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Sample records for ca tu thy

  1. Thi Qar Bee Farm Thi Qar, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    vegetation and fields where bees once gathered pollen and beekeepers face hardships from droughts and lack of financial assistance. 1... Beekeeping in the Fertile Crescent dates back to ancient Mesopotamia. However, beekeeping was virtually unknown in southern Iraq. In 2005, a small group of...engineers and farmers in Thi Qar province formed the Iraqi Beekeeping Association of Thi Qar and started to disseminate the culture of beekeeping

  2. THI1, a Thiamine Thiazole Synthase, Interacts with Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK33 and Modulates the S-Type Anion Channels and Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Long; Wang, Mei; Wu, Xiao-Meng; Chen, Dong-Hua; Lv, Hong-Jun; Shen, Jian-Lin; Qiao, Zhu; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine is required for both plant growth and development. Here, the involvement of a thiamine thiazole synthase, THI1, has been demonstrated in both guard cell abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and the drought response in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). THI1 overexpressors proved to be more sensitive to ABA than the wild type with respect to both the activation of guard cell slow type anion channels and stomatal closure; this effectively reduced the rate of water loss from the plant and thereby enhanced its level of drought tolerance. A yeast two-hybrid strategy was used to screen a cDNA library from epidermal strips of leaves for THI1 regulatory factors, and identified CPK33, a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase, as interactor with THI1 in a plasma membrane-delimited manner. Loss-of-function cpk33 mutants were hypersensitive to ABA activation of slow type anion channels and ABA-induced stomatal closure, while the CPK33 overexpression lines showed opposite phenotypes. CPK33 kinase activity was essential for ABA-induced stomatal closure. Consistent with their contrasting regulatory role over stomatal closure, THI1 suppressed CPK33 kinase activity in vitro. Together, our data reveal a novel regulatory role of thiamine thiazole synthase to kinase activity in guard cell signaling. PMID:26662273

  3. HMP Binding Protein ThiY and HMP-P Synthase THI5 Are Structural Homologues

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Shridhar; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Perry, Kay; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-10-14

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter system ThiXYZ transports N-formyl-4-amino-5-(aminomethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine (FAMP), a thiamin salvage pathway intermediate, into cells. FAMP is then converted to 4-amino-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) and recycled into the thiamin biosynthetic pathway. ThiY is the periplasmic substrate binding protein of the ThiXYZ system and delivers the substrate FAMP to the transmembrane domain. We report the crystal structure of Bacillus halodurans ThiY with FAMP bound at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. The crystal structure reveals that ThiY belongs to the group II periplasmic binding protein family. The closest structural homologues of ThiY are periplasmic binding proteins involved in alkanesulfonate/nitrate and bicarbonate transport. ThiY is also structurally homologous to thiamin binding protein (TbpA) and to thiaminase-I. THI5 is responsible for the synthesis of 4-amino-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway of eukaryotes and is approximately 25% identical in sequence with ThiY. A homology model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae THI5 was generated on the basis of the structure of ThiY. Many features of the thiamin pyrimidine binding site are shared between ThiY and THI5, suggesting a common ancestor.

  4. Structure of trifunctional THI20 from yeast

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-08-24

    In a recently characterized thiamin-salvage pathway, thiamin-degradation products are hydrolyzed by thiaminase II, yielding 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP). This compound is an intermediate in thiamin biosynthesis that, once phosphorylated by an HMP kinase, can be used to synthesize thiamin monophosphate. Here, the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae THI20, a trifunctional enzyme containing an N-terminal HMP kinase/HMP-P kinase (ThiD-like) domain and a C-terminal thiaminase II (TenA-like) domain, is presented. Comparison to structures of the monofunctional enzymes reveals that while the ThiD-like dimer observed in THI20 resembles other ThiD structures, the TenA-like domain, which is tetrameric in all previously reported structures, forms a dimer. Similarly, the active site of the ThiD-like domain of THI20 is highly similar to other known ThiD enzymes, while the TenA-like active site shows unique features compared with previously structurally characterized TenAs. In addition, a survey of known TenA structures revealed two structural classes, both of which have distinct conserved features. The TenA domain of THI20 possesses some features of both classes, consistent with its ability to hydrolyze both thiamin and the thiamin-degradation product 2-methyl-4-amino-5-aminomethylpyrimidine.

  5. Expression of Thy-1 on human hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Expression of Thy-1 on hematopoietic cells from human fetal liver (FL), cord blood (CB), and bone marrow (BM) was studied with a novel anti-Thy- 1 antibody, 5E10. Specificity of 5E10 for human Thy-1 was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of a 25-35-kD molecule, and the sequence of a cDNA that was cloned by immunoselection of COS cells transfected with a cDNA library derived from a 5E10+ cell line. Two- and three-color immunofluorescence staining experiments revealed that the Thy-1 expression is restricted to, an average, 1-4% of FL, CB, and BM cells, and binding to these cell types is essentially restricted to a very small subset of lymphoid cells and approximately 25% of CD34+ cells. Thy-1+ CD34+ cells were further characterized as CD38lo/CD45RO+/CD45RA- /CD71lo/c-kit(lo) and rhodamine 123dull. When CD34+ cells were sorted on the basis of Thy-1 expression, the majority of clonogenic cells were recovered in the CD34+Thy-1- fraction, whereas the majority of cells capable of producing myeloid colonies after 5-8 wk of long-term culture (long-term culture initiating cells) were recovered in the Thy-1+CD34+ fraction. In addition to CD34+ cells, Thy-1 was found to be expressed on a variable, very small number (< 1%) of CD34- mononuclear cells in BM, CB, and peripheral blood that were further characterized as CD3+ CD4+ lymphocytes. The restricted expression of Thy-1 on primitive hematopoietic cells is in agreement with a previous report (Baum et al., 1992. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 89:2804) in which Thy-1 expression was used to enrich for primitive hematopoietic cells from fetal tissue. Compared with those previous studies, we found Thy-1 expression on a larger proportion of CD34+ cells (25% in our study vs. 5% in Baum et al.) and furthermore performed studies on Thy-1 expression on CD34+ cells from CB, FL, and BM in relation to markers that are known to be differentially expressed on hematopoietic cells. Taken together our results indicate that Thy-1-specific antibody

  6. Atmospheric chemical composition of the peculiar carbon giant TU Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovina, L. A.; Polinovskii, G. A.; Pavlenko, Ya. V.; Kuznetsov, M. K.

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionary status of the bright peculiar carbon giant TU Gemis fairly uncertain. The possibility that this is aCH star—aGalactic halo star with characteristic chemical-composition anomalies—is considered. Unfortunately, data on the atmospheric chemical composition of TUGem are relatively few and are ambiguous. The results of an analysis of a moderate-resolution optical and near-infrared spectrum of TU Gem obtained on the 2-m telescope of Terskol Peak Observatory (Northern Caucasus) is presented. The atmospheric parameters of TU Gem T eff = 3100 K, C/O = 1.10, and [N/Fe] = 0.0 for the derived metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.0 are taken from [1]. The abundances of Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, and Cr are estimated to be normal or slightly enhanced, and the lithium abundance is log N(Li) = +0.1. The abundances of s-process elements are substantially enhanced in the atmosphere of TU Gem, namely, [s/Fe] ≈ 2, for both light and heavy s-process elements. The range of uncertainty in [Fe/H] is 0.0-0.3, and the uncertainties in other estimates are Δ[M/Fe]≈ ±0.3 and Δ[ s/Fe] = ±0.5. The results show that TU Gem is an anomalous carbon giant, but not a CH star.

  7. Historically Speaking, "Tu" or "Vocus"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maley, Catherine A.

    1972-01-01

    Comments on the usage of the second person pronouns of address ( tu" and vous") in French, and traces the usage from the fifteenth century to present day, reflecting social, religious, and political attitudes. (DS)

  8. Tu-144LL Factory scenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A jointly funded activity by the NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program and the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group took place to obtain experimental flight data on the Tu-144 supersonic transport built by Russia. The Tu-144 was modified by the Tupolev Aircraft Design Bureau, Moscow, Russia, in 1995-1996 into the Tu-144LL Flying Laboratory to perform flight experiments as part of the NASA HSR Program. Knowledge gained from the flights will benefit the NASA efforts to develop the technology that may enable design of an efficient, environmentally friendly second-generation supersonic transport in this country. This program involved eight experiments -- six aboard the aircraft and two ground test engine experiments. Between November 1996 and February 1998 the Tu-144LL flew 19 research flights. The follow-on Tu-144LL program encompassed about eight flights, focusing on extensions of five experiments from the first project and two new experiments to measure fuel system temperatures and to define in-flight wing deflections. This movie clip runs 1:17 minutes and shows several different views of the Russian Tu-144 LL supersonic transport, on the ramp, in its hangar, a rear view of the engine exhaust nozzles, the avionics bay, cockpit and finally a shot looking forward along the fuselage from the tail.

  9. Assessment of the Thies optical disdrometer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasson, Renato Prata de Moraes; da Cunha, Luciana Kindl; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2011-07-01

    Optical disdrometers have the potential to be low maintenance instruments that can measure drop-size distributions and drop-size distribution moments such as rainfall rate, radar reflectivity, optical extinction, and others. As with any other measurement device, their output is affected by different sources of uncertainty. To better understand these uncertainties, we compared rainfall accumulations that were measured by three dual tipping bucket stations, three Vaisala WXT510 compact weather stations, and four Thies optical disdrometers. We detected considerable bias between disdrometers and tipping buckets, as well as among disdrometers, that we attempted to minimize through calibrating diameter measurements. Although the calibration successfully decreased bias among disdrometers, it increased bias between disdrometer rainfall accumulations and tipping bucket accumulations, indicating that there are other relevant sources of error in the estimation of rainfall accumulation from disdrometer measurements. We developed a simulation capable of mimicking the disdrometer's operation during the calibration procedure and studied the effects of using three arbitrary laser beam patterns into the measurement of the spheres' diameters. The simulation successfully reproduced some of the behavior observed in calibration data, showing the dependence of the bias and the spread of sphere diameter measurements on the studied beam patterns. Furthermore, we designed a Monte-Carlo-based simulation to propagate the uncertainties of the measurement of spheres' diameters into the estimation of rainfall accumulations. We used the calculated uncertainties to correct rainfall accumulations which improved the agreement among disdrometers, although apparently overcorrected the accumulation for one of the instruments. Moreover we found the average correction to be related to both average and standard deviation of the diameter error and insensitive to the diameter error skewness. Overall we

  10. Cutaneous expression of Thy-1 in mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Fivenson, D. P.; Douglass, M. C.; Nickoloff, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    Dermal dendritic cells from eleven cases of mycosis fungoides (MF) (six patch and five plaque stage), two cases of pre-MF, and five specimens of normal human skin, were characterized immunohistochemically using a panel of antibodies including anti-human Thy-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; CD54), endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), CD1a, CD2, CD14, CD18, CD34, MAC387, KP-1, EBM-11, factor XIIIa, factor XIIIs, and S100. Thy-1 expression in normal skin was limited to the microvascular endothelium and perivascular dendritic cells. An extensive interstitial network of Thy-1+ dendritic cells was seen in the papillary dermis of all cases of MF, whereas no epidermal cells were Thy-1+. The mean +/- standard deviation of interstitial Thy-1+ cells per high power field in the dermis was: normal skin, 2.86 +/- 0.34; pre-MF, 15; patch stage MF, 13.4 +/- 7.08; plaque stage MF, 49.96 +/- 21.29. Thy-1+ dendritic cells morphologically resembled the factor XIIIa+ "dermal dendrocyte" (DD) and shared their VCAM-1+, ICAM-1+, CD1a, CD2-, CD14+, CD18+, EMB11+, factor XIIIa+, factor XI-IIs-, S100-, MAC387- and KP-1-immunophenotype in MF. Double labeling studies revealed up to 50% of Thy-1+DD were also factor XIIIa+ in MF. Immediately beneath these cells was a similar network of CD34+, Thy-1-, factor XIIIa- dendritic cells limited to the reticular dermis. Strong microvascular endothelial cell expression of Thy-1 and VCAM-1, and focal vascular ELAM-1 expression were also seen in MF. Distinct cellular compartmentalization (papillary dermis versus reticular dermis versus epidermis) of dendritic cells is demonstrated by the differential expression of Thy-1, factor XIIIa, and CD34 antigens. The extensive number and prominent dermal dendritic network in the papillary dermis juxtaposed between epidermal keratinocytes (KC) and dermal/epidermal T cells, suggests an important pathophysiologic role for this newly recognized and

  11. Thy-1, the enigmatic extrovert on the neuronal surface.

    PubMed

    Morris, R

    1992-10-01

    Thy-1 is a small glycoprotein of 110 amino acids which, folded in the characteristic structure of an immunoglobulin variable domain, are enchored to the plasma membrane via a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) tail (Fig. 1). It is a major component of the surface of various cell types, including neurons, at certain stages of their development. These qualities doubtlessly appeal to certain cognoscenti, but it is not clear why they would raise Thy-1 to the status of a favourite molecule. Indeed, few scientists readily admit to having a favourite. We study individual molecules because science is rooted in specific observations; but we do so in order to discover mechanisms of general importance. A molecule's appeal is dependent on its ability to reveal novel aspects of how nature works. Thy-1 has been unusual in this respect. It was the first lymphocyte surface antigen shown to be restricted to a functional subset of lymphocytes (T cells in the mouse), a finding crucial to the development of cellular immunology; it was one of the first cell surface molecules to be sequenced and indicated the importance of immunoglobulin domains and GPI anchors as structural motifs; it has been pivotal in studies demonstrating that GPI-anchored molecules are able to signal across the membrane they do not span. Thy-1 has revealed this much, however, with the charm of an adroit stripper: it has always promised glimpses of things more exciting than that displayed. In particular, the function of this molecule has never emerged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Isolation and characterization of Thy 1 homologue from human thymus.

    PubMed

    Bonewald, L F; Goust, J M; Sade, R M; Wang, A C

    1985-01-01

    A 40 000 M.W. glycoprotein was isolated from human thymus. This molecule binds lentil lectin, reacts with an antiserum made against the p25 antigen (the human Thy 1 homologue) and possesses almost identical amino acid composition as the p25 antigen and its 40 000 M.W. dimer.

  13. An astrocytic binding site for neuronal Thy-1 and its effect on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, E B; Leifer, D; Heng, J E; McConnell, J E; Gorla, M; Levin, L A; Barnstable, C J; Lipton, S A

    1995-01-01

    Thy-1, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is one of the most abundant glycoproteins on mammalian neurons. Nevertheless, its role in the peripheral or central nervous system is poorly understood. Certain monoclonal antibodies to Thy-1 promote neurite outgrowth by rodent central nervous system neurons in vitro, suggesting that Thy-1 functions, in part, by modulating neurite outgrowth. We describe a binding site for Thy-1 on astrocytes. This Thy-1-binding protein has been characterized by immunofluroesence with specific anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies and by three competitive binding assays using (i) anti-idiotype antibodies, (ii) purified Thy-1, and (iii) Thy-1-transfected cells. The Thy-1-binding protein may participate in axonal or dendritic development in the nervous system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7479964

  14. THI1, a protein involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin in Arabidopsis thaliana: structural analysis of THI1(A140V) mutant.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Assuero F; Dyszy, Fabio; Munte, Claudia E; Demarco, Ricardo; Beltramini, Leila M; Oliva, Glaucius; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Araujo, Ana P U

    2014-06-01

    In eukaryotes, there are still steps of the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway not completely understood. In Arabidopsis thaliana, THI1 protein has been associated with the synthesis of the thiazole ring, a finding supported by the identification of a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-like compound in its structure. Here, we investigated THI1 and its mutant THI1(A140V), responsible for the thiamin auxotrophy in a A. thaliana mutant line, aiming to clarify the impact of this mutation in the stability and activity of THI1. Recently, the THI1 orthologue (THI4) was revealed to be responsible for the donation of the sulfur atom from a cysteine residue to the thiazole ring in the thiamine intermediate. In this context, we carried out a cysteine quantification in THI1 and THI1(A140V) using electron spin resonance (ESR). These data showed that THI1(A140V) contains more sulfur-containing cysteines than THI1, indicating that the function as a sulfur donor is conserved, but the rate of donation reaction is somehow affected. Also, the bound compounds were isolated from both proteins and are present in different amounts in each protein. Unfolding studies presented differences in melting temperatures and also in the concentration of guanidine at which half of the protein unfolds, thus showing that THI1(A140V) has its conformational stability affected by the mutation. Hence, despite keeping its function in the early steps during the synthesis of TPP precursor, our studies have shown a decrease in the THI1(A140V) stability, which might be slowing down the biological activity of the mutant, and thus contributing to thiamin auxotrophy.

  15. Tu-144LL Rollout Ceremony - Ambassador Pickering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    U.S. Ambassador to Russia, Thomas J. Pickering, addresses a crowd of Tupolev employees and international media at the rollout of the newly modified TU-144LL March 17, 1996. The nose of the TU-144LL can be seen in the background.

  16. Thy1 (CD90) controls adipogenesis by regulating activity of the Src family kinase, Fyn

    PubMed Central

    Woeller, Collynn F.; O’Loughlin, Charles W.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Feldon, Steven E.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide obesity rates are at epidemic levels, and new insight into the regulation of obesity and adipogenesis are required. Thy1 (CD90), a cell surface protein with an enigmatic function, is expressed on subsets of fibroblasts and stem cells. We used a diet-induced obesity model to show that Thy1-null mice gain weight at a faster rate and gain 30% more weight than control C57BL/6 mice. During adipogenesis, Thy1 expression is lost in mouse 3T3-L1 cells. Overexpression of Thy1 blocked adipocyte formation and reduced mRNA and protein expression of an adipocyte marker, fatty acid-binding protein 4, by 5-fold. Although preadipocyte fibroblasts expressed Thy1 mRNA and protein, adipocytes from mouse and human fat tissue had almost undetectable Thy1 levels. Thy1 decreases the activity of the adipogenic transcription factor PPARγ by more than 60% as shown by PPARγ-dependent reporter assays. Using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we show Thy1 expression dampens PPARγ by inhibiting the activity of the Src-family kinase, Fyn. Thus, these studies reveal Thy1 blocks adipogenesis and PPARγ by inhibiting Fyn and support the idea that Thy1 is a novel therapeutic target in obesity.—Woeller, C. F., O’Loughlin, C. W., Pollock, S. J., Thatcher, T. H., Feldon, S. E., Phipps, R. P. Thy1 (CD90) controls adipogenesis by regulating activity of the Src family kinase, Fyn. PMID:25416548

  17. Identification of THY1 as a novel thyrotrope marker and THY1 antibody-mediated thyrotrope isolation in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Nakakura, Takashi; Yoshida, Saishu; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kanno, Naoko; Hasegawa, Rumi; Takigami, Shu; Ohsako, Shunji; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-11-11

    Contact-dependent (juxtacrine) signaling is important for local cell-to-cell interaction and has received attention in recent years regarding its role in pituitary function, differentiation, and development. This study investigated one of the juxtacrine-related molecules, thymocyte differentiation antigen 1 (THY1), in the anterior lobe of the rat pituitary gland. Western blot analysis revealed expression of the THY1 protein in the adult rat anterior lobe. We also found that the THY1 ligand, integrin-β2 (ITGB2), is also expressed in the pituitary gland. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses showed that both THY1 mRNA and protein were present in almost, if not all, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-immunopositive cells (thyrotropes) and that ITGB2 was co-expressed in these cells. As THY1 appeared to represent a novel marker for thyrotropes, we then attempted to isolate these cells from various anterior lobe cells by the use of a THY1 antibody and a pluriBead-cascade cell isolation system. This technology allowed the isolation of thyrotropes with 83% purity at about 17-fold enrichment. Furthermore, the isolated THY1-immunopositive cells had higher Tsh mRNA levels compared with THY1-immunonegative cells and released TSH in response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone. These findings indicated that THY1 represents a potent thyrotrope marker and that the thyrotrope isolation method using the THY1 antibody may serve as a powerful tool to analyze their function including juxtacrine regulation through THY1/ITGB2 interaction.

  18. Anti-Proliferative Actions of T-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition in Thy1 Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Cove-Smith, Andrea; Mulgrew, Christopher J.; Rudyk, Olena; Dutt, Neelanjana; McLatchie, Linda M.; Shattock, Michael J.; Hendry, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant proliferation of mesangial cells (MCs) is a key finding in progressive glomerular disease. TH1177 is a small molecule that has been shown to inhibit low-voltage activated T-type Ca2+ channels (TCCs). The current study investigates the effect of TH1177 on MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Ca2+ channel inhibition on primary rat MC proliferation in vitro was studied using the microculture tetrazolium assay and by measuring bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. In vivo, rats with Thy1 nephritis were treated with TH1177 or vehicle. Glomerular injury and average glomerular cell number were determined in a blinded fashion. Immunostaining for Ki-67 and phosphorylated ERK were also performed. The expression of TCC isoforms in healthy and diseased tissue was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. TCC blockade caused a significant reduction in rat MC proliferation in vitro, whereas L-type inhibition had no effect. Treatment of Thy1 nephritis with TH1177 significantly reduced glomerular injury (P < 0.005) and caused a 49% reduction in glomerular cell number (P < 0.005) compared to the placebo. TH1177 also reduced Ki-67-positive and pERK-positive cells per glomerulus by 52% (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively). These results demonstrate that TH1177 inhibits MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that TCC inhibition may be a useful strategy for studying and modifying MC proliferative responses to injury. PMID:23746655

  19. Interleukin 4 induces membrane Thy-1 expression on normal murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Snapper, C M; Hornbeck, P V; Atasoy, U; Pereira, G M; Paul, W E

    1988-01-01

    Thy-1, a cell-surface glycoprotein of undetermined function, is expressed in relatively large amounts on mouse thymocytes, peripheral T cells, and neurons. It is widely used as a marker to distinguish peripheral T cells from B cells in mice. We show here that, in five distinct mouse strains, recombinant interleukin 4 (IL-4/B-cell stimulatory factor 1) strikingly induces membrane expression of Thy-1 on the vast majority of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated normal murine B cells. Thy-1+ B cells are precursors for immunoglobulin-secreting cells. RNA blot analysis indicates that B cells express a Thy-1 mRNA of 1.8 kilobases, the same size as that found in T cells. Cell mixing experiments show that only cells derived from Thy-1.2+ donors express Thy-1.2, indicating that B cells expressing Thy-1 have not passively absorbed the glycoprotein from another cell source. Recombinant interferon-gamma inhibits Thy-1 induction by B cells stimulated with LPS and IL-4. Thy-1 is also induced on B cells that have been stimulated as a result of the specific activation of an IL-4-producing T-helper clone. Anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibody inhibits the induction of B-cell Thy-1 in this T-cell-B-cell interaction. Images PMID:2901096

  20. Tu-144LL ramp taxi and takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A jointly funded activity by the NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program and the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group took place to obtain experimental flight data on the Tu-144 supersonic transport built by Russia. The Tu-144 was modified by the Tupolev Aircraft Design Bureau, Moscow, Russia, in 1995-1996 into the Tu-144LL Flying Laboratory to perform flight experiments as part of the NASA HSR Program. Knowledge gained from the flights will benefit the NASA efforts to develop technology that may enable design of an efficient, environmentally friendly second-generation supersonic transport in this country. This program involved eight experiments -- six aboard the aircraft and two ground test engine experiments. Between November 1996 and February 1998 the Tu-144LL flew 19 research flights. The follow-on Tu-144LL program encompassed about eight flights, focusing on extensions of five experiments from the first project and two new experiments to measure fuel system temperatures and to define in-flight wing deflections. This 31-second clip shows the Russian Tu-144 LL supersonic transport on the ramp in Moscow, then taxiing into position and making its takeoff run, rotating from the runway and climbing away.

  1. Domain Organization in Candida glabrata THI6, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Thiamin Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-15

    THI6 is a bifunctional enzyme found in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of THI6 catalyzes the ligation of the thiamin thiazole and pyrimidine moieties to form thiamin phosphate, and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the phosphorylation of 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole in a salvage pathway. In prokaryotes, thiamin phosphate synthase and 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase are separate gene products. Here we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic THI6 along with several complexes that characterize the active sites responsible for the two chemical reactions. THI6 from Candida glabrata is a homohexamer in which the six protomers form a cage-like structure. Each protomer is composed of two domains, which are structurally homologous to their monofunctional bacterial counterparts. Two loop regions not found in the bacterial enzymes provide interactions between the two domains. The structures of different protein-ligand complexes define the thiazole and ATP binding sites of the 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase domain and the thiazole phosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate binding sites of the thiamin phosphate synthase domain. Our structural studies reveal that the active sites of the two domains are 40 {angstrom} apart and are not connected by an obvious channel. Biochemical studies show 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate is a substrate for THI6; however, adenosine diphospho-5{beta}-ethyl-4-methylthiazole-2-carboxylic acid, the product of THI4, is not a substrate for THI6. This suggests that an unidentified enzyme is necessary to produce the substrate for THI6 from the THI4 product.

  2. Teaching Tu Fu on the Night Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Philip

    1995-01-01

    Describes a teacher's unsuccessful attempt to introduce the poetry of Tu Fu, a wayward bureaucrat of the T'ang dynasty, to a class of part-time students. Uses his students' resistance to this poetry as an occasion to discuss the importance of personal responses to poetry, as opposed to "correct" academic responses. (TB)

  3. Targeting of Helicobacter pylori thymidylate synthase ThyX by non-mitotoxic hydroxy-naphthoquinones

    PubMed Central

    Skouloubris, Stéphane; Djaout, Kamel; Lamarre, Isabelle; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Anger, Karine; Briffotaux, Julien; Liebl, Ursula; de Reuse, Hilde; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    ThyX is an essential thymidylate synthase that is mechanistically and structurally unrelated to the functionally analogous human enzyme, thus providing means for selective inhibition of bacterial growth. To identify novel compounds with anti-bacterial activity against the human pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori, based on our earlier biochemical and structural analyses, we designed a series of eighteen 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinones (2-OH-1,4-NQs) that target HpThyX. Our lead-like molecules markedly inhibited the NADPH oxidation and 2′-deoxythymidine-5′-monophosphate-forming activities of HpThyX enzyme in vitro, with inhibitory constants in the low nanomolar range. The identification of non-cytotoxic and non-mitotoxic 2-OH-1,4-NQ inhibitors permitted testing their in vivo efficacy in a mouse model for H. pylori infections. Despite the widely assumed toxicity of naphthoquinones (NQs), we identified tight-binding ThyX inhibitors that were tolerated in mice and can be associated with a modest effect in reducing the number of colonizing bacteria. Our results thus provide proof-of-concept that targeting ThyX enzymes is a highly feasible strategy for the development of therapies against H. pylori and a high number of other ThyX-dependent pathogenic bacteria. We also demonstrate that chemical reactivity of NQs does not prevent their exploitation as anti-microbial compounds, particularly when mitotoxicity screening is used to prioritize these compounds for further experimentation. PMID:26040760

  4. The roles of THY1 and integrin beta3 in cell adhesion during theca cell layer formation and the effect of follicle-stimulating hormone on THY1 and integrin beta3 localization in mouse ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Itami, Saori; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Sakai, Atsushi; Yasuda, Keiko

    2011-05-01

    The mechanism of theca cell layer formation in mammalian ovaries has not been elucidated. In the present study, we examined the roles of THY1 and integrin beta3 in theca cell layer formation during mouse folliculogenesis. The localization pattern of THY1 and integrin beta3 in adult mouse ovary was investigated immunohistochemically. The strongest THY1 signal was observed in theca cell layers from secondary to preantral follicles, at which time theca cells have begun to participate in follicle formation. Integrin beta3 also localized to the theca cell layer of secondary to preantral follicles and showed a localization pattern similar to that of THY1. Moreover, the role of THY1 in theca cell layer formation was examined using a follicle culture system. When anti-THY1 antibody was added to this culture, no theca cell layers were formed, and the granulosa cells were distanced from each other. Because a THY1 signal was not observed in ovaries at stages earlier than prepuberty, THY1 localization also appeared to be affected by mouse development. This possibility was examined by determining the effect of administering follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and 17beta-estradiol to 7-day-old mice on THY1 localization in the ovary 3 days later. Only follicle-stimulating hormone induced a THY1 signal in 10-day-old mouse ovaries. No THY1 signal was observed in untreated 10-day-old ovaries. In conclusion, THY1 might play a role in cell adhesion via binding to integrin beta3 in mouse ovaries. The present results suggest that THY1 localization may be affected by follicle-stimulating hormone in mouse ovaries.

  5. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiura, Yoshihito; Kotani, Norihiro; Yamashita, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Harumi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Honke, Koichi

    2010-05-28

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae THI4p is a suicide thiamine thiazole synthase.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Abeydeera, N Dinuka; Bale, Shridhar; Pai, Pei-Jing; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Russell, David H; Ealick, Steven E; Begley, Tadhg P

    2011-10-26

    Thiamine pyrophosphate 1 is an essential cofactor in all living systems. Its biosynthesis involves the separate syntheses of the pyrimidine 2 and thiazole 3 precursors, which are then coupled. Two biosynthetic routes to the thiamine thiazole have been identified. In prokaryotes, five enzymes act on three substrates to produce the thiazole via a complex oxidative condensation reaction, the mechanistic details of which are now well established. In contrast, only one gene product is involved in thiazole biosynthesis in eukaryotes (THI4p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Here we report the preparation of fully active recombinant wild-type THI4p, the identification of an iron-dependent sulphide transfer reaction from a conserved cysteine residue of the protein to a reaction intermediate and the demonstration that THI4p is a suicide enzyme undergoing only a single turnover.

  7. Characterization of Thi9, a novel thiamine (Vitamin B1) transporter from Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Christian; Klein, Cornelia M; Batke, Angelika F; Schweingruber, M Ernst; Stolz, Jürgen

    2008-03-21

    Thiamine is an essential component of the human diet and thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes play an important role in carbohydrate metabolism in all living cells. Although the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe can derive thiamine from biosynthesis, both are also able to take up thiamine from external sources, leading to the down-regulation of the enzymes involved in its formation. We have isolated the S. pombe thiamine transporter Thi9 by genetic complementation of mutants defective in thiamine biosynthesis and transport. Thi9 localizes to the S. pombe cell surface and works as a high-affinity proton/thiamine symporter. The uptake of thiamine was reduced in the presence of pyrithiamine, oxythiamine, amprolium, and the thiazole part of thiamine, indicating that these compounds are substrates of Thi9. In pyrithiamine-resistant mutants, a conserved glutamate residue close to the first of the 12 transmembrane domains is exchanged by a lysine and this causes aberrant localization of the protein. Thiamine uptake is significantly increased in thiamine-deficient medium and this is associated with an increase in thi9(+) mRNA and protein levels. Upon addition of thiamine, the thi9(+) mRNA becomes undetectable within minutes, whereas the Thi9 protein appears to be stable. The protein is distantly related to transporters for amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid and polyamines, and not to any of the known thiamine transporters. We also found that the pyridoxine transporter Bsu1 has a marked contribution to the thiamine uptake activity of S. pombe cells.

  8. Amiodarone-induced T-U fusion.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hesham R

    2012-11-01

    Amiodarone is a widely used antiarrythmic drug for various atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. It has the potential to cause prolongation of the QT interval, which, in turn, can increases the incidence of torsade de pointes. Amiodarone is also one of the causes of prominent U waves. The presented case exemplifies the phenomenon of amiodarone-induced T-U fusion and QT prolongation. Other causes of QT prolongation as electrolyte abnormalities or administration of other drugs that prolong the QT interval were excluded. Awareness of this phenomenon and method of calculation of QT interval in this scenario is of utmost importance.

  9. 40 CFR 264.553 - Temporary Units (TU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temporary Units (TU). 264.553 Section 264.553 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... Provisions for Cleanup § 264.553 Temporary Units (TU). (a) For temporary tanks and container storage...

  10. 40 CFR Appendixes T-U to Part 51 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false T Appendixes T-U to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Appendixes T-U to Part 51...

  11. Thy-1 Regulates VEGF-Mediated Choroidal Endothelial Cell Activation and Migration: Implications in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Kunz, Eric; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study addresses the hypothesis that age-related stresses upregulate Thy-1 in choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) and contribute to CEC activation and migration, processes important in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods Measurements were made of Thy-1 protein (Western blot) in CECs and Thy-1 mRNA (real time quantitative PCR) in CECs treated with VEGF, CCL11, or PBS or in RPE/choroids from young or old donors or lasered or nonlasered mice. Immunolabeled Thy-1 in ocular sections was compared from young versus old human donor eyes or those with or without neovascular AMD or from lasered versus nonlasered mice. Choroidal endothelial cells transfected with Thy-1 or control siRNA or pretreated with Thy-1 blocking peptide or control were stimulated with VEGF or 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC). Choroidal endothelial cell migration, proliferation, cytoskeletal stress fibers, Rac1 activation, and phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), integrin β3, and Src were measured. Statistics were performed using ANOVA. Results Thy-1 was expressed in retinal ganglion cells and in vascular endothelial-cadherin–labeled choroid and localized to human or mouse laser-induced CNV lesions. Thy-1 protein and mRNA were significantly increased in CECs treated with VEGF or CCL11 and in RPE/choroids from aged versus young donor eyes or from lasered mice versus nonlasered controls. Knockdown or inhibition of Thy-1 in CECs significantly reduced VEGF-induced CEC migration and proliferation, stress fiber formation and VEGFR2, Src, integrin β3 and Rac1 activation, and 7-KC–induced Rac1 and Src activation. Conclusions Thy-1 in CECs regulates VEGF-induced CEC activation and migration and links extracellular 7-KC to intracellular signaling. Future studies elucidating Thy-1 mechanisms in neovascular AMD are warranted. PMID:27768790

  12. Molecular characterization of Thy1 expressing fear-inhibiting neurons within the basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Kenneth M.; Choi, Dennis; Guo, Jidong; Zimmerman, Kelsey; Walton, Jordan; Rainnie, Donald G.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of neuron populations, particularly those controlling threat responses, is essential for understanding the cellular basis of behaviour and identifying pharmacological agents acting selectively on fear-controlling circuitry. Here we demonstrate a comprehensive workflow for identification of pharmacologically tractable markers of behaviourally characterized cell populations. Thy1-eNpHR-, Thy1-Cre- and Thy1-eYFP-labelled neurons of the BLA consistently act as fear inhibiting or ‘Fear-Off' neurons during behaviour. We use cell-type-specific optogenetics and chemogenetics (DREADDs) to modulate activity in this population during behaviour to block or enhance fear extinction. Dissociated Thy1-eYFP neurons are isolated using FACS. RNA sequencing identifies genes strongly upregulated in RNA of this population, including Ntsr2, Dkk3, Rspo2 and Wnt7a. Pharmacological manipulation of neurotensin receptor 2 confirms behavioural effects observed in optogenetic and chemogenetic experiments. These experiments identify and validate Ntsr2-expressing neurons within the BLA, as a putative ‘Fear-Off' population. PMID:27767183

  13. Bioadsorption and biostabilization of cadmium by Enterobacter cloacae TU.

    PubMed

    Xu, Canran; He, Shengbao; Liu, Yongmin; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Diannan

    2017-04-01

    Biostabilization of cadmium, a hazardous chemical found widely in China, was attempted using Enterobacter cloacae TU (E.cloacae TU). A cadmium (Cd)-tolerant E.cloacae TU was obtained by mutagenesis using an atmosphere pressure glow discharge plasma system, and it displayed regular growth behavior in the presence of 250 mg/L Cd in solution. The maximum stabilization capacity of E.cloacae TU toward Cd reached 67.0 ± 3.5 mg/g dry cell weight at an initial Cd concentration of 200 mg/L. The percentage of Cd removal by E.cloacae TU reached 97.4± 0.3% at an initial Cd concentration of 20 mg/L. A desorption experiment confirmed both extracellular adsorption and intracellular uptake contribute to biostabilization, although Cd was mainly distributed on the surface of E.cloacae TU cells due to over-secretion of extracellular polysaccharides under Cd stimulus. The changes in morphology and functional groups of the E.cloacae TU cell surface in the presence of Cd were analyzed using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectoscopy (FT-IR). The feasibility of using E.cloacae TU for this purpose was further confirmed by on site remediation, in which the application of E.cloacae TU reduced the bioavailability and moreover the accumulation of Cd in tobacco plants without affecting the quality of flue-cured tobacco.

  14. Astrocytic αVβ3 Integrin Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth and Promotes Retraction of Neuronal Processes by Clustering Thy-1

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Frischknecht, Renato; Maldonado, Horacio; Seidenbecher, Constanze I.; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Hetz, Claudio; Aylwin, María de la Luz; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Thy-1 is a membrane glycoprotein suggested to stabilize or inhibit growth of neuronal processes. However, its precise function has remained obscure, because its endogenous ligand is unknown. We previously showed that Thy-1 binds directly to αVβ3 integrin in trans eliciting responses in astrocytes. Nonetheless, whether αVβ3 integrin might also serve as a Thy-1-ligand triggering a neuronal response has not been explored. Thus, utilizing primary neurons and a neuron-derived cell line CAD, Thy-1-mediated effects of αVβ3 integrin on growth and retraction of neuronal processes were tested. In astrocyte-neuron co-cultures, endogenous αVβ3 integrin restricted neurite outgrowth. Likewise, αVβ3-Fc was sufficient to suppress neurite extension in Thy-1(+), but not in Thy-1(−) CAD cells. In differentiating primary neurons exposed to αVβ3-Fc, fewer and shorter dendrites were detected. This effect was abolished by cleavage of Thy-1 from the neuronal surface using phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Moreover, αVβ3-Fc also induced retraction of already extended Thy-1(+)-axon-like neurites in differentiated CAD cells as well as of axonal terminals in differentiated primary neurons. Axonal retraction occurred when redistribution and clustering of Thy-1 molecules in the plasma membrane was induced by αVβ3 integrin. Binding of αVβ3-Fc was detected in Thy-1 clusters during axon retraction of primary neurons. Moreover, αVβ3-Fc-induced Thy-1 clustering correlated in time and space with redistribution and inactivation of Src kinase. Thus, our data indicates that αVβ3 integrin is a ligand for Thy-1 that upon binding not only restricts the growth of neurites, but also induces retraction of already existing processes by inducing Thy-1 clustering. We propose that these events participate in bi-directional astrocyte-neuron communication relevant to axonal repair after neuronal damage. PMID:22479590

  15. A paired comparison of tuberculin skin test results in health care workers using 5 TU and 10 TU tuberculin

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, R.; Bennett, N.; Forbes, A.; Grayson, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Historically, 10 TU has been employed in Australia and the United Kingdom to perform the tuberculin skin test (TST). However, this makes it difficult to compare the rates of TST positivity with other countries such as the USA who use 5 TU. To assess the impact of the dose of tuberculin on the TST a comparison was made of TST responses in health care workers given a TST with both 5 and 10 TU.
METHODS—Two TSTs were performed simultaneously in each health care worker using 5 and 10 TU. Each dose was randomly assigned in a blinded manner to the right or left forearm and read at 48-72 hours by a single nurse who was blinded to the assignment of the 5 and 10 TU doses.
RESULTS—A total of 128 health care workers were enrolled, 119 (93%) of whom had a past history of BCG vaccination. The overall mean difference in paired reaction sizes for the two doses was 1.5 mm with 95% limits of agreement of -3.6 to 6.5 mm.
CONCLUSION—A slightly larger TST reading was seen with 10 TU than with 5 TU. The mean difference of 1.5 mm between the two doses should be considered when comparing rates of TST positivity between countries who use different doses of tuberculin to perform the tuberculin skin test.

 PMID:10899248

  16. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Flavin Dependent Thymidylate Synthase (MtbThyX) at 2.0 Å Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Turley, Stewart; Ulmer, Jonathan E.; Rhie, Ho Gun; Hopkins Sibley, Carol; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-07-20

    A novel flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase was identified recently as an essential gene in many archaebacteria and some pathogenic eubacteria. This enzyme, ThyX, is a potential antibacterial drug target, since humans and most eukaryotes lack the thyX gene and depend upon the conventional thymidylate synthase (TS) for their dTMP requirements. We have cloned and overexpressed the thyX gene (Rv2754c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Escherichia coli. The M. tuberculosis ThyX (MtbThyX) enzyme complements the E. coli {chi}2913 strain that lacks its conventional TS activity. The crystal structure of the homotetrameric MtbThyX was determined in the presence of the cofactor FAD and the substrate analog, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (BrdUMP). In the active site, which is formed by three monomers, FAD is bound in an extended conformation with the adenosine ring in a deep pocket and BrdUMP in a closed conformation near the isoalloxazine ring. Structure-based mutational studies have revealed a critical role played by residues Lys165 and Arg168 in ThyX activity, possibly by governing access to the carbon atom to be methylated of a totally buried substrate dUMP.

  17. Conformational changes in the expression domain of the Escherichia coli thiM riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Rentmeister, Andrea; Mayer, Günter; Kuhn, Nicole; Famulok, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The thiM riboswitch contains an aptamer domain that adaptively binds the coenzyme thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The binding of TPP to the aptamer domain induces structural rearrangements that are relayed to a second domain, the so-called expression domain, thereby interfering with gene expression. The recently solved crystal structures of the aptamer domains of the thiM riboswitches in complex with TPP revealed how TPP stabilizes secondary and tertiary structures in the RNA ligand complex. To understand the global modes of reorganization between the two domains upon metabolite binding the structure of the entire riboswitch in presence and absence of TPP needs to be determined. Here we report the secondary structure of the entire thiM riboswitch from Escherichia coli in its TPP-free form and its transition into the TPP-bound variant, thereby depicting domains of the riboswitch that serve as communication links between the aptamer and the expression domain. Furthermore, structural probing provides an explanation for the lack of genetic control exerted by a riboswitch variant with mutations in the expression domain that still binds TPP. PMID:17517779

  18. 2-Acetyl-5-tetrahydroxybutyl imidazole (THI) protects 661W cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Carlotta; Zulueta, Aida; Bonezzi, Fabiola; Casas, Josefina; Ghidoni, Riccardo; Signorelli, Paola; Caretti, Anna

    2017-04-13

    Retinal degeneration and in particular retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is associated to ceramide (Cer) accumulation and cell death induction. Cer and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) belong to the sphingolipids class and exert a pro-apoptotic and pro-survival activity, respectively. Our aim is to target sphingolipid metabolism by inhibiting S1P lyase that regulates one of the S1P degradation pathways, to reduce retinal photoreceptor damage. The murine 661W cone-like cell line was pretreated with THI, an inhibitor of S1P lyase and exposed to H2O2-induced oxidative stress. 661W cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by Trypan Blue and TUNEL assay, respectively. Protein expression of mediators of the survival/death pathway (ERK1/2, Akt, Bcl-2, Bax) was analyzed by Western blotting. RT-PCR was performed to establish HO-1 transcript changes and LC-MS analysis to measure Cer intracellular content. THI rescues inhibitory H2O2-effect on 661W cell viability and impairs H2O2-induced apoptosis by increasing Bcl-2/Bax ratio. THI administration counteracts the oxidative stress effects of H2O2 on 661W cells by activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway, regulating ERK and Akt phosphorylation levels, and decreasing Cer intracellular content. We conclude that sphingolipid metabolism manipulation can be considered a therapeutic target to promote photoreceptor survival.

  19. Predictive modeling targets thymidylate synthase ThyX in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Djaout, Kamel; Singh, Vinayak; Boum, Yap; Katawera, Victoria; Becker, Hubert F.; Bush, Natassja G.; Hearnshaw, Stephen J.; Pritchard, Jennifer E.; Bourbon, Pauline; Madrid, Peter B.; Maxwell, Anthony; Mizrahi, Valerie; Myllykallio, Hannu; Ekins, Sean

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for tuberculosis (TB), a major infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which results in 1.5 million deaths each year. We have targeted two essential enzymes in this organism that are promising for antibacterial therapy and reported to be inhibited by naphthoquinones. ThyX is an essential thymidylate synthase that is mechanistically and structurally unrelated to the human enzyme. DNA gyrase is a DNA topoisomerase present in bacteria and plants but not animals. The current study set out to understand the structure-activity relationships of these targets in Mtb using a combination of cheminformatics and in vitro screening. Here, we report the identification of new Mtb ThyX inhibitors, 2-chloro-3-(4-methanesulfonylpiperazin-1-yl)-1,4-dihydronaphthalene-1,4-dione) and idebenone, which show modest whole-cell activity and appear to act, at least in part, by targeting ThyX in Mtb. PMID:27283217

  20. Crystal structures of the thi-box riboswitch bound to thiamine pyrophosphate analogs reveal adaptive RNA-small molecule recognition.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas E; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2006-09-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA elements that bind small-molecule metabolites with high affinity and specificity, and they regulate the expression of associated genes. The thi-box riboswitch can exhibit a 1000-fold higher affinity for thiamine pyrophosphate over closely related noncognate compounds such as thiamine monophosphate. To understand the chemical basis of thi-box pyrophosphate specificity, we have determined crystal structures of an E. coli thi-box bound to thiamine pyrophosphate, thiamine monophosphate, and the structural analogs benfotiamine and pyrithiamine. When bound to monophosphorylated compounds, the RNA elements that recognize the thiamine and phosphate moieties of the ligand move closer together. This allows the riboswitch to recognize the monophosphate in a manner similar to how it recognizes the beta-phosphate of thiamine pyrophosphate. In the pyrithiamine complex, the pyrophosphate binding site is largely unstructured. These results show how the riboswitch can bind to various metabolites, and why the thi-box preferentially binds thiamine pyrophosphate.

  1. The thiG Gene Is Required for Full Virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae by Preventing Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoyue; Liang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Kexue; Dong, Wenxia; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Ming-guo

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial blight of rice is an important serious bacterial diseases of rice in many rice-growing regions, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). The thiG gene from Xoo strain ZJ173, which is involved with thiazole moiety production in the thiamine biosynthesis pathway, is highly conserved among the members of Xanthomonas. The thiG deletion mutant displayed impaired virulence and growth in thiamine-free medium but maintained its normal growth rate in the rice tissues, indicating that the thiG gene is involved in Xoo virulence. Compared to the wild type strain, the formation of cell-cell aggregates was affected in thiG deletion mutants. Although biofilm formation was promoted, motility and migration in rice leaves were repressed in the thiG mutants, and therefore limited the expansion of pathogen infection in rice. Quorum sensing and extracellular substance are two key factors that contribute to the formation of cell-cell aggregates. Our study found that in the thiG mutant the expression of two genes, rpfC and rpfG, which form a two-component regulatory signal system involved in the regulation of biofilm formation by a second messenger cyclic di-GMP is down-regulated. In addition, our study showed that xanthan production was not affected but the expression of some genes associated with xanthan biosynthesis, like gumD, gumE, gumH and gumM, were up-regulated in thiG mutants. Taken together, these findings are the first to demonstrate the role of the thiazole biosynthsis gene, thiG, in virulence and the formation of aggregates in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. PMID:26222282

  2. EF-Tu dynamics during pre-translocation complex formation: EF-Tu·GDP exits the ribosome via two different pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Chunlai; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Knudsen, Charlotte R; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2015-10-30

    The G-protein EF-Tu, which undergoes a major conformational change when EF-Tu·GTP is converted to EF-Tu·GDP, forms part of an aminoacyl(aa)-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex (TC) that accelerates the binding of aa-tRNA to the ribosome during peptide elongation. Such binding, placing a portion of EF-Tu in contact with the GTPase Associated Center (GAC), is followed by GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and results in formation of a pretranslocation (PRE) complex. Although tRNA movement through the ribosome during PRE complex formation has been extensively studied, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of EF-Tu interaction with either the ribosome or aa-tRNA. Here we examine these dynamics, utilizing ensemble and single molecule assays employing fluorescent labeled derivatives of EF-Tu, tRNA, and the ribosome to measure changes in either FRET efficiency or fluorescence intensity during PRE complex formation. Our results indicate that ribosome-bound EF-Tu separates from the GAC prior to its full separation from aa-tRNA, and suggest that EF-Tu·GDP dissociates from the ribosome by two different pathways. These pathways correspond to either reversible EF-Tu·GDP dissociation from the ribosome prior to the major conformational change in EF-Tu that follows GTP hydrolysis, or irreversible dissociation after or concomitant with this conformational change.

  3. Thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) is expressed by lymphatic vessels and mediates cell adhesion to lymphatic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Jurisic, Giorgia; Iolyeva, Maria; Proulx, Steven T; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2010-10-15

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined by comparative transcriptional profiling studies of ex vivo isolated mouse intestinal lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative PCR, and at the protein level by FACS and immunofluorescence analyses. Thy1 was also strongly expressed by tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, as evaluated in a B16 melanoma footpad model in mice. Blockade of Thy1 inhibited tumor cell adhesion to cultured mouse lymphatic endothelial cells. Importantly, treatment of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells with tumor necrosis factor or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate resulted in Thy1 upregulation in podoplanin-expressing lymphatic endothelial cells, but not in podoplanin-negative blood vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, adhesion of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes to human lymphatic endothelial cells was Thy1-dependent. Together, these results identify Thy1 as a novel lymphatic vessel expressed gene and suggest its potential role in the cell adhesion processes required for tumor progression and inflammation.

  4. Applying thiouracil (TU)-tagging for mouse transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Leslie; Karfilis, Kate V.; Miller, Michael R.; Doe, Chris Q.; Stankunas, Kryn

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach to study mouse development, physiology, and disease models. Here, we describe a protocol for mouse thiouracil-tagging (TU-tagging), a transcriptome analysis technology that includes in vivo covalent labeling, purification, and analysis of cell type-specific RNA. TU-tagging enables 1) the isolation of RNA from a given cell population of a complex tissue, avoiding transcriptional changes induced by cell isolation trauma, and 2) the identification of actively transcribed RNAs and not pre-existing transcripts. Therefore, in contrast to other cell-specific transcriptional profiling methods based on purification of tagged ribosomes or nuclei, TU-tagging provides a direct examination of transcriptional regulation. We describe how to: 1) deliver 4-thiouracil to transgenic mice to thio-label cell lineage-specific transcripts, 2) purify TU-tagged RNA and prepare libraries for Illumina sequencing, and 3) follow a straight-forward bioinformatics workflow to identify cell type-enriched or differentially expressed genes. Tissue containing TU-tagged RNA can be obtained in one day, RNA-Seq libraries generated within two days, and, following sequencing, an initial bioinformatics analysis completed in one additional day. PMID:24457332

  5. Engineering the elongation factor Tu for efficient selenoprotein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Haruna, Ken-ichi; Alkazemi, Muhammad H; Liu, Yuchen; Söll, Dieter; Englert, Markus

    2014-09-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is naturally co-translationally incorporated into proteins by recoding the UGA opal codon with a specialized elongation factor (SelB in bacteria) and an RNA structural signal (SECIS element). We have recently developed a SECIS-free selenoprotein synthesis system that site-specifically--using the UAG amber codon--inserts Sec depending on the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). Here, we describe the engineering of EF-Tu for improved selenoprotein synthesis. A Sec-specific selection system was established by expression of human protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (hAGT), in which the active site cysteine codon has been replaced by the UAG amber codon. The formed hAGT selenoprotein repairs the DNA damage caused by the methylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and thereby enables Escherichia coli to grow in the presence of this mutagen. An EF-Tu library was created in which codons specifying the amino acid binding pocket were randomized. Selection was carried out for enhanced Sec incorporation into hAGT; the resulting EF-Tu variants contained highly conserved amino acid changes within members of the library. The improved UTu-system with EF-Sel1 raises the efficiency of UAG-specific Sec incorporation to >90%, and also doubles the yield of selenoprotein production.

  6. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  7. A Grammar of Bao'an Tu, a Mongolic Language of Northwest China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fried, Robert Wayne

    2010-01-01

    The present study is a grammatical overview of the Bao'an Tu language (one of the varieties included in the designation "ISO6393-3:PEH", also known as "Tongren Monguor", "Southwestern Monguor", or "Tongren Tu"). Bao'an Tu is spoken by approximately 4,000 people who live on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in…

  8. Intimate association of Thy-1 and the T-cell antigen receptor with the CD45 tyrosine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Volarevic, S.; Burns, C.M.; Sussman, J.J.; Ashwell, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Immunoprecipitation of Thy-1 from Triton X-100 detergent lysates of surface-iodinated and chemically cross-linked T cells precipitated at least first major and discrete bands. Four of these bands were identified as Thy-1, CD45 (a trasmembrane tyrosine phosphatase), a major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I molecule, and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin. Similar analyses revealed that CD45 was coprecipitated from lysates of cross-linker-treated cells by antibodies to the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR). The same pattern of coprecipitated bands was observed when digitonin was used to lyse untreated cells. Immunoprecipitation of Thy-1 or the TCR from lysates of cross-linked T cells precipitated CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity. Calculations based upon the amounts of coprecipitated enzymatic activity or TCR {zeta} chain indicate that a substantial fraction of Thy-1 and TCR complexes can be cross-linked to CD45. These data support a model in which the dependence of Thy-1 signaling on TCR coexpression is due to their common interaction with a tyrosine phosphatase and provide a possible structural basis for the influence of CD45 on TCR-mediated signaling.

  9. Primary structure of the Escherichia coli thyA gene and its thymidylate synthase product.

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, M; Maley, G; Pedersen-Lane, J; Maley, F

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 1,163-base-pair fragment that encodes the entire thyA gene of Escherichia coli K-12 was determined. The strategy involved sequence determination of both DNA strands by using overlapping deletions that had been generated in vitro from the two ends of the fragment with BAL-31 nuclease. The amino-terminal sequence of thymidylate synthase (5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate:dUMP C-methyltransferase, EC 2.1.1.45), the product of the thyA gene, located the 792-base-pair open reading frame, which codes for the 264 amino acid residues of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide data was confirmed to the extent of 40% by partial sequence analysis of the enzyme purified from extracts of the amplified cloned gene. Transcriptional and translational control areas were apparent in the regions flanking the structural gene. The 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate-binding residue of the active site was identified as cysteine-146. Comparison of the E. coli and Lactobacillus casei synthase sequences reveals consistent homology (62%) over extensive regions. This homology is particularly striking in a very hydrophobic region bordering cysteine-146. In the two enzymes, this region, which probably defines the active site, is 82% homologous. However, a dramatic difference between the two sequences is reflected by the surprising finding that a 51-amino-acid stretch, present midway through the L. casei sequence, is completely absent from the E. coli enzyme. PMID:6308660

  10. Properties of B cells and Thy-1-antigen-expressing cells infiltrating rat renal allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, D.; Halttunen, J.; Tiisala, S.; Ustinov, J.; Renkonen, R.; Haeyry, P. )

    1990-10-01

    We have examined (1) the frequency of B cells secreting antibodies against donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens and (2) the properties of Thy-1-antigen-expressing leukocytes in rats rejecting renal allografts. Our results show that B cells secreting antibodies are present in the inflammatory cell population at the frequency of 1:850. Among them only 1 out of 2-150 is engaged in production of antibodies directed to the graft MHC antigens, depending on the method of assay. This suggests that despite the observed significant production of nonspecific immunoglobulin in situ, only a minority of the B-cell population is specifically committed to the graft MHC antigens. This finding is concordant with the described previously low frequencies of the T cells specifically directed toward the graft MHC antigen. The role of the immunologically noncommitted cells in graft rejection is unknown. We have found that a substantial part (up to 60%) of inflammatory cells invading a rat kidney allograft express the Thy-1 antigen. This suggests that they might be immature (progenitor ) cells and, therefore, unable to respond to the graft antigens. Progenitor-like properties of these cells have been confirmed by their ability to reconstitute lethally irradiated syngeneic rat. Finally, these immature cells are of lymphoid, not of myeloid, linkage, because they do not proliferate in the presence of GM-CSF.

