including subevents, directivity, and high stress drop. The 2013 M w 3.2 Orinda earthquake exhibits a complex rupture process involving two subevents with northwest and up-dip directivity. The two subevents release 43 and 18 % of the total seismic moment (6.7 × 1013 N m), and their inferred peak stress drops are 18 and 8 MPa. The 2011 M w 4.0 Berkeley and 2012 M w 4.0 El Cerrito earthquakes are marked by high stress drop. The inferred peak and mean stress drops are about 100-130 and 40 MPa, respectively, which suggests that there are locally high levels of fault strength on the Hayward fault. Our finite-source modeling suggests that the radiation efficiency determined for these two earthquakes is very low (<0.1) and implies that most energy is dissipated during the earthquake rupture process.

  19. Large Earthquake Hazard of the San Jacinto Fault Zone, CA, from Long Record of Simulated Seismicity Assimilating the Available Instrumental and Paleoseismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöller, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate spatio-temporal properties of earthquake patterns in the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ), California, between Cajon Pass and the Superstition Hill Fault, using a long record of simulated seismicity constrained by available seismological and geological data. The model provides an effective realization of a large segmented strike-slip fault zone in a 3D elastic half-space, with heterogeneous distribution of static friction chosen to represent several clear step-overs at the surface. The simulated synthetic catalog reproduces well the basic statistical features of the instrumental seismicity recorded at the SJFZ area since 1981. The model also produces events larger than those included in the short instrumental record, consistent with paleo-earthquakes documented at sites along the SJFZ for the last 1,400 years. The general agreement between the synthetic and observed data allows us to address with the long-simulated seismicity questions related to large earthquakes and expected seismic hazard. The interaction between m ≥ 7 events on different sections of the SJFZ is found to be close to random. The hazard associated with m ≥ 7 events on the SJFZ increases significantly if the long record of simulated seismicity is taken into account. The model simulations indicate that the recent increased number of observed intermediate SJFZ earthquakes is a robust statistical feature heralding the occurrence of m ≥ 7 earthquakes. The hypocenters of the m ≥ 5 events in the simulation results move progressively towards the hypocenter of the upcoming m ≥ 7 earthquake.

  20. Past seismic activity in Eastern Anatolia recorded over several glacial/interglacial cycles in the sediments of Lake Van

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhecke, M.; Anselmetti, F.; Sturm, M.

    2012-12-01

    Lake sediments document besides paleoenvironmental and paleoclimate conditions also paleoseismic activity through various forms of deformation structures. These are especially visible in finely-laminated sediments. Being situated in a tectonically active region, the partly annually-laminated sedimentary sequence of the terminal Lake Van, recovered in 2010 under the context of the ICDP Paleovan project, shows dozens of earthquake-triggered microdeformations that document past seismic events of the last half a million years. Lithological and multiproxy analysis revealed that the Lake Van's depositional conditions varied in correspondence to Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch cycles. Glacial/stadial and interglacial/interstadial conditions were recorded continuously over the last half a million years excluding two discontinuities, which indicate major hydrological and geomorphological changes in Lake Van's early history. Two sites were drilled 10 km apart: A primary drill site, situated on a ridge, covers the entire lake history since its initial transgression in the middle Pleistocene; A secondary drill site, located in a more shallow northern basin, covers the past 90'000 years. Multiple coring at both drill sites allows to establish two almost complete 220 m and 145 m long composite sections, respectively. Observing deformation structures in multiple parallel cores at each site is used as a criteria to distinguish 'true' paleoseismic deformation structures from potential drilling artifacts. Deformation structures consist of i) silt-filled vertical fractures, ii) microfaults with displacements at cm-scale, iii) microfolds, iv) liquefaction structures (mushroom, pseudonodules), iv) disturbed varve laminations and v) mixed layers. While the ridge site records the paleoseismic events as microdeformations, the northern basinal site rather records seismic events through the deposition of seismo-turbidites. In some cases, individual earthquake events can even be identified

  1. Historical seismometry database project: A comprehensive relational database for historical seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The recovery and preservation of the patrimony made of the instrumental registrations regarding the historical earthquakes is with no doubt a subject of great interest. This attention, besides being purely historical, must necessarily be also scientific. In fact, the availability of a great amount of parametric information on the seismic activity in a given area is a doubtless help to the seismologic researcher's activities. In this article the project of the Sismos group of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology of Rome new database is presented. In the structure of the new scheme the matured experience of five years of activity is summarized. We consider it useful for those who are approaching to "recovery and reprocess" computer based facilities. In the past years several attempts on Italian seismicity have followed each other. It has almost never been real databases. Some of them have had positive success because they were well considered and organized. In others it was limited in supplying lists of events with their relative hypocentral standards. What makes this project more interesting compared to the previous work is the completeness and the generality of the managed information. For example, it will be possible to view the hypocentral information regarding a given historical earthquake; it will be possible to research the seismograms in raster, digital or digitalized format, the information on times of arrival of the phases in the various stations, the instrumental standards and so on. The relational modern logic on which the archive is based, allows the carrying out of all these operations with little effort. The database described below will completely substitute Sismos' current data bank. Some of the organizational principles of this work are similar to those that inspire the database for the real-time monitoring of the seismicity in use in the principal offices of international research. A modern planning logic in a distinctly historical

  2. Time-domain identification of dynamic properties of layered soil by using extended Kalman filter and recorded seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yibin; Mansheng, Wang; Liu, He; Yao, Ying; Xiyuan, Zhou

    2004-12-01

    A novel time-domain identification technique is developed for the seismic response analysis of soil-structure interaction. A two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) model with eight lumped parameters is adopted to model the frequencydependent behavior of soils. For layered soil, the equivalent eight parameters of the 2DOF model are identified by the extended Kaiman filter (EKF) method using recorded seismic data. The polynomial approximations for derivation of state estimators are applied in the EKF procedure. A realistic identification example is given for the layered-soil of a building site in Anchorage, Alaska in the United States. Results of the example demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of the proposed identification technique. The 2DOF soil model and the identification technique can be used for nonlinear response analysis of soil-structure interaction in the time-domain for layered or complex soil conditions. The identified parameters can be stored in a database for use in other similar soil conditions. If a universal database that covers information related to most soil conditions is developed in the future, engineers could conveniently perform time history analyses of soil-structural interaction.

  3. Historical seismicity of the Texas Panhandle from an examination of Lubbock seismographic station records: Revision 2: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, H.

    1987-09-01

    Seismicity data for the Texas Panhandle area are based on instrumental data and felt reports. Sparse population density and poor instrumental coverage of the area suggest that the data base may not be complete or reliable for small earthquakes. Film chips from the Lubbock Seismographic Station for the period of 1963-1980 were, therefore, examined to identify all earthquakes that had occurred in the Texas Panhandle during that period. Film chips of known events were also used to aid investigators in identifying characteristics of signals from earthquakes that occurred in the Panhandle. This examination identified 40 earthquakes that occurred within approximately 360 km of Lubbock during 1963-1980. These 40 earthquakes were not recorded by many stations and 38 of these were not located earlier. First motion amplitude and direction on all three components were measured for these earthquakes. Earthquakes that occurred north of Lubbock were identified on the basis of azimuth computation and were then approximately located using the time interval between the arrival of P and S phases. Application of a magnitude duration relationship that was developed in Oklahoma suggests a range of 1.6 to 4.5 for these earthquakes. This study suggests an activity rate of two to three earthquakes per year within about 360 km of Lubbock during 1963-1980. The study, therfore, shows that the area north of Lubbock Station, including the Texas Panhandle, is an area of low seismicity. 21 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Parameters of induced and natural seismicity recorded in the vicinity of an active low angle normal fault in the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, T.; Cesca, S.; Martirosian, A.; Dahm, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Upper Tiber Valley is situated in the northern part of the Central Apennines and is setting of a number of geological phenomena, like CO2 degassing, moderate earthquakes (M < 6) and a strong microseismicity. The major part of the recorded seismicity can be associated to a Low Angle Normal Fault (LANF) - the so called Alto Tiberina Fault - but some of the recorded seismograms show signals similar to those recorded on active volcanoes. In the vicinity of the ATF human activity provides a number of candidates, capable to influence the local stress regime and the seismic release in the area: (i) a huge barrier lake is directly situated on the ATF and is characterized by significant seasonal water level oscillations, (ii) a cement plant and decommissioned mines present in the area are in the direct vicinity of epicentres of tornillo-like seismograms and episodes of non-volcanic tremor, (iii) since July 2011, a private company extracts CO2 by a 4 km deep borehole (PSS1). Since 2003 different seismic network and array configurations have been deployed to monitor the local seismicity. Human related influences, as realized by the industrial activities of cement plants, quarries or superficial mines may produce seismic signals, but will not directly have an impact on the mechanical behaviour of an active fault system at crustal depth. However, water level changes in the huge barrier lake or long term CO2-extraction from the upper crust have the capability to directly influence the stress field at depth. Since summer 2011 the reservoir user produces about 4 tons per hour of reservoir gases for commercial usage and trading. This production lead to a pore pressure change and slow depletion of the reservoir formation, similar to many other gas fields under production. Since production volumes and pore pressure changes are relatively well known, we consider the local depletion-induced stress changes on the ATF and in the surrounding rock as driving forces to the system. The

  5. The seismic stratigraphy of Okanagan Lake, British Columbia; a record of rapid deglaciation in a deep 'fiord-lake' basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, Nicholas; Mullins, Henry T.; Hine, Albert C.

    1991-09-01

    This paper presents the first detailed data regarding the newly discovered deep infill of Okanagan Lake. Okanagan Lake (50°00'N, 119°30'W) is 120 km long, ˜ 3-5 km wide and occupies a glacially overdeepened bedrock basin in the southern interior of British Columbia. This basin, and other elongate lakes of the region (e.g. Shuswap, Kootenay, Kalamalka, Canim and Mahood lakes), mark the site of westward flowing ice streams within successive Cordilleran ice sheets. An air gun seismic survey of Okanagan Lake shows that the bedrock floor is nearly 650 m below sea-level, more than 2000 m below the rim of the surrounding plateau. The maximum thickness of Pleistocene sediment in Okanagan Lake basin approaches 800 m. Forty-six seismic reflection traverses and an axial profile show a relatively simple stratigraphy composed of three seismic sequences argued to be no older than the last glacial cycle (< 30 ka). A discontinuous basal unit (sequence I) characterized by large-scale diffractions, and up to 460 m thick, infills the narrow, V-shaped bedrock floor of the basin and is interpreted as a boulder gravel deposited by subglacial meltwaters. Overlying seismic sequence II is composed of two sub-sequences. Sub-sequence IIa is a chaotic to massive facies up to 736 m thick. Lakeshore exposures close to where this unit reaches lake level show deformed and chaotically-bedded glaciolacustrine silts containing gravel lens and large ice-rafted boulders. The surface topography of this sub-sequence is irregular and in general mimics the form of the underlying bedrock as a result of compaction. This sequence passes laterally into stratified facies (sub-sequence IIb) at the northern end of the basin. Seismic sequence II appears to record rapid ice-proximal dumping of glaciolacustrine silt as the Okanagan glacier backwasted upvalley in a deep lake. A thin (60 m max.) laminated seismic sequence (III) drapes the hummocky surface of sequence II and represents postglacial sedimentation

  6. Seismic stratigraphy of the Antarctic Peninsula pacific margin: A record of Pliocene-Pleistocene ice volume and paleoclimate

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, R.D.; Barker, P.F. )

    1989-08-01

    Multichannel seismic profiles across the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Peninsula show a series of oblique progradational sequences. These sequences exhibit a variety of unusual characteristics that suggest they were produced by the action of ice sheets grounded out to the shelf edge at times of glacial maximum. Reflection events from deeper stratigraphic levels, followed down the continental slope and onto the rise, overlie ocean crust of known age, showing that at least eight such glacial sequences have been deposited within the past 6 m.y. Similar groundings have probably occurred on most Antarctic margins, but the depositional record is particularly well preserved at this margin because of Pliocene-Pleistocene thermal subsidence. Neogene global sea-level fluctuations have been attributed to changes in volume of continental ice sheets. The depositional sequences on the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Peninsula are thought to record West Antarctic ice-sheet fluctuations directly. Further investigation of these sequences would assess the relation between fluctuations in ice volume and the low-latitude record of global sea-level change.

  7. Ocean-Based Seismic Noise Sources Recorded by a Moderate Aperture Array in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, M. J.; Winberry, J. P.; Wiens, D.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Euler, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    The deployment of a temporary, 60 km aperture, broadband seismic array on the Whillans Ice Stream (WIS), West Antarctica provides an opportunity to analyze ocean-derived seismic noise sources. The location of Antarctica, surrounded by the Southern Ocean and the seasonal effect of sea ice on shallow water noise production, allows for an intriguing experiment as to the production of primary and secondary microseisms. The WIS array was deployed for 2 months between December 2010-January 2011 with its primary objective to study WIS stick-slip events and glacial microseismicity. However, daylong stacks of station-to-station correlograms show directionality of the ambient noise field within the frequency bands of the primary and secondary microseisms. Although the WIS array is located close to the grounding line, it lies 700 km from the nearest open water at the end of the austral summer. The array consists of 17 broadband stations arranged in a series of offset concentric circles that minimizes spatial artifacts with regards to the array response. We use beamforming analysis to show that primary microseisms (~15 s) are sourced from three azimuthal directions with some ice-free coastline: Antarctic Peninsula, Victoria Land, and Dronning-Maude Land. Long-period secondary microseisms (~10 s) appear to be sourced in the deep Southern Ocean and track storm systems. Short-period secondary microseisms (~6 s) show much more dependence on the continental shelf and possibly coastal reflections. This is consistent with year-long noise spectra showing diminishment in the 15 s and 6 s bands [Grob et al. 2011]. Modeling of secondary microseism sources [Ardhuin et al. 2011] provides insight on the sources of surface wave noise at higher frequencies. We backproject daily P and PKPbc body wave microseism signals found at lower ray parameters sourced at distances of ~20-90° and ~145-155° respectively. The ocean sources for these arrivals remain fairly consistent, suggesting a

  8. Spectral discrimination analysis of Eurasian nuclear tests and earthquakes recorded by the Israel Seismic Network and the NORESS array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.; Pinsky, V.; Shapira, A.

    1999-06-01

    The energy spectral ratio and the innovative spectral semblance discriminants, successfully performed previously on a local Israeli events, were verified on teleseismic short-period recordings. The events tested include 29 nuclear explosions and 41 earthquakes ( mb=5.2-6.5), mainly from China and Kazakhstan, recorded by the Israel Seismic Network (ISN) and the NORESS array. A 15-s window comprising P- and P-coda waves was selected for the analysis. The `semblance' statistic commonly used in seismic prospecting for phase correlation in the time domain was modified and utilized as a measure of coherency of the smoothed spectra across the network/array. The semblance and the average spectral ratio of low-to-high frequency energy were evaluated, using a subset of 7-10 stations for a given event. Semblance and spectral ratio values, calculated from ISN seismograms, were found to be higher for earthquakes, where the analyzed waves are richer in low-frequency energy and have more coherent spectral shapes than explosions. These observations are contrary to those observed for local events. The best performance is provided in the frequency bands (0.6-1 Hz)/(1-3 Hz) (for the ratio) and (0.6-2 Hz) (for the semblance). Joint application of the two discriminants showed almost full separation (95%) between the two populations. Some explosions exhibited pronounced minima (nulls) near 1 Hz which could be interpreted in terms of interference of P- and pP-waves from a source at the depth of several hundreds of meters. Nevertheless, this feature could not be utilized as a discriminant: many explosions revealed strong variability of this minimum across the ISN network and some earthquakes also distinctly exhibited this feature. The ISN and NORESS discrimination performances were compared. The latter records showed the same (as the ISN) relation between spectral ratio values for earthquakes and explosions, whereas the character of semblance was reversed. The ratios in the frequency

  9. Real-time seismic monitoring of the integrated cape girardeau bridge array and recorded earthquake response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the state of the art, real-time and broad-band seismic monitoring network implemented for the 1206 m [3956 ft] long, cable-stayed Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau (MO), a new Mississippi River crossing, approximately 80 km from the epicentral region of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. The bridge was designed for a strong earthquake (magnitude 7.5 or greater) during the design life of the bridge. The monitoring network comprises a total of 84 channels of accelerometers deployed on the superstructure, pier foundations and at surface and downhole free-field arrays of the bridge. The paper also presents the high quality response data obtained from the network. Such data is aimed to be used by the owner, researchers and engineers to assess the performance of the bridge, to check design parameters, including the comparison of dynamic characteristics with actual response, and to better design future similar bridges. Preliminary analyses of ambient and low amplitude small earthquake data reveal specific response characteristics of the bridge and the free-field. There is evidence of coherent tower, cable, deck interaction that sometimes results in amplified ambient motions. Motions at the lowest tri-axial downhole accelerometers on both MO and IL sides are practically free from any feedback from the bridge. Motions at the mid-level and surface downhole accelerometers are influenced significantly by feedback due to amplified ambient motions of the bridge. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  10. One Landslide forecasting method using ground ruptures model and strong seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Aiping; Cui, Yuping

    2010-05-01

    According to the assessment report of Taiwan earthquake (Ms.7.1 Sep. 21.1999) and Wenchuan earthquake (Ms.8.0, May 21.2008), there were vast ground rupture and strong ground motion to be observed in the above two events, and a great number of a landslides had also been found over a broad area,which damaged and destroyed homes and other structures, blocked roads, disrupted pipelines, and caused other serious damage like barrier lakes. So, it is very important to analysis the distribution and characteristics of landslides under earthquake dynamic loads and forecast what areas may be susceptible to landsliding in future earthquakes. Landslide disaster characteristics including frequency, distribution, and geometries etc in Taiwan and Wenchuan earthquake are summarized at first, and then the correlation between landslide spatial distribution and ground rupture, and strong earthquake motion are explored by using of statistics analysis respectively. Lastly, a landslide disaster forecasting model is built up. The model includes viscoplastic behaviors of soil and rock under seismic dynamic load, and takes into account directly the landslide spatial distribution related to earthquake intensity and ground rupture through a statistical model. A Prediction was made and compared to the results in Wenchuan earthquake.

  11. Sealing the deal? Vent dynamics and strombolian eruptions recorded with broadband seismic, acoustic and gas observations at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. J.; Waite, G. P.; Nadeau, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of a multi-parameter approach towards characterizing conduit dynamics and explosion sources during a period of strombolian activity at Fuego volcano, Guatemala. Hundreds of explosions were recorded on a temporary network of 10 intermediate-band (30s CMG 40-T and 60s CMG 3ESPC) seismometers deployed around the active summit crater at distances from 750 m to 5 km. Eight acoustic pressure transducers (50 s corner) were deployed in 2-element arrays collocated with seismometers. Seismic and acoustic data were recorded continuously at 100 Hz from January 9-26, 2009. An ultraviolet (UV) camera was also deployed to record ~1 Hz SO2 emission rates at ~1 km from the summit crater, though intermittent ash interference and meteorological clouds prevented continuous image acquisition. Explosive energy release in both the seismic and acoustic records varies by orders of magnitude, which agrees with observations of inaudible gas puffs that reached 10s of meters above the crater to blasts akin to thunder overhead that propelled meter-sized incandescent bombs hundreds of meters above the crater. No active lava flow was observed during the experiment but incandescent rockfall from the crater following strong explosions and incandescent ejecta suggest that the magma column was near the surface. These analyses focus primarily on the strongest explosions recorded by the network because they released a broad spectrum of energy over different timescales that provide insight into conduit and explosion dynamics. Seismic energy is processed into 10-30 s and 100-600 s bands to investigate source location and mechanism and edifice deformation, respectively. The 10-30 s very-long-period (VLP) data that accompany large (>100 Pa acoustic pressure at 750 m) explosions are highly similar, suggesting a repetitive source process. VLP particle motions are rectilinear and point to a shallow source beneath the summit crater, although the steep topography complicates their

  12. Unusual Signals Recorded by Ocean Bottom Seismometers in the Caldera of Deception Island Volcano: Biological Activity or Hydrothermally Generated Seismicity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Wilcock, W. S.

    2011-12-01

    As part of an active source land-sea tomography experiment, ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) were deployed at Deception Island Volcano, Antarctica, in January 2005. Following the tomography study, three OBSs were left for a month inside the flooded caldera and ten on the outer slopes of the volcano to record seismo-volcanic signals. The OBS sensor package included three-orthogonal 1-Hz geophones but no hydrophone. The OBSs were deployed in water depths of 125 to 143 m inside the caldera and at depths of 119 to 475 m on the volcano's flanks. Only two volcano-tectonic earthquakes and three long period events were recorded by the network. However, the OBSs inside the caldera recorded over 4,500 unusual seismic events. These were detected by only one station at a time and were completely absent from OBSs on the flank of the volcano and from land stations deployed on the island. The signals had a dominant frequency of 5 Hz and were one to ten seconds long. Event activity in the caldera was variable with the number of events per hour ranging from 0 up to 60 and the level of activity decreasing slightly over the study period. We categorize the signals into three types based on waveform characteristics. Type 1 events have an impulsive onset and last 1 to 2 s with characteristics that are consistent with the impulse response of a poorly coupled OBS. Type 2 events typically last 2 to 4 s and comprise a low amplitude initial arrival followed less than a second later by a more energetic second phase that looks a Type 1 event. Type 3 events last up to 10 s and have more complex waveforms that appear to comprise several arrivals of varying amplitudes. Type 1 events are similar to the 'fish-bump' signals reported from previous studies that attributed them to biological activity. The consistent timing and relative amplitudes of the two arrivals for Type 2 events are difficult to explain by animals randomly touching the OBSs. Type 3 events are quite similar in frequency, duration

  13. Recorded seismic response of a base-isolated steel bridge carrying a steel water pipe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Brady, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    A set of strong motion records was obtained from the base-isolated Santa Ana River Pipeline Bridge during the magnitude 5.9 Whittier Narrows, California, earthquake of October 1, 1987. The analysis of the records show that the level of excitation was not strong enough to fully activate the base isolators. The dominant modes of the response are the translations of the abutment-bridge-pipe system in the longitudinal and transverse directions, and the bending of the steel truss between supports in the vertical direction.

  14. Crustal Effects on Regional Seismic Phases in Aseismic Regions of Northern Eurasia: Constraints From PNE Recordings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Nuclear Explosions (PNEs) has been recently extended to 19 PNEs recorded along 7 long-range refraction/reflection profiles: QUARTZ, CRATON, KIMBERLITE ...studied the best, with detailed crustal and upper Figure 1 DSS PNE profiles under study at the University of Wyoming: QUARTZ, CRATON, KIMBERLITE , RIFT

  15. Pre-instrumental seismicity in Central Africa using felt seisms recorded mainly at the meteorological stations of DRC, Rwanda and Burundi during the colonial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulumba, J.-L.; Delvaux, D.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic hazard assessment and mitigation of catastrophes are primarily based on the identification and characterization of seismically active zones. These tasks still rely heavily on the existing knowledge of the seismic activity over the longest possible time period. The first seismic network in Equatorial Africa (IRSAC network) was operated from the Lwiro scientific base on the western shores of Lake Kivu between 1953 and 1963. Before this installation, the historical record of seismic activity in Central Africa is sparse. Even for the relatively short period concerned, spanning only 50-60 years, the historical record is far from being complete. A first attempt has been made by Herrinckx (1959) who compiled a list 960 felt seisms recorded at the meteorological stations between 1915 and 1954 in Congo, Rwanda and Burundi. They were used to draw a density map of felt seisms per square degree. We completed this data base by exploiting the meteorological archives and any available historical report to enlarge the database which now reaches 1513 entries between 1900 and 1959. These entries have been exanimate in order to identify possible historical seismic events. Those are defined by 3 or more quasi-simultaneous records observed over a relatively short distance (a few degrees of latitude/longitude) within a short time difference (few hours). A preliminary list of 115 possible historical seisms has been obtained, identified by 3 to 15 different stations. The proposed location is taken as the average latitude and longitude of the stations where the felt seisms were recorded. Some of the most important ones are associated to aftershocks that have been felt at some stations after the main shocks. The most recent felt seisms have been also recorded instrumentally, which helps to validate the procedure followed. The main difficulties are the magnitude estimation and the possible spatial incompleteness of the recording of felt seism evidence at the margin of the observation

  16. Bed load transport and boundary roughness changes as competing causes of hysteresis in the relationship between river discharge and seismic amplitude recorded near a steep mountain stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Danica L.; Finnegan, Noah J.; Brodsky, Emily E.; Rickenmann, Dieter; Turowski, Jens M.; Badoux, Alexandre; Gimbert, Florent

    2017-05-01

    Hysteresis in the relationship between bed load transport and river stage is a well-documented phenomenon with multiple known causes. Consequently, numerous studies have interpreted hysteresis in the relationship between seismic ground motion near rivers and some measure of flow strength (i.e., discharge or stage) as the signature of bed load transport. Here we test this hypothesis in the Erlenbach stream (Swiss Prealps) using a metric to quantitatively compare hysteresis in seismic data with hysteresis recorded by geophones attached beneath steel plates within the streambed, a well-calibrated proxy for direct sediment transport measurements. We find that while both the geophones and seismometers demonstrate hysteresis, the magnitude and direction of hysteresis are not significantly correlated between these data, indicating that the seismic signal at this site is primarily reflecting hysteresis in processes other than sediment transport. Seismic hysteresis also does not correlate significantly with the magnitude of sediment transport recorded by the geophones, contrary to previous studies' assumptions. We suggest that hydrologic sources and changes in water turbulence, for instance due to evolving boundary conditions at the bed, rather than changes in sediment transport rates, may sometimes contribute to or even dominate the hysteresis observed in seismic amplitudes near steep mountain rivers.

  17. Passive Tomography using a Dense Array of Single-Channel Seismic Recorders with Applications to the Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, C. T.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Worthington, L. L.; BASE Seismic Team

    2011-12-01

    In 2010 an array of >800 Reftek RT125A "Texan" recorders and geophones (OYO Geospace 4.5Hz) was deployed across the Bighorn Mountain Range in northern Wyoming as part of the EarthScope Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE) Flexible Array experiment. Originally used for the active-source portion of the project, the instruments remained deployed and recording continuously for a period of 15 days in order to record teleseisms. This approach to passive-source seismology is an emerging field, and is showing the ability to provide high-density coverage, leading to high-resolution images of the subsurface. During these 15 days we observed a total of 57 events with pickable P-wave arrivals across the array, providing over 10,000 travel times to date (mostly direct P, some PKiKP, Pdiff as well as Pn from regional earthquakes). These events range in magnitude from 4.1 to 7.0 at distances up to 135 degrees. We assigned absolute arrival times to the travel time data using a multichannel cross-correlation program to align the waveforms. One of the goals of the BASE project is to clearly identify Moho topography in order to better understand the tectonic origin of foreland arches such as the Bighorn Mountains. We will present tomographic models for the lower crust and upper mantle, including the Moho discontinuity, below the Bighorn Mountain Range obtained from a combination of the teleseismic travel time data and picks from 21 active-source shots observed on >1700 stations occurring during the active-source deployment. The exchange of data between the active- and passive-source researchers will improve models for both; active-source filling in the shallow crust that is poorly sampled by teleseismic ray paths, and teleseismic coverage to constrain the active-source models at depth. This new approach to passive-source imaging is providing large amounts of data that offer high spatial resolution for 3-D seismic velocity models.

  18. Impact of wind on ambient noise recorded by the "13 BB star" seismic array in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, Simone; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Grad, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Seismic interferometry and beam forming techniques were applied to ambient noise recorded during January 2014 at the "13 BB star" array, composed of thirteen seismic stations located in northern Poland, with the aim of evaluating the azimuth of noise sources and the velocities of surface waves. After normalizing the raw recordings in time and frequency domain, the spectral characteristics of the ambient noise were studied to choose a frequency band suitable for the waves' retrieval. To get the velocity of surface waves by seismic interferometry, the crosscorrelation between all station pairs was analysed for the vertical and horizontal components in the 0.05-0.1 Hz, 0.1-1 Hz and 1 10 Hz frequency bands. For each pair, the crosscorrelation was applied to one hour recordings extracted from the ambient noise. The obtained traces were calculated for a complete day, and then summed together: the daily results were stacked for the whole January 2014. In the lowest frequency range, most of the energy is located around the 3.0 km/s line, meaning that the surface waves coming from the uppermost mantle will be retrieved. The intermediate frequency range shows most of the energy between the 2.0 km/s and 1.5 km/s lines: consequently, surface waves originating from the crust will be retrieved. In the highest frequency range, the surface waves are barely visible on the crosscorrelation traces, implying that the associated energy is strongly attenuated. The azimuth variation associated to the noise field was evaluated by means of the beam forming method, using the data from the whole array for all the three components. To that, the beam power was estimated in a small range of frequencies every day for the whole month. For each day, one hour long results of beam forming applications were stacked together. To avoid aliasing and near field effects, the minimum frequency was set at 0.05 Hz and the maximum to 0.1 Hz. In this frequency band, the amplitude maximum was sought

  19. Comparing SO2 Emissions to Seismic and Acoustic Records: the Value and Limitations of the new UV Camera Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, M. P.; Waite, G. P.; Nadeau, P. A.; Watson, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    SO2 emission measurements are an important component of monitoring volcanic eruption processes. Owing mainly to limitations in the temporal resolution of measurements, the goal of merging a gas flux record with other geophysical datasets (seismic, acoustic) with the aim of investigating subsurface processes has been elusive. In recent years, ground-based, ultraviolet (UV) digital cameras have improved upon previous methods of SO2 observation by capturing a large portion of the plume in one measurement- a single image. The UV digital camera can record at up to 1Hz, producing a data set that is more comparable with other monitoring techniques, allowing for a more precise record of SO2 flux, and directly providing the plume speed. Many monitoring advantages are gained by using this technique, but the accuracy and limitations require thorough investigation. The effect of some user-controlled parameters, include image exposure length, the diameter of the lens aperture, the regularity of calibration cell imaging, and the use of the single or paired bandpass filters, are addressed in this study. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to clarify methodological consequences and quantify accuracy. Digital images of calibration cells were collected under varying observational conditions, and SO2 retrieval results from a coal power plant plume were compared to direct sampling measurements. The results indicate that the UV camera retrieval compares favorably with direct sampling methods; that careful attention must be paid to exposure times; and that there is some latitude in the calibration cell conversion technique. A multi-instrument field campaign was undertaken at Pacaya volcano, Guatemala to relate complementary high-temporal-resolution datasets. Between January 5 and January 9, 2008 SO2 flux was recorded at Pacaya using the UV camera. These measurements were coincident with recordings from a temporary network of five broadband seismometers and five low

  20. Seismic source functions from free-field ground motions recorded on SPE: Implications for source models of small, shallow explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, Esteban; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-05-01

    Reduced displacement potentials (RDPs) for chemical explosions of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) in granite at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site are estimated from free-field ground motion recordings. Far-field P wave source functions are proportional to the time derivative of RDPs. Frequency domain comparisons between measured source functions and model predictions show that high-frequency amplitudes roll off as ω- 2, but models fail to predict the observed seismic moment, corner frequency, and spectral overshoot. All three features are fit satisfactorily for the SPE-2 test after cavity radius Rc is reduced by 12%, elastic radius is reduced by 58%, and peak-to-static pressure ratio on the elastic radius is increased by 100%, all with respect to the Mueller-Murphy model modified with the Denny-Johnson Rc scaling law. A large discrepancy is found between the cavity volume inferred from RDPs and the volume estimated from laser scans of the emplacement hole. The measurements imply a scaled Rc of ~5 m/kt1/3, more than a factor of 2 smaller than nuclear explosions. Less than 25% of the seismic moment can be attributed to cavity formation. A breakdown of the incompressibility assumption due to shear dilatancy of the source medium around the cavity is the likely explanation. New formulas are developed for volume changes due to medium bulking (or compaction). A 0.04% decrease of average density inside the elastic radius accounts for the missing volumetric moment. Assuming incompressibility, established Rc scaling laws predicted the moment reasonable well, but it was only fortuitous because dilation of the source medium compensated for the small cavity volume.

  1. Characterization of the 2015 M4.0 Venus, Texas, Earthquake Sequence Using Locally Recorded Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scales, M. M.; DeShon, H. R.; Hayward, C.; Magnani, M. B.; Walter, J. I.; Pratt, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present high-resolution relative earthquake relocations derived using differential time data from waveform cross-correlation and first motion fault plane solutions to characterize the 2015 M4.0 Venus, TX, earthquake sequence. On 7 May 2015, a M4.0 earthquake occurred in Johnson County, TX, south of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. It is the largest event recorded to date in the Fort Worth (Barnett Shale) Basin, which is an active shale gas production area that has been associated with induced earthquakes. The USGS moment tensor indicated normal faulting along NE-SW trending faults and two additional felt aftershocks were reported in the National Earthquake Information Center catalog. Beginning on 11 May 2015, a temporary seismic network was deployed. Over the first week, SMU deployed 13 vertical-component RT125s and 3 USGS NetQuakes instruments. The RT125s were replaced with 7 short-period 3-component instruments provided by IRIS and 4 broadband stations deployed throughout Johnson County by the University of Texas. To date, we have located over 100 events that define a 5 km long normal fault striking 35°NE and dipping ~70°. Events occur in the Precambrian granitic basement at depths of 4-6km. These locations are near the bottom of the Ellenburger Group (~3.5km in depth), which is an Ordovician carbonate platform overlying the basement and is often used for wastewater disposal. Five large volume injection wells operate within 10km of the earthquake sequence and inject very near, if not through, the Ellenburger-basement contact. These wells were temporarily shut down by the Texas Railroad Commission for testing but were reported at the time to have no causal effect on the earthquake activity. We explore temporal and spatial correlations between seismicity, wastewater injection data and subsurface fault data to better understand the cause of the Venus sequence.

  2. The record of iceberg roll generated waves from sediments and seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, N. J.; Szczucinski, W.; Strzelecki, M.; Long, A. J.; Norman, E. C.; Dunning, S.; Drewniak, M.

    2013-12-01

    Iceberg-roll tsunamis in coastal settings have been observed to generate significant local waves, that hold potential to be recorded in coastal depositional records. Capturing the past magnitude and frequency of such events remains challenging, hindered by a lack of a good understanding of the nature, recurrence and scale of iceberg rolls, and more specifically those rolls that generate waves. Here we consider the sedimentary evidence for iceberg rolls in West Central Greenland, based upon survey of depositional environments in a range of open and confined coastal environments. We examine both an open 80 km fjord setting, and a series of confined ice-marginal beaches. We combine a detailed interpretation of sediment deposits from shore-normal transects with wider-scale high-resolution terrestrial laser scanning of sediments. Our sites - Vaigat, which separates Disko Island from the Nussuaq Peninsular, and the northern shore of Icefjord - both have a recent history of tsunamis, triggered variously by large rock avalanches, landslides and iceberg rolls. Icebergs in Vaigat and Icefjord are observed to undergo frequent failure and roll, generating - where circumstances permit - nearshore waves of meter-scale. To obtain a more detailed understanding of the likely recurrence of such iceberg roll waves and to consider their influence upon the preserved sedimentary record, we undertook an intensive 2-month monitoring campaign during sea-ice free conditions in summer 2013 to determine the patterns in the location, magnitude, frequency and timing of iceberg roll waves. Innovatively, using microseismic monitoring combined with time-lapse photography and weather monitoring, we derive a first-order model of the occurrence of iceberg roll waves. We then use this to inform our interpretation of deposits in these two environments, and consider the presence and absence of records of iceberg roll deposits in such settings. The study was funded by Polish National Science Centre grant

  3. Data report for onshore-offshore wide-angle seismic recordings in the Bering-Chukchi Sea, Western Alaska and eastern Siberia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Allen, Richard M.; Stone, David B.; Wolf, Lorraine W.; Galloway, Brian K.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents fourteen deep-crustal wide-angle seismic reflection and refraction profiles recorded onland in western Alaska and eastern Siberia from marine air gun sources in the Bering-Chukchi Seas. During a 20-day period in August, 1994, the R/V Ewing acquired two long (a total of 3754 km) deep-crustal seismic-reflection profiles on the continental shelf of the Bering and Chukchi Seas, in a collaborative project between Stanford University and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The Ewing's 137.7 liter (8355 cu. in.) air gun array was the source for both the multichannel reflection and the wide-angle seismic data. The Ewing, operated by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, steamed northward from Nunivak Island to Barrow, and returned, firing the air gun array at intervals of either 50 m or 75 m. About 37,700 air gun shots were fired along the northward directed Lines 1 and 2, and more than 40,000 air gun shots were fired along the southward directed Line 3. The USGS and the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF), deployed an array of twelve 3-component REFTEK and PDAS recorders in western Alaska and eastern Siberia which continuously recorded the air gun signals fired during the northward bound Lines 1 and 2. Seven of these recorders also continuously recorded the southward bound Line 3. These wide-angle seismic data were acquired to: (1) image reflectors in the upper to lower crust, (2) determine crustal and upper mantle refraction velocities, and (3) provide important constraints on the geometry of the Moho along the seismic lines. In this report, we describe the land recording of wide-angle data conducted by the USGS and the UAF, describe in detail how the wide-angle REFTEK and PDAS data were reduced to common receiver gather seismic sections, and illustrate the wide-angle seismic data obtained by the REFTEKs and PDAS's. Air gun signals were observed to ranges in excess of 400 km, and crustal and upper /mantle refractions indicate substantial

  4. Comparing two years of TIR satellite measurements and seismic records during the ongoing seismic sequence on the Pollino (Italy) mountain range.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzano, Nicola; Filizzola, Carolina; Lisi, Mariano; Mucciarelli, Marco; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing seismic sequence on the Pollino mountain range (2010-2013, maximum magnitude 5.0) provides a test for possible precursory patterns both from seismic catalogue and other observations. In this paper more than two years of TIR anomaly maps - generated by applying the RST (Robust Satellite Technique) approach to MSG/SEVIRI data over Italy (since October 2010) are analyzed looking for possible relations of persistent space-time anomalous transients with local seismic patterns and/or major (single) seismic events. The analysis of the catalogue shows first of all the problem of apparent variations due to the densification of the seismic network from one side and to the influence of weather conditions on completeness from the other. Even above a safe completeness threshold it is not easy to identify stable patterns, and some hypotheses that seemed very viable at a certain point of the sequence proved to be false after a while. The analysis of TIR anomaly maps performed within areas of different dimension (up to the Dobrovolsky radius for an EQ of M=5) around the position of the main shock, shows quite particular TIR signal behaviors (both in terms of punctual intensity and spatial distribution of anomalous patterns) around the time (starting about 2 weeks before) and the location of the main shock. The sequence is still ongoing at the moment of abstract submission and thus no definitive results can be given at the moment.