  11. Establishment and characterization of a novel ovarian clear cell carcinoma cell line, TU-OC-2, with loss of ARID1A expression.

    PubMed

    Sato, Seiya; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Oumi, Nao; Chiba, Youhei; Oishi, Tetsuro; Shimada, Muneaki; Sato, Shinya; Chikumi, Jun; Nonaka, Michiko; Kudoh, Akiko; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Harada, Tasuku; Sugiyama, Toru

    2016-10-01

    A new cell line of human ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC), TU-OC-2, was established and characterized. The cells were polygonal in shape, grew in monolayers without contact inhibition and were arranged in islands like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. The chromosome numbers ranged from 41 to 96. A low rate of proliferation was observed and the doubling time was 37.5 h. The IC50 values of cisplatin, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN38), which is an active metabolite of camptothecin, and paclitaxel were 7.7 μM, 17.7 nM and 301 nM, respectively. The drug sensitivity assay indicated that TU-OC-2 was sensitive to SN38, but resistant to cisplatin and paclitaxel. Mutational analysis revealed that TU-OC-2 cells have no mutations of PIK3CA in exons 9 and 20 and of TP53 in exons 4-9. We observed the loss of ARID1A protein expression in TU-OC-2 cells by western blot analysis and in the original tumor tissue by immunohistochemistry. This cell line may be useful for studying the chemoresistant mechanisms of CCC and exploring novel therapeutic targets such as the ARID1A-related signaling pathway.

  12. Impact of three THI levels on somatic cell count, milk yield and composition of multiparous Holstein cows in a subtropical region.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Mohammed A F; El-Tarabany, Mahmoud S

    2017-02-01

    In Egypt, cow's milk represents 52.11% of the total milk production. Climatic condition is mainly expected to impact the welfare and productive performance of livestock animals. Thus, we aimed to explore the impact of temperature-humidity index (THI) on somatic cell count (SCC), milk production and composition on daily milk test records (33600) of Holstein cows under subtropical Egyptian conditions with different levels of THI. Our results revealed that daily milk yield and composition (fat%, protein %, yielded fat, yielded protein and the percentage of lactose) were higher in low THI (31.91kg, 3.91%, 3.22%, 418kg, 349kg and 4.20%, respectively) when compared with high THI. SCC significantly increased 36% from low to high THI. In addition to, it was increased with advanced parities 231.11% from 2nd to 7th parities. At high THI level, SCC was negatively correlated with total MY (r=-0.12P<0.05), 305 MY (r=-0.16P<0.05), protein % (r=-0.15P<0.01), fat% (r=-0.14P<0.01) and lactose % (r=-0.26P<0.01). The current study concluded that dairy cows performance was better in most of the investigated parameters at low THI than those in high THI. Thus, indicating a detrimental effect of THI on both welfare and economic return.

  13. Problem-Centered Design and Personal Teaching Style: An Exploratory Study of Youguang Tu's Course on Philosophy of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Hongde

    2016-01-01

    Youguang Tu is a contemporary Chinese philosopher of education. His course on philosophy of education had a significant impact on his students. This exploratory study examines how Tu designed and taught this course. Ultimately, there are two reasons why Tu's course had such a significant influence on his students. The first is that Tu used…

  14. "The Et Tu Brute Complex" Compulsive Self Betrayal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antus, Robert Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses "The Et Tu Brute Complex." More specifically, this phenomenon occurs when a person, instead of supporting and befriending himself, orally condemns himself in front of other people and becomes his own worst enemy. This is a form of compulsive self-hatred. Most often, the victim of this complex is unaware of the…

  15. The Impending Demise of "tu" in Montevideo, Uruguay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weyers, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, the "tuteo" (T-T), and particularly the use of tonic "tu" with the "vos" verbal morphology (T-V) has been accepted as typical of the speech of Montevideo, Uruguay, a region generally classified as "voseante". This paper reports on the results of 117 rapid anonymous interviews conducted…

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Spiroplasma sp. TU-14

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Haryono, Mindia; Gasparich, Gail E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spiroplasma sp. TU-14 was isolated from a contaminated sample of Entomoplasma lucivorax PIPN-2T obtained from the International Organization for Mycoplasmology collection. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium to facilitate the investigation of its biology and the comparative genomics among Spiroplasma spp. PMID:28082500

  17. Purification, characterization, and sequencing of novel antimicrobial peptides, Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2, from bulbs of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.).

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Masatoshi; Ideguchi, Mineo; Minami, Yuji; Watanabe, Keiichi; Tadera, Kenjiro

    2004-03-01

    Novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP), designated Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2, were purified from the bulbs of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.) by chitin affinity chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). They bind to chitin in a reversible way. They were basic peptides having isoelectric points of over 12. Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 had molecular masses of 4,988 Da and 5,006 Da on MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and their extinction coefficients of 1% aqueous solutions at 280 nm were 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Half of all amino acid residues of Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 were occupied by cysteine, arginine, lysine, and proline. The concentrations of peptides required for 50% inhibition (IC(50)) of the growth of plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi were 2 to 20 microg/ml. The structural characteristics of Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 indicated that they were novel thionin-like antimicrobial peptides, though Tu-AMP 2 was a heterodimer composes of two short peptides joined with disulfide bonds.

  18. Cloning, overexpression and purification of Bacillus subtilis elongation factor Tu in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Kim, H Y; Kwak, J H; Kwon, S H; Lee, S Y

    2000-02-29

    To establish the overexpression and one-step purification system of Bacillus subtilis elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu), the EF-Tu gene was amplified with or without own ribosome binding site (rbs) by PCR and the only PCR product without rbs was subcloned successfully. For the expression of the EF-Tu gene cloned after PCR amplification, a constitutive expression system and inducible expression system with His6 tag at N-terminus or C-terminus, or glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion system were examined in E. coli and B. subtilis. Except GST fusion system in E. coli, however, all other trials were unsuccessful at the step of plasmid construction for the EF-Tu expression. The GST/EF-Tu fusion proteins were highly expressed by IPTG induction and obtained as both soluble and insoluble form. From the soluble GST/EF-Tu fusion protein, EF-Tu was obtained to near homogeneity by one-step purification with glutathione-sepharose affinity column chromatography followed by factor Xa treatment. The purified EF-Tu showed high GDP binding activity. These results indicate that the GST/EF-Tu fusion system is favorable to overexpression and purification of B. subtilis EF-Tu.

  19. "Anything "You" Can Do, "Tu" Can Do Better": "Tu" and "Vous" as Substitutes for Indefinite "On" in French.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coveney, Aidan

    2003-01-01

    Presents a survey of the French indefinite "tu/vous" in in earlier periods and in a range of varieties. Draws on a corpus of French spoken in Picardy in Northern France to investigate the extent to which this use of second person pronouns helps to avoid ambiguity and co-occurs with another grammatical variable. (Author/VWL)

  20. In vivo mutations of thymidylate synthase (encoded by thyA) are responsible for thymidine dependency in clinical small-colony variants of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Indranil; Kriegeskorte, Andre; Fischer, Andreas; Deiwick, Susanne; Theimann, Nadine; Proctor, Richard A; Peters, Georg; Herrmann, Mathias; Kahl, Barbara C

    2008-02-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus thymidine-dependent small-colony variants (TD-SCVs) are frequently isolated from the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, often in combination with isogenic normal strains if patients were treated with SXT for extended periods. As SXT inhibits the synthesis of tetrahydrofolic acid, which acts as a cofactor for thymidylate synthase (thyA), the survival of TD-SCVs depends exclusively on the availability of external thymidine. Since the underlying mechanism for thymidine dependency is unknown, we investigated if alterations in the thyA nucleotide sequences were responsible for this phenomenon. Sequence analysis of several clinical TD-SCVs and their isogenic normal strains with reference to previously published S. aureus thyA nucleotide sequences was performed. Three clinical TD-SCVs were complemented by transforming TD-SCVs with the vector pCX19 expressing ThyA from S. aureus 8325-4. Transcriptional analysis of metabolic and virulence genes and regulators (agr, hla, spa, citB, thyA, and nupC) was performed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. The previously published sequences of thyA and two normal clinical strains were highly conserved, while thyA of four normal strains and four SCVs had nonsynonymous point mutations. In 8/10 SCVs, deletions occurred, resulting in stop codons which were located in 4/10 SCVs close to or within the active site of the protein (dUMP binding). Complementation of TD-SCVs with thyA almost fully reversed the phenotype, growth characteristics, and transcription patterns. In conclusion, we demonstrated that mutations of the thyA gene were responsible for the phenotype of TD-SCVs. Complementation of TD-SCVs with thyA revealed that a functional ThyA protein is necessary and sufficient to change the SCV phenotype and behavior back to normal.

  1. Imaging Neural Activity Using Thy1-GCaMP Transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Cichon, Joseph; Wang, Wenting; Qiu, Li; Lee, Seok-Jin R.; Campbell, Nolan R.; DeStefino, Nicholas; Goard, Michael J.; Fu, Zhanyan; Yasuda, Ryohei; Looger, Loren L.; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.; Gan, Wen-Biao; Feng, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Summary The ability to chronically monitor neuronal activity in the living brain is essential for understanding the organization and function of the nervous system. The genetically encoded green fluorescent protein based calcium sensor GCaMP provides a powerful tool for detecting calcium transients in neuronal somata, processes, and synapses that are triggered by neuronal activities. Here we report the generation and characterization of transgenic mice that express improved GCaMPs in various neuronal subpopulations under the control of the Thy1 promoter. In vitro and in vivo studies show that calcium transients induced by spontaneous and stimulus-evoked neuronal activities can be readily detected at the level of individual cells and synapses in acute brain slices, as well as chronically in awake behaving animals. These GCaMP transgenic mice allow investigation of activity patterns in defined neuronal populations in the living brain, and will greatly facilitate dissecting complex structural and functional relationships of neural networks. PMID:23083733

  2. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  3. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase inhibition by 2-acetyl-4-(tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) under conditions of vitamin B6 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ohtoyo, Mamoru; Tamura, Masakazu; Machinaga, Nobuo; Muro, Fumihito; Hashimoto, Ryuji

    2015-02-01

    Caramel food colorant 2-acetyl-4-(tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) causes lymphopenia in animals through sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) inhibition. However, this mechanism of action is partly still controversial because THI did not inhibit SPL in vitro either in cell-free or in cell-based systems. It is thought that the in vitro experimental conditions which have been used so far were not suitable for the evaluation of SPL inhibition, especially in case of cell-based experiments. We speculated that the key factor might be the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), an active form of vitamin B6 (VB6), because media used in cell-based assays usually contain an excess amount of VB6 which leads to the activation of SPL. By the use of VB6-deficient culture medium, we could regulate apo- (without PLP) and holo- (with PLP) SPL enzyme in cultured cells, resulting in the successful detection of SPL inhibition by THI. Although the observed inhibitory effect was not as strong as that of 4-deoxypyridoxine (a VB6 analog SPL inhibitor), these findings may be useful for further understanding the mechanism of action of THI.

  4. The radii of SU Cas and TU Cas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niva, G. D.; Schmidt, E. G.

    1980-01-01

    It is possible to obtain the masses of Cepheid variables by several methods involving the pulsation theory. However, these masses are frequently smaller than those indicated by the theory of stellar evolution. The cause of this discrepancy is not fully understood. Since the pulsation theory indicates that there is a relation among the mass, the radius and the period, the discrepancy also manifests itself in the radii of these stars. With this in mind, radius determinations for two Cepheids, SU Cas and TU Cas, were undertaken. It is concluded that because of the agreement between the present radius and the beat radius of TU Cas, the pulsation theory is giving correct information about the radii of beat Cepheids. This implies that the luminosities of short period Cepheids have been overestimated. Thus, the solution to the mass discrepancy should perhaps be sought in the theory of stellar evolution or in the possibility of mass loss.

  5. Astrocyte-to-neuron communication through integrin-engaged Thy-1/CBP/Csk/Src complex triggers neurite retraction via the RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, H; Calderon, C; Burgos-Bravo, F; Kobler, O; Zuschratter, W; Ramirez, O; Härtel, S; Schneider, P; Quest, A F G; Herrera-Molina, R; Leyton, L

    2017-02-01

    Two key proteins for cellular communication between astrocytes and neurons are αvβ3 integrin and the receptor Thy-1. Binding of these molecules in the same (cis) or on adjacent (trans) cellular membranes induces Thy-1 clustering, triggering actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Molecular events that could explain how the Thy-1-αvβ3 integrin interaction signals have only been studied separately in different cell types, and the detailed transcellular communication and signal transduction pathways involved in neuronal cytoskeleton remodeling remain unresolved. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, single-molecule tracking, and high-resolution nanoscopy, we provide evidence that upon binding to αvβ3 integrin, Thy-1 mobility decreased while Thy-1 nanocluster size increased. This occurred concomitantly with inactivation and exclusion of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src from the Thy-1/C-terminal Src kinase (Csk)-binding protein (CBP)/Csk complex. The Src inactivation decreased the p190Rho GTPase activating protein phosphorylation, promoting RhoA activation, cofilin, and myosin light chain II phosphorylation and, consequently, neurite shortening. Finally, silencing the adaptor CBP demonstrated that this protein was a key transducer in the Thy-1 signaling cascade. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that the Thy-1-CBP-Csk-Src-RhoA-ROCK axis transmitted signals from astrocytic integrin-engaged Thy-1 (trans) to the neuronal actin cytoskeleton. Importantly, the β3 integrin in neurons (cis) was not found to be crucial for neurite shortening. This is the first study to detail the signaling pathway triggered by αvβ3, the endogenous Thy-1 ligand, highlighting the role of membrane-bound integrins as trans acting ligands in astrocyte-neuron communication.

  6. A comparison of THI indices leads to a sensible heat-based heat stress index for shaded cattle that aligns temperature and humidity stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, A.; Horovitz, Talia; Kaim, M.; Gacitua, H.

    2016-10-01

    The combined temperature-humidity heat stress is estimated in farm animals by indices derived of an index based on human thermal comfort sensation. The latter index consists of temperature and humidity measures that sum to form the temperature-humidity index (THI). The hitherto unknown relative contribution of temperature and humidity to the THI was examined. A temperature-humidity data set (temperature 20-42 °C and relative humidity 10-70 %) was used to assess by regression procedures the relative weights of temperature and humidity in the variance of THI values produced by six commonly used heat stress indices. The temperature (Ta) effect was predominant (0.82-0.95 of variance) and humidity accounted for only 0.05 to 0.12 of THI variance, half of the variance encountered in animal responses to variable humidity heat stress. Significant difference in THI values was found between indices in the relative weights of temperature and humidity. As in THI indices, temperature and humidity are expressed in different physical units, their sum has no physical attributes, and empirical evaluations assess THI relation to animal responses. A sensible heat THI was created, in which at higher temperatures humidity reaches 0.25 of sensible heat, similarly to evaporative heat loss span in heat stressed animals. It relates to ambient temperature-humidity similarly to present THI; its values are similar to other THI but greater at higher humidity. In warm conditions, mean animal responses are similar in both indices. The higher sensitivity to humidity makes this index preferable for warm-humid conditions.

  7. Immunospecific responses to bacterial elongation factor Tu during Burkholderia infection and immunization.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Wildaliz; Heang, Julie; Asakrah, Saja; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Roy, Chad J; Morici, Lisa A

    2010-12-17

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis, a disease endemic in parts of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Currently there is no licensed vaccine against infection with this biological threat agent. In this study, we employed an immunoproteomic approach and identified bacterial Elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu) as a potential vaccine antigen. EF-Tu is membrane-associated, secreted in outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), and immunogenic during Burkholderia infection in the murine model of melioidosis. Active immunization with EF-Tu induced antigen-specific antibody and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. Mucosal immunization with EF-Tu also reduced lung bacterial loads in mice challenged with aerosolized B. thailandensis. Our data support the utility of EF-Tu as a novel vaccine immunogen against bacterial infection.

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi elongation factor EF-Tu is an immunogenic protein during Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sebastian E; Yang, Youyun; Troxell, Bryan; Yang, Xiuli; Pal, Utpal; Yang, X Frank

    2015-09-02

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease, does not produce lipopolysaccharide but expresses a large number of lipoproteins on its cell surface. These outer membrane lipoproteins are highly immunogenic and have been used for serodiagnosis of Lyme disease. Recent studies have shown that highly conserved cytosolic proteins such as enolase and elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) unexpectedly localized on the surface of bacteria including B. burgdorferi, and surface-localized enolase has shown to contribute to the enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi. In this study, we studied the immunogenicity, surface localization, and function of B. burgdorferi EF-Tu. We found that EF-Tu is highly immunogenic in mice, and EF-Tu antibodies were readily detected in Lyme disease patients. On the other hand, active immunization studies showed that EF-Tu antibodies did not protect mice from infection when challenged with B. burgdorferi via either needle inoculation or tick bites. Borrelial mouse-tick cycle studies showed that EF-Tu antibodies also did not block B. burgdorferi migration and survival in ticks. Consistent with these findings, we found that EF-Tu primarily localizes in the protoplasmic cylinder of spirochetes and is not on the surface of B. burgdorferi. Taken together, our studies suggest that B. burgdorferi EF-Tu is not surfaced exposed, but it is highly immunogenic and is a potential serodiagnostic marker for Lyme borreliosis.

  9. The thiamine biosynthetic enzyme ThiC catalyzes multiple turnovers and is inhibited by S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) metabolites.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lauren D; Downs, Diana M

    2013-10-18

    ThiC (4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate synthase; EC 4.1.99.17) is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) enzyme that uses a [4Fe-4S](+) cluster to reductively cleave AdoMet to methionine and a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates catalysis. In plants and bacteria, ThiC converts the purine intermediate 5-aminoimidazole ribotide to 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate, an intermediate of thiamine pyrophosphate (coenzyme B1) biosynthesis. In this study, assay conditions were implemented that consistently generated 5-fold molar excess of HMP, demonstrating that ThiC undergoes multiple turnovers. ThiC activity was improved by in situ removal of product 5'-deoxyadenosine. The activity was inhibited by AdoMet metabolites S-adenosylhomocysteine, adenosine, 5'-deoxyadenosine, S-methyl-5'-thioadenosine, methionine, and homocysteine. Neither adenosine nor S-methyl-5'-thioadenosine had been shown to inhibit radical AdoMet enzymes, suggesting that ThiC is distinct from other family members. The parameters for improved ThiC activity and turnover described here will facilitate kinetic and mechanistic analyses of ThiC.

  10. Thy-1 mRNA destabilization by norepinephrine requires a 3′ UTR cAMP responsive decay element and involves RNA binding proteins1

    PubMed Central

    LaJevic, Melissa D.; Koduvayur, Sujatha P.; Caffrey, Veronique; Cohen, Rhonna L.; Chambers, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Thy-1 is a cell surface protein important in immunologic and neurologic processes, including T cell activation and proliferation, and neuronal outgrowth. In murine thymocytes, Thy-1 is downregulated in response to norepinephrine (NE) through posttranscriptional destabilization of its mRNA mediated by βAR/AC/cAMP/PKA signaling. In this study we investigated factors involved in NE/cAMP mediated Thy-1 mRNA destabilization in S49 thymoma cells, and identified a region containing two copies of the AUUUA regulatory element (ARE), a motif commonly associated with mRNA decay, in the Thy-1 mRNA 3′ UTR. Insertion of the Thy-1 ARE region into a reporter gene, resulted in cAMP induced destabilization of the reporter gene mRNA. RNA-protein binding studies revealed multiple Thy-1 ARE binding proteins, including AUF1, HuR, and TIAR. RNA silencing of HuR enhanced cAMP mediated downregulation of Thy-1 mRNA, in contrast, silencing AUF1 had no effect. Immunoblotting revealed multiple proteins phosphorylated by PKA as a result of NE or cAMP signaling. These results reveal that the machinery of NE/cAMP modulation of Thy-1 mRNA decay involves a cAMP responsive ARE in its 3′ UTR and multiple site specific ARE binding proteins. These findings add to our knowledge of Thy-1 mRNA regulation and provide insight into the regulation of ARE containing mRNAs, which impacts stress-related immunosuppression. PMID:20412850

  11. [Management of sigmoid volvulus in the tropical area of Thies (Senegal)].

    PubMed

    Ba, P A; Diop, B; Soumah, S A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report our experience in the management of sigmoid volvulus in a tropical environment. This retrospective study covers the period from June 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013, in the department of emergency surgery at the regional hospital of Thiés: 40 patients were admitted with sigmoid volvulus: 36 men and 4 women, with a mean age of 45 years (20-89 years). Twelve had chronic constipation. All four signs of occlusion were present in 72.5% of cases. Abdominal radiography confirmed the diagnosis in all cases. The volvulus resolved spontaneously in one patient, while the other 39 required laparotomy: 25 had a one-stage colectomy, and 11 patients a sigmoidectomy with a temporary colostomy. Two patients underwent a sigmoidopexy, one with a simple closure of a perforated duodenal ulcer. The morbidity rate was 7.5%, due mainly to complications of infection. The mortality rate was 10%. After a mean follow-up of 2.77 months (range: 15 days-12 months), no recurrences were observed. Sigmoid volvulus is a common condition in Africa especially in younger patients. The diagnosis is easy, based on clinical and abdominal radiography findings. Several procedures have been described but the one-stage colectomy remains the method of choice, especially in tropical areas where socioeconomic conditions are difficult.

  12. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Side View of Nose, with a TU-144D on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A Tupolev Tu-144D supersonic jetliner is framed by the drooped nose and forward fuselage of the Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, in 1998. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used

  13. Cyan fluorescent protein expression in ganglion and amacrine cells in a thy1-CFP transgenic mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Alejandro; Huynh, Uyen-Chi N.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) expression in the retina of the thy1-CFP (B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J) transgenic mouse line. Methods CFP expression was characterized using morphometric methods and immunohistochemistry with antibodies to neurofilament light (NF-L), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), POU-domain protein (Brn3a) and calretinin, which immunolabel ganglion cells, and syntaxin 1 (HPC-1), glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), GABA plasma membrane transporter-1 (GAT-1), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which immunolabel amacrine cells. Results CFP was extensively expressed in the inner retina, primarily in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), ganglion cell layer (GCL), nerve fiber layer, and optic nerve. CFP fluorescent cell bodies were in all retinal regions and their processes ramified in all laminae of the IPL. Some small, weakly CFP fluorescent somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL). CFP-containing somata in the GCL ranged from 6 to 20 μm in diameter, and they had a density of 2636±347 cells/mm2 at 1.5 mm from the optic nerve head. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated colocalization of CFP with the ganglion cell markers NF-L, NeuN, Brn3a, and calretinin. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to HPC-1, GAD67, GAT-1, and ChAT indicated that the small, weakly fluorescent CFP cells in the INL and GCL were cholinergic amacrine cells. Conclusions The total number and density of CFP-fluorescent cells in the GCL were within the range of previous estimates of the total number of ganglion cells in the C57BL/6J line. Together these findings suggest that most ganglion cells in the thy1-CFP mouse line 23 express CFP. In conclusion, the thy1-CFP mouse line is highly useful for studies requiring the identification of ganglion cells. PMID:18728756

  14. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The delta wing of the Tupolev Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory is evident in this view from underneath the aircraft during a 1998 test flight at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were

  15. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Tupolev Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory shows off its sleek lines in a low-level pass over the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, on a 1998 research flight. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in production

  16. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Being Towed Down Taxiway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    With its giant delta wings drooping toward the ground, the Tupolev Tu-144LL is towed down a taxiway at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, in preparation for a high-speed research flight in 1998. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines

  17. The gammaTuRC Nanomachine Mechanism and Future Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehlman, Timothy D.

    The complexity and precision of the eukaryotic cell's cytoskeletal network is unrivaled by any man-made systems, perfected by billions of years of evolution, mastering elegant processes of self-assembly, error correction, and self-repair. Understanding the capabilities of these networks will have important and far reaching applications in human medicine by aiding our understanding of developmental processes, cellular division, and disease mechanisms, and through biomimicry will provide insights for biosynthetic manufacturing at the nanoscale and across scales. My research utilizes cross species techniques from Human to the model organism of Fission Yeast to investigate the structure and mechanisms of the g-tubulin ring complex (gTuRC). The gTuRC is a highly conserved eukaryotic multiprotein complex serving as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC) responsible for microtubule nucleation through templating, regulation of dynamics, and establishment of microtubule polarity. Microtubules are 25 nm diameter dynamic flexible polymers of a/b-tubulin heterodimers that function as scaffolds, force generators, distributors, and intracellular highways. The microtubule cytoskeleton is essential for numerous fundamental cellular processes such as mitotic division of chromosomes and cell division, organelle distribution within the cell, cell signaling, and cell shape. This incredible diversity in functions is made possible in part due to molecular motor Kinesin-like proteins (Klps), which allow expansion into more specialized neural, immune, and ciliated cell functions. Combined, the MTOC, microtubules, and Klps represent ideal microtubule cytoskeleton protein (MCP) modular components for in vitro biomimicry towards generation of adaptable patterned networks for human designed applications. My research investigates the hypothesis that a mechanistic understanding of conserved MTOC gTuRC mechanisms will help us understand dynamic cellular nanomachines and their ability to self

  18. Loss of medial septum cholinergic neurons in THY-Tau22 mouse model: what links with tau pathology?

    PubMed

    Belarbi, K; Burnouf, S; Fernandez-Gomez, F-J; Desmercières, J; Troquier, L; Brouillette, J; Tsambou, L; Grosjean, M-E; Caillierez, R; Demeyer, D; Hamdane, M; Schindowski, K; Blum, D; Buée, L

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder histologically defined by the cerebral accumulation of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is another hallmark of the disease thought to contribute to the cognitive dysfunctions. To this date, the mechanisms underlying cholinergic neurons degeneration remain uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between neurofibrillary degeneration and cholinergic defects in AD using THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model exhibiting a major hippocampal AD-like tau pathology and hyperphosphorylated tau species in the septohippocampal pathway. Here, we report that at a time THY-Tau22 mice display strong reference memory alterations, the retrograde transport of fluorogold through the septohippocampal pathway is altered. This impairment is associated with a significant reduction in the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunopositive cholinergic neurons in the medial septum. Analysis of nerve growth factor (NGF) levels supports an accumulation of the mature neurotrophin in the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 mice, consistent with a decrease of its uptake or retrograde transport by cholinergic terminals. Finally, our data strongly support that tau pathology could be instrumental in the cholinergic neuronal loss observed in AD.

  19. Secondary structures and functional requirements for thiM riboswitches from Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora and Rhodobacter spheroides.

    PubMed

    Rentmeister, Andrea; Mayer, Günter; Kuhn, Nicole; Famulok, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Abstract Bacterial thiM riboswitches contain aptamer domains that bind the metabolite thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). Binding of TPP to the aptamer domain induces structural rearrangements that are relayed to the expression domain, thereby interfering with gene expression. Here, we report identification of three putative thiM riboswitches from different bacteria and analysis of their secondary structures. Chemical probing revealed that the riboswitches share similar secondary structures in their aptamer domains that can communicate with the highly variant expression domains in a mechanism likely involving sequestration of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Remarkably, the aptamer domain of the thiM gene of Desulfovibrio vulgaris binds TPP with similar affinity and selectivity as that of Escherichia coli, although nucleotides previously shown to form direct contacts to the metabolite are mutated. We also designed small RNA hairpins for each riboswitch that bind the RNA only in the absence of the metabolite. Our study shows that aptamer domains in riboswitches with high similarity in their secondary structures can communicate with a broad variety of non-related expression domains by similar mechanisms.

  20. Ring closure activates yeast γTuRC for species-specific microtubule nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Kollman, Justin M.; Greenberg, Charles H.; Li, Sam; Moritz, Michelle; Zelter, Alex; Fong, Kimberly K.; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Sali, Andrej; Kilmartin, John; Davis, Trisha N.; Agard, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC) is the primary microtubule nucleator in cells. γTuRC is assembled from repeating γ-tubulin small complex (γTuSC) subunits and is thought to function as a template by presenting a γ-tubulin ring that mimics microtubule geometry. However, a previous yeast γTuRC structure showed γTuSC in an open conformation that prevents matching to microtubule symmetry. By contrast, we show here that γ-tubulin complexes are in a closed conformation when attached to microtubules. To confirm its functional importance we trapped the closed state and determined its structure, showing that the γ-tubulin ring precisely matches microtubule symmetry and providing detailed insight into γTuRC architecture. Importantly, the closed state is a stronger nucleator, suggesting this conformational switch may allosterically control γTuRC activity. Finally, we demonstrate that γTuRCs have a profound preference for tubulin from the same species. PMID:25599398

  1. Intestinal, portal, and peripheral profiles of daikenchuto (TU-100)'s active ingredients after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Junko; Kaifuchi, Noriko; Kushida, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Takashi; Fukutake, Miwako; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru

    2015-01-01

    A pharmaceutical grade Japanese traditional medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100), consisting of Japanese pepper, processed ginger, and ginseng, has been widely used for various intestinal disorders in Japan and now under development as a new therapeutic drug in the US. It is suggested that TU-100 ingredients exert pharmacological effects on intestines via two routes, from the luminal side before absorption and the peripheral blood stream after absorption. Therefore, in order to fully understand the pharmacological actions of TU-100, it is critically important to know the intraluminal amounts and forms of ingested TU-100 ingredients. In the present study, after administrating TU-100 to rats, the concentrations of TU-100 ingredients and their conjugates in the peripheral and portal blood and ileal contents were determined by LC-MS/MS. Next, TU-100 was administered to patients with ileostomy bags, but whose small intestines are diagnosed as healthy, and the ingredients/conjugates in the ileal effluent were analyzed. The results suggest that: (1) Pepper ingredients hydroxysanshools are rapidly absorbed and enter systemic circulation, (2) Ginseng ingredients ginsenosides are transported to the colon with the least absorption, (3) Ginger ingredients gingerols are absorbed and some conjugated in the small intestine and transported via the portal vein. While only a small amount of gingerols/gingerol conjugates enter systemic circulation, considerable amounts reappear in the small intestine. Thus, the effect of TU-100 on the intestines is believed to be a composite of multiple actions by multiple compounds supplied via multiple routes. PMID:26516578

  2. Co-ordination of Mobile Information Agents in TuCSoN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omicini, Andrea; Zambonelli, Franco

    1998-01-01

    Examines mobile agent coordination and presents TuCSoN, a coordination model for Internet applications based on mobile information agents that uses a tuple centre, a tuple space enhanced with the capability of programming its behavior in response to communication events. Discusses the effectiveness of the TuCSoN model in the contexts of Internet…

  3. Intestinal, portal, and peripheral profiles of daikenchuto (TU-100)'s active ingredients after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Junko; Kaifuchi, Noriko; Kushida, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Takashi; Fukutake, Miwako; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru

    2015-10-01

    A pharmaceutical grade Japanese traditional medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100), consisting of Japanese pepper, processed ginger, and ginseng, has been widely used for various intestinal disorders in Japan and now under development as a new therapeutic drug in the US. It is suggested that TU-100 ingredients exert pharmacological effects on intestines via two routes, from the luminal side before absorption and the peripheral blood stream after absorption. Therefore, in order to fully understand the pharmacological actions of TU-100, it is critically important to know the intraluminal amounts and forms of ingested TU-100 ingredients. In the present study, after administrating TU-100 to rats, the concentrations of TU-100 ingredients and their conjugates in the peripheral and portal blood and ileal contents were determined by LC-MS/MS. Next, TU-100 was administered to patients with ileostomy bags, but whose small intestines are diagnosed as healthy, and the ingredients/conjugates in the ileal effluent were analyzed. The results suggest that: (1) Pepper ingredients hydroxysanshools are rapidly absorbed and enter systemic circulation, (2) Ginseng ingredients ginsenosides are transported to the colon with the least absorption, (3) Ginger ingredients gingerols are absorbed and some conjugated in the small intestine and transported via the portal vein. While only a small amount of gingerols/gingerol conjugates enter systemic circulation, considerable amounts reappear in the small intestine. Thus, the effect of TU-100 on the intestines is believed to be a composite of multiple actions by multiple compounds supplied via multiple routes.

  4. Observations on the TU/VOS Option in Guatemalan Ladino Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Anne

    1986-01-01

    Examines the usage of the "voseo" in Guatemalan Ladino Spanish. It is concluded that "vos" has not replaced "tu" in Guatemalan Ladino Spanish but rather has joined with "tu" and "usted" to form a tri-level second person singular address system. (SED)

  5. Ribosome-induced changes in elongation factor Tu conformation control GTP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Elizabeth; Sengupta, Jayati; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; LeBarron, Jamie; Baxter, William T.; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Grassucci, Robert A.; Nissen, Poul; Ehrenberg, Måns; Schulten, Klaus; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In translation, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) molecules deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs to the mRNA-programmed ribosome. The GTPase activity of EF-Tu is triggered by ribosome-induced conformational changes of the factor that play a pivotal role in the selection of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. We present a 6.7-Å cryo-electron microscopy map of the aminoacyl-tRNA·EF-Tu·GDP·kirromycin-bound Escherichia coli ribosome, together with an atomic model of the complex obtained through molecular dynamics flexible fitting. The model reveals the conformational changes in the conserved GTPase switch regions of EF-Tu that trigger hydrolysis of GTP, along with key interactions, including those between the sarcin-ricin loop and the P loop of EF-Tu, and between the effector loop of EF-Tu and a conserved region of the 16S rRNA. Our data suggest that GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu is controlled through a hydrophobic gate mechanism. PMID:19122150

  6. Host sex-dependent growth of potential Thy-1+ lymphoma cells that appear in the thymus of X-irradiated NFS mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, N.; Takamori, Y. )

    1990-01-01

    During the course of studies designed to detect potentially leukemic cells in radiation lymphomagenesis, using an opposite-sex (male----female) transplantation assay method, we previously found that potential Thy-1- lymphoma cells are generated in the bone marrow of NFS mice exposed to a split-dose irradiation (1.7 Gy X 4), while potential Thy-1+ lymphoma cells are not detectable. In this report, using a (female----male) intrathymic transplantation assay system we show that potential Thy-1+ lymphoma cells were generated in the thymus of female NFS mice exposed to split-dose irradiation, and reconfirm that such cells were not detected in the (male----female) transplantation system. These results demonstrate that the detection of potential Thy-1+ lymphoma cells strictly depends on the transplantation system.

  7. Radioiodination and biodistribution of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubaštová, H.; Kleinova, V.; Seifert, D.; Fišer, M.; Kranda, K.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment to specifically bind to the C-end of the class III beta-tubulin makes these preparations useful as potential diagnostics for in vivo determination of neurodegenerative diseases that entail degradation of neuronal cytoskeleton. To examine this hypothesis, TU-20 and its scFv were labelled with 125I and their properties were extensively investigated. TU-20 and its scFv were labelled via chloramine-T with the yield 90 95% and 64 78%, respectively. Their quality control, performed by an ELISA and gel electrophoresis, determined adequate properties for further studies. The in vitro experiment, involving autoradiography and immunohistochemistry of mice’ brain slices, enabled confirmation of preserved immunospecificity of the radiolabelled substances. Finally, the in vivo biodistribution proved differences in elimination of either TU-20, scFv TU-20, or iodide from the mice.

  8. Overexpression of CD90 (Thy-1) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma present in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhui; Thakolwiboon, Smathorn; Liu, Xinhua; Zhang, Min; Lubman, David M

    2014-01-01

    CD90 (Thy-1) plays important roles in oncogenesis and shows potential as a candidate marker for cancer stem cells (CSCs) in various malignancies. Herein, we investigated the expression of CD90 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), with a comparison to normal pancreas and non-malignant pancreatic disease, by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of tissue microarrays containing 183 clinical tissue specimens. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the correlation between CD90 expression and the major clinicopathological factors after adjustment of age and gender. The IHC data showed that CD90 was significantly overexpressed in PDAC and its metastatic cancers as compared to chronic pancreatitis and benign islet tumors, while it was negative in normal pancreas and 82.7% of adjacent normal pancreas tissues. The abundant CD90 expression was predominantly present in PDAC stroma, such as fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells, which could serve as a promising marker to distinguish pancreatic adenocarcinoma from normal pancreas and non-malignant pancreatic diseases. Double immunostaining of CD90 with CD24, a CSC marker for PDAC, showed that there was little overlap between these two markers. However, CD90+ fibroblast cells were clustered around CD24+ malignant ducts, suggesting that CD90 may be involved in the tumor-stroma interactions and promote pancreatic cancer development. Furthermore, CD90 mostly overlapped with α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA, a marker of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)) in PDAC stroma, which demonstrated that CD90+ stromal cells consist largely of activated PSCs. Double immunostaining of CD90 and a vascular endothelial cell marker CD31 demonstrated that CD90 expression on vascular endothelial cells was significantly increased in PDACs as compared to normal pancreas and non-malignant pancreatic diseases. Our findings suggest that CD90 could serve as a promising marker for pancreatic adenocarcinoma where desmoplastic stroma plays an

  9. Doc Toxin Is a Kinase That Inactivates Elongation Factor Tu*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Jonathan W.; Rothenbacher, Francesca P.; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S.; Dunham, Christine M.; Woychik, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site. PMID:24448800

  10. Mechanism of activation of elongation factor Tu by ribosome: catalytic histidine activates GTP by protonation.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Alexey; Field, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is central to prokaryotic protein synthesis as it has the role of delivering amino-acylated tRNAs to the ribosome. Release of EF-Tu, after correct binding of the EF-Tu:aa-tRNA complex to the ribosome, is initiated by GTP hydrolysis. This reaction, whose mechanism is uncertain, is catalyzed by EF-Tu, but requires activation by the ribosome. There have been a number of mechanistic proposals, including those spurred by a recent X-ray crystallographic analysis of a ribosome:EF-Tu:aa-tRNA:GTP-analog complex. In this work, we have investigated these and alternative hypotheses, using high-level quantum chemical/molecular mechanical simulations for the wild-type protein and its His85Gln mutant. For both proteins, we find previously unsuggested mechanisms as being preferred, in which residue 85, either His or Gln, directly assists in the reaction. Analysis shows that the RNA has a minor catalytic effect in the wild-type reaction, but plays a significant role in the mutant by greatly stabilizing the reaction's transition state. Given the similarity between EF-Tu and other members of the translational G-protein family, it is likely that these mechanisms of ribosome-activated GTP hydrolysis are pertinent to all of these proteins.

  11. Physical Characterization of the Binary Asteroid 66146 (1998 Tu3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Thien-Tin; Hicks, M.; Mayes, D.; Barajas, T.; Garcia, K.

    2011-01-01

    The near-Earth asteroid 66146 (1998 TU3) was discovered on 1998 October 13 by the LINEAR NEO survey (MPEC 1998-U03). We obtained five nights of Bessel BVRI observations (2010 Aug 6,7,10,12,13 UT) and one night of Bessel R (August 8 PST) at the JPL Table Mountain Observatory (TMO) 0.6-m telescope near Wrightwood, California. These observations were obtained as part of our ongoing survey at TMO of Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs), planetary radar targets, and low delta-V near-Earth asteroids (NEOs). The object's rotationally averaged colors (B-R=1.238+/-0.011 mag; V-R=0.440+/-0.008 mag; R-I=0.275+/-0.010 mag) were found most compatible with an Sk-type spectral classification (Bus Taxonomy)/S-type (Tholen Taxonomy). This association was obtained through a comparison of our colors with the 1341 asteroid spectra in the SMASS II database (Bus & Binzel 2002). Our classification differs significantly from the Q-type taxonomy reported by Whitely (2002). Assuming a solar phase parameter g=0.15 we performed a period search using standard Fourier techniques. We found a best-fit rotational period Psyn=2.378+/-0.001 hr, in excellent agreement with the 2.3779+/-0.0004 period determined by Richards et al. (2007). The dispersion in the phased single period lightcurve strongly suggests that 1998 TU3 is be a binary system, with variations in observed flux caused by an unresolved, tidally locked secondary companion. Fitting a 2-period model as described by Pravec et al. (2000), we found that our photometry agrees well with a binary model (P1=2.378+/-0.01 hr, P2=28.28+/-0.05 hr). We have three additional nights scheduled for this object at TMO (Oct 8, 9, 10 2010 UT), extending our solar phase coverage and allowing us to refine our rotational models. 1998 TU3 will experience an exceptional apparition in 2012. This object may be a good candidate for shape/pole modeling via lightcurve inversion, especially if photometry can be obtained from both northern and southern hemispheres. We

  12. A Thy1-CFP DBA/2J mouse line with cyan fluorescent protein expression in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    RAYMOND, IONA D.; POOL, ANGELA L.; VILA, ALEJANDRO; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2013-01-01

    A DBA/2J (D2) transgenic mouse line with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) reporter expression in ganglion cells was developed for the analysis of ganglion cells during progressive glaucoma. The Thy1-CFP D2 (CFP-D2) line was created by congenically breeding the D2 line, which develops pigmentary glaucoma, and the Thy1-CFP line, which expresses CFP in ganglion cells. Microsatellite marker analysis of CFP-D2 progeny verified the genetic inclusion of the D2 isa and ipd loci. Specific mutations within these loci lead to dysfunctional melanosomal proteins and glaucomatous phenotype in D2 mice. Polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the inclusion of the Thy1-CFP transgene. CFP-fluorescent ganglion cells, 6–20 μm in diameter, were distributed in all retinal regions, CFP processes were throughout the inner plexiform layer, and CFP-fluorescent axons were in the fiber layer and optic nerve head. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to ganglion cell markers NF-L, NeuN, Brn3a, and SMI32 was used to confirm CFP expression in ganglion cells. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to amacrine cell markers HPC-1 and ChAT was used to confirm weak CFP expression in cholinergic amacrine cells. CFP-D2 mice developed a glaucomatous phenotype, including iris disease, ganglion cell loss, attrition of the fiber layer, and elevated intraocular pressure. A CFP-D2 transgenic line with CFP-expressing ganglion cells was developed, which has (1) a predominantly D2 genetic background, (2) CFP-expressing ganglion cells, and (3) age-related progressive glaucoma. This line will be of value for experimental studies investigating ganglion cells and their axons in vivo and in vitro during the progressive development of glaucoma. PMID:19930759

  13. Thy-1-mediated Cell -Cell Contact Induces Astrocyte Migration through the Engagement of αVβ3 Integrin and Syndecan-4

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Cárdenas, Areli; Schneider, Pascal; Burridge, Keith; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2013-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins occurs through interactions with integrins that bind to Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) tripeptides, and syndecan-4, which recognizes the heparin-binding domain (HBD) of other proteins. Both receptors trigger signaling pathways, including those that activate RhoGTPases such as RhoA and Rac1. This sequence of events modulates cell adhesion to the ECM and cell migration. Using a neuron-astrocyte model, we have reported that the neuronal protein Thy-1 engages αVβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 to induce RhoA activation and strong astrocyte adhesion to their underlying substrate. Thus, because cell-cell interactions and strong cell attachment to the matrix are considered antagonistic to cell migration, we hypothesized that Thy-1 stimulation of astrocytes should preclude cell migration. Here, we studied the effect of Thy-1 expressing neurons on astrocyte polarization and migration using a wound-healing assay and immunofluorescence analysis. Signaling molecules involved were studied by affinity precipitations, western blots and the usage of specific antibodies. Intriguingly, Thy-1 interaction with its two receptors was found to increase astrocyte polarization and migration. The latter events required interactions of these receptors with both the RGD-like sequence and the HBD of Thy-1. Additionally, prolonged Thy-1-receptor interactions inhibited RhoA activation while activating FAK, PI3K and Rac1. Therefore, sustained engagement of integrin and syndecan-4 with the neuronal surface protein Thy-1 induces astrocyte migration. Interestingly we identify here, a cell-cell interaction that although initially induces strong cell attachment, upon persistant stimulation favors cell migration by engaging the same signaling receptors and molecules as those utilized by ECM proteins to stimulate cell movement. PMID:23481656

  14. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  15. The Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI): an instrument for remote sensing of Earth's surface from a micro-satellite platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, R.; Lucey, P. G.; Horton, K. A.; Wood, M.; Garbeil, H.; Crites, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    The Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI) is a low cost, low mass, power efficient instrument designed to acquire hyperspectral remote sensing data in the long-wave infrared. The instrument has been designed to satisfy mass, volume, and power constraints necessary to allow for its accommodation in a 95 kg micro-satellite bus, designed by staff and students at the University of Hawai'i. THI acquires approximately 30 separate spectral bands in the 8 to 14 μm wavelength region, at 10 wavenumber resolution. Rather than using filtering or dispersion to generate the spectral information, THI uses an interferometric technique. Light from the scene is focused onto an uncooled microbolometer detector array through a stationary interferometer, causing the light incident at each detector at any instant in time to be phase shifted by an optical path difference which varies linearly across the array in the along-track dimension. As platform motion translates the detector array in the along-track direction at a rate of approximately one pixel per frame (the camera acquires data at 30 Hz) the radiance from each scene element can be sampled at each OPD, thus generating an interferogram. Spectral radiance as a function of wavelength is subsequently obtained for each scene element using standard Fourier transform techniques. Housed in a pressure vessel to shield COTS parts from the space environment, the total instrument has a mass of 15 kg. Peak power consumption, largely associated with the calibration procedure, is <90 W. From a nominal altitude of 550 km the resulting data would have a spatial resolution of approximately 300 m. Although an individual imaging event yields approximately 1 Gbit of raw uncompressed data, onboard processing (to convert the interferograms into a conventional spectral hypercube) can reduce this to tens of Mbits per scene. In this presentation we will describe a) the rationale for the project, b) the instrument design, and c) how the data are processed

  16. Is tissue harmonic ultrasound imaging (THI) of the prostatic urethra and rectum superior to brightness (B) mode imaging? An observer study.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurpreet K; Angyalfi, Steve; Dunscombe, Peter B; Khan, Rao F

    2014-09-01

    Quality ultrasound images are an essential part of prostate brachytherapy procedure. The authors have previously reported that tissue harmonic ultrasound images (THI) are superior to brightness (B) mode for the prostate. The objective of the current study was to compare both imaging modes for visualization of the prostatic urethra and rectum. B and THI mode transrectal ultrasound images were acquired for ten patients. The prostatic urethra and rectal wall were contoured by a radiation oncologist (RO) and five observers on randomly presented images. The contours on one patient were repeated four additional times by four observers. All the images were qualitatively scored using a five-level Likert scale. The values of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients showed that the observers were in close agreement with the RO. Two sample paired student t-test showed that the rectum volumes with THI were significantly smaller than B-mode, but no significant difference for urethra. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant observer variability in defining the rectum and urethra in both imaging modes. Observer consistency of the rectum volumes, estimated by standard deviations as percentages of means was significantly improved for THI. The Likert scale based qualitative assessment supported quantitative observations. The significant improvement in image quality of the prostate (reported previously) and rectum with THI may offer better-quality treatment plans for prostate brachytherapy and potential improvement in local control.

  17. Brugia pahangi in nude mice: protective immunity to infective larvae is Thy 1.2+ cell dependent and cyclosporin A resistant.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A C; Nayar, J K

    1987-03-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to larvae of Brugia pahangi were studied in congenitally athymic nude C3H/HeN mice and their syngeneic heterozygous littermates. An average 11% of subcutaneous larval inocula was recovered from control nudes 28 days after inoculation. No worms were recovered from nude recipients of viable splenic Thy 1.2+ T lymphocytes from heterozygotes which had killed a priming dose of B. pahangi larvae. Primed T lymphocytes, depleted of either Lyt 1.1+ or Lyt 2.1+ cells or incubated with anti-Thy 1.2 monoclonal antibody and complement, failed to protect nude mice against a larval challenge. Nor were primed B lymphocytes depleted by Thy 1.2+ T cell contaminants protective. Treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA) did not increase the numbers of worms recovered from heterozygotes nor did CsA treatment of heterozygous cell donors abolish the ability of primed Thy 1.2+ T lymphocytes to transfer protection to nude mice. IgG but not IgM antibody titres to B. pahangi antigens were depressed in all CsA-treated mice. CsA treatment of nude mice had no direct effect upon development of B. pahangi larvae. These results show that protective immunity to larvae of B. pahangi in mice depends upon small numbers of Thy 1.2+ T cells which are CsA-resistant.

  18. Large, detergent-resistant complexes containing murine antigens Thy-1 and Ly-6 and protein tyrosine kinase p56lck.

    PubMed

    Bohuslav, J; Cinek, T; Horejsí, V

    1993-04-01

    A number of human and mouse leukocyte surface (glyco)proteins anchored in a membrane via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) moiety have been previously shown to be noncovalently associated with protein tyrosine kinases (Science 1991. 254: 1016; J. Biol. Chem. 1992. 267: 12317). Here we show that two murine antigens of this group, Thy-1 and Ly-6, implicated in the activation of the T cells, are associated with each other, with the kinase p56lck and with several of potential kinase substrates in very large, detergent-resistant complexes, the size of which is between 50 and 200 nm, as determined by ultrafiltration and gel chromatography. Experiments on simultaneous solubilization of mixed human and mouse cells rule out that the observed complexes are artifacts induced by the detergent. Complexes of similar composition and properties were obtained when either detergents Brij-58, Nonidet-P40 or 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]- 1-propane-sulfonate (Chaps) were used for solubilization of the cells, while octylglucoside at least partially dissociated them. These "GPI-complexes" may be essential for the well-known signal-transducing capacity of Thy-1 and Ly-6.

  19. Genetic control of immunity to Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) pathotype 1 in Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage).

    PubMed

    Lydiate, Derek J; Pilcher, Rachel L Rusholme; Higgins, Erin E; Walsh, John A

    2014-08-01

    Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) is the major virus infecting crops of the genus Brassica worldwide. A dominant resistance gene, TuRB01b, that confers immunity to the virus isolate UK 1 (a representative pathotype 1 isolate of TuMV) on Brassica rapa was identified in the Chinese cabbage cultivar Tropical Delight. The TuRB01b locus was mapped to a 2.9-cM interval on B. rapa chromosome 6 (A6) that was flanked by RFLP markers pN101e1 and pW137e1. This mapping used a first backcross (B(1)) population segregating for the resistance gene at TuRB01b and sets of RFLP markers employed in previous mapping experiments in Brassica. Virus-plant interaction phenotypes were assayed in inbred progeny derived from B(1) individuals to allow different virus isolates to be tested. Comparative mapping confirmed that A6 of B. rapa was equivalent to chromosome 6 of Brassica napus (A6) and that the map position of TuRB01b in B. rapa could be identical to that of TuRB01 in B. napus. Detailed evaluation of plant-virus interactions showed that TuRB01 and TuRB01b had indistinguishable specificities to a range of TuMV isolates. The possibility that TuRB01 and TuRB01b represent similar or identical alleles at the same A genome resistance locus suggests that B. napus acquired TuRB01 from the B. rapa gene pool.

  20. Conserved discrimination against misacylated tRNAs by two mesophilic elongation factor Tu orthologs.

    PubMed

    Cathopoulis, Terry J T; Chuawong, Pitak; Hendrickson, Tamara L

    2008-07-22

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) binds and loads elongating aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) onto the ribosome for protein biosynthesis. Many bacteria biosynthesize Gln-tRNA (Gln) and Asn-tRNA (Asn) by an indirect, two-step pathway that relies on the misacylated tRNAs Glu-tRNA (Gln) and Asp-tRNA (Asn) as intermediates. Previous thermodynamic and experimental analyses have demonstrated that Thermus thermophilus EF-Tu does not bind Asp-tRNA (Asn) and predicted a similar discriminatory response against Glu-tRNA (Gln) [Asahara, H., and Uhlenbeck, O. (2005) Biochemistry 46, 6194-6200; Roy, H., et al. (2007) Nucleic Acids Res. 35, 3420-3430]. By discriminating against these misacylated tRNAS, EF-Tu plays a direct role in preventing misincorporation of aspartate and glutamate into proteins at asparagine and glutamine codons. Here we report the characterization of two different mesophilic EF-Tu orthologs, one from Escherichia coli, a bacterium that does not utilize either Glu-tRNA (Gln) or Asp-tRNA (Asn), and the second from Helicobacter pylori, an organism in which both misacylated tRNAs are essential. Both EF-Tu orthologs discriminate against these misacylated tRNAs, confirming the prediction that Glu-tRNA (Gln), like Asp-tRNA (Asn), will not form a complex with EF-Tu. These results also demonstrate that the capacity of EF-Tu to discriminate against both of these aminoacyl-tRNAs is conserved even in bacteria like E. coli that do not generate either misacylated tRNA.

  1. Daikenchuto (TU-100) shapes gut microbiota architecture and increases the production of ginsenoside metabolite compound K.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takumu; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Musch, Mark W; Nadimpalli, Anuradha; Kaneko, Atsushi; Kaifuchi, Noriko; Watanabe, Junko; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru; Inaba, Yuhei; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka; Chang, Eugene B

    2016-02-01

    Many pharmaceutical agents not only require microbial metabolism for increased bioavailability and bioactivity, but also have direct effects on gut microbial assemblage and function. We examined the possibility that these actions are not mutually exclusive and may be mutually reinforcing in ways that enhance long-term of these agents. Daikenchuto, TU-100, is a traditional Japanese medicine containing ginseng. Conversion of the ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) to bioactive compound K (CK) requires bacterial metabolism. Diet-incorporated TU-100 was administered to mice over a period of several weeks. T-RFLP and 454 pyrosequencing were performed to analyze the time-dependent effects on fecal microbial membership. Fecal microbial capacity to metabolize Rb1 to CK was measured by adding TU-100 or ginseng to stool samples to assess the generation of bioactive metabolites. Levels of metabolized TU-100 components in plasma and in stool samples were measured by LC-MS/MS. Cecal and stool short-chain fatty acids were measured by GC-MS. Dietary administration of TU-100 for 28 days altered the gut microbiota, increasing several bacteria genera including members of Clostridia and Lactococcus lactis. Progressive capacity of microbiota to convert Rb1 to CK was observed over the 28 days administration of dietary TU-100. Concomitantly with these changes, increases in all SCFA were observed in cecal contents and in acetate and butyrate content of the stool. Chronic consumption of dietary TU-100 promotes changes in gut microbiota enhancing metabolic capacity of TU-100 and increased bioavailability. We believe these findings have broad implications in optimizing the efficacy of natural compounds that depend on microbial bioconversion in general.

  2. Cell-cycle dependent phosphorylation of yeast pericentrin regulates γ-TuSC-mediated microtubule nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-chen; Neuner, Annett; Schlosser, Yvonne T; Scharf, Annette ND; Weber, Lisa; Schiebel, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Budding yeast Spc110, a member of γ-tubulin complex receptor family (γ-TuCR), recruits γ-tubulin complexes to microtubule (MT) organizing centers (MTOCs). Biochemical studies suggest that Spc110 facilitates higher-order γ-tubulin complex assembly (Kollman et al., 2010). Nevertheless the molecular basis for this activity and the regulation are unclear. Here we show that Spc110 phosphorylated by Mps1 and Cdk1 activates γ-TuSC oligomerization and MT nucleation in a cell cycle dependent manner. Interaction between the N-terminus of the γ-TuSC subunit Spc98 and Spc110 is important for this activity. Besides the conserved CM1 motif in γ-TuCRs (Sawin et al., 2004), a second motif that we named Spc110/Pcp1 motif (SPM) is also important for MT nucleation. The activating Mps1 and Cdk1 sites lie between SPM and CM1 motifs. Most organisms have both SPM-CM1 (Spc110/Pcp1/PCNT) and CM1-only (Spc72/Mto1/Cnn/CDK5RAP2/myomegalin) types of γ-TuCRs. The two types of γ-TuCRs contain distinct but conserved C-terminal MTOC targeting domains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02208.001 PMID:24842996

  3. Direct evidence of an elongation factor-Tu/Ts·GTP·Aminoacyl-tRNA quaternary complex.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Benjamin J; Altman, Roger B; Ferguson, Angelica; Wasserman, Michael R; Zhou, Zhou; Blanchard, Scott C

    2014-08-22

    During protein synthesis, elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu) bound to GTP chaperones the entry of aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) into actively translating ribosomes. In so doing, EF-Tu increases the rate and fidelity of the translation mechanism. Recent evidence suggests that EF-Ts, the guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for EF-Tu, directly accelerates both the formation and dissociation of the EF-Tu-GTP-Phe-tRNA(Phe) ternary complex (Burnett, B. J., Altman, R. B., Ferrao, R., Alejo, J. L., Kaur, N., Kanji, J., and Blanchard, S. C. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 13917-13928). A central feature of this model is the existence of a quaternary complex of EF-Tu/Ts·GTP·aa-tRNA(aa). Here, through comparative investigations of phenylalanyl, methionyl, and arginyl ternary complexes, and the development of a strategy to monitor their formation and decay using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we reveal the generality of this newly described EF-Ts function and the first direct evidence of the transient quaternary complex species. These findings suggest that EF-Ts may regulate ternary complex abundance in the cell through mechanisms that are distinct from its guanosine nucleotide exchange factor functions.

  4. Thorium-mediated ring-opening of tetrahydrofuran and the development of a new thorium starting material: preparation and chemistry of ThI4(DME)2.

    PubMed

    Travia, Nicholas E; Monreal, Marisa J; Scott, Brian L; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2012-12-28

    The thorium(IV) tetraiodide complex ThI(4)(DME)(2) (3) (DME = 1,2-dimethoxyethane) has been prepared in high yield by reacting the corresponding chloride complex ThCl(4)(DME)(2) with an excess of trimethylsilyl iodide (Me(3)SiI) in toluene. This new route avoids the use of thorium metal as a reagent. ThI(4)(DME)(2) (3) exhibits excellent thermal stability compared to ThI(4)(THF)(4) (1), which undergoes rapid ring-opening of THF at ambient temperature to yield the iodobutoxide complex ThI(3)[O(CH(2))(4)I](THF)(3) (2). Subsequent ligand-exchange between 2 and DME affords ThI(3)[O(CH(2))(4)I](DME)(2) (11), which can be converted to 3 with Me(3)SiI. Salt metathesis between 2 and K(L(Me)) (L(Me) = (2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))NC(Me)CHC(Me)N(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))) cleanly gives (L(Me))ThI(2)[O(CH(2))(4)I](THF) (10), which is a rare example of a thorium β-diketiminate complex. Complexes 2, 10, and 11 represent the first reported examples of THF ring-opening mediated by thorium. The synthetic utility of ThI(4)(DME)(2) (3) is demonstrated by preparation of thorium(IV) alkoxide, amide, and organometallic compounds.

  5. The interface between Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu and aminoacyl-tRNA.

    PubMed

    Yikilmaz, Emine; Chapman, Stephen J; Schrader, Jared M; Uhlenbeck, Olke C

    2014-09-09

    Nineteen of the highly conserved residues of Escherichia coli (E. coli) Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) that form the binding interface with aa-tRNA were mutated to alanine to better understand how modifying the thermodynamic properties of EF-Tu-tRNA interaction can affect the decoding properties of the ribosome. Comparison of ΔΔG(o) values for binding EF-Tu to aa-tRNA show that the majority of the interface residues stabilize the ternary complex and their thermodynamic contribution can depend on the tRNA species that is used. Experiments with a very tight binding mutation of tRNA(Tyr) indicate that interface amino acids distant from the tRNA mutation can contribute to the specificity. For nearly all of the mutations, the values of ΔΔG(o) were identical to those previously determined at the orthologous positions of Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus) EF-Tu indicating that the thermodynamic properties of the interface were conserved between distantly related bacteria. Measurement of the rate of GTP hydrolysis on programmed ribosomes revealed that nearly all of the interface mutations were able to function in ribosomal decoding. The only interface mutation with greatly impaired GTPase activity was R223A which is the only one that also forms a direct contact with the ribosome. Finally, the ability of the EF-Tu interface mutants to destabilize the EF-Tu-aa-tRNA interaction on the ribosome after GTP hydrolysis were evaluated by their ability to suppress the hyperstable T1 tRNA(Tyr) variant where EF-Tu release is sufficiently slow to limit the rate of peptide bond formation (kpep) . In general, interface mutations that destabilize EF-Tu binding are also able to stimulate kpep of T1 tRNA(Tyr), suggesting that the thermodynamic properties of the EF-Tu-aa-tRNA interaction on the ribosome are quite similar to those found in the free ternary complex.

  6. Regulation of the utilization of mRNA for eucaryotic elongation factor Tu in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T R; Slobin, L I

    1987-01-01

    When Friend erythroleukemia cells were allowed to grow to stationary phase (2 X 10(6) to 3 X 10(6) cells per ml), approximately 60% of the mRNA for eucaryotic elongation factor Tu (eEF-Tu) sedimented at less than or equal to 80S, and most of the remaining factor mRNA was associated with small polysomes. Under the same growth conditions, greater than 90% of the mRNA for eucaryotic initiation factor 4A remained associated with polysomes. The association of eEF-Tu mRNA with polysomes changed dramatically when stationary-phase cells were treated with fresh medium. After 1 h in fresh medium, approximately 90% of eEF-Tu mRNA in Friend cells was found in heavy polysomes. Associated with the shift of eEF-Tu mRNA into heavy polysomes, we found at least a 2.6-fold increase in the synthesis of eEF-Tu in vivo as well as a remarkable 40% decrease in the total amount of eEF-Tu mRNA per cell. Our data raise the possibility that eEF-Tu mRNA that has accumulated in ribonucleoprotein particles in stationary-phase cells is degraded rather than reutilized for eEF-Tu synthesis. Images PMID:2434834

  7. Structural outline of the detailed mechanism for elongation factor Ts-mediated guanine nucleotide exchange on elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Thirup, Søren S; Van, Lan Bich; Nielsen, Tine K; Knudsen, Charlotte R

    2015-07-01

    Translation elongation factor EF-Tu belongs to the superfamily of guanine-nucleotide binding proteins, which play key cellular roles as regulatory switches. All G-proteins require activation via exchange of GDP for GTP to carry out their respective tasks. Often, guanine-nucleotide exchange factors are essential to this process. During translation, EF-Tu:GTP transports aminoacylated tRNA to the ribosome. GTP is hydrolyzed during this process, and subsequent reactivation of EF-Tu is catalyzed by EF-Ts. The reaction path of guanine-nucleotide exchange is structurally poorly defined for EF-Tu and EF-Ts. We have determined the crystal structures of the following reaction intermediates: two structures of EF-Tu:GDP:EF-Ts (2.2 and 1.8Å resolution), EF-Tu:PO4:EF-Ts (1.9Å resolution), EF-Tu:GDPNP:EF-Ts (2.2Å resolution) and EF-Tu:GDPNP:pulvomycin:Mg(2+):EF-Ts (3.5Å resolution). These structures provide snapshots throughout the entire exchange reaction and suggest a mechanism for the release of EF-Tu in its GTP conformation. An inferred sequence of events during the exchange reaction is presented.

  8. Mitochondrial translation factors of Trypanosoma brucei: elongation factor-Tu has a unique subdomain that is essential for its function.

    PubMed

    Cristodero, Marina; Mani, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Aeberhard, Lukas; Hashimi, Hassan; Ramrath, David J F; Lukeš, Julius; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial translation in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei relies on imported eukaryotic-type tRNAs as well as on bacterial-type ribosomes that have the shortest known rRNAs. Here we have identified the mitochondrial translation elongation factors EF-Tu, EF-Ts, EF-G1 and release factor RF1 of trypanosomatids and show that their ablation impairs growth and oxidative phosphorylation. In vivo labelling experiments and a SILAC-based analysis of the global proteomic changes induced by EF-Tu RNAi directly link EF-Tu to mitochondrial translation. Moreover, EF-Tu RNAi reveals downregulation of many nuclear encoded subunits of cytochrome oxidase as well as of components of the bc1-complex, whereas most cytosolic ribosomal proteins were upregulated. Interestingly, T. brucei EF-Tu has a 30-amino-acid-long, highly charged subdomain, which is unique to trypanosomatids. A combination of RNAi and complementation experiments shows that this subdomain is essential for EF-Tu function, but that it can be replaced by a similar sequence found in eukaryotic EF-1a, the cytosolic counterpart of EF-Tu. A recent cryo-electron microscopy study revealed that trypanosomatid mitochondrial ribosomes have a unique intersubunit space that likely harbours the EF-Tu binding site. These findings suggest that the trypanosomatid-specific EF-Tu subdomain serves as an adaption for binding to these unusual mitochondrial ribosomes.

  9. Identification and characterisation of elongation factor Tu, a novel protein involved in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Caroline Maria; de Oliveira, Haroldo Cesar; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Assato, Patricia Akemi; Yamazaki, Daniella Sayuri; da Silva, Rosângela Aparecida Moraes; Santos, Cláudia Tavares; Santos-Filho, Norival Alves; Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa

    2016-11-01

    Paracoccidioides spp., which are temperature-dependent dimorphic fungi, are responsible for the most prevalent human systemic mycosis in Latin America, the paracoccidioidomycosis. The aim of this study was to characterise the involvement of elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis-host interaction. Adhesive properties were examined using recombinant PbEF-Tu proteins and the respective polyclonal anti-rPbEF-Tu antibody. Immunogold analysis demonstrated the surface location of EF-Tu in P. brasiliensis. Moreover, PbEF-Tu was found to bind to fibronectin and plasminogen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and it was determined that the binding to plasminogen is at least partly dependent on lysine residues and ionic interactions. To verify the participation of EF-Tu in the interaction of P. brasiliensis with pneumocytes, we blocked the respective protein with an anti-rPbEF-Tu antibody and evaluated the consequences on the interaction index by flow cytometry. During the interaction, we observed a decrease of 2- and 3-fold at 8 and 24 h, respectively, suggesting the contribution of EF-Tu in fungal adhesion/invasion.

  10. Fundamental Parameters of the Eclipsing Binary TU Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés L., J.; Mennickent, R. E.; Zharikov, S.

    2017-04-01

    We present a spectroscopic and photometric study of the eclipsing binary TU Canis Majoris aimed to obtain their fundamental stellar parameters and evolutionary stage. Our results indicate that the masses, radii, temperatures, and luminosities for the primary and secondary stars are: {M}1=1.761+/- 0.012 {M}ȯ , {M}2=1.144+/- 0.010 {M}ȯ , {R}1=1.553+/- 0.002 {R}ȯ , {R}2=1.075+/- 0.002 {R}ȯ , {T}1=8014+/- 151 K, {T}2=6060+/- 100 K, {L}1=8.913 +/- 0.695 {L}ȯ , and {L}2=1.396+/- 0.097 {L}ȯ . We estimate an age for the system of τ =2.11+/- 0.24× {10}8 years, and a distance of d = 324.81+/- 12.86 pc. In addition, we note that none of the components has filled their respective Roche lobe and both are on the main sequence.

  11. Joint US/Russia TU-144 Engine Ground Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Waldo A.; Balser, Jeffrey S.; McCartney, Timothy P.; Richter, Charles A.; Woike, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Two engine research experiments were recently completed in Moscow, Russia using an engine from the Tu-144 supersonic transport airplane. This was a joint project between the United States and Russia. Personnel from the NASA Lewis Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines, Pratt & Whitney, the Tupolev Design Bureau, and EBP Aircraft LTD worked together as a team to overcome the many technical and cultural challenges. The objective was to obtain large scale inlet data that could be used in the development of a supersonic inlet system for a future High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The-first experiment studied the impact of typical inlet structures that have trailing edges in close proximity to the inlet/engine interface plane on the flow characteristics at that plane. The inlet structure simulated the subsonic diffuser of a supersonic inlet using a bifurcated splitter design. The centerbody maximum diameter was designed to permit choking and slightly supercritical operation. The second experiment measured the reflective characteristics of the engine face to incoming perturbations of pressure amplitude. The basic test rig from the first experiment was used with a longer spacer equipped with fast actuated doors. All the objectives set forth at the beginning of the project were met.

  12. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of C. perfringens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungwoo; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Li, Guangxing; Park, Myeong-Seon; Jang, Seung I; Jeong, Wooseog; Jeoung, Hye-Young; An, Dong-Jun; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with immune sera from commercial meat-type chickens with clinical outbreak of Clostridium infections. In addition to the genes encoding EF-Tu and PFO, C. perfringens alpha-toxin and necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB) toxin were also expressed in Escherichia coli and their corresponding recombinant proteins were purified. Using the four recombinant proteins as target antigens in ELISA immunoassays, high serum antibody titers were observed not only in chickens with clinical signs of Clostridium infections, but also in apparently healthy animals from the same disease-endemic farm. By contrast, no antibodies against any of the proteins were present in the serum of a specific pathogen-free bird. In ELISA using recombinant proteins of C. perfringens, the levels of anti-bacterial protein antibodies were also higher in chickens which were experimentally induced to show NE clinical signs after co-infection with C. perfringens and Eimeria maxima compared with uninfected controls. These results show that two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, EF-Tu and PFO can be useful detection antigens for C. perfringens-afflicted infections in commercial poultry.

  13. Loss of Photoreversibility of Damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication in Ultraviolet-Irradiated Escherichia coli B/r thy trp

    PubMed Central

    Doudney, C. O.

    1974-01-01

    Loss of photoreversibility (LOP) of the ultraviolet (UV) damage which prevents reinitiation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication occurred with incubation of Escherichia coli B/r thy trp cultures after UV doses of 240, 320, and 400 ergs/mm2. LOP occurred at the time of reinitiation of DNA replication in the cultures (i.e., after postirradiation lag periods of 45 min or more). Neither the absence of thymine nor the absence of tryptophan prevented LOP of the damage to DNA replication, suggesting that neither DNA replication nor protein synthesis is necessary for the process. These findings suggest that attempted initiation of DNA replication results in transformation of pyrimidine damage into permanent damage to chromosome structure at the reinitiation site. PMID:4607425

  14. The Thy Pol-2 intein of Thermococcus hydrothermalis is an isoschizomer of PI-TliI and PI-TfuII endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Saves, Isabelle; Eleaume, Heïdy; Dietrich, Jacques; Masson, Jean-Michel

    2000-01-01

    Thy Pol-2 intein, from Thermococcus hydrothermalis, belongs to the same allelic family as Tli Pol-2 (PI-TliI), Tfu Pol-2 (PI-TfuII) and TspTY Pol-3 mini-intein, all inserted at the pol-c site of archaeal DNA polymerase genes. This new intein was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The intein is a specific endonuclease (PI-ThyI) which cleaves the inteinless sequence of the Thy DNA pol gene. Moreover, PI-TliI, PI-TfuII and PI-ThyI are very similar endonucleases which cleave DNA in the same optimal conditions at 70°C yielding similar 3′-hydroxyl overhangs of 4 bp and the reaction is subject to product inhibition. The three enzymes are able to cleave the three DNA sequences spanning the pol-c site and a 24 bp consensus cleavage site was defined for the three isoschizomers. However, the exact size of the minimal cleavage site depends both on the substrate sequence and the endonuclease. The inability of the isoschizomers to cleave the inteinless DNA polymerase gene from Pyrococcus spp. KOD is due to point substitutions on the 5′ side of the pol-c site, suggesting that the absence of inteins of this allelic family in DNA polymerase genes from Pyrococcus spp. can be linked to small differences in the target site sequence. PMID:11058140

  15. Thy1.2 driven expression of transgenic His₆-SUMO2 in the brain of mice alters a restricted set of genes.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Moritz J; Tirard, Marilyn

    2014-08-05

    Protein SUMOylation is a post-translational protein modification with a key regulatory role in nerve cell development and function, but its function in mammals in vivo has only been studied cursorily. We generated two new transgenic mouse lines that express His6-tagged SUMO1 and SUMO2 driven by the Thy1.2 promoter. The brains of mice of the two lines express transgenic His6-SUMO peptides and conjugate them to substrates in vivo but cytoarchitecture and synaptic organization of adult transgenic mouse brains are indistinguishable from the wild-type situation. We investigated the impact of transgenic SUMO expression on gene transcription in the hippocampus by performing genome wide analyses using microarrays. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in Thy1.2::His6-SUMO1 transgenic mice and only a restricted set of genes were upregulated in Thy1.2::His6-SUMO2 mice. Among these, Penk1 (Preproenkephalin 1), which encodes Met-enkephalin neuropeptides, showed the highest degree of alteration. Accordingly, a significant increase in Met-enkephalin peptide levels in the hippocampus of Thy1.2::His6-SUMO2 was detected, but the expression levels and cellular localization of Met-enkephalin receptors were not changed. Thus, transgenic neuronal expression of His6-SUMO1 or His6-SUMO2 only induces very minor phenotypical changes in mice.

  16. Preclinical trials in autosomal dominant AD: implementation of the DIAN-TU trial.

    PubMed

    Mills, S M; Mallmann, J; Santacruz, A M; Fuqua, A; Carril, M; Aisen, P S; Althage, M C; Belyew, S; Benzinger, T L; Brooks, W S; Buckles, V D; Cairns, N J; Clifford, D; Danek, A; Fagan, A M; Farlow, M; Fox, N; Ghetti, B; Goate, A M; Heinrichs, D; Hornbeck, R; Jack, C; Jucker, M; Klunk, W E; Marcus, D S; Martins, R N; Masters, C M; Mayeux, R; McDade, E; Morris, J C; Oliver, A; Ringman, J M; Rossor, M N; Salloway, S; Schofield, P R; Snider, J; Snyder, P; Sperling, R A; Stewart, C; Thomas, R G; Xiong, C; Bateman, R J

    2013-10-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU) was formed to direct the design and management of interventional therapeutic trials of international DIAN and autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) participants. The goal of the DIAN-TU is to implement safe trials that have the highest likelihood of success while advancing scientific understanding of these diseases and clinical effects of proposed therapies. The DIAN-TU has launched a trial design that leverages the existing infrastructure of the ongoing DIAN observational study, takes advantage of a variety of drug targets, incorporates the latest results of biomarker and cognitive data collected during the observational study, and implements biomarkers measuring Alzheimer's disease (AD) biological processes to improve the efficiency of trial design. The DIAN-TU trial design is unique due to the sophisticated design of multiple drugs, multiple pharmaceutical partners, academics servings as sponsor, geographic distribution of a rare population and intensive safety and biomarker assessments. The implementation of the operational aspects such as home health research delivery, safety magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) at remote locations, monitoring clinical and cognitive measures, and regulatory management involving multiple pharmaceutical sponsors of the complex DIAN-TU trial are described.

  17. Two distinct EF-Tu epitopes induce immune responses in rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takehito; Inagaki, Hiroaki; Takai, Ryota; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Che, Fang-Sik

    2014-02-01

    Plants sense potential pathogens by recognizing conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that cause PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). We previously reported that rice recognizes flagellin from the rice-incompatible N1141 strain of Acidovorax avenae and subsequently induces immune responses. Cell extracts isolated from flagellin-deficient N1141 (Δfla1141) still induced PTI responses, suggesting that Δfla1141 possesses an additional PAMP distinct from flagellin. Here, we show that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), one of the most abundant bacterial proteins, acts as a PAMP in rice and causes several PTI responses. In Brassicaceae species, EF-Tu and an N-acetylated peptide comprising the first 18 amino acids of the N-terminus, termed elf18, are fully active as inducers of PTI responses. By contrast, elf18 did not cause any immune responses in rice, whereas an EF-Tu middle region comprising Lys176 to Gly225, termed EFa50, is fully active as a PAMP in rice. In the leaves of rice plants, EF-Tu induced H2O2 generation and callose deposition, and also triggered resistance to coinfection with pathogenic bacteria. Taken together, these data demonstrate that rice recognizes EFa50, which is distinct from elf18, and that this epitope induces PTI responses.

  18. Centers of motion associated with EF-Tu binding to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Paci, Maxim; Fox, George E

    2016-05-03

    Structural centers of motion (pivot points) in the ribosome have recently been identified by measurement of conformational changes in rRNA resulting from EF-G GTP hydrolysis. This series of measurements is extended here to the ribosome's interactions with the cofactor EF-Tu. Four recent EF-Tu bound ribosome structures were compared to unbound structures. A total of 16 pivots were identified, of which 4 are unique to the EF-Tu interaction. Pivots in the GTPase associated center and the sarcin-ricin loop omitted previously, are found to be mobile in response to both EF-Tu and EF-G binding. Pivots in the intersubunit bridge rRNAs are found to be cofactor specific. Head swiveling motions in the small subunit are observed in the EF-Tu bound structures that were trapped post GTP hydrolysis. As in the case of pivots associated with EF-G, the additional pivots described here are associated with weak points in the rRNA structures such as non-canonical pairs and bulge loops. The combined set of pivots should be regarded as a minimal set. Only several states available to the ribosome have been presented in this work. Future, precise crystal structures in conjunction with experimental data will likely show additional functional pivoting elements in the rRNA.

  19. Calibration Methods for Air Coupled Antennas - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marecos, Vânia; Solla, Mercedes; Fontul, Simona; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the comparison of different methods for calibrating air coupled antennas: Coring, Surface Reflection Method (SRM) and Common Mid-Point (CMP) through the analysis of GPR data collected in a test site with different pavement solutions. Research activities have been carried out during a Short Term Scientific Mission (STSM) funded by the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" in December 2015. The use of GPR in transport infrastructures represents one of the most significant advances for obtaining continuous data along the road, with the advantage of operation at traffic speed and being a non-destructive technique. Its main application has been the evaluation of layer thickness. For the determination of layer thickness, it is necessary to know the velocity of the signal, which depends on the dielectric constant of the material, and the two-way travel time of the reflected signal that is recorded by the GPR system. The calculation of the dielectric value of the materials can be done using different approaches such as: using fixed values based on experience, laboratory determination of dielectric values, applying the SRM, performing back calculation from ground truth references such as cores and test pits, or using the CMP method. The problem with using ground truth is that it is time consuming, labour intensive and intrusive to traffic, in addition, a drill core is not necessarily representative of the whole surveyed area. Regarding the surface reflection technique, one of the problems is that it only measures the dielectric value from the layer surface and not from the whole layer. Recent works already started to address some of these challenges proposing new approaches for GPR layer thickness measurements using multiple antennas to calculate the average dielectric value of the asphalt layer, taking advantage of significant hardware improvements in GPR

  20. [Analysis on intestinal disorders in Jiujing Tu (Illustration of Moxiustion) found from Dunhuang].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yin; Shang, Haixia; Wu, Huangan

    2016-05-01

    Jiujing Tu (Illustration of Moxibustion), excavated from Mo Kao Grotto at Dunhuang, is one of the earliest existing monographs on moxibustion. The medical masters from different schools have focused on this book because it is different from the existing ancient medical works and have not been collected in the medical works of different dynasties. In this study, the literature of Jiujing Tu on five acupoints (Dachangshu, Pangguangshu, Daxiaochangshu, Nieshu and Cigong) relevant with intestinal disorders is collected. It is intended to discuss and analyze the acupoint location, main intestinal disorder, moxibustion characters, recognition on the literature of different dynasties and modern clinical applications. It is believed that the thought of strong moxibustion in the treatment of intestinal disorders advocated in Jiujing Tu has profound impact on the medical development in later generations. It deserves us to have a further digging, collection and promotion of this thought in the modern time.

  1. Tutoiement et Vouvoiement chez les Lyceens Francais (French Pupils' Use of the Personal Pronouns "Tu" and "Vous")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustin-Lekeu, Francine

    1973-01-01

    Surveys conducted among secondary school students in Toulon, France in choice of personal pronouns indicate more prevalent use of tu''. Students consider widespread use of tu'' to be more democratic and thought employment of vous'' on certain occasions is a hypocritical and bourgeois habit. (DS)

  2. Daikenchuto (TU-100) Suppresses Tumor Development in the Azoxymethane and APC(min/+) Mouse Models of Experimental Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takumu; Matsukawa, Jun; Ringus, Daina; Miyoshi, Jun; Hart, John; Kaneko, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka; Wang, Chong-Zi; Yuan, Chun-Su; Bissonnette, Marc; Musch, Mark W; Chang, Eugene B

    2017-01-01

    Chemopreventative properties of traditional medicines and underlying mechanisms of action are incompletely investigated. This study demonstrates that dietary daikenchuto (TU-100), comprised of ginger, ginseng, and Japanese pepper effectively suppresses intestinal tumor development and progression in the azoxymethane (AOM) and APC(min/+) mouse models. For the AOM model, TU-100 was provided after the first of six biweekly AOM injections. Mice were sacrificed at 30 weeks. APC(min/+) mice were fed diet without or with TU-100 starting at 6 weeks, and sacrificed at 24 weeks. In both models, dietary TU-100 decreased tumor size. In APC (min/+) mice, the number of small intestinal tumors was significantly decreased. In the AOM model, both TU-100 and Japanese ginseng decreased colon tumor numbers. Decreased Ki-67 and β-catenin immunostaining and activation of numerous transduction pathways involved in tumor initiation and progression were observed. EGF receptor expression and stimulation/phosphorylation in vitro were investigated in C2BBe1 cells. TU-100, ginger, and 6-gingerol suppressed EGF receptor induced Akt activation. TU-100 and ginseng and to a lesser extent ginger or 6-gingerol inhibited EGF ERK1/2 activation. TU-100 and some of its components and metabolites of these components inhibit tumor progression in two mouse models of colon cancer by blocking downstream pathways of EGF receptor activation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  4. Heat tolerance and expression of protein synthesis elongation factors, EF-Tu and EF-1a, in spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein elongation factors, EF-Tu and EF-1a, have been implicated in cell response to heat stress. In spring wheat, EF-Tu displays chaperone activity and reduces thermal aggregation of Rubisco activase. Similarly, in mammalian cells, EF-1a displays chaperone-like activity and regulates the expressio...

  5. A single amino acid substitution in elongation factor Tu disrupts interaction between the ternary complex and the ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Tubulekas, I; Hughes, D

    1993-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu).GTP has the primary function of promoting the efficient and correct interaction of aminoacyl-tRNA with the ribosome. Very little is known about the elements in EF-Tu involved in this interaction. We describe a mutant form of EF-Tu, isolated in Salmonella typhimurium, that causes a severe defect in the interaction of the ternary complex with the ribosome. The mutation causes the substitution of Val for Gly-280 in domain II of EF-Tu. The in vivo growth and translation phenotypes of strains harboring this mutation are indistinguishable from those of strains in which the same tuf gene is insertionally inactivated. Viable cells are not obtained when the other tuf gene is inactivated, showing that the mutant EF-Tu alone cannot support cell growth. We have confirmed, by partial protein sequencing, that the mutant EF-Tu is present in the cells. In vitro analysis of the natural mixture of wild-type and mutant EF-Tu allows us to identify the major defect of this mutant. Our data shows that the EF-Tu is homogeneous and competent with respect to guanine nucleotide binding and exchange, stimulation of nucleotide exchange by EF-Ts, and ternary complex formation with aminoacyl-tRNA. However various measures of translational efficiency show a significant reduction, which is associated with a defective interaction between the ribosome and the mutant EF-Tu.GTP.aminoacyl-tRNA complex. In addition, the antibiotic kirromycin, which blocks translation by binding EF-Tu on the ribosome, fails to do so with this mutant EF-Tu, although it does form a complex with EF-Tu. Our results suggest that this region of domain II in EF-Tu has an important function and influences the binding of the ternary complex to the codon-programmed ribosome during protein synthesis. Models involving either a direct or an indirect effect of the mutation are discussed. Images PMID:8416899

  6. Youyou Tu: significance of winning the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxiu; Liu, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Youyou Tu, a female scientist at the China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing, is the first Chinese winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Based on the study of recipes which had been used for thousands of years to treat fever, Tu's group discovered that the plant artemesia annua, sweet wormwood, showed substantial inhibition of rodent malaria parasites. Her achievement and experience have inspired other researchers and emphasized the development of traditional Chinese medicine. Her award has led to a heated discussion about scientific research investment, fair treatment of research staff, and intellectual property right (IPR) protection in China.

  7. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study on the TU gas for the GEM-TPC detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hui-Rong; Li, Yu-Lan; Li, Jin; Gao, Yuan-Ning; Li, Yuan-Jing

    2009-04-01

    In this paper several different working gas mixtures for GEM-TPC were evaluated based on a Garfield simulation. Among them, Ar:CH4:CF4 = 90:7:3 (named herein TU gas) was selected for a detailed study because of its better performance. Some performances of drift velocity, transverse diffusion, spatial resolution and the effective number of electrons in various electric fields were obtained. The performance of a GEM-TPC prototype working in the TU gas was studied and compared with that in Ar:CH4 = 90:10 (P10 gas).

  8. EF-Tu from the enacyloxin producing Frateuria W-315 strain: Structure/activity relationship and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Malosse, Christian; Hountondji, Codjo

    2016-08-01

    In this report, we have demonstrated that the poly(U)-dependent poly(Phe) synthesis activity of elongator factor Tu (EF-Tu) from the enacyloxin producing strain Frateuria sp. W-315 is inhibited by the antibiotic similarly to that of Escherichia coli EF-Tu. The inhibitory effect of enacyloxin observed in a purified system was the same as that obtained with an S30 extract from E. coli or Frateuria sp. W-315, respectively, suggesting that antibiotic resistance of enacyloxin producing Frateuria sp. W-315 is not due neither to EF-Tu nor to other components of the translation machinery but to a still unknown mechanism. The EF-Tu gene, as PCR amplified from Frateuria W-315 genomic DNA and sequenced represented an ORF of 1191 nucleotides corresponding to 396 amino acids. This protein is larger than the product of tufA from E. coli by only two amino acid residues. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of EF-Tu from E. coli with those of Frateuria and Ralstonia solanacearum indicates on average 80% identical amino acid residues and 9.7% conservative replacements between EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu E. coli, on one hand, and 97% identity and 1.7% conservative replacement between EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu Ralstonia solanacearum, on the other hand. These strong primary structure similarities between EF-Tu from different origins are consistent with the fact that this factor is essential for the translation process in all kingdoms of life. Comparison of the effects of antibiotics on EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu E. coli revealed that enacyloxin, kirromycin and pulvomycin exert a stronger stimulation of the GDP dissociation rate on EF-Tu Frateuria, while the effects of the antibiotics on the GDP association rate were comparable for the two EF-Tu species. Different mutants of EF-Tu E. coli were constructed with the help of site directed mutagenesis by changing one or several residues of EF-Tu E. coli by the corresponding residues of EF-Tu Frateuria. The single A45K substitution did

  9. The Heme Oxygenase-1 Inducer THI-56 Negatively Regulates iNOS Expression and HMGB1 Release in LPS-Activated RAW 264.7 Cells and CLP-Induced Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Min; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear DNA binding protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been suggested to act as a late mediator of septic shock. The effect of ((S)-6,7-dihydroxy-1-(4-hydroxynaphthylmethyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, also known as THI-56, in an experimental model of sepsis was investigated. THI-56 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties in response to LPS in RAW 264.7 cells. In particular, THI-56 significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of HMGB1 in activated macrophages. THI-56 activated NE-F2-regulated factor 2 (Nrf-2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The specific knockdown of the HO-1 gene by HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of THI-56 on iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Importantly, THI-56 administration protected animals from death induced by either a lethal dose of LPS or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Furthermore, the ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine, and HMGB1 levels in the blood were significantly increased in CLP-induced septic mice, and the administration of THI-56 reduced these levels in a concentration-dependent and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX)-sensitive manner. In addition, the administration of THI-56 significantly ameliorated not only lung damage but also macrophage infiltration in the livers of CLP-induced septic mice, and these effects were also abrogated in the presence of ZnPPIX. Thus, we conclude that THI-56 significantly attenuates the proinflammatory response induced by LPS and reduces organ damage in a CLP-induced sepsis model through the upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1. PMID:24098466

  10. Ligand-induced folding of the thiM TPP riboswitch investigated by a structure-based fluorescence spectroscopic approach

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Kathrin; Rieder, Renate; Micura, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Riboswitches are genetic control elements within non-coding regions of mRNA. They consist of a metabolite-sensitive aptamer and an adjoining expression platform. Here, we describe ligand-induced folding of a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) responsive riboswitch from Escherichia coli thiM mRNA, using chemically labeled variants. Referring to a recent structure determination of the TPP/aptamer complex, each variant was synthesized with a single 2-aminopurine (AP) nucleobase replacement that was selected to monitor formation of tertiary interactions of a particular region during ligand binding in real time by fluorescence experiments. We have determined the rate constants for conformational adjustment of the individual AP sensors. From the 7-fold differentiation of these constants, it can be deduced that tertiary contacts between the two parallel helical domains (P2/J3-2/P3/L3 and P4/P5/L5) that grip the ligand's ends in two separate pockets, form significantly faster than the function-critical three-way junction with stem P1 fully developed. Based on these data, we characterize the process of ligand binding by an induced fit of the RNA and propose a folding model of the TPP riboswitch aptamer. For the full-length riboswitch domain and for shorter constructs that represent transcriptional intermediates, we have additionally evaluated ligand-induced folding via AP-modified variants and provide insights into the sequential folding pathway that involves a finely balanced equilibrium of secondary structures. PMID:17693433

  11. Immunotherapy targeting α-synuclein protofibrils reduced pathology in (Thy-1)-h[A30P] α-synuclein mice.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Veronica; Fagerqvist, Therese; Nordström, Eva; Eriksson, Fredrik; Lord, Anna; Tucker, Stina; Andersson, Jessica; Johannesson, Malin; Schell, Heinrich; Kahle, Philipp J; Möller, Christer; Gellerfors, Pär; Bergström, Joakim; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that accumulation of aggregated alpha-synuclein (α-synuclein) in the central nervous system (CNS) is an early pathogenic event in Parkinson's disease and other Lewy body disorders. In recent years, animal studies have indicated immunotherapy with antibodies directed against α-synuclein as a promising novel treatment strategy. Since large α-synuclein oligomers, or protofibrils, have been demonstrated to possess pronounced cytotoxic properties, such species should be particularly attractive as therapeutic targets. In support of this, (Thy-1)-h[A30P] α-synuclein transgenic mice with motor dysfunction symptoms were found to display increased levels of α-synuclein protofibrils in the CNS. An α-synuclein protofibril-selective monoclonal antibody (mAb47) was evaluated in this α-synuclein transgenic mouse model. As measured by ELISA, 14month old mice treated for 14weeks with weekly intraperitoneal injections of mAb47 displayed significantly lower levels of both soluble and membrane-associated protofibrils in the spinal cord. Besides the lower levels of pathogenic α-synuclein demonstrated, a reduction of motor dysfunction in transgenic mice upon peripheral administration of mAb47 was indicated. Thus, immunotherapy with antibodies targeting toxic α-synuclein species holds promise as a future disease-modifying treatment in Parkinson's disease and related disorders.

  12. SeqTU: A Web Server for Identification of Bacterial Transcription Units

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Xu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    A transcription unit (TU) consists of K ≥ 1consecutive genes on the same strand of a bacterial genome that are transcribed into a single mRNA molecule under certain conditions. Their identification is an essential step in elucidation of transcriptional regulatory networks. We have recently developed a machine-learning method to accurately identify TUs from RNA-seq data, based on two features of the assembled RNA reads: the continuity and stability of RNA-seq coverage across a genomic region. While good performance was achieved by the method on Escherichia coli and Clostridium thermocellum, substantial work is needed to make the program generally applicable to all bacteria, knowing that the program requires organism specific information. A web server, named SeqTU, was developed to automatically identify TUs with given RNA-seq data of any bacterium using a machine-learning approach. The server consists of a number of utility tools, in addition to TU identification, such as data preparation, data quality check and RNA-read mapping. SeqTU provides a user-friendly interface and automated prediction of TUs from given RNA-seq data. The predicted TUs are displayed intuitively using HTML format along with a graphic visualization of the prediction. PMID:28266571

  13. SeqTU: A Web Server for Identification of Bacterial Transcription Units.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Xu, Ying

    2017-03-07

    A transcription unit (TU) consists of K ≥ 1consecutive genes on the same strand of a bacterial genome that are transcribed into a single mRNA molecule under certain conditions. Their identification is an essential step in elucidation of transcriptional regulatory networks. We have recently developed a machine-learning method to accurately identify TUs from RNA-seq data, based on two features of the assembled RNA reads: the continuity and stability of RNA-seq coverage across a genomic region. While good performance was achieved by the method on Escherichia coli and Clostridium thermocellum, substantial work is needed to make the program generally applicable to all bacteria, knowing that the program requires organism specific information. A web server, named SeqTU, was developed to automatically identify TUs with given RNA-seq data of any bacterium using a machine-learning approach. The server consists of a number of utility tools, in addition to TU identification, such as data preparation, data quality check and RNA-read mapping. SeqTU provides a user-friendly interface and automated prediction of TUs from given RNA-seq data. The predicted TUs are displayed intuitively using HTML format along with a graphic visualization of the prediction.

  14. "Vous" or "tu"? Native and Non-Native Speakers of French on a Sociolinguistic Tightrope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewaele, Jean-Marc

    2004-01-01

    Sociolinguistic rules governing choice of pronouns of address are notoriously difficult in French, despite the fact that the number of variants is rather limited: the more formal "vous" versus the more informal "tu." Children with French as L1 learn to use pronouns of address appropriately as part of their socialization process. The learning curve…

  15. “Impact of CB6 and CB05TU chemical mechanisms on air quality”

    EPA Science Inventory

    “Impacts of CB6 and CB05TU chemical mechanisms on air quality”In this study, we incorporate the newly developed Carbon Bond chemical mechanism (CB6) into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQv5.0.1) and perform air quality model simulations with the CB6 and t...

  16. α1-Tubulin FaTuA1 plays crucial roles in vegetative growth and conidiation in Fusarium asiaticum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiqun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Zheng, Jingwu; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-04-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Fusarium asiaticum contains two homologous genes FaTUA1 and FaTUA2 encoding α-tubulins. In this study, we found that FaTUA2 was dispensable for vegetative growth and sporulation in F. asiaticum. The deletion of FaTUA1 however led to dramatically reduced mycelial growth, twisted hyphae and abnormal nuclei in apical cells of hyphae. The FaTUA1 deletion mutant (ΔFaTuA1-5) also showed a significant decrease in conidiation, and produced abnormal conidia. Pathogenicity assays showed that ΔFaTuA1-5 exhibited decreased virulence on wheat head. Unexpectedly, the deletion of FaTUA1 led to resistance to high temperatures. In addition, ΔFaTuA2 showed increased sensitivity to carbendazim. Furthermore, increased FaTUA2 expression in ΔFaTuA1-5 partially restored the defects of the mutant in mycelial growth, conidial production and virulence, vice versa, increased FaTUA1 expression in the FaTUA2 deletion mutant also partially relieved the defect of the mutant in the delay of conidial germination. Taken together, these results indicate that FaTuA1 plays crucial roles in vegetative growth and development, and the functions of FaTuA1 and FaTuA2 are partially interchangeable in F. asiaticum.

  17. Mapping of fluorescent protein-expressing neurons and axon pathways in adult and developing Thy1-eYFP-H transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Porrero, Cesar; Rubio-Garrido, Pablo; Avendaño, Carlos; Clascá, Francisco

    2010-07-23

    Transgenic mouse lines in which a fluorescent protein is constitutively expressed under the Thy1 gene promoter have become important models in cell biology and pathology studies of specific neuronal populations. As a result of positional insertion and/or copy number effects on the transgene, the populations expressing the fluorescent protein (eYFP+) vary markedly among the different mice lines. However, identification of the eYFP+ subpopulations has remained sketchy and fragmentary even for the most widely used lines such as Thy1-eYFP-H mice (Feng, G., Mellor, R.H., Bernstein, M., Keller-Peck, C., Nguyen, Q.T., Wallace, M., Nerbonne, J.M., Lichtman and J.W., Sanes. J.R. 2000. Imaging neuronal subsets in transgenic mice expressing multiple spectral variants of GFP. Neuron 28, 41-51). Here, we provide a comprehensive mapping of labeled cell types throughout the central nervous system in adult and postnatal (P0-P30) Thy1-eYFP-H mice. Cell type identification was based on somatodendritic morphology, axon trajectories, and, for cortical cells, retrograde labeling with Fast Blue to distinguish between subpopulations with different axonal targets. In the neocortex, eYFP+ cells are layers 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons, whose abundance and sublaminar distribution varies markedly between areas. Labeling is particularly prevalent in the corticospinal cells; as a result, the pyramidal pathway axons are conspicuously labeled down to the spinal cord. Large populations of hippocampal, subicular and amygdaloid projection neurons are eYFP+ as well. Additional eYFP+ cell groups are located in specific brainstem nuclei. Present results provide a comprehensive reference dataset for adult and developmental studies using the Thy1-eYFP-H mice strain, and show that this animal model may be particularly suitable for studies on the cell biology of corticospinal neurons.

  18. Synthesis of 5-[3-(2-aminopyrimidin-4-yl)aminopropyn-1-yl]uracil derivative that recognizes Ade-Thy base pairs in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yu; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Kanamori, Takashi; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Seio, Kohji; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    5-[3-(2-Aminopyrimidin-4-yl)aminopropyn-1-yl]uracil (Ura(Pyr)) was designed as a new nucleobase to recognize Ade-Thy base pair in double-stranded DNA. We successfully synthesized the dexoynucleoside phosphoramidite having Ura(Pyr) and incorporated it into triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). Melting temperature analysis revealed that introduction of Ura(Pyr) into TFOs could effectively stabilize their triplex structures without loss of base recognition capabilities.

  19. Design and properties of efficient tRNA:EF-Tu FRET system for studies of ribosomal translation.

    PubMed

    Chudaev, Maxim; Poruri, Kiran; Goldman, Emanuel; Jakubowski, Hieronim; Jain, Mohit Raja; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong; Tyagi, Sanjay; Mandecki, Wlodek

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the ternary complex between GTP-bound form of elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and aminoacylated transfer RNA (aa-tRNA) is a key event in protein biosynthesis. Here we show that fluorescently modified Escherichia coli EF-Tu carrying three mutations, C137A, C255V and E348C, and fluorescently modified Phe-tRNA(Phe) form functionally active ternary complex that has properties similar to those of the naturally occurring (unmodified) complex. Similarities include the binding and binding rate constants, behavior in gel retardation assay, as well as activities in tRNA protection and in vitro translation assays. Proper labeling of EF-Tu was demonstrated in MALDI mass spectroscopy experiments. To generate the mutant EF-Tu, a series of genetic constructions were performed. Two native cysteine residues in the wild-type EF-Tu at positions 137 and 255 were replaced by Ala and Val, respectively, and an additional cysteine was introduced either in position 324 or 348. The assembly FRET assay showed a 5- to 7-fold increase of Cy5-labeled EF-Tu E348C mutant fluorescence upon formation of ternary complex with charged tRNA(Phe)(Cy3-labeled) when the complex was excited at 532 nm and monitored at 665 nm. In a control experiment, we did not observe FRET using uncharged tRNA(Phe)(Cy3), nor with wild-type EF-Tu preparation that was allowed to react with Cy5 maleimide, nor in the absence of GTP. The results obtained demonstrate that the EF-Tu:tRNA FRET system described can be used for investigations of ribosomal translation in many types of experiments.

  20. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, John S.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A.; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B.; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M.; Bowman, Lesley A. H.; Loik, Nikita D.; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J.; Tang, Christoph M.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Preston, Gail M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins. PMID:25197067

  1. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Scotti, John S; Leung, Ivanhoe K H; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M; Bowman, Lesley A H; Loik, Nikita D; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J; Tang, Christoph M; Claridge, Timothy D W; Preston, Gail M; McDonough, Michael A; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-09-16

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins.

  2. Oxidation of a Cysteine Residue in Elongation Factor EF-Tu Reversibly Inhibits Translation in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Yutthanasirikul, Rayakorn; Nagano, Takanori; Jimbo, Haruhiko; Hihara, Yukako; Kanamori, Takashi; Ueda, Takuya; Haruyama, Takamitsu; Konno, Hiroki; Yoshida, Keisuke; Hisabori, Toru; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-11

    Translational elongation is susceptible to inactivation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and elongation factor G has been identified as a target of oxidation by ROS. In the present study we examined the sensitivity to oxidation by ROS of another elongation factor, EF-Tu. The structure of EF-Tu changes dramatically depending on the bound nucleotide. Therefore, we investigated the sensitivity to oxidation in vitro of GTP- and GDP-bound EF-Tu as well as that of nucleotide-free EF-Tu. Assays of translational activity with a reconstituted translation system from Escherichia coli revealed that GTP-bound and nucleotide-free EF-Tu were sensitive to oxidation by H2O2, whereas GDP-bound EF-Tu was resistant to H2O2. The inactivation of EF-Tu was the result of oxidation of Cys-82, a single cysteine residue, and subsequent formation of both an intermolecular disulfide bond and sulfenic acid. Replacement of Cys-82 with serine rendered EF-Tu resistant to inactivation by H2O2, confirming that Cys-82 was a target of oxidation. Furthermore, oxidized EF-Tu was reduced and reactivated by thioredoxin. Gel-filtration chromatography revealed that some of the oxidized nucleotide-free EF-Tu formed large complexes of >30 molecules. Atomic force microscopy revealed that such large complexes dissociated into several smaller aggregates upon the addition of dithiothreitol. Immunological analysis of the redox state of EF-Tu in vivo showed that levels of oxidized EF-Tu increased under strong light. Thus, resembling elongation factor G, EF-Tu appears to be sensitive to ROS via oxidation of a cysteine residue, and its inactivation might be reversed in a redox-dependent manner.

  3. A tRNA body with high affinity for EF-Tu hastens ribosomal incorporation of unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ieong, Ka-Weng; Pavlov, Michael Y; Kwiatkowski, Marek; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C

    2014-05-01

    There is evidence that tRNA bodies have evolved to reduce differences between aminoacyl-tRNAs in their affinity to EF-Tu. Here, we study the kinetics of incorporation of L-amino acids (AAs) Phe, Ala allyl-glycine (aG), methyl-serine (mS), and biotinyl-lysine (bK) using a tRNA(Ala)-based body (tRNA(AlaB)) with a high affinity for EF-Tu. Results are compared with previous data on the kinetics of incorporation of the same AAs using a tRNA(PheB) body with a comparatively low affinity for EF-Tu. All incorporations exhibited fast and slow phases, reflecting the equilibrium fraction of AA-tRNA in active ternary complex with EF-Tu:GTP before the incorporation reaction. Increasing the concentration of EF-Tu increased the amplitude of the fast phase and left its rate unaltered. This allowed estimation of the affinity of each AA-tRNA to EF-Tu:GTP during translation, showing about a 10-fold higher EF-Tu affinity for AA-tRNAs formed from the tRNA(AlaB) body than from the tRNA(PheB) body. At ∼1 µM EF-Tu, tRNA(AlaB) conferred considerably faster incorporation kinetics than tRNA(PheB), especially in the case of the bulky bK. In contrast, the swap to the tRNA(AlaB) body did not increase the fast phase fraction of N-methyl-Phe incorporation, suggesting that the slow incorporation of N-methyl-Phe had a different cause than low EF-Tu:GTP affinity. The total time for AA-tRNA release from EF-Tu:GDP, accommodation, and peptidyl transfer on the ribosome was similar for the tRNA(AlaB) and tRNA(PheB) bodies. We conclude that a tRNA body with high EF-Tu affinity can greatly improve incorporation of unnatural AAs in a potentially generalizable manner.

  4. A tRNA body with high affinity for EF-Tu hastens ribosomal incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Ieong, Ka-Weng; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Kwiatkowski, Marek; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that tRNA bodies have evolved to reduce differences between aminoacyl-tRNAs in their affinity to EF-Tu. Here, we study the kinetics of incorporation of L-amino acids (AAs) Phe, Ala allyl-glycine (aG), methyl-serine (mS), and biotinyl-lysine (bK) using a tRNAAla-based body (tRNAAlaB) with a high affinity for EF-Tu. Results are compared with previous data on the kinetics of incorporation of the same AAs using a tRNAPheB body with a comparatively low affinity for EF-Tu. All incorporations exhibited fast and slow phases, reflecting the equilibrium fraction of AA-tRNA in active ternary complex with EF-Tu:GTP before the incorporation reaction. Increasing the concentration of EF-Tu increased the amplitude of the fast phase and left its rate unaltered. This allowed estimation of the affinity of each AA-tRNA to EF-Tu:GTP during translation, showing about a 10-fold higher EF-Tu affinity for AA-tRNAs formed from the tRNAAlaB body than from the tRNAPheB body. At ∼1 µM EF-Tu, tRNAAlaB conferred considerably faster incorporation kinetics than tRNAPheB, especially in the case of the bulky bK. In contrast, the swap to the tRNAAlaB body did not increase the fast phase fraction of N-methyl-Phe incorporation, suggesting that the slow incorporation of N-methyl-Phe had a different cause than low EF-Tu:GTP affinity. The total time for AA-tRNA release from EF-Tu:GDP, accommodation, and peptidyl transfer on the ribosome was similar for the tRNAAlaB and tRNAPheB bodies. We conclude that a tRNA body with high EF-Tu affinity can greatly improve incorporation of unnatural AAs in a potentially generalizable manner. PMID:24671767

  5. Share with thy neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Surendar; Yu, Xuwen

    2007-01-01

    Peer to peer (P2P) systems are traditionally designed to scale to a large number of nodes. However, we focus on scenarios where the sharing is effected only among neighbors. Localized sharing is particularly attractive in scenarios where wide area network connectivity is undesirable, expensive or unavailable. On the other hand, local neighbors may not offer the wide variety of objects possible in a much larger system. The goal of this paper is to investigate a P2P system that shares contents with its neighbors. We analyze the sharing behavior of Apple iTunes users in an University setting. iTunes restricts the sharing of audio and video objects to peers within the same LAN sub-network. We show that users are already making a significant amount of content available for local sharing. We show that these systems are not appropriate for applications that require access to a specific object. We argue that mechanisms that allow the user to specify classes of interesting objects are better suited for these systems. Mechanisms such as bloom filters can allow each peer to summarize the contents available in the neighborhood, reducing network search overhead. This research can form the basis for future storage systems that utilize the shared storage available in neighbors and build a probabilistic storage for local consumption.

  6. Know Thy Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2012-01-01

    Teachers give a lot of feedback, and not all of it is good. This article discusses how to ensure teachers are giving students powerful feedback they can use. For feedback to be effective, teachers need to clarify the goal of the lesson or activity, ensure that students understand the feedback, and seek feedback from students about the…

  7. Translation elongation factor EF-Tu modulates filament formation of actin-like MreB protein in vitro.

    PubMed

    Defeu Soufo, Hervé Joël; Reimold, Christian; Breddermann, Hannes; Mannherz, Hans G; Graumann, Peter L

    2015-04-24

    EF-Tu has been shown to interact with actin-like protein MreB and to affect its localization in Escherichia coli and in Bacillus subtilis cells. We have purified YFP-MreB in an active form, which forms filaments on glass slides in vitro and was active in dynamic light-scattering assays, polymerizing in milliseconds after addition of magnesium. Purified EF-Tu enhanced the amount of MreB filaments, as seen by sedimentation assays, the speed of filament formation and the length of MreB filaments in vitro. EF-Tu had the strongest impact on MreB filaments in a 1:1 ratio, and EF-Tu co-sedimented with MreB filaments, revealing a stoichiometric interaction between both proteins. This was supported by cross-linking assays where 1:1 species were well detectable. When expressed in E. coli cells, B. subtilis MreB formed filaments and induced the formation of co-localizing B. subtilis EF-Tu structures, indicating that MreB can direct the positioning of EF-Tu structures in a heterologous cell system. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis showed that MreB filaments have a higher turnover in B. subtilis cells than in E. coli cells, indicating different filament kinetics in homologous or heterologous cell systems. The data show that MreB can direct the localization of EF-Tu in vivo, which in turn positively affects the formation and dynamics of MreB filaments. Thus, EF-Tu is a modulator of the activity of a bacterial actin-like protein.

  8. Interaction of CK1δ with γTuSC ensures proper microtubule assembly and spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yutian; Moritz, Michelle; Han, Xuemei; Giddings, Thomas H.; Lyon, Andrew; Kollman, Justin; Winey, Mark; Yates, John; Agard, David A.; Drubin, David G.; Barnes, Georjana

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ) family members associate with microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) from yeast to humans, but their mitotic roles and targets have yet to be identified. We show here that budding yeast CK1δ, Hrr25, is a γ-tubulin small complex (γTuSC) binding factor. Moreover, Hrr25's association with γTuSC depends on its kinase activity and its noncatalytic central domain. Loss of Hrr25 kinase activity resulted in assembly of unusually long cytoplasmic microtubules and defects in spindle positioning, consistent with roles in regulation of γTuSC-mediated microtubule nucleation and the Kar9 spindle-positioning pathway, respectively. Hrr25 directly phosphorylated γTuSC proteins in vivo and in vitro, and this phosphorylation promoted γTuSC integrity and activity. Because CK1δ and γTuSC are highly conserved and present at MTOCs in diverse eukaryotes, similar regulatory mechanisms are expected to apply generally in eukaryotes. PMID:25971801

  9. Lack of discrimination against non-proteinogenic amino acid norvaline by elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cvetesic, Nevena; Akmacic, Irena; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita

    2013-01-01

    The GTP-bound form of elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) brings aminoacylated tRNAs (aa-tRNA) to the A-site of the ribosome. EF-Tu binds all cognate elongator aa-tRNAs with highly similar affinities, and its weaker or tighter binding of misacylated tRNAs may discourage their participation in translation. Norvaline (Nva) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that is activated and transferred to tRNA(Leu) by leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). No notable accumulation of Nva-tRNA(Leu) has been observed in vitro, because of the efficient post-transfer hydrolytic editing activity of LeuRS. However, incorporation of norvaline into proteins in place of leucine does occur under certain conditions in vivo. Here we show that EF-Tu binds Nva-tRNA(Leu) and Leu-tRNA(Leu) with similar affinities, and that Nva-tRNA(Leu) and Leu-tRNA(Leu) dissociate from EF-Tu at comparable rates. The inability of EF-Tu to discriminate against norvaline may have driven evolution of highly efficient LeuRS editing as the main quality control mechanism against misincorporation of norvaline into proteins.

  10. Interaction of Leptospira elongation factor Tu with plasminogen and complement factor H: a metabolic leptospiral protein with moonlighting activities.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Danielly G; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica M; Abe, Cecília M; Monaris, Denize; Morais, Zenaide M; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patrícia A E; Barbosa, Angela S

    2013-01-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), an abundant bacterial protein involved in protein synthesis, has been shown to display moonlighting activities. Known to perform more than one function at different times or in different places, it is found in several subcellular locations in a single organism, and may serve as a virulence factor in a range of important human pathogens. Here we demonstrate that Leptospira EF-Tu is surface-exposed and performs additional roles as a cell-surface receptor for host plasma proteins. It binds plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner, and lysine residues are critical for this interaction. Bound plasminogen is converted to active plasmin, which, in turn, is able to cleave the natural substrates C3b and fibrinogen. Leptospira EF-Tu also acquires the complement regulator Factor H (FH). FH bound to immobilized EF-Tu displays cofactor activity, mediating C3b degradation by Factor I (FI). In this manner, EF-Tu may contribute to leptospiral tissue invasion and complement inactivation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a leptospiral protein exhibiting moonlighting activities.