  5. Applying distance sampling to fin whale calls recorded by single seismic instruments in the northeast Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Harris, Danielle; Matias, Luis; Thomas, Len; Harwood, John; Geissler, Wolfram H

    2013-11-01

    Automated methods were developed to detect fin whale calls recorded by an array of ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed off the Portuguese coast between 2007 and 2008. Using recordings collected on a single day in January 2008, a standard seismological method for estimating earthquake location from single instruments, the three-component analysis, was used to estimate the relative azimuth, incidence angle, and horizontal range between each OBS and detected calls. A validation study using airgun shots, performed prior to the call analysis, indicated that the accuracy of the three-component analysis was satisfactory for this preliminary study. Point transect sampling using cue counts, a form of distance sampling, was then used to estimate the average probability of detecting a call via the array during the chosen day. This is a key step to estimating density or abundance of animals using passive acoustic data. The average probability of detection was estimated to be 0.313 (standard error: 0.033). However, fin whale density could not be estimated due to a lack of an appropriate estimate of cue (i.e., vocalization) rate. This study demonstrates the potential for using a sparse array of widely spaced, independently operating acoustic sensors, such as OBSs, for estimating cetacean density.

  6. Seismological results from the records obtained by the Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX). The analysis of the earthquake of March 20, 2012 and other examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Perez, S.; Rodriguez Gonzalez, M.; Uribe Carvajal, A.; Espinosa Aranda, J.; Cuellar Martinez, A.

    2013-05-01

    In this talk we show seismological processes performed with data obtained from the records collected by the strong motion recorders that constitute the seismic alert system of Mexico (SASMEX). The instruments and the triggering algorithms are original design of CIRES, This has allowed that optimal time modifications, improvements and error corrections. Punctual parameters as first time arrivals, S-P times, and maximum acceleration (Amax) for each seismic station can be obtained from the warning record it self, before the earthquake arrives. When the system initiates the alert process the S-P time at least two sites are already known and at this moment common time is set in all the array which allows the synchronization of all the records, these are recovered during field trips after every trigger. The time histories are obtained by A/D converters (12 bits) and MEMS accelerometers. During the March 20, 2012 earthquake nine seismic stations of the SASMEX array detected the event at less than one hundred kilometres of epicentral distance, this allowed to calculate the location of the hypocenter, the maxima displacements associated to each of these sites. The greatest value corresponds to the Llano Grande seismic station, 0.47m on the SW direction, for the NS component. The distributions of Amax and the estimated movement displacement are shown. The foreshock of October 6 is also analysed, The behaviour of the SASMEX during the earthquakes of Tehuacan (June 15, 1999) and of Guatemala (Nov 7, 2012) are shown as examples of the possibility that the nature of the seismic activity it self point the need and probable success of increasing the coverage of SASMEX.

  7. Characteristics of radiation and propagation of seismic waves in the Baikal Rift Zone estimated by simulations of acceleration time histories of the recorded earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, O. V.; Tubanov, Ts. A.

    2017-01-01

    The regularities in the radiation and propagation of seismic waves within the Baikal Rift Zone in Buryatia are studied to estimate the ground motion parameters from the probable future strong earthquakes. The regional parameters of seismic radiation and propagation are estimated by the stochastic simulation (which provides the closest agreement between the calculations and observations) of the acceleration time histories of the earthquakes recorded by the Ulan-Ude seismic station. The acceleration time histories of the strongest earthquakes ( M W 3.4-4.8) that occurred in 2006-2011 at the epicentral distances of 96-125 km and had source depths of 8-12 km have been modeled. The calculations are conducted with estimates of the Q-factor which were previously obtained for the region. The frequency-dependent attenuation and geometrical spreading are estimated from the data on the deep structure of the crust and upper mantle (velocity sections) in the Ulan-Ude region, and the parameters determining the wave forms and duration of acceleration time histories are found by fitting. These parameters fairly well describe all the considered earthquakes. The Ulan-Ude station can be considered as the reference bedrock station with minimum local effects. The obtained estimates for the parameters of seismic radiation and propagation can be used for forecasting the ground motion from the future strong earthquakes and for constructing the seismic zoning maps for Buryatia.

  8. Fin whale tracks recorded by a seismic network on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Soule, Dax C; Wilcock, William S D

    2013-03-01

    Fin whale calls recorded from 2003 to 2004 by a seafloor seismic network on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed to determine tracks and calling patterns. Over 150 tracks were obtained with a total duration of ~800 h and swimming speeds from 1 to 12 km/h. The dominant inter-pulse interval (IPI) is 24 s and the IPI patterns define 4 categories: a 25 s single IPI and 24/30 s dual IPI produced by single calling whales, a 24/13 s dual IPI interpreted as two calling whales, and an irregular IPI interpreted as groups of calling whales. There are also tracks in which the IPI switches between categories. Call rates vary seasonally with all the tracks between August and April. From August to October tracks are dominated by the irregular IPI and are predominantly headed to the northwest, suggesting that a portion of the fin whale population does not migrate south in the fall. The other IPI categories occur primarily from November to March. These tracks have slower swimming speeds, tend to meander, and are predominantly to the south. The distribution of fin whales around the network is non-random with more calls near the network and to the east and north.

  9. Strong Seismic Scatterers Near the Core-Mantle Boundary North of Pacific Anomaly From PKP Precursors Recorded by Antarctica Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Ma, X.; Wiens, D. A.; Wen, L.; Nyblade, A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Huerta, A. D.; Wilson, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The arrival times and amplitudes of PKP precursors can provide valuable information on the location, geometry, velocity and density variations of small-scale heterogeneities near the CMB, making it a very useful tool to study the nature of CMB region. We observed PKP precursors from earthquakes in Aleutian Islands and Kamchatka Peninsula recorded by seismic arrays in Antarctica (GAMSEIS and POLENET/ANET) from distance 134-142o. By comparing the CMB entry and exit points of the two sets of earthquakes, we suggest that the precursors are generated by scatterers near the source side entry point. We further analyze the arrival times of PKP precursors and forward model the precursor envelopes. Our preliminary results show that the scatterers are located near the north side of Pacific anomaly, in latitude 30-50°N, and within ~400 km above CMB. Furthermore, the scatterers can be divided into three regions, with 2-3% variation in the middle (160-180°E) and ~1% variation in the other two sides (140-160°E,160-180°W). By further analyzing ScS-S differential traveltime residuals sampling these regions, we argue that the heterogeneous scatterers are probably the remnants of ancient subducted slab.

  10. Exotic seismic phases recorded near Mammoth Lakes and their use in the delineation of shallow-crustal (magma?) anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppin, William A.

    1987-11-01

    Observations of several hundred exotic seismic phases (herein defined) recorded in and near Long Valley caldera, California, have been cataloged. I discuss here four classes of such seismograms: (1) seismograms with missing S-waves, (2) seismograms with an unusual pre-S phase seen at the single station SLK northwest of the caldera, (3) seismograms with a strong pre-S phase as seen at a number of stations south of the caldera, and (4) a very large, very slow (<2 km/sec) post-S phase seen at the single station Benton. For each of these phenomena, it is not yet possible to pin down an unambiguous and unique theoretical explanation. However, for each, I have presented an explanation, summarizing current thinking, which involves nonplanar reflections/refractions within shallow-crustal anomalous zones which can reasonably be supposed to be magma bodies. If these explanations are even partially pertinent, then the investigation of exotic phases near complex regions like Mammoth Lakes and other volcanic areas is potentially a way to bring precise resolving power on the nature and geometry of local crustal anomalies.

  11. Broadband recording of Strombolian explosions and associated very-long-period seismic signals on Mount Erebus Volcano, Ross Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. A.; Aster, R. C.; Kyle, P. R.; Schlue, J. W.; Dibble, R. R.

    In December 1996 and January 1997, broadband seismometers were deployed on the summit plateau of Mount Erebus at radial distances of 0.7, 1.4 and 1.9 km from the central crater and lava lake. Strombolian explosions at Erebus previously have been observed to produce seismic and acoustic energy between 1 and 6 Hz. New observations document significant energy with spectral peaks as grave as 20 s. Nearly identical very-long-period (VLP) signals begin ∼1.5 s prior to explosions, have dilatational onsets and persist for up to 150 s. Similar VLP waveforms were recorded at all three stations, indicating that the seismograms are essentially source-dominated. Particle motions suggest an initial depth for the VLP source of up to several hundred meters, migrating deeper in the course of ∼15 s. Such explosion-associated VLP signals may indicate a nondestructive lossy resonance or nonlinear fluid-flow excitation within the shallow magmatic system.

  12. Source process of the 1911 M8.0 Chon-Kemin earthquake: investigation results by analogue seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikova, Galina; Krüger, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Several destructive earthquakes have occurred in Tien-Shan region at the beginning of 20th century. However, the detailed seismological characteristics, especially source parameters of those earthquakes are still poorly investigated. The Chon-Kemin earthquake is the strongest instrumentally recorded earthquake in the Tien-Shan region. This earthquake has produced an approximately 200 km long system of surface ruptures along Kemin-Chilik fault zone and killed about ˜400 people. Several studies presented the different information on the earthquake epicentre location and magnitude, and two different focal mechanisms were also published. The reason for the limited knowledge of the source parameters for the Chon-Kemin earthquake is the complexity of old analogue records processing, digitization and analysis. In this study the data from 23 seismic stations worldwide were collected and digitized. The earthquake epicentre was relocated to 42.996N° and 77.367E°, the hypocentre depth is estimated between 10 and 20 km. The magnitude was recalculated to mB 8.05, Ms 7.94 and Mw 8.02. The focal mechanism, determined from amplitude ratios comparison of the observed and synthetic seismograms, was: str = 264°, dip = 52°, rake = 98°. The apparent source time duration was between ˜45 and ˜70 s, the maximum slip occurred 25 s after the beginning of the rupture. Two subevents were clearly detected from the waveforms with the scalar moment ratio between them of about 1/3, the third subevent was also detected with less certainty. Taking into account surface rupture information, the fault geometry model with three patches was proposed. Based on scaling relations we conclude that the total rupture length was between ˜260 and 300 km and a maximum rupture width could reach ˜70 km.

  13. Networks of recurrent events, a theory of records, and an application to finding causal signatures in seismicity.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2008-06-01

    We propose a method to search for signs of causal structure in spatiotemporal data making minimal a priori assumptions about the underlying dynamics. To this end, we generalize the elementary concept of recurrence for a point process in time to recurrent events in space and time. An event is defined to be a recurrence of any previous event if it is closer to it in space than all the intervening events. As such, each sequence of recurrences for a given event is a record breaking process. This definition provides a strictly data driven technique to search for structure. Defining events to be nodes, and linking each event to its recurrences, generates a network of recurrent events. Significant deviations in statistical properties of that network compared to networks arising from (acausal) random processes allows one to infer attributes of the causal dynamics that generate observable correlations in the patterns. We derive analytically a number of properties for the network of recurrent events composed by a random process in space and time. We extend the theory of records to treat not only the variable where records happen, but also time as continuous. In this way, we construct a fully symmetric theory of records leading to a number of results. Those analytic results are compared in detail to the properties of a network synthesized from time series of epicenter locations for earthquakes in Southern California. Significant disparities from the ensemble of acausal networks that can be plausibly attributed to the causal structure of seismicity are as follows. (1) Invariance of network statistics with the time span of the events considered. (2) The appearance of a fundamental length scale for recurrences, independent of the time span of the catalog, which is consistent with observations of the "rupture length." (3) Hierarchy in the distances and times of subsequent recurrences. As expected, almost all of the statistical properties of a network constructed from a surrogate

  14. Analysis and models of pre-injection surface seismic array noise recorded at the Aquistore carbon storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnie, Claire; Chambers, Kit; Angus, Doug; Stork, Anna L.

    2016-08-01

    Noise is a persistent feature in seismic data and so poses challenges in extracting increased accuracy in seismic images and physical interpretation of the subsurface. In this paper, we analyse passive seismic data from the Aquistore carbon capture and storage pilot project permanent seismic array to characterise, classify and model seismic noise. We perform noise analysis for a three-month subset of passive seismic data from the array and provide conclusive evidence that the noise field is not white, stationary, or Gaussian; characteristics commonly yet erroneously assumed in most conventional noise models. We introduce a novel noise modelling method that provides a significantly more accurate characterisation of real seismic noise compared to conventional methods, which is quantified using the Mann-Whitney-White statistical test. This method is based on a statistical covariance modelling approach created through the modelling of individual noise signals. The identification of individual noise signals, broadly classified as stationary, pseudo-stationary and non-stationary, provides a basis on which to build an appropriate spatial and temporal noise field model. Furthermore, we have developed a workflow to incorporate realistic noise models within synthetic seismic data sets providing an opportunity to test and analyse detection and imaging algorithms under realistic noise conditions.

  15. Investigation of Historic Seismic and Infrasound Records from Events Occurred at the Region of Novaya Zemplya Test Site by the USSR Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Inna

    2014-05-01

    Located in the north the Novaya Zemlya Test Site was used in Soviet time for conducting unique nuclear weapon tests in different mediums. 130 nuclear explosions with total yield 265 megatons were conducted at the Test Site for the period 1955-1990. During this period the following nuclear explosions were conducted: 1 surface explosion, 85 air explosions, 2 above water explosions, 3 underwater explosions and 39 underground explosions (in boreholes and tunnels). In addition, tectonic earthquakes and induced earthquakes caused by multi-megatons UNE occur near the Test Site. Unfortunately, only few seismic events occurred on the territory of the Test Site were recorded by digital stations. However, the archives of different seismological organizations of the USSR contain huge amount of analogue seismograms recorded by permanent and temporary stations. Historical seismograms of nuclear explosions and earthquakes from Novaya Zemlya Test site territory were digitized by the Complex Seismological Expedition IPE RAS and by the Institute of Geophysical Researches RK; a database of the events from the Test Site containing 470 seismograms at epicentral distance 2100-3800 was created. The database includes seismic records of air, underground nuclear explosions, and records of underwater nuclear explosion conducted within "Korall" exercise. In addition, infrasound records of waves from multi-megatons air nuclear explosions recorded by a microbarograph installed at Talgar seismic station at distance ~3600 km from the Test Site were digitized. Kinematic and dynamic parameters of nuclear explosions records conducted in different mediums (air, under water and underground) were investigated by the digitized records from events at Novaya Zemlya Test Site; specific features of wave pattern for each class of events were found.

  16. First seismic survey of Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada): sedimentary record of the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutz, Alexis; Schuster, Mathieu; Ghienne, Jean-François; Raphaël, Certain; Nicolas, Robin; Claude, Roquin; Frédéric, Bouchette; Cousineau Pierre, A.

    2015-04-01

    The general post-glacial evolution of the Lake Saint-Jean region (Canada/Québec) was, until now, only known from onshore studies (outcrops and geomorphology). Because this lake corresponds to sediment depocentre since the area is ice free (latest Pleistocene and the entire Holocene), a comprehensive sedimentary archive could be expected from this area. As a consequence, the offshore archives of Lake Saint-Jean leave a basic, but crucial, question: can the transition from glacial to post-glacial periods be deciphered? The stratigraphy of the last deglacial sequence is investigated in Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada) from 300 km of echo-sounder 2D seismic profiles. The sedimentary archive of this basin is documented from the Late Pleistocene Laurentidian ice-front recession to the present-day situation. Ten seismic units have been identified that reflect spatio-temporal variations in depositional processes characterizing different periods of the Lake Saint-Jean basin evolution. During the postglacial marine flooding, a high deposition rate of mud settling, from proglacial glacimarine and then prodeltaic plumes in the Laflamme Gulf, produced an extensive, up to 50 m thick mud sheet draping the isostatically depressed marine basin floor. Subsequently, closing of the water body due to glacio-isostatic rebound that occurred at 8.5 cal. ka BP and ice-sheet retreat outside the Saint-Jean catchment at 7.5 cal. ka BP drastically modify the hydrodynamics and sedimentation. Hyperpycnal flows appeared because fresh lake water replaced dense marine water. River sediments were transferred towards the deeper part of the lake into river-related confined lobes. The water body is also marked by the onset of a wind-driven internal circulation associating wave-related hydrodynamics and bottom currents with sedimentary features including shoreface deposits, sediment drifts, a sedimentary shelf and important erosional surfaces. The Lake Saint-Jean reveals important diversity and

  17. Friction weakening in granular flows deduced from seismic records at the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Clara; Mangeney, Anne; Bonilla, Fabian; Hibert, Clément; Calder, Eliza S.; Smith, Patrick J.

    2015-11-01

    Accurate modeling of rockfalls and pyroclastic flows is still an open issue, partly due to a lack of measurements related to their dynamics. Using seismic data from the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, and granular flow modeling, we show that the power laws relating the seismic energy Es to the seismic duration ts and relating the loss of potential energy ΔEp to the flow duration tf are very similar, like the power laws observed at Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island. Observations showing that tf≃ts suggest a constant ratio Es/ΔEp≃10-5. This similarity in these two power laws can be obtained only when the granular flow model uses a friction coefficient that decreases with the volume transported. Furthermore, with this volume-dependent friction coefficient, the simulated force applied by the flow to the ground correlates well with the seismic energy, highlighting the signature of this friction weakening effect in seismic data.

  18. Persistent pre-seismic signature detected by means of Na-K-Mg geothermometry records in a saline spring of Vrancea area (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofan, H.; Marin, C.; Zugrǎvescu, D.; Chitea, F.; Anghelache, M.-A.; Beşuå£Iu, L.; Tudorache, A.

    2010-02-01

    A six year-long hydrochemical monitoring operation was conducted in Vrancea seismic zone (Romania), addressing a saline spring that proved to be suitable for Na-K-Mg geothermometry diagnosis. During the considered time-interval (2003-2009), only one important earthquake (mb=5.8) occurred in Vrancea region, this circumstance providing an unambiguous reference-moment between pre-seismic and post-seismic periods. On occurrence of that earthquake, an anomalous fluctuation of the Na-K temperature was detected - a result largely similar to previous ones recorded worldwide (California, southwest Egypt, northeast India). Yet such fluctuations may not necessarily be induced by earthquake-associated processes: they can occur also "routinely", possibly reflecting some environmental, meteorologically-induced "noise". It was therefore important to examine whether the variations observed in the data values could be plausibly related to a seismogenesis process. By additionally investigating (in a "scattterplot" diagram) the correlation between the Na-K temperatures and the values of a so-called "maturity index", a specific pattern emerged, with pre-seismic data-points plotting in a distinct domain of the diagram; moreover, those data-points appeared to describe a "drift away" pathway with respect to the remaining data-points "cluster", recorded during the subsequent 4 years of post-seismic monitoring. The "drift away" pattern persistently evolved for at least 18 months, ending just before the mb=5.8 earthquake and consequently suggesting the existence of some kind of long-term precursory phenomenon.

  19. Late-stage stretching and subsidence rates in the Danakil Depression, evidenced from borehole records and seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Adam; Bastow, Ian; Magee, Craig; Keir, Derek; Corti, Giacomo; Jackson, Chris; Wilkinson, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The Ethiopian and Afar Rift systems provide a globally unique opportunity to study the incipient transition from continental rifting to sea-floor spreading. A consensus has emerged that a considerable proportion of plate extension in Ethiopia is accommodated by dyke intrusion, with smaller contributions from crustal thinning. However, observations of thinned crust and a pulse in Quaternary-Recent basaltic volcanism within Ethiopia's Danakil Depression have been cited (Bastow and Keir, 2011) as evidence that localised plate stretching may mark the final stages of continent-ocean transition. We explore this hypothesis using an archive of five 2-D seismic reflection profiles, each between 7-10 km in length, and ˜120 borehole records distributed over an area of 225 km2. From depth and age relationships of key marker horizons, we also suggest local subsidence and extension rates. The borehole archive reveals extensive evaporite sequences deposited in and around an asymmetric basin, bounded to the west by a network of east-dipping normal faults. West of the basin, the maximum observed thickness of evaporites is 150 m, beneath which are deposits of clastic sediment, but a sequence of evaporites at least 900 m thick is observed at the basin centre. The sedimentary architecture of these sequences suggests deposition in a shallow salt-pan environment, with seasonal - potentially diurnal - freshening of the brine supply (Warren, 2012). Isotopic analysis of reef carbonates in the basin flank dates the last marine incursion into the Danakil Depression at 24-230ka (Lalou et al., 1970; Bonatti et al., 1971; Bannert et al., 1971), therefore the evaporite sequence must be younger than this. A key marker horizon within the evaporites is the potash-bearing Houston Formation, also distinct in borehole records given its high porosity (25-40%) and radioactivity (50-250 API units). The elevation of the Houston Formation is ˜500 m deeper in the centre of the basin than on the flank

  20. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  1. Late 18th to early 19th century sea-level history and inter-seismic behavior along the western Myanmar plate boundary belt recorded by coral microatolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sze-Chieh; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2016-04-01

    Along the western Myanmar plate boundary belt, the Indian-Australian plate is subducting obliquely beneath the Burma micro-plate at a rate of about 23 mm/yr. Although information about the 1762 Arakan earthquake, the only major historical event occurred along this plate boundary belt, has been delineated recently from uplifted coastal features, constraints on the inter-seismic behavior of this belt is still very limited, due to the lack of high resolution instrumental records in the area. Therefore, we utilized coral microatolls to analyze relative sea level history, in order to obtain potential information of land-level change along the western coast of Myanmar. Our sample was collected from northwestern Ramree Island, approximately 80 km away from the trench. Previous studies suggest that the coral was uplifted and killed during a local earthquake event in 1848, and recorded relative sea level history of ~80 years prior to that event. Since the highest level of survival (HLS) of coral microatolls is constrained within a few centimeters of the lowest tide level of the area, the patterns of annual growth bands of the coral microatoll in x-radiograph provide us yearly record of relative sea level, and we used U-Th dating technique to constrain the age of the coral. Our results show that this coral microatoll may have recorded the inter-seismic subsidence of northwestern Ramree Island, punctuated by several climatic events that produced die-down records of the coral growth bands. We hope the data obtained from this coral microatoll, combined with previously reported information of the area, will enable us to further understand the seismic behavior of this major plate boundary belt.

  2. Friction weakening in granular flows deduced from seismic records at the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Clara; Mangeney, Anne; Bonilla, Fabian; Hibert, Clément; Calder, Eliza; Smith, Paddy

    2015-04-01

    Accurate modelling of rockfalls and pyroclastic flows is still an open issue, partly due the lack of measurements related to the dynamics of such events. Using seismic data from the Soufrière Hills Volcano and granular flow modelling, we show that the power laws relating the seismic energy Es to the seismic duration ts and relating the loss of potential energy ΔEp to the flow duration tf are very similar (Ei ≈ tiβ with i = s,p), as observed previously at Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island. Observations showing that tf ≃ ts suggest a constant ratio Es/ΔEp ≃ 10-5. This similarity in the power laws can be obtained only when the granular flow model uses a friction coefficient that decreases with the volume involved. Furthermore, with this volume-dependent friction coefficient, the simulated force applied by the flow to the ground correlates well with the seismic energy, highlighting the signature of this friction weakening effect in seismic data.

  3. Determination of temporal changes in seismic velocity caused by volcanic activity in and around Hakone volcano, central Japan, using ambient seismic noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukutake, Yohei; Ueno, Tomotake; Miyaoka, Kazuki

    2016-12-01

    Autocorrelation functions (ACFs) for ambient seismic noise are considered to be useful tools for estimating temporal changes in the subsurface structure. Velocity changes at Hakone volcano in central Japan, where remarkable swarm activity has often been observed, were investigated in this study. Significant velocity changes were detected during two seismic activities in 2011 and 2013. The 2011 activity began immediately after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, suggesting remote triggering by the dynamic stress changes resulting from the earthquake. During the 2013 activity, which exhibited swarm-like features, crustal deformations were detected by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations and tiltmeters, suggesting a pressure increment of a Mogi point source at a depth of 7 km and two shallow open cracks. Waveforms that were bandpass-filtered between 1 and 3 Hz were used to calculate ACFs using a one-bit correlation technique. Fluctuations in the velocity structure were obtained using the stretching method. A gradual decrease in the velocity structure was observed prior to the 2013 activity at the KOM station near the central cone of the caldera, which started after the onset of crustal expansion observed by the GNSS stations. Additionally, a sudden significant velocity decrease was observed at the OWD station near a fumarolic area just after the onset of the 2013 activity and the tilt changes. The changes in the stress and strain caused by the deformation sources were likely the main contributors to these decreases in velocity. The precursory velocity reduction at the KOM station likely resulted from the inflation of the deep Mogi source, whereas the sudden velocity decrease at the OWD station may reflect changes in the strain caused by the shallow open-crack source. Rapid velocity decreases were also detected at many stations in and around the volcano after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The velocity changes may reflect the redistribution of hydrothermal

  4. The April 2009 L'Aquila (Italy) seismic sequence: recordings in the Anfiteatro Flavio (Colosseum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserta, A.; Marra, F.; Cara, F.; Valente, G.

    2015-12-01

    We show a preliminary study concerning the interaction of the seismic wave-field coming from aftershocks of the 2009 seismic sequence in Abruzzo and the structure of the Anfiteatro Flavio, usually called Colosseum. By using mainly Arias intensity, we assess how the incoming energy beneath the foundations is convoyed into the monument, through what preferential frequencies such process takes place, how the trapped energy increases amplitude vibration with floors. Moreover, we also investigate the role played by the near-surface geology in generating differential motions below the monument foundations. In addition we also check, in a preliminary way, the foundation dynamical behaviour under the action of the incoming wave-field.

  5. Strong ground motion generated by controlled blasting experiments and mining induced seismic events recorded underground at deep level mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, A.; Selllers, E.; Skorpen, L.; Scheepers, L.; Murphy, S.; Spottiswoode, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground at deep level gold mines in South Africa in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to strong ground motion. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The simulated rockbursts involved the design of the seismic source, seismic observations in the near and far field, high-speed video filming, a study of rock mass conditions such as fractures, joints, rock strength etc. Knowledge of the site conditions before and after the simulated rockbursts was also gained. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of peak particle velocities, was found to be proportional to R^-1.7. Special investigations were carried out to evaluate the mechanism and the magnitude of damage, as well as the support behaviour under excessive dynamic loading. The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied, as part of this work, not only to characterize the rock mass response, but also to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instrument especially designed for recording strong ground motions was used to create a large database of peak particle velocities measured on stope hangingwalls. A total number of 58 sites located in stopes where the Carbon Leader Reef, Ventersdorp Contact Reef, Vaal Reef and Basal Reef are mined, were monitored. The peak particle velocities were measured at the surface of the excavations to identify the effect of the free surface and the fractures surrounding the underground mining. Based on these measurements the generally accepted velocity criterion of 3 m

  6. Array analyses of volcanic earthquakes and tremor recorded at Las Cañadas caldera (Tenerife Island, Spain) during the 2004 seismic activation of Teide volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendros, Javier; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Carmona, Enrique; Zandomeneghi, Daria

    2007-02-01

    We analyze data from three seismic antennas deployed in Las Cañadas caldera (Tenerife) during May-July 2004. The period selected for the analysis (May 12-31, 2004) constitutes one of the most active seismic episodes reported in the area, except for the precursory seismicity accompanying historical eruptions. Most seismic signals recorded by the antennas were volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes. They usually exhibited low magnitudes, although some of them were large enough to be felt at nearby villages. A few long-period (LP) events, generally associated with the presence of volcanic fluids in the medium, were also detected. Furthermore, we detected the appearance of a continuous tremor that started on May 18 and lasted for several weeks, at least until the end of the recording period. It is the first time that volcanic tremor has been reported at Teide volcano. This tremor was a small-amplitude, narrow-band signal with central frequency in the range 1-6 Hz. It was detected at the three antennas located in Las Cañadas caldera. We applied the zero-lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) method to estimate the propagation parameters (back-azimuth and apparent slowness) of the recorded signals. For VT earthquakes, we also determined the S-P times and source locations. Our results indicate that at the beginning of the analyzed period most earthquakes clustered in a deep volume below the northwest flank of Teide volcano. The similarity of the propagation parameters obtained for LP events and these early VT earthquakes suggests that LP events might also originate within the source volume of the VT cluster. During the last two weeks of May, VT earthquakes were generally shallower, and spread all over Las Cañadas caldera. Finally, the analysis of the tremor wavefield points to the presence of multiple, low-energy sources acting simultaneously. We propose a model to explain the pattern of seismicity observed at Teide volcano. The process started in early April with a deep magma

  7. Seismic Microzonation for Refinement of Seismic Load Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Savich, A. I.; Bugaevskii, A. G. E-mail: bugaevskiy@geodyn.ru

    2016-05-15

    Functional dependencies are established for the characteristics of seismic transients recorded at various points of a studied site, which are used to propose a new approach to seismic microzonation (SMZ) that enables the creation of new SMZ maps of strong seismic motion, with due regard for dynamic parameters of recorded transients during weak earthquakes.

  8. The Reconstruction of the pre Storegga Slide Seafloor and Stratigraphy Using a Dense Grid of 2D Seismic Records.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, C. F. M.

    2014-12-01

    This work was performed as part of the Storegga Slide study that was part of the Ormen Lange Gas Field development on the Mid Norwegian continental margin. The purpose of the reconstruction was to use seismic reflection data as a basis to provide slide volume estimates, pre slide stratigraphy and seafloor morphology that could be used as input to separate conceptual and numerical slide models. A comprehensive database of 2D high resolution and 2D exploration seismic reflection profiles was used. Additionally, the seismic stratigraphy on both sides of the Storegga Slide scar was well known, but had to be applied/interpreted on most of the seismic sections in the database to provide geographical grids of the horizon depths. The reconstruction was performed by "filling" The Storegga Slide scar from bottom up through interpolation and gridding of the thicknesses of successively younger units removed by the slide. The estimated volume of the slide was 3500 km3 with a maximum removal of 500 m of overburden. The loss of overburden due sliding estimated from the reconstructon was confirmed at several sites where geotechnical boreholes had been drilled.

  9. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  10. Seismicity around the source areas of the 1946 Nankai and the 1944 Tonankai earthquakes detected from data recorded at DONET stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Kamiya, S.; Takahashi, N.

    2016-12-01

    The Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) installed DONET (Dense Oceanfloor Network System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis) off the Kii Peninsula, southwest of Japan, to monitor earthquakes and tsunamis. Stations of DONET1, which are distributed in Kumano-nada, and DONET2, which are distributed off Muroto, were installed by August 2011 and April 2016, respectively. After the installation of all of the 51 stations, DONET was transferred to National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED). NIED and JAMSTEC have now corroborated in the operation of DONET since April 2016. To investigate the seismicity around the source areas of the 1946 Nankai and the 1944 Tonankai earthquakes, we detected earthquakes from the records of the broadband seismometers installed to DONET. Because DONET stations are apart from land stations, we can detect smaller earthquakes than by using only land stations. It is important for understanding the stress state and seismogenic mechanism to monitoring the spatial-temporal seismicity change. In this study we purpose to evaluate to the seismicity around the source areas of the Nankai and the Tonankai earthquakes by using our earthquake catalogue. The frequency-magnitude relationships of earthquakes in the areas of DONET1&2 had an almost constant slope of about -1 for earthquakes of ML larger than 1.5 and 2.5, satisfying the Gutenberg-Richter law, and the slope of smaller earthquakes approached 0, reflecting the detection limits. While the most of the earthquakes occurred in the aftershock area of the 2004 off the Kii Peninsula earthquakes, very limited activity was detected in the source region of the Nankai and Tonankai earthquake except for the large earthquake (MJMA = 6.5) on 1st April 2016 and its aftershocks. We will evaluate the detection limit of the earthquake in more detail and investigate the spatial-temporal seismicity change with waiting the data store.

  11. Source locations of teleseismic P, SV, and SH waves observed in microseisms recorded by a large aperture seismic array in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiaoxia; Koper, Keith D.; Burlacu, Relu; Ni, Sidao; Wang, Fuyun; Zou, Changqiao; Wei, Yunhao; Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya M.

    2016-09-01

    Transversely polarized seismic waves are routinely observed in ambient seismic energy across a wide range of periods, however their origin is poorly understood because the corresponding source regions are either undefined or weakly constrained, and nearly all models of microseism generation incorporate a vertically oriented single force as the excitation mechanism. To better understand the origin of transversely polarized energy in the ambient seismic wavefield we make the first systematic attempt to locate the source regions of teleseismic SH waves observed in microseismic (2.5-20 s) noise. We focus on body waves instead of surface waves because the source regions can be constrained in both azimuth and distance using conventional array techniques. To locate microseismic sources of SH waves (as well as SV and P waves) we continuously backproject the vertical, radial, and transverse components of the ambient seismic wavefield recorded by a large-aperture array deployed in China during 2013-2014. As expected, persistent P wave sources are observed in the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Indian Oceans, mainly at periods of 2.5-10 s, in regions with the strong ocean wave interactions needed to produce secondary microseisms. SV waves are commonly observed to originate from locations indistinguishable from the P wave sources, but with smaller signal-to-noise ratios. We also observe SH waves with about half or less the signal-to-noise ratio of SV waves. SH source regions are definitively located in deep water portions of the Pacific, away from the sloping continental shelves that are thought to be important for the generation of microseismic Love waves, but nearby regions that routinely generate teleseismic P waves. The excitation mechanism for the observed SH waves may therefore be related to the interaction of P waves with small-wavelength bathymetric features, such as seamounts and basins, through some sort of scattering process.

  12. Ground motions recorded in Rome during the April 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence: site response and comparison with ground‐motion predictions based on a global dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caserta, Arrigo; Boore, David; Rovelli, Antonio; Govoni, Aladino; Marra, Fabrizio; Monica, Gieseppe Della; Boschi, Enzo

    2013-01-01

    The mainshock and moderate‐magnitude aftershocks of the 6 April 2009 M 6.3 L’Aquila seismic sequence, about 90 km northeast of Rome, provided the first earthquake ground‐motion recordings in the urban area of Rome. Before those recordings were obtained, the assessments of the seismic hazard in Rome were based on intensity observations and theoretical considerations. The L’Aquila recordings offer an unprecedented opportunity to calibrate the city response to central Apennine earthquakes—earthquakes that have been responsible for the largest damage to Rome in historical times. Using the data recorded in Rome in April 2009, we show that (1) published theoretical predictions of a 1 s resonance in the Tiber valley are confirmed by observations showing a significant amplitude increase in response spectra at that period, (2) the empirical soil‐transfer functions inferred from spectral ratios are satisfactorily fit through 1D models using the available geological, geophysical, and laboratory data, but local variability can be large for individual events, (3) response spectra for the motions recorded in Rome from the L’Aquila earthquakes are significantly amplified in the radial component at periods near 1 s, even at a firm site on volcanic rocks, and (4) short‐period response spectra are smaller than expected when compared to ground‐motion predictions from equations based on a global dataset, whereas the observed response spectra are higher than expected for periods near 1 s.