  11. A new velocity curve of the RR Lyrae star TU Ursae Majoris - Evidence for duplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, A.; White, R.E. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ )

    1990-02-01

    Spectra taken at the coude focus of the 5-m Hale telescope were reduced to obtain a velocity curve for the field RR Lyr star TU UMa. The observations were aimed at detecting differences (if any) in the velocity curves obtained from weak metal lines shortward of the Balmer jump, as opposed to those from similar lines longward of the Balmer jump, so that velocity gradients deep in the atmosphere could be studied. The mean velocity from this velocity curve is different from those measured at earlier epochs. This suggests that TU UMa is a binary system in which the visible component is the RR Lyr star. Fluctuations in times of light maxima are interpreted here as time delays due to light travel time as the RR Lyr component moves in its orbit. 35 refs.

  12. An interbacterial NAD(P)(+) glycohydrolase toxin requires elongation factor Tu for delivery to target cells.

    PubMed

    Whitney, John C; Quentin, Dennis; Sawai, Shin; LeRoux, Michele; Harding, Brittany N; Ledvina, Hannah E; Tran, Bao Q; Robinson, Howard; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R; Raunser, Stefan; Mougous, Joseph D

    2015-10-22

    Type VI secretion (T6S) influences the composition of microbial communities by catalyzing the delivery of toxins between adjacent bacterial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a T6S integral membrane toxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Tse6, acts on target cells by degrading the universally essential dinucleotides NAD(+) and NADP(+). Structural analyses of Tse6 show that it resembles mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase proteins, such as diphtheria toxin, with the exception of a unique loop that both excludes proteinaceous ADP-ribose acceptors and contributes to hydrolysis. We find that entry of Tse6 into target cells requires its binding to an essential housekeeping protein, translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). These proteins participate in a larger assembly that additionally directs toxin export and provides chaperone activity. Visualization of this complex by electron microscopy defines the architecture of a toxin-loaded T6S apparatus and provides mechanistic insight into intercellular membrane protein delivery between bacteria.

  13. Duplication of Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial EF-Tu: pre-adaptation to T-arm truncation and exclusion of bulky aminoacyl residues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Aya; Suematsu, Takuma; Aihara, Koh-Ki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoh-Ichi

    2017-03-07

    Translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) delivers aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) to ribosomes in protein synthesis. EF-Tu generally recognizes aminoacyl moieties and acceptor- and T-stems of aa-tRNAs. However, nematode mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs frequently lack all or part of the T-arm that is recognized by canonical EF-Tu. We previously reported that two distinct EF-Tu species, EF-Tu1 and EF-Tu2, respectively, recognize mt tRNAs lacking T-arms and D-arms in the mitochondria of the chromadorean nematode Caenorhabditis elegansC. elegans EF-Tu2 specifically recognizes the seryl moiety of serylated D-armless tRNAs. Mitochondria of the enoplean nematode Trichinella possess three structural types of tRNAs: T-armless tRNAs, D-armless tRNAs, and cloverleaf tRNAs with a short T-arm. Trichinella mt EF-Tu1 binds to all three types and EF-Tu2 binds only to D-armless Ser-tRNAs, showing an evolutionary intermediate state from canonical EF-Tu to chromadorean nematode (e.g. C. elegans) EF-Tu species. We report here that two EF-Tu species also participate in Drosophila melanogaster mitochondria. Both D. melanogaster EF-Tu1 and EF-Tu2 bound to cloverleaf and D-armless tRNAs. D. melanogaster EF-Tu1 has the ability to recognize T-armless tRNAs that do not evidently exist in D. melanogaster mitochondria, but do exist in related arthropod species. In addition, D. melanogaster EF-Tu2 preferentially bound to aa-tRNAs carrying small amino acids, but not to aa-tRNAs carrying bulky amino acids. These results suggest that the Drosophila mt translation system could be another intermediate state between the canonical and nematode mitochondria-type translation systems.

  14. An unusual mechanism for EF-Tu activation during tmRNA-mediated ribosome rescue.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mickey R; Buskirk, Allen R

    2014-02-01

    In bacteria, ribosomes stalled on truncated mRNAs are rescued by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its protein partner SmpB. Acting like tRNA, the aminoacyl-tmRNA/SmpB complex is delivered to the ribosomal A site by EF-Tu and accepts the transfer of the nascent polypeptide. Although SmpB binding within the decoding center is clearly critical for licensing tmRNA entry into the ribosome, it is not known how activation of EF-Tu occurs in the absence of a codon-anticodon interaction. A recent crystal structure revealed that SmpB residue His136 stacks on 16S rRNA nucleotide G530, a critical player in the canonical decoding mechanism. Here we use pre-steady-state kinetic methods to probe the role of this interaction in ribosome rescue. We find that although mutation of His136 does not reduce SmpB's affinity for the ribosomal A-site, it dramatically reduces the rate of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu. Surprisingly, the same mutation has little effect on the apparent rate of peptide-bond formation, suggesting that release of EF-Tu from the tmRNA/SmpB complex on the ribosome may occur prior to GTP hydrolysis. Consistent with this idea, we find that peptidyl transfer to tmRNA is relatively insensitive to the antibiotic kirromycin. Taken together, our studies provide a model for the initial stages of ribosomal rescue by tmRNA.

  15. An unusual mechanism for EF-Tu activation during tmRNA-mediated ribosome rescue

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mickey R.; Buskirk, Allen R.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria, ribosomes stalled on truncated mRNAs are rescued by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its protein partner SmpB. Acting like tRNA, the aminoacyl-tmRNA/SmpB complex is delivered to the ribosomal A site by EF-Tu and accepts the transfer of the nascent polypeptide. Although SmpB binding within the decoding center is clearly critical for licensing tmRNA entry into the ribosome, it is not known how activation of EF-Tu occurs in the absence of a codon–anticodon interaction. A recent crystal structure revealed that SmpB residue His136 stacks on 16S rRNA nucleotide G530, a critical player in the canonical decoding mechanism. Here we use pre-steady-state kinetic methods to probe the role of this interaction in ribosome rescue. We find that although mutation of His136 does not reduce SmpB's affinity for the ribosomal A-site, it dramatically reduces the rate of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu. Surprisingly, the same mutation has little effect on the apparent rate of peptide-bond formation, suggesting that release of EF-Tu from the tmRNA/SmpB complex on the ribosome may occur prior to GTP hydrolysis. Consistent with this idea, we find that peptidyl transfer to tmRNA is relatively insensitive to the antibiotic kirromycin. Taken together, our studies provide a model for the initial stages of ribosomal rescue by tmRNA. PMID:24345396

  16. LONG-TERM PHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE ACTIVE W UMa-TYPE SYSTEM TU BOOTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Dale, Horace A. III; Williamon, Richard M.

    2008-09-15

    We present multicolor light curves for the W UMa-type eclipsing binary TU Boo for two epochs separated by 22 years. An analysis of the O - C diagram indicates the earlier observations took place right in the middle of a major period change, thus allowing for a unique study on mass transfer and period changes in this W UMa-type system. We compute model fits to our light curves, along with the only other published set, using the Wilson-Devinney program, and find temporally correlated changes in the size of the secondary component with anomalies in the O - C diagram. We investigate the cause of these changes and find support for the existence of rapid, large-scale mass transfer between the components. We postulate that this interaction allows them to maintain nearly equal surface temperatures despite having achieved only marginal contact. We also find support for the evolutionary scenario in which TU Boo has undergone a mass ratio reversal in the past, due to large-scale mass transfer so that what is presently the secondary component of TU Boo is in an advanced evolutionary state, oversized due to a helium-enriched core, with a total system age of {>=}10 Gyr.

  17. Longitudinal Handling Qualities of the Tu-144LL Airplane and Comparisons With Other Large, Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Timothy H.; Marshall, Alisa

    2000-01-01

    Four flights have been conducted using the Tu-144LL supersonic transport aircraft with the dedicated objective of collecting quantitative data and qualitative pilot comments. These data are compared with the following longitudinal flying qualities criteria: Neal-Smith, short-period damping, time delay, control anticipation parameter, phase delay (omega(sp)*T(theta(2))), pitch bandwidth as a function of time delay, and flight path as a function of pitch bandwidth. Determining the applicability of these criteria and gaining insight into the flying qualities of a large, supersonic aircraft are attempted. Where appropriate, YF-12, XB-70, and SR-71 pilot ratings are compared with the Tu-144LL results to aid in the interpretation of the Tu-144LL data and to gain insight into the application of criteria. The data show that approach and landing requirements appear to be applicable to the precision flightpath control required for up-and-away flight of large, supersonic aircraft. The Neal-Smith, control anticipation parameter, and pitch-bandwidth criteria tend to correlate with the pilot comments better than the phase delay criterion, omega(sp)*T(theta(2)). The data indicate that the detrimental flying qualities implication of decoupled pitch-attitude and flightpath responses occurring for high-speed flight may be mitigated by requiring the pilot to close the loop on flightpath or vertical speed.

  18. Arabidopsis EF-Tu receptor enhances bacterial disease resistance in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; Wang, Hsi-Hua; Stefanato, Francesca L; Craze, Melanie; Bowden, Sarah; Wallington, Emma; Zipfel, Cyril; Ridout, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Perception of pathogen (or microbe)-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is a key component of plant innate immunity. The Arabidopsis PRR EF-Tu receptor (EFR) recognizes the bacterial PAMP elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and its derived peptide elf18. Previous work revealed that transgenic expression of AtEFR in Solanaceae confers elf18 responsiveness and broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance. In this study, we developed a set of bioassays to study the activation of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) in wheat. We generated transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants expressing AtEFR driven by the constitutive rice actin promoter and tested their response to elf18. We show that transgenic expression of AtEFR in wheat confers recognition of elf18, as measured by the induction of immune marker genes and callose deposition. When challenged with the cereal bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. oryzae, transgenic EFR wheat lines had reduced lesion size and bacterial multiplication. These results demonstrate that AtEFR can be transferred successfully from dicot to monocot species, further revealing that immune signalling pathways are conserved across these distant phyla. As novel PRRs are identified, their transfer between plant families represents a useful strategy for enhancing resistance to pathogens in crops.

  19. Research data from hydrology disciplines are safely stored and published in 3TU.Datacentrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinčič, Alenka; Rombouts, Jeroen

    2013-04-01

    Good management of research data from different science disciplines such as hydrology, geodesy and climate research, is crucial for reducing the uncertainties in forecasting and predictions. These research data can be well-managed and safely stored in 3TU.Datacentrum and thus become available for future use by the scientific community. 3TU.Datacentrum (datacentrum.3tu.nl) is a portal for science- and technology research data in the Netherlands. It provides long-term archive and permanent access to research data, it provides tools for citation of research datasets and thus enables linking, sharing and reuse of research data. Versatility of disciplines and thus versatility of the data producers' needs is a challenge of the data center. 3TU.Datacentrum offers solutions - as standardized as possible yet different where required. Standardized solution is the data model: datasets, instruments, locations and time frames are all objects on their own, with own metadata and interconnected through rdf relationships. These relations are also used to generate ORE Resource Maps. The file format NetCDF, which is primarily used for sets of multidimensional arrays with metadata included, enables interoperability. For simple datasets a Fedora repository is used where datasets of any format are allowed including that of a specific instrument. Alongside the NetCDF an xml version (ncml) is stored that can be converted to other formats. For complex datasets an OPeNDAP framework is used, which allows querying within and across datasets. Some examples from hydrological research are presented. 1 - For a complex collection of simple datasets consisting of ongoing hydrological measurements from several project partners, using several instruments, on several locations, and over a long period of time, there was a need for central storage in order to share the data and enable easy combination of data sets. The measurements are not repeatable and are also valuable for multidisciplinary research

  20. New analysis of the light time effect in TU Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liška, J.; Skarka, M.; Mikulášek, Z.; Zejda, M.; Chrastina, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Recent statistical studies prove that the percentage of RR Lyrae pulsators that are located in binaries or multiple stellar systems is considerably lower than might be expected. This can be better understood from an in-depth analysis of individual candidates. We investigate in detail the light time effect of the most probable binary candidate TU UMa. This is complicated because the pulsation period shows secular variation. Aims: We model possible light time effect of TU UMa using a new code applied on previously available and newly determined maxima timings to confirm binarity and refine parameters of the orbit of the RRab component in the binary system. The binary hypothesis is also tested using radial velocity measurements. Methods: We used new approach to determine brightness maxima timings based on template fitting. This can also be used on sparse or scattered data. This approach was successfully applied on measurements from different sources. To determine the orbital parameters of the double star TU UMa, we developed a new code to analyse light time effect that also includes secular variation in the pulsation period. Its usability was successfully tested on CL Aur, an eclipsing binary with mass-transfer in a triple system that shows similar changes in the O-C diagram. Since orbital motion would cause systematic shifts in mean radial velocities (dominated by pulsations), we computed and compared our model with centre-of-mass velocities. They were determined using high-quality templates of radial velocity curves of RRab stars. Results: Maxima timings adopted from the GEOS database (168) together with those newly determined from sky surveys and new measurements (85) were used to construct an O-C diagram spanning almost five proposed orbital cycles. This data set is three times larger than data sets used by previous authors. Modelling of the O-C dependence resulted in 23.3-yr orbital period, which translates into a minimum mass of the second component of

  1. Bone marrow transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers. V. Protection of mice from lethal graft-vs. -host disease by pretreatment of donor cells with monoclonal anti-Thy-1. 2 coupled to the toxin ricin

    SciTech Connect

    Vallera, D.A.; Youle, R.J.; Neville, D.M. Jr.; Kersey, J.H.

    1982-03-01

    A new method has been devised to eliminate T cells from murine bone marrow grafts across major histocompatibility barriers and thus prevent graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD). The method utilizes a monoclonal antibody directed at the Thy-1.2 antigen but is complement independent. To make anti-Thy-1.2 toxic, the antibody is covalently linked to the toxin ricin. Ricin ordinarily binds, enters, and kills cells through receptors containing galactose. The hybrid protein, anti-Thy-1.2-ricin, can enter and kill cells via the Thy-1.2 receptor. In the presence of lactose the usual entry route for ricin is largely blocked and the hybrid is shown to be a highly selective reagent that is T cell specific in its inhibition of mitogen-stimulated splenocytes. We have used a model of severe and fatal GVHD where BALB/c splenocytes and bone marrow cells are given to irradiated C57BL/6 recipients. Over 90% of these mice die by day 70, exhibiting signs of GVHD. When donor cells are pretreated with 0.5 microgram/ml of anti-Thy-1.2-ricin plus 200 mM lactose before injection, 10 of 11 animals survive through day 70 without signs of GVHD. These studies demonstrate that ricin linked to monoclonal antibodies may have utility related to the prevention of GVHD in human bone marrow transplantation.

  2. Nonatopic asthma: in vivo airway hyperreactivity adoptively transferred to naive mice by THY-1(+) and B220(+) antigen-specific cells that lack surface expression of CD3.

    PubMed Central

    Geba, G P; Wegner, C D; Wolyniec, W W; Li, Y; Askenase, P W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the cellular immune events contributing to airway hyperreactivity (AHR), we studied an in vivo mouse model induced by the hapten picryl (trinitrophenyl) chloride (PCl). Mice were immunized by cutaneous contact sensitization with PCl and airway challenged subsequently with picryl sulfonic acid (PSA) antigen (Ag). Increased airway resistance was produced late (24 h) after Ag challenge, disappeared by 48 h, and was associated with no decrease in diffusion capacity. AHR could be produced in PCl immune/ PSA challenged mice on day 7 or even, with challenge, as early as 1 d after contact sensitization, after adoptive transfer of immune cells lacking CD3(+) contact sensitivity effector T cells, or after transfer of Ag-specific lymphoid cells depleted of conventional T lymphocytes with surface determinants for CD3, CD4, CD8, TCR-beta, or TCR-delta molecules. Further experiments showed that development of AHR depended upon transfer of immune cells expressing surface membrane Thy-1 and B220 (CD45RA) determinants. We concluded that a novel population of Ag-specific lymphoid cells with a defined surface phenotype (Thy-1(+), CD3(-), CD4(-), CD8(-), TCR-alphabeta-, TCR-gammadelta-, and CD45RA+) is required in a mouse model for the development of AHR. PMID:9241124

  3. Transgene therapy for rat anti-Thy1.1 glomerulonephritis via mesangial cell vector with a polyethylenimine/decorin nanocomplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Sun, Yu; Wu, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2012-08-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI), a cationic polymer, is one of the most efficient non-viral vectors for transgene therapy. Decorin (DCN), a leucine-rich proteoglycan secreted by glomerular mesangial cells (MC), is a promising anti-fibrotic agent for the treatment of glomerulonephritis. In this study, we used PEI-DCN nanocomplexes with different N/P ratios to transfect MC in vitro and deliver the MC vector with PEI-DCN expressing into rat anti-Thy1.1 nephritis kidney tissue via injection into the left renal artery in vivo. The PEI-plasmid DNA complex at N/P 20 had the highest level of transfection efficiency and the lowest level of cytotoxicity in cultured MC. Following injection, the ex vivo gene was transferred successfully into the glomeruli of the rat anti-Thy1.1 nephritis model by the MC vector with the PEI-DCN complex. The exogenous MC with DCN expression was located mainly in the mesangium and the glomerular capillary. Over-expression of DCN in diseased glomeruli could result in the inhibition of collagen IV deposition and MC proliferation. The pathological changes of rat nephritis were alleviated following injection of the vector. These findings demonstrate that the DCN gene delivered by the PEI-DNA nanocomplex with the MC vector is a promising therapeutic method for the treatment of glomerulonephritis.

  4. In vivo nonlinear imaging of corneal structures with special focus on BALB/c and streptozotocin-diabetic Thy1-YFP mice.

    PubMed

    Ehmke, Tobias; Leckelt, Janine; Reichard, Maria; Weiss, Heike; Hovakimyan, Marina; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Stachs, Oliver; Baltrusch, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Two-photon microscopy (TPM) allows high contrast imaging at a subcellular resolution scale. In this work, the microscopy technique was applied to visualize corneal structures in two mouse models (BALB/c and B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-YFP)16Jrs/J) in vivo. In particular, the transgenic Thy1-YFP mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in all motor and sensory neurons had been used for investigating the nerve fiber density in healthy and streptozotocin-diabetic mice. This model is clinically relevant since patients suffering from diabetes mellitus have a high risk to develop small fiber neuropathy. Nonlinear laser scanning microscopy displayed a reduction of nerve fiber density in streptozotocin-diabetic versus healthy mice and confirmed data obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In recent years, corneal CLSM was proved to be an appropriate non-invasive tool for an early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. Nevertheless, validation of the CLSM method for the clinical routine is currently a matter of investigation and requires confirmation by further studies and complementary techniques. Thus, the present study provides further evidence of corneal confocal microscopy as a promising technique for non-invasive detection of diabetic neuropathy. Information derived from these experiments may become clinically relevant and help to develop new drugs for treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  5. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus - Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections.

    PubMed

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G; Müller, Ingrid B; Eberle, Raphael J; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-03-10

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues.

  6. A novel high-throughput and quantitative method based on visible color shifts for screening Bacillus subtilis THY-15 for surfactin production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Yu, Huimin; Shen, Zhongyao

    2015-08-01

    A novel chromatic visible screening method using bromothymol blue (BTB) as a color indicator and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) as a mediator was constructed to obtain the high titer surfactin-producing strains. The reliability and quantification accuracy of color shift were also confirmed. Regular chromatic responses from faint yellow-green to dark green and bright blue reflected the different ranges of surfactin concentrations. Moreover, the quantitative accuracy of surfactin quantification in the range of 100-500 mg/L was verified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using different fermentation supernatant samples. Using this CPC-BTB method, a superior surfactin producer, Bacillus subtilis THY-15, was successfully screened. The producer's surfactin (Srf) titer reached 1240 mg/L. RP-HPLC analysis of THY-15 revealed four surfactin isoforms. As identified by amino acid analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, the isoforms of surfactin in fraction 1, 2 and 4 had the same circular peptide sequence of Glu-Leu-Leu-Val-Asp-Leu-Leu but different iso-C13, C14 and C15 fatty acid chains, but the isoform in fraction 3 possessed a special peptide sequence of Glu-Val-Leu-Leu-Asp-Leu-Val.

  7. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    PubMed Central

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues. PMID:26960569

  8. Induction of hair follicle dermal papilla cell properties in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived multipotent LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Veraitch, Ophelia; Mabuchi, Yo; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Okuno, Hironobu; Tsukashima, Aki; Amagai, Masayuki; Okano, Hideyuki; Ohyama, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    The dermal papilla (DP) is a specialised mesenchymal component of the hair follicle (HF) that plays key roles in HF morphogenesis and regeneration. Current technical difficulties in preparing trichogenic human DP cells could be overcome by the use of highly proliferative and plastic human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). In this study, hiPSCs were differentiated into induced mesenchymal cells (iMCs) with a bone marrow stromal cell phenotype. A highly proliferative and plastic LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) subset of iMCs was subsequently programmed using retinoic acid and DP cell activating culture medium to acquire DP properties. The resultant cells (induced DP-substituting cells [iDPSCs]) exhibited up-regulated DP markers, interacted with human keratinocytes to up-regulate HF related genes, and when co-grafted with human keratinocytes in vivo gave rise to fibre structures with a hair cuticle-like coat resembling the hair shaft, as confirmed by scanning electron microscope analysis. Furthermore, iDPSCs responded to the clinically used hair growth reagent, minoxidil sulfate, to up-regulate DP genes, further supporting that they were capable of, at least in part, reproducing DP properties. Thus, LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) iMCs may provide material for HF bioengineering and drug screening for hair diseases. PMID:28220862

  9. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues.

  10. Enhancement of innate immune system in monocot rice by transferring the dicotyledonous elongation factor Tu receptor EFR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fen; Wang, Huiqin; Wang, Shanzhi; Jiang, Wendi; Shan, Changlin; Li, Bin; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Shiyong; Sun, Wenxian

    2015-07-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) receptor (EFR) in cruciferous plants specifically recognizes the N-terminal acetylated elf18 region of bacterial EF-Tu and thereby activates plant immunity. It has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis EFR confers broad-spectrum bacterial resistance in the EFR transgenic solanaceous plants. Here, the transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cv. Zhonghua 17) and cell cultures with constitutive expression of AtEFR were developed to investigate whether AtEFR senses EF-Tu and thus enhances bacterial resistance in the monocot plants. We demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae-derived elf18 peptide induced oxidative burst and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the AtEFR transgenic rice cells and plants, respectively. Pathogenesis-related genes, such as OsPBZ1, were upregulated dramatically in transgenic rice plant and cell lines in response to elf18 stimulation. Importantly, pretreatment with elf18 triggered strong resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae in the transgenic plants, which was largely dependent on the AtEFR expression level. These plants also exhibited enhanced resistance to rice bacterial brown stripe, but not to rice fungal blast. Collectively, the results indicate that the rice plants with heterologous expression of AtEFR recognize bacterial EF-Tu and exhibit enhanced broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance and that pattern recognition receptor-mediated immunity may be manipulated across the two plant classes, dicots and monocots.

  11. Russian Tu-144LL SST Roll-Out for Joint NASA Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The modified Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory is rolled out of its hangar at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia in March 1996 at the beginning of a joint U.S. - Russian high-speed flight research program. The 'LL' stands for Letayuschaya Laboratoriya, which means Flying Laboratory. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The

  12. Russian Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Landing with Drag Chutes at Zhukovsky Air Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The modified Tupolev Tu-144 supersonic flying laboratory touches down and deploys a trio of drag chutes following a test flight at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, in July 1997. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used

  13. Russian Tu-144LL SST Joint NASA Flying Laboratory - Flight November 29, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The modified Tupolev Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory during a test flight from the Zhukovsky Airfield near Moscow, Russia. The 'LL' stands for Letayuschaya Laboratoriya, which means Flying Laboratory. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were

  14. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory on Taxiway at Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The sleek lines of the Tupolev Tu-144LL are evident as it sits on the taxiway at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in production-model aircraft. Fifty experiments were proposed

  15. Russian Tu-144LL SST Roll-out for Joint NASA Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    U.S. Ambassador Pickering addresses Russian and American dignitaries, industry representatives and members of the press during a roll-out ceremony for the modified Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory. The ceremony was held at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, on March 17, 1996. The 'LL' designation for the aircraft stands for Letayuschaya Laboratoriya, which means Flying Laboratory in Russian. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation

  16. Russian Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Takeoff at Zhukovsky Air Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    With its nose drooped and canards extended, the Tupolev Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory lifts off from the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia on a 1997 test flight. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in production

  17. Research Pilot C. Gordon Fullerton in Cockpit of TU-144LL SST Flying Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Research pilot C. Gordon Fullerton sits in cockpit of TU-144LL SST Flying Laboratory. Fullerton was one of two NASA pilots who flew the aircraft as part of a joint high speed research program. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in

  18. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Front View with Nose Dropped for Takeoff and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A front view of the Tupolev Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia. The plane's nose droops down for take off and landing and is then raised for high-speed flight. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different

  19. Russian Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Landing at Zhukovsky Air Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Tupolev Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory touches down at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, following a 1997 test flight. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in production-model aircraft. Fifty experiments

  20. Russian Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Landing at Zhukovsky Air Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Tupolev Tu-144LL supersonic flying laboratory lifts off from the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, on a 1997 test flight. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in production-model aircraft. Fifty experiments were

  1. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Lifts off Runway on a High-Speed Research Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Tupolev Tu-144LL lifts off from the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, on a 1998 test flight. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in production-model aircraft. Fifty experiments were proposed for the program and

  2. In vitro and in vivo activities of novel, semisynthetic thiopeptide inhibitors of bacterial elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Leeds, J A; LaMarche, M J; Brewer, J T; Bushell, S M; Deng, G; Dewhurst, J M; Dzink-Fox, J; Gangl, E; Jain, A; Lee, L; Lilly, M; Manni, K; Mullin, S; Neckermann, G; Osborne, C; Palestrant, D; Patane, M A; Raimondi, A; Ranjitkar, S; Rann, E M; Sachdeva, M; Shao, J; Tiamfook, S; Whitehead, L; Yu, D

    2011-11-01

    Recently, we identified aminothiazole derivatives of GE2270 A. These novel semisynthetic congeners, like GE2270 A, target the essential bacterial protein elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). Medicinal chemistry optimization of lead molecules led to the identification of preclinical development candidates 1 and 2. These cycloalklycarboxylic acid derivatives show activity against difficult to treat Gram-positive pathogens and demonstrate increased aqueous solubility compared to GE2270 A. We describe here the in vitro and in vivo activities of compounds 1 and 2 compared to marketed antibiotics. Compounds 1 and 2 were potent against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (MIC(90) ≤ 0.25 μg/ml) but weaker against the streptococci (MIC(90) ≥ 4 μg/ml). Like GE2270 A, the derivatives inhibited bacterial protein synthesis and selected for spontaneous loss of susceptibility via mutations in the tuf gene, encoding EF-Tu. The mutants were not cross-resistant to other antibiotic classes. In a mouse systemic infection model, compounds 1 and 2 protected mice from lethal S. aureus infections with 50% effective doses (ED(50)) of 5.2 and 4.3 mg/kg, respectively. Similarly, compounds 1 and 2 protected mice from lethal systemic E. faecalis infections with ED(50) of 0.56 and 0.23 mg/kg, respectively. In summary, compounds 1 and 2 are active in vitro and in vivo activity against difficult-to-treat Gram-positive bacterial infections and represent a promising new class of antibacterials for use in human therapy.

  3. Youyou Tu: significance of winning the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenxiu

    2016-01-01

    Youyou Tu, a female scientist at the China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing, is the first Chinese winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Based on the study of recipes which had been used for thousands of years to treat fever, Tu’s group discovered that the plant artemesia annua, sweet wormwood, showed substantial inhibition of rodent malaria parasites. Her achievement and experience have inspired other researchers and emphasized the development of traditional Chinese medicine. Her award has led to a heated discussion about scientific research investment, fair treatment of research staff, and intellectual property right (IPR) protection in China. PMID:26885485

  4. A Qualitative Piloted Evaluation of the Tupolev Tu-144 Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Robert A.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Cox, Timothy H.; Princen, Norman H.

    2000-01-01

    Two U.S. research pilots evaluated the Tupolev Tu-144 supersonic transport aircraft on three dedicated flights: one subsonic and two supersonic profiles. The flight profiles and maneuvers were developed jointly by Tupolev and U.S. engineers. The vehicle was found to have unique operational and flight characteristics that serve as lessons for designers of future supersonic transport aircraft. Vehicle subsystems and observed characteristics are described as are flight test planning and ground monitoring facilities. Maneuver descriptions and extended pilot narratives for each flight are included as appendices.

  5. Protein synthesis alongation factors EF-Tu and eEF1A: biosynthesis, functions and application in the improvement of heat tolerance in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis elongation factors EF-Tu and eEF1A (EFs) represent a group of highly conserved and abundant GTPases with an important role in transporting the aminoacyl-tRNA complex to the A site of the ribosome during elongation phase of translation. EF-Tu proteins are located in bacteria and, du...

  6. 75 FR 59060 - Airworthiness Directives; Turboméca S.A. ARRIEL 2B Turboshaft Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ...-mechanical unit (HMU) acceleration controller axle except on engines that incorporate modification TU 132... modification TU 149. This AD results from reports of engines with modification TU 132 incorporated experiencing... TU 62A, unless the engine incorporates modification TU 132. That AD was the result of several...

  7. Tuberculate fruit gene Tu encodes a C2 H2 zinc finger protein that is required for the warty fruit phenotype in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuqin; Zhang, Weiwei; He, Huanle; Nie, Jingtao; Bie, Beibei; Zhao, Junlong; Ren, Guoliang; Li, Yue; Zhang, Dabing; Pan, Junsong; Cai, Run

    2014-06-01

    Cucumber fruits that have tubercules and spines (trichomes) are known to possess a warty (Wty) phenotype. In this study, the tuberculate fruit gene Tu was identified by map-based cloning, and was found to encode a transcription factor (TF) with a single C2 H2 zinc finger domain. Tu was identified in all 38 Wty lines examined, and was completely absent from all 56 non-warty (nWty) lines. Cucumber plants transgenic for Tu (TCP) revealed that Tu was required for the Wty fruit phenotype. Subcellular localization showed that the fusion protein GFP-Tu was localized mainly to the nucleus. Based on analyses of semi-quantitative and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and mRNA in situ hybridization, we found that Tu was expressed specifically in fruit spine cells during development of fruit tubercules. Moreover, cytokinin (CTK) content measurements and cytological observations in Wty and nWty fruits revealed that the Wty fruit phenotype correlated with high endogenous CTK concentrations. As a result of further analyses on the transcriptomic profile of the nWty fruit epidermis and TCP fruit warts, expression of CTK-associated genes, and hormone content in nWty fruit epidermis, Wty fruit warts and epidermis, and TCP fruit warts and epidermis, we found that Tu probably promoted CTK biosynthesis in fruit warts. Here we show that Tu could not be expressed in the glabrous and tubercule-free mutant line gl that contained Tu, this result that futher confirmed the epistatic effect of the trichome (spine) gene Gl over Tu. Taken together, these data led us to propose a genetic pathway for the Wty fruit trait that could guide future mechanistic studies.

  8. Elongation factor Tu D138N, a mutant with modified substrate specificity, as a tool to study energy consumption in protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Weijland, A; Parlato, G; Parmeggiani, A

    1994-09-06

    Substitution Asp138-->Asn changes the substrate specificity of elongation factor (EF) Tu from GTP to XTP [Hwang & Miller (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 13081-13085]. This mutated EF-Tu (EF-Tu D138N) was used to show that 2 XTP molecules are hydrolyzed for each elongation cycle [Weijland & Parmeggiani (1993) Science 259, 1311-1313]. Here we extend the study of the properties of this EF-Tu mutant and its function in the elongation process. In poly(U)-directed poly(phenylalanine) synthesis, the number of peptide chains synthesized using EF-Tu D138N.XTP was 30% higher than with EF-Tu wild type (wt).GTP. However, since in the former case the average peptide chain length was correspondingly reduced, the number of the residues incorporated turned out to be nearly the same in both systems. The K'd values of the XTP and XDP complexes of EF-Tu D138N were similar to those of the GTP and GDP complexes of EF-Tu wt. The extent of leucine misincorporation and the kirromycin effect were also comparable to those in the EF-Tu wt/GTP system. The hydrolysis of two XTP molecules, very likely as part of two EF-Tu D138N.XTP complexes, for each elongation cycle was found to be independent of (i) MgCl2 concentration, (ii) ribosome concentration, and (iii) temperature (5-40 degrees C). With rate-limiting amounts of XTP the K'm of its XTPase activity corresponded to the K'm for XTP of poly(phenylalanine) synthesis (0.3-0.6 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Estimation of Handling Qualities Parameters of the Tu-144 Supersonic Transport Aircraft from Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Timothy J.; Batterson, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Low order equivalent system (LOES) models for the Tu-144 supersonic transport aircraft were identified from flight test data. The mathematical models were given in terms of transfer functions with a time delay by the military standard MIL-STD-1797A, "Flying Qualities of Piloted Aircraft," and the handling qualities were predicted from the estimated transfer function coefficients. The coefficients and the time delay in the transfer functions were estimated using a nonlinear equation error formulation in the frequency domain. Flight test data from pitch, roll, and yaw frequency sweeps at various flight conditions were used for parameter estimation. Flight test results are presented in terms of the estimated parameter values, their standard errors, and output fits in the time domain. Data from doublet maneuvers at the same flight conditions were used to assess the predictive capabilities of the identified models. The identified transfer function models fit the measured data well and demonstrated good prediction capabilities. The Tu-144 was predicted to be between level 2 and 3 for all longitudinal maneuvers and level I for all lateral maneuvers. High estimates of the equivalent time delay in the transfer function model caused the poor longitudinal rating.

  10. Modeling study of carbonate decomposition in LLNL`s 4TU pilot oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1994-10-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) 4 tonne-per-day oil shale Pilot Retort (4TU-Pilot) has been modeled to study the degree of carbonate decomposition occurring in the process. The modeling uses a simplified version of the processes occurring in the retort to allow parametric studies to be performed. The primary focus of the work is on the sensitivity of computed carbonate decomposition to the assumed manner in which solid material leaves the retort. It was found that for a variety of assumptions about solid passage and evolution within the process the computed carbonate decomposition varied by only a few percent. It was also determined that using available kinetic expressions based on literature data led to a consistent underestimate of the carbonate decomposition, from 12--17% low on an absolute basis and on a relative basis as much as a factor of seven times too low. A simplified kinetic expression based on limited data from laboratory experiments on the same shale as used in the 4TU-Pilot run was also employed and found to match the pilot results fairly well.

  11. TuBaFrost 5: multifunctional central database application for a European tumor bank.

    PubMed

    Isabelle, M; Teodorovic, I; Morente, M M; Jaminé, D; Passioukov, A; Lejeune, S; Therasse, P; Dinjens, W N M; Oosterhuis, J W; Lam, K H; Oomen, M H A; Spatz, A; Ratcliffe, C; Knox, K; Mager, R; Kerr, D; Pezzella, F; van de Vijver, M; van Boven, H; Alonso, S; Kerjaschki, D; Pammer, J; Lopez-Guerrero, J A; Llombart Bosch, A; Carbone, A; Gloghini, A; van Veen, E-B; van Damme, B; Riegman, P H J

    2006-12-01

    Developing a tissue bank database has become more than just logically arranging data in tables combined with a search engine. Current demand for high quality samples and data, and the ever-changing legal and ethical regulations mean that the application must reflect TuBaFrost rules and protocols for the collection, exchange and use of tissue. To ensure continuation and extension of the TuBaFrost European tissue bank, the custodianship of the samples, and hence the decision over whether to issue samples to requestors, remains with the local collecting centre. The database application described in this article has been developed to facilitate this open structure virtual tissue bank model serving a large group. It encompasses many key tasks, without the requirement for personnel, hence minimising operational costs. The Internet-accessible database application enables search, selection and request submission for requestors, whereas collectors can upload and edit their collection. Communication between requestor and involved collectors is started with automatically generated e-mails.

  12. Flight Test Measurements From The Tu-144LL Structure/Cabin Noise Follow-On Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Rackl, Robert G.; Andrianov, Eduard V.

    2000-01-01

    This follow-on flight experiment on the TU-144LL Supersonic Flying Laboratory, conducted during the period September 1998 to April 1999, was a continuation of previous Structure/Cabin Noise Experiment 2.1. Data was obtained over a wide range of altitudes and Mach numbers. Measured were: turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the fuselage over its length; structural response on skin panels using accelerometers; and flow direction over three windows using 'flow cones'. The effect of steps in the flow was also measured using two window blank pairs; each pair bridged by a plate which created small sharp forward and aft facing steps. The effect of transducer flushness with the exterior surface was also measured during flight. Height test points were chosen to cover much of the TU-144's flight envelope, as well as to obtain as large a unit Reynolds number range as possible at various Mach numbers: takeoff, subsonic, transonic, and supersonic cruise conditions up to Mach 2. Data on engine runups and background noise were acquired on the ground. The data in the form of time histories of the acoustic signals, together with auxiliary data and basic MATLAB processing modules, are available on CD-R disks.

  13. An interbacterial NAD(P)+ glycohydrolase toxin requires elongation factor Tu for delivery to target cells

    DOE PAGES

    Whitney, John C.; Quentin, Dennis; Sawai, Shin; ...

    2015-10-08

    Type VI secretion (T6S) influences the composition of microbial communities by catalyzing the delivery of toxins between adjacent bacterial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a T6S integral membrane toxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Tse6, acts on target cells by degrading the universally essential dinucleotides NAD+ and NADP+. Structural analyses of Tse6 show that it resembles mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase proteins, such as diphtheria toxin, with the exception of a unique loop that both excludes proteinaceous ADP-ribose acceptors and contributes to hydrolysis. We find that entry of Tse6 into target cells requires its binding to an essential housekeeping protein, translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). Thesemore » proteins participate in a larger assembly that additionally directs toxin export and provides chaperone activity. Lastly, visualization of this complex by electron microscopy defines the architecture of a toxin-loaded T6S apparatus and provides mechanistic insight into intercellular membrane protein delivery between bacteria.« less

  14. Low Order Equivalent System Identification for the Tu-144LL Supersonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    Low order equivalent system models were identified from flight test data for the Tu-144LL supersonic transport aircraft. Flight test maneuvers were executed by Russian and American test Pilots flying the aircraft from Zhukovsky airfield outside Moscow, Russia. Flight tests included longitudinal and lateral / directional maneuvers at supersonic cruise flight conditions. Piloted frequency sweeps and multi-step maneuvers were used to generate data for closed loop low order equivalent system modeling. Model parameters were estimated using a flexible. high accuracy Fourier transform and an equation error / output error (EE/OE) formulation in the frequency domain. Results were compared to parameter estimates obtained using spectral estimation and subsequent least squares fit to frequency response data in Bode plots. Modeling results from the two methods agreed well for both a frequency sweep and multiple concatenated multi-step maneuvers. For a single multi-step maneuvers the EE/OE method gave a better model fit with improved prediction capability. A summary of closed loop low order equivalent system identification results for the Tu-144LL, including estimated parameters, standard errors, and flying qualities level predictions, were computed and tabulated.

  15. Low Order Equivalent System for the Tu-144LL Supersonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    Low order equivalent system models were identified from flight test data for the Tu- 144LL supersonic transport aircraft. Flight test maneuvers were executed by Russian and American test pilots flying the aircraft from Zhukovsky airfield outside Moscow, Russia. Flight tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional maneuvers at supersonic cruise flight conditions. Piloted frequency sweeps and multi-step maneuvers were used to Generate data for p closed loop low order equivalent system modeling Model parameters were estimated using a flexible, high accuracy Fourier transform and an equation error output error (EE/OE) formulation in the frequency domain. Results were compared to parameter estimates obtained using spectral estimation and subsequent least squares fit to frequency response data in Bode plots. Modeling results from the two methods a-reed well for both a frequency sweep and multiple concatenated multi-step maneuvers. For a single multi-step maneuver, the EE/OE method gave a better model fit with improved prediction capability. A summary of closed loop low order equivalent system identification results for the Tu-144LL. including estimated parameters, standard errors, and flying qualities level predictions, were computed and tabulated.

  16. TU Comae Berenices: Blazhko RR Lyrae Star in a Potential Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ponthière, P.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Menzies, K.; Sabo, R.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a photometry campaign of TU Com performed over a five-year time span. The analysis showed that the possible Blazhko period of 75 days published by the General Catalogue of Variable Stars is not correct. We identified two Blazhko periods of 43.6 and 45.5 days. This finding is based on measurement of 124 light maxima. A spectral analysis of the complete light curve confirmed these two periods. Besides the Blazhko amplitude and phase modulations, another long term periodic phase variation has been identified. This long term periodic variation affects the times of maximum light only and can be attributed to a light-travel time effect due to orbital motion of a binary system. The orbital parameters have been estimated by a nonlinear least-square fit applied to the set of (O-C) values. The Levenberg-Marquart algorithm has been used to perform the nonlinear least-square fit. The tentative orbital parameters include an orbital period of 1676 days, a minimal semi-major axis of 1.55 AU and a small eccentricity of 0.22. The orbital parameter estimation also used 33 (O-C) values obtained from the SWASP survey database. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements are needed to confirm this binarity. If confirmed, TU Com would be the first Blazhko RR Lyrae star detected in a binary system.

  17. Divergence among genes encoding the elongation factor Tu of Yersinia Species.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Sandra; Leblanc, Eric; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Grondin, Myrian; Picard, François J; Martel, Eric A; Parham, Nicholas J; Chain, Patrick S G; Bader, Douglas E; Mulvey, Michael R; Bryden, Louis; Roy, Paul H; Ouellette, Marc; Bergeron, Michel G

    2008-11-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), encoded by tuf genes, carries aminoacyl-tRNA to the ribosome during protein synthesis. Duplicated tuf genes (tufA and tufB), which are commonly found in enterobacterial species, usually coevolve via gene conversion and are very similar to one another. However, sequence analysis of tuf genes in our laboratory has revealed highly divergent copies in 72 strains spanning the genus Yersinia (representing 12 Yersinia species). The levels of intragenomic divergence between tufA and tufB sequences ranged from 8.3 to 16.2% for the genus Yersinia, which is significantly greater than the 0.0 to 3.6% divergence observed for other enterobacterial genera. We further explored tuf gene evolution in Yersinia and other Enterobacteriaceae by performing directed sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Phylogenetic trees constructed using concatenated tufA and tufB sequences revealed a monophyletic genus Yersinia in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Moreover, Yersinia strains form clades within the genus that mostly correlate with their phenotypic and genetic classifications. These genetic analyses revealed an unusual divergence between Yersinia tufA and tufB sequences, a feature unique among sequenced Enterobacteriaceae and indicative of a genus-wide loss of gene conversion. Furthermore, they provided valuable phylogenetic information for possible reclassification and identification of Yersinia species.

  18. Ecology of Phlebotomine Sand Flies in the Rural Community of Mont Rolland (Thiès Region, Senegal): Area of Transmission of Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Senghor, Massila W.; Faye, Malick N.; Faye, Babacar; Diarra, Karamoko; Elguero, Eric; Gaye, Oumar

    2011-01-01

    Background Different epidemiological studies previously indicated that canine leishmaniasis is present in the region of Thiès (Senegal). However, the risks to human health, the transmission cycle and particularly the implicated vectors are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve our knowledge on the population of phlebotomine sand flies and the potential vectors of canine leishmaniasis, sand flies were collected using sticky traps, light traps and indoor spraying method using pyrethroid insecticides in 16 villages of the rural community of Mont Rolland (Thiès region) between March and July 2005. The 3788 phlebotomine sand flies we collected (2044 males, 1744 females) were distributed among 9 species of which 2 belonged to the genus Phlebotomus: P. duboscqi (vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Senegal) and P. rodhaini. The other species belonged to the genus Sergentomyia: S. adleri, S. clydei, S. antennata, S. buxtoni, S. dubia, S. schwetzi and S. magna. The number of individuals and the species composition differed according to the type of trap, suggesting variable, species-related degrees of endophily or exophily. The two species of the genus Phlebotomus were markedly under-represented in comparison to the species of the genus Sergentomyia. This study also shows a heterogeneous spatial distribution within the rural community that could be explained by the different ecosystems and particularly the soil characteristics of this community. Finally, the presence of the S. dubia species appeared to be significantly associated with canine leishmaniasis seroprevalence in dogs. Conclusions/Significance Our data allow us to hypothesize that the species of the genus Sergentomyia and particularly the species S. dubia and S. schwetzi might be capable of transmitting canine leishmaniasis. These results challenge the dogma that leishmaniasis is exclusively transmitted by species of the genus Phlebotomus in the Old World. This hypothesis should be more thoroughly

  19. Mouse TU tagging: a chemical/genetic intersectional method for purifying cell type-specific nascent RNA.

    PubMed

    Gay, Leslie; Miller, Michael R; Ventura, P Britten; Devasthali, Vidusha; Vue, Zer; Thompson, Heather L; Temple, Sally; Zong, Hui; Cleary, Michael D; Stankunas, Kryn; Doe, Chris Q

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach for understanding development and disease. Current cell type-specific RNA purification methods have limitations, including cell dissociation trauma or inability to identify all RNA species. Here, we describe "mouse thiouracil (TU) tagging," a genetic and chemical intersectional method for covalent labeling and purification of cell type-specific RNA in vivo. Cre-induced expression of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) provides spatial specificity; injection of 4-thiouracil (4TU) provides temporal specificity. Only UPRT(+) cells exposed to 4TU produce thio-RNA, which is then purified for RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). This method can purify transcripts from spatially complex and rare (<5%) cells, such as Tie2:Cre(+) brain endothelia/microglia (76% validated by expression pattern), or temporally dynamic transcripts, such as those acutely induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Moreover, generating chimeric mice via UPRT(+) bone marrow transplants identifies immune versus niche spleen RNA. TU tagging provides a novel method for identifying actively transcribed genes in specific cells at specific times within intact mice.

  20. The 51-63 base pair of tRNA confers specificity for binding by EF-Tu.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Lee E; Uhlenbeck, Olke C

    2007-06-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) exhibits significant specificity for the different elongator tRNA bodies in order to offset its variable affinity to the esterified amino acid. Three X-ray cocrystal structures reveal that while most of the contacts with the protein involve the phosphodiester backbone of tRNA, a single hydrogen bond is observed between the Glu390 and the amino group of a guanine in the 51-63 base pair in the T-stem of tRNA. Here we show that the Glu390Ala mutation of Thermus thermophilus EF-Tu selectively destabilizes binding of those tRNAs containing a guanine at either position 51 or 63 and that mutagenesis of the 51-63 base pair in several tRNAs modulates their binding affinities to EF-Tu. A comparison of Escherichia coli tRNA sequences suggests that this specificity mechanism is conserved across the bacterial domain. While this contact is an important specificity determinant, it is clear that others remain to be identified.

  1. A guidelines handbook for GPR surveys in tunnels: a COST Action TU1208 contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Alani, Amir M.; Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Loizos, Andreas; Tosti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    A significant open issue concerning the reliability of geophysical methods and in particular of ground penetrating radar (GPR), both in research and professional context, is a general lack of international standards. This is a major problem to be faced, in order to gain scientific strictness for the GPR practices, and to easily extend to the international community the results achieved within the area of single virtuous countries. Producing international guidelines can represent an important step forward, in this sense. In the memorandum of understanding of the COST Action TU1208 is clearly stated that one of the main purposes of the Action is the "development of innovative protocols and guidelines which will be published in a handbook and constitute a basis for European Standards, for an effective GPR application in CE tasks; safety, economic and financial criteria will be integrated within the protocols". Of course this is not a simple task to be accomplished. Firstly, survey procedures are highly dependent on the objective of the survey itself. On the basis of the objective of each geophysical test, the GPR system, the antenna configuration, and even the processing procedures may change. Besides, these procedures are also influenced by the environmental conditions in which the tests are performed. This affects several aspects spanning from hardware to software, but including, for instance, also safety issues. Due to these reasons, one of the main goal of the COST Action TU1208 is the development of several guidelines related to the main applications of GPR in the field of civil engineering. In this work, the structure of a guidelines handbook for GPR activities in tunnels is outlined. In the first sections, the principal references in the field are provided, and the most common GPR equipment and complementary technologies are described. Subsequently, the survey methodologies are explained. Particular attention is paid to the preliminary activities to be carried

  2. Spectrophotometric and kinetic studies on the interaction of antibiotic X5108, the N-methylated derivative of kirromycin, with elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eccleston, J F

    1981-04-10

    The absorption spectrum of antibiotic X5108, the N-methylated derivative of kirromycin, has been found to be decreased in intensity on binding to elongation factor (EF)-Tu . GDP, EF-Tu . GTP, and nucleotide-free EF-Tu. This has allowed the binding of X5108 to be studied directly. In agreement with previous studies, a 1:1 stoichiometry is observed, with a dissociation constant of less than 1 microM. Identical results were obtained with all three EF-Tu species. The absorption spectrum of X5108 in increasing concentrations of isopropyl alcohol first intensifies and then decreases, 80% isopropyl alcohol giving the same spectrum as that of X5108 bound to EF-Tu. This result is interpreted as showing that the chromophoric moiety of X5108 is bound in a highly hydrophobic environment on EF-Tu. The rate of binding of X5108 to EF-Tu . GDP was measured using a stopped flow spectrophotometer. This rate was proportional to the concentration of X5108, giving a second order binding rate constant of 4.8 X 10(3) M-1 s-1. Since this is several orders of magnitude too slow for a diffusion-controlled reaction, the results are interpreted based on a two-step binding process. A half-time of about 10 min is calculated for the dissociation of X5108 from EF-Tu . GDP. The fact that X5108 bound to EF-Tu is not in rapid equilibrium with X5108 free in solution needs to be considered in studies on the effect of X5108 and kirromycin on partial reactions of protein biosynthesis.

  3. Evolution of translational elongation factor (EF) sequences: reliability of global phylogenies inferred from EF-1 alpha(Tu) and EF-2(G) proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Creti, R; Ceccarelli, E; Bocchetta, M; Sanangelantoni, A M; Tiboni, O; Palm, P; Cammarano, P

    1994-01-01

    The EF-2 coding genes of the Archaea Pyrococcus woesei and Desulfurococcus mobilis were cloned and sequenced. Global phylogenies were inferred by alternative tree-making methods from available EF-2(G) sequence data and contrasted with phylogenies constructed from the more conserved but shorter EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequences. Both the monophyly (sensu Hennig) of Archaea and their subdivision into the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota are consistently inferred by analysis of EF-2(G) sequences, usually at a high bootstrap confidence level. In contrast, EF-1 alpha(Tu) phylogenies tend to be inconsistent with one another and show low bootstrap confidence levels. While evolutionary distance and DNA maximum parsimony analyses of EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequences do show archaeal monophyly, protein parsimony and DNA maximum-likelihood analyses of these data do not. In no case, however, do any of the tree topologies inferred from EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequence analyses receive significant bootstrap support. PMID:8159735

  4. Robust Glyoxalase activity of Hsp31, a ThiJ/DJ-1/PfpI Family Member Protein, Is Critical for Oxidative Stress Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Bankapalli, Kondalarao; Saladi, SreeDivya; Awadia, Sahezeel S.; Goswami, Arvind Vittal; Samaddar, Madhuja; D'Silva, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive metabolic intermediate generated during various cellular biochemical reactions, including glycolysis. The accumulation of MG indiscriminately modifies proteins, including important cellular antioxidant machinery, leading to severe oxidative stress, which is implicated in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, aging, and cardiac disorders. Although cells possess efficient glyoxalase systems for detoxification, their functions are largely dependent on the glutathione cofactor, the availability of which is self-limiting under oxidative stress. Thus, higher organisms require alternate modes of reducing the MG-mediated toxicity and maintaining redox balance. In this report, we demonstrate that Hsp31 protein, a member of the ThiJ/DJ-1/PfpI family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, plays an indispensable role in regulating redox homeostasis. Our results show that Hsp31 possesses robust glutathione-independent methylglyoxalase activity and suppresses MG-mediated toxicity and ROS levels as compared with another paralog, Hsp34. On the other hand, glyoxalase-defective mutants of Hsp31 were found highly compromised in regulating the ROS levels. Additionally, Hsp31 maintains cellular glutathione and NADPH levels, thus conferring protection against oxidative stress, and Hsp31 relocalizes to mitochondria to provide cytoprotection to the organelle under oxidative stress conditions. Importantly, human DJ-1, which is implicated in the familial form of Parkinson disease, complements the function of Hsp31 by suppressing methylglyoxal and oxidative stress, thus signifying the importance of these proteins in the maintenance of ROS homeostasis across phylogeny. PMID:26370081

  5. Flood risk analysis and adaptive strategy in context of uncertainties: a case study of Nhieu Loc Thi Nghe Basin, Ho Chi Minh City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Long-Phi; Chau, Nguyen-Xuan-Quang; Nguyen, Hong-Quan

    2013-04-01

    The Nhieu Loc - Thi Nghe basin is the most important administrative and business area of Ho Chi Minh City. Due to system complexity of the basin such as the increasing trend of rainfall intensity, (tidal) water level and land subsidence, the simulation of hydrological, hydraulic variables for flooding prediction seems rather not adequate in practical projects. The basin is still highly vulnerable despite of multi-million USD investment for urban drainage improvement projects since the last decade. In this paper, an integrated system analysis in both spatial and temporal aspects based on statistical, GIS and modelling approaches has been conducted in order to: (1) Analyse risks before and after projects, (2) Foresee water-related risk under uncertainties of unfavourable driving factors and (3) Develop a sustainable flood risk management strategy for the basin. The results show that given the framework of risk analysis and adaptive strategy, certain urban developing plans in the basin must be carefully revised and/or checked in order to reduce the highly unexpected loss in the future

  6. Interaction of helix D of elongation factor Tu with helices 4 and 5 of protein L7/12 on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Ute; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Mohr, Dagmar; Rodnina, Marina V

    2004-03-05

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) promotes binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to the A site of the ribosome. Here, we report the effects of mutations in helix D of EF-Tu and in the C-terminal domain of L7/12 on the kinetics of A-site binding. Reaction rates were measured by stopped-flow and quench-flow techniques. The rates of A-site binding were decreased by mutations at positions 144, 145, 148, and 152 in helix D of EF-Tu as well as at positions 65, 66, 69, 70, 73, and 84 in helices 4 and 5 of L7/12. The effect was due primarily to the lower association rate constant of ternary complex binding to the ribosome. These results suggest that helix D of EF-Tu is involved in an initial transient contact with helices 4 and 5 of L7/12 that promotes ternary complex binding to the ribosome. By analogy to the interaction of helix D of EF-Tu with the N-terminal domain of EF-Ts, the contact area is likely to consist of a hydrophobic patch flanked by two salt-bridges.

  7. Structure of the Acinetobacter baumannii dithiol oxidase DsbA bound to elongation factor EF-Tu reveals a novel protein interaction site.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Grøftehauge, Morten K; King, Gordon J; Halili, Maria A; Heras, Begoña; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-07-18

    The multidrug resistant bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of nosocomial infection. Biofilm formation, that requires both disulfide bond forming and chaperone-usher pathways, is a major virulence trait in this bacterium. Our biochemical characterizations show that the periplasmic A. baumannii DsbA (AbDsbA) enzyme has an oxidizing redox potential and dithiol oxidase activity. We found an unexpected non-covalent interaction between AbDsbA and the highly conserved prokaryotic elongation factor, EF-Tu. EF-Tu is a cytoplasmic protein but has been localized extracellularly in many bacterial pathogens. The crystal structure of this complex revealed that the EF-Tu switch I region binds to the non-catalytic surface of AbDsbA. Although the physiological and pathological significance of a DsbA/EF-Tu association is unknown, peptides derived from the EF-Tu switch I region bound to AbDsbA with submicromolar affinity. We also identified a seven-residue DsbB-derived peptide that bound to AbDsbA with low micromolar affinity. Further characterization confirmed that the EF-Tu- and DsbB-derived peptides bind at two distinct sites. These data point to the possibility that the non-catalytic surface of DsbA is a potential substrate or regulatory protein interaction site. The two peptides identified in this work together with the newly characterized interaction site provide a novel starting point for inhibitor design targeting AbDsbA.

  8. Mapping the self-interacting domains of TuMV HC-Pro and the subcellular localization of the protein.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongying; Yan, Fei; Lu, Yuwen; Sun, Liying; Lin, Lin; Cai, Li; Hou, Mingsheng; Chen, Jianping

    2011-02-01

    The helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) of potyviruses is a multifunctional protein involved in aphid transmission, polyprotein processing, cell-to-cell and long-distance movement, genome amplification and symptom expression. The HC-Pros of several potyviruses interact with themselves but the key domains responsible for self-interaction are apparently not conserved. In our experiments, yeast two-hybrid assays and bimolecular fluorescence complementation showed that Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) HC-Pro interacted with itself in yeast cells, plant cells and insect cells. It was also shown that the central and C-terminal regions of the HC-Pro participated in these self-interactions. Fluorescence microscopy showed that TuMV HC-Pro was present in the cytoplasm and formed aggregates along the ER.

  9. BnSGS3 Has Differential Effects on the Accumulation of CMV, ORMV and TuMV in Oilseed Rape

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quan; Wang, Jie; Hou, Mingsheng; Liu, Shengyi; Huang, Junyan; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    Virus diseases greatly affect oilseed rape (Brassica napus) production. Investigating antiviral genes may lead to the development of disease-resistant varieties of oilseed rape. In this study, we examined the effects of the suppressor of gene silencing 3 in Brassica napus (BnSGS3, a putative antiviral gene) with different genus viruses by constructing BnSGS3-overexpressing (BnSGS3-Ov) and BnSGS3-silenced (BnSGS3-Si) oilseed rape (cv. Zhongshuang No. 6) plants. These three viruses are Oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV), Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). The native BnSGS3 expressed in all examined tissues with the highest expression in siliques. All three viruses induced BnSGS3 expression, but ORMV induced a dramatic increase in the BnSGS3-Ov plants, followed by TuMV and CMV. Upon inoculation with three different viruses, transcript abundance of BnSGS3 gene follows: BnSGS3-Ov > non-transgenic plants > BnSGS3-Si. The accumulation quantities of ORMV and TuMV exhibited a similar trend. However, CMV accumulation showed an opposite trend where virus accumulations were negatively correlated with BnSGS3 expression. The results suggest that BnSGS3 selectively inhibits CMV accumulation but promotes ORMV and TuMV accumulation. BnSGS3 should be used in different ways (up- and down-regulation) for breeding virus-resistant oilseed rape varieties. PMID:26225990

  10. Development of SAP-DoA techniques for GPR data processing within COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, Simone; Pajewski, Lara; Marciniak, Marian

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the use of Sub-Array Processing (SAP) and Direction of Arrival (DoA) approaches for the processing of Ground-Penetrating Radar data, with the purpose of locating metal scatterers embedded in concrete or buried in the ground. Research activities have been carried out during two Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) funded by the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" in May 2015 and January 2016. In applications involving smart antennas and in the presence of several transmitters operating simultaneously, it is important for a receiving array to be able to estimate the Direction of Arrival (DoA) of the incoming signals, in order to decipher how many emitters are present and predict their positions. A number of methods have been devised for DoA estimation: the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) and Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Technique (ESPRIT) are amongst the most popular ones [1]. In the scenario considered by us, the electromagnetic sources are the currents induced on metal elements embedded in concrete or buried in the ground. GPR radargrams are processed, to estimate the DoAs of the electric field back-scattered by the sought targets. In order to work in near-field conditions, a sub-array processing (SAP) approach is adopted: the radargram is partitioned in sub-radargrams composed of few A-scans each, the dominant DoA is predicted for each sub-radargram. The estimated angles are triangulated, obtaining a set of crossings with intersections condensed around object locations. This pattern is filtered, in order to remove a noisy background of unwanted crossings, and is processed by applying the statistical procedure described in [2]. We tested our approach on synthetic GPR radargrams, obtained by using the freeware simulator gprMax implementing the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method [3]. In particular, we worked with

  11. Contribution of TU Delft to the SWITCH-ON project: Testing FLEX-TOPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijzink, Remko C.; Hrachowitz, Markus; H. G Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    The SWITCH-ON project is an EU FP7 project that started in November 2013 and will run till November 2017. SWITCH-ON stands for Sharing Water-related Information to Tackle Changes in the Hydrosphere for Operational Needs and it addresses the potential of open data. Open water data will be tailored with 14 products for end-users, a spatial information platform and the development of new forms of collaborative research. TU Delft will, among five other universities, help developing these new forms of research. The individual goal of TU Delft is to proof the concept of FLEX-TOPO as introduced by Savenije (2010) and tested in a central European meso-scale catchment by Gharari et al.(2011). The FLEX-TOPO modeling concept makes use of landscape classification based on slope and Height Above the Nearest Drainage (HAND) as defined by Rennó (2008). Gharari et al.(2011) defined for the Wark catchment in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg three landscape classes: wetland, hillslope and plateau. Areas with low slope and low HAND were defined as wetland, areas with high slope as hillslope and areas with low slope and high HAND as plateau. The distinction between the several landscape units was based on threshold values of slope and HAND. After this classification each of the landscape classes was given its own conceptual model structure. The SWITCH-ON project creates the opportunity to test the FLEX-TOPO concept in catchments all over Europe with different hydrological and climatological characteristics. It can be tested if the classification method as used by Gharari et al. (2011) still holds for other catchments or that new landscape units with different model structures should be created. It can also be discussed if the threshold values for HAND and slope in the Wark catchment can be used all over Europe. Next to that, it can be hypothesized that the different landscape units act different over Europe. For example, does a Mediterranean wetland behave similar to a Scandinavian

  12. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu.GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation.

  13. How EF-Tu can contribute to efficient proofreading of aa-tRNA by the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Jeffrey K.; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the thermodynamics of mRNA–tRNA base pairing is insufficient to explain the high fidelity and efficiency of aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) selection by the ribosome. To rationalize this apparent inconsistency, Hopfield proposed that the ribosome may improve accuracy by utilizing a multi-step kinetic proofreading mechanism. While biochemical, structural and single-molecule studies have provided a detailed characterization of aa-tRNA selection, there is a limited understanding of how the physical–chemical properties of the ribosome enable proofreading. To this end, we probe the role of EF-Tu during aa-tRNA accommodation (the proofreading step) through the use of energy landscape principles, molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic models. We find that the steric composition of EF-Tu can reduce the free-energy barrier associated with the first step of accommodation: elbow accommodation. We interpret this effect within an extended kinetic model of accommodation and show how EF-Tu can contribute to efficient and accurate proofreading. PMID:27796304

  14. How EF-Tu can contribute to efficient proofreading of aa-tRNA by the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Jeffrey K.; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-10-01

    It has long been recognized that the thermodynamics of mRNA-tRNA base pairing is insufficient to explain the high fidelity and efficiency of aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) selection by the ribosome. To rationalize this apparent inconsistency, Hopfield proposed that the ribosome may improve accuracy by utilizing a multi-step kinetic proofreading mechanism. While biochemical, structural and single-molecule studies have provided a detailed characterization of aa-tRNA selection, there is a limited understanding of how the physical-chemical properties of the ribosome enable proofreading. To this end, we probe the role of EF-Tu during aa-tRNA accommodation (the proofreading step) through the use of energy landscape principles, molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic models. We find that the steric composition of EF-Tu can reduce the free-energy barrier associated with the first step of accommodation: elbow accommodation. We interpret this effect within an extended kinetic model of accommodation and show how EF-Tu can contribute to efficient and accurate proofreading.

  15. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-08

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu · GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation.

  16. TU-100 (Daikenchuto) and ginger ameliorate anti-CD3 antibody induced T cell-mediated murine enteritis: microbe-independent effects involving Akt and NF-κB suppression.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Nobuhiro; Hasebe, Takumu; Kaneko, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka; Kono, Toru; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su; Bissonnette, Marc; Chang, Eugene B; Musch, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese traditional medicine daikenchuto (TU-100) has anti-inflammatory activities, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. TU-100 includes ginger, ginseng, and Japanese pepper, each component possessing bioactive properties. The effects of TU-100 and individual components were investigated in a model of intestinal T lymphocyte activation using anti-CD3 antibody. To determine contribution of intestinal bacteria, specific pathogen free (SPF) and germ free (GF) mice were used. TU-100 or its components were delivered by diet or by gavage. Anti-CD3 antibody increased jejunal accumulation of fluid, increased TNFα, and induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis in both SPF and GF mice, which was blocked by either TU-100 or ginger, but not by ginseng or Japanese pepper. TU-100 and ginger also blocked anti-CD3-stimulated Akt and NF-κB activation. A co-culture system of colonic Caco2BBE and Jurkat-1 cells was used to examine T-lymphocyte/epithelial cells interactions. Jurkat-1 cells were stimulated with anti-CD3 to produce TNFα that activates epithelial cell NF-κB. TU-100 and ginger blocked anti-CD3 antibody activation of Akt in Jurkat cells, decreasing their TNFα production. Additionally, TU-100 and ginger alone blocked direct TNFα stimulation of Caco2BBE cells and decreased activation of caspase-3 and polyADP ribose. The present studies demonstrate a new anti-inflammatory action of TU-100 that is microbe-independent and due to its ginger component.

  17. Bacterial Contamination in Intensive Care Unit at Al-Imam Al-Hussein Hospital in Thi-qar Province in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Nazar Edward; Abbas, Ali Taher; Hamed, Saad L.

    2013-01-01

    Cross- infection from patient to patient or from hospital personnel to patients represents constant hazards. It is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality especially in Intensive Care Unit all over the world. To identify the types and the source of bacterial contamination in ICU and to study the sensitivity of bacterial isolates to commonly used antibiotics in hospitals this study had been conducted in Al-Imam Al-Hussein hospital in Thi-qar province for the period from the 1st of September to the end of December 2011. A total of 320 swabs and samples were collected from 17 different sites of Intensive Care Unit environment and inoculated on a normal cultural media, then incubated at 37°C for 24 hour. The obtained growth revealed different bacterial colonies which had been tested for their morphological and biochemical characteristics. Sixty eight of pure isolates were obtained including 24 (35.29%) Gram positive bacterial isolates, and 44(64.71%) of Gram negative bacterial isolates, the highest rates (19.11%) of bacterial contamination had been found on the walls and the floor. Sensitivity tests for all isolates were done using 25 types of commonly used antibiotics in Iraq, among Gram negative bacteria and gram positive bacteria the genus Enterobacter spp and Staphylococcus spp respectively, showed the highest resistance to most of the tested antibiotics, MIC tests for 5 types of antibiotics being applied for the most resistant and the most sensitive isolates had identified that all isolates have a low rate of MIC against Ciprofloxacine. Bacillus spp and Enterobacter spp were the most prevalent bacterial contaminants of Intensive Care Unit environment. such contamination could be managed mostly by strict application of sterilization measures. PMID:23283046

  18. Polymorphism in dhfr/dhps genes, parasite density and ex vivo response to pyrimethamine in Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in Thies, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Daouda; Dieye, Baba; Ndiaye, Yaye D; Van Tyne, Daria; Daniels, Rachel; Bei, Amy K; Mbaye, Aminata; Valim, Clarissa; Lukens, Amanda; Mboup, Souleymane; Ndir, Omar; Wirth, Dyann F; Volkman, Sarah

    2013-12-01

    Resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites is associated with mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) genes, and these mutations have spread resistance worldwide. SP, used for several years in Senegal, has been recommended for intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) and has been widely implemented since 2003 in this country. There is currently limited data on SP resistance from molecular marker genotyping, and no data on pyrimethamine ex vivo sensitivity in Senegal. Molecular markers of SP resistance and pyrimethamine ex vivo sensitivity were investigated in 416 parasite samples collected from the general population, from the Thies region between 2003 and 2011. The prevalence of the N51I/C59R/S108N triple mutation in dhfr increased from 40% in 2003 to 93% in 2011. Furthermore, the prevalence of the dhfr N51I/C59R/S108N and dhps A437G quadruple mutation increased, from 20% to 66% over the same time frame, then down to 44% by 2011. There was a significant increase in the prevalence of the dhfr triple mutation, as well as an association between dhfr genotypes and pyrimethamine response. Conversely, dhps mutations in codons 436 and 437 did not show consistent variation between 2003 and 2011. These findings suggest that regular screening for molecular markers of antifolate resistance and ex vivo drug response monitoring should be incorporated with ongoing in vivo efficacy monitoring in areas where IPTp-SP is implemented and where pyrimethamine and sulfa drugs are still widely administered in the general population.

  19. CD90/THY1 is over-expressed in prostate cancer-associated fibroblasts and could serve as a cancer biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    True, Lawrence D.; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Mingliang; Huang, Chung-Ying; Nelson, Peter S.; Von Haller, Priska D.; Tjoelker, Larry W.; Kim, Jong Seo; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Ellis, William J.; Liebeskind, Emily S.; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2010-10-01

    A by-product in the processing of prostate tissue for cell sorting by collagenase digestion is the media supernatant that remains after the cells are harvested. These supernatants contain proteins made by the cells within the tissue. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Nglycosylated proteins detected an increased amount of CD90/THY1 in cancer supernatants compared to non-cancer supernatants. Immunohistochemistry showed that in all carcinomas, regardless of Gleason grade, a layer of CD90-positive stromal fibroblastic cells, approximately 5-to-10 cells deep, was localized to tumor glands. In contrast, a no more than 1-cell wide girth of CD90-positive stromal cells was found around benign glands. The increased number of CD90-positive stromal cells in cancer correlated with overexpression of CD90 mRNA detected by gene expression analysis of stromal cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection. There is increasing evidence that cancer-associated stroma plays a role in both tumor progression and carcinogenesis. Most experiments to identify cancer biomarkers have focused on the cancer cells. CD90, being a marker for prostate cancer-associated stroma, might be a potential biomarker for this cancer. A non-invasive test could be provided by a urine test. Proteomic analysis of urine from patients with prostate cancer identified CD90; conversely, CD90 was not detected in the urine of post-prostatectomy patients. Furthermore, this urinary CD90 protein was a variant CD90 protein not known to be expressed by such cells as lymphocytes that express CD90. These CD90 results were obtained from ~90 cases consisting of proteomic analysis of tissue and urine, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis of tissue media, flow cytometry of cells from digested tissue, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of isolated stromal cells.

  20. "TuNa-saving" endoscopic medial maxillectomy: a surgical technique for maxillary inverted papilloma.

    PubMed

    Pagella, Fabio; Pusateri, Alessandro; Matti, Elina; Avato, Irene; Zaccari, Dario; Emanuelli, Enzo; Volo, Tiziana; Cazzador, Diego; Citraro, Leonardo; Ricci, Giampiero; Tomacelli, Giovanni Leo

    2017-04-03

    The maxillary sinus is the most common site of sinonasal inverted papilloma. Endoscopic sinus surgery, in particular endoscopic medial maxillectomy, is currently the gold standard for treatment of maxillary sinus papilloma. Although a common technique, complications such as stenosis of the lacrimal pathway and consequent development of epiphora are still possible. To avoid these problems, we propose a modification of this surgical technique that preserves the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated for maxillary inverted papilloma in three tertiary medical centres between 2006 and 2014. Pedicle-oriented endoscopic surgery principles were applied and, in select cases where the tumour pedicle was located on the anterior wall, a modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy was carried out as described in this paper. From 2006 to 2014 a total of 84 patients were treated. A standard endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed in 55 patients (65.4%), while the remaining 29 (34.6%) had a modified technique performed. Three recurrences (3/84; 3.6%) were observed after a minimum follow-up of 24 months. A new surgical approach for select cases of maxillary sinus inverted papilloma is proposed in this paper. In this technique, the endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed while preserving the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct ("TuNa-saving"). This technique allowed for good visualization of the maxillary sinus, good oncological control and a reduction in the rate of complications.

  1. DeitY-TU face database: its design, multiple camera capturing, characteristics, and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Saha, Kankan; Saha, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh

    2014-10-01

    The development of the latest face databases is providing researchers different and realistic problems that play an important role in the development of efficient algorithms for solving the difficulties during automatic recognition of human faces. This paper presents the creation of a new visual face database, named the Department of Electronics and Information Technology-Tripura University (DeitY-TU) face database. It contains face images of 524 persons belonging to different nontribes and Mongolian tribes of north-east India, with their anthropometric measurements for identification. Database images are captured within a room with controlled variations in illumination, expression, and pose along with variability in age, gender, accessories, make-up, and partial occlusion. Each image contains the combined primary challenges of face recognition, i.e., illumination, expression, and pose. This database also represents some new features: soft biometric traits such as mole, freckle, scar, etc., and facial anthropometric variations that may be helpful for researchers for biometric recognition. It also gives an equivalent study of the existing two-dimensional face image databases. The database has been tested using two baseline algorithms: linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis, which may be used by other researchers as the control algorithm performance score.

  2. Planeando Tu Vida: sex and family life education: fundamentals of development, implementation, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pick De Weiss, S; Givaudan, M; Givaudan, S

    1993-01-01

    Misinformation about sexuality, reproduction, and contraception is widespread among Mexican adolescents and existing sex education programs have been limited in both scope and availability. To address this situation, the Instituto Mexicano de Investigacion de Familia y Poblacion (IMIFAP) designed a comprehensive sex education program based on data gathered in a 1986 diagnostic survey of 865 adolescents 12-19 years of age and interviews with 365 pregnant adolescents. As part of this preliminary research, one group of teens was exposed to a traditional sex education course while another participated in a program that used participatory learning techniques and emphasized communication skills, assertiveness training, value clarification, peer support, and decision making processes. The latter, more effective approach served as the basis for design of a course, Planeando Tu Vida. Operational evaluations of this course conducted at completion and four and eight months later indicated significant increases in knowledge about contraception, but no effect on age at first intercourse. On the other hand, adolescent males who took the course before onset of sexual activity were significantly more likely to use contraceptives at first intercourse than those in traditional courses. This finding underscores the importance of early initiation of sex education programs. To date, the curriculum has been used in over 100 public and private schools, reaching more than 30,000 adolescents. IMIFAP has since developed more than 70 additional health education course guides aimed at children from preschool through high school, all of which emphasize a participatory approach to learning.

  3. Flight Test Measurements From The Tu- 144LL Structure/Cabin Noise Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Rackl, Robert G.; Andrianov, Eduard V.

    2000-01-01

    During the period September 1997 to February 1998, the Tupolev 144 Supersonic Flyine Laboratory was used to obtain data for the purpose of enlarging the data base used by models for the prediction of cabin noise in supersonic passenger airplanes. Measured were: turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the fuselage in seven instrumented window blanks distributed over the length of the fuselage; structural response with accelerometers on skin panels close to those window blanks-, interior noise with microphones at the same fuselage bay stations as those window blanks. Flight test points were chosen to cover much of the TU- 144's flight envelope, as well as to obtain as large a unit Reynolds number range as possible at various Mach numbers: takeoff, landing, six subsonic cruise conditions, and eleven supersonic conditions up to Mach 2. Engine runups and reverberation times were measured with a stationary aircraft. The data in the form of time histories of the acoustic signals, together with auxiliary data and basic MATLAB processing modules, are available on CD-R disks.

  4. Honor thy gut symbionts redux.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2012-06-08

    Exploring our gut microbial communities with new tools is allowing us to revisit old questions; to develop new concepts about our evolution, postnatal development, systems physiology, individuality, and definitions of health; and to further delineate the impact of our changing life-styles. It is also allowing us to envision exciting new ways for addressing global health problems. This area is inherently interdisciplinary, offering a wealth of opportunities to create new fields, partnerships, and educational initiatives. It is captivating to the public and carries substantial expectations. As such, participating scientists need to sponsor proactive, solution-focused discussions of its societal implications.

  5. Secretomic Analysis of Host-Pathogen Interactions Reveals That Elongation Factor-Tu Is a Potential Adherence Factor of Helicobacter pylori during Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuo-Hsun; Wang, Ling-Hui; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2017-01-06

    The secreted proteins of bacteria are usually accompanied by virulence factors, which can cause inflammation and damage host cells. Identifying the secretomes arising from the interactions of bacteria and host cells could therefore increase understanding of the mechanisms during initial pathogenesis. The present study used a host-pathogen coculture system of Helicobacter pylori and monocytes (THP-1 cells) to investigate the secreted proteins associated with initial H. pylori pathogenesis. The secreted proteins from the conditioned media from H. pylori, THP-1 cells, and the coculture were collected and analyzed using SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. Results indicated the presence of 15 overexpressed bands in the coculture. Thirty-one proteins were identified-11 were derived from THP-1 cells and 20 were derived from H. pylori. A potential adherence factor from H. pylori, elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu), was selected for investigation of its biological function. Results from confocal microscopic and flow cytometric analyses indicated the contribution of EF-Tu to the binding ability of H. pylori in THP-1. The data demonstrated that fluorescence of EF-Tu on THP-1 cells increased after the addition of the H. pylori-conditioned medium. This study reports a novel secretory adherence factor in H. pylori, EF-Tu, and further elucidates mechanisms of H. pylori adaptation for host-pathogen interaction during pathogenesis.

  6. Establishment and characterization of a novel uterine carcinosarcoma cell line, TU-ECS-1, with mutations of TP53 and KRAS.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yohei; Sato, Seiya; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Suga, Yasuko; Fukagawa, Tomoyuki; Oumi, Nao; Oishi, Tetsuro; Harada, Tasuku; Sugai, Tamotsu; Sugiyama, Toru

    2017-04-01

    A new human uterine carcinosarcoma (UCS) cell line, TU-ECS-1, was established and characterized. The morphological appearance of the cultured cells was an insular of epithelial-like cells arranged in the form of a jigsaw puzzle and mesenchymal-like cells with a spindle-shaped or fibroblast-like morphology. A relatively high proliferation rate was observed with a doubling time of 18.2 h. The chromosome number ranged from 44 to 49 and had an extra chromosome 12 (trisomy 12). The respective half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of cisplatin, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin were 2.9 µM, 154 nM, and 219 ng/mL, respectively. Mutational analysis revealed that TU-ECS-1 cells have mutations of TP53 in exons 4, 6, and 8 and of KRAS at codon 12 (G12D) in exon 2, which is a mutation hot spot on this gene. Western blot analysis showed that p53 protein was overexpressed in TU-ECS-1 cells. Immunostaining of the cultured cells and in vivo tumors showed that the TU-ECS-1 cells and xenografts were positive for epithelial marker cytokeratin AE1/3 and mesenchymal marker vimentin. These results suggested that TU-ECS-1 cells might have both epithelial and mesenchymal characteristics. This cell line may be useful to study the carcinogenesis of UCS and contribute to the development of novel treatment strategies.

  7. Neutron Knockout to Probe 3N Forces in the Ca Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Heather; NSCL Experiment e12029 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Recent calculations by Holt et al. have suggested that the inclusion of 3N forces to describe the structure of neutron-rich Ca isotopes provides a more realistic description of the nuclear structure. Mass measurements have confirmed the importance of including 3N forces compared to NN-only interactions, but cannot discriminate between the predictions of phenomenological interactions and the NN+3N microscopic calculations. Neutron knockout along the Z = 20 isotopes provides an opportunity to test the results of NN+3N calculations against phenomenological interactions. The calculations of Holt et al. predict a fragmentation of the 1f7 / 2 neutron strength from the first 7/2- state in 49Ca into higher lying states, in contrast to the predictions of both GXPF1 and KB3G which concentrate the strength in the lowest lying 7/2- state. Differences are also observed in the summed f7 / 2 strength to bound nuclear states in both 50Ca and 49Ca neutron knockout. We will report on a systematic study of one-neutron knockout along the Ca isotopes using GRETINA+S800. Comparison of experimental spectroscopic factors to calculations will provide insight into the role of 3N forces in describing the Z = 20 isotopes. With collaborators from LBNL, NSCL/MSU, ANL, Central Michigan University, TRIUMF/UBC and TU-Darmstadt.

  8. The Ca(2+)/Calmodulin/CaMKK2 Axis: Nature's Metabolic CaMshaft.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential ligand that binds its primary intracellular receptor calmodulin (CaM) to trigger a variety of downstream processes and pathways. Central to the actions of Ca(2+)/CaM is the activation of a highly conserved Ca(2+)/CaM kinase (CaMK) cascade that amplifies Ca(2+) signals through a series of subsequent phosphorylation events. Proper regulation of Ca(2+) flux is necessary for whole-body metabolism and disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to various metabolic diseases. Here we provide a synthesis of recent advances that highlight the roles of the Ca(2+)/CaMK axis in key metabolic tissues. An appreciation of this information is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent signaling contributes to metabolic homeostasis and disease.

  9. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Landing on Runway at Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Ru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Tupolev Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory rolls down the runway at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, after a 1998 test flight. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in production-model aircraft. Fifty experiments

  10. COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar": ongoing research activities and third-year results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Loizos, Andreas; Tosti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at disseminating the ongoing research activities and third-year results of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar." About 350 experts are participating to the Action, from 28 COST Countries (Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Malta, Macedonia, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom), and from Albania, Armenia, Australia, Colombia, Egypt, Hong Kong, Jordan, Israel, Philippines, Russia, Rwanda, Ukraine, and United States of America. In September 2014, TU1208 has been recognised among the running Actions as "COST Success Story" ("The Cities of Tomorrow: The Challenges of Horizon 2020," September 17-19, 2014, Torino, IT - A COST strategic workshop on the development and needs of the European cities). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, whilst simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Moreover, the Action is oriented to the following specific objectives and expected deliverables: (i) coordinating European scientists to highlight problems, merits and limits of current GPR systems; (ii) developing innovative protocols and guidelines, which will be published in a handbook and constitute a basis for European standards, for an effective GPR application in civil- engineering tasks; safety, economic and financial criteria will be integrated within the protocols; (iii) integrating competences for the improvement and merging of electromagnetic scattering techniques and of data- processing techniques; this will lead to a novel freeware tool for the localization of

  11. Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar: Research Perspectives in COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Loizos, Andreas; Slob, Evert; Tosti, Fabio

    2013-04-01

    can be used by GPR operators to identify the signatures generated by uncommon targets or by composite structures. Repeated evaluations of the electromagnetic field scattered by known targets can be performed by a forward solver, in order to estimate - through comparison with measured data - the physics and geometry of the region investigated by the GPR. It is possible to identify three main areas, in the GPR field, that have to be addressed in order to promote the use of this technology in the civil engineering. These are: a) increase of the system sensitivity to enable the usability in a wider range of conditions; b) research novel data processing algorithms/analysis tools for the interpretation of GPR results; c) contribute to the development of new standards and guidelines and to training of end users, that will also help to increase the awareness of operators. In this framework, the COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar", proposed by Lara Pajewski, "Roma Tre" University, Rome, Italy, has been approved in November 2012 and is going to start in April 2013. It is a 4-years ambitious project already involving 17 European Countries (AT, BE, CH, CZ, DE, EL, ES, FI, FR, HR, IT, NL, NO, PL, PT, TR, UK), as well as Australia and U.S.A. The project will be developed within the frame of a unique approach based on the integrated contribution of University researchers, software developers, geophysics experts, Non-Destructive Testing equipment designers and producers, end users from private companies and public agencies. The main objective of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, whilst promoting the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of systems. In this interdisciplinary Action, advantages and limitations of GPR will be highlighted, leading to the identification of gaps in knowledge and technology

  12. Desulfurizing Ability of the CaOsatd.-CaCl2-CaF2 Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiazhan; Kobayashi, Yoshinao

    2017-04-01

    Desulfurizing ability of the CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags saturated with CaO has been investigated from the viewpoint of the sulfide capacity and CaO solubility. The CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags containing small amounts of Cu2O and CaS were inserted in a CaO crucible with metallic copper. The CaO crucible was sealed in a nickel holder to prevent the evaporation of CaCl2, then heated up and kept at temperatures from 1573 K (1300 °C) to 1673 K (1400 °C) for 24 hours, which enabled the system inside the CaO crucible to reach the equilibrium. As expected, the sulfide capacity derived from the data obtained as well as CaO solubility of the slag increase with an increase in temperature at a constant ratio of CaCl2/CaF2. The solubility of CaO increases by the replacement of CaF2 with CaCl2, whereas the sulfide capacity slightly decreases and the activity coefficient of CaS ( γ CaS) increases. This suggests that CaF2 has stronger interaction with CaS than CaCl2. The sulfur distribution ratio between carbon-saturated iron melts and the CaO-CaCl2 slag has been calculated to be about 10 000 at 1573 K (1300 °C) using the sulfide capacity obtained, which value is still large enough even with the replacement of CaF2 by CaCl2.

  13. Desulfurizing Ability of the CaOsatd.-CaCl2-CaF2 Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiazhan; Kobayashi, Yoshinao

    2016-12-01

    Desulfurizing ability of the CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags saturated with CaO has been investigated from the viewpoint of the sulfide capacity and CaO solubility. The CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags containing small amounts of Cu2O and CaS were inserted in a CaO crucible with metallic copper. The CaO crucible was sealed in a nickel holder to prevent the evaporation of CaCl2, then heated up and kept at temperatures from 1573 K (1300 °C) to 1673 K (1400 °C) for 24 hours, which enabled the system inside the CaO crucible to reach the equilibrium. As expected, the sulfide capacity derived from the data obtained as well as CaO solubility of the slag increase with an increase in temperature at a constant ratio of CaCl2/CaF2. The solubility of CaO increases by the replacement of CaF2 with CaCl2, whereas the sulfide capacity slightly decreases and the activity coefficient of CaS (γ CaS) increases. This suggests that CaF2 has stronger interaction with CaS than CaCl2. The sulfur distribution ratio between carbon-saturated iron melts and the CaO-CaCl2 slag has been calculated to be about 10 000 at 1573 K (1300 °C) using the sulfide capacity obtained, which value is still large enough even with the replacement of CaF2 by CaCl2.

  14. COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar:" ongoing research activities and mid-term results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Loizos, Andreas; Slob, Evert; Tosti, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing activities and mid-term results of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar.' Almost three hundreds experts are participating to the Action, from 28 COST Countries (Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Malta, Macedonia, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom), and from Albania, Armenia, Australia, Egypt, Hong Kong, Jordan, Israel, Philippines, Russia, Rwanda, Ukraine, and United States of America. In September 2014, TU1208 has been praised among the running Actions as 'COST Success Story' ('The Cities of Tomorrow: The Challenges of Horizon 2020,' September 17-19, 2014, Torino, IT - A COST strategic workshop on the development and needs of the European cities). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, whilst simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Moreover, the Action is oriented to the following specific objectives and expected deliverables: (i) coordinating European scientists to highlight problems, merits and limits of current GPR systems; (ii) developing innovative protocols and guidelines, which will be published in a handbook and constitute a basis for European standards, for an effective GPR application in civil- engineering tasks; safety, economic and financial criteria will be integrated within the protocols; (iii) integrating competences for the improvement and merging of electromagnetic scattering techniques and of data- processing techniques; this will lead to a novel freeware tool for the localization of buried objects

  15. Overview and comparative study of GPR international standards and guidelines - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Marciniak, Marian; Benedetto, Andrea; Tosti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can be effectively used for non-destructive testing of composite structures and diagnostics affecting the whole life-cycle of civil engineering works. Nevertheless, few recognised international standards exist in this field and inhomogeneous recommendations are present in different countries. Moreover, the levels of knowledge, awareness and experience regarding the use of GPR in civil engineering vary strongly across different European areas. The COST Action TU1208 is working hard on leveraging these differences, by sharing and disseminating knowledge and experience, as well as by developing guidelines and protocols for a safe and effective use of GPR in civil engineering. GPR users need to know which is the best way to conduct GPR measurements and what the quality level for the results should be. The TU1208 guidelines will ensure a higher efficiency and quality of GPR services and they will constitute a scientific basis for the introduction of European Standards on the application of GPR in civil engineering. The aim of this contribution is to present an in-depth overview and critical analysis of the existing GPR international and national standards and guidelines. The main documents considered in our work are listed and briefly described in the following. Three standards are provided by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), to guide the GPR use for subsurface investigation, evaluation of asphalt-covered concrete bridge decks, and determination of pavement-layer thickness: 1. ASTM D6432-11, Standard Guide for Using the Surface Ground Penetrating Radar Method for Subsurface Investigation, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2011, www.astm.org, DOI: 10.1520/D6432-11. 2. ASTM D6087-08, Standard Test Method for Evaluating Asphalt-Covered Concrete Bridge Decks Using Ground Penetrating Radar, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2008, www.astm.org, DOI: 10.1520/D6087-08. 3. ASTM D4748-10, Standard Test Method

  16. CA-125 blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... above 35 U/mL is considered abnormal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ... 125 usually does not mean ovarian cancer is present. Most healthy women with an elevated CA-125 ...

  17. Structure of the Acinetobacter baumannii Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Bound to Elongation Factor EF-Tu Reveals a Novel Protein Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Grøftehauge, Morten K.; King, Gordon J.; Halili, Maria A.; Heras, Begoña; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistant bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of nosocomial infection. Biofilm formation, that requires both disulfide bond forming and chaperone-usher pathways, is a major virulence trait in this bacterium. Our biochemical characterizations show that the periplasmic A. baumannii DsbA (AbDsbA) enzyme has an oxidizing redox potential and dithiol oxidase activity. We found an unexpected non-covalent interaction between AbDsbA and the highly conserved prokaryotic elongation factor, EF-Tu. EF-Tu is a cytoplasmic protein but has been localized extracellularly in many bacterial pathogens. The crystal structure of this complex revealed that the EF-Tu switch I region binds to the non-catalytic surface of AbDsbA. Although the physiological and pathological significance of a DsbA/EF-Tu association is unknown, peptides derived from the EF-Tu switch I region bound to AbDsbA with submicromolar affinity. We also identified a seven-residue DsbB-derived peptide that bound to AbDsbA with low micromolar affinity. Further characterization confirmed that the EF-Tu- and DsbB-derived peptides bind at two distinct sites. These data point to the possibility that the non-catalytic surface of DsbA is a potential substrate or regulatory protein interaction site. The two peptides identified in this work together with the newly characterized interaction site provide a novel starting point for inhibitor design targeting AbDsbA. PMID:24860094

  18. Identification, Genotypic Relation, and Clinical Features of Colistin-Resistant Isolates of Acinetobacter Genomic Species 13BJ/14TU from Bloodstreams of Patients in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Ju Hee; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2014-01-01

    Colistin resistance remains rare among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species. We noted the emergence of colistin-resistant bloodstream isolates of the Acinetobacter genomic species (GS) 13BJ/14TU from patients at a university hospital between 2003 and 2011. We report here, for the first time, the microbiological and molecular characteristics of these isolates, with clinical features of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU bacteremia. All 11 available patient isolates were correctly identified as Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU using partial rpoB gene sequencing but were misidentified using the phenotypic methods Vitek 2 (mostly as Acinetobacter baumannii), MicroScan (mostly as A. baumannii/Acinetobacter haemolyticus), and the API 20 NE system (all as A. haemolyticus). Most isolates were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, including carbapenems, but all were resistant to colistin, for which it is unknown whether the resistance is acquired or intrinsic. However, the fact that none of the patients had a history of colistin therapy strongly suggests that Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU is innately resistant to colistin. The phylogenetic tree of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that all 11 isolates formed a separate cluster from other Acinetobacter species and yielded five sequence types. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed 11 distinct patterns, suggesting that the bacteremia had occurred sporadically. Four patients showed persistent bacteremia (6 to 17 days), and all 11 patients had excellent outcomes with cleared bacteremia, suggesting that patients with Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU-associated bacteremia show a favorable outcome. These results emphasize the importance of precise species identification, especially regarding colistin resistance in Acinetobacter species. In addition, MLST offers another approach to the identification of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU, whereas PFGE is useful for genotyping for this species. PMID:24403305

  19. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  20. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep.

  1. Identification, genotypic relation, and clinical features of colistin-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter genomic species 13BJ/14TU from bloodstreams of patients in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Ju Hee; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2014-03-01

    Colistin resistance remains rare among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species. We noted the emergence of colistin-resistant bloodstream isolates of the Acinetobacter genomic species (GS) 13BJ/14TU from patients at a university hospital between 2003 and 2011. We report here, for the first time, the microbiological and molecular characteristics of these isolates, with clinical features of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU bacteremia. All 11 available patient isolates were correctly identified as Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU using partial rpoB gene sequencing but were misidentified using the phenotypic methods Vitek 2 (mostly as Acinetobacter baumannii), MicroScan (mostly as A. baumannii/Acinetobacter haemolyticus), and the API 20 NE system (all as A. haemolyticus). Most isolates were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, including carbapenems, but all were resistant to colistin, for which it is unknown whether the resistance is acquired or intrinsic. However, the fact that none of the patients had a history of colistin therapy strongly suggests that Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU is innately resistant to colistin. The phylogenetic tree of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that all 11 isolates formed a separate cluster from other Acinetobacter species and yielded five sequence types. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed 11 distinct patterns, suggesting that the bacteremia had occurred sporadically. Four patients showed persistent bacteremia (6 to 17 days), and all 11 patients had excellent outcomes with cleared bacteremia, suggesting that patients with Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU-associated bacteremia show a favorable outcome. These results emphasize the importance of precise species identification, especially regarding colistin resistance in Acinetobacter species. In addition, MLST offers another approach to the identification of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU, whereas PFGE is useful for genotyping for this species.

  2. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  3. Crosslinking of elongation factor Tu to tRNA(Phe) by trans-diamminedichloroplatinum (II). Characterization of two crosslinking sites in the tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wikman, F P; Romby, P; Metz, M H; Reinbolt, J; Clark, B F; Ebel, J P; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B

    1987-01-01

    Trans-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) was used to induce reversible crosslinks between EF-Tu and Phe-tRNA(Phe) within the ternary EF-Tu/GTP/Phe-tRNA(Phe) complex. Up to 40% of the complex was specifically converted into crosslinked species. Two crosslinking sites have been unambiguously identified. The major one encompassing nucleotides 58 to 65 is located in the 3'-part of the T-stem, and the minor one encompassing nucleotides 31 to 42 includes the anticodon loop and part of the 3'-strand of the anticodon stem. Images PMID:3302946

  4. Nondestructive tests for railway monitoring. European Experience in COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontul, Simona; Solla, Mercedes; Loizos, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The railway monitoring is an important issue for a proper maintenance planning. With the increase in loads and travel speed, it is important to be able to diagnose the track defects and to plan the proper maintenance without interfering with the users. Traditionally, the maintenance actions are planned based on the geometric level parameters assessed without contact with the line, at traffic speed, by dedicated inspection vehicles. Nevertheless, the geometric condition of the line does not provide information on the defects causes. In order to complements the information on the causes, geophysics measurements can be performed in a nondestructive way. Among these later methods, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a quick and effective technique to evaluate infrastructure condition in a continuous manner, replacing or reducing the use of traditional drilling method. GPR application to railways infrastructures, during construction and monitoring phase, is relatively recent. It is based on the measuring of layers thicknesses and detection of structural changes. It also enables the assessment of materials properties that constitute the infrastructure and the evaluation of the different types of defects such as ballast pockets, fouled ballast, poor drainage, subgrade settlement and transitions problems. These deteriorations are generally the causes of vertical deviations in track geometry. Moreover, the development of new GPR systems with higher antenna frequencies, better data acquisition systems, more user friendly software and new algorithms for calculation of materials properties can lead to a regular use of GPR. A resume of the European experience in COST Action TU1208 of the application of GPR for railway monitoring and the measurement interpretation is presented in this paper. Also complementary nondestructive tests and other geophysical methods are referred, together with case studies of their application. The main troubleshooting and the needs for data analysis

  5. The Dynamic Atmospheres of Mira Stars: Comparing the CODEX Models to PTI Time Series Observations of TU Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    We present our already-published evaluation of the effectiveness of the CODEX models, released in 2011, in representing the atmospheres of M-type Mira variables. We present a high-precision interferometric K-band time series of TU And, consisting of 50 nights that cover eight consecutive pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2μm was obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in five channels across the K band. We show a comparison between these data and the dynamical self-excited CODEX model which gives the closest match in stellar parameters yet available. Both the spectrum and the visibilities are consistently reproduced around visual minimum phases. Near the maximum phases, however, the current models predict a photosphere that is too hot and compact, surrounded by an extended atmosphere that lacks H2O opacity, compared to the observations. A better coverage in the model parameter space is needed to make firm conclusions as to the cause of the discrepancies. In the case of TU And, the discrepancy might be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increased stellar mass and/or a decreased metallicity.

  6. An interbacterial NAD(P)+ glycohydrolase toxin requires elongation factor Tu for delivery to target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, John C.; Quentin, Dennis; Sawai, Shin; LeRoux, Michele; Harding, Brittany N.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Tran, Bao Q.; Robinson, Howard; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R.; Raunser, Stefan; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2015-10-08

    Type VI secretion (T6S) influences the composition of microbial communities by catalyzing the delivery of toxins between adjacent bacterial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a T6S integral membrane toxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Tse6, acts on target cells by degrading the universally essential dinucleotides NAD+ and NADP+. Structural analyses of Tse6 show that it resembles mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase proteins, such as diphtheria toxin, with the exception of a unique loop that both excludes proteinaceous ADP-ribose acceptors and contributes to hydrolysis. We find that entry of Tse6 into target cells requires its binding to an essential housekeeping protein, translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). These proteins participate in a larger assembly that additionally directs toxin export and provides chaperone activity. Lastly, visualization of this complex by electron microscopy defines the architecture of a toxin-loaded T6S apparatus and provides mechanistic insight into intercellular membrane protein delivery between bacteria.

  7. Routes of Ca2+ Shuttling during Ca2+ Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pecze, László; Blum, Walter; Schwaller, Beat

    2015-01-01

    In some cell types, Ca2+ oscillations are strictly dependent on Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane, whereas in others, oscillations also persist in the absence of Ca2+ influx. We observed that, in primary mesothelial cells, the plasmalemmal Ca2+ influx played a pivotal role. However, when the Ca2+ transport across the plasma membrane by the “lanthanum insulation method” was blocked prior to the induction of the serum-induced Ca2+ oscillations, mitochondrial Ca2+ transport was found to be able to substitute for the plasmalemmal Ca2+ exchange function, thus rendering the oscillations independent of extracellular Ca2+. However, in a physiological situation, the Ca2+-buffering capacity of mitochondria was found not to be essential for Ca2+ oscillations. Moreover, brief spontaneous Ca2+ changes were observed in the mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration without apparent changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, indicating the presence of a mitochondrial autonomous Ca2+ signaling mechanism. In the presence of calretinin, a Ca2+-buffering protein, the amplitude of cytosolic spikes during oscillations was decreased, and the amount of Ca2+ ions taken up by mitochondria was reduced. Thus, the increased calretinin expression observed in mesothelioma cells and in certain colon cancer might be correlated to the increased resistance of these tumor cells to proapoptotic/pronecrotic signals. We identified and characterized (experimentally and by modeling) three Ca2+ shuttling pathways in primary mesothelial cells during Ca2+ oscillations: Ca2+ shuttled between (i) the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, (ii) the ER and the extracellular space, and (iii) the ER and cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffers. PMID:26396196

  8. Molecular characterization of the thi3 gene involved in thiamine biosynthesis in Zea mays: cDNA sequence and enzymatic and structural properties of the recombinant bifunctional protein with 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (phosphate) kinase and thiamine monophosphate synthase activities.

    PubMed

    Rapala-Kozik, Maria; Olczak, Mariusz; Ostrowska, Katarzyna; Starosta, Agata; Kozik, Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    A thiamine biosynthesis gene, thi3, from maize Zea mays has been identified through cloning and sequencing of cDNA and heterologous overexpression of the encoded protein, THI3, in Escherichia coli. The recombinant THI3 protein was purified to homogeneity and shown to possess two essentially different enzymatic activities of HMP(-P) [4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (phosphate)] kinase and TMP (thiamine monophosphate) synthase. Both activities were characterized in terms of basic kinetic constants, with interesting findings that TMP synthase is uncompetitively inhibited by excess of one of the substrates [HMP-PP (HMP diphosphate)] and ATP. A bioinformatic analysis of the THI3 sequence suggested that these activities were located in two distinct, N-terminal kinase and C-terminal synthase, domains. Models of the overall folds of THI3 domains and the arrangements of active centre residues were obtained with the SWISS-MODEL protein modelling server, on the basis of the known three-dimensional structures of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium HMP(-P) kinase and Bacillus subtilis TMP synthase. The essential roles of Gln98 and Met134 residues for HMP kinase activity and of Ser444 for TMP synthase activity were experimentally confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  9. COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar": first-year activities and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Loizos, Andreas; Slob, Evert; Tosti, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    This work aims at presenting the first-year activities and results of COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar". This Action was launched in April 2013 and will last four years. The principal aim of COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, whilst simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Moreover, the Action is oriented to the following specific objectives and expected deliverables: (i) coordinating European scientists to highlight problems, merits and limits of current GPR systems; (ii) developing innovative protocols and guidelines, which will be published in a handbook and constitute a basis for European standards, for an effective GPR application in civil- engineering tasks; safety, economic and financial criteria will be integrated within the protocols; (iii) integrating competences for the improvement and merging of electromagnetic scattering techniques and of data- processing techniques; this will lead to a novel freeware tool for the localization of buried objects, shape-reconstruction and estimation of geophysical parameters useful for civil engineering needs; (iv) networking for the design, realization and optimization of innovative GPR equipment; (v) comparing GPR with different NDT techniques, such as ultrasonic, radiographic, liquid-penetrant, magnetic-particle, acoustic-emission and eddy-current testing; (vi) comparing GPR technology and methodology used in civil engineering with those used in other fields; (vii) promotion of a more widespread, advanced and efficient use of GPR in civil engineering; and (viii) organization of a high-level modular training program for GPR European users. Four Working Groups (WGs) carry out the research activities. The first WG

  10. Assessment of waterfront location in hardened concrete by GPR within COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Abad, Isabel; Klysz, Gilles; Balayssac, Jean Paul; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the analysis of the capability of Ground-Penetrating radar (GPR) technique for evaluating how the water penetrates into concrete samples by means of the assessment of the waterfront advance. Research activities have been carried out during a Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) funded by the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" in November 2015. The evaluation of water penetrability is crucial in most building materials, such us concrete, since, water and aggressive chemical agents dissolved therein contribute to the deterioration of the material. A number of techniques have been developed to measure their advance in concrete. Although the most common method for measuring water content is the gravimetric method by observing the change in mass, this method has a large number of disadvantages. In this context, non-destructive techniques as GPR play an interesting role. In particular, the application of GPR in the building materials area is providing very promising and interesting results regarding the building materials characterization and especially concrete deterioration evaluation [1-3]. In addition, recent experimental studies highlight the strong relation between wave propagation parameters (velocity and energy level) and water content advance [4-5]. Water content has a decisive influence on dielectric properties and those might be assessed by the study of the wave properties that are derived by using GPR. Therefore, the waterfront advance will result in a change on wave parameters. In line with this, this research is focused on the development of specific processing algorithms necessary to understand how the water penetrates and how the wave parameters will be affected regarding the location of the antenna in reference to the water absorption direction. For this purpose, concrete samples were manufactured, which after curing (90 days) and oven

  11. Moisture evaluation of wood material using GPR with WARR method - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reci, Hamza; Sbart'i, Zoubir Mehdi; Pajewski, Lara; Marciniak, Marian

    2016-04-01

    This work deals with the study of the sensitivity of GPR electromagnetic waves to moisture variation in wood material in relation with the direction of fibers and polarization of Electromagnetic field. The relations between relative permittivity and moisture content and the amplitude attenuation with distance was a target study using the direct waves in Wide Angle Radar Reflection (WARR) configuration. Comparison of results measured with reflected waves and direct waves was of main importance since they have different behavior in relation with moisture variation, due to different path of propagation. This research activity has been carried out during one Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSM) funded by the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" in November-December 2015. In context of durability evaluation of construction materials, several studies have been carried out by the I2M team, University of Bordeaux, using direct and reflected waves for the evaluation of water content on concrete and wood materials [1-3]. As related to the wood material there is one study carried out using the reflected waves on wood for different humidity and different wood samples, in all the direction of polarization using GPR technique ground coupled antenna at 1.5 GHz [3]. This work continued with different moisture content in order to study the behavior of direct waves as function of moisture. Results taken from those measurements are compared with them from Fixed Offset (reflected method) with one antenna (1.5GHz or 2.6GHz), realized from the previous studies from the I2M and already published [1-3]. The results taken from this work from the reflected waves, show that the effect of wood anisotropy is significant on the variation of relative permittivity with moisture content on wood sample and that is in good agreement with the previous results [3-6]. As related to the direct waves, a small

  12. A new interpretation of the deep-part of Senegal-Mauritanian Basin in the Diourbel-Thies area by integrating seismic, magnetic, gravimetric and borehole data: Implication for petroleum exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndiaye, Matar; Ngom, Papa Malick; Gorin, Georges; Villeneuve, Michel; Sartori, Mario; Medou, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    The Diourbel-Thies area is located in the centre of the onshore part of the Senegal-Mauritanian Basin (SMB). The new interpretation of old petroleum data (2-D seismic lines and drilling data of three oil wells) in the deeppart of this poorly evaluated zone, integrating gravimetric and magnetic data, has allowed the distinction of the Hercynian ante-rift phase (U1) which is distinguished from the syn-rift phase (U2) probably of Permo-Triassic to Middle Jurassic age. The syn-rift phase resulted in a series of compartments or grabens infilling aligned in a North-South direction. Tholeiitic volcanism of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is present in the syn-rift phase of the Diourbel-Thies area. The syn-rift deposits and associated volcanics allow us to surmise that the Diourbel basin represents a deeper rift basin. In comparison with other Central Atlantic Margins (CAM), the Diourbel rift basin could be one of the numerous rift basins that formed during the Permo-Triassic age. From a petroleum exploration perspective, the existence of the Diourbel rift basin is attractive because of the presence of structures that are excellent for deep gas exploration.

  13. Formulations of the endophytic bacterium Bacillus subtilis Tu-100 suppress Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on oilseed rape and improve plant vigor in field trials conducted at separate locations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes serious yield losses in crops in The People’s Republic of China. Two formulations of oilseed rape seed containing the endophytic bacterium Bacillus subtilis Tu-100 were evaluated for suppression of this pathogen in field trials conducted at two independent locations....

  14. :Examination of Sulfate production by CB05TU, RACM2 & RACM2 with SCI initiated SO2,oxidation in the Northern Hemisphere"

    EPA Science Inventory

    We employ the Community Multiscale Air Quality model to examine tropospheric sulfateproduction in the northern hemisphere using the Carbon Bond 2005 chemical mechanism withupdated toluene chemistry (CB05TU) and the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism(RACM2) without and with ...

  15. Effect of thiostrepton and 3'-terminal fragments of aminoacyl-tRNA on EF-Tu and ribosome-dependent GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bhuta, P; Chládek, S

    1982-08-30

    The effect of the antibiotics thiostrepton and micrococcin on EF-Tu-catalyzed (ribosome-dependent) GTP hydrolysis in the presence of A-Phe, C-A-Phe, or C-C-A-Phe (related to the sequence of the 3'-terminus of aminoacyl-tRNA)(System I) or by methanol ('uncoupled GTPase', System II) was investigated. In System I, thiostrepton increases the binding affinities of the effectors to the EF-Tu.GTP.70 S ribosome complex, as well as the extent of the GTP hydrolysis, while the KmGTP is virtually unchanged. Similarly, in the uncoupled system (System II) and in the absence of effectors, thiostrepton significantly increases VmaxGTP, whereas KmGTP remains unaffected. Micrococcin is without any effect in both systems. The 'uncoupled GTPase' (in System II) is also strongly inhibited by C-A-Phe. The results indicate the crucial role of the EF-Tu site which binds the aminoacylated C-C-A terminus of aminoacyl-tRNA in promoting GTP hydrolysis. It follows that the binding of the model effectors (such as C-C-A-Phe) to that site is favorably influenced by the interaction of thiostrepton with the 50 S ribosomal subunit, whereas thiostrepton, per se, does not influence the affinity of EF-Tu for GTP.

  16. Ca2+ signaling and intracellular Ca2+ binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Niki, I; Yokokura, H; Sudo, T; Kato, M; Hidaka, H

    1996-10-01

    Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations evoke a wide range of cellular responses and intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins are the key molecules to transduce Ca2+ signaling via enzymatic reactions or modulation of protein/protein interations (Fig.1). The EF hand proteins, like calmodulin and S100 proteins, are considered to exert Ca(2+)-dependent actions in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. The Ca2+/phospholipid binding proteins are classified into two groups, the annexins and the C2 region proteins. These proteins, distributed mainly in the cytoplasm, translocate to the plasma membrane in response to an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ and function in the vicinity of the membrane. Ca2+ storage proteins in the endoplasmic or sarcoplasmic reticulum provide the high Ca2+ capacity of the Ca2+ store sites, which regulate intracellular Ca2+ distribution. The variety and complexity of Ca2+ signaling result from the cooperative actions of specific Ca(2+)-binding proteins. This review describes biochemical properties of intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins and their proposed roles in mediating Ca2+ signaling.

  17. Analysis of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) harboring a maize (Zea mays L.) gene for plastid EF-Tu: segregation pattern, expression and effects of the transgene.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianming; Ristic, Zoran

    2010-06-01

    We previously reported that transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) carrying a maize (Zea mays L.) gene (Zmeftu1) for chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, displays reduced thermal aggregation of leaf proteins, reduced injury to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids), and enhanced rate of CO(2) fixation following exposure to heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C) [Fu et al. in Plant Mol Biol 68:277-288, 2008]. In the current study, we investigated the segregation pattern and expression of the transgene Zmeftu1 and determined the grain yield of transgenic plants after exposure to a brief heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C). We also assessed thermal aggregation of soluble leaf proteins in transgenic plants, testing the hypothesis that increased levels of EF-Tu will lead to a non-specific protection of leaf proteins against thermal aggregation. The transgenic wheat displayed a single-gene pattern of segregation of Zmeftu1. Zmeftu1 was expressed, and the transgenic plants synthesized and accumulated three anti-EF-Tu cross-reacting polypeptides of similar molecular mass but different pI, suggesting the possibility of posttranslational modification of this protein. The transgenic plants also showed better grain yield after exposure to heat stress compared with their non-transgenic counterparts. Soluble leaf proteins of various molecular masses displayed lower thermal aggregation in transgenic than in non-transgenic wheat. The results suggest that overexpression of chloroplast EF-Tu can be beneficial to wheat tolerance to heat stress. Moreover, the results also support the hypothesis that EF-Tu contributes to heat tolerance by acting as a molecular chaperone and protecting heat-labile proteins from thermal aggregation in a non-specific manner.