  13. Response to long-period seismic waves recorded by broadband seismometer and pore pressure sensor at IODP Site C0002, Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitada, K.; Araki, E.; Kimura, T.; Saffer, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Long term in situ monitoring of seismic activity, slow slip event, and pore fluid behavior around mega earthquake zone is important for understanding the processes of earthquake generation and strain accumulation. In order to characterize the response to long-period seismic waves, we compared waveforms and hydroseismograms recorded by broadband seismometer and pore pressure transducers, respectively, which were installed at IODP Site C0002 in the Nankai Trough Kumano Basin. The borehole monitoring system sensor array at Site C0002 is designed to collect multiparameter observations covering a dynamic range of events, including local microearthquakes, low frequency earthquakes, and large-scale earthquakes similar to the Tonankai earthquake. The suite of sensors for the downhole portion of the observatory includes a broadband seismometer (CMG3TBD, Guralp Systems Ltd.) with sampling rate of 100Hz at the depth of 907mbsf, and four pressure ports connected to pressure gauges located at 948mbsf, 917mbsf, 766mbsf, and at the seafloor. The sampling rate of the data logger was set to 1Hz after successful connection to the DONET seafloor cable network for real-time monitoring on 24 Jan 2013. Since then, we processed 12 earthquakes between a moment magnitude of 6.5 to 8.3. In addition to the comparison of long-period surface waves waveform and pressure data, we compared the records with theoretical strain seismograms. The latter were calculated by normal mode summation using the earth model PREM of Dziewonski and Anderson (1981). A Butterworth bandpass filter was applied to the records with cut-off frequencies of 0.003 and 0.1 Hz. Our initial results indicate that the hydroseismograms correspond well with the vertical rather than the horizontal (radial and transverse) components in seismic data. The observed hydroseismogram have a good correlation with the predicted volumetric strain seismogram, especially for the Okhotsk (2013/05/24 14:17UT, Mw8.3, 632km depth), the Chishima

  14. Micro-seismic Signals Recorded During Fast Depressurization of Natural Volcanic Samples in a Shock Tube Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, M.; Dingwell, D. B.; Scheu, B.; Delgado Granados, H.; Navarrete Montesinos, M.; Richard, D.; Kueppers, U.; Lavallée, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions generate different types of seismic signals in a wide frequency bandwidth. Volcano seismology studies have dealt with analyzing seismic signals characteristics and waveform patterns in order to discriminate between source, path and site effects and reconstruct the volcanic source dynamics. The source may involve brittle failure, magma transport, magma fragmentation, bubble collapse, fluid depressurization, fluid instabilities, degassing or a combination of these processes. Given the complexity of the volcanic source dynamics and the impossibility to undertake direct observations of the source, laboratory experiments provide a promising approach to investigate the source process. In this study we present preliminary results of an experimental approach in a shock tube apparatus. The apparatus consists of two serial steel pipes separated by a diaphragm: the autoclave which represents the "source mechanism", where the samples are pressurized and fragmented, and a tank which represents a conduit. The physical mechanism consists of the slow pressurization (using Argon gas) followed by rapid depressurization of natural samples of ash (> 0.5 mm), pumice (with average porosity of 63%,) and fragmented particles of pumice. Several experiments were designed under controlled pressure conditions (ranging from 4 to 20 MPa), at room temperature. Micro-seismic signals were detected during the depressurization process using high dynamic piezo film sensors (PDF, 0.001 - 10 G Hz analog bandwidth, low impedance), fixed and distributed along the tube system. In addition, two laser beams (wavelength 532 nm) measure the speed of the ejected materials; all sensors were correlated and synchronized with two dynamic pressure sensors located at the autoclave. The resonance of the empty tube apparatus was characterized in order to distinguish between natural resonance of the tank due to the pressure shock wave and the signals generated by depressurization of the system and

  15. The seismic-stratigraphic record of lake-level fluctuations in Lake Challa: Hydrological stability and change in equatorial East Africa over the last 140 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moernaut, J.; Verschuren, D.; Charlet, F.; Kristen, I.; Fagot, M.; De Batist, M.

    2010-02-01

    Seismic-reflection data from crater lake Challa (Mt. Kilimanjaro, equatorial East Africa) reveal a ˜ 210-m thick sedimentary infill containing distinct seismic-stratigraphic signatures of late-Quaternary lake-level fluctuations. Extrapolation of a well-constrained age model on the cored upper part of the sequence suggests that these lake-level fluctuations represent a detailed and continuous record of moisture-balance variation in equatorial East Africa over the last 140 kyr. This record indicates that the most severe aridity occurred during peak Penultimate glaciation immediately before ˜ 128 kyr BP (coeval with Heinrich event 11) and during a Last Interglacial 'megadrought' period between ˜ 114 and ˜ 97 kyr BP; in comparison, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) aridity was modest. It was preceded by ˜ 75 000 years of relatively stable and moist climate conditions interrupted by eleven short-lived dry spells, five of which match the timing of Heinrich events 2 to 6. Climate history near the East African equator reflects variation in the precessional forcing of monsoon rainfall modulated by orbital eccentricity, but precession-driven moisture fluctuations were less extreme than those observed in northern and southern tropical Africa. The near-continuous moist climate from ˜ 97 to 20.5 kyr BP recorded in the Lake Challa record contrasts with the trend towards greater aridity after ˜ 70 kyr BP documented in equatorial West Africa. This long period of moist glacial climate and a short, relatively modest LGM drought can be attributed to greater independence of western Indian Ocean monsoon dynamics from northern high-latitude glaciation than those in the tropical Atlantic Ocean. This rather persistent moist glacial climate regime may have helped maintain high biodiversity in the tropical forest ecosystems of the Eastern Arc mountains in Tanzania.

  16. Analysis of the low-level seismicity along the Southern Indian Ocean spreading ridges recorded by the OHASISBIO array of hydrophones in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Sukhovich, Alexey; Perrot, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Arrays of autonomous hydrophones (AUHs) proved to be a very valuable tool for monitoring the seismic activity of mid-ocean ridges. AUHs take advantage of the ocean acoustic properties to detect many low-magnitude underwater earthquakes undetected by land-based stations. This allows for a significant improvement in the magnitude completeness level of seismic catalogs in remote oceanic areas. This study presents some results from the deployment of the OHASISBIO array comprising 7 AUHs deployed in the southern Indian Ocean. The source of acoustic events, i.e. site where - conversion from seismic to acoustic waves occur and proxy to epicenters for shallow earthquakes - can be precisely located within few km, inside the AUH array. The distribution of the uncertainties in the locations and time-origins shows that the OHASISBIO array reliably covers a wide region encompassing the Indian Ocean triple junction and large extent of the three mid-oceanic Indian spreading ridges, from 52°E to 80°E and from 25°S to 40°S. During its one year long deployment in 2012 and in this area the AUH array recorded 1670 events, while, for the same period, land-based networks only detected 470 events. A comparison of the background seismicity along the South-east (SEIR) and South-west (SWIR) Indian ridges suggests that the microseismicity, even over a year period, could be representative of the steady-state of stress along the SEIR and SWIR; this conclusion is based on very high Spearman's correlations between our one-year long AUH catalog and teleseismic catalogs over nearly 40 years. Seismicity along the ultra-slow spreading SWIR is regularly distributed in space and time, along spreading segments and transform faults, whereas the intermediate spreading SEIR diplays clusters of events in the vicinity of some transform faults or near specific geological structures such as the St-Paul and Amsterdam hotspot. A majority of these clusters seem to be related to magmatic processes, such as

  17. Seismic exploration system

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.H.

    1983-02-08

    Seismic exploration method in arctic regions involving the generation of a seismic disturbance in the water beneath the ice in areas where conventional marine and land exploration methods are functionally inadequate. Seismic disturbances are generated by an air gun assembly which automatically executes lowering air guns through apertures in the ice and retrieving them while carrying out preventive measures against freeze-ups. Seismic sensing and recording equipment are positioned within an appropriate range to detect seismic data in the form of reflective or diffractive signals generated in response to the seismic disturbance after actuating the air gun array, wherein the seismic data is indicative of sub-surface structural formations existing below the body of water.

  18. Crustal migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids recorded by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, CA, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Shelly, David R.; King, John C.; McGeehin, John P.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Evans, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Unrest at Mammoth Mountain over the past several decades, manifest by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated 3He/4He ratios in fumarolic gases has been driven by the release of CO2-rich fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Recent unrest included the occurrence of three lower-crustal (32–19 km depth) seismic swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 that were consistently followed by peaks in the occurrence rate of shallow (≤10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured 14C in the growth rings (1998–2012) of a tree growing in the largest (∼0.3 km2) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK) and applied atmospheric CO2 concentration source area modeling to confirm that the tree was a reliable integrator of magmatic CO2 emissions over most of this area. The tree-ring 14C record implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season that immediately followed the largest (February 2010) peak in the occurrence rate of shallow earthquakes. Migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, while the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled the temporal pattern of surface CO2 emissions.

  19. Crustal migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids recorded by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, CA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.; Shelly, D. R.; King, J. C.; McGeehin, J. P.; Mangan, M.; Evans, W. C.

    2014-03-01

    Unrest at Mammoth Mountain over the past several decades, manifest by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated He3/He4 ratios in fumarolic gases has been driven by the release of CO2-rich fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Recent unrest included the occurrence of three lower-crustal (32-19 km depth) seismic swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 that were consistently followed by peaks in the occurrence rate of shallow (⩽10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured C14 in the growth rings (1998-2012) of a tree growing in the largest (∼0.3 km) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK) and applied atmospheric CO2 concentration source area modeling to confirm that the tree was a reliable integrator of magmatic CO2 emissions over most of this area. The tree-ring C14 record implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season that immediately followed the largest (February 2010) peak in the occurrence rate of shallow earthquakes. Migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, while the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled the temporal pattern of surface CO2 emissions.

  20. Mapping the North Sea base-Quaternary: using 3D seismic to fill a gap in the geological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Rachel; Huuse, Mads; Stewart, Margaret; Brocklehurst, Simon H.

    2014-05-01

    The identification and mapping of the base-Quaternary boundary in the central parts of the North Sea is problematic due to the change from an unconformable transition between Pliocene and Pleistocene deltaic deposits in the southern North Sea to a conformable one further north (Sejrup et al 1991; Gatliff et al 1994). The best estimates of the transition use seismic reflection data to identify a 'crenulated reflector' (Buckley 2012), or rely on correlating sparse biostratigraphy (Cameron et al 1987). Recent integration of biostratigraphy, pollen analysis, paleomagnetism and amino acid analysis in the Dutch and Danish sectors (Rasmussen et al 2005; Kuhlmann et al 2006) allows greater confidence in the correlation to a regional 3D seismic dataset and show that the base-Quaternary can be mapped across the entire basin. The base-Quaternary has been mapped using the PGS MegaSurvey dataset from wells in the Danish Sector along the initially unconformable horizon and down the delta front into the more conformable basin giving a high degree of confidence in the horizon pick. The mapped horizon is presented here alongside the difference between this new interpretation and the previously interpreted base-Quaternary (Buckley 2012). The revised base-Quaternary surface reaches a depth of 1248 ms TWT or approximately 1120 m (assuming average velocity of 1800 m/s) showing an elongate basin shape that follows the underlying structure of the Central Graben. The difference between the revised base-Quaternary and the traditional base-Quaternary reaches a maximum of over 600 ms TWT or approximately 540 m in the south-west with over 300 ms TWT or approximately 270 m at the Josephine well (56° 36.11'N, 2° 27.09'E) in the centre of the basin. Mapping this new base-Quaternary allows for the interpretation of the paleo-envionrment during the earliest Quaternary. Seismic attribute analysis indicates a deep water basin with sediment deposition from multiple deltas and redistribution by deep

  1. U-Th dating of broken speleothems from Cacahuamilpa cave, Mexico: Are they recording past seismic events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, Pauline; Garduño-Monroy, Victor-Hugo; Pinti, Daniele L.; Ghaleb, Bassam; Bouvier, Laura; Gomez-Vasconcelos, Martha G.; Tremblay, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cacahuamilpa cave is one of the largest karst systems in Central Mexico. The cave contains numerous massive speleothems broken and fallen following oriented directions, damaged during cataclysmic geological events. One fallen and two broken speleothems were sampled in the Cacahuamilpa cave for dating the rupture event using measured U-Th disequilibrium ages. A total of eight small carbonate cores were drilled perpendicular and longitudinal to the rupture surface. Results showed three groups of ages (weighted average): 0.95 ± 0.02 ka, 28.8 ± 0.2 ka and 88.0 ± 0.7 ka. This indicates that the construction of the Cacahuamilpa karst system, for which no absolute ages existed before this study, initiated at least since Late Pleistocene. The first two groups of ages might be related to two distinct episodes of intense seismic activity. Calculated minimum horizontal ground acceleration and frequency values of the seismic events needed to create the rupture of the stalagmites dated at 0.95 ± 0.02 ka and 28.8 ± 0.2 ka range between 1.3 and 2.0 m s-2 and between 13.4 and 20.8 Hz, respectively. These parameters are compatible with earthquakes of magnitude equal or higher than 7 M, with an epicentral distance between 50 and 100 km from the Cacahuamilpa cave. The stalagmite rupture dated at 88.0 ± 0.7 ka might result from the invasion of the cave by one of the older lahars deposits of the nearby volcano Nevado del Toluca, and successively fell by gravity instability.

  2. Toward the Autonomous Recording and Transmission of Seismic Data from the Oceans: Testing the Son-O-Mermaid Float in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. D.; Simons, F. J.; Vincent, H. T.; Nolet, G.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the deployment of two new Son-O-Mermaid floats into theSargasso Sea during a cruise aboard the R/V Atlantic Explorer, whichdeparted from Bermuda in May of 2015. Son-O-Mermaid is a freelyfloating and autonomous oceangoing system composed of a surface buoyconnected to a length of cable from which a three-hydrophone array issuspended. The main objective of the Son-O-Mermaid project is torecord signals suitable for global tomography in the deep ocean andprovide the seismic community with an abundance of novel raypaths frompreviously unsampled regions of the Earth. The Son-O-Mermaid float,with its ability to continually record, analyze, and transmit seismicdata from the oceans in near-real time has the potential torevolutionize the field of seismology. We analyze new data returnedfrom this deployment, a previous Son-O-Mermaid test, as well as theongoing MERMAID mission in the time, spectral, and wavelet domains. Afull description of the float and deployment report will be presented.A short-term goal of the project is determining realistic magnitude,distance, and pressure relationships for teleseismic earthquakes thatare recorded in the water column. Our analysis of this question isaided by synthetics created using SPECFEM2D and guided by the data,especially noise records recorded by Son-O-Mermaid and MERMAID fromoceans throughout the world. Synthetics provide an idealized waveformuseful for understanding the often very messy and noisy arrivalscommon in midcolumn acoustic recordings. Notably, synthetics allowthe confirmation or rejection of unlikely phases which are matched toearthquake databases after arrivals are detected by automatic pickingalgorithms. Additionally, marine-acoustic processing techniques willbe improved once the underwater acoustic field is better modeled usingrealistic signal-to-noise ratios and noise spectra returned fromSon-O-Mermaid and MERMAID missions. This analysis, particularly whenimplemented in the wavelet domain, is proving

  3. Preliminary results of receiver function analysis of seismic data recorded from a broadband deployment across the Gulf Coast Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, H.; Pratt, K. W.; Pulliam, J.; Dunbar, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    In summer of 2010, 21 broadband seismographs were installed at 16-18 km spacing along a transect running from Johnson City, TX, (on the Edwards Plateau), to Matagorda Island to study the current structure of this rifted passive margin. The large magnetic anomaly that parallels the coast throughout the Gulf region moves on-shore beneath our transect such that we will be able to investigate the source of this anomaly. A second important target that will be imaged in this Balcones fault which is associated with the Ouachita front. This project is funded by a grant from the Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program (NHARP), a biannual competition among Texas Universities to support research, and makes use of Texas Tech, Baylor, and UT Austin equipment. As a result, the deployment includes a less uniform array of seismic equipment, (10 Trillium compact seismometers and 10 Guralps; including 40Ts, 3Ts and 3ESPs), than projects supported by the IRIS PASSCAL center. Our vault construction was similar to Flexible array vaults, but Gulf Coast provides a more challenging environment for deployment than most encountered in the western US. The shallow water table and loose sediment can become almost fluid when storms deluge the area with rain. In dry periods, mud cracks near the vaults cause the vaults to tilt. As a result, even high quality, shallow seismic vaults can "float" or shift sufficiently to cause one or two components of the seismic stations to drift against their stops in days or weeks. As a result, the only data consistently available from all our stations, are vertical components. Horizontal component data from the summer of 2010 can be hit and miss due to the tilting of the vaults. These issues have been reduced in the summer of 2011 due to the drought. To address the data's shortcomings, we will average the vertical components from our stations and nearby EarthScope TA stations, (up 300 km away), to isolate the cleanest representation of the incoming P

  4. Preliminary TEX86 temperatures and a lake level record of tropical climate extremes derived from sediment cores and seismic stratigraphy from Lake Turkana, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, A. J.; Scholz, C. A.; Russell, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Turkana is the largest lake in the Eastern Branch of the East African Rift System and records hydrologic conditions of a region spanning nearly 2.5 degrees of latitude (~2.0 - 4.5 degrees N) in the African tropics. New data suggest the Turkana region likely experienced much wetter and cooler climate over several intervals since the latest Pleistocene. Lake level was extremely low twice during the latest Pleistocene, evidenced by depositional hiatuses in high-resolution CHIRP seismic reflection data that correlate with sediments that have low water-content, abundant sand, and low total organic carbon (TOC as low as <0.7%). Lake Turkana, like many lakes in northern tropical Africa, had a wetter climate during the African Humid Period. Intervals of high lake levels (up to ~440 m amsl) are indicated by flat-lying, laterally continuous, low-amplitude reflections that correlate in sediment cores to dark, fine-grained, laminated sediment with high TOC (up to ~6%). Calcium carbonate accumulation during this time period is nearly 0%, and combined with evidence of laminated, unbioturbated sediment suggests a fresh, stratified lake with anoxic bottom waters. During the early mid-Holocene, lake level began to fall to close to present levels (~365 m amsl). Sediments deposited during this time period have low but variable organic carbon content (~0.5 - ~2%) and are much higher in inorganic carbon (from fine-grained calcite precipitation). A moderate lowstand during the late Holocene is indicated by an erosional unconformity seen down to ~40 m below the current lake surface in several seismic profiles. This record of lake level extremes suggests highly variable rainfall patterns, forced by migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone) across tropical East Africa over the last 20,000 years. More than 50 sediment samples from 3 piston cores represent a continuous record of TEX86 temperature from ~20,000 years ago to modern. The generally low (<0.25) BIT index for the

  5. cGNSS recordings at the Adria microplate northern boundary reveal fault-induced fluid diffusion during the seismic cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Giuliana; Zuliani, David; Fabris, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    The analysis of long-term deformation signals at the northern tip of the Adria microplate revealed the surge of a transient signal. The correction for the hydrological loading effects, both at global, and local scale enabled to state its independence upon these, and a possible tectonic origin. This latter is confirmed by the location of its source close in space on the continuation of the seismogenic Ravne fault in the Bovec basin in W-Slovenia, and in time to the occurrence of the Bovec-Krn Mw=5.1 earthquake of 2004. A tomographic approach allowed reconstructing the 3D field of the propagation velocity and hydraulic diffusivity. Adding to this information other physical properties of the four most representative lithological formations of the region, we obtain the initial effective stress. The ratio of the effective stress and the lithostatic load calculated for different vertical profiles in the Bovec area indicates a state of overpressure, with pore pressure close to the value of the lithostatic load. In such conditions, the dilatation and formation of domains of interconnected fractures - i.e. of a porosity wave - that increasing the permeability relieve the overpressure, can contribute to restoring the equilibrium. Our results, hence, support the interpretation of the transient as due to a porosity wave, allowing to insert the phases of the seismic cycle in the Bovec-Krn area in a scenario very close to the Sibson's fault valve model.

  6. Notes on some experiments on the application of subtractive compensation to USGS seismic magnetic tape recording and playback systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments is to lay the groundwork for the implementation of subtractive compensation of the USGS seismic network tape playbacks utilizing the Develco model 6203 discriminators at a x1 playback speed. Although the Develco discriminators were designed for this application and a matching Develco compensation discriminator was purchased, effective use of this system for subtractive compensation has been blocked by the inadequate (frequency dependent) matching of the phase of the compensation signal to that of the data signal at the point compensation is carried out in the data discriminators. John Van Schaack has ameliorated the phase mismatch problem by an empirical alteration of the compensation discriminator input bandpass filter. We have selected a set (of eight) Develco discriminators and adjusted their compensation signal input levels to minimize spurious signals (noise) originating from tape speed irregularities. The sensitivity of the data discriminators was adjusted so that deviations of +125 Hz and -125 Hz produced output signals of +2.00 volts and -2.00 volts, respectively. The eight data discriminators are driven by a multiplex signal on a single tape track (subcarriers 680, 1020, 1360, 1700, 2040, 2380, 2720, and 3060 Hz). The Develco-supplied compensation discriminator requires an unmodulated 3125 Hz signal on a separate tape track.

  7. A Discrimination Analysis of Regional Seismic Data Recorded at Tonto Forest Observatory from Nevada Test Site Explosions and Nearby Earthquakes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    and earthquakes primarily from the Nevada-Utah region but also in- cluding events in New Mexico , Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, Missouri and Alaska. Their...summarized as follows: Pn phases recorded at TFO had low 44 sys.. ms. SCIENCE AND sor.wA.r * I 24 * Eartquake A zxplouian 23 22 - o21-a 20 19o 19 0

  8. Frequency-Magnitude Study Down To Magnitude -4.4 For Induced Seismicity Recorded At Mponeng Deep Gold Mine, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, G.; Plenkers, K.; Schorlemmer, D.; Nakatani, M.; Yabe, Y.; Dresen, G. H.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the lower magnitude limits and frequency-magnitude characteristics of the microseismic catalogue recorded with a high-sensitivity seismic network at the Mponeng mine, South Africa (Nakatani et al., SSA 2008 Proceedings). The network, composed of one 3-component accelerometer (50Hz to 25kHz) and 8 acoustic-emission sensors (700Hz to 200kHz), is located at a depth of 3543m and covers the limited volume of approx. 300x300x300m. The 3-component accelerometer was used to estimate the moment magnitude for the limited number of 135 very well recorded events (Mw in the range from -4.1 to -0.3). We use the relation between the moment magnitude estimated from accelerometer data and moment magnitude calculated from acoustic emission sensors to extend the catalogue to lower magnitudes. The magnitude of completeness of selected spatio-temporal subsets of the catalogue was estimated for: (1) post-blasting activity during working days, located more than 80 m from the network and (2) an aftershock sequence of a MW 1.9 event that occurred ~30 m from our network. Both datasets follow the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) frequency-magnitude relationship with no visible deviation from self-similar behavior of seismicity between Mw -4.4 and -1.9 for the aftershock sequence and between -3.5 and -1.5 for the post-blasting dataset. We estimated the magnitude of completeness of selected subset as low as -4.3 for the aftershock sequence and -3.4 for the post-blasting activity. Differences in magnitude of completeness are attributed to location of recorded activity and site effects. We do not observe Type A activity as reported in Richardson and Jordan (BSSA, 2002) study. To test the results obtained by GR analyzes and to get better insights into the influence of location and site effects, we estimated the probability-based magnitude of completeness for the aftershock sequence following Schorlemmer and Woessner (BSSA, 2008) was estimated for the aftershock sequence. This study reveals

  9. Comparison of the historical record of earthquake hazard with seismic-hazard models for New Zealand and the continental United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stirling, M.; Petersen, M.

    2006-01-01

    We compare the historical record of earthquake hazard experienced at 78 towns and cities (sites) distributed across New Zealand and the continental United States with the hazard estimated from the national probabilistic seismic-hazard (PSH) models for the two countries. The two PSH models are constructed with similar methodologies and data. Our comparisons show a tendency for the PSH models to slightly exceed the historical hazard in New Zealand and westernmost continental United States interplate regions, but show lower hazard than that of the historical record in the continental United States intraplate region. Factors such as non-Poissonian behavior, parameterization of active fault data in the PSH calculations, and uncertainties in estimation of ground-motion levels from historical felt intensity data for the interplate regions may have led to the higher-than-historical levels of hazard at the interplate sites. In contrast, the less-than-historical hazard for the remaining continental United States (intraplate) sites may be largely due to site conditions not having been considered at the intraplate sites, and uncertainties in correlating ground-motion levels to historical felt intensities. The study also highlights the importance of evaluating PSH models at more than one region, because the conclusions reached on the basis of a solely interplate or intraplate study would be very different.

  10. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993

  11. Signatures of the seismic source in EMD-based characterization of the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake recordings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, R.R.; Ma, S.; Hartzell, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this article we use empirical mode decomposition (EMD) to characterize the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake records and investigate the signatures carried over from the source rupture process. Comparison of the current study results with existing source inverse solutions that use traditional data processing suggests that the EMD-based characterization contains information that sheds light on aspects of the earthquake rupture process. We first summarize the fundamentals of the EMD and illustrate its features through the analysis of a hypothetical and a real record. Typically, the Northridge strong-motion records are decomposed into eight or nine intrinsic mode functions (IMF's), each of which emphasizes a different oscillation mode with different amplitude and frequency content. The first IMF has the highest-frequency content; frequency content decreases with an increase in IMF component. With the aid of a finite-fault inversion method, we then examine aspects of the source of the 1994 Northridge earthquake that are reflected in the second to fifth IMF components. This study shows that the second IMF is predominantly wave motion generated near the hypocenter, with high-frequency content that might be related to a large stress drop associated with the initiation of the earthquake. As one progresses from the second to the fifth IMF component, there is a general migration of the source region away from the hypocenter with associated longer-period signals as the rupture propagates. This study suggests that the different IMF components carry information on the earthquake rupture process that is expressed in their different frequency bands.

  12. Volcanism and tectonics in action along the Southern Andes: space-time analysis of current deformation recorded by GNSS and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassara, Andres; Giorgis, Scott; Yáñez, Vicente; Garcia, Francisco; Baez, Juan Carlos; Lara, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Andean margin is perhaps the best natural laboratory on Earth to study the relationship between volcanism and active tectonics. Convergence between Nazca and Southamerican plates along the Southern Andes is relatively rapid (66 mm/yr) and slightly oblique (15-20°) with respect to the continental margin. The trench-normal component of convergence is mainly released along the megathrust fault by great subduction earthquakes. At the time scale of millions of years, the trench-parallel component has been mostly released by dextral strike-slip along the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), a long-lived (Eocene-Recent) crustal-scale structure more than 1000 km long which is intimately related to the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of the Andes. Volcanic systems of the SVZ are clustered near intersections of the LOFZ with oblique and inherited basement structures. In contrast with this clear relationship between crustal tectonics and volcanism at long time-scales, little is still known (here and elsewhere) at the time scale of earthquakes and eruptions about the mechanisms by which they actually interact to create the observed long-term relationship. Into this framework, we are taking advantage of the largely unpublished and very unique geodetic and seismic database that is available for us via the project Active Tectonics and Volcanism at the Southern Andes (ACT&VO-SA) in order to gain understanding about the physical link between contemporary tectono-volcanic processes occurred recently along the southern Andean margin and the long-term construction of the LOFZ-SVZ. We will present a characterization of the current surface velocity field along this region deduced from a kinematic analysis of a network of continuous GNSS stations operating since 2007 and relate this with the spatio-temporal evolution of crustal seismicity recorded by seismic networks maintained by Chilean institutions in order to analyze the possible connection between crustal deformation and

  13. Relative sea level variations recorded by coral microatolls over the last two centuries in Martinique and Guadeloupe: implication for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eric, J.; Jennifer, W.; Feuillet, N.; Deschamps, P.; Guy, C.; Paul, T.; Galetzka, J. E.; Jean-Marie, S.; Bruno, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles arc is a region of high seismic hazard, which results from the convergence of the American and Caribbean plates at 2cm/yr. Several earthquakes of magnitude ≥ 7 have struck the islands in the past. The largest ones (M 8+) occurred four years apart on January 11 1839 and February 8, 1843, offshore Martinique and Guadeloupe respectively. The 1843 event destroyed the town of Pointe-à-Pitre and killed several thousand people. It was probably a megathrust event. To better constrain the seismic hazard induced by this poorly known subduction interface, we have quantified the surface deformations of Lesser Antilles arc recorded by coral skeletons in Martinique and Guadeloupe. Certain coral species form microatolls, whose upwards growth is limited by the yearly lowest tides (Highest Level of Survival- HLS). They act as tide gauges and provide powerful tools to quantify with a precision of few centimeters the sea-level variations induced by tectonic or climatic processes at annual scale over several centuries. We identified several places where microatolls are growing on Martinique, Guadeloupe, Antigua and Barbuda Islands. Several reefs were first surveyed with low altitude helicopter flights. High-resolution aerial photographs were acquired by a drone in some areas, which allowed identifying sites featuring abundant microatolls. Accurate total station mapping of several sites showed that microatolls within the same area recorded the HLS with a precision of about 4±1cm. Several heads were sampled with a hydraulic chain saw along the eastern coast of Martinique and Guadeloupe. Most are Siderastrea Siderea or Diploria strigosa. Using sclerochronology combined with chemical analysis and U/Th dating, we have determined annual growth rates of 5 mm/yr for the former and of ~10mm/year for the latter. During the last two centuries, all microatolls sampled in Martinique recorded a local relative sea level (RSL) rise of ≈ 2-3 mm/yr, interrupted by sudden

  14. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  15. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  16. Dynamic deformations of shallow sediments in the Valley of Mexico, Part I: Three-dimensional strains and rotations recorded on a seismic array

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.; Singh, S.K.; Santoyo, M.

    1997-01-01

    We study the spatial variation in earthquake ground motions, or equivalently the dynamic displacement gradient field, using a novel analysis procedure borrowed from geodesy. Seismic data recorded in the Valley of Mexico by a microarray of three three-component surface accelerographs and two three-component accelerographs at depths of 30 m and 102 m constrain our estimates of the dynamic displacement gradient field (from which strains and rotations derive) for four moderate earthquakes at distances of 250 to 300 km. Our study focuses on the effects of low-velocity surface materials on the deformation. At the surface, the gradients corresponding to deformation across vertical planes dominate, and vertical-axis rotations are of similar magnitudes as strains. The greatest peak surface gradient we observed was 206 ??strain for the 14 September 1995 Mw 7.5 earthquake at a distance of ???300 km. However, much larger gradients occur across horizontal planes (???u/???z, where u is a horizontal displacement and z is depth) at some depth between 0 and 30 m. These values are about a factor 10 greater than the corresponding gradient components at the surface, ???u/???z for the 14 September earthquake equaled or exceeded 665 ??strain at depth. The dynamic deformations experienced in Mexico City undoubtedly have occurred before and will occur again in other densely populated areas. However, in many other regions, the sediment response will not remain linear and elastic, resulting instead in liquefaction and ground failure.

  17. Seismicity of the Equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge and its Large Offset Transforms recorded during a multi-year hydrophone array deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J.; Meyer, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    To increase our understanding of the slow-spreading, equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), we deployed an array of eight autonomous hydrophones centered on the ridge axis between ~20°N and ~10°S. The hydrophones were deployed for 2+ years (500 Hz sample rate) and obtained a continuous record of the regional seismicity. This region is especially interesting for many reasons. A strongly segmented MAR is offset by some of the longest transform faults in the global oceans. In addition, the North America-South America-Africa (NA-SA-AF) triple junction is thought to be between 10°N and 20°N at the MAR, but its exact location is not well-defined. And finally, the NA-SA plate boundary is not clearly delineated by teleseismicity or prominent seafloor structures despite known relative motion between the plates. Seven of the eight hydrophones were recovered in January 2015 and earthquake location analysis is underway. These seismic data will be used to understand the modes of spreading, short-term earthquake predictability, and triple junction dynamics. In particular, we will use patterns in the earthquake data to address the following: 1) Whether long-lived detachment faults play a central role in accretion at the equatorial MAR similar to what is observed to the north (Escartin et al., 2008). 2) Whether foreshock sequences can be used to predict (retrospectively) earthquakes with magnitudes ≥ 5.4 mb on equatorial Atlantic transform faults as they can be on Pacific transforms (McGuire et al., 2005). A total of eighteen teleseismic earthquakes ≥ 5.4 mb occurred in this region during the hydrophone deployment providing a robust data base to test this foreshock precursor hypothesis. 3) Lastly, whether or not the geometry and crustal stress patterns induced by the NA-SA-AF triple junction are apparent in the earthquake data. If so, the earthquake patterns will help improve our understanding of triple junction dynamics and overall lithospheric strength.

  18. Evolution of a giant debris flow in the transitional mountainous region between the Tibetan Plateau and the Qinling Mountain range, Western China: Constraints from broadband seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinghui; Li, Zhengyuan; Yu, Dan; Xu, Qiang; Fan, Junyi; Hao, Zhen; Niu, Yanping

    2017-10-01

    The catastrophic Sanyanyu and Luojiayu debris flows, which were induced by heavy rainfall, occurred at approximately midnight, August 7th, 2010 (Beijing time, UTC + 8) and claimed 1,765 lives. Most seismic stations located within 150 km did not detect the debris flows except for the closest seismic station, ZHQ, indicating that the seismic signals generated by the debris flows decayed rapidly. We analyzed broadband seismic signals from the ZHQ seismic station, beginning approximately 20 min before the outbreak of the Sanyanyu debris flow, to rebuild its evolution processes. Seismic signals can detect development of the Sanyanyu debris flow approximately 20 min after a heavy rain started falling in its initiation area; this time was characterized by a gradual increase in seismic amplitude accompanied by a series of spike signals that were probably generated by rock collapses within the catchment. The frequency contents and the characteristics of seismic signals before and after 23:33:15 (T1) are distinctively different, which we interpret as being generated by a large quantity of flowing material entering the main channel, marking the formation of the Sanyanyu debris flow. We attribute seismic amplitude increases between 23:33:15 (T1) and 23:34:26 (T2) and between 23:35:40 (T3) and 23:36:49 (T4) to entrainment of the deposit material after initiation of the debris flow and to its flow through a colluvial deposit area, respectively. The main frequency band broadening of seismic signals after 23:37:30 (T5) is believed to have been induced by impacts between the flowing material and check dams.

  19. Seismic source study of the Racha-Dzhava (Georgia) earthquake from aftershocks and broad-band teleseismic body-wave records: An example of active nappe tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuenzalida, H.; Rivera, L.; Haessler, H.; Legrand, D.; Philip, H.; Dorbath, L.; McCormack, D.; Arefiev, S.; Langer, C.; Cisternas, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Racha-Dzhava earthquake (Ms = 7.0) that occurred on 1991 April 29 at 09:12:48.1 GMT in the southern border of the Great Caucasus is the biggest event ever recorded in the region, stronger than the Spitak earthquake (Ms = 6.9) of 1988. A field expedition to the epicentral area was organised and a temporary seismic network of 37 stations was deployed to record the aftershock activity. A very precise image of the aftershock distribution is obtained, showing an elongated cloud oriented N105??, with one branch trending N310?? in the western part. The southernmost part extends over 80 km, with the depth ranging from 0 to 15 km, and dips north. The northern branch, which is about 30 km long, shows activity that ranges in depth from 5 to 15 km. The complex thrust dips northwards. A stress-tensor inversion from P-wave first-motion polarities shows a state of triaxial compression, with the major principal axis oriented roughly N-S, the minor principal axis being vertical. Body-waveform inversion of teleseismic seismograms was performed for the main shock, which can be divided into four subevents with a total rupture-time duration of 22 s. The most important part of the seismic moment was released by a gentle northerly dipping thrust. The model is consistent with the compressive tectonics of the region and is in agreement with the aftershock distribution and the stress tensor deduced from the aftershocks. The focal mechanisms of the three largest aftershocks were also inverted from body-wave records. The April 29th (Ms = 6.1) and May 5th (Ms = 5.4) aftershocks have thrust mechanisms on roughly E-W-oriented planes, similar to the main shock. Surprisingly, the June 15th (Ms = 6.2) aftershock shows a thrust fault striking N-S. This mechanism is explained by the structural control of the rupture along the east-dipping geometry of the Dzirula Massif close to the Borzhomi-Kazbeg strike-slip fault. In fact, the orientation and shape of the stress tensor produce a thrust on a N

  20. Geometry of basement faults around the Soultz geothermal wells from reflected and converted seismic waves recorded during the 2007 multisource VSP survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubrano Lavadera, P.; Marthelot, J.; Zillmer, M.; Cornet, F. H.; Genter, A.

    2012-12-01

    reflected on this fault and recorded in the two wells provides traveltimes that fit the high apparent velocity downgoing waves for the shots located in positions allowing reflections. Depending on the incidence angles of the reflected waves at the geophones, these waves are observed in a complementary way on vertical or horizontal geophones. The geometry of the VSP survey allows illuminating vertically and horizontally the GPK3 fault in the depth range 3 to 4.7 km and in a 1000m lateral interval respectively. In contrast, the 2D surface seismic lines shot around the wells show no reliable reflections within the basement. In addition to the major fault, the Soultz VSP data include several evidences of basement faults where reflected waves and converted waves coincide at the well. VSP is one of the few geophysical techniques able to image fault zones within a deep seated granite.

  1. Volcanic tremor at Volcán de Colima, México recorded during May 2002 and its interactions with the seismic signals produced by low-energy explosive activity and rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobin, Vyacheslav M.; Reyes, Gabriel A.; Bretón, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    The May 2002 eruption episode at Volcán de Colima, México represented the transition period between two stages of effusive activity which were characterized by the formation of lava flows. The short-period seismic signals, recorded during May 2002 at a distance of 1.6 km from the crater, were represented by volcanic tremor and the signals produced by low-energy explosions and rockfalls. Two types of volcanic tremor were recognized: harmonic with two fundamental spectral frequencies of 1.2-1.4 Hz and 1.6-1.7 Hz and non-harmonic. The existence of two fundamental frequencies of volcanic tremor may indicate a two-vent magmatic conduit. No clear relationship between the variations in the spectral content of tremor and occurrence of explosions was observed. The waveforms of the signals, produced by low-energy explosions and rockfalls and recorded on the background of volcanic tremor, were strongly modulated by the low-frequency harmonic tremor signals, forming, in this manner, pseudo-long period events. Fourier analysis of the seismic signals associated with low-energy explosions and rockfalls but recorded on the background of regular seismic noise indicated their high-frequency sources characterized by dominant frequencies within 2-3 Hz and 3-4.5 Hz, respectively.