  18. Transgenic Brassica rapa plants over-expressing eIF(iso)4E variants show broad-spectrum Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhee; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, Jeena; Yang, Hee-Bum; Dosun, Kim; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2014-08-01

    The protein-protein interaction between VPg (viral protein genome-linked) of potyviruses and eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E) or eIF(iso)4E of their host plants is a critical step in determining viral virulence. In this study, we evaluated the approach of engineering broad-spectrum resistance in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) to Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), which is one of the most important potyviruses, by a systematic knowledge-based approach to interrupt the interaction between TuMV VPg and B. rapa eIF(iso)4E. The seven amino acids in the cap-binding pocket of eIF(iso)4E were selected on the basis of other previous results and comparison of protein models of cap-binding pockets, and mutated. Yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that W95L, K150L and W95L/K150E amino acid mutations of B. rapa eIF(iso)4E interrupted its interaction with TuMV VPg. All eIF(iso)4E mutants were able to complement an eIF4E-knockout yeast strain, indicating that the mutated eIF(iso)4E proteins retained their function as a translational initiation factor. To determine whether these mutations could confer resistance, eIF(iso)4E W95L, W95L/K150E and eIF(iso)4E wild-type were over-expressed in a susceptible Chinese cabbage cultivar. Evaluation of the TuMV resistance of T1 and T2 transformants demonstrated that the over-expression of the eIF(iso)4E mutant forms can confer resistance to multiple TuMV strains. These data demonstrate the utility of knowledge-based approaches for the engineering of broad-spectrum resistance in Chinese cabbage.

  19. Two-way WKB Approximation Applied to GPR - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopovich, Igor; Popov, Alexei; Marciniak, Marian; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    account. In this work we study bistatic EM pulse probing of a horizontally layered medium in a 2D case. Coupled WKB equations set describing both forward and backward waves are derived and solved analytically. The comparison of our semi-analytical solutions with numerical calculations by gprMax software [4] demonstrates a good agreement, being hundreds of times faster than the letter. Our numerical results explain the protracted return pulses in the low-frequency GPR data. As an example, we discuss the experimental data obtained during the GPR mission in search of a big fragment of Chelyabinsk meteorite under a thick silt layer at the bottom of Chebarcul' Lake [5]. Acknowledgement The Authors are grateful to the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (www.cost.eu) facilitating this work by a Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSM) within the framework of the Action TU1208 "Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" (www.GPRadar.eu). References 1. H. Bremmer "Propagation of electromagnetic waves", in Handbuch der Physik, S. Flugge, Ed. Berlin-Goettingen-Heidelberg: Springer, 1958, pp. 423-639 2. L.M. Brekhovskikh, Waves in Stratified Media (in Russian). Moscow: USSR Academy of Sciences, 1957. 3. V.A.Vinogradov, V.V. Kopeikin, A.V. Popov, "An Approximate Solution of 1D Inverse Problem", in Proc. 10th Internat. Conf. on GPR, 21-24 June, 2004, Delft, The Netherlands 4. A. Giannopoulos, "Modelling ground penetrating radar by GprMax", Construction and Building Materials, vol. 19, no. 10, pp. 755-762, 2005, doi: 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2005.06.007 5. V. V. Kopeikin , V. D. Kuznetsov, P. A. Morozov, A. V. Popov et al., "Ground penetrating radar investigation of the supposed fall site of a fragment of the Chelyabinsk meteorite in Lake Chebarkul'", Geochemistry International, vol. 51, no. 7, pp. 575-582, 2013, doi: 10.1134/S0016702913070112

  20. [Tuberculosis Laboratory Surveillance Network (TuLSA) study group. The first step for national tuberculosis laboratory surveillance: Ankara, 2011].

    PubMed

    Sezen, Figen; Albayrak, Nurhan; Özkara, Şeref; Karagöz, Alper; Alp, Alpaslan; Duyar Ağca, Filiz; İnan Süer, Asiye; Müderris, Tuba; Ceyhan, İsmail; Durmaz, Rıza; Ertek, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    The most effective method for monitoring country-level drug resistance frequency and to implement the necessary control measures is the establishment of a laboratory-based surveillance system. The aim of this study was to summarize the follow up trend of the drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases, determine the load of resistance and evaluate the capacities of laboratories depending on laboratory quality assurance system for the installation work of National Tuberculosis Laboratory Surveillance Network (TuLSA) which has started in Ankara in 2011. TuLSA studies was carried out under the coordination of National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory (NRL) with the participation of TB laboratories and dispensaries. Specimens of TB patients, reported from health institutions, were followed in TB laboratories, and the epidemiological information was collected from the dispensaries. One isolate per patient with the drug susceptibility test (DST) results were sent to NRL from TB laboratories and in NRL the isolates were rechecked with the genotypical (MTBDRplus, Hain Lifescience, Germany) and phenotypical (MGIT 960, BD, USA) DST methods. Molecular epidemiological analysis were also performed by spoligotyping and MIRU/VNTR. Second-line DST was applied to the isolates resistant to rifampin. A total of 1276 patients were reported between January 1st to December 31th 2011, and 335 cases were defined as "pulmonary TB from Ankara province". The mean age of those patients was 43.4 ± 20 years, and 67.5% were male. Three hundred seventeen (94.6%) patients were identified as new cases. The average sample number obtained from pulmonary TB cases was 3.26 ± 2.88, and 229 (68.3%) of them was culture positive. DST was applied to all culture positive isolates; 90.4% (207/229) of cases were susceptible to the five drugs tested (ethambutol, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, rifampicin, streptomycin). Eight (3.5%) of the isolates were multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), while no extensively drug

  1. Talarolide A, a Cyclic Heptapeptide Hydroxamate from an Australian Marine Tunicate-Associated Fungus, Talaromyces sp. (CMB-TU011).

    PubMed

    Dewapriya, Pradeep; Prasad, Pritesh; Damodar, Rakesh; Salim, Angela A; Capon, Robert J

    2017-04-06

    A miniaturized 24-well plate microbioreactor approach was used to explore secondary metabolite media dependence in an Australian marine tunicate-associated fungus, Talaromyces sp. (CMB TU011). Detailed chemical investigations of an antifungal M1-saline cultivation yielded talarolide A (1), only the second reported natural cyclic peptide hydroxamate, and the first from a fungus. The antifungal properties of the M1-saline extract were attributed to the known diterpene glycoside sordarin (2). Structure elucidation of 1 and 2 was achieved by detailed spectroscopic analysis, with amino acid configurations in 1 assigned by the C3 and C18 Marfey's methods, and l-Ala and d-Ala regiochemistry by the recently reported 2D C3 Marfey's method.

  2. [Information technologies intended to solve contingencies in the Peruvian subsidized health system affiliation: "Resuelve tu afiliación"].

    PubMed

    Villegas-Ortega, José; Loyola-Martínez, César; Santisteban-Romero, Javier; Manchego-Lombardi, Mónica; Lozada-Urbano, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The National Health Authority (SUSALUD) has developed an online platform, "ReSUelve tu afiliación", with the intent to solve the problems with health service access experienced by Peruvian citizens who hold health insurance policies through institutions that manage health insurance funds (IAFAS). This platform virtually articulates the main IAFAS in Peru, which receives requests from any user requiring an update on his/her affiliation status to be resolved within 24 hours. Nearly 8 months after the implementation of this platform, more than 55 thousand applications have been resolved, thus ensuring timely access to health services under the corresponding user coverage form. As a result, this platform has helped to guarantee citizens' rights to health service access in the face of infringement caused by delays in affiliation processing among the different IAFAS in Peru.

  3. The dynamic atmospheres of Mira stars: comparing the CODEX models to PTI time series of TU Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; van Winckel, H.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Our comprehension of stellar evolution on the AGB still faces many difficulties. To improve on this, a quantified understanding of large-amplitude pulsator atmospheres and interpretation in terms of their fundamental stellar parameters are essential. Aims: We wish to evaluate the effectiveness of the recently released CODEX dynamical model atmospheres in representing M-type Mira variables through a confrontation with the time-resolved spectro-photometric and interferometric PTI data set of TU And. Methods: We calibrated the interferometric K-band time series to high precision. This results in 50 nights of observations, covering 8 subsequent pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2 μm is obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in 5 channels across the K-band. We compared the data set to the relevant dynamical, self-excited CODEX models. Results: Both spectrum and visibilities are consistently reproduced at visual minimum phases. Near maximum, our observations show that the current models predict a photosphere that is too compact and hot, and we find that the extended atmosphere lacks H2O opacity. Since coverage in model parameter space is currently poor, more models are needed to make firm conclusions on the cause of the discrepancies. We argue that for TU And, the discrepancy could be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increase in the stellar mass and/or a decrease in metallicity, but this requires the release of an extended model grid. Figure 4 and Table 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Ca2+ current vs. Ca2+ channel cooperativity of exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Matveev, Victor; Bertram, Richard; Sherman, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Recently there has been significant interest and progress in the study of spatio-temporal dynamics of Ca2+ that triggers exocytosis at a fast chemical synapse, which requires understanding the contribution of individual calcium channels to the release of a single vesicle. Experimental protocols provide insight into this question by probing the sensitivity of exocytosis to Ca2+ influx. While varying extracellular or intracellular Ca2+ concentration assesses the intrinsic biochemical Ca2+ cooperativity of neurotransmitter release, varying the number of open Ca2+ channels using pharmacological channel block or the tail current titration probes the cooperativity between individual Ca2+ channels in triggering exocytosis. Despite the wide use of these Ca2+ sensitivity measurements, their interpretation often relies on heuristic arguments. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the Ca2+ sensitivity measures probed by these experimental protocols, present simple expressions for special cases, and demonstrate the distinction between the Ca2+ current cooperativity, defined by the relationship between exocytosis rate and the whole-terminal Ca2+ current magnitude, and the underlying Ca2+ channel cooperativity, defined as the average number of channels involved in the release of a single vesicle. We find simple algebraic expressions that show that the two are different but linearly related. Further, we use 3D computational modeling of buffered Ca2+ diffusion to analyze these distinct Ca2+ cooperativity measures, and demonstrate the role of endogenous Ca2+ buffers on such measures. We show that buffers can either increase or decrease the Ca2+ current cooperativity of exocytosis, depending on their concentration and the single-channel Ca2+ current. PMID:19793978

  5. A Whitham-Theory Sonic-Boom Analysis of the TU-144 Aircraft at a Mach Number of 2.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Officially, the Tu-144 was the first supersonic-cruise, passenger-carrying aircraft to enter commercial service. Design, construction, and testing were carried out by the Soviet Union, flight certification was by the Soviet Union, and the only regular passenger flights were scheduled and flown across the territory of the Soviet Union. Although it was not introduced to international passenger service, there were many significant engineering accomplishments achieved in the design, production, and flight of this aircraft. Development of the aircraft began with a prototype stage. Systematic testing and redesign led to a production aircraft in discrete stages that measurably improved the performance of the aircraft from the starting concept to final aircraft certification. It flew in competition with the English-French Concorde for a short time, but was withdrawn from national commercial service due to a lack of interest by airlines outside the Soviet Union. NASA became interested in the Tu- 144 aircraft when it was offered for use as a flying "testbed" in the study of operating characteristics of a supersonic-cruise commercial airplane. Since it had been in supersonic-cruise service, the Tu- 144 had operational characteris'tics similar to those anticipated in the conceptual aircraft designs being studied by the United States aircraft companies. In addition to the other operational tests being conducted on the Tu-144 aircraft, it was proposed that two sets of sonic-boom pressure signature measurements be made. The first set would be made on the ground, using techniques and devices similar to those in reference I and many other subsequent studies. A second set would be made in the air with an instrumented aircraft flying close under the Tu-144 in supersonic flight. Such in-flight measurements would require pressure gages that were capable of accurately recording the flow-field overpressures generated by the Tu- 144 at relatively close distances under the vehicle

  6. Measurement of CA1P and CA in leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.d.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Carboxyarabinitol-1-phosphate (CA1P) and carboxyarabinitol (CA) were assayed in leaves by isotope dilution. {sup 14}C-labeled standards were synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C) CABP using acid (CA1P) or alkaline (CA) phosphatase. Either was added to boiling 80% EtOH along with liquid N{sub 2}-killed leaves. Each was largely purified by anion exchange chromatography. CA1P samples were subjected to 2D-TLE/TLC. The specific activity of the {sup 14}C-containing spot was measured using alkaline phosphatase. CA samples were run on an HPLC and the specific activity was determined using a UV monitor and a flow-through radioisotope detector. In 3 of the tested species, light/dark amount of CA1P (nmol/mg Chl) were kidney bean, 0.7/67; sugar beet, 0.8/33; and Alocasia, 0/3.4. Light/dark CA levels (nmol/mg Chl) in these respective species were 897/653, 3.2/3.5, and 5.7/4.6. These results support the hypothesis that CA is a product of CA1P metabolism in vivo under high light, but also indicate that CA is not the only intermediate involved in CA1P synthesis under low light/dark conditions.

  7. Ecological risk assessment of a coastal zone in Southern Vietnam: Spatial distribution and content of heavy metals in water and surface sediments of the Thi Vai Estuary and Can Gio Mangrove Forest.

    PubMed

    Costa-Böddeker, Sandra; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Thuyên, Lê Xuân; Huy, Hoang Duc; Nguyen, Hoang Anh; Richter, Otto; Schwalb, Antje

    2017-01-30

    Enrichment of heavy metals was assessed in the Thi Vai Estuary and in the Can Gio Mangrove Forest (SE, Vietnam). Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn contents in water and in sediments were measured. Total organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and C/N ratios were determined. Cu and Cr values were higher than threshold effect level of toxicity, while Ni exceeded probable effect level, indicating the risk of probable toxicity effects. Enrichment factors (EF), contamination factor (CF) and Geo-accumulation index (I-geo) were determined. CF reveals moderate to considerable pollution with Cr and Ni. EF suggests anthropogenic sources of Cr, Cu and Ni. I-geo indicates low contamination with Co, Cu and Zn and moderate contamination with Cr and Ni. Overall metal contents were lower than expected for this highly industrialized region, probably due to dilution, suggesting that erosion rates and hydrodynamics may also play a role in metal contents distribution.

  8. TU-C-BRE-09: Performance Comparisons of Patient Specific IMRT QA Methodologies Using ROC Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, E; Balter, P; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Kry, S; Jones, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a selection of patient-specific QA methods to accurately classify IMRT plans as acceptable or unacceptable based on a multiple ion chamber (MIC) phantom. Methods: Twenty-four IMRT plans were selected (20 previously failed the institutional QA), and were measured on a MIC phantom to assess their dosimetric acceptability. These same plans were then measured using film (Kodak EDR2) and ion chamber (Wellhofer cc04), ArcCheck (Sun Nuclear), and MapCheck (Sun Nuclear) (delivered AP field-by-field, AP composite, and with original gantry angles). All gamma analyses were performed at 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 5%/3mm. By using the MIC results as a gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated across a range of cut-off thresholds (% pixels passing for gamma analysis, and % dose difference for ion chamber), and were used to form ROC curves. Area under the curve (AUC) was used as a metric to quantify the performance of the various QA methods. Results: Grouping device’s AUC’s revealed two statistically significant different groups: ion chamber (AUC of 0.94), AP composite MapCheck (AUC of 0.85), ArcCheck (AUC of 0.84), and film (AUC of 0.82) were in the better performing group, while original gantry angles and AP field-by-field MapCheck (AUC of 0.65 and 0.66, respectively) matched less well with the gold standard results. Optimal cut-offs were also assessed using the ROC curves. We found that while often 90% of pixels passing is used as a criteria, the differing sensitivities of QA methods can lead to device and methodology-based optimal cutoff thresholds. Conclusion: While many methods exist to perform the same task of patient-specific IMRT QA, they utilize different strategies. This work has shown that there are inconsistencies in these methodologies in terms of their sensitivity and specificity to dosimetric acceptability. This work was supported by Public Health Service grants CA010953, CA081647, and CA21661 awarded by the

  9. Ca isotope variations in Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jungck, M. H. A.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ca-isotope measurements of Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs), together with those on an apatite-enriched fraction from Orgueil, indicate the existence of widespread excesses on the neutron-rich isotope Ca-48. Isotopic anomalies are noted in 7 out of 11 CAIs analyzed. This abundance of isotopic excesses places Ca alongside Ti and O, although no clear correlation has yet been found between Ca-48 and Ti-50, which are thought to be coproduced by neutron-rich nucleosynthetic processes within stars. It is suggested that the higher volatility of Ca, by comparison with Ti compounds, led to a variable dilution with isotopically normal Ca in vaporization and recondensation processes in stellar envelopes, the interstellar medium, and/or the solar nebula.

  10. TU-G-BRD-05: Results From Multi-Institutional Measurements with An Anthropomorphic Spine Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Molineu, A; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Followill, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the results from an anthropomorphic spine phantom used for credentialing institutions for National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored clinical trial. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom that contains left and right lungs, a heart, an esophagus, spinal cord, bony material and a PTV was sent to institutions wishing to be credentialed for NCI trials. The PTV holds 4 TLD and radiochromic film in the axial and sagittal planes. The heart holds one TLD. Institutions created IMRT plans to cover ≥90% of the PTV with 6 Gy and limit the cord dose to <0.35cc receiving 3.75 Gy and <1.2cc receiving 2.63 Gy. They were instructed to treat the phantom as they would a patient, including making plan specific IMRT/SBRT QA measurements before treatment. The TLD results in the PTV were required to be within ±7% of the plan dose. A gamma calculation was performed using the film results and the submitted DICOM plan. ≥85% of the analyzed region was required to pass a 5%/3 mm criteria. Results: 176 institutions irradiated the spine phantom for a total of 255 results. The pass rate was 73% (187 irradiations) overall. 44 irradiations failed only the gamma criteria, 2 failed only the dose criteria and 22 failed both. The most used planning systems were Eclipse (116) and Pinnacle (52) and they had pass rates of 76% and 71%, respectively. The AAA algorithm had a pass rate of 77% while superposition type algorithms had a 71% pass rate. The average TLD measurement to institution calculation ratio was 0.99 (0.04 std dev.). The average percent pixels passing the gamma criteria for films was 89% (12% std dev.) Conclusion: Results show that this phantom is an important part of credentialing and that we have room for improvement in IMRT/SBRT spine treatments. This work was supported by PHS CA180803 and CA037422 awarded by NCI, DHHS.

  11. [Organizational problems of disaster victim identification in mass casualties as exemplified by Tu 154-M and Airbus A310 passenger plane crashes].

    PubMed

    Volkov, A V; Kolkutin, V V; Klevno, V A; Shkol'nikov, B V; Kornienko, I V

    2008-01-01

    Managerial experience is described that was gained during the large-scale work on victim identification following mass casualties in the Tu 154-M and Airbus A310 passenger plane crashes. The authors emphasize the necessity to set up a specialized agency of constant readiness meeting modern requirements for the implementation of a system of measures for personality identification. This agency must incorporate relevant departments of the Ministries of Health, Defense, and Emergency Situations as well as investigative authorities and other organizations.

  12. A great honor and a huge challenge for China: You-you TU getting the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Da; Yang, Xue; Guo, Jun-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Public excitement over the award of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to the Chinese medical scientist You-you TU for the discovery of a herbal anti-malarial, may mislead the Chinese people into believing that traditional Chinese herbal medicine can be used to cure all disease without any adverse effects. The aim of this paper is to explain the advantages and disadvantages of herbal traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) objectively. PMID:27143269

  13. Blockage of both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of diazinon-induced apoptosis in PaTu cells by magnesium oxide and selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Mahdi; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Mahboudi, Hossein; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    Diazinon (DZ) is an organophosphorus insecticide that acts as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. It is important to note that it can induce oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, diabetic disorders, and cytotoxicity. Magnesium oxide (MgO) and selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) showed promising protection against oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity, and diabetic disorders. Therefore, this study was conducted to explore the possible protective mechanisms of MgO and Se NPs against DZ-induced cytotoxicity in PaTu cell line. Cytotoxicity of DZ, in the presence or absence of effective doses of MgO and Se NPs, was determined in human pancreatic cancer cell line (PaTu cells) after 24 hours of exposure by using mitochondrial activity and mitochondrial membrane potential assays. Then, the insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide release; caspase-3 and -9 activities; and total thiol molecule levels were assessed. Determination of cell viability, including apoptotic and necrotic cells, was assessed via acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining. Furthermore, expression of 15 genes associated with cell death/apoptosis in various phenomena was examined after 24 hours of contact with DZ and NPs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Compared to the individual cases, the group receiving the combination of MgO and Se NPs showed more beneficial effects in reducing the toxicity of DZ. Cotreatment of PaTu cell lines with MgO and Se NPs counteracts the toxicity of DZ on insulin-producing cells.

  14. The characterization of Mycoplasma synoviae EF-Tu protein and proteins involved in hemadherence and their N-terminal amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Bencina, D; Narat, M; Dovc, P; Drobnic-Valic, M; Habe, F; Kleven, S H

    1999-04-01

    An abundant cytoplasmic 43-kDa protein from Mycoplasma synoviae, a major pathogen from poultry, was identified as elongation factor Tu. The N-terminal amino acid sequence (AKLDFDRSKEHVNVGTIGHV) has 90% identity with the sequence of the Mycoplasma hominis elongation factor Tu protein. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with the M. synoviae elongation factor Tu protein also reacted with 43-kDa proteins from the avian Mycoplasma species Mycoplasma gallinarum, Mycoplasma gallinaceum, Mycoplasma pullorum, Mycoplasma cloacale, Mycoplasma iners and Mycoplasma meleagridis, but not with the proteins from Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma imitans or Mycoplasma iowae. In addition, two groups of phase variable integral membrane proteins, pMSA and pMSB, associated with hemadherence and pathogenicity of M. synoviae strains AAY-4 and ULB925 were identified. The cleavage of a larger hemagglutinating protein encoded by a gene homologous to the vlhA gene of M. synoviae generates pMSB1 and pMSA1 proteins defined by mAb 125 and by hemagglutination inhibiting mAb 3E10, respectively. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of pMSA proteins (SENKLI ... and SENETQ ...) probably indicate the cleavage site of the M. synoviae strain ULB 925 hemagglutinin.

  15. Blockage of both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of diazinon-induced apoptosis in PaTu cells by magnesium oxide and selenium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shiri, Mahdi; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Mahboudi, Hossein; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Diazinon (DZ) is an organophosphorus insecticide that acts as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. It is important to note that it can induce oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, diabetic disorders, and cytotoxicity. Magnesium oxide (MgO) and selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) showed promising protection against oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity, and diabetic disorders. Therefore, this study was conducted to explore the possible protective mechanisms of MgO and Se NPs against DZ-induced cytotoxicity in PaTu cell line. Cytotoxicity of DZ, in the presence or absence of effective doses of MgO and Se NPs, was determined in human pancreatic cancer cell line (PaTu cells) after 24 hours of exposure by using mitochondrial activity and mitochondrial membrane potential assays. Then, the insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide release; caspase-3 and -9 activities; and total thiol molecule levels were assessed. Determination of cell viability, including apoptotic and necrotic cells, was assessed via acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining. Furthermore, expression of 15 genes associated with cell death/apoptosis in various phenomena was examined after 24 hours of contact with DZ and NPs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Compared to the individual cases, the group receiving the combination of MgO and Se NPs showed more beneficial effects in reducing the toxicity of DZ. Cotreatment of PaTu cell lines with MgO and Se NPs counteracts the toxicity of DZ on insulin-producing cells. PMID:27920530

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: TU UMa light curves and maxima, CL Aur minima (Liska+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, J.; Skarka, M.; Mikulasek, Z.; Zejda, M.; Chrastina, M.

    2016-02-01

    Differential photometry for RR Lyrae star TU UMa in the 1st and 2nd file. The measurements were obtained using 24-inch and 1-inch telescopes, respectively. The observations were performed at the Masaryk University Observatory in Brno (3 nights, 24-inch), and at the private observatory in Brno (16 nights, 1-inch) in the Czech Republic from December 2013 to June 2014. Observing equipments consisted of 24-inch Newtonian telescope (600/2780mm, diameter/focal length) and a Moravian Instruments CCD camera G2-4000 with Stromgren photometric filters vby, and of 1-inch refractor (a photographic lens Sonnar 4/135mm, lens focal ratio/focal length) and ATIK 16IC CCD camera with green photometric filter with similar throughput as the Johnson V filter. Exposures were v - 60s, b - 30s, y - 30s, green - 30s. For the small aperture telescope, five frames were combined to a single image to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. The time resolution of a such combined frame is about 170s. CCD images were calibrated in a standard way (dark frame and flat field corrections). The C-Munipack software (Motl 2009) was used for this processing as well as for differential photometry. The comparison star BD+30 2165 was the same for both instruments, but the control stars were BD+30 2164 (for the 24-inch telescope) and HD 99593 (for the 1-inch telescope). The 3rd file contains maxima timings of TU UMa adopted from the GEOS RR Lyr database, from the latest publications, together with maxima timings determined in our study. Times of maxima were calculated from our observations, sky-surveys data (Hipparcos, NSVS, Pi of the Sky, SuperWASP), photographic measurements (project DASCH), and from several published datasets, in which the maxima were omitted or badly determined - Boenigk (1958AcA.....8...13B), Liakos, Niarchos (2011IBVS.6099....1L, 2011IBVS.5990....1L), Liu, Janes (1989ApJS...69..593L), Preston et al. (1961ApJ...133..484P). The 4th file contains minima timings of eclipsing binary CL Aur

  17. Adrenoceptors in Brain: Cellular Gene Expression and Effects on Astrocytic Metabolism and [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Lovatt, Ditte; Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Recent in vivo studies have established astrocytes as a major target for locus coeruleus activation (Bekar et al., Cereb. Cortex 18, 2789–2795), renewing interest in cell culture studies on noradrenergic effects on astrocytes in primary cultures and calling for additional information about the expression of adrenoceptor subtypes on different types of brain cells. In the present communication, mRNA expression of α1-, α2- and β-adrenergic receptors and their subtypes was determined in freshly-isolated, cell marker-defined populations of astrocytes, NG2-positive cells, microglia, endothelial cells, and Thy1-positive neurons (mainly glutamatergic projection neurons) in murine cerebral cortex. Immediately after dissection of frontal, parietal and occipital cortex of 10–12-week-old transgenic mice, which combined each cell-type marker with a specific fluorescent signal, the tissue was digested, triturated and centrifuged, yielding a solution of dissociated cells of all types, which were separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). mRNA expression in each cell fraction was determined by microarray analysis. α1A-Receptors were unequivocally expressed in astrocytes and NG2-positive cells, but absent in other cell types, and α1B-receptors were not expressed in any cell population. Among α2-receptors only α2A-receptors were expressed, unequivocally in astrocytes and NG-positive cells, tentatively in microglia and questionably in Thy1-positive neurons and endothelial cells. β1-Receptors were unequivocally expressed in astrocytes, tentatively in microglia, and questionably in neurons and endothelial cells, whereas β2-adrenergic receptors showed tentative expression in neurons and astrocytes and unequivocal expression in other cell types. This distribution was supported by immunochemical data and its relevance established by previous studies in well-differentiated primary cultures of mouse astrocytes, showing that stimulation of α2-adrenoceptors

  18. Subplasma membrane Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed

    McCarron, John G; Chalmers, Susan; Olson, Marnie L; Girkin, John M

    2012-07-01

    Ca(2+) may selectively activate various processes in part by the cell's ability to localize changes in the concentration of the ion to specific subcellular sites. Interestingly, these Ca(2+) signals begin most often at the plasma membrane space so that understanding subplasma membrane signals is central to an appreciation of local signaling. Several experimental procedures have been developed to study Ca(2+) signals near the plasma membrane, but probably the most prevalent involve the use of fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators and fall into two general approaches. In the first, the Ca(2+) indicators themselves are specifically targeted to the subplasma membrane space to measure Ca(2+) only there. Alternatively, the indicators are allowed to be dispersed throughout the cytoplasm, but the fluorescence emanating from the Ca(2+) signals at the subplasma membrane space is selectively measured using high resolution imaging procedures. Although the targeted indicators offer an immediate appeal because of selectivity and ease of use, their limited dynamic range and slow response to changes in Ca(2+) are a shortcoming. Use of targeted indicators is also largely restricted to cultured cells. High resolution imaging applied with rapidly responding small molecule Ca(2+) indicators can be used in all cells and offers significant improvements in dynamic range and speed of response of the indicator. The approach is technically difficult, however, and realistic calibration of signals is not possible. In this review, a brief overview of local subplasma membrane Ca(2+) signals and methods for their measurement is provided.

  19. Coachella Valley, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These band composites, acquired on June 4, 2000, cover a 11 by 13.5 km sub-scene in the Coachella Valley, CA. The area is shown by the yellow box on the full scene in the LOWER RIGHT corner, northwest of the Salton Sea. This is a major agricultural region of California, growing fruit and produce throughout the year. Different combinations of ASTER bands help identify the different crop types. UPPER LEFT: bands 3, 2, 1 as red, green, and blue (RGB); UPPER RIGHT: bands 4, 2, 1 as RGB; LOWER LEFT: bands 4, 3, 2 as RGB. The image is centered at 33.6 degrees north latitude, 116.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  20. TU-CD-303-05: Unveiling Tumor Heterogeneity by Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jeraj, R.

    2015-06-15

    these advances in cancer biology research will give medical physicists a new perspective in daily clinical physics practice and in future radiation therapy technological development. Furthermore, academic medical physics should continue to be an integral part of the multidisciplinary cancer research community, harnessing our newly acquired understanding of radiation effects, and developing novel cost-effective treatment strategies to better combat cancer. Learning Objectives: Understand that localized radiation can lead to non-localized secondary effects such as radiation-induced immune response, bystander effect, and abscopal effect. Understand that the non-localized radiation effects may be harnessed to improve cancer treatment. Learn examples of physics participation in multidisciplinary research to advance cancer biology. Recognize the challenges and possibilities of physics applications in cancer research. Chang: NIH 5RC2CA148487-02 and 1U54CA151652-01 Graves: IDEA award (19IB-0106) from the California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP), and by NIH P01 CA67166.

  1. TU-CD-BRB-12: Radiogenomics of MRI-Guided Prostate Cancer Biopsy Habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyanova, R; Lynne, C; Abraham, S; Patel, M; Jorda, M; Kryvenko, O; Ishkanian, A; Abramowitz, M; Pollack, A; Tachar, M; Erho, N; Buerki, C; Lam, L; Davicioni, E

    2015-06-15

    identified, targeting with radiotherapy should improve outcome. This is the first demonstration of a link between quantitative imaging features (radiomics) with genomic features in MRI-directed prostate biopsies. The research was supported by NIH- NCI R01 CA 189295 and R01 CA 189295; E Davicioni is partial owner of GenomeDx Biosciences, Inc. M Takhar, N Erho, L Lam, C Buerki and E Davicioni are current employees at GenomeDx Biosciences, Inc.

  2. A SelB/EF-Tu/aIF2γ-like protein from Methanosarcina mazei in the GTP-bound form binds cysteinyl-tRNA(Cys.).

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Ishii, Ryohei; Hikida, Yasushi; Fukunaga, Ryuya; Sengoku, Toru; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-03-01

    The putative translation elongation factor Mbar_A0971 from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri was proposed to be the pyrrolysine-specific paralogue of EF-Tu ("EF-Pyl"). In the present study, the crystal structures of its homologue from Methanosarcina mazei (MM1309) were determined in the GMPPNP-bound, GDP-bound, and apo forms, by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method. The three MM1309 structures are quite similar (r.m.s.d. < 0.1 Å). The three domains, corresponding to domains 1, 2, and 3 of EF-Tu/SelB/aIF2γ, are packed against one another to form a closed architecture. The MM1309 structures resemble those of bacterial/archaeal SelB, bacterial EF-Tu in the GTP-bound form, and archaeal initiation factor aIF2γ, in this order. The GMPPNP and GDP molecules are visible in their co-crystal structures. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements of MM1309·GTP·Mg(2+), MM1309·GDP·Mg(2+), and MM1309·GMPPNP·Mg(2+) provided dissociation constants of 0.43, 26.2, and 222.2 μM, respectively. Therefore, the affinities of MM1309 for GTP and GDP are similar to those of SelB rather than those of EF-Tu. Furthermore, the switch I and II regions of MM1309 are involved in domain-domain interactions, rather than nucleotide binding. The putative binding pocket for the aminoacyl moiety on MM1309 is too small to accommodate the pyrrolysyl moiety, based on a comparison of the present MM1309 structures with that of the EF-Tu·GMPPNP·aminoacyl-tRNA ternary complex. A hydrolysis protection assay revealed that MM1309 binds cysteinyl (Cys)-tRNA(Cys) and protects the aminoacyl bond from non-enzymatic hydrolysis. Therefore, we propose that MM1309 functions as either a guardian protein that protects the Cys moiety from oxidation or an alternative translation factor for Cys-tRNA(Cys).

  3. Applications of GPR in archaeological prospecting and cultural heritage diagnostics: Research Perspectives in COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Schettini, Giuseppe; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a safe, non-destructive and non-invasive imaging technique that can be effectively used for advanced inspection of composite structures and for diagnostics affecting the whole life-cycle of civil engineering works. GPR can also be successfully employed in archaeological prospecting and cultural heritage diagnostics. In many Countries, where the archeological patrimony is an outstanding value (as Egypt, Israel, Greece, Central and South America), GPR is usually employed both as a diagnostic tool for the preventive detection of archeological structures and as the most advanced instrument able to prospect geometry and shape of underground valuable sites. However many uncertainties persist, because of several difficulties and ambiguities due to the complexity of the image processing in heterogeneous environment. It is possible to identify three main areas, in GPR field, that have to be addressed in order to promote the use of this technology in archaeological prospecting and cultural heritage diagnostics. These are: a) increase of the system sensitivity to enable the usability in a wider range of conditions, archeological sites are often located in impervious and critical environments; b) research novel data processing algorithms/analysis tools for the interpretation of GPR results; c) contribute to the development of new standards and guidelines and to training of end users, that will also help to increase the awareness of operators. It is also important to further investigate and promote a combined use of GPR with other non-invasive advanced techniques, typically used in the archeological investigation. In this framework, the COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar", proposed by a research team of "Roma Tre" University, Rome, Italy, has been approved in November 2012 and is going to start in April 2013. It is a 4-years ambitious project already involving 17 European Countries (AT, BE, CH, CZ, DE

  4. The Romanian contribution to the COST action TU0801 "Semantic enrichment of 3D city models for sustainable urban development"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Iuliana; Bostenaru Dan, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The COST action TU0801 "Semantic enrichment of 3D city models for sustainable urban development" aims at using ontologies to enrich three dimensional models of cities. Such models can be used for various purposes, one of them being disaster management. COST actions are European networks of nationally funded projects, the European Science Foundation funding the networking activities. Romania adhered to the above mentioned COST action in 2009, the nationally funded project being concerned with the use of GIS for the vulnerability to hazards of the city of Bucharest. Among the networking activites Romanian representatives participated in are a training school on 3D GIS for disaster management (with two trainees) and a working group and management committee meeting. It is aimed to further develop the issues of usability and guidance of semantically enriched city models as task from the working group within the Action for the nationally funded project. In this contribution there will be shown how it is aimed to achieve this. One of the issues is on how to extrude GIS to achieve a simple 3D representation for a pilot area in the historic centre of Bucharest. Another one is on how to use this for the study of urbanism aspects, ranging from visual urban composition to the complex 3D aspects in restoration projects, including addition of new floors to buildings.

  5. Incidence and Remission of Parasomnias among Adolescent Children in the Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea (TuCASA) Study.

    PubMed

    Furet, Oscar; Goodwin, James L; Quan, Stuart F

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Longitudinal assessments of parasomnias in the adolescent population are scarce. This analysis aims to identify the incidence and remission of parasomnias in the adolescent age group. METHODS: The TuCASA study is a prospective cohort study that initially enrolled children between the ages of 6 and 11 years (Time 1) and subsequently restudied them approximately 5 years later (Time 2). At both time points parents were asked to complete a comprehensive sleep habits questionnaire designed to assess the severity of sleep-related symptoms that included questions about enuresis (EN), sleep terrors (TR), sleep walking (SW) and sleep talking (ST). RESULTS: There were 350 children participating at Time 1 who were studied as adolescents at time 2. The mean interval between measurements was (4.6 years). The incidence of EN, TR, ST, and SW in these 10-18 year old children was 0.3%, 0.6%, 6.0% and 1.1% respectively. Remission rates were 70.8%, 100%, 64.8% and 50.0% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence rates of EN, TR, and SW were relatively low moving from childhood to adolescence while remission rates were high across all parasomnias.

  6. First intercomparison among laboratories involved in COST Action-TU1301 "NORM4Building": Determination of natural radionuclides in ceramics.

    PubMed

    Xhixha, Gerti; Trinidad, José Antonio; Gascó, Catalina; Mantovani, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    This work describes the outcomes of the COST Action-TU1301 "NORM4Building" intercomparison on the determination of natural radioactivity in ceramics. Twenty-two laboratories involved in the intercomparison are evaluated for their performance using robust statistics. The reference values of (226)Ra ((214)Bi and (214)Pb) are determined to be 122 ± 11 Bq kg(-1) and 124 ± 14 Bq kg(-1), respectively and in secular equilibrium in the uranium chain while the reference values of (232)Th ((228)Ac) is determined to be 61 ± 6 Bq kg(-1) and that of (40)K was determined to be 955 ± 40 Bq kg(-1). Although the aim of the exercise was to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and evaluation of the "Activity Concentration Index", laboratories were asked to report complete characterization of natural radionuclides. The results of this exercise pointed out a good performance among laboratories since the percentage of the acceptable results were above 90% for the radionuclides of interest. Based on these results, considering the systematic rejection of the results reported from a few laboratories we emphasize the need for quality control procedures.

  7. Increasing HIV-related knowledge, communication, and testing intentions among Latinos: Protege tu Familia: Hazte la Prueba.

    PubMed

    Rios-Ellis, Britt; Espinoza, Lilia; Bird, Mara; Garcia, Melawhy; D'Anna, Laura Hoyt; Bellamy, Laura; Scolari, Rosana

    2010-08-01

    Latinos are less likely to be aware of their HIV seropositivity than African Americans and Whites. 'Protege tu Familia: Hazte la Prueba' is a culturally and linguistically-sensitive HIV/AIDS prevention and testing program targeting Latino families. Using community-based participatory research techniques, Spanish-speaking bicultural community health workers helped develop and then used an educational flip chart and materials to conduct outreach and HIV prevention education in diverse settings. The intervention was created to increase HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, to improve communication regarding sexual risk, and to augment intentions to use condoms and test for HIV. A secondary purpose was to decrease HIV-related stigma by improving knowledge about transmission and reducing homophobia. Participants demonstrated significant increases in HIV knowledge, intention to practice safer sex and communicate sexual risk to partner(s), and intention to test for HIV. Improvements were also found in self-reported comfort levels when interacting with and caring for the HIV positive, thus decreasing HIV/AIDS-related stigma.

  8. Phylogeny of the Enterobacteriaceae based on genes encoding elongation factor Tu and F-ATPase beta-subunit.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Sonia; Boissinot, Maurice; Paquette, Nancy; Bélanger, Simon D; Martel, Eric A; Boudreau, Dominique K; Picard, François J; Ouellette, Marc; Roy, Paul H; Bergeron, Michel G

    2005-09-01

    The phylogeny of enterobacterial species commonly found in clinical samples was analysed by comparing partial sequences of their elongation factor Tu gene (tuf) and of their F-ATPase beta-subunit gene (atpD). An 884 bp fragment for tuf and an 884 or 871 bp fragment for atpD were sequenced for 96 strains representing 78 species from 31 enterobacterial genera. The atpD sequence analysis exhibited an indel specific to Pantoea and Tatumella species, showing, for the first time, a tight phylogenetic affiliation between these two genera. Comprehensive tuf and atpD phylogenetic trees were constructed and are in agreement with each other. Monophyletic genera are Cedecea, Edwardsiella, Proteus, Providencia, Salmonella, Serratia, Raoultella and Yersinia. Analogous trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences available from databases were also reconstructed. The tuf and atpD phylogenies are in agreement with the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and distance comparisons revealed that the tuf and atpD genes provide better discrimination for pairs of species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. In conclusion, phylogeny based on tuf and atpD conserved genes allows discrimination between species of the Enterobacteriaceae.

  9. TU-EF-304-08: LET-Based Inverse Planning for IMPT

    SciTech Connect

    Gorissen, BL; Giantsoudi, D; Unkelbach, J; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cell survival experiments suggest that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams depends on linear energy transfer (LET), leading to higher RBE near the end of range. With intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), multiple treatment plans that differ in the dose contribution per field may yield a similar physical dose distribution, but the RBE-weighted dose distribution may be disparate. RBE models currently do not have the required predictive power to be included in an optimization model due to the variations in experimental data. We propose an LET-based planning method that guides IMPT optimization models towards plans with reduced RBE-weighted dose in surrounding organs at risk (OARs) compared to inverse planning based on physical dose alone. Methods: Optimization models for physical dose are extended with a term for dose times LET (doseLET). Monte Carlo code is used to generate the physical dose and doseLET distribution of each individual pencil beam. The method is demonstrated for an atypical meningioma patient where the target volume abuts the brainstem and partially overlaps with the optic nerve. Results: A reference plan optimized based on physical dose alone yields high doseLET values in parts of the brainstem and optic nerve. Minimizing doseLET in these critical structures as an additional planning goal reduces the risk of high RBE-weighted dose. The resulting treatment plan avoids the distal fall-off of the Bragg peaks for shaping the dose distribution in front of critical stuctures. The maximum dose in the OARs evaluated with RBE models from literature is reduced by 8–14\\% with our method compared to conventional planning. Conclusion: LET-based inverse planning for IMPT offers the ability to reduce the RBE-weighted dose in OARs without sacrificing target dose. This project was in part supported by NCI - U19 CA 21239.

  10. TU-G-210-00: Treatment Planning Strategies, Modeling, Control

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Modeling can play a vital role in predicting, optimizing and analyzing the results of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Simulating the propagating acoustic beam in various targeted regions of the body allows for the prediction of the resulting power deposition and temperature profiles. In this session we will apply various modeling approaches to breast, abdominal organ and brain treatments. Of particular interest is the effectiveness of procedures for correcting for phase aberrations caused by intervening irregular tissues, such as the skull in transcranial applications or inhomogeneous breast tissues. Also described are methods to compensate for motion in targeted abdominal organs such as the liver or kidney. Douglas Christensen – Modeling for Breast and Brain HIFU Treatment Planning Tobias Preusser – TRANS-FUSIMO – An Integrative Approach to Model-Based Treatment Planning of Liver FUS Tobias Preusser – TRANS-FUSIMO – An Integrative Approach to Model-Based Treatment Planning of Liver FUS Learning Objectives: Understand the role of acoustic beam modeling for predicting the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Apply acoustic modeling to specific breast, liver, kidney and transcranial anatomies. Determine how to obtain appropriate acoustic modeling parameters from clinical images. Understand the separate role of absorption and scattering in energy delivery to tissues. See how organ motion can be compensated for in ultrasound therapies. Compare simulated data with clinical temperature measurements in transcranial applications. Supported by NIH R01 HL172787 and R01 EB013433 (DC); EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under 270186 (FUSIMO) and 611889 (TRANS-FUSIMO)(TP); and P01 CA159992, GE, FUSF and InSightec (UV)

  11. TU-G-210-01: Modeling for Breast and Brain HIFU Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.

    2015-06-15

    Modeling can play a vital role in predicting, optimizing and analyzing the results of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Simulating the propagating acoustic beam in various targeted regions of the body allows for the prediction of the resulting power deposition and temperature profiles. In this session we will apply various modeling approaches to breast, abdominal organ and brain treatments. Of particular interest is the effectiveness of procedures for correcting for phase aberrations caused by intervening irregular tissues, such as the skull in transcranial applications or inhomogeneous breast tissues. Also described are methods to compensate for motion in targeted abdominal organs such as the liver or kidney. Douglas Christensen – Modeling for Breast and Brain HIFU Treatment Planning Tobias Preusser – TRANS-FUSIMO – An Integrative Approach to Model-Based Treatment Planning of Liver FUS Tobias Preusser – TRANS-FUSIMO – An Integrative Approach to Model-Based Treatment Planning of Liver FUS Learning Objectives: Understand the role of acoustic beam modeling for predicting the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Apply acoustic modeling to specific breast, liver, kidney and transcranial anatomies. Determine how to obtain appropriate acoustic modeling parameters from clinical images. Understand the separate role of absorption and scattering in energy delivery to tissues. See how organ motion can be compensated for in ultrasound therapies. Compare simulated data with clinical temperature measurements in transcranial applications. Supported by NIH R01 HL172787 and R01 EB013433 (DC); EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under 270186 (FUSIMO) and 611889 (TRANS-FUSIMO)(TP); and P01 CA159992, GE, FUSF and InSightec (UV)

  12. TU-F-17A-03: An Analytical Respiratory Perturbation Model for Lung Motion Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G; Yuan, A; Wei, J

    2014-06-15

    training, and therefore is potentially more resilient to breathing irregularities. On-going investigation introduces airflow into the RMP model for improvement. This research is in part supported by NIH (U54CA137788/132378). AY would like to thank MSKCC summer medical student research program supported by National Cancer Institute and hosted by Department of Medical Physics at MSKCC.

  13. TU-G-BRA-03: Predicting Radiation Therapy Induced Ventilation Changes Using 4DCT Jacobian Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T; Du, K; Bayouth, J; Christensen, G; Reinhardt, J

    2015-06-15

    predicted and actual outcome are similar to differences between repeat scans with equivalent ventilation. This work was supported by NIH grant CA166703 and a Pilot Grant from University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.

  14. TU-G-BRB-00: Clinical Trials in Proton and Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    development and support. Research reported in this presentation is supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National; Institutes of Health under Award Number P20CA183640.

  15. TU-G-BRB-03: IROC Houston’s Proton Beam Validation for Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.

    2015-06-15

    development and support. Research reported in this presentation is supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National; Institutes of Health under Award Number P20CA183640.

  16. TU-G-BRB-04: Digital Phantoms for Developing Protocols in Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.

    2015-06-15

    development and support. Research reported in this presentation is supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National; Institutes of Health under Award Number P20CA183640.

  17. TU-G-BRB-02: Clinical Trials in Particle Therapy - Open Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, H.

    2015-06-15

    development and support. Research reported in this presentation is supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National; Institutes of Health under Award Number P20CA183640.

  18. The dynamics of mitochondrial Ca2+ fluxes.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Sergio; Montenegro, Pablo; Fonteriz, Rosalba I; Moreno, Alfredo; Lobatón, Carmen D; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx and efflux and their dependence on cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and [Na(+)] using low-Ca(2+)-affinity aequorin. The rate of Ca(2+) release from mitochondria increased linearly with mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](M)). Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) release was predominant al low [Ca(2+)](M) but saturated at [Ca(2+)](M) around 400muM, while Na(+)-independent Ca(2+) release was very slow at [Ca(2+)](M) below 200muM, and then increased at higher [Ca(2+)](M), perhaps through the opening of a new pathway. Half-maximal activation of Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) release occurred at 5-10mM [Na(+)], within the physiological range of cytosolic [Na(+)]. Ca(2+) entry rates were comparable in size to Ca(2+) exit rates at cytosolic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](c)) below 7muM, but the rate of uptake was dramatically accelerated at higher [Ca(2+)](c). As a consequence, the presence of [Na(+)] considerably reduced the rate of [Ca(2+)](M) increase at [Ca(2+)](c) below 7muM, but its effect was hardly appreciable at 10muM [Ca(2+)](c). Exit rates were more dependent on the temperature than uptake rates, thus making the [Ca(2+)](M) transients to be much more prolonged at lower temperature. Our kinetic data suggest that mitochondria have little high affinity Ca(2+) buffering, and comparison of our results with data on total mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes indicate that the mitochondrial Ca(2+) bound/Ca(2+) free ratio is around 10- to 100-fold for most of the observed [Ca(2+)](M) range and suggest that massive phosphate precipitation can only occur when [Ca(2+)](M) reaches the millimolar range.

  19. Ground-penetrating radar investigation of St. Leonard's Crypt under the Wawel Cathedral (Cracow, Poland) - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Andrea; Pajewski, Lara; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Avlonitou, Pepi; Konstantakis, Yannis; Musiela, Małgorzata; Mitka, Bartosz; Lambot, Sébastien; Żakowska, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    The Wawel ensemble, including the Royal Castle, the Wawel Cathedral and other monuments, is perched on top of the Wawel hill immediately south of the Cracow Old Town, and is by far the most important collection of buildings in Poland. St. Leonard's Crypt is located under the Wawel Cathedral of St Stanislaus BM and St Wenceslaus M. It was built in the years 1090-1117 and was the western crypt of the pre-existing Romanesque Wawel Cathedral, so-called Hermanowska. Pope John Paul II said his first Mass on the altar of St. Leonard's Crypt on November 2, 1946, one day after his priestly ordination. The interior of the crypt is divided by eight columns into three naves with vaulted ceiling and ended with one apse. The tomb of Bishop Maurus, who died in 1118, is in the middle of the crypt under the floor; an inscription "+ MAVRVS EPC MCXVIII +" indicates the burial place and was made in 1938 after the completion of archaeological works which resulted in the discovery of this tomb. Moreover, the crypt hosts the tombs of six Polish kings and heroes: Michał Korybut Wiśniowiecki (King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth), Jan III Sobieski (King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Commander at the Battle of Vienna), Maria Kazimiera (Queen of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and consort to Jan III Sobieski), Józef Poniatowski (Prince of Poland and Marshal of France), Tadeusz Kościuszko (Polish general, revolutionary and a Brigadier General in the American Revolutionary War) and Władysław Sikorski (Prime Minister of the Polish Government in Exile and Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Armed Forces). The adjacent six crypts and corridors host the tombs of the other Polish kings, from Sigismund the Old to Augustus II the Strong, their families and several Polish heroes. In May 2015, the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" organised and offered a Training School (TS) on the

  20. Exchanging knowledge and working together in COST Action TU1208: Short-Term Scientific Missions on Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Assuncao, Sonia; De Smedt, Philippe; Giannakis, Iraklis; Matera, Loredana; Pinel, Nicolas; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Sala, Jacopo; Lambot, Sébastien; Trinks, Immo; Marciniak, Marian; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the scientific results stemming from six Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) funded by the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (Action Chair: Lara Pajewski, STSM Manager: Marian Marciniak). STSMs are important means to develop linkages and scientific collaborations between participating institutions involved in a COST Action. Scientists have the possibility to go to an institution abroad, in order to undertake joint research and share techniques/equipment/infrastructures that may not be available in their own institution. STSMs are particularly intended for Early Stage Researchers (ESRs), i.e., young scientists who obtained their PhD since no more than 8 years when they started to be involved in the Action. Duration of a standard STSM can be from 5 to 90 days and the research activities carried out during this short stay shall specifically contribute to the achievement of the scientific objectives of the supporting COST Action. The first STSM was carried out by Lara Pajewski, visiting Antonis Giannopoulos at The University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). The research activities focused on the electromagnetic modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) responses to complex targets. A set of test scenarios was defined, to be used by research groups participating to Working Group 3 of COST Action TU1208, to test and compare different electromagnetic forward- and inverse-scattering methods; these scenarios were modelled by using the well-known finite-difference time-domain simulator GprMax. New Matlab procedures for the processing and visualization of GprMax output data were developed. During the second STSM, Iraklis Giannakis visited Lara Pajewski at Roma Tre University (Italy). The study was concerned with the numerical modelling of horn antennas for GPR. An air-coupled horn antenna was implemented in GprMax and tested in a realistically

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Newly Generated Dentate Granule Cells Using TU Tagging Reveals Pattern Shifts in Gene Expression during Circuit Integration1,2

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Christina; Shen, Rongkun; Goodman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite representing only a small fraction of hippocampal granule cells, adult-generated newborn granule cells have been implicated in learning and memory (Aimone et al., 2011). Newborn granule cells undergo functional maturation and circuit integration over a period of weeks. However, it is difficult to assess the accompanying gene expression profiles in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution using traditional methods. Here we used a novel method [“thiouracil (TU) tagging”] to map the profiles of nascent mRNAs in mouse immature newborn granule cells compared with mature granule cells. We targeted a nonmammalian uracil salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, to newborn neurons and mature granule cells using retroviral and lentiviral constructs, respectively. Subsequent injection of 4-TU tagged nascent RNAs for analysis by RNA sequencing. Several hundred genes were significantly enhanced in the retroviral dataset compared with the lentiviral dataset. We compared a selection of the enriched genes with steady-state levels of mRNAs using quantitative PCR. Ontology analysis revealed distinct patterns of nascent mRNA expression, with newly generated immature neurons showing enhanced expression for genes involved in synaptic function, and neural differentiation and development, as well as genes not previously associated with granule cell maturation. Surprisingly, the nascent mRNAs enriched in mature cells were related to energy homeostasis and metabolism, presumably indicative of the increased energy demands of synaptic transmission and their complex dendritic architecture. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our modified TU-tagging method provides a foundation for comparison with steady-state RNA analyses by traditional transcriptomic approaches in defining the functional roles of newborn neurons. PMID:27011954

  2. [Classes of crude drugs and its distribution of producing area in the attached illustrations in Ben cao tu jing (Illustrated Classic of Materia Medica)].

    PubMed

    Xu, T; Peng, H S

    2016-03-01

    Ben cao tu jing (Illustrated Classic of Materia Medica) is the earliest extant atlas book of materia medica in China, with 933 attached drawings. Among them, the largest portion, amounting to 670, are herbaceous plants, mostly commonly used, with definite marks of the origin producing areas, distributed across 149 administrative divisions(prefectures and counties) of the Song Dynasty, most of them in Northern area which were distributed denser than those in Southern area. The densest ones were located in Southern Shanxi, Eastern Sichuan and Eastern Anhui. In the attached drawings, the frequency of highest occurrence appeared in this Classic are three prefectures, Chuzhou, Shizhou and Guangzhou.

  3. CaPTC Biennial Meetings

    Cancer.gov

    CaPTC hosts the 'Biennial Science of Global Prostate Cancer Disparities in Black Men' conference to address the growing global public health problem of prostate cancer among Black men in industrialized and developing countries.