  2. Seismic Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Seismic methods are the most commonly conducted geophysical surveys for engineering investigations. Seismic refraction provides engineers and geologists with the most basic of geologic data via simple procedures with common equipment.

  3. New sedimentary-core records and a recent co-seismic turbidite help to unravel the paleoseismicity of the Hikurangi Subduction Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Philip; Orpin, Alan; Howarth, Jamie; Patton, Jason; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Woelz, Susanne; Hopkins, Jenni; Gerring, Peter; Mitchell, John; Quinn, Will; McKeown, Monique; Ganguly, Aratrika; Banks, Simon; Davidson, Sam

    2017-04-01

    The Hikurangi margin straddles the convergent boundary between the Pacific and Australia tectonic plates and is New Zealand's potentially largest earthquake and tsunami hazard. The 3000 m-deep Hikurangi Trough, off eastern Marlborough, Wairarapa, Hawkes Bay, and East Cape, marks the location where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the eastern continental margin of the North Island and northeastern South Island. To date the Hikurangi margin has a short historical record relative to the recurrence of great earthquakes and tsunami, and consequently the associated hazard remains poorly constrained. In October 2016 a new, international, 5-year project commenced to evaluate the pre-historic earthquake history of the margin. In November 2016 a RV Tangaroa voyage acquired 50 sediment cores up to 5.5 m long from sites on the continental margin between the Kaikoura coast and Poverty Bay. Core sites were selected using available 30 kHz multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, sub-bottom acoustic profiles, archived sediment samples, and results from numerical modelling of turbidity currents. Sites fell into three general categories: turbidite distributary systems; small isolated slope-basins; and Hikurangi Channel, levees, and trough. Typical of the margin, the terrigenous-dominated sequence included layers of gravel, sand, mud, and volcanic ash. Many of these layers are turbidites, some of which may have been triggered by strong shaking associated with earthquakes (subduction megathrust and other coastal faults). Some cores contain up to 25 individual turbidites. This library of turbidites may provide the basis of new paleoseismic records that span several hundred kilometres of strike along the plate boundary. During the voyage the 14th November 2016 (NZDT) Mw 7.8 Kaikoura Earthquake occurred, causing strong ground shaking beneath the Kaikoura Canyon region. Sampling with a multicorer within five days of the earthquake, we recovered what appeared to be a very recently

  4. Earthquake-induced soft-sediment deformations and seismically amplified erosion rates recorded in varved sediments of Köyceğiz Lake (SW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avşar, Ulaş; Jónsson, Sigurjón; Avşar, Özgür; Schmidt, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    Earthquake-triggered landslides amplify erosion rates in catchments, i.e., catchment response (CR) to seismic shocks. In addition to historical eyewitness accounts of muddy rivers implying CRs after large earthquakes, several studies have quantitatively reported increased sediment concentrations in rivers after earthquakes. However, only a few paleolimnological studies could detect CRs within lacustrine sedimentary sequences as siliciclastic-enriched intercalations within background sedimentation. Since siliciclastic-enriched intercalations can easily be of nonseismic origin, their temporal correlation with nearby earthquakes is crucial to assign a seismic triggering mechanism. In most cases, either uncertainties in dating methods or the lack of recent seismic activity has prevented reliable temporal correlations, making the seismic origin of observed sedimentary events questionable. Here we attempt to remove this question mark by presenting sedimentary traces of CRs in the 370-year-long varved sequence of Köyceğiz Lake (SW Turkey) that we compare with estimated peak ground acceleration (PGA) values of several nearby earthquakes. We find that earthquakes exceeding estimated PGA values of ~20 cm/s2 can induce soft-sediment deformations, while CRs seem only to be triggered by PGA levels higher than 70 cm/s2. In Köyceğiz Lake, CRs produce Cr- and Ni-enriched sedimentation due to the seismically mobilized soils derived from ultramafic rocks in the catchment. Given the varve chronology, the residence time of the seismically mobilized material in the catchment is determined to be 5 to 10 years.

  5. Investigation in the iceberg capsizing force responsible for glacial earthquakes and ice-volume discharge estimation from seismic records and a numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Amandine; Mangeney, Anne; Yastrebov, Vladislav; Castelnau, Olivier; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Stuzmann, Eléonore

    2017-04-01

    Glacial earthquakes is a class of seismic events of magnitude up to 5, occurring primarily in Greenland, in the margins of large marine-terminated glaciers with near-grounded termini. They are caused by calving of kilometer-scale unstable icebergs which penetrate the full-glacier thickness and, driven by the buoyancy forces, capsize against the calving front. These phenomena produce seismic energy including surface waves which last between 2 and 10 min, with dominant energy between 10-100 s of period. The source responsible for generation of such seismic waves is compatible with the contact force exerted on the terminus by the iceberg while it capsizes. We develop a 2D finite element model which takes into account the effect of water on solid structures. Using realistic rheological laws that describe ice behavior, we model iceberg capsize and investigate the forces applied on the solid Earth during this phenomenon, and generated seismic waves. We investigate the force variations with iceberg dimensions, initial buoyant conditions and direction of capsize rotation. We find that top-out iceberg capsize exerts a force on the glacier terminus which largely differs from the bottom-out capsize force in terms of amplitude and force waveforms but only in the seismic frequency band. For realistic iceberg dimensions, we compute a catalog of capsize forces whose magnitudes are consistent with seismic observations. Finally, by exploring the geometric parameters which control the capsize dynamics (height and width of the iceberg, and its initial buoyant condition), we are able to accurately reproduce the observed seismic wavefield and estimate the calved iceberg volume.

  6. Investigation in the iceberg capsizing force responsible for glacial earthquakes and ice-volume discharge estimation from seismic records and a numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, A.; Sergeant, A.; Yastrebov, V.; Castelnau, O.; Montagner, J. P.; Stutzmann, E.

    2016-12-01

    Glacial earthquakes is a class of seismic events of magnitude up to 5, occurring primarily in Greenland, in the margins of large marine-terminated glaciers with near-grounded termini. They are caused by calving of cubic kilometer-scale unstable icebergs which penetrate the full-glacier thickness and, driven by the buoyancy forces, capsize against the calving front. These phenomena produce seismic energy including surface waves which last between 2 and 10 min, with dominant energy between 10-100 s of period. The source responsible for generation of such seismic waves is compatible with the contact force exerted on the terminus by the iceberg while it capsizes. We develop a 2D finite element model which takes into account the effect of water on solid structures. Using realistic rheological laws that describe ice behavior, we model iceberg capsize and investigate the forces applied on the solid Earth during this phenomenon, and generated seismic waves. We investigate the force variations with iceberg dimensions, initial buoyant conditions and direction of capsize rotation. We find that top-out iceberg capsize exerts a force on the glacier terminus which largely differs from the bottom-out capsize force in terms of amplitude and force waveforms but only in the seismic frequency band. For realistic iceberg dimensions, we compute a catalog of capsize forces whose magnitudes are consistent with seismic observations. Finally, by exploring the geometric parameters which control the capsize dynamics (height and width of the iceberg, and its initial buoyant condition), we are able to accurately reproduce the observed seismic wavefield and estimate the calved iceberg volume.

  7. Seismic Gradiometry using Ambient Seismic Noise in an Anisotropic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S. A. L.; Curtis, A.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a wavefield gradiometry technique to estimate both isotropic and anisotropic local medium characteristics from short recordings of seismic signals by inverting a wave equation. The method exploits the information in the spatial gradients of a seismic wavefield that are calculated using dense deployments of seismic arrays. The application of the method uses the surface wave energy in the ambient seismic field. To estimate isotropic and anisotropic medium properties we invert an elliptically anisotropic wave equation. The spatial derivatives of the recorded wavefield are evaluated by calculating finite differences over nearby recordings, which introduces a systematic anisotropic error. A two step approach corrects this error: finite difference stencils are first calibrated, then the output of the wave-equation inversion is corrected using the linearized impulse response to the inverted velocity anomaly. We test the procedure on ambient seismic noise recorded in a large and dense ocean bottom cable array installed over Ekofisk field. The estimated azimuthal anisotropy forms a circular geometry around the production-induced subsidence bowl. This conforms with results from studies employing controlled sources, and with interferometry correlating long records of seismic noise. Yet in this example, the results where obtained using only a few minutes of ambient seismic noise.

  8. Seismic gradiometry using ambient seismic noise in an anisotropic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S. A. L.; Curtis, A.

    2017-05-01

    We introduce a wavefield gradiometry technique to estimate both isotropic and anisotropic local medium characteristics from short recordings of seismic signals by inverting a wave equation. The method exploits the information in the spatial gradients of a seismic wavefield that are calculated using dense deployments of seismic arrays. The application of the method uses the surface wave energy in the ambient seismic field. To estimate isotropic and anisotropic medium properties we invert an elliptically anisotropic wave equation. The spatial derivatives of the recorded wavefield are evaluated by calculating finite differences over nearby recordings, which introduces a systematic anisotropic error. A two-step approach corrects this error: finite difference stencils are first calibrated, then the output of the wave-equation inversion is corrected using the linearized impulse response to the inverted velocity anomaly. We test the procedure on ambient seismic noise recorded in a large and dense ocean bottom cable array installed over Ekofisk field. The estimated azimuthal anisotropy forms a circular geometry around the production-induced subsidence bowl. This conforms with results from studies employing controlled sources, and with interferometry correlating long records of seismic noise. Yet in this example, the results were obtained using only a few minutes of ambient seismic noise.

  9. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  10. Seismicity around Brazilian dam reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.E.F.P. )

    1987-01-01

    More than 30 cases of seismicity associated with dam reservoir sites are known throughout the world. Despite the lack of data in some areas, where seismicity occurred after reservoir impounding, there have been distinct seismic patterns observed in seismic areas after dam projects implantation. This has demonstrated that reservoir loading can trigger earthquakes. A mechanism of earthquake generation by reservoir impounding is proposed here with particular application to the Brazilian cases and to areas subject to low confining stress conditions in stable regions. Six artificial lakes are described and the associated earthquake sources are discussed in terms of natural or induced seismicity. Earthquake monitoring in Brazil up to 1967, when Brasilia's seismological station started operation, was mainly based in personal communications to the media. Therefore, there is a general lack of seismic records in relatively uninhabited areas, making it difficult to establish a seismic risk classification for the territory and to distinguish natural from induced seismicity. Despite this, cases reported here have shown an alteration of the original seismic stability in dam sites after reservoir loading, as observed by the inhabitants or records from Brasilia's seismological station. All cases appear to be related to an increase in pore pressure in permeable rocks or fracture zones which are confined between impermeable rock slabs or more competent rock. It is apparent that some cases show some participation of high residual stress conditions in the area.

  11. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  12. Seismic offset balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Beale, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to successfully predict lithology and fluid content from reflection seismic records using AVO techniques is contingent upon accurate pre-analysis conditioning of the seismic data. However, all too often, residual amplitude effects remain after the many offset-dependent processing steps are completed. Residual amplitude effects often represent a significant error when compared to the amplitude variation with offset (AVO) response that the authors are attempting to quantify. They propose a model-based, offset-dependent amplitude balancing method that attempts to correct for these residuals and other errors due to sub-optimal processing. Seismic offset balancing attempts to quantify the relationship between the offset response of back-ground seismic reflections and corresponding theoretical predictions for average lithologic interfaces thought to cause these background reflections. It is assumed that any deviation from the theoretical response is a result of residual processing phenomenon and/or suboptimal processing, and a simple offset-dependent scaling function is designed to correct for these differences. This function can then be applied to seismic data over both prospective and nonprospective zones within an area where the theoretical values are appropriate and the seismic characteristics are consistent. A conservative application of the above procedure results in an AVO response over both gas sands and wet sands that is much closer to theoretically expected values. A case history from the Gulf of Mexico Flexure Trend is presented as an example to demonstrate the offset balancing technique.

  13. Structure of the North Anatolian Fault Zone from the Auto-Correlation of Ambient Seismic Noise Recorded at a Dense Seismometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. G.; Rost, S.; Houseman, G.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the technique of cross-correlating the ambient seismic noise wavefield at two seismometers to reconstruct empirical Green's Functions for the determination of Earth structure has been a powerful tool to study the Earth's interior without earthquake or man-made sources. However, far less attention has been paid to using auto-correlations of seismic noise to reveal body wave reflections from interfaces in the subsurface. In principle, the Green's functions thus derived should be comparable to the Earth's impulse response to a co-located source and receiver. We use data from a dense seismic array (Dense Array for Northern Anatolia - DANA) deployed across the northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in the region of the 1999 magnitude 7.6 Izmit earthquake in western Turkey. The NAFZ is a major strike-slip system that extends ~1200 km across northern Turkey and continues to pose a high level of seismic hazard, in particular to the mega-city of Istanbul. We construct reflection images for the entire crust and upper mantle over the ~35 km by 70 km footprint of the 70-station DANA array. Using auto-correlations of vertical and horizontal components of ground motion, both P- and S-wave velocity information can be retrieved from the wavefield to constrain crustal structure further to established methods. We show that clear P-wave reflections from the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) can be retrieved using the autocorrelation technique, indicating topography on the Moho on horizontal scales of less than 10 km. Offsets in crustal structure can be identified that seem to be correlated with the surface expression of the fault zone in the region. The combined analysis of auto-correlations using vertical and horizontal components will lead to further insight into the fault zone structure throughout the crust and upper mantle.

  14. Continuous H/V Spectral Ratio Analysis of Ambient Noise Recorded by Stationary Seismic Stations to Improve Microzonation Results Obtained by Mobile Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Noten, K.; Lecocq, T.; Meyer, L.; Molron, J.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating the resonance frequency and amplification factor of unconsolidated sediments by H/V spectral ratio (HVSR) analysis of seismic ambient noise has been widely used since Nakamura's proposal in 1989. The fundamental frequency (f0) usually correlates well with the thickness of unconsolidated sediments above the bedrock. To measure f0 properly, Nakamura suggested to perform microzonation surveys at night when the artificial microtremor is small and does not fully disrupt the ambient seismic noise. As nightly fieldwork is not always a reasonable demand, we propose an alternative workflow of Nakamura's technique to improve the quality of HVSR results obtained by ambient noise measurements of mobile stations during the day. This new workflow includes the automated H/V calculation of one year of continuous seismic data of a stationary/permanent station located nearby the sites selected for microzonation. By means of an automated python script, the daily, weekly, monthly and seasonally variations of the fundamental frequency and the H/V amplitude at the site where the stationary station is installed are evaluated. Continuous HVSR analysis of sites with constant bedrock depth shows that the changes in the determined f0 and H/V amplitude are dominantly caused by the human behaviour which is stored in the ambient seismic noise (e.g. later onset of traffic in a weekend, quiet Sundays, differences between daily/nightly activity,…). This continuous analysis allows the characterisation of the deviation of the measured f0 to the true f0 throughout the whole year! Consequently, as mobile stations are affected by the same variation of the ambient noise, a correction factor can be applied on the calculated f0 of individual measurements during the microzonation survey and a proper Vs can be estimated. In this presentation, we apply this workflow to two different case studies; i.e. a rural site with a shallow bedrock depth of 30 m and an urban site (Brussels, capital of

  15. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, S.S.N.; Umino, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ???30?? at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  16. Imaging geothermal systems associated with oceanic ridge: first analysis of records from a dense seismic network deployed within and around the Reykjanes high-temperature area, SW-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, P. G.; Ágústsson, K.; Verdel, A.; Blanck, H.; Stefánsson, S. A.; Erbas, K.; Deon, F.; Erlendsson, Ö.; Guðnason, E. Á.; Specht, S.; Hersir, G. P.; Halldórsdóttir, S.; Wemstraa, K.; Franke, S.; Bruhn, D.; Flovenz, O. G.; Tryggvason, H.; Friðleifsson, G. Ó.

    2014-12-01

    Manifestations of supercritical water in magmatic environments have so far only been accessible from analogue outcrops of fossil systems and by simulating pressure/temperature conditions in the laboratory. In order to assess the unknown properties of such reservoirs, scientific drilling is used when Earth surface sampled rocks cannot sufficiently explain past geological processes and when geophysical imaging does not sufficiently explain observed phenomena. However, our understanding of structural and dynamic characteristics of geothermal systems can be improved through application of advanced and/or innovative exploration technologies. Unlike resistivity imaging, active and passive seismic techniques have rarely been used in volcanic geothermal areas, because processing techniques were not adapted to geothermal conditions. Recent advances in volcano-seismology have introduced new processing techniques for assessing subsurface structures and controls on fluid flow in geothermal systems. We present here preliminary analyses of seismic records around a geothermal reservoir located both on-land and offshore along the Reykjanes Ridge, SW-Iceland. We deployed on-land stations (20 broad-band and 10 short-period seismometers) and 24 Ocean Bottom Seismometers which are recording since April 2014. Together with existing permanent stations, the complete network comprises 66 stations. The network was designed so that several processing techniques can be used with the data set and address scientific questions concerning geothermal systems and the oceanic ridge. We present the network deployment, our approach and preliminary results from the first months.

  17. Landslide seismic magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. H.; Jan, J. C.; Pu, H. C.; Tu, Y.; Chen, C. C.; Wu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    Landslides have become one of the most deadly natural disasters on earth, not only due to a significant increase in extreme climate change caused by global warming, but also rapid economic development in topographic relief areas. How to detect landslides using a real-time system has become an important question for reducing possible landslide impacts on human society. However, traditional detection of landslides, either through direct surveys in the field or remote sensing images obtained via aircraft or satellites, is highly time consuming. Here we analyze very long period seismic signals (20-50 s) generated by large landslides such as Typhoon Morakot, which passed though Taiwan in August 2009. In addition to successfully locating 109 large landslides, we define landslide seismic magnitude based on an empirical formula: Lm = log ⁡ (A) + 0.55 log ⁡ (Δ) + 2.44, where A is the maximum displacement (μm) recorded at one seismic station and Δ is its distance (km) from the landslide. We conclude that both the location and seismic magnitude of large landslides can be rapidly estimated from broadband seismic networks for both academic and applied purposes, similar to earthquake monitoring. We suggest a real-time algorithm be set up for routine monitoring of landslides in places where they pose a frequent threat.

  18. Seismic Data Gathering and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Three recent earthquakes in the last seven years have exceeded their design basis earthquake values (so it is implied that damage to SSC’s should have occurred). These seismic events were recorded at North Anna (August 2011, detailed information provided in [Virginia Electric and Power Company Memo]), Fukushima Daichii and Daini (March 2011 [TEPCO 1]), and Kaswazaki-Kariwa (2007, [TEPCO 2]). However, seismic walk downs at some of these plants indicate that very little damage occurred to safety class systems and components due to the seismic motion. This report presents seismic data gathered for two of the three events mentioned above and recommends a path for using that data for two purposes. One purpose is to determine what margins exist in current industry standard seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) tools. The second purpose is the use the data to validated seismic site response tools and SSI tools. The gathered data represents free field soil and in-structure acceleration time histories data. Gathered data also includes elastic and dynamic soil properties and structural drawings. Gathering data and comparing with existing models has potential to identify areas of uncertainty that should be removed from current seismic analysis and SPRA approaches. Removing uncertainty (to the extent possible) from SPRA’s will allow NPP owners to make decisions on where to reduce risk. Once a realistic understanding of seismic response is established for a nuclear power plant (NPP) then decisions on needed protective measures, such as SI, can be made.

  19. Seismic seiches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, Arthur; Gupta, Harsh K.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic seiche is a term first used by Kvale (1955) to discuss oscillations of lake levels in Norway and England caused by the Assam earthquake of August 15, 1950. This definition has since been generalized to apply to standing waves set up in closed, or partially closed, bodies of water including rivers, shipping channels, lakes, swimming pools and tanks due to the passage of seismic waves from an earthquake.

  20. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-31

    for second-order Sturm - Liouville boundary-value problems, such a count of eigenvalues may be established in terms of the number of zero crossings of...will be operational during the next six months. Section 11 describes a series of activities in the development and imple- mentation of the seismic...element of seismic research. with emphasis on those areas directly related to tho operations of the SDC. Substantial progress has been made in the

  1. Ancient seismic record of the Tarascan (Purhepecha) Empire. Preclasic Period (3000 Yr B.P.). Jaracuaro Island, Patzcuaro Lake. Michoacan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Pascua, Miguel Angel; Garduño-Monroy, Victor Hugo; Perez-Lopez, Raul; Israde-Alcantara, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    The Pátzcuaro lake is located in the Mexican State of Michoacán in the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. The Jarácuaro island is formed by Holocene lake sediments highly deformed by active faults (Morelia-Acambay Fault System, MAFS, more than 200 km long). MAFS is an E-W strike-slip fault with a transtensive component in the Pázcuaro Lake zone. Several paleoseismic studies were carried out in the island. Four trenches were made in the active faults that cross the island and it is possible observe that there are two andesitic blocks (>4 m3) over two different faults with surface rupture. The archaeological evidences (pottery, idols, etc), founded in the soils affected by the fault, implies that the age of the events concern to the Pre - Classic period (3.000 years B.P.).The Tarascan (or Purhépecha) Empire supported this earthquakes and put the blocks close both faults on the hanging wall block. The andesitic blocks are carved and polished and the quarry where this blocks were extracted is 1.5 km long out the lake. This cultural behaviour was profusely used by the Tarascan related to natural disasters but not documented before related to earthquakes. Maybe this is ones of the oldest human seismic manifestation, and is the first time that is connected a fault with a seismic movement.

  2. Progressive Seismic Failure, Seismic Gap, and Great Seismic Risk across the Densely Populated North China Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, A.; Yu, X.; Shen, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Although the seismically active North China basin has the most complete written records of pre-instrumentation earthquakes in the world, this information has not been fully utilized for assessing potential earthquake hazards of this densely populated region that hosts ~200 million people. In this study, we use the historical records to document the earthquake migration pattern and the existence of a 180-km seismic gap along the 600-km long right-slip Tangshan-Hejian-Cixian (THC) fault zone that cuts across the North China basin. The newly recognized seismic gap, which is centered at Tianjin with a population of 11 million people and ~120 km from Beijing (22 million people) and Tangshan (7 million people), has not been ruptured in the past 1000 years by M≥6 earthquakes. The seismic migration pattern in the past millennium suggests that the epicenters of major earthquakes have shifted towards this seismic gap along the THC fault, which implies that the 180- km gap could be the site of the next great earthquake with M≈7.6 if it is ruptured by a single event. Alternatively, the seismic gap may be explained by aseismic creeping or seismic strain transfer between active faults.

  3. Lunar seismic data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific data transmitted continuously from all ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package) stations on the Moon and recorded on instrumentation tapes at receiving stations distributed around the Earth were processed. The processing produced sets of computer-compatible digital tapes, from which various other data sets convenient for analysis were generated. The seismograms were read, various types of seismic events were classified; the detected events were cataloged.

  4. Seismic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    Textron Systems (Textron) has been using geophones for target detection for many years. This sensing capability was utilized for detection and classification purposes only. Recently Textron has been evaluating multiaxis geophones to calculate bearings and track targets more specifically personnel. This capability will not only aid the system in locating personnel in bearing space or cartesian space but also enhance detection and reduce false alarms. Textron has been involved in the testing and evaluation of several sensors at multiple sites. One of the challenges of calculating seismic bearing is an adequate signal to noise ratio. The sensor signal to noise ratio is a function of sensor coupling to the ground, seismic propagation and range to target. The goals of testing at multiple sites are to gain a good understanding of the maximum and minimum ranges for bearing and detection and to exploit that information to tailor sensor system emplacement to achieve desired performance. Test sites include 10A Site Devens, MA, McKenna Airfield Ft. Benning, GA and Yuma Proving Ground Yuma, AZ. Geophone sensors evaluated include a 28 Hz triax spike, a 15 Hz triax spike and a hybrid triax spike consisting of a 10 Hz vertical geophone and two 28 Hz horizontal geophones. The algorithm uses raw seismic data to calculate the bearings. All evaluated sensors have triaxial geophone configuration mounted to a spike housing/fixture. The suite of sensors also compares various types of geophones to evaluate benefits in lower bandwidth. The data products of these tests include raw geophone signals, seismic features, seismic bearings, seismic detection and GPS position truth data. The analyses produce Probability of Detection vs range, bearing accuracy vs range, and seismic feature level vs range. These analysis products are compared across test sites and sensor types.

  5. A statistical analysis of the possible influence of electromagnetic emissions associated with seismic activity on the propagation of whistler-waves recorded by the DEMETER satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Livio; Buzzi, Aurora; Parrot, Michel; Pincon, Jean-Louis; Sgrigna, Vittorio

    Studies reported in literature, on whistlers detected by ground-based observatories, suggested the possible influence of seismo-electromagnetic emissions on the propagation of magnetospheric whistler-waves. In particular, the increase in the number of whistlers with high-dispersions values has been supposed to be correlated with electromagnetic disturbances associated with earthquakes occurring along the whistler propagation geomagnetic field line. In the present work it has been carried out a statistical analysis on the spatial and temporal distributions of whistlers detected in the period 2005-2008 by the RNF experiment on board the DEMETER satellite. This is the first time that correlation between seismic activity and whistlers occurrence is investigated by using satellite data. Several cuts and constrains (on the geomagnetic conditions, whistler propagation modes, seasonal variation, local time dependence, etc.) have been applied in order to discriminate possible whistler anomalous fluctuations with respect to the mean monthly and geographical background values. Assuming a ducted propagation of whistlerwaves along the magnetic field line, a few mathematical estimators of the signal-to-noise ratio have been introduced to estimate the statistical significance of anomalous signals. What is observed is that for high whistler dispersion values, number of whistlers detected close to earthquakes and associated conjugated points exhibits an increase greater than that along the magnetic field line. This effect is evident in the daytime maps. On the contrary, no variation is observed for positive or negative values of the ∆T = (TDemeter - TEQ ) difference, indicating that any possible whistler anomalous signal associated with earthquake occurrence can not be catalogued as pre-, co-, or post-seismic one, but only associated with the time window of each seismic event as a whole. The existence of anomalous signals only for highest whistlers dispersion values is in

  6. Seismic monitoring of Poland - temporary seismic project - first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojanowski, J.; Plesiewicz, B.; Wiszniowski, J.; Suchcicki, J.; Tokarz, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the project is to develop national database of seismic activity for seismic hazard assessment. Poland is known as a region of very low seismicity, however some earthquakes occur from time to time. The historical catalogue consists of less than one hundred earthquakes in the time span of almost one thousand years. Due to such a low occurrence rate, the study has been focussing on events at magnitudes lower than 2 which are more likely to occur during a few-year-long project. There are 24 mobile seismic stations involved in the project which are deployed in temporary locations close to humans neighbourhood. It causes a high level of noise and disturbances in recorded seismic signal. Moreover, the majority of Polish territory is covered by a thick sediments. It causes the problem of a reliable detection method for small seismic events in noisy data. The majority of algorithms is based on the concept of STA/LTA ratio and is designed for strong teleseismic events registered on many stations. Unfortunately they fail on the problem of weak events in the signal with noise and disturbances. It has been decided to apply Real Time Recurrent Neural Network (RTRN) to detect small natural seismic events from Poland. This method is able to assess relations of seismic signal in frequency domains as well as in time of seismic phases. The RTRN was taught by wide range of seismic signals - regional, teleseismic as well as blasts. The method is routinely used to analyse data from the project. In the firs two years of the project the seismic network was set in southern Poland, where relatively large seismicity in known. Since the mid-2010 the stations have been working in several regions of central and northern Poland where some minor historical earthquakes occurred. Over one hundred seismic events in magnitude range from 0.5 to 2.3 confirms the activity of Podhale region (Tatra Mountains, Carpathians), where an earthquake of magnitude 4.3 occurred in 2004. Initially three

  7. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  8. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  9. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  10. Investigating the coastal paleo-seismic and paleo-tsunami records using vermetid benches in the Eastern Mediterranean: case of the Palm Islands reserve -Lebanon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, A.

    2014-12-01

    The vermetid benches or reefs are thick bio-constructions of marine shells of the Vermetidae group that thrive at sea-level and are used as proxy for crustal tectonic deformation, sea-level changes, paleoclimate reconstruction or paleo-Tsunami markers in different regions especially around the Mediterranean Sea. The Palm Islands Reserve located 5km offshore northern Lebanon in the Eastern Mediterranean, on the hanging wall of a submarine, active thrust fault - the Rankine-Abdeh fault - hold abundant vermetid bio-constructions that are still relatively well preserved. It is an exceptional site for testing and investigating hypothesis on the use of the vermetid benches. We surveyed the surface and shorelines of the Palm Island, the largest of the Islands. The fossil vermetid bio-constructions are present as uplifted benches on its northern side. Also, many of the large boulders mostly found on the south-western shore of the islands still hold vermetid bio-constructions originally from the intertidal position before the boulders were uplifted and thrown over the surface of the island away from the shoreline by powerful waves. Two continuous vertical sections of these bio-constructions, 7 and 13cm thick were sampled for radiocarbon dating. Of the 21 large boulders we surveyed 10 had their vermetid crusts sampled for 14C dating. Their measured radiocarbon ages are spread over many centuries and do not cluster around any single date that could correspond with that of a tsunami or storm event responsible for their transport. On another hand the radiocarbon ages from the uplifted benches show that the last co-seismic rupture of the underlying and offshore Rankine-Abdeh thrust took place after the 9th century AD and resulted in the tectonic uplift of the Palm Islands shoreline, by around 80cm. Interpretation of the morphology and ages of the vermetid bio-constructions found on the overthrown boulders suggest that another such co-seismic event happened towards the end of the

  11. Locating mofettes using seismic noise records from small dense arrays and Matched Field Processing Analysis in the NW Bohemia/Vogtland Region, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Estrella, H.; Umlauft, J.; Schmidt, A.; Korn, M.

    2015-12-01

    The NW Bohemia/Vogtland region is characterized by currently ongoing geodynamic processes within the intracontinental lithospheric mantle. Among others, this activity results in the occurrence of mid-crustal earthquake swarms as well as CO2 degassing zones, called mofettes. These two natural phenomena are related to each other since it is considered that fluid flow and fluid-induced effective stress trigger earthquake swarms. At the Earth's surface they appear spatially separated, but their connection could be explained by the existence of pathways within the crust that allow efficient and permanent fluid transport. However, neither structure nor position of such pathways has so far been imaged. With this background we applied the Matched Field Processing (MFP) analysis within the NW Bohemia/Vogtland region to locate mofettes and investigate their characteristics. Considering the CO2 degassing process as high frequency noise source, we chose two different test sites: the Dolní Částkov Borehole, which is an artificial mofette that we used to validate the method's functionality, and the South Hartoušov Mofette, a natural CO2 degassing field. On both sites, we measured seismic noise in continuous mode over several hours (7-9 hours) with a sampling frequency of 250 samples per second in multiple campaigns using an array of approximately 30 randomly distributed stations. Each array covered an area of about 60 x 60 m2 and consisted of vertical geophones (4.5 Hz) connected to Reftek Texans. For the MFP computation the phase velocity of the study area is required, which we obtained from active seismic experiments with hammer blows as source. For Dolní Částkov the phase velocity varies between 200-420 m/s; and in South Hartoušov between 100-280 m/s, both in a frequency interval of 10-60 Hz. With the MFP analysis at the artificial mofette in Dolní Částkov we could relocate the noise source successfully and hence, the method's functionality was confirmed. In the

  12. Seismicity in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    The largest historical earthquake in South Carolina, and in the southeastern US, occurred in the Coastal Plain province, probably northwest of Charleston, in 1886. Locations for aftershocks associated with this earthquake, estimated using intensities based on newspaper accounts, defined a northwest trending zone about 250 km long that was at least 100 km wide in the Coastal Plain but widened to a northeast trending zone in the Piedmont. The subsequent historical and instrumentally recorded seismicity in South Carolina images the 1886 aftershock zone. Instrumentally recorded seismicity in the Coastal Plain province occurs in 3 seismic zones or clusters: Middleton Place-Summervile (MPSSZ), Adams Run (ARC), and Bowman (BSZ). Approximately 68% of the Coastal Plain earthquakes occur in the MPSSZ, a north trending zone about 22 km long and 12 km wide, lying about 20 km northwest of Charleston. The hypocenters of MPSSZ earthquakes range in depth from near the surface to almost 12 km. Thrust, strike-slip, and some normal faulting are indicated by the fault plane solutions for Coastal Plain earthquakes. The maximum horizontal compressive stress, inferred from the P-axes of the fault plane solutions, is oriented NE-SW in the shallow crust (<9 km deep) but appears to be diffusely E-W between 9 to 12 km deep. -from Author

  13. Probabilistic Simulation of Territorial Seismic Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, Alessandro; Corbi, Ileana

    2008-07-08

    The paper is focused on a stochastic process for the prevision of seismic scenarios on the territory and developed by means of some basic assumptions in the procedure and by elaborating the fundamental parameters recorded during some ground motions occurred in a seismic area.

  14. Probabilistic Simulation of Territorial Seismic Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratta, Alessandro; Corbi, Ileana

    2008-07-01

    The paper is focused on a stochastic process for the prevision of seismic scenarios on the territory and developed by means of some basic assumptions in the procedure and by elaborating the fundamental parameters recorded during some ground motions occurred in a seismic area.

  15. Seismic azimuthal anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere from broadband surface wave analysis of OBS array records at 60 Ma seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Kawakatsu, H.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed seismic ambient noise and teleseismic waveforms of nine broadband ocean bottom seismometers deployed at a 60 Ma seafloor in the southeastward of Tahiti island, the South Pacific, by the Tomographic Investigation by seafloor ARray Experiment for the Society hotspot project. We first obtained one-dimensional shear wave velocity model beneath the array from average phase velocities of Rayleigh waves at a broadband period range of 5-200 s. The obtained model shows a large velocity reduction at depths between 40 and 80 km, where the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary might exist. We then estimated shear wave azimuthal anisotropy at depths of 20-100 km by measuring azimuthal dependence of phase velocities of Rayleigh waves. The obtained model shows peak-to-peak intensity of the azimuthal anisotropy of 2%-4% with the fastest azimuth of NW-SE direction both in the lithosphere and asthenosphere. This result suggests that the ancient flow frozen in the lithosphere is not perpendicular to the strike of the ancient mid-ocean ridge but is roughly parallel to the ancient plate motion at depths of 20-60 km. The fastest azimuths in the current asthenosphere are subparallel to current plate motion at depths of 60-100 km. Additional shear wave splitting analysis revealed possible perturbations of flow in the mantle by the hot spot activities and implied the presence of azimuthal anisotropy in the asthenosphere down to a depth of 190-210 km.

  16. Method for interpreting seismic records to yield indications of gas/oil in an earth formation such as a sandstone, limestone, or dolostone

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.J.; Runge, R.J.; Thompson, D.D.

    1983-02-22

    The present invention indicates that acoustic characteristics associated with gas/oil-containing strata such as a sandstone, limestone or dolostone, including reflectivity coefficients can be normalized (and favorably compared) with similar characteristics calculated and displayed by means of a machineimplemented data processing method in which well logging and geologic data are fed thereto to calculate such characteristics without the need for shear-wave velocities. In more detail, in accordance with the invention brine-saturated bulk and shear moduli, (i.e., kw* and gw*) of a sandstone, limestone or dolostone can be predicted as a function of, say, brine-saturated p-wave modulus (pw*) alone (Independent of shearwave velocity). In that way, resulting acoustic values including seismic velocities and amplitudes (also, reflectivities) as a function of a saturation operator can ultimately be provided. Such values, when compared to actual field-generated characteristics, are surprisingly accurate predictors of the amount of gas/oil saturation in the zone of interest. The method has particular accuracy in designating gas zones within formations of interest due to use of the complete Benedict-Webb-Rubin non-ideal gas law in pseudo-reduced form, as cited in Journal of Current Petroleum Technology, Vol. 22, pp. 889-895.

  17. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-31

    dyn-cm. It can be seen that there is a wide range of the potential con- tribution of different seismic zones to excitation of the Chandler wobble ...Correction to the Excitation of the Chandler Wobble by Earthquakes," Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 32, 203-217 (1973). 22. S. C. Solomon, N. H. Sleep

  18. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  19. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  20. Millennial-scale climatic fluctuation in the fluvial record during MIS3: Very high-resolution seismic images from NE Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cserkész-Nagy, Ágnes; Sztanó, Orsolya

    2016-12-01

    Alluvial architectures of a meandering river existing in MIS3 were observed on very high-resolution (VHR) single-channel waterborne seismic profiles, 20-30 m below the Tisza River in the Pannonian Basin (Hungary). The study investigated the spatial and temporal variations of two, more than 2 km-long continuous series of inclined reflections interpreted as laterally accreted point bar complexes. The phases of natural meander migration were reconstructed in 3D based on the changes in the geometry and dip of the inclined reflections. A channel-forming discharge curve extending over approximately 2.5 ky was calculated by using paleo-width and depth data derived from the lateral accretion surfaces. Systematic analysis of the geometrical variations coupled with the discharge curve evaluation on each point bar complexes indicates millennial-scale discharge fluctuations 40-50 ky ago, to that the river responded principally by incision and infilling. The primary periodicity, comparable to the sub-Milankovitch cycles, is superimposed by shorter periods: ca. 500-year cycles reflect the phases of unidirectional meander development, while the smallest ones reflect the recurrence interval (150-200 years) of the highest floods. River-bed incisions happened step-by-step related to extreme floods, when the meander development also changed. The smaller-scale and more rapid fluctuations within a development unit were represented in variations of the channel width. Although the poor geochronology of the sandy fluvial deposits cannot allow any direct correlation to the climatostratigraphic events, the millennial-scale climate variations of MIS3 were pronouncedly characteristic in the discharge fluctuations.

  1. Evidence of an imbricate crustal thrust belt in the southern British Variscides: Contributions of southwestern approaches traverse (SWAT) deep seismic reflection profiling recorded through the English Channel and the Celtic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, Bernard

    1990-04-01

    The Southwestern Approaches Traverse (SWAT) seismic reflection profiles recorded through the Celtic Sea and the English Channel provide unexpected data concerning, notably, the deep structure of the Irish and south British Variscan crust. One of the most significant results is the recognition of prominent deep southerly dipping reflectors, regarded as large-scale foreland directed Variscan thrusts which constitute, in the southern innermost zones, a crustal stacking wedge. The resulting overthickened crust may have induced the petrogenesis of the Cornubian granitic batholith by an anatectic melting process. The roots of this crustal duplex are not imaged on the SWAT lines because of their subsequent assimilation by the more recent layering of the present-day lower crust. Upward, the deep crustal ramps are assumed to flatten out and to join a roof thrust which acts as a major midcrustal decoupling zone, not revealed by the SWAT profiles, and which underlies the thick Devonian allochthonous high-strained units of Cornwall. Northward, this shallow northerly verging shear zone is overstepped by the Tintagel antithetic back thrusts which are closely related to deeper northward dipping basement faults considered as Caledonian features. Southward, the imbricate crustal thrust unit is overridden by the Lizard ophiolitic suture, which appears as a 8-km-thick gently southerly dipping sheared zone, crosscuttting the entire crust and rooting deep beneath the present-day Moho. Its hanging wall is constituted by the Channel Cadomian block, characterized by an almost seismically featureless upper crust which is not involved in the main Variscan thrust stacking. Northward, the imbricate thrust unit is delineated by a moderately southerly dipping ramp which penetrates straight down into the upper crust without any evidence of an intervening flat-lying decollement level. This frontal ramp emerges along a broadly 110°N trending discontinuous thrust front, located above the northern

  2. Quarterly seismic monitoring report 96B

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.

    1996-06-12

    This report summarizes the location, magnitude, and other pertinent information on earthquakes recorded on and near the Hanford Site by Westinghouse Seismic Monitoring during the period encompassing January 1, 1996 to March 31, 1996.

  3. New seismic study begins in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, A.C.

    1974-01-01

    A new seismological project is now underway in Puerto Rico to provide information needed for accurate assessment of the island's seismic hazard. The project should also help to increase understanding of the tectonics and geologic evolution of the Caribbean region. The Puerto Rico Seismic Program is being conducted by the Geological Survey with support provided by the Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority, an agency responsible for generation and distribution of electric power throughout the Commonwealth. The Program will include the installation of a network of high quality seismograph stations to monitor seismic activity on and around Puerto Rico. These stations will be distributed across the island to record the seismicity as uniformly as possible. The detection and accurate location of small earthquakes, as well as moderate magnitude shocks, will aid in mapping active seismic zones and in compiling frequency of occurrence statistics which ultimately wil be useful in seismic risk-zoning of hte island. 

  4. Updated Colombian Seismic Hazard Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eraso, J.; Arcila, M.; Romero, J.; Dimate, C.; Bermúdez, M. L.; Alvarado, C.

    2013-05-01

    The Colombian seismic hazard map used by the National Building Code (NSR-98) in effect until 2009 was developed in 1996. Since then, the National Seismological Network of Colombia has improved in both coverage and technology providing fifteen years of additional seismic records. These improvements have allowed a better understanding of the regional geology and tectonics which in addition to the seismic activity in Colombia with destructive effects has motivated the interest and the need to develop a new seismic hazard assessment in this country. Taking advantage of new instrumental information sources such as new broad band stations of the National Seismological Network, new historical seismicity data, standardized global databases availability, and in general, of advances in models and techniques, a new Colombian seismic hazard map was developed. A PSHA model was applied. The use of the PSHA model is because it incorporates the effects of all seismic sources that may affect a particular site solving the uncertainties caused by the parameters and assumptions defined in this kind of studies. First, the seismic sources geometry and a complete and homogeneous seismic catalog were defined; the parameters of seismic rate of each one of the seismic sources occurrence were calculated establishing a national seismotectonic model. Several of attenuation-distance relationships were selected depending on the type of seismicity considered. The seismic hazard was estimated using the CRISIS2007 software created by the Engineering Institute of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México -UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). A uniformly spaced grid each 0.1° was used to calculate the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and response spectral values at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3.0 seconds with return periods of 75, 225, 475, 975 and 2475 years. For each site, a uniform hazard spectrum and exceedance rate curves were calculated. With the results, it is

  5. Tests of the standard (30 hz) NCER FM multiplex telemetry system, augmented by two timing channels and a compensation reference signal, used to record multiplexed seismic network data on magnetic tape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1976-01-01

    The application of subtractive compensation to USGS seismic magnetic tape recording and playback systems was examined in a recent USGS Open-file report (1). It was found, for the standard (30 Hz) NCER multiplex system, that subtractive compensation utilizing a 4688 Hz reference signal multiplexed onto each data track was more effective than that utilizing a 3125 Hz reference signal recorded separately on a different track. Moreover, it was found that the portion of the spectrum between the uppermost data channel (3060 Hz + or - 125 Hz) and the compensation reference signal (4688 Hz) could be used to record an additional timing signal, with a center frequency of 3700 Hz and a broader playback bandwidth (ca 0 to 100 Hz) than that of the standard data channels. Accordingly, for the tests described in that report, the standard 8-datachannel multiplex system was augmented by one additional timing channel with a center frequency of 3700 Hz. The 3700 Hz discriminator used in those tests was not successfully set up to utilize subtractive compensation; so its output from a tape playback was quite noisy. Subsequently, further tests have been carried out on the application of subtractive compensation to a 4-channel broad-band multiplex system and to the standard multiplex system, both recorded on field tape recorders with relatively poor tape speed control (2), (3). In the course of these experiments, it was discovered that two separate timing channe1s, not just one, can be inserted between the uppermost data channel and the compensation reference signal, Furthermore, it was possible to adjust the discriminators used to playback these timing channels so that they profited significantly from subtractive compensation even though the playback bandwidth was 0 to 100 Hz (for short rise times of square wave timing signals). The advantages of recording two timing signals on each data track include: 1) one standard time signal to be used for critical timing, e.g. IRIG E, can be

  6. The slant-stacklet transform and its application to teleseismic PcP-P data recorded at large aperture seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventosa, S.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In most high-resolution studies of the Earth's Deep Interior, the limited amount and uneven distribution of high-quality observations of short-period teleseismic body waves are major obstacles. Dense broadband seismic networks help to overcome major challenges of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the target phases and of signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) of other (often stronger) mantle phases when the slowness difference is large enough. Intuitive delay-and-sum (i.e. slant-stack) approaches are routinely applied to combine data of many spatially close stations to improve data quality. Alternative methods developed in the context of image processing, such as Radon transform-based methods, have proven useful in exploration seismology to facilitate enhancement and separation of signals according to their slowness and time of arrival. In this spirit, we have introduced the slant-stacklet transform to define coherency-guided filters able to exploit signals that would have been otherwise rejected because of low SNR or SIR. As an illustration, this method allows us to dramatically increase the amount of high-quality PcP observations using dense arrays in North America and Japan, sampling Central America, the western Pacific and Alaska/western Canada with unprecedented resolution and accuracy. After mantle corrections, the main signal left in these regions is relatively long wavelength in these regions of fast velocities around the Pacific, except at the western border of the Pacific large-low shear-velocity province (LLSVP) where we observe a rapid reduction of Vp velocity over a distance of about 10˚. This is just one step to further increase lowermost mantle imaging using P waves, much more information from PcP and other complementary signals (e.g. PdP) around the globe are needed to resolve volumetric structure, topography of the core-mantle boundary and D" discontinuity, and the trade-offs between them, in order to improve our understanding of the interaction

  7. Sedimentary record of seismic events in the Eocene Green River Formation and its implications for regional tectonics on lake evolution (Bridger Basin, Wyoming)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törő, Balázs; Pratt, Brian R.

    2016-10-01

    Outcrops and cores from the top of the lacustrine Tipton Member and the base of the Wilkins Peak Member ( 51.5 Ma) of the Eocene Green River Formation, Bridger Basin in southwestern Wyoming yield a wide variety of sedimentary deformation features many of which are laterally extensive for more than 50 km. They include various types of folds, load structures, pinch-and-swell structures, microfaults, breccias and sedimentary dikes. In most cases deformation is represented by hybrid brittle-ductile structures exhibiting lateral variation in deformation style. These occur in low-energy, profundal organic-rich carbonate mudstones (oil shales), trona beds, tuffs, and profundal to sublittoral silty carbonate deposited in paleolake Gosiute. The deformation is not specific to the depositional environment because sedimentary units stratigraphically higher with similar facies show no deformation. The studied interval lacks any evidence for possible trigger mechanisms intrinsic to the depositional environment, such as strong wave action, rapid sediment loading, evaporite dissolution and collapse, or desiccation, so 'endogenic' causes are ruled out. Thus, the deformation features are interpreted as seismites, and change in deformation style and inferred increase in intensity towards the south suggest that the earthquakes were sourced from the nearby Uinta Fault System. The 22 levels exhibiting seismites recognized in cores indicate earthquakes with minimum magnitudes between 6 and 7, minimum epicentral intensity (MCS) of 9, and varying recurrence intervals in the seismic history of the Uinta Fault System, with a mean apparent recurrence period of 8.1 k.y. using average sedimentation rates and dated tuffs; in detail, however, there are two noticeably active periods followed by relative quiescence. The stratigraphic position of these deformed intervals also marks the transition between two distinct stages in lake evolution, from the balanced-filled Tipton Member to the overlying

  8. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-31

    Determining Phase and Group Velocities of Surface Seismic Waves 21 B. Group-Velocity Measurements Across Eurasia from Mashad SRO 22 C. Group-Velocity...Albuquerque), MAIO ( Mashad ), GUMO (Guam), NWAO (Australia), SNZO (New Zealand), and TATO (Taiwan). Fairly extensive data are now a|ailable for the...include a new rapid algorithm for the determination of group and phase velocity, a series of observations of Rayleigh-wave dispersion at the Mashad

  9. Seismic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, S.

    1981-10-01

    Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research programs in seismic testing to improve earthquake design guidelines lowers the safety-design costs of nuclear power plants. Explosive tests that simulate earthquakes help to determine how structures respond to ground motion and how these are related to soil and geologic conditions at a specific site. Explosive tests develop data for simulation using several computer codes. Photographs illustrate testing techniques. 6 references. (DCK)

  10. Seismic monitoring of torrential and fluvial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, Arnaud; Hovius, Niels; Turowski, Jens M.

    2016-04-01

    In seismology, the signal is usually analysed for earthquake data, but earthquakes represent less than 1 % of continuous recording. The remaining data are considered as seismic noise and were for a long time ignored. Over the past decades, the analysis of seismic noise has constantly increased in popularity, and this has led to the development of new approaches and applications in geophysics. The study of continuous seismic records is now open to other disciplines, like geomorphology. The motion of mass at the Earth's surface generates seismic waves that are recorded by nearby seismometers and can be used to monitor mass transfer throughout the landscape. Surface processes vary in nature, mechanism, magnitude, space and time, and this variability can be observed in the seismic signals. This contribution gives an overview of the development and current opportunities for the seismic monitoring of geomorphic processes. We first describe the common principles of seismic signal monitoring and introduce time-frequency analysis for the purpose of identification and differentiation of surface processes. Second, we present techniques to detect, locate and quantify geomorphic events. Third, we review the diverse layout of seismic arrays and highlight their advantages and limitations for specific processes, like slope or channel activity. Finally, we illustrate all these characteristics with the analysis of seismic data acquired in a small debris-flow catchment where geomorphic events show interactions and feedbacks. Further developments must aim to fully understand the richness of the continuous seismic signals, to better quantify the geomorphic activity and to improve the performance of warning systems. Seismic monitoring may ultimately allow the continuous survey of erosion and transfer of sediments in the landscape on the scales of external forcing.

  11. Estimation of seismic velocity changes at different depths associated with the 2014 Northern Nagano Prefecture earthquake, Japan ( M W 6.2) by joint interferometric analysis of NIED Hi-net and KiK-net records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawazaki, Kaoru; Saito, Tatsuhiko; Ueno, Tomotake; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    To estimate the seismic velocity changes at different depths associated with a large earthquake, we apply passive image interferometry to two types of seismograms: KiK-net vertical pairs of earthquake records and Hi-net continuous borehole data. We compute the surface/borehole deconvolution waveform (DCW) of seismograms recorded by a KiK-net station and the autocorrelation function (ACF) of ambient noise recorded by a collocated Hi-net station, 26 km from the epicenter of the 2014 Northern Nagano Prefecture earthquake, Japan ( M W 6.2). Because the deeper KiK-net sensor and the Hi-net sensor are collocated at 150 m depth, and another KiK-net sensor is located at the surface directly above the borehole sensors, we can measure shallow (<150 m depth) and deep (>150 m depth) velocity changes separately. The sensitivity of the ACF to the velocity changes in the deeper zone is evaluated by a numerical wave propagation simulation. We detect relative velocity changes of -3.1 and -1.4% in the shallow and deep zones, respectively, within 1 week of the mainshock. The relative velocity changes recover to -1.9 and -1.1%, respectively, during the period between 1 week and 4 months after the mainshock. The observed relative velocity reductions can be attributed to dynamic strain changes due to the strong ground motion, rather than static strain changes due to coseismic deformation by the mainshock. The speed of velocity recovery may be faster in the shallow zone than in the deep zone because the recovery speed is controlled by initial damage in the medium. This recovery feature is analogous to the behavior of slow dynamics observed in rock experiments.

  12. Using strain rates to forecast seismic hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    One essential component in forecasting seismic hazards is observing the gradual accumulation of tectonic strain accumulation along faults before this strain is suddenly released as earthquakes. Typically, seismic hazard models are based on geologic estimates of slip rates along faults and historical records of seismic activity, neither of which records actively accumulating strain. But this strain can be estimated by geodesy: the precise measurement of tiny position changes of Earth’s surface, obtained from GPS, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), or a variety of other instruments.

  13. Seismic assessment of buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Chaar, G.; Brady, P.; Fernandez, G.

    1995-12-31

    A structure and its lifelines are closely linked because the disruption of lifeline systems will obstruct emergency service functions that are vitally needed after an earthquake. As an example of the criticality of these systems, the Association of Bay Area Government (ABAG) recorded thousands of leaks in pipelines that resulted in more than twenty million gallons of hazardous materials being released in several recorded earthquakes. The cost of cleaning the spills from these materials was very high. This information supports the development of seismic protection of lifeline systems. The US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) has, among its missions, the responsibility to develop seismic vulnerability assessment procedures for military installations. Within this mission, a preliminary research program to assess the seismic vulnerability of buried pipeline systems on military installations was initiated. Phase 1 of this research project resulted in two major studies. In the first, evaluating current procedures to seismically design or evaluate existing lifeline systems, the authors found several significant aspects that deserve special consideration and need to be addressed in future research. The second was focused on identifying parameters related to buried pipeline system vulnerability and developing a generalized analytical method to relate these parameters to the seismic vulnerability assessment of existing pipeline systems.

  14. Unfolding the procedure of characterizing recorded ultra low frequency, kHZ and MHz electromagetic anomalies prior to the L'Aquila earthquake as pre-seismic ones - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftaxias, K.; Athanasopoulou, L.; Balasis, G.; Kalimeri, M.; Nikolopoulos, S.; Contoyiannis, Y.; Kopanas, J.; Antonopoulos, G.; Nomicos, C.

    2009-11-01

    Ultra low frequency, kHz and MHz electromagnetic (EM) anomalies were recorded prior to the L'Aquila catastrophic earthquake that occurred on 6 April 2009. The main aims of this paper are threefold: (i) suggest a procedure for the designation of detected EM anomalies as seismogenic ones. We do not expect to be able to provide a succinct and solid definition of a pre-seismic EM emission. Instead, we aim, through a multidisciplinary analysis, to provide the elements of a definition. (ii) Link the detected MHz and kHz EM anomalies with equivalent last stages of the earthquake preparation process. (iii) Put forward physically meaningful arguments for quantifying the time to global failure and the identification of distinguishing features beyond which the evolution towards global failure becomes irreversible. We emphasize that we try to specify not only whether a single EM anomaly is pre-seismic in itself, but also whether a combination of kHz, MHz, and ULF EM anomalies can be characterized as pre-seismic. The entire procedure unfolds in two consecutive parts. Here in Part 1 we focus on the detected kHz EM anomaly, which play a crucial role in our approach to these challenges. We try to discriminate clearly this anomaly from background noise. For this purpose, we analyze the data successively in terms of various concepts of entropy and information theory including, Shannon n-block entropy, conditional entropy, entropy of the source, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, T-entropy, approximate entropy, fractal spectral analysis, R/S analysis and detrended fluctuation analysis. We argue that this analysis reliably distinguishes the candidate kHz EM precursor from the noise: the launch of anomalies from the normal state is combined by a simultaneous appearance of a significantly higher level of organization, and persistency. This finding indicates that the process in which the anomalies are rooted is governed by a positive feedback mechanism. This mechanism induces a non

  15. Seismic Imager Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Coste, Keith; Cunningham, J.; Sievers,Michael W.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Polanco, Otto R.; Green, Joseph J.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Redding, David C.; Avouac, Jean Philippe; hide

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a geostationary seismic imager (GSI), a space telescope in geostationary orbit above the Pacific coast of the Americas that would provide movies of many large earthquakes occurring in the area from Southern Chile to Southern Alaska. The GSI movies would cover a field of view as long as 300 km, at a spatial resolution of 3 to 15 m and a temporal resolution of 1 to 2 Hz, which is sufficient for accurate measurement of surface displacements and photometric changes induced by seismic waves. Computer processing of the movie images would exploit these dynamic changes to accurately measure the rapidly evolving surface waves and surface ruptures as they happen. These measurements would provide key information to advance the understanding of the mechanisms governing earthquake ruptures, and the propagation and arrest of damaging seismic waves. GSI operational strategy is to react to earthquakes detected by ground seismometers, slewing the satellite to point at the epicenters of earthquakes above a certain magnitude. Some of these earthquakes will be foreshocks of larger earthquakes; these will be observed, as the spacecraft would have been pointed in the right direction. This strategy was tested against the historical record for the Pacific coast of the Americas, from 1973 until the present. Based on the seismicity recorded during this time period, a GSI mission with a lifetime of 10 years could have been in position to observe at least 13 (22 on average) earthquakes of magnitude larger than 6, and at least one (2 on average) earthquake of magnitude larger than 7. A GSI would provide data unprecedented in its extent and temporal and spatial resolution. It would provide this data for some of the world's most seismically active regions, and do so better and at a lower cost than could be done with ground-based instrumentation. A GSI would revolutionize the understanding of earthquake dynamics, perhaps leading ultimately to effective warning

  16. Broadband bearing-time records of three-component seismic array data and their application to the study of local earthquake coda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Gregory S.; Owens, Thomas J.

    1993-09-01

    High-frequency three-component array d, are used to study the P and S coda produced by* cal earthquakes. The data are displayed as broadba bearing-time records which allow us to examine a compl, time history of the propagation directions and arrival tin of direct and scattered phases crossing the array. This ~ sualization technique is used to examine the wavefield ~ two scale lengths using two sub-arrays~of sensors. Resu suggest that P coda is dominated by P energy propag, ing sub-parallel to the direct P arrival. The S coda pro agates in all directions and appears to be composed p~ dominantly of S and/or surface wave energy. Significant more 0e coda appears on the smaller scale length sub-art relative to the larger scale array suggesting that much, the ~, coda remains coherent for only very short distanc

  17. MSNoise: a Python Package for Monitoring Seismic Velocity Changes using Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecocq, T.; Caudron, C.; Brenguier, F.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes occur every day all around the world and are recorded by thousands of seismic stations. In between earthquakes, stations are recording "noise". In the last 10 years, the understanding of this noise and its potential usage have been increasing rapidly. The method, called "seismic interferometry", uses the principle that seismic waves travel between two recorders and are multiple-scattered in the medium. By cross-correlating the two records, one gets an information on the medium below/between the stations. The cross-correlation function (CCF) is a proxy to the Green Function of the medium. Recent developments of the technique have shown those CCF can be used to image the earth at depth (3D seismic tomography) or study the medium changes with time. We present MSNoise, a complete software suite to compute relative seismic velocity changes under a seismic network, using ambient seismic noise. The whole is written in Python, from the monitoring of data archives, to the production of high quality figures. All steps have been optimized to only compute the necessary steps and to use 'job'-based processing. We present a validation of the software on a dataset acquired during the UnderVolc[1] project on the Piton de la Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island, France, for which precursory relative changes of seismic velocity are visible for three eruptions betwee 2009 and 2011.

  18. Monitoring seismic wave speed by an active seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Okubo, M.; Saiga, A.

    2012-12-01

    Decreases in elastic wave speed around cracked zones prior to faulting in rock fracture experiments have been reported (e.g., Yukutake, 1989; Yoshimitsu et al., 2009). These decreases in wave speed have been considered to be associated with crack and fault growth based on non-destructive observation using X-ray CT scan (Kawakata et al., 1999). Meanwhile, there were some reports on the decreases in seismic wave speed along paths that cross the hypocentral area in periods including some large earthquakes. Uchida et al. (2002) analyzed seismic waveform with explosive sources before and after the 1998 northern Iwate prefecture earthquake, and they showed that the decrease in seismic wave speed approximately 0.1-0.9 % by the earthquake occurrence. Justin et al. (2007) reported the reduction in seismic wave speed accompanied with the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake around the rupture area by using the four repeating earthquakes that occurred before and after the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake. However, seismograms of explosive sources or repeating earthquakes are hard to be frequently recorded, which makes the time intervals of estimated seismic wave speed be too long to distinguish preseismic changes from coseismic and post seismic changes. In order to monitor crustal structures and detecting the variation of rock properties in the crust, a kind of active seismic source systems ACROSS (Accurately Controlled Routinely Operated Signal System) has been developed(e.g., Kunitomo and Kumazawa, 2004). We used the controlled seismic source ACROSS, which installed at the Tono mine, Gifu prefecture, central Japan and has been routinely operated by Tono Geoscience center of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), automatically. Frequency modulated seismic waves are continuously radiated from approximately 10-20 Hz by eccentric rotation of the source. In order to investigate the stability of ACROSS signals, we used seismograms recorded at the 110m depth of Shobasama observing site, which is

  19. Tracking Northwestern Pacific typhoon using seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo-Dong; Kang, Tae-Seob

    2017-04-01

    The ambient seismic data recorded on Korean Seismic array network (KSRS) are investigated to analyze (1) to trace typhoons in the Pacific Ocean and (2) to investigate the seismic phases comprising the seismic noise fields. Super typhoons (equivalent to category 4 hurricane) in Northwestern Pacifics were selected for this study. They were selected on the basis of their strength and wide azimuthal coverage from the seismic array. To trace source area of seismic noise generated by typhoons, CLEAN f-k analysis was applied to the KSRS data to estimate the direction of seismic energy of the 0.2-0.7 Hz noise field (DF microseisms). These estimated back azimuths by the CLEAN technique show good agreement with the known values to the centers of the NW Pacific typhoons. This clearly indicates that these typhoons were responsible source of microseisms during their passing. The seismic phases in our DF microseism band are investigated with the apparent velocities from our method. The estimated velocity range indicates that the ambient seismic noise in the frequency range propagates in mostly fundamental and first few higher modes.

  20. Historical seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dengler, L.

    1992-01-01

    The North Coast region of California in the vicinity of Cape Mendocino is one of the state's most seismically active areas, accounting for 25 percent of seismic energy release in California during the last 50 years. the region is located in a geologically dynamic are surrounding the Mendocino triple junction where three of the Earth's tectonic plates join together ( see preceding article by Sam Clarke). In the historic past the North Coast has been affected by earthquakes occurring on the San Andreas fault system to the south, the Mendocino fault to the southwest, and intraplate earthquakes within both the Gorda and North American plates. More than sixty of these earthquakes have caused damage since the mid-1800's. Recent studies indicate that California's North Coast is also at risk with respect to very large earthquakes (magnitude >8) originating along the Cascadia subduction zone. Although the subduction zone has not generated great earthquakes in historic time, paleoseismic evidence suggests that such earthquakes have been generated by the subduction zone in the recent prehistoric past. 

  1. Building a Smartphone Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Q.; Allen, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    We are exploring to build a new type of seismic network by using the smartphones. The accelerometers in smartphones can be used to record earthquakes, the GPS unit can give an accurate location, and the built-in communication unit makes the communication easier for this network. In the future, these smartphones may work as a supplement network to the current traditional network for scientific research and real-time applications. In order to build this network, we developed an application for android phones and server to record the acceleration in real time. These records can be sent back to a server in real time, and analyzed at the server. We evaluated the performance of the smartphone as a seismic recording instrument by comparing them with high quality accelerometer while located on controlled shake tables for a variety of tests, and also the noise floor test. Based on the daily human activity data recorded by the volunteers and the shake table tests data, we also developed algorithm for the smartphones to detect earthquakes from daily human activities. These all form the basis of setting up a new prototype smartphone seismic network in the near future.

  2. Seismicity of the Adriatic microplate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Console, R.; Di, Giovambattista R.; Favali, P.; Presgrave, B.W.; Smriglio, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Adriatic microplate was previously considered to be a unique block, tectonically active only along its margins. The seismic sequences that took place in the basin from 1986 to 1990 give new information about the geodynamics of this area. Three subsets of well recorded events were relocated by the joint hypocentre determination technique. On the whole, this seismic activity was concentrated in a belt crossing the southern Adriatic sea around latitude 42??, in connection with regional E-W fault systems. Some features of this seismicity, similar to those observed in other well known active margins of the Adriatic plate, support a model of a southern Adriatic lithospheric block, detached from the Northern one. Other geophysical information provides evidence of a transitional zone at the same latitude. ?? 1993.

  3. Seismic instrumentation of buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Çelebi, Mehmet

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on how and why we deploy seismic instruments in and around building structures. The recorded response data from buildings and other instrumented structures can be and are being primarily used to facilitate necessary studies to improve building codes and therefore reduce losses of life and property during damaging earthquakes. Other uses of such data can be in emergency response situations in large urban environments. The report discusses typical instrumentation schemes, existing instrumentation programs, the steps generally followed in instrumenting a structure, selection and type of instruments, installation and maintenance requirements and data retrieval and processing issues. In addition, a summary section on how recorded response data have been utilized is included. The benefits from instrumentation of structural systems are discussed.

  4. The Recent Seismicity Near Tabouk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldamegh, K. S.; Aljurayed, I. M.; Mostafa, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    Tabouk is a very populated historic city that was jolted by a 5.2 earthquake in June of 2004. Fortunately no damage has been reported. The seismic activity attracted the attention of residence as well as scientists and authorities in the region. The earthquake is located in a neogene/Quaternary volcanic region named Harat ar Raha about 140 km south west of Tabouk. Not far from the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba, Tabouk is at the north western edge of the Arabian Shield. The main shock was followed by small magnitude (less than 4) aftershocks. Moreover the region remained active (many events with a magnitudes less than 2 has been recorded) every now and then until now. According to historic reports the city and the region surrounding it has been affected by a large magnitude earthquake in March of 1068 that caused about 20000 deaths in the region. The goal of this study is to map the seismicity and understand the source of the activity. The results would hopefully have an impact on hazard mitigation in the region. Realizing that more seismic stations were needed to better monitor the activities and locate the small events, we deployed 5 temporary short period and broadband seismic stations to the region. We have also collected waveform data from 23 broadband stations that are part of the National Seismic Network previously run by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). Our early results show that the historic event location does not match with the current seismicity. In addition we have been able to present a new and more accurate seismicity map for the study region. This project has been fully funded by KACST and is planned to last until the end of 2008.

  5. Seismicity of southern Lake Tanganyika

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavayssiere, A.; Gallacher, R. J.; Keir, D.; Ebinger, C. J.; Drooff, C.; Khalfan, M.; Bull, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global seismic networks document frequent and unusually deep earthquakes in East African rift sectors lacking central volcanoes. The deep seismicity means that we can use earthquakes to probe the geometry and kinematics of fault systems throughout the crust, and to understand the distribution of strain between large offset border fault systems and intrabasinal faults. The southern Tanganyika rift zone has the highest seismicity rate within East Africa during the period 1973-present, yet earlier temporary seismometer networks have been too sparse in space and time to relocate earthquakes with location and depth errors of < 5-10 km. We address this issue by recording seismicity of southern Lake Tanganyika since June 2014 using a network at 12 broadband seismic stations. The distribution of earthquakes shows that deformation primarily occurs on large offset border faults beneath the lake. Subsidiary earthquake activity occurs along the subparrallel Rukwa graben, and beneath the NE-SW striking Mweru rift. The distribution of earthquakes suggests the southern end of lake Tanganyika is characterized by a network of intersecting NNW and NE striking faults. The depths of earthquakes are distributed throughout the crust, consistent with the relatively strong lithosphere.

  6. The LaBarge Passive Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, G. M.; Schmedes, J.; Saltzer, R. L.; Roth, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate large-scale seismic velocity models provide critical support for subsurface imaging, particularly for migration and inversion. However, conventional seismic sources typically do not provide significant information below 5-10Hz. Further, alternative methods to obtain a reference velocity model such as normal move-out analysis may be ambiguous or misleading in complicated tectonic settings like fold-and-thrust belts. To address these challenges, we investigated the potential of using naturally occurring earthquakes to obtain a seismic velocity model for shallow sediment structure (above 5 km). Passive seismic data were continuously recorded at 55 stations in LaBarge, Wy for six months in early 2009. We employed two widely used techniques, relative travel-time tomography and teleseismic receiver functions, more commonly used to image deep crustal and mantle structure. The resulting structural image and velocity model compares favorably with local well control, suggesting seismic models obtained by this method would provide viable support for imaging and inversions.

  7. Seismic event interpretation using fuzzy logic and neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, W.J.; Dowla, F.U.

    1994-01-01

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, unknown sources of seismic events must be represented and reasoned about using measurements from the recorded signal. In this report, we develop the use of fuzzy logic to improve our ability to interpret weak seismic events. Processing strategies for the use of fuzzy set theory to represent vagueness and uncertainty, a phenomena common in seismic data analysis, are developed. A fuzzy-assumption based truth-maintenance-inferencing engine is also developed. Preliminary results in interpreting seismic events using the fuzzy neural network knowledge-based system are presented.

  8. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  9. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  10. Numerical modeling of landslide generated seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, P.; Mangeney, A.; Lucas, A.; Shapiro, N. M.; Crosta, G. B.; Bouchut, F.; Hungr, O.

    2009-12-01

    Gravitational instabilities such as debris flows, landslides or avalanches play a key role in erosion processes at the surface of the Earth and other telluric planets. On Earth, they represent one of the major natural hazards threatening population and infrastructure in volcanic, mountainous, seismic and coastal areas. One of the main issues in terms of risk assessment is to produce tools for detection of natural instabilities and for prediction of velocity and runout extent of rapid landslides. The lack of field measurements of the dynamics of natural landslides due to their unpredictability and destructive power, prevents investigating the mechanical properties of the flowing material that appears to be very different from experimental granular flows in the laboratory. In this context, the analysis of the seismic signal generated by natural instabilities provides a unique paradigm to study flow dynamics and discriminate the physical processes at play during their emplacement along the slope. Potentially, it is possible to infer information about the “landslide source” from the seismic signal produced during the initial collapse and the subsequent flow along the natural terrain. However, the process of reverse dynamic analysis is complex and must take into consideration the role of topography, mass of the landslide, flow dynamics, and wave propagation on the recorded signal. We use here numerical modeling of the landslide and of the generated seismic waves to address this issue. We show that (i) numerical simulation of landslide and generated seismic waves well match the observed low frequency seismic signal, (ii) topography effects on landslide dynamics play a key role in the observed seismic signal, (iii) simulation of the seismic wave makes it possible to discriminate between the alternative possible scenario of flow dynamics and to provide estimates of the rheological parameters during the flow. As a result, unique data on natural flow dynamics could be

  11. The Southern Kansas Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Historically aseismic Harper and Sumner counties in Southern Kansas experienced a dramatic increase in seismicity beginning in early 2014, coincident with the development of new oil production in the Mississippi Lime Play. In order to better understand the potential relationships between seismicity and oil development, the USGS installed a real-time telemetered seismic network in cooperation with the Kansas Geological Survey, the Kansas Corporation Commission, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Harper County, and the Oklahoma Geological Survey. The network began operation in March 2014 with an initial deployment of 5 NetQuakes accelerometers and by July 2014 had expanded to include 10 broadband sites. The network currently has 14 stations, all with accelerometers and 12 with broadband seismometers. The network has interstation spacing of 15 - 25 km and typical azimuthal gap of 80 for well-located events. Data are continuously streamed to IRIS at 200 samples per second from most sites. Earthquake locations are augmented with additional stations from the USGS National Network, Oklahoma Geological Survey Seismic Network, Kansas Seismic Monitoring Network and the Enid Oklahoma Network. Since the spring of 2014 over 7500 earthquakes have been identified with data from this network, 1400 of which have been manually timed and cataloged. Focal depths for earthquakes typically range between 2 and 7 km. The catalog is available at earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/search/ under network code 'Ismpkansas'. The network recorded the largest known earthquake in Harper County, Mw 4.3, on October 2, 2014 and in Sumner County, Mw 4.9, on November 12, 2014. Recorded ground motions at the epicenter of the October earthquake were 0.70 g (PGA) and 12 cm/s (PGV). These high ground motion values agree with near-source recordings made by other USGS temporary deployments in the U. S. midcontinent, indicating a significant shaking hazard from such shallow, moderate

  12. Quantifying Similarity in Seismic Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W. S.; Jones, J. P.; Caffagni, E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring similarity in seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low S/N signals, and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via. computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Using records of the Mw=8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake from CNSN broadband sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and vertical borehole array data from a monitoring experiment at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Because histogram distance metrics are bounded by [0 1], clustering allows empirical time-frequency separation of seismic phase arrivals on single-station three-component records. Array processing for automatic seismic phase classification may be possible using subspace clustering of polarization similarity, but efficient algorithms are required to reduce the dimensionality.

  13. Seismic Monitoring for the United Arab Emirates

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Nakanishi, K

    2005-04-11

    There is potential for earthquakes in the United Arab Emirates and in the Zagros mountains to cause structural damage and pose a threat to safety of people. Damaging effects from earthquakes can be mitigated by knowledge of the location and size of earthquakes, effects on construction, and monitoring these effects over time. Although a general idea of seismicity in the UAE may be determined with data from global seismic networks, these global networks do not have the sensitivity to record smaller seismic events and do not have the necessary accuracy to locate the events. A National Seismic Monitoring Observatory is needed for the UAE that consists of a modern seismic network and a multidisciplinary staff that can analyze and interpret the data from the network. A seismic network is essential to locate earthquakes, determine event magnitudes, identify active faults and measure ground motions from earthquakes. Such a network can provide the data necessary for a reliable seismic hazard assessment in the UAE. The National Seismic Monitoring Observatory would ideally be situated at a university that would provide access to the wide range of disciplines needed in operating the network and providing expertise in analysis and interpretation.

  14. Seismic investigations in the Skagerrak and Kattegat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Klaus; Hansen, Jochen; Flüh, Ernst R.; Goldflam, Stan; Hirschleber, Hans

    1986-09-01

    During the Meteor 66 cruise in the offshore areas surrounding Jutland in November 1983, seismic reflection and refraction measurements were made. A streamer, Ocean Bottom Seismographs, and land stations were deployed, which enabled both vertical-incidence and wide-angle reflections to be recorded. Seismic energy was provided by an airgun array fired at two-minute intervals. For the reflection seismic observations, this resulted in onefold coverage only, but it was established that airguns are a suitable energy source for crustal refraction seismic measurements out to distances of more than 100 km, and in areas with considerable sedimentary cover. This observation was an important contribution to the planning of the EUGENO-S project. Simultaneous application of reflection and refraction seismic methods at sea permits the observation of both the sedimentary horizons and the lower crust. This provided insight into the deeper sedimentary layers to the north of Jutland. No evidence for deep-reaching faults below the Norwegian Channel is indicated. We are thus able to reinforce the theory of glacial erosion. The seismic survey failed to confirm any seismic evidence for the gravity and magnetic anomaly near Kristiansand. A seismic section obtained by a land station in Sweden clearly delineates the upper-lower crust and the crust-mantle transitions. Strong S-waves, converted at the sea floor, were also observed.

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seismic yield determination for the NPE

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, R.