  4. TU-E-201-02: Eye Lens Dosimetry From CT Perfusion Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.

    2015-06-15

    awareness can lead to avoidance or even prevention. Learning Objectives: To understand recent changes in eye lens dose limits and thresholds for tissue reactions To understand different approaches to dose estimation for eye lens To learn about challenges in eye lens opacities among staff in interventional fluoroscopy Di Zhang, Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA, USA Eye lens radiation dose from brain perfusion CT exams CT perfusion imaging requires repeatedly exposing one location of the head to monitor the uptake and washout of iodinated contrast. The accumulated radiation dose to the eye lens can be high, leading to concerns about potential radiation injury from these scans. CTDIvol assumes continuous z coverage and can overestimate eye lens dose in CT perfusion scans where the table do not increment. The radiation dose to the eye lens from clinical CT brain perfusion studies can be estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models. MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers were simulated and the eye lens doses were estimated using the AAPM posted clinical protocols. They were also compared to CTDIvol values to evaluate the overestimation from CTDIvol. The efficacy of eye lens dose reduction techniques such as tilting the gantry and moving the scan location away from the eyelens were also investigated. Eye lens dose ranged from 81 mGy to 279 mGy, depending on the scanner and protocol used. It is between 59% and 63% of the CTDIvol values reported by the scanners. The eye lens dose is significantly reduced when the eye lenses were not directly irradiated. CTDIvol should not be interpreted as patient dose; this study has shown it to overestimate dose to the eye lens. These results may be used to provide more accurate estimates of actual dose to ensure that protocols are operated safely below thresholds. Tilting the gantry or moving the scanning region further away from the eyes are effective for reducing lens dose in clinical practice

  5. TU-E-201-00: Eye Lens Dosimetry for Patients and Staff

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    awareness can lead to avoidance or even prevention. Learning Objectives: To understand recent changes in eye lens dose limits and thresholds for tissue reactions To understand different approaches to dose estimation for eye lens To learn about challenges in eye lens opacities among staff in interventional fluoroscopy Di Zhang, Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA, USA Eye lens radiation dose from brain perfusion CT exams CT perfusion imaging requires repeatedly exposing one location of the head to monitor the uptake and washout of iodinated contrast. The accumulated radiation dose to the eye lens can be high, leading to concerns about potential radiation injury from these scans. CTDIvol assumes continuous z coverage and can overestimate eye lens dose in CT perfusion scans where the table do not increment. The radiation dose to the eye lens from clinical CT brain perfusion studies can be estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models. MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers were simulated and the eye lens doses were estimated using the AAPM posted clinical protocols. They were also compared to CTDIvol values to evaluate the overestimation from CTDIvol. The efficacy of eye lens dose reduction techniques such as tilting the gantry and moving the scan location away from the eyelens were also investigated. Eye lens dose ranged from 81 mGy to 279 mGy, depending on the scanner and protocol used. It is between 59% and 63% of the CTDIvol values reported by the scanners. The eye lens dose is significantly reduced when the eye lenses were not directly irradiated. CTDIvol should not be interpreted as patient dose; this study has shown it to overestimate dose to the eye lens. These results may be used to provide more accurate estimates of actual dose to ensure that protocols are operated safely below thresholds. Tilting the gantry or moving the scanning region further away from the eyes are effective for reducing lens dose in clinical practice

  6. Cathodic behavior of molten CaCl2-CaO and CaCl2-NaCl-CaO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Lan; Wang, Wei; Li, Shi-Chao; Cao, Shan-Hui

    2010-12-01

    The cathodic behavior of molten CaCl2, CaCl2-CaO and equimolar CaCl2-NaCl-CaO was studied by cyclic voltammograms and constant potential polarization at temperatures of 1123 to 1173 K on molybdenum and titanium electrodes. The diffusion coefficient of Ca2+ (CaO) in molten CaCl2-CaO was calculated from the linear relationship between the square root of scan rate and the peak current density. The deposition potentials and the potential temperature coefficient of CaO in molten CaCl2-0.5mol%CaO and CaCl2-NaCl-0.5mol%CaO were also obtained from their cyclic voltammograms. The result shows that CaO is more easily reduced than CaCl2. The addition of NaCl in molten CaCl2-CaO induces the underpotential electrodeposition of CaO.

  7. Electromagnetic modelling, inversion and data-processing techniques for GPR: ongoing activities in Working Group 3 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonis; van der Kruk, Jan

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 3 (WG3) 'EM methods for near-field scattering problems by buried structures; data processing techniques' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. WG3 is structured in four Projects. Project 3.1 deals with 'Electromagnetic modelling for GPR applications.' Project 3.2 is concerned with 'Inversion and imaging techniques for GPR applications.' The topic of Project 3.3 is the 'Development of intrinsic models for describing near-field antenna effects, including antenna-medium coupling, for improved radar data processing using full-wave inversion.' Project 3.4 focuses on 'Advanced GPR data-processing algorithms.' Electromagnetic modeling tools that are being developed and improved include the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique and the spectral domain Cylindrical-Wave Approach (CWA). One of the well-known freeware and versatile FDTD simulators is GprMax that enables an improved realistic representation of the soil/material hosting the sought structures and of the GPR antennas. Here, input/output tools are being developed to ease the definition of scenarios and the visualisation of numerical results. The CWA expresses the field scattered by subsurface two-dimensional targets with arbitrary cross-section as a sum of cylindrical waves. In this way, the interaction is taken into account of multiple scattered fields within the medium hosting the sought targets. Recently, the method has been extended to deal with through-the-wall scenarios. One of the

  8. Faculty: Thy Administrator's Keeper? Some Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Brendan M.

    2009-01-01

    Colleges and universities face a principal-agent problem. There are information asymmetries over the actions chosen by administrators. Because non-profit constraints limit the financial stake of trustees there may be insufficient monitoring of administrators and, consequentially, shirking. It is conceivable that faculty will serve as "delegated…

  9. The site of net absorption of Ca from the intestinal tract of growing pigs and effect of phytic acid, Ca level and Ca source on Ca digestibility.

    PubMed

    González-Vega, J Caroline; Walk, Carrie L; Liu, Yanhong; Stein, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the standardised digestibility of Ca in calcium carbonate and Lithothamnium calcareum Ca is not different regardless of the level of dietary Ca, and that phytic acid affects the digestibility of Ca in these two ingredients to the same degree. The objectives were to determine where in the intestinal tract Ca absorption takes place and if there are measurable quantities of basal endogenous Ca fluxes in the stomach, small intestine or large intestine. Diets contained calcium carbonate or L. calcareum Ca as the sole source of Ca, 0% or 1% phytic acid and 0.4% or 0.8% Ca. A Ca-free diet was also formulated and used to measure endogenous fluxes and losses of Ca. Nine growing pigs (initial body weight 23.8 ± 1.3 kg) were cannulated in the duodenum and in the distal ileum, and faecal, ileal and duodenal samples were collected. Duodenal endogenous fluxes of Ca were greater (p < 0.05) than ileal endogenous fluxes and total tract endogenous losses of Ca, but ileal endogenous fluxes were less (p < 0.05) than total tract endogenous losses. Standardised digestibility of Ca was not affected by the level of phytic acid, but decreased (p < 0.05) as Ca level increased in L. calcareum Ca diets, but that was not the case if calcium carbonate was the source of Ca (interaction, p < 0.05). The standardised duodenal digestibility (SDD), standardised ileal digestibility (SID) and standardised total tract digestibility (STTD) of Ca were not different if calcium carbonate was the source of dietary Ca. However, the STTD of Ca in L. calcareum Ca was greater (p < 0.05) than the SID and SDD of Ca. The SDD, SID and STTD of Ca in calcium carbonate were greater (p < 0.05) than those of L. calcareum Ca. In conclusion, under the conditions of this experiment, standardised digestibility of Ca is not affected by the level of phytic acid, but may be affected by dietary Ca level depending on the Ca source. Calcium from calcium carbonate is mostly

  10. Ca2+ waves in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Izu, Leighton T.; Xie, Yuanfang; Sato, Daisuke; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ waves were probably first observed in the early 1940s. Since then Ca2+ waves have captured the attention of an eclectic mixture of mathematicians, neuroscientists, muscle physiologists, developmental biologists, and clinical cardiologists. This review discusses the current state of mathematical models of Ca2+ waves, the normal physiological functions Ca2+ waves might serve in cardiac cells, as well as how the spatial arrangement of Ca2+ release channels shape Ca2+ waves, and we introduce the idea of Ca2+ phase waves that might provide a useful framework for understanding triggered arrhythmias. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Calcium Signaling in Heart’. PMID:23220129

  11. Expression of the mucus adhesion genes Mub and MapA, adhesion-like factor EF-Tu and bacteriocin gene plaA of Lactobacillus plantarum 423, monitored with real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ramiah, K; van Reenen, C A; Dicks, L M T

    2007-05-30

    Expression of the mucus adhesion genes Mub and MapA, adhesion-like factor EF-Tu and bacteriocin gene plaA by Lactobacillus plantarum 423, grown in the presence of bile, pancreatin and at low pH, was studied by real-time PCR. Mub, MapA and EF-Tu were up-regulated in the presence of mucus, proportional to increasing concentrations. Expression of MapA was up-regulated in the presence of 3.0 g/l bile and 3.0 g/l pancreatin at pH 6.5. Similar results were recorded in the presence of 10.0 g/l bile and 10.0 g/l pancreatin at pH 6.5. Expression of Mub was down-regulated in the presence of bile and pancreatin, whilst the expression of EF-Tu and plaA remained unchanged. Expression of Mub and MapA remained unchanged at pH 4.0, whilst expression of EF-Tu and plaA were up-regulated. Expression of MapA was down-regulated in the presence of 1.0 g/l l-cysteine HCl, suggesting that the gene is regulated by transcription attenuation that involves cysteine.

  12. Large Ca2+-dependent facilitation of CaV2.1 channels revealed by Ca2+ photo-uncaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin-Rong; Adams, Paul J; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Key points CaV2.1 channels constitute a dominant Ca2+ entry pathway into brain neurons, triggering downstream Ca2+-dependent processes such as neurotransmitter release. CaV2.1 is itself modulated by Ca2+, resulting in activity-dependent enhancement of channel opening termed Ca2+-dependent facilitation (CDF). Real-time Ca2+ imaging and Ca2+ uncaging here reveal that CDF turns out to be strikingly faster, more Ca2+ sensitive, and larger than anticipated on previous grounds. Robust resolution of the quantitative profile of CDF enables deduction of a realistic biophysical model for this process. These results suggest that CaV2.1 CDF would figure most prominently in short-term synaptic plasticity and cerebellar Purkinje cell rhythmicity. Abstract CaV2.1 (P-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels constitute a major source of neuronal Ca2+ current, strongly influencing rhythmicity and triggering neurotransmitter release throughout the central nervous system. Fitting with such stature among Ca2+ entry pathways, CaV2.1 is itself feedback regulated by intracellular Ca2+, acting through calmodulin to facilitate channel opening. The precise neurophysiological role of this calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF) remains uncertain, however, in large measure because the very magnitude, Ca2+ dependence and kinetics of CDF have resisted quantification by conventional means. Here, we utilize the photo-uncaging of Ca2+ with CaV2.1 channels fluxing Li+ currents, so that voltage-dependent activation of channel gating is no longer conflated with Ca2+ entry, and CDF is then driven solely by light-induced increases in Ca2+. By using this strategy, we now find that CDF can be unexpectedly large, enhancing currents by as much as twofold at physiological voltages. CDF is steeply Ca2+ dependent, with a Hill coefficient of approximately two, a half-maximal effect reached by nearly 500 nm Ca2+, and Ca2+ on/off kinetics in the order of milliseconds to tens of milliseconds. These properties were

  13. Multiple Ca2+ Binding Sites in the Extracellular Domain of Ca2+-Sensing Receptor Corresponding to Cooperative Ca2+ Response†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun; Zhou, Yubin; Castiblanco, Adriana; Yang, Wei; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2009-01-01

    A small change in the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) integrates cell signaling responses in multiple cellular and tissue networks and functions via activation of Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSR). Mainly through binding of Ca2+ to the large extracellular domain (ECD) of the dimeric CaSR, intracellular Ca2+ responses are highly cooperative with an apparent Hill coefficient ranging from 2 to 4. We have previously reported the identification of two continuous putative Ca2+-binding sites by grafting CaSR-derived, Ca2+-binding peptides to a scaffold protein, CD2, that does not bind Ca2+. In this paper, we predict more potential non-continuous Ca2+-binding sites in the ECD. We dissect the intact CaSR into three globular subdomains, each of which contains 2 to 3 predicted Ca2+-binding sites. This approach enables us to further understand the mechanisms underlying the binding of multiple metal ions to extended polypeptides derived from within the ECD of the CaSR, which would be anticipated to more closely mimic the structure of the native CaSR ECD. Tb3+-luminescence energy transfer, ANS fluorescence, and NMR studies show biphasic metal-binding components and Ca2+-dependent conformational changes in these subdomains. Removing the predicted Ca2+-binding ligands in site 1 and site 3 abolishes the first binding step and second binding step, respectively. Studies on these subdomains suggest the existence of multiple metal-binding sites and metal-induced conformational changes that might be responsible for switching on/off the CaSR by transition between its open inactive form and closed active form. PMID:19102677

  14. Solar Ca II K Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most important archives of past and current long-term solar synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K are described here. These observations are very important for understanding the state of the solar magnetism on time scales up to several decades. The first observations of this kind began in 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (India), followed by similar programs at different other locations. Regular full-disk Ca II K monitoring programs started in 1915 at the Mount Wilson Observatory (USA) and in 1917 at the National Solar Observatory of Japan. Beginning in 1919 and in 1926 regular observations were taken also at the Paris-Meudon Observatory (France) and at the "Donati solar tower telescope of the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Italy, respectively. In 1926 the the Astronomical Observatory of the Coimbra University in Portugal started its own program of Ca II K observations. Although some of these programs have been terminated over the years, their data archives constitute a unique resource for studies of solar variability. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility.

  15. Les aspects des frottis cervico-vaginaux chez les femmes vivants avec le VIH suivies à Thiès/Sénégal et association avec le degré d'immunodépression

    PubMed Central

    Bammo, Mariama; Dioussé, Pauline; Thiam, Marietou; Diop, Madoky Maguatte; Berthe, Adama; Faye, Flugence Abdou; Diallo, Thierno Abdoul Aziz; Sarr, Fatou Seck; Dione, Haby; Toure, Papa Souleymane; Diop, Bernard Marcel; Ka, Mamadou Mortalla

    2015-01-01

    De nombreuses études ont démontré que les femmes infectées par le VIH ont un risque accru de survenue de néoplasies cervicales intra épithéliales. L'association entre les deux affections étant bidirectionnelle, l'objectif était de décrire les anomalies cervicales chez les femmes séropositives au virus de l'immunodéficience humaine (VIH), de rechercher des facteurs associés et de proposer des recommandations en termes de suivi de ces femmes. Il s'agissait d'une étude transversale, multicentrique recensant l'ensemble des frottis cervico-vaginaux (FCV) et des colposcopies des patientes infectées par le VIH entre 2012 et 2014 dans les services de dermatologie de Thiès et de Mbour. Les données étaient recueillies et analysées par le logiciel EPI Info 2012 version 3.5.4. Les tests statistiques ont été effectués avec un seuil de significativité p <0,05. Etaient inclus 125 patientes. L’âge moyen était de 38,98 ± 10.2 ans [20-77]. Il n'y avait aucun signe d'appels dans 82.4%. Le FCV était normal dans 32.8%, inflammatoire dans 44.8%. Les anomalies cytologiques concernaient 22,4% dont, ASC-H (suspicion de lésions de haut grade: 2.4%), LSIL (lésions de bas grade: 8.8%), HSIL (lésions de haut grade: 4%). Leur majorité (60.7%) avaient un taux de CD4 < 500 et étaient au stade 3 de l'OMS dans 64.3%; la biopsie montrait une dysplasie sévère chez 37.5% des patientes ayant pu réaliser cet examen. Deux patientes ont bénéficié d'un traitement curatif notamment l'exérèse chirurgicale. La survenue de dysplasies cervicales même précoces semble être associée à un stade avancé de l'infection VIH. Un dépistage et un traitement précoces sont absolument nécessaires. PMID:26834915

  16. Ca2+ shuttling between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria underlying Ca2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kiyoaki; Hirose, Kenzo; Iino, Masamitsu

    2006-01-01

    Although many cell functions are regulated by Ca2+ oscillations induced by a cyclic release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores, the pacemaker mechanism of Ca2+ oscillations remains to be explained. Using green fluorescent protein-based Ca2+ indicators that are targeted to intracellular Ca2+ stores, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, we found that Ca2+ shuttles between the ER and mitochondria in phase with Ca2+ oscillations. Following agonist stimulation, Ca2+ release from the ER generated the first Ca2+ oscillation and loaded mitochondria with Ca2+. Before the second Ca2+ oscillation, Ca2+ release from the mitochondria by means of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger caused a gradual increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, inducing a regenerative ER Ca2+ release, which generated the peak of Ca2+ oscillation and partially reloaded the mitochondria. This sequence of events was repeated until mitochondrial Ca2+ was depleted. Thus, Ca2+ shuttling between the ER and mitochondria may have a pacemaker role in the generation of Ca2+ oscillations. PMID:16415789

  17. Decoding Ca2+ signals in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2004-01-01

    Different input signals create their own characteristic Ca2+ fingerprints. These fingerprints are distinguished by frequency, amplitude, duration, and number of Ca2+ oscillations. Ca(2+)-binding proteins and protein kinases decode these complex Ca2+ fingerprints through conformational coupling and covalent modifications of proteins. This decoding of signals can lead to a physiological response with or without changes in gene expression. In plants, Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases are involved in decoding Ca2+ signals into phosphorylation signals. This review summarizes the elements of conformational coupling and molecular mechanisms of regulation of the two groups of protein kinases by Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin in plants.

  18. Ca2+ dynamics in zebrafish morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Kenta; Ogawa, Tomohisa

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) signaling is heavily involved in development, as illustrated by the use of a number of Ca2+ indicators. However, continuous Ca2+ patterns during morphogenesis have not yet been studied using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to track the Ca2+ sensor. In the present study, we monitored Ca2+ levels during zebrafish morphogenesis and differentiation with yellow cameleon, YC2.12. Our results show not only clear changes in Ca2+ levels but also continuous Ca2+ patterns at 24 hpf and later periods for the first time. Serial Ca2+dynamics during early pharyngula period (Prim-5-20; 24–33 hpf) was successfully observed with cameleon, which have not reported anywhere yet. In fact, high Ca2+ level occurred concurrently with hindbrain development in segmentation and pharyngula periods. Ca2+ patterns in the late gastrula through segmentation periods which were obtained with cameleon, were similar to those obtained previously with other Ca2+sensor. Our results suggested that the use of various Ca2+ sensors may lead to novel findings in studies of Ca2+ dynamics. We hope that these results will prove valuable for further research in Ca2+ signaling. PMID:28133572

  19. COST Action TU1206 "SUB-URBAN - A European network to improve understanding and use of the ground beneath our cities"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Diarmad; de Beer, Johannes; Lawrence, David; van der Meulen, Michiel; Mielby, Susie; Hay, David; Scanlon, Ray; Campenhout, Ignace; Taugs, Renate; Eriksson, Ingelov

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable urbanisation is the focus of SUB-URBAN, a European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action TU1206 - A European network to improve understanding and use of the ground beneath our cities. This aims to transform relationships between experts who develop urban subsurface geoscience knowledge - principally national Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs), and those who can most benefit from it - urban decision makers, planners, practitioners and the wider research community. Under COST's Transport and Urban Development Domain, SUB-URBAN has established a network of GSOs and other researchers in over 20 countries, to draw together and evaluate collective urban geoscience research in 3D/4D characterisation, prediction and visualisation. Knowledge exchange between researchers and City-partners within 'SUB-URBAN' is already facilitating new city-scale subsurface projects, and is developing a tool-box of good-practice guidance, decision-support tools, and cost-effective methodologies that are appropriate to local needs and circumstances. These are intended to act as catalysts in the transformation of relationships between geoscientists and urban decision-makers more generally. As a result, the importance of the urban sub-surface in the sustainable development of our cities will be better appreciated, and the conflicting demands currently placed on it will be acknowledged, and resolved appropriately. Existing city-scale 3D/4D model exemplars are being developed by partners in the UK (Glasgow, London), Germany (Hamburg) and France (Paris). These draw on extensive ground investigation (10s-100s of thousands of boreholes) and other data. Model linkage enables prediction of groundwater, heat, SuDS, and engineering properties. Combined subsurface and above-ground (CityGML, BIMs) models are in preparation. These models will provide valuable tools for more holistic urban planning; identifying subsurface opportunities and saving costs by reducing uncertainty in

  20. Change for Life/Cambia tu vida: A health promotion program based on the stages of change model for African descendent and Latino adults in New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris; Ryan, Andrew

    2006-07-01

    Studies have shown that diabetes and cardiovascular disease can be controlled and prevented through the modification of behavioral risk factors. The transtheoretical model of behavior change, also known as the stages of change model, offers promise for designing behavior change interventions. However, this model has rarely been applied in group settings with minority communities. To address racial and ethnic disparities related to the risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, the New Hampshire REACH 2010 Initiative has designed and implemented Change for Life/Cambia tu vida, a health promotion program based on the stages of change model for African descendent and Latino residents of southern New Hampshire. The program guides participants through the five stages of change and provides resources to support healthy behavior change. We also sponsor periodic class reunions that help program graduates to maintain these healthy habits. This article describes curriculum development, participant feedback, and early pretest and posttest evaluation results from a standardized assessment.

  1. Zircon Hf isotopic constraints on the mantle source of felsic magmatic rocks in the Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu Le basin, northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuki, T.; Lan, C.; Tran, T.; Pham, T.; Wang, K.

    2013-12-01

    Permian plume-related rocks, such as picrites, flood basalts and silicic volcanic rocks occur in northern Vietnam. This area was displaced 600 km southeastward along the Ailao Shan-Red River fault during mid-Tertiary in response to the India-Eurasia collision. The original location of the area was situated at the central Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) in SW China before Tertiary. The picrites and flood basalts in northern Vietnam have been investigated by many authors and are comparable with the ELIP. While, felsic magmatisms in northern Vietnam has been poorly studied. Zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopic data are useful to compare the felsic magmatism in northern Vietnam with that in the ELIP, because the magmatisms of the ELIP had a characteristic time period (260-250 Ma) and the Hf isotopes show a remarkable mantle signature. Therefore, this study carried out in-situ U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions for 300 zircon grains in eighteen granitoids and rhyolites in Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu Le basin in northern Vietnam. Zircons from the granitoids and rhyolites occasionally show development of {101} pyramid and {100} prism crystal facies, suggesting typical zircons crystallized from high temperature alkaline granite. 206Pb/238U ages of granitoid and rhyolite yield consistently in a narrow range of 260 to 250 Ma, which coincides with those from peralkaline to metaluminous granites in the ELIP. ɛHf(t) values of zircons in rhyolites and granites of this study dominate in the range of +5 to +10, which is consistent with those from the ELIP. U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions of zircons indicate that felsic magmatic rocks in the Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu La basin have been derived from the same mantle source with the ELIP.

  2. Rejection of tmRNA·SmpB after GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu on ribosomes stalled on intact mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Miller, Mickey R; Muto, Akira; Buskirk, Allen R; Himeno, Hyouta

    2014-11-01

    Messenger RNAs lacking a stop codon trap ribosomes at their 3' ends, depleting the pool of ribosomes available for protein synthesis. In bacteria, a remarkable quality control system rescues and recycles stalled ribosomes in a process known as trans-translation. Acting as a tRNA, transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is aminoacylated, delivered by EF-Tu to the ribosomal A site, and accepts the nascent polypeptide. Translation then resumes on a reading frame within tmRNA, encoding a short peptide tag that targets the nascent peptide for degradation by proteases. One unsolved issue in trans-translation is how tmRNA and its protein partner SmpB preferentially recognize stalled ribosomes and not actively translating ones. Here, we examine the effect of the length of the 3' extension of mRNA on each step of trans-translation by pre-steady-state kinetic methods and fluorescence polarization binding assays. Unexpectedly, EF-Tu activation and GTP hydrolysis occur rapidly regardless of the length of the mRNA, although the peptidyl transfer to tmRNA decreases as the mRNA 3' extension increases and the tmRNA·SmpB binds less tightly to the ribosome with an mRNA having a long 3' extension. From these results, we conclude that the tmRNA·SmpB complex dissociates during accommodation due to competition between the downstream mRNA and the C-terminal tail for the mRNA channel. Rejection of the tmRNA·SmpB complex during accommodation is reminiscent of the rejection of near-cognate tRNA from the ribosome in canonical translation.

  3. CaFe interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Kozak, M.; Gnaciński, P.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Beletsky, Y.; Krełowski, J.

    2007-07-01

    A new kind of interstellar cloud is proposed. These are rare (just a few examples among ~300 lines of sight) objects with the CaI 4227-Å, FeI 3720-Å and 3860-Å lines stronger than those of KI (near 7699 Å) and NaI (near 3302 Å). We propose the name `CaFe' for these clouds. Apparently they occupy different volumes from the well-known interstellar HI clouds where the KI and ultraviolet NaI lines are dominant features. In the CaFe clouds we have not found either detectable molecular features (CH, CN) or diffuse interstellar bands which, as commonly believed, are carried by some complex, organic molecules. We have found the CaFe clouds only along sightlines toward hot, luminous (and thus distant) objects with high rates of mass loss. In principle, the observed gas-phase interstellar abundances reflect the combined effects of the nucleosynthetic history of the material, the depletion of heavy elements into dust grains and the ionization state of these elements which may depend on irradiation by neighbouring stars. Based on data collected using the Maestro spectrograph at the Terskol 2-m telescope, Russia; and on data collected using the ESO Feros spectrograph; and on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility acquired with the UVES spectrograph, Chile. E-mail: `arctur'@rambler.ru (AB); marizak@astri.uni.torun.pl (MK); pg@iftia.univ.gda.pl (PG); gala@boao.re.kr (GAG); ybialets@eso.org (YB); jacek@astri.uni.torun.pl (JK)

  4. Carcinogenesis of PIK3CA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    PIK3CA is the most frequently mutated oncogene in human cancers. PIK3CA is phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha. It controls cell growth, proliferation, motility, survival, differentiation and intracellular trafficking. In most of human cancer alteration occurred frequently in the alpha isoform of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase. PIK3CA mutations were most frequent in endometrial, ovarian, colorectal, breast, cervical, squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, chondroma, thyroid carcinoma and in cancer family syndrome. Inhibition of PI3K signaling can diminish cell proliferation, and in some circumstances, promote cell death. Consequently, components of this pathway present attractive targets for cancer therapeutics. A number of PI3K pathway inhibitors have been developed and used. PI3K inhibitors (both pan-PI3K and isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors), dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitors that are catalytic site inhibitors of the p110 isoforms and mTOR (the kinase component of both mTORC1 and mTORC2), mTOR catalytic site inhibitors, and AKT inhibitors are the most advanced in the clinic. They are approved for the treatment of several carcinomas. PMID:23768168

  5. Calmodulin Regulates Ca2+-sensing Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling and Its Cell Surface Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun; Zhou, Yubin; Wong, Hing-Cheung; Castiblanco, Adriana; Chen, Yanyi; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a member of family C of the GPCRs responsible for sensing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o) levels, maintaining extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and transducing Ca2+ signaling from the extracellular milieu to the intracellular environment. In the present study, we have demonstrated a Ca2+-dependent, stoichiometric interaction between CaM and a CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) located within the C terminus of CaSR (residues 871–898). Our studies suggest a wrapping around 1–14-like mode of interaction that involves global conformational changes in both lobes of CaM with concomitant formation of a helical structure in the CaMBD. More importantly, the Ca2+-dependent association between CaM and the C terminus of CaSR is critical for maintaining proper responsiveness of intracellular Ca2+ responses to changes in extracellular Ca2+ and regulating cell surface expression of the receptor. PMID:20826781

  6. Evolution of Seawater 44Ca/40Ca Through the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, P. R.; Gopalan, K.; Norris, R. D.; MacIsaac, C.; Liu, X.; MacDougall, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    We analyzed the Ca concentrations and 44Ca/40Ca ratios of surface ocean planktonic (Morozovella, Acarinina, Dentoglobigerina) and benthic (Gavelinella) foraminifera of Late Cretaceous to Late Oligocene ages from DSDP and ODP sites in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans in order to fill a major gap in the Phanerozoic seawater 44Ca/40Ca curve (Farkass et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2007). Our new 44Ca/40Ca data indicate a general increase in foraminiferan-based seawater 44Ca/40Ca from ~-1.3 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW in Late Cretaceous to ~0.0 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW in Early Miocene (Heuser et al., Paleocean. 20, 2005; Sime et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2007). In detail, the 44Ca/40Ca ratio stepped abruptly from ~-1.3 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW to a slightly higher value of ~-1.1 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW across the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. A slight positive excursion of ~0.2 ‰ above the background value occurred after the Paleocene Thermal Maximum (55 Ma) but otherwise, the Paleocene to Middle Eocene ratio is relatively stable at ~-1.0 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW. The most prominent increase in foraminiferan-based seawater 44Ca/40Ca occurred from Late Eocene to Late Oligocene, roughly coincident with the initial phase of the rapid and steady rise of marine carbonate 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the Tertiary (e.g., DePaolo and Ingram, Science 227, 1985).

  7. Cell biology of Ca2+-triggered exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhiping P; Südhof, Thomas C

    2010-08-01

    Ca(2+) triggers many forms of exocytosis in different types of eukaryotic cells, for example synaptic vesicle exocytosis in neurons, granule exocytosis in mast cells, and hormone exocytosis in endocrine cells. Work over the past two decades has shown that synaptotagmins function as the primary Ca(2+)-sensors for most of these forms of exocytosis, and that synaptotagmins act via Ca(2+)-dependent interactions with both the fusing phospholipid membranes and the membrane fusion machinery. However, some forms of Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis may utilize other, as yet unidentified Ca(2+)-sensors, for example, slow synaptic exocytosis mediating asynchronous neurotransmitter release. In the following overview, we will discuss the synaptotagmin-based mechanism of Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells, and its potential extension to other types of Ca(2+)-stimulated exocytosis for which no synaptotagmin Ca(2+)-sensor has been identified.

  8. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  9. [Effect of polycarbophil Ca on IBS].

    PubMed

    Mine, Tetsuya

    2006-08-01

    In this chapter, I mentioned the effect of polycarbophil Ca on IBS. IBS is classified into 3 types; diarrhea type, constipation type and combined type. Polycarbophil Ca is effective for all types of IBS.

  10. CaMKII regulates intracellular Ca²⁺ dynamics in native endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Fanny; Charbel, Chimène; Blanchette, Alexandre; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Localized endothelial Ca(2+) signalling, such as Ca(2+) pulsars, can modulate the contractile state of the underlying vascular smooth muscle cell through specific endothelial targets. In addition to K(Ca)3.1 as a target, Ca(2+) pulsars, an IP3R-dependent pulsatile Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could activate a frequency-sensitive Ca(2+)-dependent kinase such as CaMKII. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), acetylcholine increased endothelial CaMKII phosphorylation and activation, thereby suggesting CaMKII activation independently of Ca(2+) influx. Herein, a reciprocal relation where CaMKII controls endothelial Ca(2+) dynamics has been investigated in mesenteric arteries. Both CaMKIIα and β isoforms have been identified in endothelial cells and close proximity (<40 nm) suggests their association in heteromultimers. Intracellular Ca(2+) monitoring with high speed confocal microscopy then showed that inhibition of CaMKII with KN-93 significantly increased the population of Ca(2+) pulsars active sites (+89%), suggesting CaMKII as a major regulator of Ca(2+) pulsars in native endothelium. Mechanistic insights were then sought through the elucidation of the impact of CaMKII on ER Ca(2+) store. ER Ca(2+) emptying was accelerated by CaMKII inhibition and ER Ca(2+) content was assessed using ionomycin. Exposure to KN-93 strongly diminished ER Ca(2+) content (-61%) by relieving CaMKII-dependent inhibition of IP3 receptors (IP3R). Moreover, in situ proximity ligation assay suggested CaMKII-IP3R promiscuity, essential condition for a protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, segregation of IP3R within myoendothelial projection (MEP) appears to be isoform-specific. Hence, only IP3R type 1 and type 2 are detected within fenestrations of the internal elastic lamina, sites of MEP, whilst type 3 is absent from these structures. In summary, CaMKII seems to act as a Ca(2+)-sensitive switch of a negative feedback loop regulating endothelial Ca(2

  11. Mojave Toxin: A Selective Ca(++) Channel Antagonist

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    other than maitotoxin, blocking 3H-nitrendipine binding to the high affinity dihydropyridine receptor associated with the Ca++ channel, as well as... dihydropyridine receptors in rat synaptic membranes suggests that this toxin may be a useful proble of the Ca++ channel complex. It is not certain whether MoTX has...increase in intracellular Ca++ resulting from the binding of the toxin to dihydropyridine receptors coupled to Ca++ channels. The resolution of this

  12. Mission CaMKIIγ: shuttle calmodulin from membrane to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zulfiqar A; Stein, Ivar S; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-10-09

    Neuronal plasticity depends on plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx, resulting in activity-dependent gene transcription. Calmodulin (CaM) activated by Ca(2+) initiates the nuclear events, but how CaM makes its way to the nucleus has remained elusive. Ma et al. now show that CaMKIIγ transports CaM from cell surface Ca(2+) channels to the nucleus.

  13. [Regulation of the Na/Ca exchanger].

    PubMed

    DiPolo, R; Rojas, H; Beaugé, L

    1993-01-01

    The introduction of the squid giant axon preparation to studies on Ca homeostasis has proven very useful in laying the foundations in the study of Ca regulation. In particular the Na/Ca exchange mechanism has been characterized in terms of its regulatory processes using the well define technique of intracellular dialysis and membrane potential control. The Na/Ca exchange countertransport system plays a critical role in physiological processes including cardiac contractility and photoreception. It has also been implicate in the etiology of essential hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias and cell death. The ability of the Na/Ca exchanger to regulate the intracellular ionized Ca concentration ([Ca2+i]) under physiological conditions, is determined by the direction (net Ca efflux or Ca influx), and magnitude of transport. The direction of Ca transport is decided by the chemical gradient of sodium and calcium. The magnitude of the exchange is regulated by kinetic factors. This kinetic factors are critical since they decide whether the exchanger will mediate a net Ca movement under certain conditions. Recently, a large effort has been put together to characterize the secondary modulation of the Na/Ca exchanger. In particular modulation by MgATP and intracellular Ca2+. In nerve cells we have discover that MgATP regulates the exchanger through as phosphorylation-dephosphorylation processes most probably relate to the action of a kinase-phosphatase system. The other important ligand that regulates the exchange activity is the level of [Ca2+i]. We have found the presence of a regulatory site in the cytoplasmic face of the exchanger different from the transport site and probably responsible for turning the carrier "on" or "off". In this article we will depict some of the processes involved in the metabolic and ionic regulation of the Na/Ca exchanger.

  14. Separate Ca2+ sources are buffered by distinct Ca2+ handling systems in aplysia neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Groten, Christopher J; Rebane, Jonathan T; Blohm, Gunnar; Magoski, Neil S

    2013-04-10

    Although the contribution of Ca(2+) buffering systems can vary between neuronal types and cellular compartments, it is unknown whether distinct Ca(2+) sources within a neuron have different buffers. As individual Ca(2+) sources can have separate functions, we propose that each is handled by unique systems. Using Aplysia californica bag cell neurons, which initiate reproduction through an afterdischarge involving multiple Ca(2+)-dependent processes, we investigated the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial sequestration, as well as extrusion via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, to the clearance of voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx, Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release (CICR), and store-operated Ca(2+) influx. Cultured bag cell neurons were filled with the Ca(2+) indicator, fura-PE3, to image Ca(2+) under whole-cell voltage clamp. A 5 Hz, 1 min train of depolarizing voltage steps elicited voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx followed by EGTA-sensitive CICR from the mitochondria. A compartment model of Ca(2+) indicated the effect of EGTA on CICR was due to buffering of released mitochondrial Ca(2+) rather than uptake competition. Removal of voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx was dominated by the mitochondria and PMCA, with no contribution from the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger or sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). In contrast, CICR recovery was slowed by eliminating the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and PMCA. Last, store-operated influx, evoked by ER depletion, was removed by the SERCA and depended on the mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results demonstrate that distinct buffering systems are dedicated to particular Ca(2+) sources. In general, this may represent a means to differentially regulate Ca(2+)-dependent processes, and for Aplysia, influence how reproductive behavior is triggered.

  15. Ca2+ Cycling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Anderson, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ plays a crucial role in connecting membrane excitability with contraction in myocardium. The hallmark features of heart failure are mechanical dysfunction and arrhythmias; defective intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is a central cause of contractile dysfunction and arrhythmias in failing myocardium. Defective Ca2+ homeostasis in heart failure can result from pathological alteration in the expression and activity of an increasingly understood collection of Ca2+ homeostatic binding proteins, ion channels and enzymes. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of defective Ca2+ cycling in heart failure and consider how fundamental understanding of these pathways may translate into novel and innovative therapies. PMID:23989713

  16. Distinct Roles for Dorsal CA3 and CA1 in Memory for Sequential Nonspatial Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farovik, Anja; Dupont, Laura M.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dorsal hippocampal areas CA3 and CA1 are both involved in representing sequences of events that compose unique episodes. However, it is uncertain whether the contribution of CA3 is restricted to spatial information, and it is unclear whether CA1 encodes order per se or contributes by an active maintenance of…

  17. Ca2+ sensor proteins in dendritic spines: a race for Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, Vijeta; Sharma, Yogendra; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic spines are believed to be micro-compartments of Ca2+ regulation. In a recent study, it was suggested that the ubiquitous and evolutionarily conserved Ca2+ sensor, calmodulin (CaM), is the first to intercept Ca2+ entering the spine and might be responsible for the fast decay of Ca2+ transients in spines. Neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) and neuronal calcium-binding protein (nCaBP) families consist of Ca2+ sensors with largely unknown synaptic functions despite an increasing number of interaction partners. Particularly how these sensors operate in spines in the presence of CaM has not been discussed in detail before. The limited Ca2+ resources and the existence of common targets create a highly competitive environment where Ca2+ sensors compete with each other for Ca2+ and target binding. In this review, we take a simple numerical approach to put forth possible scenarios and their impact on signaling via Ca2+ sensors of the NCS and nCaBP families. We also discuss the ways in which spine geometry and properties of ion channels, their kinetics and distribution, alter the spatio-temporal aspects of Ca2+ transients in dendritic spines, whose interplay with Ca2+ sensors in turn influences the race for Ca2+. PMID:22586368

  18. Levels of CEA, CA153, CA199, CA724 and AFP in nipple discharge of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Song; Mei, Yu; Wang, Yongmei; Zhu, Jiang; Zheng, Guixi; Ma, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between breast cancer and benign breast diseases with nipple discharge remains an important diagnostic challenge. The purpose of this study was to predict the potential usefulness of tumor markers in nipple discharge and to investigate the relationship of tumor markers and clinical characteristics with breast cancer.One hundred and eleven patients with nipple discharge received breast surgery from November 2013 to December 2014 were included in the study. We evaluated levels of five tumor markers (CEA, CA153, CA199, CA724 and AFP) prior to treatment. Patients were divided into two groups according to postoperative pathological results: 30 cases in breast cancer group and 81 cases in benign group. The relationships of clinical characteristics with breast cancer were investigated by multivariate analysis with a logistic regression model.It showed significant differences in levels of nipple discharge CEA (P < 0.001) and CA153 (P = 0.014), but not CA199 (P = 0.856), CA724 (P = 0.171), AFP (P = 0.834) among two groups. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated complaint, age, menopause, abnormal palpable mass, CEA and CA153 were associated with breast cancer. In summary, measurements of CA199, CA724 and AFP in nipple discharge are not of great clinical value. Detecting CEA and CA153 in nipple dischargecould potentially be used for the early detection of breast cancer with in high-risk populations. PMID:26885008

  19. Levels of CEA, CA153, CA199, CA724 and AFP in nipple discharge of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Song; Mei, Yu; Wang, Yongmei; Zhu, Jiang; Zheng, Guixi; Ma, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between breast cancer and benign breast diseases with nipple discharge remains an important diagnostic challenge. The purpose of this study was to predict the potential usefulness of tumor markers in nipple discharge and to investigate the relationship of tumor markers and clinical characteristics with breast cancer.One hundred and eleven patients with nipple discharge received breast surgery from November 2013 to December 2014 were included in the study. We evaluated levels of five tumor markers (CEA, CA153, CA199, CA724 and AFP) prior to treatment. Patients were divided into two groups according to postoperative pathological results: 30 cases in breast cancer group and 81 cases in benign group. The relationships of clinical characteristics with breast cancer were investigated by multivariate analysis with a logistic regression model.It showed significant differences in levels of nipple discharge CEA (P < 0.001) and CA153 (P = 0.014), but not CA199 (P = 0.856), CA724 (P = 0.171), AFP (P = 0.834) among two groups. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated complaint, age, menopause, abnormal palpable mass, CEA and CA153 were associated with breast cancer. In summary, measurements of CA199, CA724 and AFP in nipple discharge are not of great clinical value. Detecting CEA and CA153 in nipple dischargecould potentially be used for the early detection of breast cancer with in high-risk populations.

  20. Adenosine stimulates Ca2+ fluxes and increases cytosolic free Ca2+ in cultured rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, A; López-Rivas, A; López-Novoa, J M

    1992-01-01

    Adenosine has been associated with cellular Ca2+ metabolism in some cell types. Since adenosine is able to contract glomerular mesangial cells in culture, and since Ca2+ is the main messenger mediating contractile responses, we studied the effect of adenosine on 45Ca2+ movements into and out of mesangial cells and on the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Adenosine at 0.1 mM increased 45Ca2+ uptake (basal, 9993 +/- 216; + adenosine, 14823 +/- 410 d.p.m./mg; P less than 0.01) through verapamil-sensitive Ca2+ channels. These channels seem to be of the A1-adenosine receptor subtype. Adenosine also stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux from 45Ca(2+)-loaded mesangial cells. This effect was accompanied by a net depletion of intracellular 45Ca2+ content under isotopic equilibrium conditions (basal, 24213 +/- 978; + adenosine, 18622 +/- 885 d.p.m./mg; P less than 0.05). The increase in 45Ca2+ efflux was inhibited by a Ca(2+)-free medium or in the presence of 10 microM-verapamil. However, the intracellular Ca(2+)-release blocker TMB-8 (10 microM) only partially inhibited the adenosine-stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux. In addition, adenosine induced an elevation in [Ca2+]i in mesangial cells with an initial transient peak within 15 s (basal, 113 +/- 7; adenosine, 345 +/- 46 nM), and a secondary increase which was slower (3-4 min) and of lower magnitude than the initial peak (250 +/- 21 nM). In summary, adenosine elevates [Ca2+]i and stimulates both Ca2+ uptake from the extracellular pool and Ca2+ efflux from intracellular pools in mesangial cells. The Ca2+ release from internal stores is produced by a combination of a TMB-8-inhibitable and a non-TMB-8-inhibitable mechanism, and seems to be dependent on Ca2+ influx. PMID:1554371

  1. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength.

    PubMed

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Buard, Isabelle; Coultrap, Steven J; Kulbe, Jacqueline R; O'Leary, Heather; Benke, Timothy A; Bayer, K Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    A hallmark feature of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is generation of autonomous (Ca(2+)-independent) activity by T286 autophosphorylation. Biochemical studies have shown that "autonomous" CaMKII is ∼5-fold further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM, but demonstration of a physiological function for such regulation within cells has remained elusive. In this study, CaMKII-induced enhancement of synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons required both autonomous activity and further stimulation. Synaptic strength was decreased by CaMKIIα knockdown and rescued by reexpression, but not by mutants impaired for autonomy (T286A) or binding to NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B; formerly NR2B; I205K). Full rescue was seen with constitutively autonomous mutants (T286D), but only if they could be further stimulated (additional T305/306A mutation), and not with two other mutations that additionally impair Ca(2+)/CaM binding. Compared to rescue with wild-type CaMKII, the CaM-binding-impaired mutants even had reduced synaptic strength. One of these mutants (T305/306D) mimicked an inhibitory autophosphorylation of CaMKII, whereas the other one (Δstim) abolished CaM binding without introducing charged residues. Inhibitory T305/306 autophosphorylation also reduced GluN2B binding, but this effect was independent of reduced Ca(2+)/CaM binding and was not mimicked by T305/306D mutation. Thus, even autonomous CaMKII activity must be further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM for enhancement of synaptic strength.

  2. Interplay Between Intracellular Ca2+ Oscillations and Ca2+-stimulated Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wacquier, Benjamin; Combettes, Laurent; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration are a widespread mode of signalling. Oscillatory spikes rely on repetitive exchanges of Ca2+ between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the cytosol, due to the regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Mitochondria also sequester and release Ca2+, thus affecting Ca2+ signalling. Mitochondrial Ca2+ activates key enzymes involved in ATP synthesis. We propose a new integrative model for Ca2+ signalling and mitochondrial metabolism in electrically non-excitable cells. The model accounts for (1) the phase relationship of the Ca2+ changes in the cytosol, the ER and mitochondria, (2) the dynamics of mitochondrial metabolites in response to cytosolic Ca2+ changes, and (3) the impacts of cytosol/mitochondria Ca2+ exchanges and of mitochondrial metabolism on Ca2+ oscillations. Simulations predict that as expected, oscillations are slowed down by decreasing the rate of Ca2+ efflux from mitochondria, but also by decreasing the rate of Ca2+ influx through the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU). These predictions were experimentally validated by inhibiting MCU expression. Despite the highly non-linear character of Ca2+ dynamics and mitochondrial metabolism, bioenergetics were found to be robust with respect to changes in frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ oscillations. PMID:26776859

  3. Ca2+/Cation Antiporters (CaCA): Identification, Characterization and Expression Profiling in Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Mehak; Tyagi, Shivi; Sharma, Shailesh; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The Ca2+/cation antiporters (CaCA) superfamily proteins play vital function in Ca2+ ion homeostasis, which is an important event during development and defense response. Molecular characterization of these proteins has been performed in certain plants, but they are still not characterized in Triticum aestivum (bread wheat). Herein, we identified 34 TaCaCA superfamily proteins, which were classified into TaCAX, TaCCX, TaNCL, and TaMHX protein families based on their structural organization and evolutionary relation with earlier reported proteins. Since the T. aestivum comprises an allohexaploid genome, TaCaCA genes were derived from each A, B, and D subgenome and homeologous chromosome (HC), except chromosome-group 1. Majority of genes were derived from more than one HCs in each family that were considered as homeologous genes (HGs) due to their high similarity with each other. These HGs showed comparable gene and protein structures in terms of exon/intron organization and domain architecture. Majority of TaCaCA proteins comprised two Na_Ca_ex domains. However, TaNCLs consisted of an additional EF-hand domain with calcium binding motifs. Each TaCaCA protein family consisted of about 10 transmembrane and two α-repeat regions with specifically conserved signature motifs except TaNCL, which had single α-repeat. Variable expression of most of the TaCaCA genes during various developmental stages suggested their specified role in development. However, constitutively high expression of a few genes like TaCAX1-A and TaNCL1-B indicated their role throughout the plant growth and development. The modulated expression of certain genes during biotic (fungal infections) and abiotic stresses (heat, drought, salt) suggested their role in stress response. Majority of TaCCX and TaNCL family genes were found highly affected during various abiotic stresses. However, the role of individual gene needs to be established. The present study unfolded the opportunity for detail functional

  4. Ca isotope cycling in a forested ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, Chris; Bélanger, Nicolas

    2010-02-01

    Reports of large Ca isotope fractionations between trees and soils prompted this study of a Boreal forest ecosystem near La Ronge, Saskatchewan, to improve understanding of this phenomenon. The results on five tree species (black spruce, trembling aspen, white spruce, jack pine, balsam poplar) confirm that nutrient Ca uptake by plants favors the light isotopes, thus driving residual Ca in plant available soil pools towards enrichment in the heavy isotopes. Substantial within-tree fraction occurs in tissues formed along the transpiration stream, with low δ 44Ca values in fine roots (2 mm), intermediate values in stemwood, and high values in foliage. Separation factors between different plant tissues are similar between species, but the initial fractionation step in the tips of the fine roots is species specific, and/or sensitive to the local soil environment. Soil water δ 44Ca values appear to increase with depth to at least 35 cm below the top of the forest floor, which is close to the deepest level of fine roots. The heavy plant fractionated signature of Ca in the finely rooted upper soils filters downward where it is retained on ion exchange sites, leached into groundwater, and discharged into surface waters. The relationship between Ca uptake by tree fine roots and the pattern of δ 44Ca enrichment with soil depth was modeled for two Ca pools: the forest floor (litter) and the underlying (upper B) mineral soil. Six study plots were investigated along two hillside toposequences trending upwards from a first order stream. We used allometric equations describing the Ca distribution in boreal tree species to calculate weighted average δ 44Ca values for the stands in each plot and estimate Ca uptake rates. The δ 44Ca value of precipitation was measured, and soil weathering signatures deduced, by acid leaching of lower B mineral soils. Steady state equations were used to derive a set of model Ca fluxes and fractionation factors for each plot. The model reproduces

  5. Fortilin binds Ca2+ and blocks Ca2+-dependent apoptosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Graidist, Potchanapond; Yazawa, Michio; Tonganunt, Moltira; Nakatomi, Akiko; Lin, Curtis Chun-Jen; Chang, Jui-Yoa; Phongdara, Amornrat; Fujise, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Fortilin, a 172-amino-acid polypeptide present both in the cytosol and nucleus, possesses potent anti-apoptotic activity. Although fortilin is known to bind Ca2+, the biochemistry and biological significance of such an interaction remains unknown. In the present study we report that fortilin must bind Ca2+ in order to protect cells against Ca2+-dependent apoptosis. Using a standard Ca2+-overlay assay, we first validated that full-length fortilin binds Ca2+ and showed that the N-terminus (amino acids 1–72) is required for its Ca2+-binding. We then used flow dialysis and CD spectropolarimetry assays to demonstrate that fortilin binds Ca2+ with a dissociation constant (Kd) of approx. 10 μM and that the binding of fortilin to Ca2+ induces a significant change in the secondary structure of fortilin. In order to evaluate the impact of the binding of fortilin to Ca2+ in vivo, we measured intracellular Ca2+ levels upon thapsigargin challenge and found that the lack of fortilin in the cell results in the exaggerated elevation of intracellular Ca2+ in the cell. We then tested various point mutants of fortilin for their Ca2+ binding and identified fortilin(E58A/E60A) to be a double-point mutant of fortilin lacking the ability of Ca2+-binding. We then found that wild-type fortilin, but not fortilin(E58A/E60A), protected cells against thapsigargin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the binding of fortilin to Ca2+ is required for fortilin to protect cells against Ca2+-dependent apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that fortilin is an intracellular Ca2+ scavenger, protecting cells against Ca2+-dependent apoptosis by binding and sequestering Ca2+ from the downstream Ca2+-dependent apoptotic pathways. PMID:17705784

  6. Numerical modelling of GPR ground-matching enhancement by a chirped multilayer structure - output of cooperation within COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, Hovik V.; Knyazyan, Tamara M.; Hovhannisyan, Tamara. T.; Marciniak, Marian; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    As is well know, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an electromagnetic technique for the detection and imaging of buried objects, with resolution ranging from centimeters to few meters [1, 2]. Though this technique is mature enough and different types of GPR devices are already in use, some problems are still waiting for their solution [3]. One of them is to achieve a better matching of transmitting GPR antenna to the ground, that will increase the signal penetration depth and the signal/noise ratio at the receiving end. In the current work, a full-wave electromagnetic modelling of the interaction of a plane wave with a chirped multilayered structure on the ground is performed, via numerical simulation. The method of single expression is used, which is a suitable technique for multi-boundary problems solution [4, 5]. The considered multilayer consists of two different dielectric slabs of low and high permittivity, where the highest value of permittivity doesn't exceed the permittivity of the ground. The losses in the ground are suitably taken into account. Two types of multilayers are analysed. Numerical results are obtained for the reflectance from the structure, as well as for the distributions of electric field components and power flow density in both the considered structures and the ground. The obtained results indicate that, for a better matching with the ground, the layer closer to the ground should be the high-permittivity one. Acknowledgement This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" (www.GPRadar.eu, www.cost.eu). Part of this work was developed during the Short-Term Scientific Mission COST-STSM-TU1208-25016, carried out by Prof. Baghdasaryan in the National Institute of Telecommunications in Warsaw, Poland. References [1] H. M. Jol. Ground Penetrating Radar: Theory and Applications. Elsevier, 2009. 509 pp. [2] R. Persico. Introduction to

  7. "Thy Father & Thy Mother": A Second Look at Filial Responsibility and Family Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Alvin

    This report represents an extensive revision of a 1960 study which evaluated the impact of public programs, particularly social security, on the relationships between adult children and their aging parents. The materials focus on filial responsibility, the responsibility for parents exercised by children, and are organized in three sections: an…

  8. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: in vitro inhibition of α isoforms (hCA I, hCA II, bCA III, hCA IV) by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Derya; Karagoz, Lutfi; Ekinci, Deniz; Senturk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    A series of flavonoids, such as quercetin, catechin, apigenin, luteolin, morin, were investigated for their inhibitory effects against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). The compounds were tested against four α-CA isozymes purified from human and bovine (hCA I, hCA II, bCA III, hCA IV) tissues. The four isozymes showed quite diverse inhibition profiles with these compounds. The flavonoids inhibited hCA I with K(I)-s in the range of 2.2-12.8 μM, hCA II with K(I)-s in the range of 0.74-6.2 μM, bCA III with K(I)-s in the range of 2.2-21.3 μM, and hCA IV with inhibition constants in the range of 4.4-15.7, with an esterase assay using 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. Some simple phenols/sulfonamides were also investigated as standard inhibitors. The flavonoids incorporate phenol moieties which inhibit these CAs through a diverse, not yet determined inhibition mechanism, compared to classic inhibitors such as the sulfonamide/sulfamate ones.

  9. The influence of Ca²⁺ buffers on free [Ca²⁺] fluctuations and the effective volume of Ca²⁺ microdomains.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H; Smith, Gregory D

    2014-06-17

    Intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) plays a significant role in many cell signaling pathways, some of which are localized to spatially restricted microdomains. Ca(2+) binding proteins (Ca(2+) buffers) play an important role in regulating Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]). Buffers typically slow [Ca(2+)] temporal dynamics and increase the effective volume of Ca(2+) domains. Because fluctuations in [Ca(2+)] decrease in proportion to the square-root of a domain's physical volume, one might conjecture that buffers decrease [Ca(2+)] fluctuations and, consequently, mitigate the significance of small domain volume concerning Ca(2+) signaling. We test this hypothesis through mathematical and computational analysis of idealized buffer-containing domains and their stochastic dynamics during free Ca(2+) influx with passive exchange of both Ca(2+) and buffer with bulk concentrations. We derive Langevin equations for the fluctuating dynamics of Ca(2+) and buffer and use these stochastic differential equations to determine the magnitude of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations for different buffer parameters (e.g., dissociation constant and concentration). In marked contrast to expectations based on a naive application of the principle of effective volume as employed in deterministic models of Ca(2+) signaling, we find that mobile and rapid buffers typically increase the magnitude of domain [Ca(2+)] fluctuations during periods of Ca(2+) influx, whereas stationary (immobile) Ca(2+) buffers do not. Also contrary to expectations, we find that in the absence of Ca(2+) influx, buffers influence the temporal characteristics, but not the magnitude, of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations. We derive an analytical formula describing the influence of rapid Ca(2+) buffers on [Ca(2+)] fluctuations and, importantly, identify the stochastic analog of (deterministic) effective domain volume. Our results demonstrate that Ca(2+) buffers alter the dynamics of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations in a nonintuitive manner. The finding that Ca(2

  10. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations generated via the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) in response to extracellular Ca2+ or L-phenylalanine: impact of the highly conservative mutation Ser170Thr

    PubMed Central

    Young, Steven H.; Rey, Osvaldo; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) is an allosteric protein that responds to changes in the extracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) and aromatic amino acids with the production of different patterns of oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). An increase in [Ca2+]e stimulates sinusoidal oscillations in [Ca2+]i whereas aromatic amino acid-induced CaR activation in the presence of a threshold [Ca2+]e promotes transient oscillations in [Ca2+]i. Here, we examined spontaneous and ligand-evoked [Ca2+]i oscillations in single HEK-293 cells transfected with the wild type CaSR or with a mutant CaSR in which Ser170 was converted to Thr (CaSRS170T). Our analysis demonstrates that cells expressing CaSRS170T display [Ca2+]i oscillations in the presence of low concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ and respond to L-Phe with robust transient [Ca2+]i oscillations. Our results indicate that the S170T mutation induces a marked increase in CaSR sensitivity to [Ca2+]e and imply that the allosteric regulation of the CaSR by aromatic amino acids is not only mediated by an heterotropic positive effect on Ca2+ binding cooperativity but, as biased agonists, aromatic amino acids stabilize a CaSR conformation that couples to a different signaling pathway leading to transient [Ca2+]i oscillations. PMID:26431875

  11. TU-CD-303-02: Beyond Radiation Induced Double Strand Breaks - a New Horizon for Radiation Therapy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.