    1994-12-31

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recorded seismic signals from the Non-Proliferation experiment at the Nevada Test Site on September 22, 1993, at seismic stations near Mina, Nevada; Kanab Utah; Landers, California; and Elko, Nevada. Yields were calculated from these recorded seismic amplitudes at the stations using statistical amplitude- yield regression curves from earlier nuclear experiments performed near the Non-Proliferation experiment. The weighted seismic yield average using these amplitudes is 1.9 kt with a standard deviation of 19%. The calibrating experiments were nuclear, so this yield is equivalent to a 1.9-kt nuclear experiment.

  16. Seismic augmentation of acoustic monitoring of mortar fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas S.

    2007-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center participated in a joint ARL-NATO TG-53 field experiment and data collect at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ in early November 2005. Seismic and acoustic signatures from both muzzle blasts and impacts of small arms fire and artillery were recorded using 7 seismic arrays and 3 acoustic arrays. Arrays comprised of 12 seismic and 12 acoustic sensors each were located from 700 m to 18 km from gun positions. Preliminary analysis of signatures attributed to 60mm, 81mm, 120 mm mortars recorded at a seismic-acoustic array 1.1 km from gun position are presented. Seismic and acoustic array f-k analysis is performed to detect and characterize the source signature. Horizontal seismic data are analyzed to determine efficacy of a seismic discriminant for mortar and artillery sources. Rotation of North and East seismic components to radial and transverse components relative to the source-receiver path provide maximum surface wave amplitude on the transverse component. Angles of rotation agree well with f-k analysis of both seismic and acoustic signals. The spectral energy of the rotated transverse surface wave is observable on the all caliber of mortars at a distance of 1.1 km and is a reliable source discriminant for mortar sources at this distance. In a step towards automation, travel time stencils using local seismic and acoustic velocities are applied to seismic data for analysis and determination of source characteristics.

  17. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  18. Super-shear fault rupture propagation during the 2016/04/16 Kumamoto earthquake (Mw7.1) imaged by seismic back-projection and KNET/KiKnet strong motion records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido Hernandez, N. E.

    2016-12-01

    I investigated the rupture process of the April 16, 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, using a seismic back-projection methodology (Pulido et al. 2008, Suzuki et al. 2016), and a dense array of near-source strong motion records from the K-NET/KiKnet networks. The main target of this study is to understand the evolution of the rupture velocity during fault rupture propagation. I selected all the KNET/KiKnet records of the mainshock within 100 km around the Hinet epicenter (112 stations), and used the fault-parallel component rotated from the horizontal components. I calculated the envelopes of velocity time series (5 to 10 Hz) obtained as the vectorial summation of the waveforms and their Hilbert transforms. Envelopes were stacked within a horizontal grid mesh covering the regions around the Hinagu and Futagawa fault traces and beyond, without any constraint on the starting point of rupture or rupture speed, to obtain a temporal and spatial image of rupture propagation. My back-projection results show that significant grid energy was released in a region spanning 43km length along the Hinagu (16km) and Futagawa (27 km) fault zones. I was not able to image the rupture process for the initial 4 seconds of rupture because of the very small S-wave radiation during this interval. Back-projection results show a bilateral fault rupture propagation along the Hinagu and Futagawa faults, characterized by a slow sub-Rayleigh rupture velocity of 1.4 1.7 km/s, for the first 5.5 seconds of imaged rupture (4 9.5s from the origin time, OT). The rupture propagation towards the NE (along the Futagawa fault) experienced a sudden increase in rupture velocity by reaching a value 1.4 times larger than the average S-wave velocity (Vrup= 4.7 km/s) at 9.5s from OT, and remained super-shear for approximately 4.5 s (9.5 14s from OT) until fault rupture arrest. I also imaged a clear sub-Rayleigh rupture propagation towards the SW along the Hinagu fault zone (Vrup= 3.1 km/s), from 11 to 14 seconds after

  19. S-wave velocity down to the uppermost mantle below the East European Craton in northern Poland from the inversion of ambient noise recorded at "13 BB star" seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, S.; Polkowski, M.; Grad, M.

    2016-12-01

    The East European Craton (EEC) occupies the northeastern half of Europe. In the most external sedimentary crust (SC), the P-wave velocity (Vp) raises from 2.5 to 4.3 km/s. In the underlying upper crust (UC) the Vp ranges within 6.1-6.4 km/s, 6.5-6.8 km/s in the middle crust (MC), and 6.9-7.2 km/s in the lower crust (LC). The Moho, whose depth is 40-45 km, shows a relatively flat topography, which is advantageous when studying the deep velocity structure. The Vp in the uppermost mantle (UM) down to 100 km is 8.3 km/s. Seismic experiments conducted in Poland along refraction profiles provided significant information about the structure in any layer, but not sufficient for the study of the S-wave velocity (Vs). Thus, Vs and Vp/Vs profiles down to 100 m were evaluated by the Monte Carlo inversion of surface wave velocity dispersion (SWVD) curves retrieved from the crosscorrelation (CC) of ambient noise recorded in northern Poland. The records were carried out during 2014 at the "13 BB star" array equipped with thirteen broadband stations installed during 2013 and scheduled to operate until the end of 2016. Those stations, covering an area of 120 km in diameter, are arranged in a circular, regular geometry, allowing a thorough study of the deep structures. The extraction of the SWVD was performed in the 0.1-1 Hz and 0.02-0.1 Hz frequency bands, to have a good resolution within 0-20 km and 20-100 km. The dispersion curves show different modes because remarkable changes of surface wave attenuation are present in the different layers. All the modes of the SWVD curves were together inverted assuming the characteristics and the Vp values in every layer as known. The Vs [km/s] ranges within 1.0-2.4 in SC, 3.1-3.6 in UC, 3.2-4.3 in MC, 3.2-4.3 in LC, and 4.5-5.1 in UM; Vp/Vs within 1.8-2.0 in SC, 1.7-2.0 in UC, 1.5-2.1 in MC, 1.8-2.1 in LC, and 1.6-1.8 in UM. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  20. Final Data Report: P- and S-Wave Velocity Logging Borings C4993, C4996, and C4997 Part A: Interval Logs

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, Robert; Diehl, John

    2007-02-01

    Insitu borehole P- and S-wave velocity measurements were collected in three borings located within the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) boundaries at the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington. Geophysical data acquisition was performed between August and October of 2006 by Rob Steller, Charles Carter, Antony Martin and John Diehl of GEOVision. Data analysis was performed by Rob Steller and John Diehl, and reviewed by Antony Martin of GEOVision, and report preparation was performed by John Diehl and reviewed by Rob Steller. The work was performed under subcontract with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division with Marty Gardner as Battelle’s Technical Representative and Alan Rohay serving as the Technical Administrator for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This report describes the field measurements, data analysis, and results of this work.

  1. Final Data Report: P- and S-Wave Velocity Logging Borings C4993, C4996, and C4997 Part B: Overall Logs

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, John; Steller, Robert

    2007-03-20

    Insitu borehole P- and S-wave velocity measurements were collected in three borings located within the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) boundaries at the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington. Geophysical data acquisition was performed between August and October of 2006 by Rob Steller, Charles Carter, Antony Martin and John Diehl of GEOVision. Data analysis was performed by Rob Steller and John Diehl, and reviewed by Antony Martin of GEOVision, and report preparation was performed by John Diehl and reviewed by Rob Steller. The work was performed under subcontract with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division with Marty Gardner as Battelle’s Technical Representative and Alan Rohay serving as the Technical Administrator for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This report describes the field measurements, data analysis, and results of this work.

  2. Seismic activation of tectonic stresses by mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcak, Henryk; Mutke, Grzegorz

    2013-10-01

    Hard coal mining in the area of the Bytom Syncline (Upper Silesia Coal Basin, Poland) has been associated with the occurrence of high-energy seismic events (up to 109 J; local magnitude up to 4.0), which have been recorded by the local mining seismological network and regional seismological network. It has been noticed that the strongest seismic events occur when the mine longwall alignments coincide with the syncline axis. Data recorded by the improved local seismic network in the Bobrek Mine allow the estimation of the depths of the events’ hypocentres during excavation of longwall panel 3 as it approached the syncline axis. The recorded data were also used to estimate the location of the rupture surface and stress distribution in the seismic focus region. It was concluded that tectonic stresses, particularly horizontal stress components, are essential in the distribution of seismic tremors resulting from reverse faulting. The stresses induced by mining activity are only triggering tectonic deformations. The hypocentres of the strongest seismic events during mining of longwall panel 3/503 were located 300-800 m deeper than the level of coal seam 503.

  3. Monitoring of low-energy seismic activity in Elbrus volcanic area with the use of underground seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, V.; Sobisevitch, A.

    2012-04-01

    Results of experiment with underground seismic array for studying low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area are presented. Linear seismic array of 2.5 km aperture is created in the tunnel of Baksan neutrino observatory. Horizontal tunnel of 4.3 km length is drilled in the mount Andyrchi at a distance of 20 km from Elbrus volcano. Array includes 6 three-component seismic sensors with 24-byte recorders installed with 500 m interval one from another along the tunnel. Underground seismic array is the new instrument of geophysical observatory organized for studies of geophysical processes in the Elbrus volcanic area. The observatory equipped with modern geophysical instruments including broadband tri-axial seismometers, quartz tilt-meters, magnetic variometers, geo-acoustic sensors, hi-precision distributed thermal sensors and gravimeters. The initial analysis of seismic signals recorded by seismic array allows us to detect low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area beginning from the distance of 3-5 km (the faults in a vicinity of mount Andyrchi) up to 15-25 km (area of Elbrus volcano). The regional micro-earthquakes with magnitude 1-2 at the distances 50-100 km was also recorded. 2.5 km aperture of the underground linear seismic array make it possible to determine with high accuracy hypocenters of local seismic events associated with geodynamic of volcanic magmatic structures and to realize seismo-emission tomography of the active zones of Elbrus volcano.

  4. Observed Seismic Solitary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataille, K.

    2008-05-01

    A feature that has been observed for many decades in a variety of instruments, without a solid explanation, is a signal with a shape of a "bump" in velocity records, especially near small earthquakes. This signal arrives at times close to the S wave and has commonly being argued by some to be a nonlinear effect of the instrument (Aki and Richards, 1980), while by others as to be a real earth motion due to an unknown wave propagation phenomena. Here we propose that these observations are seismic solitary waves. The seismic solitary wave arises from an equation that describes the propagation of Love waves within a general nonlinear media. For a specific "bump-like" solution, the dispersive and nonlinear effects balance each other, allowing its propagation without distortion for long distances. Solitary waves have been observed in a variety of physical systems, including the ocean, but so far it has not been recognized in the seismological literature. The theory and modelling of several observations from different instruments will be presented.

  5. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, Michael A.; Cook, Neville G. W.; McEvilly, Thomas V.; Majer, Ernest L.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  6. A Review of Detected Interplate Seismicity in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, I.; Vidale, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    The Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) is dangerous, but its seismic risk is not well understood. This project reviews records of offshore seismicity from established land-based seismic networks and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployments to explore seismic behavior along the plate interface. We assemble and combine the catalogues of regional land-based seismic networks, including the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN), the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN), and the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN). Where applicable, the catalogues are supplemented with Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) records. These observations are combined with the few regional OBS-array catalogues, including those of the SeaJade Project and the Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS). These records show that the detected interplate seismicity is limited to distinct patches, suggesting heterogeneous fractional behavior on the subduction surface and widespread locking of the seismogenic zone. We describe our plan to expand upon these records with Cascadia Initiative OBS deployment data. Our primary means of event location is through the use of amplitude averaging filters, which are supplemented by waveform cross-correlation where appropriate; events are located using generalized velocity models of the region, as well as double difference algorithms.

  7. The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    by the Western Norway seismic network. For one site where a large number of known explosions (36) were processed, the average NORESS location error... description of NOI{ESS data tapes. NORESS * "data are recorded 24 hours a day and all data are stored permanently. Data from NORESS are available from NORSAR...list activities carried out at both the NORSAR and NORESS sites . Subarray/ area Task Date NORESS A satellite transmitter amplifier (TWT) 24 April failed

  8. Historical Seismicity of Central Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, E.

    2013-05-01

    Central Panama lies in the Panama microplate, neighboring seismically active regions of Costa Rica and Colombia. This region, crossed by the Panama Canal, concentrates most of the population and economic activity of the Republic of Panama. Instrumental observation of earthquakes in Panama began on 1882 by the Compagnie Universelle du Canal Interocéanique de Panama and continued from 1904 to 1977 by the Panama Canal Company. From October 1997 to March 1998 the USGS deployed a temporary digital seismic network. Since 2003 this region is monitored by a digital seismic network operated by the Panama Canal Authority and I complemented by the broad band stations of the University of Panama seismic network. The seismicity in this region is very diffuse and the few events which are recorded have magnitudes less than 3.0. Historical archives and antique newspapers from Spain, Colombia, Panama and the United Sates have been searched looking for historical earthquake information which could provide a better estimate of the seismicity in this region. We find that Panama City has been shaken by two destructive earthquakes in historical times. One by a local fault (i.e. Pedro Miguel fault) on May 2, 1621 (I=Vlll MM), and a subduction event from the North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB) on September 7, 1882 (I=Vll MM). To test these findings two earthquakes scenarios were generated, using SELENA, for Panama City Old Quarter. Panama City was rebuilt on January 21, 1673, on a rocky point facing the Pacific Ocean after the sack by pirate Morgan on January 28, 1671. The pattern of damage to calicanto (unreinforced colonial masonry) and wood structures for a crustal local event are higher than those for an event from the NPDB and seem to confirm that the city has not been shaken by a major local event since May 2, 1621 and a subduction event since September 7, 1882

  9. Seismic spatial wavefield gradient and rotational rate measurements as new observables in land seismic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, Cedric; Sollberger, David; Van Renterghem, Cédéric; Häusler, Mauro; Robertsson, Johan; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, land-seismic data acquisition is conducted using vertical-component sensors. A more complete representation of the seismic wavefield can be obtained by employing multicomponent sensors recording the full vector wavefield. If groups of multicomponent sensors are deployed, then spatial seismic wavefield gradients and rotational rates can be estimated by differencing the outputs of closely spaced sensors. Such data capture all six degrees of freedom of a rigid body (three components of translation and three components of rotation), and hence allow an even more complete representation of the seismic wavefield compared to single station triaxial data. Seismic gradient and rotation data open up new possibilities to process land-seismic data. Potential benefits and applications of wavefield gradient data include local slowness estimation, improved arrival identification, wavefield separation and noise suppression. Using synthetic and field data, we explored the reliability and sensitivity of various multicomponent sensor layouts to estimate seismic wavefield gradients and rotational rates. Due to the wavelength and incidence-angle dependence of sensor-group reception patterns as a function of the number of sensors, station spacing and layout, one has to counterbalance the impacts of truncation errors, random noise attenuation, and sensitivity to perturbations such as amplitude variations and positioning errors when searching for optimum receiver configurations. Field experiments with special rotational rate sensors were used to verify array-based rotational-rate estimates. Seismic wavefield gradient estimates and inferred wavefield attributes such as instantaneous slowness enable improved arrival identification, e.g. wave type and path. Under favorable conditions, seismic-wavefield gradient attributes can be extracted from conventional vertical-component data and used to, for example, enhance the identification of shear waves. A further promising

  10. Monitoring gas reservoirs by seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Priolo, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Ambient seismic noise can be used to image spatial anomalies in the subsurface, without the need of recordings from seismic sources, such as earthquakes or explosions. Furthermore, the temporal variation of ambient seismic noise's can be used to infer temporal changes of the seismic velocities in the investigated medium. Such temporal variations can reflect changes of several physical properties/conditions in the medium. For example, they may be consequence of stress changes, variation of hydrogeological parameters, pore pressure and saturation changes due to fluid injection or extraction. Passive image interferometry allows to continuously monitor small temporal changes of seismic velocities in the subsurface, making it a suitable tool to monitor time-variant systems such as oil and gas reservoirs or volcanic environments. The technique does not require recordings from seismic sources in the classical sense, but is based on the processing of noise records. Moreover, it requires only data from one or two seismic stations, their locations constraining the sampled target area. Here we apply passive image interferometry to monitor a gas storage reservoir in northern Italy. The Collalto field (Northern Italy) is a depleted gas reservoir located at 1500 m depth, now used as a gas storage facility. The reservoir experience a significant temporal variation in the amount of stored gas: the injection phases mainly occur in the summer, while the extraction take place mostly in winter. In order to monitor induced seismicity related to gas storage operations, a seismic network (the Collalto Seismic Network) has been deployed in 2011. The Collalto Seismic Network is composed by 10 broadband stations, deployed within an area of about 20 km x 20 km, and provides high-quality continuous data since January 1st, 2012. In this work we present preliminary results from ambient noise interferometry using a two-months sample of continuous seismic data, i.e. from October 1st, 2012, to the

  11. Seismic Noise Analysis and Reduction through Utilization of Collocated Seismic and Atmospheric Sensors at the GRO Chile Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, M. E.; Russo, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The installation of Earthscope Transportable Array-style geophysical observatories in Chile expands open data seismic recording capabilities in the southern hemisphere by nearly 30%, and has nearly tripled the number of seismic stations providing freely-available data in southern South America. Through the use of collocated seismic and atmospheric sensors at these stations we are able to analyze how local atmospheric conditions generate seismic noise, which can degrade data in seismic frequency bands at stations in the ';roaring forties' (S latitudes). Seismic vaults that are climate-controlled and insulated from the local environment are now employed throughout the world in an attempt to isolate seismometers from as many noise sources as possible. However, this is an expensive solution that is neither practical nor possible for all seismic deployments; and also, the increasing number and scope of temporary seismic deployments has resulted in the collection and archiving of terabytes of seismic data that is affected to some degree by natural seismic noise sources such as wind and atmospheric pressure changes. Changing air pressure can result in a depression and subsequent rebound of Earth's surface - which generates low frequency noise in seismic frequency bands - and even moderate winds can apply enough force to ground-coupled structures or to the surface above the seismometers themselves, resulting in significant noise. The 10 stations of the permanent Geophysical Reporting Observatories (GRO Chile), jointly installed during 2011-12 by IRIS and the Chilean Servicio Sismológico, include instrumentation in addition to the standard three seismic components. These stations, spaced approximately 300 km apart along the length of the country, continuously record a variety of atmospheric data including infrasound, air pressure, wind speed, and wind direction. The collocated seismic and atmospheric sensors at each station allow us to analyze both datasets together, to

  12. Synthesis of artificial spectrum-compatible seismic accelerograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrochidou, E.; Alvanitopoulos, P. F.; Andreadis, I.; Elenas, A.; Mallousi, K.

    2014-08-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform is used to generate artificial seismic signals compatible with the acceleration spectra of natural seismic records. Artificial spectrum-compatible accelerograms are utilized instead of natural earthquake records for the dynamic response analysis of many critical structures such as hospitals, bridges, and power plants. The realistic estimation of the seismic response of structures involves nonlinear dynamic analysis. Moreover, it requires seismic accelerograms representative of the actual ground acceleration time histories expected at the site of interest. Unfortunately, not many actual records of different seismic intensities are available for many regions. In addition, a large number of seismic accelerograms are required to perform a series of nonlinear dynamic analyses for a reliable statistical investigation of the structural behavior under earthquake excitation. These are the main motivations for generating artificial spectrum-compatible seismic accelerograms and could be useful in earthquake engineering for dynamic analysis and design of buildings. According to the proposed method, a single natural earthquake record is deconstructed into amplitude and frequency components using the Hilbert-Huang transform. The proposed method is illustrated by studying 20 natural seismic records with different characteristics such as different frequency content, amplitude, and duration. Experimental results reveal the efficiency of the proposed method in comparison with well-established and industrial methods in the literature.

  13. Seismic Reflection Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Seismic methods are the most commonly conducted geophysical surveys for engineering investigations. Seismic refraction provides engineers and geologists with the most basic of geologic data via simple procedures with common equipment.

  14. The Seismic Ring: A Classroom Model for Mantle Seismic Wave Propogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubailo, I.; Aurnou, J.

    2006-12-01

    We have built an experimental setup to simulate travel time calculations of seismic waves propagating through the Earth's mantle. Our Seismic Ring set-up consists of the following components. Earth's mantle: An acrylic ring; Seismic wave source: A simple pendulum; Seismometer: Piezoelectric sensors attached to the outside of the ring; Seismic recording drum: An oscilloscope with flash memory; Computer: computer. This experiment allows us to make in-class comparisons between theoretically computed differential travel times and experimentally measured travel times from the Seismic Ring. At our poster, we will carry out demonstrations that illustrate how we acquire differential travel times in our device and how data stacking greatly improves the data quality.

  15. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    . An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified

  16. Seismic intrusion detector system

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Hervey L.; Hawley, James G.; Portlock, John M.; Scheibner, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A system for monitoring man-associated seismic movements within a control area including a geophone for generating an electrical signal in response to seismic movement, a bandpass amplifier and threshold detector for eliminating unwanted signals, pulse counting system for counting and storing the number of seismic movements within the area, and a monitoring system operable on command having a variable frequency oscillator generating an audio frequency signal proportional to the number of said seismic movements.

  17. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola; Mazzarella, Adriano

    2017-04-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius (Italy). The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice and with external geomagnetic field. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard. Reference: Mazzarella, A., Scafetta, N., 2016. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 321, 102-113. DOI: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2016.04.026

  18. Natural fracture characterization using passive seismic illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.

    2003-01-08

    The presence of natural fractures in reservoir rock can significantly enhance gas production, especially in tight gas formations. Any general knowledge of the existence, location, orientation, spatial density, and connectivity of natural fractures, as well as general reservoir structure, that can be obtained prior to active seismic acquisition and drilling can be exploited to identify key areas for subsequent higher resolution active seismic imaging. Current practices for estimating fracture properties before the acquisition of surface seismic data are usually based on the assumed geology and tectonics of the region, and empirical or fracture mechanics-based relationships between stratigraphic curvature and fracturing. The objective of this research is to investigate the potential of multicomponent surface sensor arrays, and passive seismic sources in the form of local earthquakes to identify and characterize potential fractured gas reservoirs located near seismically active regions. To assess the feasibility of passive seismic fracture detection and characterization, we have developed numerical codes for modeling elastic wave propagation in reservoir structures containing multiple, finite-length fractures. This article describes our efforts to determine the conditions for favorable excitation of fracture converted waves, and to develop an imaging method that can be used to locate and characterize fractures using multicomponent, passive seismic data recorded on a surface array.

  19. Updated seismic solar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W. A.; Goode, Philip R.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Sienkiewicz, R.

    1995-05-01

    Recently released low-l solar oscillation data from the BISON network are combined with BBSO data to obtain an updated solar seismic model of the Sun's interior. For the core, the solar seismic model from the new data is more consistent with the current standard solar models than our earlier seismic model. An astrophysical solution to the solar neutrino problem fades away.

  20. Central Anatolian Seismic Network: Initial Analysis of the Seismicity and Earth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arda Özacar, A.; Abgarmi, Bizhan; Delph, Jonathan; Beck, Susan L.; Sandvol, Eric; Türkelli, Niyazi; Kalafat, Doğan; Kahraman, Metin; Teoman, Uğur

    2015-04-01

    Anatolian Microplate provides many of the clues to understand the geodynamic processes leading to continental collision, plateau formation, slab tearing / break-off and development of escape tectonics. During last decades, the tectonic evolution and dynamics of Anatolia has been the prime target of numerous research efforts employing wide spectrum of disciplines. However the Anatolian interior which is characterized by large magnitude lateral and vertical displacements, widespread Neogene volcanism and a complex tectonic history, is still under much debate and require a joint multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mantle-to-surface dynamics. In order to identify the crust and mantle structure beneath Central Anatolia and related seismicity, a dense seismic array that consists of 70 broadband seismic stations was deployed temporarily in 2013 as a part of the Central Anatolian Tectonics (CAT) project on continental dynamics. A year of seismic record has been processed and part of it was analyzed using various seismic methods. Distribution of preliminary earthquake locations supports the presence of seismic activity partly localized along major tectonic structures across the region. According ambient noise tomography results, upper crustal seismic velocity variations correlate well with surface geology while slow shear wave velocities dominate the lower crust indicating a weaker crustal rheology at the bottom. Furthermore, analysis of teleseismic P wave receiver functions revealed the presence of crustal low velocity zones associated to Neogene volcanism and sharp Moho variations near tectonic sutures and faults. By combining this new dataset with seismic data recorded by previous seismic deployments and national networks, we will have a complete seismic coverage for the entire region allowing researchers to image beneath Anatolia from mantle to surface with high resolution.

  1. Numerical earthquake simulations for seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Sokolov, Vladimir; Soloviev, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive seismic hazard assessment can contribute to earthquake preparedness and preventive measures aimed to reduce impacts of earthquakes, especially in the view of growing population and increasing vulnerability and exposure. Realistic earthquake simulations coupled with a seismic hazard analysis can provide better assessments of potential ground shaking due to large earthquakes. We present a model of block-and-fault dynamics, which simulates earthquakes in response to lithosphere movements and allows for studying the influence of fault network properties on seismic patterns. Using case studies (e.g., the Tibet-Himalayan region and the Caucasian region), we analyse the model's performance in terms of reproduction of basic features of the observed seismicity, such as the frequency-magnitude relationship, clustering of earthquakes, occurrences of large events, fault slip rates, and earthquake mechanisms. We examine a new approach to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment, which is based on instrumentally recorded, historical and simulated earthquakes. Based on predicted and observed peak ground acceleration values, we show that the hazard level associated with large events significantly increases if the long record of simulated seismicity is considered in the hazard assessment.

  2. Seismotectonic model of the eastern Tennessee seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahovic, Gordana

    Seismicity in the central and eastern United States consists of a low background level and several distinct zones, such as the eastern Tennessee and New Madrid seismic zones. Although historical data indicate that the region experienced some of the largest intraplate earthquakes in the world, little is known about the causative mechanisms for this seismic activity. Only within the last few years has enough arrival-time data been collected from regional seismic networks to allow inversions for three-dimensional velocity structure. The principle objective of this dissertation is to explore the seismotectonic framework of the eastern Tennessee seismic zone. One-dimensional and three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity models are presented, based on joint hypocenter-velocity inversion of arrival times from 492 earthquakes recorded by regional seismic networks. Three dimensional P-wave velocity structure is also imaged using tomographic inversion of the same data set. An unusually strong relationship between potential field anomalies and the distribution of seismicity in the eastern Tennessee seismic zone was analyzed using map enhancement, ideal body inversion, and forward modeling and inversion of gravity and magnetic anomalies. Imaged velocity anomalies in the eastern Tennessee seismic zone were compared with a three-dimensional P-wave velocity model for the New Madrid seismic zone. The results of tomographic and potential field studies suggest that distinct intraplate seismic zones occur only where there is a region of low velocity in the middle to upper crust.

  3. The lunar seismic tomography and internal heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, N.; Zhu, P.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    A seismic tomography is presented to show the internal lateral heterogeneities of moon. The lunar seismic tomography is made from the moonquake arrival-time data acquired by the Apollo program during 1971 to 1977. The seismic records obtained from the four seismic station of Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package on the moon. The research target covers the surround of Apollo-12, 14, 15 and 16 landing sites. A preliminary image of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structures of lunar interior have been calculated using hundreds of arrival-times of moonquake events from surface to deep mantle. These results show that some evidences of lateral heterogeneities in the lunar mantle and crust, which implies the existence of complex structure inside the moon.

  4. Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Innocent Aluka

    2008-08-31

    Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more

  5. Ground motion simulations for seismic stations in southern and eastern Romania and seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Florin; Vacareanu, Radu

    2017-03-01

    This research focuses on the evaluation of soil conditions for seismic stations in southern and eastern Romania, their influence on stochastic finite-fault simulations, and the impact of using them on the seismic hazard assessment. First, the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) are evaluated using ground motions recorded in 32 seismic stations during small magnitude (M W ≤ 6.0) Vrancea seismic events. Most of the seismic stations situated in the southern part of Romania exhibit multiple HVSR peaks over a broad period range. However, only the seismic stations in the eastern-most part of Romania have clear short-period predominant periods. Subsequently, stochastic finite-fault simulations are performed in order to evaluate the influence of the soil conditions on the ground motion amplitudes. The analyses show that the earthquake magnitude has a larger influence on the computed ground motion amplitudes for the short- and medium-period range, while the longer-period spectral ordinates tend to be influenced more by the soil conditions. Next, the impact of the previously evaluated soil conditions on the seismic hazard results for Romania is also investigated. The results reveal a significant impact of the soil conditions on the seismic hazard levels, especially for the sites characterized by long-period amplifications (sites situated mostly in southern Romania), and a less significant influence in the case of sites which have clear short predominant periods.

  6. Ground motion simulations for seismic stations in southern and eastern Romania and seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Florin; Vacareanu, Radu

    2017-09-01

    This research focuses on the evaluation of soil conditions for seismic stations in southern and eastern Romania, their influence on stochastic finite-fault simulations, and the impact of using them on the seismic hazard assessment. First, the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) are evaluated using ground motions recorded in 32 seismic stations during small magnitude ( M W ≤ 6.0) Vrancea seismic events. Most of the seismic stations situated in the southern part of Romania exhibit multiple HVSR peaks over a broad period range. However, only the seismic stations in the eastern-most part of Romania have clear short-period predominant periods. Subsequently, stochastic finite-fault simulations are performed in order to evaluate the influence of the soil conditions on the ground motion amplitudes. The analyses show that the earthquake magnitude has a larger influence on the computed ground motion amplitudes for the short- and medium-period range, while the longer-period spectral ordinates tend to be influenced more by the soil conditions. Next, the impact of the previously evaluated soil conditions on the seismic hazard results for Romania is also investigated. The results reveal a significant impact of the soil conditions on the seismic hazard levels, especially for the sites characterized by long-period amplifications (sites situated mostly in southern Romania), and a less significant influence in the case of sites which have clear short predominant periods.

  7. Seismic hazard map of the western hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, K.M.; Tanner, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    horizontal force a building should be able to withstand during an earthquake. This seismic hazard map of the Americas depicts the likely level of short-period ground motion from earthquakes in a fifty-year window. Short-period ground motions effect short-period structures (e.g., one-to-two story buildings). The largest seismic hazard values in the western hemisphere generally occur in areas that have been, or are likely to be, the sites of the largest plate boundary earthquakes. Although the largest earthquakes ever recorded are the 1960 Chile and 1964 Alaska subduction zone earthquakes, the largest seismic hazard (PGA) value in the Americas is in Southern California (U.S.), along the San Andreas fault.

  8. Introduction about Seismic array Laboratory, IGGCAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Y.; Xu, W.

    2007-12-01

    Seismic Array Laboratory (SAL, IGGCAS) was built up in 2000, whose initiative was to study the earth structures through portable seismic observation and it has been operating for about 7 years till now. Totally, the lab have 272 sets of seismographs, including 152 CMG-3ESP seismometers, 18 CMG-3T seismometers, 2 STS-2 seismometers, 100 domestic seismometers, 172 Reftek recording system and 100 domestic recording system, respectively. The seismographs in IGGCAS are only used for temporary seismic observations and are open to users who aim at seismic observation based research and, in principle, are able to afford instrument rental. For the past seven years, more than 10 scientific research groups have used these seismographs and set up more than 470 portable stations in Chinese mainland. Up to now, IGGCAS has carried out 15 temporary seismic station arrays which are mainly distributed in North and Southwest China. The data collected at these seismic stations are currently managed by the SAL of IGGCAS and some regulations have been set down for data usage. Users who implement seismic observations with the seismographs in IGGCAS have three years priority to use the corresponding seismic data after field operation. Then, those data should be released by the SAL of IGGCAS. Now, parts of the data have been open to public through the website http://www.seislab.cn/data, and currently, only some event data in SAC format are released due to the lack of high-level technicians dealing with data pre- processing and quality control. In the near future, the lab will release more data in multiple formats to facilitate researchers in relative area via internet connection.

  9. Earthquake Data Recorded by the MEMS Accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Austin Adams

    2003-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) operates 26 seismic stations remotely located in southeastern Idaho and 25 strong-motion accelerographs located at critical facilities at the INEEL Site. The INEEL seismic network has upgraded standard analog instrumentation at all of its seismic station to digital recording systems. Seismic data are transmitted to a central recording laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho using 900 MHz wireless modems. The INEEL has also chosen digital recording systems to replace the 25 analog film-recording strong-motion accelerographs. The INEEL chose to field test the Applied MEMS Inc., model SF1500A tri-axial accelerometeri with the digital recording system for suitability in earthquake ground motion recording.

  10. The ENAM Explosive Seismic Source Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, S. H.; Magnani, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of the pilot study conducted as part of the eastern North American margin (ENAM) community seismic experiment (CSE) to test an innovative design of land explosive seismic source for crustal-scale seismic surveys. The ENAM CSE is a community based onshore-offshore controlled- and passive-source seismic experiment spanning a 400 km-wide section of the mid-Atlantic East Coast margin around Cape Hatteras. The experiment was designed to address prominent research questions such as the role of the pre-existing lithospheric grain on the structure and evolution of the ENAM margin, the distribution of magmatism, and the along-strike segmentation of the margin. In addition to a broadband OBS deployment, the CSE will acquire multichannel marine seismic data and two major onshore-offshore controlled-source seismic profiles recording both marine sources (airguns) and land explosions. The data acquired as part of the ENAM CSE will be available to the community immediately upon completion of QC procedures required for archiving purposes. The ENAM CSE provides an opportunity to test a radically new and more economical design for land explosive seismic sources used for crustal-scale seismic surveys. Over the years we have incrementally improved the performance and reduced the cost of shooting crustal seismic shots. These improvements have come from better explosives and more efficient configuration of those explosives. These improvements are largely intuitive, using higher velocity explosives and shorter, but larger diameter explosive configurations. However, recently theoretical advances now allow us to model not only these incremental improvements, but to move to more radical shot designs, which further enhance performance and reduce costs. Because some of these designs are so radical, they need experimental verification. To better engineer the shots for the ENAM experiment we are conducting an explosives test in the region of the ENAM CSE. The results of

  11. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A [Lafayette, CA; Bakulin, Andrey [Houston, TX

    2009-10-13

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  12. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  13. An economical educational seismic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    There is a considerable interest in seismology from the nonprofessional or amateur standpoint. The operation of a seismic system can be satisfying and educational, especially when you have built and operated the system yourself. A long-period indoor-type sensor and recording system that works extremely well has been developed in the James Madison University Physics Deparment. The system can be built quite economically, and any educational institution that cannot commit themselves to a professional installation need not be without first-hand seismic information. The system design approach has been selected by college students working a project or senior thesis, several elementary and secondary science teachers, as well as the more ambitious tinkerer or hobbyist at home 

  14. Short-Period Seismic Noise in Vorkuta (Russia)

    SciTech Connect

    Kishkina, S B; Spivak, A A; Sweeney, J J

    2008-05-15

    Cultural development of new subpolar areas of Russia is associated with a need for detailed seismic research, including both mapping of regional seismicity and seismic monitoring of specific mining enterprises. Of special interest are the northern territories of European Russia, including shelves of the Kara and Barents Seas, Yamal Peninsula, and the Timan-Pechora region. Continuous seismic studies of these territories are important now because there is insufficient seismological knowledge of the area and an absence of systematic data on the seismicity of the region. Another task of current interest is the necessity to consider the seismic environment in the design, construction, and operation of natural gas extracting enterprises such as the construction of the North European Gas Pipeline. Issues of scientific importance for seismic studies in the region are the complex geodynamical setting, the presence of permafrost, and the complex tectonic structure. In particular, the Uralian Orogene (Fig. 1) strongly affects the propagation of seismic waves. The existing subpolar seismic stations [APA (67,57{sup o}N; 33,40{sup o}E), LVZ (67,90{sup o}N; 34,65{sup o}E), and NRIL (69,50{sup o}N; 88,40{sup o}E)] do not cover the extensive area between the Pechora and Ob Rivers (Fig. 1). Thus seismic observations in the Vorkuta area, which lies within the area of concern, represent a special interest. Continuous recording at a seismic station near the city of Vorkuta (67,50{sup o}N; 64,11{sup o}E) [1] has been conducted since 2005 for the purpose of regional seismic monitoring and, more specifically, detection of seismic signals caused by local mining enterprises. Current surveys of local seismic noise [7,8,9,11], are particularly aimed at a technical survey for the suitability of the site for installation of a small-aperture seismic array, which would include 10-12 recording instruments, with the Vorkuta seismic station as the central element. When constructed, this seismic

  15. Statistical Seismology and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Kazemian, J.

    2014-12-01

    While seismicity triggered or induced by natural resources production such as mining or water impoundment in large dams has long been recognized, the recent increase in the unconventional production of oil and gas has been linked to rapid rise in seismicity in many places, including central North America (Ellsworth et al., 2012; Ellsworth, 2013). Worldwide, induced events of M~5 have occurred and, although rare, have resulted in both damage and public concern (Horton, 2012; Keranen et al., 2013). In addition, over the past twenty years, the increase in both number and coverage of seismic stations has resulted in an unprecedented ability to precisely record the magnitude and location of large numbers of small magnitude events. The increase in the number and type of seismic sequences available for detailed study has revealed differences in their statistics that previously difficult to quantify. For example, seismic swarms that produce significant numbers of foreshocks as well as aftershocks have been observed in different tectonic settings, including California, Iceland, and the East Pacific Rise (McGuire et al., 2005; Shearer, 2012; Kazemian et al., 2014). Similarly, smaller events have been observed prior to larger induced events in several occurrences from energy production. The field of statistical seismology has long focused on the question of triggering and the mechanisms responsible (Stein et al., 1992; Hill et al., 1993; Steacy et al., 2005; Parsons, 2005; Main et al., 2006). For example, in most cases the associated stress perturbations are much smaller than the earthquake stress drop, suggesting an inherent sensitivity to relatively small stress changes (Nalbant et al., 2005). Induced seismicity provides the opportunity to investigate triggering and, in particular, the differences between long- and short-range triggering. Here we investigate the statistics of induced seismicity sequences from around the world, including central North America and Spain, and

  16. The ISC Seismic Event Bibliography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Domenico; Storchak, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    The International Seismological Centre (ISC) is a not-for-profit organization operating in the UK for the last 50 years and producing the ISC Bulletin - the definitive worldwide summary of seismic events, both natural and anthropogenic - starting from the beginning of 20th century. Often researchers need to gather information related to specific seismic events for various reasons. To facilitate such task, in 2012 we set up a new database linking earthquakes and other seismic events in the ISC Bulletin to bibliographic records of scientific articles (mostly peer-reviewed journals) that describe those events. Such association allows users of the ISC Event Bibliography (www.isc.ac.uk/event_bibliography/index.php) to run searches for publications via a map-based web interface and, optionally, selecting scientific publications related to either specific events or events in the area of interest. Some of the greatest earthquakes were described in several hundreds of articles published over a period of few years. The journals included in our database are not limited to seismology but bring together a variety of fields in geosciences (e.g., engineering seismology, geodesy and remote sensing, tectonophysics, monitoring research, tsunami, geology, geochemistry, hydrogeology, atmospheric sciences, etc.) making this service useful in multidisciplinary studies. Usually papers dealing with large data set are not included (e.g., papers describing a seismic catalogue). Currently the ISC Event Bibliography includes over 17,000 individual publications from about 500 titles related to over 14,000 events that occurred in last 100+ years. The bibliographic records in the Event Bibliography start in the 1950s, and it is updated as new publications become available.

  17. Seismic Imaging from a TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinnen, G.; Thorbecke, J. W.; Drijkoningen, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    Seismic monitoring from the head of a tunnel-boring machine (TBM) enables improved assessment of the risks associated with the tunnel-boring process. The monitoring system provides a live image of ground conditions along the trajectory followed by the TBM and detects local heterogeneities such as boulders, foundations, and other obstacles that commonly pass undetected using local geotechnical techniques. From a seismic perspective, the underground setting of tunnelling projects places limitations on imaging capability. The principal limiting factor is the size of the area upon which transducers can be installed. This limitation requires adjustments to traditional seismic imaging techniques in which a large area is assumed to be available for attaching the transducers. Recently developed short imaging operators take this limitation into account and are used in the examples described herein. The unique conditions of tunnelling yield two advantages over traditional settings in terms of imaging: rotation of the cutter wheel and the lateral progression of the TBM. Rotation of the cutter wheel, upon which the transducers are installed, provides the opportunity to illuminate obstacles from different angles in different recordings. Spatial progression of the TBM enables improvement in the illumination of obstacles and the signal-to-noise ratio by combining recordings from different lateral positions. In this paper, these specific aspects of seismic imaging during tunnelling are discussed via models that represent different cases encountered in actual tunnelling projects. These case studies demonstrate the way in which image quality along the trajectory of the TBM is improved over that in traditional settings. In this way, the risks associated with the tunnelling process can be more accurately assured.

  18. Vulcanian explosions in the process of building-destruction of the lava dome of andesitic volcano: Insight from the seismic signals recorded at Volcán de Colima, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobin, Vyacheslav M.; Peral, Juan J.; Nava, Fernando; Bretón, Mauricio

    2015-07-01

    The seismic signals associated with the Vulcanian explosive events at Volcán de Colima, México during its 1998-2014 eruption were discriminated into three types according the waveforms of their initial phases. This classification includes about 85-90% of all seismic signals associated with explosive events. It was shown that the classification of the explosive seismic signals gave a useful tool for analysis of the eruption development. Analysis was performed for two 6-month stages of the eruption, the 2003 post-effusive stage culminated with large explosions and the 2007 co-effusive stage during the beginning of new lava dome growth in the crater of the volcano. The predominance (95%) of the type 1 and 3 events with low-frequency (LF) and high + low frequency (HF + LF) initial phases in the sample of the 2003 post-effusive stage explosive events identifies the termination of the lava effusion and preparation to the stage of large explosions. The high participation (37%) of the type 2 events with high-frequency (HF) initial phases in the sample of the 2007 co-effusive stage explosive events indicates the process of the lava dome growth beginning. The introduction of multi-stage conceptual model of explosive process allows the interpretation of peculiarities of the seismic signals associated with explosive activity. Analysis of the spectral content of the initial LF phases of the seismic signals associated with the explosions showed that the sources of LF initial phases, corresponding to the ascent of magma within the volcanic conduit above the fragmentation zone, were common for post-effusive and co-effusive stages. The source of events with the HF initial phases differed from the source of events with the LF first phases. The sources of explosions at explosion level were situated at different sites during post-effusive and co-effusive stages.

  19. Continuous passive seismic monitoring by ambient-noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic arrays permanently installed over a hydrocarbon reservoir can record data continuously, even in the absence of active seismic shooting. Here we use a 5 day long recording of ambient seismic noise over a producing oil reservoir to study ambient-seismic noise tomography as a tool for continuous monitoring by passive seismic interferometry. This is of interest for both monitoring production-related changes over a long time scale (years), and changes associated with hazards such as over-burden pressure changes on a short time scale (days to weeks. A correlation coefficient is computed between cross-correlations of partial recordings and cross-correlations of the full recording, as a quality factor for how long recordings should be made. The partial recording is varied as a function of absolute recording time, recording length, inter-station distance and frequency. The correlations converge faster for nearby receiver pairs and lower. The convergence rate also improves with the strength of the microseism energy in the ambient seismic field, but deteriorates when the microseism energy in the ambient seismic field is strongly inhomogeneous with direction. We use straight-ray tomography to image the virtual-seismic sources for travel times picked after band passes for various frequencies. Buried channels visible in ambient-seismic noise tomography images of Scholte wave group-velocity are identified and compared with their position and depth in a P wave velocity cube obtained from full waveform inversion of active seismic data. We determined that the Scholte wave group-velocity between 0.15-0.75 Hz forms an image up to a depth of 240 meters. This study shows the feasibility of ambient-seismic noise tomography monitoring of the near surface and indicates how long recordings should be made. Correlation rate studies shows that high quality virtual seismic sources can be obtained with from as little as 1 day of recorded data at very low frequencies, 0.15-0.75 Hz, and up

  20. Velocity modeling of a complex deep crustal structure across the Mesoproterozoic south Delhi Fold Belt, NW India, from joint interpretation of coincident seismic wide-angle and near-offset reflection data: An approach using unusual reflections in wide-angle records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, V. G.; Rao, V.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic wide-angle record sections from favorably placed source and limited-aperture recording spreads, particularly across collision boundaries, reveal bright unusual high-velocity contrast reflections of limited lateral coherence. The arrival times of the unusual reflections for recording updip of the reflecting plane align as high apparent velocity phases at wide-angle offsets. Coincident near-offset reflection images from similar structural features provide additional control for modeling the unusual phases on the wide-angle record sections. We propose an approach for joint interpretation of these coincident seismic data sets and modeling the unusual phases on the processed wide-angle records to delineate both the velocity stratification and the geometry of the deep crustal structures consistent with the near-offset reflection images. Processed and migrated near-offset reflection images reveal several steeply dipping isolated reflections on the western margin of the south Delhi Fold Belt (DFB), NW India, interpreted as the south Delhi thrust fault. Coincident limited-aperture, wide-angle records reveal bright unusual reflections, which are also found to be associated with the same thrust fault. Observations of similar dipping reflection patterns in various other regions lend support to consider them as genuine in-plane reflections resulting from a structural fabric imprinted on horizontally oriented geological structures. We use the reflectivity structural model from the near-offset data set that provides necessary constraints for modeling and simulating the travel times and amplitudes of the unusual reflections recognized in the wide-angle records. The unusual reflections are effectively used as part of the wide-angle data set for Gaussian beam synthetic seismogram modeling, thus delineating for the first time a complex 2-D model of the seismic velocity structure of the deep crust and uppermost mantle across the Marwar Basin (MB) and the DFB. The dipping

  1. Seismicity of Cascade Volcanoes: Characterization and Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W. A.

    2016-12-01

    Here we summarize and compare the seismicity around each of the Very High Threat Volcanoes of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon and California as defined by the National Volcanic Early Warning System (NVEWS) threat assessment (Ewert et al., 2005). Understanding the background seismic activity and processes controlling it is critical for assessing changes in seismicity and their implications for volcanic hazards. Comparing seismicity at different volcanic centers can help determine what critical factors or processes affect the observed seismic behavior. Of the ten Very High Threat Volcanoes in the Cascade Range, five volcanoes are consistently seismogenic when considering earthquakes within 10 km of the volcanic center or caldera edge (Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Newberry Caldera, Lassen Volcanic Center). Other Very High Threat volcanoes (South Sister, Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Crater Lake and Mount Shasta) have comparatively low rates of seismicity and not enough recorded earthquakes to calculate catalog statistics. Using a swarm definition of 3 or more earthquakes occurring in a day with magnitudes above the largest of the network's magnitude of completenesses (M 0.9), we find that Lassen Volcanic Center is the "swarmiest" in terms of percent of seismicity occurring in swarms, followed by Mount Hood, Mount St. Helens and Rainier. The predominance of swarms at Mount Hood may be overstated, as much of the seismicity is occurring on surrounding crustal faults (Jones and Malone, 2005). Newberry Caldera has a relatively short record of seismicity since the permanent network was installed in 2011, however there have been no swarms detected as defined here. Future work will include developing discriminates for volcanic versus tectonic seismicity to better filter the seismic catalog and more precise binning of depths at some volcanoes so that we may better consider different processes. Ewert J. W., Guffanti, M. and Murray, T. L. (2005). An

  2. Sequence stratigraphy: An integrated technique for exploration and exploitation, Part 2: Seismic examples

    SciTech Connect

    Burgis, W.A.

    1995-12-31

    Exxon`s concepts of sequence stratigraphy developed from the stratigraphic interpretation of reflection seismic data, a technique referred to as seismic stratigraphy. Differentiation of chronostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy is critical in interpreting sequences on seismic data, as well as in outcrops, logs, and cores. Extensive experience indicates that reflection geometries follow time lines in the rock record and that facies variations are recorded by lateral changes in reflection attributes, such as amplitude and continuity. Integration of all available well, outcrop, and literature data into a seismic interpretation is essential to reducing the risks associated with predictions of play parameters using seismic stratigraphy.

  3. Seismic safety in conducting large-scale blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashukov, I. V.; Chaplygin, V. V.; Domanov, V. P.; Semin, A. A.; Klimkin, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    In mining enterprises to prepare hard rocks for excavation a drilling and blasting method is used. With the approach of mining operations to settlements the negative effect of large-scale blasts increases. To assess the level of seismic impact of large-scale blasts the scientific staff of Siberian State Industrial University carried out expertise for coal mines and iron ore enterprises. Determination of the magnitude of surface seismic vibrations caused by mass explosions was performed using seismic receivers, an analog-digital converter with recording on a laptop. The registration results of surface seismic vibrations during production of more than 280 large-scale blasts at 17 mining enterprises in 22 settlements are presented. The maximum velocity values of the Earth’s surface vibrations are determined. The safety evaluation of seismic effect was carried out according to the permissible value of vibration velocity. For cases with exceedance of permissible values recommendations were developed to reduce the level of seismic impact.

  4. Seismic structure of the moon - A summary of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A seismic model of the moon, refined from previous models with the aid of new data and analyses for seismic events recorded by four Apollo lunar seismic stations and a gravimeter, is outlined. The current model has five zones. The crust is 55-60 km thick. The surface is covered by regolith of varying thicknesses and low seismic velocity. The seismic Q's are extremely high. The upper mantle, 250 km thick, is characterized by seismic velocities close to those of the earth's upper mantle, and shear wave Q of about 4000. Tidally controlled deep moonquakes are concentrated near the boundary of the middle mantle, 600-700 km thick. A lower mantle extending to an undetermined depth is characterized by high attenuation of shear waves. The existence of a low-velocity core is only tentatively proposed.

  5. Operations plan for the Regional Seismic Test Network

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-15

    The Regional Seismic Test Network program was established to provide a capability for detection of extremely sensitive earth movements. Seismic signals from both natural and man-made earth motions will be analyzed with the ultimate objective of accurately locating underground nuclear explosions. The Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, has designed an unattended seismic station capable of recording seismic information received at the location of the seismometers installed as part of that specific station. A network of stations is required to increase the capability of determining the source of the seismic signal and the location of the source. Current plans are to establish a five-station seismic network in the United States and Canada. The Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, has been assigned the responsibility for deploying, installing, and operating these remote stations. This Operation Plan provides the basic information and tasking to accomplish this assignment.

  6. Angola Seismicity MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  7. Modernization of the Slovenian National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidrih, R.; Godec, M.; Gosar, A.; Sincic, P.; Tasic, I.; Zivcic, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, the Seismology Office is responsible for the fast and reliable information about earthquakes, originating in the area of Slovenia and nearby. In the year 2000 the project Modernization of the Slovenian National Seismic Network started. The purpose of a modernized seismic network is to enable fast and accurate automatic location of earthquakes, to determine earthquake parameters and to collect data of local, regional and global earthquakes. The modernized network will be finished in the year 2004 and will consist of 25 Q730 remote broadband data loggers based seismic station subsystems transmitting in real-time data to the Data Center in Ljubljana, where the Seismology Office is located. The remote broadband station subsystems include 16 surface broadband seismometers CMG-40T, 5 broadband seismometers CMG-40T with strong motion accelerographs EpiSensor, 4 borehole broadband seismometers CMG-40T, all with accurate timing provided by GPS receivers. The seismic network will cover the entire Slovenian territory, involving an area of 20,256 km2. The network is planned in this way; more seismic stations will be around bigger urban centres and in regions with greater vulnerability (NW Slovenia, Krsko Brezice region). By the end of the year 2002, three old seismic stations were modernized and ten new seismic stations were built. All seismic stations transmit data to UNIX-based computers running Antelope system software. The data is transmitted in real time using TCP/IP protocols over the Goverment Wide Area Network . Real-time data is also exchanged with seismic networks in the neighbouring countries, where the data are collected from the seismic stations, close to the Slovenian border. A typical seismic station consists of the seismic shaft with the sensor and the data acquisition system and, the service shaft with communication equipment (modem, router) and power supply with a battery box. which provides energy in case

  8. Man-caused seismicity of Kuzbass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, Alexandr; Emanov, Alexey; Leskova, Ekaterina; Fateyev, Alexandr

    2010-05-01

    A natural seismicity of Kuznetsk Basin is confined in the main to mountain frame of Kuznetsk hollow. In this paper materials of experimental work with local station networks within sediment basin are presented. Two types of seismicity display within Kuznetsk hollow have been understood: first, man-caused seismic processes, confined to mine working and concentrated on depths up to one and a half of km; secondly, seismic activations on depths of 2-56 km, not coordinated in plan with coal mines. Every of studied seismic activations consists of large quantity of earthquakes of small powers (Ms=1-3). From one to first tens of earthquakes were recorded in a day. The earthquakes near mine working shift in space along with mine working, and seismic process become stronger at the instant a coal-plough machine is operated, and slacken at the instant the preventive works are executed. The seismic processes near three lavas in Kuznetsk Basin have been studied in detail. Uplift is the most typical focal mechanism. Activated zone near mine working reach in diameter 1-1,5 km. Seismic activations not linked with mine working testify that the subsoil of Kuznetsk hollow remain in stress state in whole. The most probable causes of man-caused action on hollow are processes, coupled with change of physical state of rocks at loss of methane from large volume or change by mine working of rock watering in large volume. In this case condensed rocks, lost gas and water, can press out upwards, realizing the reverse fault mechanism of earthquakes. A combination of stress state of hollow with man-caused action at deep mining may account for incipient activations in Kuznetsk Basin. Today earthquakes happen mainly under mine workings, though damages of workings themselves do not happen, but intensive shaking on surface calls for intent study of so dangerous phenomena. In 2009 replicates of the experiment on research of seismic activations in area of before investigated lavas have been conducted

  9. Key parameter optimization and analysis of stochastic seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhe-Yuan; Gan, Li-Deng; Dai, Xiao-Feng; Li, Ling-Gao; Wang, Jun

    2012-03-01

    Stochastic seismic inversion is the combination of geostatistics and seismic inversion technology which integrates information from seismic records, well logs, and geostatistics into a posterior probability density function (PDF) of subsurface models. The Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method is used to sample the posterior PDF and the subsurface model characteristics can be inferred by analyzing a set of the posterior PDF samples. In this paper, we first introduce the stochastic seismic inversion theory, discuss and analyze the four key parameters: seismic data signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), variogram, the posterior PDF sample number, and well density, and propose the optimum selection of these parameters. The analysis results show that seismic data S/N adjusts the compromise between the influence of the seismic data and geostatistics on the inversion results, the variogram controls the smoothness of the inversion results, the posterior PDF sample number determines the reliability of the statistical characteristics derived from the samples, and well density influences the inversion uncertainty. Finally, the comparison between the stochastic seismic inversion and the deterministic model based seismic inversion indicates that the stochastic seismic inversion can provide more reliable information of the subsurface character.

  10. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  11. Seismic slip deficit along Nepal Himalayas: implications for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Laurent; Tapponnier, Paul; Nath Sapkota, Soma; Klinger, Yann

    2016-04-01

    In 1255, 1344 and 1408 AD, then again in 1833, 1934 and 2015, large earthquakes, devastated Kathmandu. The 1255 and 1934 surface ruptures have been identified east of the city, along comparable segments of the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT). Whether the other two pairs of events were similar, is unclear. Taking into account charcoal's "Inbuilt-ages", we revisit the timing of terrace offsets at key sites, to compare them with the seismic record since 1200 AD. The location, extent, and seismic moment of the 1833 and 2015 events imply that they released only a small part of the regional slip deficit, on a deep thrust segment that stopped north of the Siwaliks. By contrast, the 1344 or 1408 AD earthquake may have ruptured the MFT up to the surface in central Nepal between Kathmandu and Pokhara, East of the surface trace of the great 1505 AD earthquake which affected Western Nepal. If so, the whole megathrust system in Nepal ruptured during a sequence of earthquakes that lasted less than three centuries and propagated the rupture up to the surface from East to West. Today's situation in the himalayan seismic sequence might be close to that of the 14th century.

  12. Reconstruction of a 2D seismic wavefield by seismic gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-12-01

    We reconstructed a 2D seismic wavefield and obtained its propagation properties by using the seismic gradiometry method together with dense observations of the Hi-net seismograph network in Japan. The seismic gradiometry method estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients at any location from a discrete station record by using a Taylor series approximation. From the spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, the properties of a propagating wave packet, including the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading, and radiation pattern can be obtained. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary conditions, the 2D vector elastic wavefield can be decomposed into divergence and rotation components. First, as a feasibility test, we performed an analysis with a synthetic seismogram dataset computed by a numerical simulation for a realistic 3D medium and the actual Hi-net station layout. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives were very well-reproduced for period bands longer than 25 s. Applications to a real large earthquake showed that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield were well reconstructed, along with slowness vector. The slowness of the reconstructed wavefield showed a clear contrast between body and surface waves and regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation, possibly owing to scattering. Slowness vectors together with divergence and rotation decomposition are expected to be useful for determining constituents of observed wavefields in inhomogeneous media.

  13. Stochastic seismic analysis in the Messina strait area

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciola, P.; Maugeri, N.; Muscolino, G.

    2008-07-08

    After 1908 Messina earthquake significant progresses have been carried out in the field of earthquake engineering. Usually seismic action is represented via the so called elastic response spectrum or alternatively by time histories of ground motion acceleration. Due the random nature of the seismic action, alternative representations assume the seismic action as zero-mean Gaussian process fully defined by the so-called Power Spectral Density function. Aim of this paper is the comparative study of the response of linear behaving structures adopting the above representation of the seismic action using recorded earthquakes in the Messina strait area. In this regard, a handy method for determining the power spectral density function of recorded earthquakes is proposed. Numerical examples conducted on the existing space truss located in Torre Faro (Messina) will show the effectiveness of stochastic approach for coping with the seismic analysis of structures.

  14. Stochastic seismic analysis in the Messina strait area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciola, P.; Maugeri, N.; Muscolino, G.

    2008-07-01

    After 1908 Messina earthquake significant progresses have been carried out in the field of earthquake engineering. Usually seismic action is represented via the so called elastic response spectrum or alternatively by time histories of ground motion acceleration. Due the random nature of the seismic action, alternative representations assume the seismic action as zero-mean Gaussian process fully defined by the so-called Power Spectral Density function. Aim of this paper is the comparative study of the response of linear behaving structures adopting the above representation of the seismic action using recorded earthquakes in the Messina strait area. In this regard, a handy method for determining the power spectral density function of recorded earthquakes is proposed. Numerical examples conducted on the existing space truss located in Torre Faro (Messina) will show the effectiveness of stochastic approach for coping with the seismic analysis of structures.

  15. 2013 East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE): implosion data, Hayward, Calif

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Strayer, Luther M.; Goldman, Mark R.; Criley, Coyn J.; Garcia, Susan; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Marisol K.; Chan, Joanne; Gordon, Leslie C.; Haefner, Scott; Blair, James Luke; Gandhok, Gini; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) in Hayward, California imploded a 13-story building (Warren Hall) that was deemed unsafe because of its immediate proximity to the active trace of the Hayward Fault. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the CSUEB collaborated on a program to record the seismic waves generated by the collapse of the building. We refer to this collaboration as the East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE). The principal objective of recording the seismic energy was to observe ground shaking as it radiated from the source, but the data also may be useful for other purposes. For example, the seismic data may be useful in evaluating the implosion process as it relates to structural engineering purposes. This report provides the metadata needed to utilize the seismic data.

  16. Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2007-12-27

    This annual report documents the locations, magnitudes, and geologic interpretations of earthquakes recorded for the Hanford monitoring region of south-central Washington in fiscal year 2007 (October 2006 through September 2007). The report provides summaries of seismic events recorded during the first three quarters of fiscal year 2007 and contains a more comprehensive discussion of seismic events for the fourth quarter of the fiscal year.

  17. Investigations on Local Seismic Phases and Modeling of Seismic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-31

    Brocher, T. M., 1987. Coincident seismic reflection/refraction studies of the continental lithosphere: a global review, Rev. Geophys., 25, 723-742...36.39 Laza 300889 42.105 -07.516 13. 3.7 3.9 35.37 Nazare 310389 39.601 -09.493 25 ? 3.7 3.5 33.35 Camero 2009 87 42.138 - 02.476 05. 3.5 3.6 34.35 Aldea ...used might be accurate enough to describe the global waveforms recorded. NEAR SOURCE SITE EFFECTS EXPECTED AT YUCCA FLAT The map of Paleozoic basement

  18. New Madrid Seismic Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NEW MADRID SEISMIC ZONE BY COLONEL J.DAVID NORWOOD United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...mCTBB l USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT New Madrid Seismic Zone by J. David Norwood, COL, USA Michael A. Pearson, COL, USA Project Advisor The...ABSTRACT AUTHOR: J. David Norwood, Colonel, U.S. Army TITLE: New Madrid Seismic Zone FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 22 April 1998 . PAGES:

  19. Missile impacts as sources of seismic energy on the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latham, G.V.; McDonald, W.G.; Moore, H.J.

    1970-01-01

    Seismic signals recorded from impacts of missiles at the White Sands Missile Range are radically different from the signal recorded from the Apollo 12 lunar module impact. This implies that lunar structure to depths of at least 10 to 20 kilometers is quite different from the typical structure of the earth's crust. Results obtained from this study can be used to predict seismic wave amplitudes from future man-made lunar impacts. Seismic energy and crater dimensions from impacts are compared with measurements from chemical explosions.

  20. Man-caused seismicity of Kuzbas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, Dr.; Emanov, A. A.; Leskova, E. V.; Fateyev, A. V.

    2009-04-01

    A natural seismicity of Kuznetsk Basin is confined in the main to mountain frame of Kuznetsk hollow. In this paper materials of experimental work with local station networks within sediment basin are presented. Two types of seismicity display within Kuznetsk hollow have been understood: first, man-caused seismic processes, confined to mine working and concentrated on depths up to one and a half of km; secondly, seismic activations on depths of 2-56 km, not coordinated in plan with coal mines. Every of studied seismic activations consists of large quantity of earthquakes of small powers (Ms=1-3). From one to first tens of earthquakes were recorded in a day. The earthquakes near mine working shift in space along with mine working, and seismic process become stronger at the instant a coal-plough machine is operated, and slacken at the instant the preventive works are executed. The seismic processes near three lavas in Kuznetsk Basin have been studied in detail. Uplift is the most typical focal mechanism. Activated zone near mine working reach in diameter 1-1,5 km. Seismic activations not linked with mine working testify that the subsoil of Kuznetsk hollow remain in stress state in whole. The most probable causes of man-caused action on hollow are processes, coupled with change of physical state of rocks at loss of methane from large volume or change by mine working of rock watering in large volume. In this case condensed rocks, lost gas and water, can press out upwards, realizing the reverse fault mechanism of earthquakes. A combination of stress state of hollow with man-caused action at deep mining account for activations nascent in Kuznetsk Basin. Today earthquakes happen mainly under mine workings, and damages of workings themselves do not register, but intensive shaking felt on surface calls for intent study of so dangerous phenomena.

  1. Seismicity of Afghanistan and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, James W.

    2006-01-01

    This publication describes the seismicity of Afghanistan and vicinity and is intended for use in seismic hazard studies of that nation. Included are digital files with information on earthquakes that have been recorded in Afghanistan and vicinity through mid-December 2004. Chapter A provides an overview of the seismicity and tectonics of Afghanistan and defines the earthquake parameters included in the 'Summary Catalog' and the 'Summary of Macroseismic Effects.' Chapter B summarizes compilation of the 'Master Catalog' and 'Sub-Threshold Catalog' and documents their formats. The 'Summary Catalog' itself is presented as a comma-delimited ASCII file, the 'Summary of Macroseismic Effects' is presented as an html file, and the 'Master Catalog' and 'Sub-Threshold Catalog' are presented as flat ASCII files. Finally, this report includes as separate plates a digital image of a map of epicenters of earthquakes occurring since 1964 (Plate 1) and a representation of areas of damage or strong shaking from selected past earthquakes in Afghanistan and vicinity (Plate 2).

  2. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  3. Seismic Waveguide of Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P.

    We developed a new method of an earthquake-resistant design to support conventional aseismic system using acoustic metamaterials. The device is an attenuator of a seismic wave that reduces the amplitude of the wave exponentially. Constructing a cylindrical shell-type waveguide composed of many Helmholtz resonators that creates a stop-band for the seismic frequency range, we convert the seismic wave into an attenuated one without touching the building that we want to protect. It is a mechanical way to convert the seismic energy into sound and heat.

  4. Separation of site effects and structural focusing in Santa Monica, California: A study of high-frequency weak motions from earthquakes and blasts recorded during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baher, S.; Davis, P.M.; Fuis, G.

    2002-01-01

    Near-surface site factors and the effects of deep structural focusing were estimated in the Santa Monica Mountains and Santa Monica, California, from a portable array of 75 seismic stations deployed during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II). The objective was to examine further the origin of seismic wave amplification in the region of intense damage south of the Santa Monica Fault from the Northridge earthquake. The analysis used normalized spectral amplitudes in the 4- to 8- and 8- to 12-Hz range in direct and coda waves from local earthquakes in Santa Paula, Northridge, Redlands, and Hector Mine. Coda waves indicated that site factor amplifications are larger south of the Santa Monica fault relative to the north. Spectral ratios of direct S waves, corrected for site effects, show additional amplificaton south of, and adjacent to, the Santa Monica fault, attributable to focusing by a deeper structure. Gao et al. (1996) concluded that localized focusing effects contributed to anomalous P- and S-wave amplification in the Santa Monica damage zone for Northridge aftershocks within a specified range of azimuths. In an attempt to reproduce the hypothesized focusing from the Northridge earthquake, two shots (4000 and 3750 lb.) were detonated, one at Pyramid Lake, a distance of about 69 km to the north-northwest of central Santa Monica, and the other near Fort Tejon, a distance of 91 km. The azimuth of the shots was chosen to be that expected to give anomalous amplification. At these distance steeply incident seismic energy from Pg/PmP waves are expected to pass through the underground focusing structure and be selectively amplified. After the local site factors are removed, the waveforms from the Fort Tejon shot exhibited localized amplification adjacent to and south of the fault, 2-3 times larger than that of the surrounding area. The effect is less for waves from the Pyramid Lake shot, which could be due to their higher angle of incidence

  5. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  6. Seismic directional beamforming using cosine amplitude distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Xu, X.; Song, J.; Jia, H.; Ge, L.

    2013-12-01

    o improve the signal-to-noise ratio in seismic exploration, we studied the method of time domain seismic beam-forming based on receiver array (TSBBRA). TSBBRA is useful to extract reflected waves from some target layers and decrease noise from other direction. When noise is strong enough, the control parameter of the method of TSBBRA need to be increased. It means that we have to use more raw records to form a directional seismic record. Therefore, the signal energy in beam is much denser, and the beam becomes narrower accordingly. When the beam can not cover the receiver array, the signal-to-noise ratios in different traces are quite unbalanced and average quality of data probably is still quite low. Therefore, this paper proposes seismic directional beamforming using the cosine amplitude distribution (SDBCAD). SDBCAD can adjust seismic beam shape by introducing cosine amplitude distribution, an amplitude weighting method, in the procedure of beamforming. We studied cosine amplitude weighting function, analyzed the characteristics of uniform and cosine amplitude distribution in beamforming, and compared directivity of beams from the two kind of amplitude pattern. It shows that the main beam of cosine-weighted amplitude is different from uniform distribution. The coverage of main beam from SDBCAD is wider than uniform amplitude, and the width of beam is varied with different number of cosine order. So we simulated the seismic raw record, and used TSBBRA and SDBCAD to process simulated data at the receiving array. The results show that SDBCAD can broaden directional beam, and the main beam from SDBCAD can cover the entire traces instead of partial coverage in TSBBRA. The average signal-to-noise ratio increased 0.2~4.5dB. It concludes that SDBCAD is competent to stretch beam reasonable, and it is useful to boost signal-to-noise ratio when beam from TSBBRA is too narrow to illuminate receiver array properly. Updated results will be presented at the meeting.

  7. Oklahoma seismic network. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. |

    1993-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

  8. Coherent Waves in Seismic Researches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, A.; Seleznev, V. S.

    2013-05-01

    Development of digital processing algorithms of seismic wave fields for the purpose of useful event picking to study environment and other objects is the basis for the establishment of new seismic techniques. In the submitted paper a fundamental property of seismic wave field coherence is used. The authors extended conception of coherence types of observed wave fields and devised a technique of coherent component selection from observed wave field. Time coherence and space coherence are widely known. In this paper conception "parameter coherence" has been added. The parameter by which wave field is coherent can be the most manifold. The reason is that the wave field is a multivariate process described by a set of parameters. Coherence in the first place means independence of linear connection in wave field of parameter. In seismic wave fields, recorded in confined space, in building-blocks and stratified mediums time coherent standing waves are formed. In prospecting seismology at observation systems with multiple overlapping head waves are coherent by parallel correlation course or, in other words, by one measurement on generalized plane of observation system. For detail prospecting seismology at observation systems with multiple overlapping on basis of coherence property by one measurement of area algorithms have been developed, permitting seismic records to be converted to head wave time sections which have neither reflected nor other types of waves. Conversion in time section is executed on any specified observation base. Energy storage of head waves relative to noise on basis of multiplicity of observation system is realized within area of head wave recording. Conversion on base below the area of wave tracking is performed with lack of signal/noise ratio relative to maximum of this ratio, fit to observation system. Construction of head wave time section and dynamic plots a basis of automatic processing have been developed, similar to CDP procedure in method of

  9. Research On The Methodology of Seismic Density and Seismic Characteristics In North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian

    We aim at researching on seismic characteristics of small and moderate earthquakes recorded by instruments, its relationship with strong earthquakes in order to determine the strong earthquake risk sites demanded by long-medium term earthquake prediction and seismic hazard analysis. In North China, since 1970 abundant data of moderate and small earthquakes have been recorded. In the same spatial-temporal interval there were several strong earthquakes. These data are very good to research on seismic characteristics of small earthquakes and its relationship with strong earthquakes. Owing to phenomeno-logic and intrinsic limitation in seismic research, firstly we introduce a quantitative method to deal with seismic patterns in North China. With the quantitative seismic patterns we can compare variation of seismicity in different regions and time periods systematically. For certain magnitude bin and time period, characteristics of epicenter distribution might be denseness or sparseness. To reflect the characteristics reasonably it should embody number and convergence of earthquakes simultaneously. We have defined the seismic density at a grid node of epicenter distribution in each magnitude bin Vj,m,t. Calculation of density at a grid node is : in the region we delineate grids with distant? ; put the jth node of the grid as the center, rm is radius; and within the spatial-temporal and magnitude interval, number of earthquakes is n, the density at the jth node Vj,m,t should be: n Vj = 1 ,m,t Ln i=1 (Di ) e=Di =rm (1) In the formula Ln( ) is Napierian logarithm, Di expresses the distance from ith epicenter to jth node. The mean of formula (1) is that density at jth node is summation of reciprocals of the distances from epicenters to jth node for each earthquake in the region. The density is direct to number of earthquakes and inverse to the distance. Ln(D) reduces affection of the distance owing to accuracy of epicenter. For the region, with given temporal interval

  10. Nonlinear Seismic Response Of Single Piles

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, R.; Conte, E.; Dente, G.

    2008-07-08

    In this paper, a method is proposed to analyse the seismic response of single piles under nonlinear soil condition. It is based on the Winkler foundation model formulated in the time domain, which makes use of p-y curves described by the Ramberg-Osgood relationship. The analyses are performed referring to a pile embedded in two-layer soil profiles with different sharp stiffness contrast. Italian seismic records are used as input motion. The calculated bending moments in the pile are compared to those obtained using other theoretical solutions.

  11. Seismic Structure of Perth Basin (Australia) and surroundings from Passive Seismic Deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, N.; Saygin, E.; Lumley, D. E.; Hoskin, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    We image the subsurface structure of Perth Basin, Western Australia and surroundings by using ambient seismic noise data from 14 seismic stations recently deployed by University of Western Australia (UWA) and other available permanent stations from Geoscience Australia seismic network and the Australian Seismometers in Schools program. Each of these 14 UWA seismic stations comprises a broadband sensor and a high fidelity 3-component 10 Hz geophone, recording in tandem at 250 Hz and 1000 Hz. The other stations used in this study are equipped with short period and broadband sensors. In addition, one shallow borehole station is operated with eight 3 component geophones at depths of between 2 and 44 m. The network is deployed to characterize natural seismicity in the basin and to try and identify any microseismic activity across Darling Fault Zone (DFZ), bounding the basin to the east. The DFZ stretches to approximately 1000 km north-south in Western Australia, and is one of the longest fault zones on the earth with a limited number of detected earthquakes. We use seismic noise cross- and auto-correlation methods to map seismic velocity perturbations across the basin and the transition from DFZ to the basin. Retrieved Green's functions are stable and show clear dispersed waveforms. Travel times of the surface wave Green's functions from noise cross-correlations are inverted with a two-step probabilistic framework to map the absolute shear wave velocities as a function of depth. The single station auto-correlations from the seismic noise yields P wave reflectivity under each station, marking the major discontinuities. Resulting images show the shear velocity perturbations across the region. We also quantify the variation of ambient seismic noise at different depths in the near surface using the geophones in the shallow borehole array.

  12. First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2011-03-31

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

  13. Seismic Yield Estimates of UTTR Surface Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, C.; Park, J.; Stump, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2007 the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) has used explosive demolition as a method to destroy excess solid rocket motors ranging in size from 19 tons to less than 2 tons. From 2007 to 2014, 20 high quality seismic stations within 180 km recorded most of the more than 200 demolitions. This provides an interesting dataset to examine seismic source scaling for surface explosions. Based upon observer records, shots were of 4 sizes, corresponding to the size of the rocket motors. Instrument corrections for the stations were quality controlled by examining the P-wave amplitudes of all magnitude 6.5-8 earthquakes from 30 to 90 degrees away. For each station recording, the instrument corrected RMS seismic amplitude in the first 10 seconds after the P-onset was calculated. Waveforms at any given station for all the observed explosions are nearly identical. The observed RMS amplitudes were fit to a model including a term for combined distance and station correction, a term for observed RMS amplitude, and an error term for the actual demolition size. The observed seismic yield relationship is RMS=k*Weight2/3 . Estimated yields for the largest shots vary by about 50% from the stated weights, with a nearly normal distribution.