    2015-06-15

    these advances in cancer biology research will give medical physicists a new perspective in daily clinical physics practice and in future radiation therapy technological development. Furthermore, academic medical physics should continue to be an integral part of the multidisciplinary cancer research community, harnessing our newly acquired understanding of radiation effects, and developing novel cost-effective treatment strategies to better combat cancer. Learning Objectives: Understand that localized radiation can lead to non-localized secondary effects such as radiation-induced immune response, bystander effect, and abscopal effect. Understand that the non-localized radiation effects may be harnessed to improve cancer treatment. Learn examples of physics participation in multidisciplinary research to advance cancer biology. Recognize the challenges and possibilities of physics applications in cancer research. Chang: NIH 5RC2CA148487-02 and 1U54CA151652-01 Graves: IDEA award (19IB-0106) from the California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP), and by NIH P01 CA67166.

  12. Topographic specificity of functional connections from hippocampal CA3 to CA1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivanlou, Iman H.; Dantzker, Jami L. M.; Stevens, Charles F.; Callaway, Edward M.

    2004-02-01

    The hippocampus is a cortical region thought to play an important role in learning and memory. Most of our knowledge about the detailed organization of hippocampal circuitry responsible for these functions is derived from anatomical studies. These studies present an incomplete picture, however, because the functional character and importance of connections are often not revealed by anatomy. Here, we used a physiological method (photostimulation with caged glutamate) to probe the fine pattern of functional connectivity between the CA3 and CA1 subfields in the mouse hippocampal slice preparation. We recorded intracellularly from CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons while scanning with photostimulation across the entire CA3 subfield with high spatial resolution. Our results show that, at a given septotemporal level, nearby CA1 neurons receive synaptic inputs from neighboring CA3 neurons. Thus, the CA3 to CA1 mapping preserves neighbor relations.

  13. Role of Ca2+, membrane excitability, and Ca2+ stores in failing muscle contraction with aging.

    PubMed

    Payne, Anthony Michael; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramón; Wang, Zhong-Ming; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2009-04-01

    Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in a population of skeletal muscle fibers of aged mice becomes dependent on the presence of external Ca(2+) ions (Payne, A.M., Zheng, Z., Gonzalez, E., Wang, Z.M., Messi, M.L., Delbono, O., 2004b. External Ca(2+)-dependent excitation - contraction coupling in a population of aging mouse skeletal muscle fibers. J. Physiol. 560, 137-155.). However, the mechanism(s) underlying this process remain unknown. In this work, we examined the role of (1) extracellular Ca(2+); (2) voltage-induced influx of external Ca(2+) ions; (3) sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) depletion during repeated contractions; (4) store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE); (5) SR ultrastructure; (6) SR subdomain localization of the ryanodine receptor; and (7) sarcolemmal excitability in muscle force decline with aging. These experiments show that external Ca(2+), but not Ca(2+) influx, is needed to maintain force upon repetitive fiber electrical stimulation. Decline in fiber force is associated with depressed SR Ca(2+) release. SR Ca(2+) depletion, SOCE, and the putative segregated Ca(2+) release store do not play a significant role in external Ca(2+)-dependent contraction. More importantly, a significant number of action potentials fail in senescent mouse muscle fibers subjected to a stimulation frequency. These results indicate that failure to generate action potentials accounts for decreased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and tetanic force in aging muscle exposed to a Ca(2+)-free medium.

  14. Serum CA549 in primary breast cancer: comparison with CA15.3 and MCA.

    PubMed Central

    Gion, M.; Plebani, M.; Mione, R.; Penzo, C.; Meo, S.; Burlina, A.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out a comparison of three commonly used mucin markers, CA549, CA15.3 and MCA. Serum samples from 184 healthy women and 237 patients with primary breast cancer were evaluated. The markers were measured using commercially available immunometric assays. Like CA15.3 and MCA, CA549 was significantly associated with tumour size and lymph node status, being an effective indicator of tumour bulk. CA549 was significantly correlated with both CA15.3 and MCA. Positive/negative concordance rate was very good (93.7%) between CA549 and MCA. Conversely, CA15.3 was positive and CA549 negative in 20.4% of cases. Axillary status was not significantly different in the latter group of patients and in cases in which CA15.3 and CA549 showed concordant results. From the present findings we draw the following major conclusions: 1. CA549 and MCA are highly correlated and their association should not provide additional information; however, they should not be considered interchangeable since they may behave differently in individual cases. 2. CA549 and CA15.3, although well correlated, are discordant in a significant number of cases. Longitudinal studies are needed to verify the usefulness of the association between the two markers. 3. The three evaluated mucin markers are not interchangeable in individual patients; if a patient is monitored with a marker, she should be followed up with the same marker. PMID:8142260

  15. Crystal structure of the CaV2 IQ domain in complex with Ca2+/calmodulin: high-resolution mechanistic implications for channel regulation by Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masayuki X; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Leahy, Daniel J; Yue, David T

    2008-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulation of Ca(2+) channels is central to Ca(2+) signaling. Ca(V)1 versus Ca(V)2 classes of these channels exhibit divergent forms of regulation, potentially relating to customized CaM/IQ interactions among different channels. Here we report the crystal structures for the Ca(2+)/CaM IQ domains of both Ca(V)2.1 and Ca(V)2.3 channels. These highly similar structures emphasize that major CaM contacts with the IQ domain extend well upstream of traditional consensus residues. Surprisingly, upstream mutations strongly diminished Ca(V)2.1 regulation, whereas downstream perturbations had limited effects. Furthermore, our Ca(V)2 structures closely resemble published Ca(2+)/CaM-Ca(V)1.2 IQ structures, arguing against Ca(V)1/2 regulatory differences based solely on contrasting CaM/IQ conformations. Instead, alanine scanning of the Ca(V)2.1 IQ domain, combined with structure-based molecular simulation of corresponding CaM/IQ binding energy perturbations, suggests that the C lobe of CaM partially dislodges from the IQ element during channel regulation, allowing exposed IQ residues to trigger regulation via isoform-specific interactions with alternative channel regions.

  16. Dissection of local Ca(2+) signals inside cytosol by ER-targeted Ca(2+) indicator.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Fumihiro; Sakuragi, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Ayana; Takagi, Shin; Oda, Yoichi; Bannai, Hiroko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2016-10-07

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a versatile intracellular second messenger that operates in various signaling pathways leading to multiple biological outputs. The diversity of spatiotemporal patterns of Ca(2+) signals, generated by the coordination of Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space and Ca(2+) release from the intracellular Ca(2+) store the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is considered to underlie the diversity of biological outputs caused by a single signaling molecule. However, such Ca(2+) signaling diversity has not been well described because of technical limitations. Here, we describe a new method to report Ca(2+) signals at subcellular resolution. We report that OER-GCaMP6f, a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator (GECI) targeted to the outer ER membrane, can monitor Ca(2+) release from the ER at higher spatiotemporal resolution than conventional GCaMP6f. OER-GCaMP6f was used for in vivo Ca(2+) imaging of C. elegans. We also found that the spontaneous Ca(2+) elevation in cultured astrocytes reported by OER-GCaMP6f showed a distinct spatiotemporal pattern from that monitored by plasma membrane-targeted GCaMP6f (Lck-GCaMP6f); less frequent Ca(2+) signal was detected by OER-GCaMP6f, in spite of the fact that Ca(2+) release from the ER plays important roles in astrocytes. These findings suggest that targeting of GECIs to the ER outer membrane enables sensitive detection of Ca(2+) release from the ER at subcellular resolution, avoiding the diffusion of GECI and Ca(2+). Our results indicate that Ca(2+) imaging with OER-GCaMP6f in combination with Lck-GCaMP6f can contribute to describing the diversity of Ca(2+) signals, by enabling dissection of Ca(2+) signals at subcellular resolution.

  17. Role of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in Ca2+ homeostasis in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Chi; Chen, Ya-Shuan; Cheng, Ruo-Ciao

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ is critical to the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). However, the role of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis in the SCN is unknown. Here we show that NCX is an important mechanism for somatic Ca2+ clearance in SCN neurons. In control conditions Na+-free solution lowered [Ca2+]i by inhibiting TTX-sensitive as well as nimodipine-sensitive Ca2+ influx. With use of the Na+ ionophore monensin to raise intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i), Na+-free solution provoked rapid Ca2+ uptake via reverse NCX. The peak amplitude of 0 Na+-induced [Ca2+]i increase was larger during the day than at night, with no difference between dorsal and ventral SCN neurons. Ca2+ extrusion via forward NCX was studied by determining the effect of Na+ removal on Ca2+ clearance after high-K+-induced Ca2+ loads. The clearance of Ca2+ proceeded with two exponential decay phases, with the fast decay having total signal amplitude of ∼85% and a time constant of ∼7 s. Na+-free solution slowed the fast decay rate threefold, whereas mitochondrial protonophore prolonged mostly the slow decay. In contrast, blockade of plasmalemmal and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ pumps had little effect on the kinetics of Ca2+ clearance. RT-PCR indicated the expression of NCX1 and NCX2 mRNAs. Immunohistochemical staining showed the presence of NCX1 immunoreactivity in the whole SCN but restricted distribution of NCX2 immunoreactivity in the ventrolateral SCN. Together our results demonstrate an important role of NCX, most likely NCX1, as well as mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in clearing somatic Ca2+ after depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx in SCN neurons. PMID:25568156

  18. Differential behavioral state-dependence in the burst properties of CA3 and CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Tropp Sneider, J; Chrobak, J J; Quirk, M C; Oler, J A; Markus, E J

    2006-09-15

    Brief bursts of fast high-frequency action potentials are a signature characteristic of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. Understanding the factors determining burst and single spiking is potentially significant for sensory representation, synaptic plasticity and epileptogenesis. A variety of models suggest distinct functional roles for burst discharge, and for specific characteristics of the burst in neural coding. However, little in vivo data demonstrate how often and under what conditions CA3 and CA1 actually exhibit burst and single spike discharges. The present study examined burst discharge and single spiking of CA3 and CA1 neurons across distinct behavioral states (awake-immobility and maze-running) in rats. In both CA3 and CA1 spike bursts accounted for less than 20% of all spike events. CA3 neurons exhibited more spikes per burst, greater spike frequency, larger amplitude spikes and more spike amplitude attenuation than CA1 neurons. A major finding of the present study is that the propensity of CA1 neurons to burst was affected by behavioral state, while the propensity of CA3 to burst was not. CA1 neurons exhibited fewer bursts during maze running compared with awake-immobility. In contrast, there were no differences in burst discharge of CA3 neurons. Neurons in both subregions exhibited smaller spike amplitude, fewer spikes per burst, longer inter-spike intervals and greater spike amplitude attenuation within a burst during awake-immobility compared with maze running. These findings demonstrate that the CA1 network is under greater behavioral state-dependent regulation than CA3. The present findings should inform both theoretic and computational models of CA3 and CA1 function.

  19. Ca isotope fractionation on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, W. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Tombrello, T. A.; Epstein, S.

    1977-01-01

    Ca has been measured in a lunar soil in order to establish the presence of isotopically mass-fractionated components. Ca was extracted by a series of water leaches after the soils were 'activated' by brief exposures to fluorine gas. The O2 obtained by this fluorination is found to have delta (O-18) of +21 per mil and to be, therefore, significantly mass-fractionated. Ca obtained in the leaches was analyzed using the double-spike technique. Very small Ca isotope fractionation is found in the leaches of this soil of up to 1 per mil per mass unit difference. The small Ca effects are in marked contrast to the measured delta (O-18) for the same sample and to large effects observed in many soils for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium. The data on Ca provide stringent constraints on models which attempt to explain the isotope mass-fractionation effects in lunar soils.

  20. Ca2+ Channels on the Move†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of Ca2+ as an intracellular messenger derives largely from the spatial organization of cytosolic Ca2+ signals, most of which are generated by regulated openings of Ca2+-permeable channels. Most Ca2+ channels are expressed in the plasma membrane (PM). Others, including the almost ubiquitous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and their relatives, the ryanodine receptors (RyR), are predominantly expressed in membranes of the sarcoplasmic or endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Targeting of these channels to appropriate destinations underpins their ability to generate spatially organized Ca2+ signals. All Ca2+ channels begin life in the cytosol, and the vast majority are then functionally assembled in the ER, where they may either remain or be dispatched to other membranes. Here, by means of selective examples, we review two issues related to this trafficking of Ca2+ channels via the ER. How do cells avoid wayward activity of Ca2+ channels in transit as they pass from the ER via other membranes to their final destination? How and why do some cells express small numbers of the archetypal intracellular Ca2+ channels, IP3R and RyR, in the PM? PMID:19928968

  1. The initial 41Ca/40Ca ratios in two type A Ca-Al-rich inclusions: Implications for the origin of short-lived 41Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Chang

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports new 41Ca-41K isotopic data for two Type A CAIs, NWA 3118 #1Nb (Compact Type A) and Vigarano 3138 F8 (Fluffy Type A), from reduced CV3 chondrites. The NWA CAI is found to have carried live 41Ca at the level of (4.6 ± 1.9) ×10-9 , consistent with the proposed Solar System initial 41Ca /40Ca = 4.2 ×10-9 by Liu et al. (2012a). On the other hand, the Vigarano CAI does not have resolvable radiogenic 41K excesses that can be attributed to the decay of 41Ca. Combined with the 26Al data that have been reported for these two CAIs, we infer that the 41Ca distribution was not homogeneous when 26Al was widespread at the canonical level of 26Al /27Al = 5.2 ×10-5 . Such a 41Ca heterogeneity can be understood under two astrophysical contexts: in situ charged particle irradiation by the protoSun in the solar nebula that had inherited some baseline 10Be abundance from the molecular cloud, and Solar System formation in a molecular cloud enriched in 26Al and 41Ca contaminated by massive star winds. That said, more high quality 41Ca data are still needed to better understand the origin of this radionuclide.

  2. Characterization of phenolic compounds in the Chinese herbal drug Tu-Si-Zi by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min; Yan, Yuning; Guo, De-An

    2005-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are the major bioactive constituents of the Chinese herbal drug Tu-Si-Zi, which is prepared from the seeds of Cuscuta chinensis. However, seeds of C. australis also are offered under the name of this drug in the herb market. In order to make a comparison of their chemical constituents, the phenolic compounds of these two Cuscuta species were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode-array detection/electrospray ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/DAD/ESI-MS(n)). A total of 50 compounds were observed in the methanol extracts, including 23 flavonoids, 20 lignans and 7 quinic acid derivatives. These compounds were separated on a C18 column and identified or tentatively characterized based on UV spectra and MS fragmentation behavior. In contrast to previous reports, the phenolic patterns of these two Cuscuta species were found to be very different. Kaempferol and astragalin were the predominant constituents of C. australis, while hyperoside was the major compound in C. chinensis. Most of the identified compounds, especially the acylated flavonoid glycosides, have not previously been reported from Cuscuta species. In addition, a 30 Da neutral loss observed for flavonols was investigated and could be used to differentiate flavonoid isomers such as kaempferol and luteolin. The ESI-MS fragmentation behavior of furofuran lignans was also investigated, and a characteristic pathway is proposed. The large differences observed between the phenolic constituents of C. chinensis and C. australis strongly encouraged further comparison of the bioactivities of these two species.

  3. Tu Amigo Pepe: Evaluation of a Multi-media Marketing Campaign that Targets Young Latino Immigrant MSM with HIV Testing Messages.

    PubMed

    Solorio, Rosa; Norton-Shelpuk, Pamela; Forehand, Mark; Montaño, Daniel; Stern, Joshua; Aguirre, Joel; Martinez, Marcos

    2016-09-01

    Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and delayed diagnosis in the United States. This paper describes the evaluation of a pilot of the Tu Amigo Pepe, a multimedia HIV testing campaign aimed at Latino MSM in Seattle, WA particularly targeting immigrants who may not identify as gay, ages 18-30 years old. The 16-week campaign included Spanish-language radio public service announcements (PSAs), a Web site, social media outreach, a reminder system using mobile technology, print materials and a toll-free hotline. In developing the PSAs, the Integrated Behavioral Model was used as a framework to reframe negative attitudes, beliefs and norms towards HIV testing with positive ones as well as to promote self-efficacy towards HIV testing. The campaign had a significant and immediate impact on attitudes, beliefs, norms and self-efficacy towards HIV testing as well as on actual behavior, with HIV testing rates increasing over time.

  4. Modeling of Turbulent Boundary Layer Surface Pressure Fluctuation Auto and Cross Spectra - Verification and Adjustments Based on TU-144LL Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rackl, Robert; Weston, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The literature on turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations provides several empirical models which were compared to the measured TU-144 data. The Efimtsov model showed the best agreement. Adjustments were made to improve its agreement further, consisting of the addition of a broad band peak in the mid frequencies, and a minor modification to the high frequency rolloff. The adjusted Efimtsov predicted and measured results are compared for both subsonic and supersonic flight conditions. Measurements in the forward and middle portions of the fuselage have better agreement with the model than those from the aft portion. For High Speed Civil Transport supersonic cruise, interior levels predicted by use of this model are expected to increase by 1-3 dB due to the adjustments to the Efimtsov model. The space-time cross-correlations and cross-spectra of the fluctuating surface pressure were also investigated. This analysis is an important ingredient in structural acoustic models of aircraft interior noise. Once again the measured data were compared to the predicted levels from the Efimtsov model.

  5. Cleavage of the sarcin–ricin loop of 23S rRNA differentially affects EF-G and EF-Tu binding

    PubMed Central

    García-Ortega, Lucía; Álvarez-García, Elisa; Gavilanes, José G.; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Joseph, Simpson

    2010-01-01

    Ribotoxins are potent inhibitors of protein biosynthesis and inactivate ribosomes from a variety of organisms. The ribotoxin α-sarcin cleaves the large 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at the universally conserved sarcin–ricin loop (SRL) leading to complete inactivation of the ribosome and cellular death. The SRL interacts with translation factors that hydrolyze GTP, and it is important for their binding to the ribosome, but its precise role is not yet understood. We studied the effect of α-sarcin on defined steps of translation by the bacterial ribosome. α-Sarcin-treated ribosomes showed no defects in mRNA and tRNA binding, peptide-bond formation and sparsomycin-dependent translocation. Cleavage of SRL slightly affected binding of elongation factor Tu ternary complex (EF-Tu•GTP•tRNA) to the ribosome. In contrast, the activity of elongation factor G (EF-G) was strongly impaired in α-sarcin-treated ribosomes. Importantly, cleavage of SRL inhibited EF-G binding, and consequently GTP hydrolysis and mRNA–tRNA translocation. These results suggest that the SRL is more critical in EF-G than ternary complex binding to the ribosome implicating different requirements in this region of the ribosome during protein elongation. PMID:20215430

  6. Supralinear dendritic Ca2+ signalling in young developing CA1 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Pohle, Jörg; Bischofberger, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Although Ca2+ is critically important in activity-dependent neuronal development, not much is known about the regulation of dendritic Ca2+ signals in developing neurons. Here, we used ratiometric Ca2+ imaging to investigate dendritic Ca2+ signalling in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells during the first 1–4 weeks of postnatal development. We show that active dendritic backpropagation of Nav channel-dependent action potentials (APs) evoked already large dendritic Ca2+ transients in animals aged 1 week with amplitudes of ∼150 nm, similar to the amplitudes of ∼160 nM seen in animals aged 4 weeks. Although the AP-evoked dendritic Ca2+ load increased about four times during the first 4 weeks, the peak amplitude of free Ca2+ concentration was balanced by a four-fold increase in Ca2+ buffer capacity κs (∼70 vs. ∼280). Furthermore, Ca2+ extrusion rates increased with postnatal development, leading to a slower decay time course (∼0.2 s vs. ∼0.1 s) and more effective temporal summation of Ca2+ signals in young cells. Most importantly, during prolonged theta-burst stimulation dendritic Ca2+ signals were up to three times larger in cells at 1 week than at 4 weeks of age and much larger than predicted by linear summation, which is attributable to an activity-dependent slow-down of Ca2+ extrusion. As Ca2+ influx is four-fold smaller in young cells, the larger Ca2+ signals are generated using four times less ATP consumption. Taken together, the data suggest that active backpropagations regulate dendritic Ca2+ signals during early postnatal development. Remarkably, during prolonged AP firing, Ca2+ signals are several times larger in young than in mature cells as a result of activity-dependent regulation of Ca2+ extrusion rates. PMID:25239458

  7. Genetically encoded green fluorescent Ca2+ indicators with improved detectability for neuronal Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Masamichi; Sasaki, Takuya; Sadakari, Junko; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Kagawa-Nagamura, Yuko; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Ikegaya, Yuji; Nakai, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the activities of individual neurons with genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators (GECIs) is a promising method for understanding neuronal network functions. Here, we report GECIs with improved neuronal Ca(2+) signal detectability, termed G-CaMP6 and G-CaMP8. Compared to a series of existing G-CaMPs, G-CaMP6 showed fairly high sensitivity and rapid kinetics, both of which are suitable properties for detecting subtle and fast neuronal activities. G-CaMP8 showed a greater signal (F(max)/F(min) = 38) than G-CaMP6 and demonstrated kinetics similar to those of G-CaMP6. Both GECIs could detect individual spikes from pyramidal neurons of cultured hippocampal slices or acute cortical slices with 100% detection rates, demonstrating their superior performance to existing GECIs. Because G-CaMP6 showed a higher sensitivity and brighter baseline fluorescence than G-CaMP8 in a cellular environment, we applied G-CaMP6 for Ca(2+) imaging of dendritic spines, the putative postsynaptic sites. By expressing a G-CaMP6-actin fusion protein for the spines in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons and electrically stimulating the granule cells of the dentate gyrus, which innervate CA3 pyramidal neurons, we found that sub-threshold stimulation triggered small Ca(2+) responses in a limited number of spines with a low response rate in active spines, whereas supra-threshold stimulation triggered large fluorescence responses in virtually all of the spines with a 100% activity rate.

  8. CaV1.1: The atypical prototypical voltage-gated Ca2+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Roger A.; Beam, Kurt G.

    2012-01-01

    CaV1.1 is the prototype for the other nine known CaV channel isoforms, yet it has functional properties that make it truly atypical of this group. Specifically, CaV1.1 is expressed solely in skeletal muscle where it serves multiple purposes; it is the voltage sensor for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and it is an L-type Ca2+ channel which contributes to a form of activity-dependent Ca2+ entry that has been termed Excitation-Coupled Ca2+ Entry (ECCE). The ability of CaV1.1 to serve as voltage-sensor for EC coupling appears to be unique amongst CaV channels, whereas the physiological role of its more conventional function as a Ca2+ channel has been a matter of uncertainty for nearly 50 years. In this chapter, we discuss how CaV1.1 supports EC coupling, the possible relevance of Ca2+ entry through CaV1.1 and how alterations of CaV1.1 function can have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:22982493

  9. Conservation of Ca2+/Calmodulin Regulation across Na and Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yang, Philemon S.; Niu, Jacqueline; Yang, Wanjun; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+channels comprise distinct ion-channel superfamilies, yet the carboxy tails of these channels exhibit high homology hinting at a long-shared and purposeful module. For different Ca2+ channels, carboxyl-tail inter actions with calmodulin do elaborate robust and similar forms of Ca2+ regulation. However, Na channels have only shown subtler Ca2+modulation that differs among reports, challenging attempts at unified understanding. Here, by rapid Ca2+photoreleaseon to Na channels, we reset this view of Na channel regulation. For cardiac muscle channels (NaV1.5), reported effects from which most mechanistic proposals derive, we observe no Ca2+modulation. Conversely, for skeletal-muscle channels (NaV1.4), we uncover fast Ca2+ regulation eerily similar to that of Ca2+ channels. Channel opathic myotonia mutations halve NaV1.4 Ca2+ regulation, and transplanting the NaV1.4 carboxy tail onto Ca2+ channels recapitulates Ca2+ regulation. Thus we argue for the persistence and physiological relevance of an ancient Ca2+ regulatory module across Na and Ca2+ channels. PMID:24949975

  10. TU-A-12A-01: Consistency of Lung Expansion and Contraction During Respiration: Implications for Quantitative Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T; Du, K; Bayouth, J; Christensen, G; Reinhardt, J

    2014-06-15

    lung tissue expansion. NIH Grant: R01 CA166703.

  11. TU-EF-304-09: Quantifying the Biological Effects of Therapeutic Protons by LET Spectrum Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, F; Bronk, L; Kerr, M; Titt, U; Wang, X; Taleei, R; Peeler, C; Patel, D; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate in vitro cell kill with linear energy transfer (LET) spectra using Monte Carlo simulations and knowledge obtained from previous high-throughput in vitro proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) measurements. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4 was used to design the experimental setups and perform the dose, dose-averaged LET, and LET spectra calculations. The clonogenic assay was performed using the H460 lung cancer cell line in standard 6-well plates. Using two different experimental setups, the same dose and dose-averaged LET (12.6 keV/µm) was delivered to the cell layer; however, each respective energy or LET spectrum was different. We quantified the dose contributions from high-LET (≥10 keV/µm, threshold determined by previous RBE measurements) events in the LET spectra separately for these two setups as 39% and 53%. 8 dose levels with 1 Gy increments were delivered. The photon reference irradiation was performed using 6 MV x-rays from a LINAC. Results: The survival curves showed that both proton irradiations demonstrated an increased RBE compared to the reference photon irradiation. Within the proton-irradiated cells, the setup with 53% dose contribution from high-LET events exhibited the higher biological effectiveness. Conclusion: The experimental results indicate that the dose-averaged LET may not be an appropriate indicator to quantify the biological effects of protons when the LET spectrum is broad enough to contain both low- and high-LET events. Incorporating the LET spectrum distribution into robust intensity-modulated proton therapy optimization planning may provide more accurate biological dose distribution than using the dose-averaged LET. NIH Program Project Grant 2U19CA021239-35.

  12. TU-G-210-03: Acoustic Simulations in Transcranial MRgFUS: Treatment Prediction and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, U.

    2015-06-15

    Modeling can play a vital role in predicting, optimizing and analyzing the results of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Simulating the propagating acoustic beam in various targeted regions of the body allows for the prediction of the resulting power deposition and temperature profiles. In this session we will apply various modeling approaches to breast, abdominal organ and brain treatments. Of particular interest is the effectiveness of procedures for correcting for phase aberrations caused by intervening irregular tissues, such as the skull in transcranial applications or inhomogeneous breast tissues. Also described are methods to compensate for motion in targeted abdominal organs such as the liver or kidney. Douglas Christensen – Modeling for Breast and Brain HIFU Treatment Planning Tobias Preusser – TRANS-FUSIMO - An Integrative Approach to Model-Based Treatment Planning of Liver FUS Urvi Vyas – Acoustic Simulations in Transcranial MRgFUS: Treatment Prediction and Analysis Learning Objectives: Understand the role of acoustic beam modeling for predicting the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Apply acoustic modeling to specific breast, liver, kidney and transcranial anatomies. Determine how to obtain appropriate acoustic modeling parameters from clinical images. Understand the separate role of absorption and scattering in energy delivery to tissues. See how organ motion can be compensated for in ultrasound therapies. Compare simulated data with clinical temperature measurements in transcranial applications. Supported by NIH R01 HL172787 and R01 EB013433 (DC); EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under 270186 (FUSIMO) and 611889 (TRANS-FUSIMO)(TP); and P01 CA159992, GE, FUSF and InSightec (UV)

  13. Time Cells in Hippocampal Area CA3

    PubMed Central

    Salz, Daniel M.; Tiganj, Zoran; Khasnabish, Srijesa; Kohley, Annalyse; Sheehan, Daniel; Howard, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on time cells in the hippocampus have so far focused on area CA1 in animals performing memory tasks. Some studies have suggested that temporal processing within the hippocampus may be exclusive to CA1 and CA2, but not CA3, and may occur only under strong demands for memory. Here we examined the temporal and spatial coding properties of CA3 and CA1 neurons in rats performing a maze task that demanded working memory and a control task with no explicit working memory demand. In the memory demanding task, CA3 cells exhibited robust temporal modulation similar to the pattern of time cell activity in CA1, and the same populations of cells also exhibited typical place coding patterns in the same task. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial coding patterns of CA1 and CA3 were equivalently robust when animals performed a simplified version of the task that made no demands on working memory. However, time and place coding did differ in that the resolution of temporal coding decreased over time within the delay interval, whereas the resolution of place coding was not systematically affected by distance along the track. These findings support the view that CA1 and CA3 both participate in encoding the temporal and spatial organization of ongoing experience. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hippocampal “time cells” that fire at specific moments in a temporally structured memory task have so far been observed only in area CA1, and some studies have suggested that temporal coding within the hippocampus is exclusive to CA1. Here we describe time cells also in CA3, and time cells in both areas are observed even without working memory demands, similar to place cells in these areas. However, unlike equivalent spatial coding along a path, temporal coding is nonlinear, with greater temporal resolution earlier than later in temporally structured experiences. These observations reveal both similarities and differences in temporal and spatial coding within the hippocampus of importance to

  14. Structures of Ca(V) Ca**2+/CaM-IQ Domain Complexes Reveal Binding Modes That Underlie Calcium-Dependent Inactivation And Facilitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.Y.; Rumpf, C.H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Cooley, E.S.; Petegem, F.Van; Minor, D.L., Jr.

    2009-05-20

    Calcium influx drives two opposing voltage-activated calcium channel (Ca{sub V}) self-modulatory processes: calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF). Specific Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (Ca{sup 2+}/CaM) lobes produce CDI and CDF through interactions with the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} subunit IQ domain. Curiously, Ca{sup 2+}/CaM lobe modulation polarity appears inverted between Ca{sub V}1s and Ca{sub V}2s. Here, we present crystal structures of Ca{sub V}2.1, Ca{sub V}2.2, and Ca{sub V}2.3 Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-IQ domain complexes. All display binding orientations opposite to Ca{sub V}1.2 with a physical reversal of the CaM lobe positions relative to the IQ {alpha}-helix. Titration calorimetry reveals lobe competition for a high-affinity site common to Ca{sub V}1 and Ca{sub V}2 IQ domains that is occupied by the CDI lobe in the structures. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrate that the N-terminal Ca{sub V}2 Ca{sup 2+}/C-lobe anchors affect CDF. Together, the data unveil the remarkable structural plasticity at the heart of Ca{sub V} feedback modulation and indicate that Ca{sub V}1 and Ca{sub V}2 IQ domains bear a dedicated CDF site that exchanges Ca{sup 2+}/CaM lobe occupants.

  15. Effect of Ca2+ efflux pathway distribution and exogenous Ca2+ buffers on intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in the rat ventricular myocyte: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Pásek, Michal; Simurda, Jiří; Orchard, Clive H

    2014-01-01

    We have used a previously published computer model of the rat cardiac ventricular myocyte to investigate the effect of changing the distribution of Ca(2+) efflux pathways (SERCA, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange, and sarcolemmal Ca(2+) ATPase) between the dyad and bulk cytoplasm and the effect of adding exogenous Ca(2+) buffers (BAPTA or EGTA), which are used experimentally to differentially buffer Ca(2+) in the dyad and bulk cytoplasm, on cellular Ca(2+) cycling. Increasing the dyadic fraction of a particular Ca(2+) efflux pathway increases the amount of Ca(2+) removed by that pathway, with corresponding changes in Ca(2+) efflux from the bulk cytoplasm. The magnitude of these effects varies with the proportion of the total Ca(2+) removed from the cytoplasm by that pathway. Differences in the response to EGTA and BAPTA, including changes in Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of the L-type Ca(2+) current, resulted from the buffers acting as slow and fast "shuttles," respectively, removing Ca(2+) from the dyadic space. The data suggest that complex changes in dyadic Ca(2+) and cellular Ca(2+) cycling occur as a result of changes in the location of Ca(2+) removal pathways or the presence of exogenous Ca(2+) buffers, although changing the distribution of Ca(2+) efflux pathways has relatively small effects on the systolic Ca(2+) transient.

  16. Literacy.CA. Issue #19, Winter 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Fiona, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The "literacy.ca" newsletter is a vehicle for literacy workers and supporters to share information, ideas, resources and research on emerging literacy issues. This issue of "literacy.ca" contains the following articles: (1) Riding The Wave: How will the federal election affect progress on a pan-Canadian literacy agenda?; (2)…

  17. Ca(2+) signalling in the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Paola; Lissandron, Valentina; Capitanio, Paola; Pozzan, Tullio

    2011-08-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a central role in lipid and protein post-translational modification and sorting. Morphologically the organelle is heterogeneous and it is possible to distinguish stacks of flat cysternae (cis- and medial Golgi), tubular-reticular networks and vesicles (trans-Golgi). These morphological differences parallel a distinct functionality with a selective distribution and complementary roles of the enzymes found in the different compartments. The Golgi apparatus has been also shown to be involved in Ca(2+) signalling: it is indeed endowed with Ca(2+) pumps, Ca(2+) release channels and Ca(2+) binding proteins and is thought to participate in determining the spatio-temporal complexity of the Ca(2+) signal within the cell, though this role is still poorly understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the organelle is heterogeneous in terms of Ca(2+) handling and selective reduction of Ca(2+) concentration, both in vitro and in a genetic human disease, within one of its sub-compartment results in alterations of protein trafficking within the secretory pathway and of the entire Golgi morphology. In this paper we review the available information on the Ca(2+) toolkit within the Golgi, its heterogeneous distribution in the organelle sub-compartments and discuss the implications of these characteristics for the physiopathology of the Golgi apparatus.

  18. Role of extracellular Ca2+ in gating of CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Olga; Isaev, Dmytro; Shirokov, Roman

    2005-01-01

    We examined changes in ionic and gating currents in CaV1.2 channels when extracellular Ca2+ was reduced from 10 mm to 0.1 μm. Saturating gating currents decreased by two-thirds (KD≈ 40 μm) and ionic currents increased 5-fold (KD≈ 0.5 μm) due to increasing Na+ conductance. A biphasic time dependence for the activation of ionic currents was observed at low [Ca2+], which appeared to reflect the rapid activation of channels that were not blocked by Ca2+ and a slower reversal of Ca2+ blockade of the remaining channels. Removal of Ca2+ following inactivation of Ca2+ currents showed that Na+ currents were not affected by Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Ca2+-dependent inactivation also induced a negative shift of the reversal potential for ionic currents suggesting that inactivation alters channel selectivity. Our findings suggest that activation of Ca2+ conductance and Ca2+-dependent inactivation depend on extracellular Ca2+ and are linked to changes in selectivity. PMID:15845581

  19. CaMKII in the cardiovascular system: sensing redox states.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeffrey R; He, B Julie; Grumbach, Isabella M; Anderson, Mark E

    2011-07-01

    The multifunctional Ca(2+)- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is now recognized to play a central role in pathological events in the cardiovascular system. CaMKII has diverse downstream targets that promote vascular disease, heart failure, and arrhythmias, so improved understanding of CaMKII signaling has the potential to lead to new therapies for cardiovascular disease. CaMKII is a multimeric serine-threonine kinase that is initially activated by binding calcified calmodulin (Ca(2+)/CaM). Under conditions of sustained exposure to elevated Ca(2+)/CaM, CaMKII transitions into a Ca(2+)/CaM-autonomous enzyme by two distinct but parallel processes. Autophosphorylation of threonine-287 in the CaMKII regulatory domain "traps" CaMKII into an open configuration even after Ca(2+)/CaM unbinding. More recently, our group identified a pair of methionines (281/282) in the CaMKII regulatory domain that undergo a partially reversible oxidation which, like autophosphorylation, prevents CaMKII from inactivating after Ca(2+)/CaM unbinding. Here we review roles of CaMKII in cardiovascular disease with an eye to understanding how CaMKII may act as a transduction signal to connect pro-oxidant conditions into specific downstream pathological effects that are relevant to rare and common forms of cardiovascular disease.

  20. Localized Calcineurin Confers Ca2+-Dependent Inactivation Upon Neuronal L-Type Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Oliveria, Seth F.; Dittmer, Philip J.; Youn, Dong-ho; Dell’Acqua, Mark L.; Sather, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Excitation-driven entry of Ca2+ through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels controls gene expression in neurons and a variety of fundamental activities in other kinds of excitable cells. The probability of opening of CaV1.2 L-type channels is subject to pronounced enhancement by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is scaffolded to CaV1.2 channels by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). CaV1.2 channels also undergo negative autoregulation via Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI), which strongly limits Ca2+ entry. An abundance of evidence indicates that CDI relies upon binding of Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) to an IQ motif in the carboxy tail of CaV1.2 L-type channels, a molecular mechanism seemingly unrelated to phosphorylation-mediated channel enhancement. But our work reveals, in cultured hippocampal neurons and a heterologous expression system, that the Ca2+/CaM-activated phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) is scaffolded to CaV1.2 channels by the neuronal anchoring protein AKAP79/150 and that over-expression of an AKAP79/150 mutant incapable of binding CaN (ΔPIX) impedes CDI. Interventions that suppress CaN activity—mutation in its catalytic site, antagonism with cyclosporine A or FK506, or intracellular perfusion with a peptide mimicking the sequence of the phosphatase’s autoinhibitory domain—interfere with normal CDI. In cultured hippocampal neurons from a ΔPIX knock-in mouse, CDI is absent. Results of experiments with the adenylyl cyclase stimulator forskolin and with the PKA inhibitor PKI suggest that Ca2+/CaM-activated CaN promotes CDI by reversing channel enhancement effectuated by kinases such as PKA. Hence our investigation of AKAP79/150-anchored CaN reconciles the CaM-based model of CDI with an earlier, seemingly contradictory model based on dephosphorylation signaling. PMID:23115171

  1. TU-C-BRE-02: A Novel, Highly Efficient and Automated Quality Assurance Tool for Modern Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Goddu, S; Sun, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Kamal, G; Mutic, S; Baltes, C; Rose, S; Stinson, K

    2014-06-15

    for QA of TrueBeam systems and its automation makes it highly efficient for testing both geometric and dosimetric aspects of the machine. This is very important for hypo-fractionated SBRT treatments. Received support from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1038.

  2. TU-AB-303-08: GPU-Based Software Platform for Efficient Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S; Robinson, A; McNutt, T; Wong, J; Lee, J; Plishker, W; Zaki, G; Shekhar, R

    2015-06-15

    efficient DIR, auto-segmentation, and dose computation, thus supporting an efficient ART workflow. This work was supported by NIH/NCI under grant R42CA137886.

  3. TU-EF-204-12: Quantitative Evaluation of Spectral Detector CT Using Virtual Monochromatic Images: Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, X; Guild, J; Arbique, G; Anderson, J; Dhanantwari, A; Yagil, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the image quality and spectral information of a spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner using virtual monochromatic (VM) energy images. Methods The SDCT scanner (Philips Healthcare) was equipped with a dual-layer detector and spectral iterative reconstruction (IR), which generates conventional 80–140 kV polychromatic energy (PE) CT images using both detector layers, PE images from the low-energy (upper) and high-energy (lower) detector layers and VM images. A solid water phantom with iodine (2.0–20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50.0–600.0 mg Ca/ml) rod inserts was used to evaluate effective energy estimate (EEE) and iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR). The EEE corresponding to an insert CT number in a PE image was calculated from a CT number fit to the VM image set. Since PE image is prone to beam-hardening artifact EEE may underestimate the actual energy separation from two layers of the detector. A 30-cm-diameter water phantom was used to evaluate noise power spectrum (NPS). The phantoms were scanned at 120 and 140 kV with the same CTDIvol. Results The CT number difference for contrast inserts in VM images (50–150 keV) was 1.3±6% between 120 and 140 kV scans. The difference of EEE calculated from low- and high-energy detector images was 11.5 and 16.7 keV for 120 and 140 kV scans, respectively. The differences calculated from 140 and 100 kV conventional PE images were 12.8, and 20.1 keV from 140 and 80 kV conventional PE images. The iodine CNR increased monotonically with decreased keV. Compared to conventional PE images, the peak of NPS curves from VM images were shifted to lower frequency. Conclusion The EEE results indicates that SDCT at 120 and 140 kV may have energy separation comparable to 100/140 kV and 80/140 kV dual-kV imaging. The effects of IR on CNR and NPS require further investigation for SDCT. Author YY and AD are Philips Healthcare employees.

  4. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    gratefully acknowledge the Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Research Programs W81XWH-13-1-0481 (LX), the National Institutes of Health 1R01 CA133474 and 1R21 A153587, and SRFDP (20124407120012) for funding.

  5. TU-CD-BRA-12: Coupling PET Image Restoration and Segmentation Using Variational Method with Multiple Regularizations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L; Tan, S; Lu, W

    2015-06-15

    Science Foundation of China (NNSFC), under Grant No.61375018, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, under Grant No. 2012QN086. Wei Lu was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant No. R01 CA172638.

  6. TU-G-BRB-05: Panel Discussion: Clinical Trials in Proton and Ion Therapy - Are We Ready?

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, R.

    2015-06-15

    development and support. Research reported in this presentation is supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National; Institutes of Health under Award Number P20CA183640.

  7. TU-AB-303-04: Characterizing CT-Derived Mass Change of Non-Tumor Pathology During Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, C; Weiss, E; Jan, N; Hugo, G; Christensen, G

    2015-06-15

    National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01CA166119. The authors have no conflicts of interest.

  8. TU-G-BRA-01: Assessing Radiation-Induced Reductions in Regional Lung Perfusion Following Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, R; Green, R; Lawrence, M; Schreiber, E; Das, S; Zagar, T; Marks, L; Sheikh, A; McCartney, W; Rivera, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose-dependent nature of radiation therapy (RT)-induced lung injury following hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT is unclear. We herein report preliminary results of a prospective study assessing the magnitude of RT-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion following hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT. Methods: Four patients undergoing hypo-fractionated stereotactic lung RT (SBRT: 12 Gy x 4 fractions or 10 Gy x 5 fractions) had a pre-treatment SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) perfusion scan providing a 3D map of regional lung perfusion. Scans were repeated 3–6 months post-treatment. Pre- and post SPECT scans were registered to the planning CT scan (and hence the 3D dose data). Changes in regional perfusion (counts per cc on the pre-post scans) were computed in regions of the lung exposed to different doses of radiation (in 5 Gy intervals), thus defining a dose-response function. SPECT scans were internally normalized to the regions receiving <5 Gy. Results: At 3 months post-RT, the changes in perfusion are highly variable. At 6 months, there is a consistent dose-dependent reduction in regional perfusion. The average percent decline in regional perfusion was 10% at 15–20 Gy, 20% at 20–25 Gy, and 30% at 25–30 Gy representing a relatively linear dose response with an approximate 2% reduction per Gray for doses in excess of 10 Gy. There was a subtle increase in perfusion in the lung receiving <10 Gy. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT appears to cause a dose-dependent reduction in regional lung perfusion. There appears to be a threshold effect with no apparent perfusion loss at doses <10 Gy, though this might be in part due to the normalization technique used. Additional data is needed from a larger number of patients to better assess this issue. This sort of data can be used to assist optimizing RT treatment plans that minimize the risk of lung injury. Partly supported by the NIH (CA69579) and the Lance Armstrong

  9. Spontaneous and nicotine-induced Ca2+ oscillations mediated by Ca2+ influx in rat pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Hiroya; Yamamura, Hisao; Muramatsu, Makoto; Kiyota, Keiko; Nishimura, Kaori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Ohya, Susumu; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    The pineal gland regulates circadian rhythm through the synthesis and secretion of melatonin. The rise of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) following nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) stimulation due to parasympathetic nerve activity downregulates melatonin production. Important characteristics and roles of Ca(2+) mobilization due to nAChR stimulation remain to be clarified. We report here that spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations can be observed in ∼15% of the pinealocytes in slice preparations from rat pineal glands when this dissociation procedure is done within 6 h from a dark-to-light change. The frequency and half-life of [Ca(2+)]i rise were 0.86 min(-1) and 19 s, respectively. Similar spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were recorded in 17% of rat pinealocytes that were primary cultured for several days. Simultaneous measurement of [Ca(2+)]i and membrane potential revealed that spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were triggered by periodic membrane depolarizations. Spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in cultured pinealocytes were abolished by extracellular Ca(2+) removal or application of nifedipine, a blocker of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC). In contrast, blockers of intracellular Ca(2+)-release channels, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate and ryanodine, have no effect. Our results also reveal that, in 23% quiescent pinealocytes, Ca(2+) oscillations were observed following the withdrawal of nicotine. Norepinephrine-induced melatonin secretion from whole pineal glands was significantly decreased by the coapplication of acetylcholine (ACh). This inhibitory effect of ACh was attenuated by nifedipine. In conclusion, both spontaneous and evoked Ca(2+) oscillations are due to membrane depolarization following activation of VDCCs. This consists of VDCC α1F subunit, and the associated Ca(2+) influx can strongly regulate melatonin secretion in pineal glands.

  10. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers: three mammalian gene families control Ca2+ transport.

    PubMed

    Lytton, Jonathan

    2007-09-15

    Mammalian Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are members of three branches of a much larger family of transport proteins [the CaCA (Ca2+/cation antiporter) superfamily] whose main role is to provide control of Ca2+ flux across the plasma membranes or intracellular compartments. Since cytosolic levels of Ca2+ are much lower than those found extracellularly or in sequestered stores, the major function of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers is to extrude Ca2+ from the cytoplasm. The exchangers are, however, fully reversible and thus, under special conditions of subcellular localization and compartmentalized ion gradients, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers may allow Ca2+ entry and may play more specialized roles in Ca2+ movement between compartments. The NCX (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger) [SLC (solute carrier) 8] branch of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers comprises three members: NCX1 has been most extensively studied, and is broadly expressed with particular abundance in heart, brain and kidney, NCX2 is expressed in brain, and NCX3 is expressed in brain and skeletal muscle. The NCX proteins subserve a variety of roles, depending upon the site of expression. These include cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, neuronal signalling and Ca2+ reabsorption in the kidney. The NCKX (Na2+/Ca2+-K+ exchanger) (SLC24) branch of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers transport K+ and Ca2+ in exchange for Na+, and comprises five members: NCKX1 is expressed in retinal rod photoreceptors, NCKX2 is expressed in cone photoreceptors and in neurons throughout the brain, NCKX3 and NCKX4 are abundant in brain, but have a broader tissue distribution, and NCKX5 is expressed in skin, retinal epithelium and brain. The NCKX proteins probably play a particularly prominent role in regulating Ca2+ flux in environments which experience wide and frequent fluctuations in Na+ concentration. Until recently, the range of functions that NCKX proteins play was generally underappreciated. This situation is now changing rapidly as evidence emerges for roles including photoreceptor

  11. CaMKIIδ meditates phenylephrine induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through store-operated Ca(2+) entry.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yawei; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Zhe; Huang, Zhuyun; Zhu, Jianghua; Chen, Qing-Hui; Gui, Le

    Evidence suggests that store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is involved in the hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. The signaling mechanisms of SOCE contributing to cardiac hypertrophy following phenylephrine (PE) stimulation are not fully understood. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II δ (CaMKIIδ) plays an important role in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) hemostasis and function in the cardimyocytes. This study is aimed to determine the role of CaMKIIδ in regulating the PE-induced myocardial hypertrophy and the associated molecular signaling mechanisms. We used primary cultures of neonatal cardimyocytes isolated from the left ventricle of Sprague Dawley rats to investigate the effects of CaMKIIδ on myocardial hypertrophy and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. We found that the expression of CaMKIIδ was enhanced in PE-induced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. CaMKIIδ siRNA, CaMKII inhibitor KN93, and SOCE blocker BTP2 attenuated the increase in the expression of CaMKIIδ and normalized the hypertrophic markers, atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide, and size of cardiomyocytes induced by PE stimulation. The protein level of stromal interaction molecule 1 and Orai1, the essential components of the SOCE, is also enhanced in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, which were normalized by CaMKIIδ siRNA and KN93 treatment. Hypertrophic cardiomyocytes showed an increase in the peak of Ca(2+) transient following store depletion, which was inhibited by SOCE blocker BTP2, CaMKIIδ siRNA, and KN93. The Ca(2+) currents through Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels were increased in PE-treated cardiomyocytes and were attenuated by CaMKIIδ siRNA and KN93. These data indicate that PE-induced myocardial hypertrophy requires a complex signaling pathway that involves activation of both CaMKIIδ and SOCE. In conclusion, these studies reveal that up-regulation of CaMKIIδ may contribute to the PE-induced myocardial hypertrophy through the activation of SOCE expressed in

  12. Role of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in Ca2+ entry of bovine airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Barajas-López, Carlos; Montaño, Luis M

    2003-10-01

    Depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores induces the opening of an unknown Ca(2+ )entry pathway to the cell. We measured the intracellular free-Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) at different sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in fura-2-loaded smooth muscle cells isolated from bovine tracheas. The absence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium generated a time-dependent decrement in [Ca(2+)]i which was proportional to the reduction in the SR-Ca(2+) content. This SR-Ca(2+) level was indirectly determined by measuring the amount of Ca(2+) released by caffeine. Ca(2+) restoration at different times after Ca(2+)-free incubation (2, 4, 6 and 10 min) induced an increment of [Ca(2+)]i. This increase in [Ca(2+)]i was considered as Ca(2+) entry to the cell. The rate of this entry was slow (~0.3 nM/s) when SR-Ca(2+) content was higher than 50% (2 and 4 min in Ca(2+)-free medium), and significantly ( p<0.01) accelerated (>1.0 nM/s) when SR-Ca(2+) content was lower than 50% (6 and 10 min in Ca(2+)-free medium). Thapsigargin significantly induced a higher rate of this Ca(2+) entry ( p<0.01). Variations in Ca(2+) influx after SR-Ca(2+) depletion were estimated more directly by a Mn(2+) quench approach. Ca(2+) restoration to the medium 4 min after Ca(2+) removal did not modify the Mn(2+) influx. However, when Ca(2+) was added after 10 min in Ca(2+)-free medium, an increment of Mn(2+) influx was observed, corroborating an increase in Ca(2+) entry. The fast Ca(2+) influx was Ni(2+) sensitive but was not affected by other known capacitative Ca(2+) entry blockers such as La(3+), Mg(2+), SKF 96365 and 2-APB. It was also not affected by the blockage of L-type Ca2(+) channels with methoxyverapamil or by the sustained K(+)-induced depolarisation. The slow Ca(2+) influx was only sensitive to SKF 96365. In conclusion, our results indicate that in bovine airway smooth muscle cells Ca(2+) influx after SR-Ca(2+) depletion has two rates: A) The slow Ca(2+) influx, which occurred in cells

  13. A comparison of fluorescent Ca2+ indicators for imaging local Ca2+ signals in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Jeffrey T.; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Localized subcellular changes in Ca2+ serve as important cellular signaling elements, regulating processes as diverse as neuronal excitability and gene expression. Studies of cellular Ca2+ signaling have been greatly facilitated by the availability of fluorescent Ca2+ indicators. The respective merits of different indicators to monitor bulk changes in cellular Ca2+ levels have been widely evaluated, but a comprehensive comparison for their use in detecting and analyzing local, subcellular Ca2+ signals is lacking. Here, we evaluated several fluorescent Ca2+ indicators in the context of local Ca2+ signals (puffs) evoked by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, using high-speed video-microscopy. Altogether, nine synthetic Ca2+ dyes (Fluo-4, Fluo-8, Fluo-8 high affinity, Fluo-8 low affinity, Oregon Green BAPTA-1, Cal-520, Rhod-4, Asante Calcium Red, and X-Rhod-1) and three genetically-encoded Ca2+-indicators (GCaMP6-slow, -medium and -fast variants) were tested; criteria include the magnitude, kinetics, signal-to-noise ratio and detection efficiency of local Ca2+ puffs. Among these, we conclude that Cal-520 is the optimal indicator for detecting and faithfully tracking local events; that Rhod-4 is the red-emitting indicator of choice; and that none of the GCaMP6 variants are well suited for imaging subcellular Ca2+ signals. PMID:26572560

  14. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Sustains the Fertilization Ca2+ Signal in Pig Eggs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmin; Zhang, Lu; Jaeger, Laurie A; Machaty, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    The role of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in the maintenance of sperm-induced Ca(2+) oscillations was investigated in porcine eggs. We found that 10 μM gadolinium (Gd(3+)), which is known to inhibit SOCE, blocked Ca(2+) entry that was triggered by thapsigargin-induced store depletion and also caused an abrupt cessation of the fertilization Ca(2+) signal. In a similar manner 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrazole 2 (20 μM), and tetrapandin-2 (10 μM), potent SOCE inhibitors, also blocked thapsigargin-stimulated Ca(2+) entry and disrupted the Ca(2+) oscillations after sperm-egg fusion. The downregulation of Stim1 or Orai1 in the eggs did not alter the Ca(2+) content of the intracellular stores, whereas co-overexpression of these proteins led to the generation of irregular Ca(2+) transients after fertilization that stopped prematurely. We also found that thapsigargin completely emptied the endoplasmic reticulum, and that the series of Ca(2+) transients stopped abruptly after the addition of thapsigargin to the fertilized eggs, indicating that the proper reloading of the intracellular stores is a prerequisite for the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations. These data strengthen our previous findings that in porcine eggs SOCE is a major signaling cascade that is responsible for sustaining the repetitive Ca(2+) signal at fertilization.

  15. GPR surveying of transport infrastructures and buildings; underground utility and void sensing - ongoing activities in Working Group 2 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Plati, Christina; Derobert, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 2 'GPR surveying of pavements, bridges, tunnels and buildings; underground utility and void sensing' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques in civil engineering, whilst simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Four Working Groups (WGs) carry out the research activities. WG1 focuses on the development of innovative GPR equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications. WG2 deals with the development of guidelines and protocols for the surveying, through the use of a GPR system, of transport infrastructure and buildings, as well as for the sensing of utilities and voids. WG3 deals with the development of electromagnetic forward and inverse scattering methods, for the characterization of GPR scenarios, as well as with data- processing algorithms for the elaboration of the data collected during GPR surveys. WG4 is concerned with the use of GPR in fields different from the civil engineering, as well as with the integration of GPR with other non-destructive testing techniques. Each WG includes several Projects. WG2 includes five Projects. Project 2.1 focuses on outlining 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR surveying of critical transport infrastructures (pavements, bridges and tunnels).' Project 2.2 is concerned with the development of 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR surveying of buildings.' Project 2.3 deals with identifying 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR sensing and mapping of underground utilities and voids, with a focus to urban

  16. [Mental diseases described in "Seririyat-i Akliye Desleri", a work of Raşit Tahsin (Tuğsavul)].

    PubMed

    Sehiralti, M

    2001-01-01

    Reşit Tahsin (Tuğsavul) is a well known Turkish psychiatrist. He was sent to Germany to study psychiatry and neurology and on his return he started to lecture in the Military Faculty of Medicine. Thus, courses on neurology and psychiatry, formerly carried out under the title of "asabiye", as a part of the internal medicine courses, became an independent course called "Emraz-i Akliye ve Asabiye". Reşit Tahsin's book "Seririyat-i Akliye Dersleri" was published in 1336 (1920). The book consists of two parts; and in the first part, mental diseases are classified and dealt with. In the foreword, Reşit Tahsin, notes that, in composing the first part of his book, he utilized a book of Emil Kraepelin whom he had worked with in Germany. The second part of the book is devoted to cases presented to the medical students. The history of each case, observations of the patients and their diseases, the method of differentiating diagnosis and the prognosis and treatment of diseases are discussed. In the foreword, the author also states that he disregarded the usual composing of medical books of his time; and he preferred to write his book as cynical lectures, after the way in Europe. He adds that be expected this to be an example for books similar to those written by "European masters