  14. Seismicity in the Triassic Deep River Basin, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, D. E.; Wagner, L. S.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.; Roman, D. C.; Golden, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Deep River Basin in central North Carolina is one of a series of Triassic rift basins along the east coast called the Newark Supergroup. Although the east coast lies on a passive plate margin, there is recorded seismicity within all of the coastal states, much of which is attributed to boundary faults of the Newark Supergroup basins. However, this seismicity is conspicuously absent around the Deep River Basin and most of North Carolina east of the Appalachian Mountains. In March 2012 we installed a 12 station broadband seismic network surrounding the Sanford Sub-Basin of the Deep River Basin to measure unrecorded seismicity. Through fifteen months of data collection, we have confidently detected and located more than 160 low magnitude seismic events within the array. However, the event locations cluster in four locations - three of which are near local rock quarries and one is near an unidentified anthropic feature. Further, these events consistently occur between the hours of 9am and 6pm local time, Monday through Friday indicating that they are anthropogenic. The Deep River Basin is one of the most likely places east of the Appalachian Mountains in North Carolina to be seismically active, yet we have measured no natural seismicity. Using receiver functions and known origins of the local seismic events we will be examining the crustal structure beneath the Deep River Basin to explain the conspicuous lack of local seismic activity.

  15. Seismic Forecasting of Eruptions at Dormant StratoVolcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic monitoring data provide important constraints on tracking magmatic ascent and eruption. Based on direct experience with over 25 and review of over 10 additional eruption sequences at 24 volcanoes, we have identified 4 phases of precursory seismicity. 1) Deep (>20 km) low frequency (DLF) earthquakes occur near the base of the crust as magma rises toward crustal reservoirs. This seismicity is the most difficult to observe, owing to generally small magnitudes (M<2.5) the significant depth. 2) Distal volcano-tectonic (DVT) earthquakes occur on tectonic faults from a 2 to 30+ km distance laterally from (not beneath) the eventual eruption site as magma intrudes into and rises out of upper crustal reservoirs to depths of 2-3 km. A survey of 111 eruptions of 83 previously dormant volcanoes, (including all eruptions of VEI >4 since 1955) shows they were all preceded by significant DVT seismicity, usually felt. This DVT seismicity is easily observed owing to magnitudes generally reaching M>3.5. The cumulative DVT energy correlates to the intruding magma volume. 3) Low frequency (LF) earthquakes, LF tremor and contained explosions occur as magma interacts with the shallow hydrothermal system (<2 km depth), while the distal seismicity dies off.4) Shortly after this, repetitive self-similar proximal seismicity may occur and may dominate the seismic records as magma rises to the surface. We present some examples of this seismic progression to demonstrate that data from a single short-period vertical station are often sufficient to forecast eruption onsets.

  16. First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2008-03-21

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earth¬quakes were classified as random events.

  17. Seismic stratigraphy and Late Quaternary evolution of Mobile Bay and Mississippi Sound, Alabama -- A record of large- and small-scale fluvial systems through multiple sea-level cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, David Lawrence, Jr.

    Examination of the Mississippi and Alabama shelf, mapping of offshore incised valleys and shelf-edge deltas, and determination of their feeder systems has been the subject of numerous investigations focusing on the Mobile River with considerable variation. To address this controversy approximately 750 km of high-resolution seismic data, 11 rotary drill cores, 16 vibracores, and 1 GeoProbe core were collected from Mobile Bay, the Mobile Bay-head Delta, Mississippi Sound, and along Cedar Point Peninsula to map the headward components of previously published offshore valleys and to compare the incised-valley fill to the idealized model of Zaitlin et al. (1994). Seismic data show that the Late Quaternary stratigraphy is composed of four unconformity-bound stacked seismic units. This study focuses on the upper two Seismic Units. The older unconformable surface is an exposure surface sampled in cores and interpreted as the Oxygen Isotope Stage 6 Sequence Boundary. Mapping of the Stage 6 Sequence Boundary shows a complex network of sinuous channels that flowed across Mobile Bay and eastern Mississippi Sound separated by a well-developed terraced morphology. The youngest unconformity is an exposure surface sampled in cores and based on 14C data is interpreted as the Oxygen Isotope Stage 2 Sequence Boundary of the last lowstand in sea-level. Mapping of the Stage 2 Sequence Boundary indicates that all systems re-incised their older lowstand valleys in approximately the same locations and are again bound by a well-developed terrace morphology. Lithologic data show that the valley-fill sequences differ from the idealized model. The Stage 6 to 5e valley fill is composed of alluvial sediment capped by bay-head delta facies whereas Stage 2 to 1 valley fill is solely composed of central basin sediments. The absence of Stage 2 to 1 bay-head delta facies implies backstepping of bay-head deltas from the Alabama shelf to the northern shorelines of Mobile Bay and Mississippi Sound

  18. SOAR Telescope seismic performance II: seismic mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Jonathan H.; Muñoz, Freddy; Warner, Michael; Rivera, Rossano; Martínez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We describe design modifications to the SOAR telescope intended to reduce the impact of future major earthquakes, based on the facility's experience during recent events, most notably the September 2015 Illapel earthquake. Specific modifications include a redesign of the encoder systems for both azimuth and elevation, seismic trigger for the emergency stop system, and additional protections for the telescope secondary mirror system. The secondary mirror protection may combine measures to reduce amplification of seismic vibration and "fail-safe" components within the assembly. The status of these upgrades is presented.

  19. Application of the Neo-Deterministic Seismic Microzonation Procedure in Bulgaria and Validation of the Seismic Input Against Eurocode 8

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanka, Paskaleva; Mihaela, Kouteva; Franco, Vaccari; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2008-07-08

    The earthquake record and the Code for design and construction in seismic regions in Bulgaria have shown that the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria is exposed to a high seismic risk due to local shallow and regional strong intermediate-depth seismic sources. The available strong motion database is quite limited, and therefore not representative at all of the real hazard. The application of the neo-deterministic seismic hazard assessment procedure for two main Bulgarian cities has been capable to supply a significant database of synthetic strong motions for the target sites, applicable for earthquake engineering purposes. The main advantage of the applied deterministic procedure is the possibility to take simultaneously and correctly into consideration the contribution to the earthquake ground motion at the target sites of the seismic source and of the seismic wave propagation in the crossed media. We discuss in this study the result of some recent applications of the neo-deterministic seismic microzonation procedure to the cities of Sofia and Russe. The validation of the theoretically modeled seismic input against Eurocode 8 and the few available records at these sites is discussed.

  20. New comprehensive standard seismic noise models and 3D seismic noise variation for Morocco territory, North Africa, obtained using seismic broadband stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fellah, Younes; El-Aal, Abd El-Aziz Khairy Abd; Harnafi, Mimoun; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    In the current work, we constructed new comprehensive standard seismic noise models and 3D temporal-spatial seismic noise level cubes for Morocco in north-west Africa to be used for seismological and engineering purposes. Indeed, the original global standard seismic noise models published by Peterson (1993) and their following updates by Astiz and Creager (1995), Ekström (2001) and Berger et al. (2003) had no contributing seismic stations deployed in North Africa. Consequently, this preliminary study was conducted to shed light on seismic noise levels specific to north-west Africa. For this purpose, 23 broadband seismic stations recently installed in different structural domains throughout Morocco are used to study the nature and characteristics of seismic noise and to create seismic noise models for Morocco. Continuous data recorded during 2009, 2010 and 2011 were processed and analysed to construct these new noise models and 3D noise levels from all stations. We compared the Peterson new high-noise model (NHNM) and low-noise model (NLNM) with the Moroccan high-noise model (MHNM) and low-noise model (MLNM). These new noise models are comparable to the United States Geological Survey (USGS) models in the short period band; however, in the period range 1.2 s to 1000 s for MLNM and 10 s to 1000 s for MHNM display significant variations. This variation is attributed to differences in the nature of seismic noise sources that dominate Morocco in these period bands. The results of this study have a new perception about permanent seismic noise models for this spectacular region and can be considered a significant contribution because it supplements the Peterson models and can also be used to site future permanent seismic stations in Morocco.

  1. Seismic measurements of explosions in the Tatum Salt Dome, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Healy, J.H.; Jackson, W.H.; Warren, D.R.

    1967-01-01

    Project Sterling provided for the detonation of a nuclear device in the cavity resulting from the Salmon nuclear explosion in the Tatum salt dome in southern Mississippi. It also provided for a high explosive (HE) comparison shot in a nearby drill hole. The purpose of the experiment was to gather information on the seismic decoupling of a nuclear explosion in a cavity by comparing seismic signals from a nuclear shot in the Salmon cavity with seismic signals recorded from Salmon and with seismic signals recorded from a muall (about 2 tons) HE shot in the salt dome. Surface seismic measurements were made by the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, and the Air Force Technical Applications Center with coordination and overall direction by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory. This report covers only the seismic measurements made by the U. S. Geological Survey. The first objective of this report is to describe the field recording procedures and the data obtained by the U. S. Geological Survey from these events. The second objective is to describe the spectral analyses which have been made on the data and the relative seismic amplitudes which have been determined from these analyses.

  2. Seismic Noise Characterization in the Northern Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, S.; Deshon, H. R.; Boyd, O. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a study of seismic noise sources present within the northern Mississippi embayment near the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). The northern embayment contains up to 1 km of unconsolidated coastal plain sediments overlying bedrock, making it an inherently noisy environment for seismic stations. The area is known to display high levels of cultural noise caused by agricultural activity, passing cars, trains, etc. We characterize continuous broadband seismic noise data recorded for the months of March through June 2009 at six stations operated by the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network. We looked at a single horizontal component of data during nighttime hours, defined as 6:15PM to 5:45AM Central Standard Time, which we determined to be the lowest amplitude period of noise for the region. Hourly median amplitudes were compared to daily average wind speeds downloaded from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We find a correlation between time periods of increased noise and days with high wind speeds, suggesting that wind is likely a prevalent source of seismic noise in the area. The effects of wind on seismic recordings may result from wind induced tree root movement which causes ground motion to be recorded at the vaults located ~3m below ground. Automated studies utilizing the local network or the EarthScope Transportable Array, scheduled to arrive in the area in 2010-11, should expect to encounter wind induced noise fluctuations and must account for this in their analysis.

  3. Seismicity of the northern part of the Kenya Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointing, A. J.; Maguire, P. K. H.; Khan, M. A.; Francis, D. J.; Swain, C. J.; Shah, E. R.; Griffiths, D. H.

    1985-07-01

    During the first eight months of 1981 earthquake data were recorded during a passive seismic experiment (KRISP 81) in northern Kenya. An eight station, small aperture, short period seismic array was located on the eastern margin of the Rift at 1.7°N, 37.3°E. Two single-point, three component stations were also located north and west of the array, forming a triangular network with approximately 150 km length sides. 2329 events were recorded during the 231 days of recording. A preliminary micro-earthquake seismicity map of the central and northern parts of the country has been produced, using a uniform half space velocity model derived from the analysis of apparent velocities, azimuths and P-S times of event arrivals at the small aperture array. Events located within the Rift show a marked north-south linearity extending from Lakes Bogoria and Baringo in the south, into the Sugata Valley to the north. Around the southern part of Lake Turkana the seismicity becomes more diffuse. However, there is little seismic activity associated with the broad zone of splay faulting that exists in northern Kenya. The seismicity observed along the axis of the Rift suggests a continuation to about 2.5°N of the tectonic style observed over the apex of the Kenya dome. A relatively quiet zone separates the activity within the Rift from a second, diffuse, north-south zone of seismicity approximately 150 km further to the east.

  4. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Deaggregation for Selected Egyptian Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawires, Rashad; Peláez, José A.; Fat-Helbary, Raafat E.; Panzera, Francesco; Ibrahim, Hamza A.; Hamdache, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration (SA) values has been performed for the Egyptian territory. Eighty-eight potential seismic sources (for shallow- and intermediate-depth seismicity) in and around Egypt were identified and characterized based on an updated and unified earthquake catalog spanning the time period from 2200 B.C. until 2013 A.D. A logic-tree approach was followed, after a sensitivity analysis, to consider the epistemic uncertainty in the different input parameters, including the selected ground-motion attenuation models to predict the ground motion for the different tectonic environments. Then the seismic hazard deaggregation results, in terms of distance and magnitude, for the most important cities in Egypt have been computed to help understanding the relative contributions of the different seismic sources. Seismic hazard deaggregation, in particular, was computed for PGA and SA at periods of 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0 s for rock-site conditions, and for 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years. In general, the results at most of the cities indicate that the distance to the seismic sources which mostly contribute to the seismic hazard is mainly controlled by the nearby seismic sources (especially for PGA). However, distant events contribute more to the hazard for larger spectral periods (for 1.0 and 2.0 s). A significant result of this type of work is that seismic hazard deaggregation provides useful data on the distance and magnitude of the contributing seismic sources to the hazard in a certain place, which can be applied to generate scenario earthquakes and select acceleration records for seismic design.

  5. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Deaggregation for Selected Egyptian Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawires, Rashad; Peláez, José A.; Fat-Helbary, Raafat E.; Panzera, Francesco; Ibrahim, Hamza A.; Hamdache, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration (SA) values has been performed for the Egyptian territory. Eighty-eight potential seismic sources (for shallow- and intermediate-depth seismicity) in and around Egypt were identified and characterized based on an updated and unified earthquake catalog spanning the time period from 2200 B.C. until 2013 A.D. A logic-tree approach was followed, after a sensitivity analysis, to consider the epistemic uncertainty in the different input parameters, including the selected ground-motion attenuation models to predict the ground motion for the different tectonic environments. Then the seismic hazard deaggregation results, in terms of distance and magnitude, for the most important cities in Egypt have been computed to help understanding the relative contributions of the different seismic sources. Seismic hazard deaggregation, in particular, was computed for PGA and SA at periods of 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0 s for rock-site conditions, and for 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years. In general, the results at most of the cities indicate that the distance to the seismic sources which mostly contribute to the seismic hazard is mainly controlled by the nearby seismic sources (especially for PGA). However, distant events contribute more to the hazard for larger spectral periods (for 1.0 and 2.0 s). A significant result of this type of work is that seismic hazard deaggregation provides useful data on the distance and magnitude of the contributing seismic sources to the hazard in a certain place, which can be applied to generate scenario earthquakes and select acceleration records for seismic design.

  6. Recent Impacts on Mars: Cluster Properties and Seismic Signal Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justine Daubar, Ingrid; Schmerr, Nicholas; Banks, Maria; Marusiak, Angela; Golombek, Matthew P.

    2016-10-01

    Impacts are a key source of seismic waves that are a primary constraint on the formation, evolution, and dynamics of planetary objects. Geophysical missions such as InSight (Banerdt et al., 2013) will monitor seismic signals from internal and external sources. New martian craters have been identified in orbital images (Malin et al., 2006; Daubar et al., 2013). Seismically detecting such impacts and subsequently imaging the resulting craters will provide extremely accurate epicenters and source crater sizes, enabling calibration of seismic velocities, the efficiency of impact-seismic coupling, and retrieval of detailed regional and local internal structure.To investigate recent impact-induced seismicity on Mars, we have assessed ~100 new, dated impact sites. In approximately half of new impacts, the bolide partially disintegrates in the atmosphere, forming multiple craters in a cluster. We incorporate the resulting, more complex, seismic effects in our model. To characterize the variation between sites, we focus on clustered impacts. We report statistics of craters within clusters: diameters, morphometry indicating subsurface layering, strewn-field azimuths indicating impact direction, and dispersion within clusters indicating combined effects of bolide strength and elevation of breakup.Measured parameters are converted to seismic predictions for impact sources using a scaling law relating crater diameter to the momentum and source duration, calibrated for impacts recorded by Apollo (Lognonne et al., 2009). We use plausible ranges for target properties, bolide densities, and impact velocities to bound the seismic moment. The expected seismic sources are modeled in the near field using a 3-D wave propagation code (Petersson et al., 2010) and in the far field using a 1-D wave propagation code (Friederich et al., 1995), for a martian seismic model. Thus we calculate the amplitudes of seismic phases at varying distances, which can be used to evaluate the detectability

  7. Studies of digital seismic data obtained in geothermal and volcanic regions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.

    1982-08-10

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) study of tremor waveforms recorded at Mount St. Helens during 1980; (2) study of seismicity recorded during 1981 at Mount St. Helens; and (3) the monitoring of seismicity accompanying hydrofracturing experiments carried out in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. (ACR)

  8. Regional variations in seismic boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumlyanska, Ludmila

    2010-05-01

    Dividing of the Earth into zones in the frame one-dimensional velocity model was proposed Jeffreys and Gutenberg is the first half of XX century. They recovered the following zones: A - the crust; B - zone in the depth interval 33-413 km, C - zone 413-984 km, D - zone 984-2898 km, E - 2898-4982 km, F - 4982-5121 km, G - 5121-6371 km (centre of the Earth). These zones differ in their seismic properties. Later, zone D was divided to the areas D' (984-2700 km) and D" (2700-2900 km). At present, this scheme is significantly modified and only the layer D" is in wide use. The more seismological studies are carried out, the more seismic boundaries appear. Boundaries at 410, 520, 670, and 2900 km, at which increase in the velocity of the seismic waves is particularly noticeable are considered as having global significance. Moreover, there are indications of the existence of geophysical boundaries at 800, 1200-1300, 1700, 1900-2000 km. Using 3D P-velocity model of the mantle based on Taylor approximation method for solving of the inverse kinematics multi-dimensional seismic task we have obtained seismic boundaries for the area covering 20-55° E × 40-55° N. Data on the time of first arrivals of P waves from earthquakes and nuclear explosions recorded at ISC stations during 1964-2002 were used as input to construct a 3-D model. The model has two a priori limits: 1) the velocity is a continuous function of spatial coordinates, 2) the function v(r)/r where r is a radius in the spherical coordinate system r, φ, λ decreases with depth. The first limitation is forced since velocity leaps can not be sustainably restored from the times of first arrival; the second one follows from the nature of the observed data. Results presented as horizontal sections of the actual velocity every 25 km in the depth interval 850-2850 km, and as the longitudinal and latitudinal sections of the discrepancy on the 1-D reference model, obtained as a result of solving of the inversion task at 1

  9. The seismic noise wavefield is not diffuse.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    Passive seismology is burgeoning under the apparent theoretical support of diffuse acoustics. However, basic physical arguments suggest that this theory may not be applicable to seismic noise. A procedure is developed to establish the applicability of the diffuse field paradigm to a wavefield, based on testing the latter for azimuthal isotropy and spatial homogeneity. This procedure is then applied to the seismic noise recorded at 65 sites covering a wide variety of environmental and subsoil conditions. Considering the instantaneous oscillation vector measured at single triaxial stations, the hypothesis of azimuthal isotropy is rejected in all cases with high confidence, which makes the spatial homogeneity test unnecessary and leads directly to conclude that the seismic noise wavefield is not diffuse. However, such a conclusion has no practical effect on passive imaging, which is also possible in non-diffuse wavefields.

  10. Seismic Instrumentation Placement Recommendations Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.N.

    1998-09-30

    DOE Order 420.1, ''Facility Safety'', requires that facilities or sites with hazardous materials be provided with instrumentation or other means to detect and record the occurrences and severity of seismic events. These requirements assure that necessary records are available after an earthquake for evaluation purposes and to supplement other data to justify a facility restart or curtailing plant operations after an earthquake. This report documents the basis for the selection of Savannah River Site areas and existing facilities to be instrumented. The need to install instrumentation in new facilities such as the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility, Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility and the Accelerator Production of Tritium Facility will be assessed separately.

  11. Astor Pass Seismic Surveys Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, John; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Faulds, James; Eisses, Amy; Kell, Annie; Frary, Roxanna; Kent, Graham

    2011-08-05

    In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and Optim re-processed, or collected and processed, over 24 miles of 2d seismic-reflection data near the northwest corner of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The network of 2d land surveys achieved a near-3d density at the Astor Pass geothermal prospect that the PLPT drilled during Nov. 2010 to Feb. 2011. The Bureau of Indian Affairs funded additional seismic work around the Lake, and an extensive, detailed single-channel marine survey producing more than 300 miles of section, imaging more than 120 ft below the Lake bottom. Optim’s land data collection utilized multiple heavy vibrators and recorded over 200 channels live, providing a state-of-the-art reflection-refraction data set. After advanced seismic analysis including first-arrival velocity optimization and prestack depth migration, the 2d sections show clear fault-plane reflections, in some areas as deep as 4000 ft, tying to distinct terminations of the mostly volcanic stratigraphy. Some lines achieved velocity control to 3000 ft depth; all lines show reflections and terminations to 5000 ft depth. Three separate sets of normal faults appear in an initial interpretation of fault reflections and stratigraphic terminations, after loading the data into the OpendTect 3d seismic visualization system. Each preliminary fault set includes a continuous trace more than 3000 ft long, and a swarm of short fault strands. The three preliminary normal-fault sets strike northerly with westward dip, northwesterly with northeast dip, and easterly with north dip. An intersection of all three fault systems documented in the seismic sections at the end of Phase I helped to locate the APS-2 and APS-3 slimholes. The seismic sections do not show the faults connected to the Astor Pass tufa spire, suggesting that we have imaged mostly Tertiary-aged faults. We hypothesize that the Recent, active faults that produced the tufa through hotspring

  12. Seismic Imaging of Open Subsurface Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S. C.; Pitarka, A.; Matzel, E.; Aguiar, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of high-pressure fluid into the subsurface is proven to stimulate geothermal, oil, and gas production by opening cracks that increase permeability. The effectiveness of increasing permeability by high-pressure injection has been revolutionized by the introduction of "proppants" into the injected fluid to keep cracks open after the pressure of the stimulation activity ends. The network of fractures produced during stimulation is most commonly inferred by the location of micro-earthquakes. However, existing (closed) fractures may open aseismically, so the whole fracture network may not be imaged by micro-seismic locations alone. Further, whether all new fractures remain open and for how long remains unclear. Open cracks, even fluid-filled cracks, scatter seismic waves because traction forces are not transmitted across the gap. Numerical simulation confirms that an open crack with dimensions on the order of 10 meters can scatter enough seismic energy to change the coda of seismic signals. Our simulations show that changes in seismic coda due to newly opened fractures are only a few percent of peak seismogram amplitudes, making signals from open cracks difficult to identify. We are developing advanced signal processing methods to identify candidate signals that originate from open cracks. These methods are based on differencing seismograms that are recorded before and after high-pressure fluid injection events to identify changes in the coda. The origins of candidate signals are located using time-reversal techniques to determine if the signals are indeed associated with a coherent structure. The source of scattered energy is compared to micro-seismic event locations to determine whether cracks opened seismically or aseismically. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675612.

  13. Propagation of seismic waves in tall buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    1998-01-01

    A discrete-time wave propagation formulation of the seismic response of tall buildings is introduced. The building is modeled as a layered medium, similar to a layered soil medium, and is subjected to vertically propagating seismic shear waves. Soil layers and the bedrock under the foundation are incorporated in the formulation as additional layers. Seismic response is expressed in terms of the wave travel times between the layers, and the wave reflection and transmission coefficients at the layer interfaces. The equations account for the frequency-dependent filtering effects of the foundation and floor masses. The calculation of seismic response is reduced to a pair of simple finite-difference equations for each layer, which can be solved recursively starting from the bedrock. Compared to the commonly used vibration formulation, the wave propagation formulation provides several advantages, including simplified calculations, better representation of damping, ability to account for the effects of the soil layers under the foundation, and better tools for identification and damage detection from seismic records. Examples presented show the versatility of the method. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Assessment of seismic design response factors of concrete wall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwafy, Aman

    2011-03-01

    To verify the seismic design response factors of high-rise buildings, five reference structures, varying in height from 20- to 60-stories, were selected and designed according to modern design codes to represent a wide range of concrete wall structures. Verified fiber-based analytical models for inelastic simulation were developed, considering the geometric nonlinearity and material inelasticity of the structural members. The ground motion uncertainty was accounted for by employing 20 earthquake records representing two seismic scenarios, consistent with the latest understanding of the tectonic setting and seismicity of the selected reference region (UAE). A large number of Inelastic Pushover Analyses (IPAs) and Incremental Dynamic Collapse Analyses (IDCAs) were deployed for the reference structures to estimate the seismic design response factors. It is concluded that the factors adopted by the design code are adequately conservative. The results of this systematic assessment of seismic design response factors apply to a wide variety of contemporary concrete wall buildings with various characteristics.

  15. Seismic activity monitoring in the Izvorul Muntelui dam region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borleanu, Felix; Otilia Placinta, Anca; Popa, Mihaela; Adelin Moldovan, Iren; Popescu, Emilia

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes occurrences near the artificial water reservoirs are caused by stress variation due to the weight of water, weakness of fractures or faults and increasing of pore pressure in crustal rocks. In the present study we aim to investigate how Izvorul Muntelui dam, located in the Eastern Carpathians influences local seismicity. For this purpose we selected from the seismic bulletins computed within National Data Center of National Institute for Earth Physics, Romania, crustal events occurred between 984 and 2015 in a range of 0.3 deg around the artificial lake. Subsequently to improve the seismic monitoring of the region we applied a cross-correlation detector on the continuous recordings of Bicaz (BIZ) seismic stations. Besides the tectonic events we detected sources within this region that periodically generate artificial evens. We couldn't emphasize the existence of a direct correlation between the water level variations and natural seismicity of the investigated area.

  16. Seismic Hazard of Eritrea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagos, L.; Arvidsson, R.

    2003-04-01

    The method of spatially smoothed seismicity developed by Frankel(1995) and later extended by Lapajne et al.(1997) , is applied to estimate the seismic hazard of Eritrea. The extended method unlike the original one involves the delineation of the whole region into subregions with statistically determined directions of seismogenic faults pertaining to the respective tectonic regions (Poljak, 2000). Fault-rupture oriented elliptical Gaussian smoothing results in spatial models of expected seismicity. Seismic catalogue was compiled from ISC, NEIC, and Turyomurgyendo(1996) and homogenized to Ms. Three seismicity models suggested by Frankel(1995) which are based on different time and magnitude intervals are used in this approach, and a fourth model suggested by Lapajne et al.(2000), which is based on the seismic energy release is also used to enhance the influence of historical events on the hazard computation. Activity rates and maximum likelihood estimates of b- values for the different models are computed using the OHAZ program. The western part of the region shows no seismic activity. b -value for models 1-3 is estimated to be 0.91. Mmax has been estimated to be 7.0. Correlation distances are obtained objectively from the location error in the seismic catalogue. The attenuation relationship by Ambraseys et al .(1996) was found suitable for the region under study. PGA values for 10% probability of exceedence in 50 years (return period of 475 years) are computed for each model and a combined seismic hazard map was produced by subjectively assigning weights to each of the models. A worst case map is also obtained showing the highest PGA values at each location from the four hazard maps. The map indicates a higher hazard along the main tectonic features of the East African and the Red sea rift systems, with its highest PGA values within Eritrea exceeding 25% of g being located north of the red sea port of Massawa. In areas around Asmara PGA values exceed 10% of g.

  17. Study of seismic exploration anti-interference technique for metallic ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jianxun, L.; Mingcai, X.; Baowei, Z.; Kai, W.

    2013-12-01

    In the metallic ore deposits areas, various interfering factors are serious, the noise has always been the most troublesome problem in seismic prospecting. During seismic data acquisition, the methods for increasing the energy of source could be used to enhance the effective signal strength, and some methods such as stack technique helps to suppress the external interference, including vertical stacking, horizontal stacking, etc. Noise elimination technology plays an important role in the workflow of seismic data processing. Aiming at all kinds of interference in seismic records, a series of denoising technology are adopted for random noise and coherent noise, the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of seismic data is improved.

  18. Improved characterization of local seismicity using the Dubai Seismic Network, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Khatibi, Eman; Abou Elenean, K. M.; Megahed, A. S.; El-Hussain, I.

    2014-08-01

    In April 2006, Dubai Municipality established a broadband seismological network in Dubai Emirate, United Arab Emirates (UAE). This network was the first seismic network in UAE and consists of four remote seismic stations to observe local and regional seismic activity that may have an effect on Dubai Emirate and the surrounding areas. The network exchanges real-time data with the National Center of Meteorology and Seismology in Abu Dhabi, the Earthquake Monitoring Center in Oman and imports in real-time data from few Global Seismic Network stations, which increases the aperture of the network. In April 2012, Dubai Municipality installed an additional five free-field strong motion stations inside the urban area to estimate and publish real-time ShakeMaps for public and decision makers. Although the local seismic activity from April 2006 to June 2013 reflects low seismic activity with the Emirate, it indicates active tectonics in the relatively aseismic northern Oman Mountains region. A few inland clusters of micro-to-small earthquakes have been identified with the new network. A clear cluster of small-to-moderate earthquakes took place in the eastern part of UAE to the east of Masafi, while two clusters of micro-to-small earthquakes took place at Wadi Nazwa and northern Huwaylat. Focal mechanisms of few well recorded earthquakes in this region indicate normal faulting, generally trending NE in parallel to the transition shear zone between the collision at Zagros and the subduction at the Makran zone.

  19. Two applications of time reversal mirrors: seismic radio and seismic radar.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Sherif M; Schuster, Gerard T

    2011-10-01

    Two seismic applications of time reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and tested with field experiments. The first one is sending, receiving, and decoding coded messages similar to a radio except seismic waves are used. The second one is, similar to radar surveillance, detecting and tracking a moving object(s) in a remote area, including the determination of the objects speed of movement. Both applications require the prior recording of calibration Green's functions in the area of interest. This reference Green's function will be used as a codebook to decrypt the coded message in the first application and as a moving sensor for the second application. Field tests show that seismic radar can detect the moving coordinates (x(t), y(t), z(t)) of a person running through a calibration site. This information also allows for a calculation of his velocity as a function of location. Results with the seismic radio are successful in seismically detecting and decoding coded pulses produced by a hammer. Both seismic radio and radar are highly robust to signals in high noise environments due to the super-stacking property of TRMs. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  20. Bighorns Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE): Amplitude Response to Different Seismic Charge Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, S. H.; Miller, K. C.; Worthington, L. L.; Snelson, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    Contrary to popular belief, charge weight is not the most important engineering parameter determining the seismic amplitudes generated by a shot. The scientific literature has long claimed that the relationship, A~R2L1/2, where A is the seismic amplitude generated by a shot, R is the radius of the seismic charge and L is the length of that charge, holds. Assuming the coupling to the formation and the pressure generated by the explosive are constants, this relationship implies that the one should be able to increase the charge radius while decreasing the charge length and obtain more seismic amplitude with less charge weight. This has significant implications for the economics of lithospheric seismic shots, because shallower holes and small charge sizes decrease cost. During the Bighorns Array Seismic Experiment (BASE) conducted in the summer of 2010, 24 shots with charge sizes ranging from 110 to 900 kg and drill hole diameters of 300 and 450 mm were detonated and recorded by an array of up to 2000 single-channel Texan seismographs. Maximum source-receiver offset of 300 km. Five of these shots were located within a one-acre square in an effort to eliminate coupling effects due to differing geological formations. We present a quantitative comparison of the data from these five shots to experimentally test the equation above.

  1. Bighorns Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE): Amplitude Response to Different Seismic Charge Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, S. H., Killer, K. C., Worthington, L. L., Snelson, C. M.

    2010-09-02

    Contrary to popular belief, charge weight is not the most important engineering parameter determining the seismic amplitudes generated by a shot. The scientific literature has long claimed that the relationship, A ~R2L1/2, where A is the seismic amplitude generated by a shot, R is the radius of the seismic charge and L is the length of that charge, holds. Assuming the coupling to the formation and the pressure generated by the explosive are constants, this relationship implies that the one should be able to increase the charge radius while decreasing the charge length and obtain more seismic amplitude with less charge weight. This has significant implications for the economics of lithospheric seismic shots, because shallower holes and small charge sizes decrease cost. During the Bighorns Array Seismic Experiment (BASE) conducted in the summer of 2010, 24 shots with charge sizes ranging from 110 to 900 kg and drill hole diameters of 300 and 450 mm were detonated and recorded by an array of up to 2000 single-channel Texan seismographs. Maximum source-receiver offset of 300 km. Five of these shots were located within a one-acre square in an effort to eliminate coupling effects due to differing geological formations. We present a quantitative comparison of the data from these five shots to experimentally test the equation above.

  2. Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

    2000-07-17

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 506 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the second quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twenty-seven seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46--47{degree} N latitude and 119--120{degree} W longitude; 12 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 2 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 5 were quarry blasts. Three earthquakes appear to be related to geologic structures, eleven earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and seven earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion

  3. First quarter Hanford seismic report for fiscal year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

    2000-02-23

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EW uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 311 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twelve seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46--47{degree}N latitude and 119--120{degree}W longitude; 2 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 1 was a quarry blast. Two earthquakes appear to be related to a major geologic structure, no earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 9 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers

  4. Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

    2000-09-01

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its con-tractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (E WRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 818 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Thirteen seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46-47{degree} N latitude and 119-120{degree} W longitude; 7 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 1 was an earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments, and 5 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement. Three earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 10 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the third quarter of FY 2000.

  5. Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2008-06-26

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

  6. The INGV seismic monitoring system: activities during the first month of the 2016 Amatrice seismic sequence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scognamiglio, L.; Margheriti, L.; Moretti, M.; Pintore, S.

    2016-12-01

    At 01:36:32 UTC on August 24, 2016 an earthquake of ML=6.0 occurred in Central Italy, near Amatrice village; 21 s after the origin time, the first automatic location became available while the first magnitude estimate followed 47s after. The INGV seismologists on duty provided the alert to the Italian Civil Protection Department and thereby triggered the seismic emergency protocol In the hours after the earthquake, hundreds of events were recorded by the Italian Seismic Network of the INGV. SISMIKO, the coordinating body of the emergency seismic network, was activated few minutes after the mainshock. The main goal of this emergency group is to install temporary dense seismic network integrated with the existing permanent networks in the epicentral area to better constrain the aftershock hypocenters. From August the 24th to the 30th, SISMIKO deployed 18 seismic stations, generally six components (equipped with both seismometer and accelerometer), 13 of which were transmitting in real-time to the INGV seismic surveillance room in Rome. All data acquired are available at the European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA). The seismic sequence in the first month generated thousands of earthquakes which were processed and detected by the INGV automated localization system. We analyzed the performance of this system. Hundreds of those events were located by seismologists on shifts, the others were left to be analyzed by the Bollettino Sismico Italiano (BSI). The procedures of the BSI revise and integrate all available data. This allows for a better constrained location and for a more realistic hypocentral depth estimation. The first eight hours of August 24th were the most critical for the INGV surveillance room. Data recorded in these hours were carefully re-analyzed by BSI operators and the number of located events increased from 133 to 408, while the magnitude of completeness dropped significantly from about 3.5 to 2.7.

  7. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  8. Combining Seismic Noise Techniques for Landslide Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilz, Marco; Parolai, Stefano; Bindi, Dino; Saponaro, Annamaria; Abdybachaev, Ulan

    2014-08-01

    A strong topographic relief and the presence of weakly consolidated sediments create favorable conditions for the development of landslides around the eastern rim of the Fergana Basin (Central Asia). In summer 2012, a field experiment employing small aperture seismic arrays was carried out on an unstable slope, using ambient vibration recordings. The aim of the study was to constrain the seismic response of a potential future landslide and to map lateral and vertical changes in the shear-wave velocity of the surficial soil layers. Strong variations of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios in terms of amplitude and directionality indicated clear differences in local site effects, probably reflecting the stability of different sections of the slope. Results further showed resonant frequencies of both the entire unstable block, as well as for smaller, individual parts. The use of an ad hoc, passive seismic tomography approach based on noise correlograms allowed for the mapping of the shear-wave velocities of the sliding material, even in cases of significant topography relief. Based on the recording of seismic noise only, we clearly identified a low-velocity body of weakly consolidated claystone and limestone material, which can be interpreted as the landslide body, with laterally varying thickness.

  9. Seismically observed seiching in the Panama Canal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.; Ringler, A.T.; Hutt, C.R.; Gee, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    A large portion of the seismic noise spectrum is dominated by water wave energy coupled into the solid Earth. Distinct mechanisms of water wave induced ground motions are distinguished by their spectral content. For example, cultural noise is generally <1 s period, microseisms dominate the seismic spectrum from periods of 2 to 20 s, and the Earth's "hum" is in the range of 50 to 600 s. We show that in a large lake in the Panama Canal there is an additional source of long-period noise generated by standing water waves, seiches, induced by disturbances such as passing ships and wind pressure. We compare seismic waveforms to water level records and relate these observations to changes in local tilt and gravity due to an oscillating seiche. The methods and observations discussed in this paper provide a first step toward quantifying the impact of water inundation as recorded by seismometers. This type of quantified understanding of water inundation will help in future estimates of similar phenomena such as the seismic observations of tsunami impact. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Seismically observed seiching in the Panama Canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Ringler, A. T.; Hutt, C. R.; Gee, L. S.

    2011-04-01

    A large portion of the seismic noise spectrum is dominated by water wave energy coupled into the solid Earth. Distinct mechanisms of water wave induced ground motions are distinguished by their spectral content. For example, cultural noise is generally <1 s period, microseisms dominate the seismic spectrum from periods of 2 to 20 s, and the Earth's "hum" is in the range of 50 to 600 s. We show that in a large lake in the Panama Canal there is an additional source of long-period noise generated by standing water waves, seiches, induced by disturbances such as passing ships and wind pressure. We compare seismic waveforms to water level records and relate these observations to changes in local tilt and gravity due to an oscillating seiche. The methods and observations discussed in this paper provide a first step toward quantifying the impact of water inundation as recorded by seismometers. This type of quantified understanding of water inundation will help in future estimates of similar phenomena such as the seismic observations of tsunami impact.

  11. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    SciTech Connect

    Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient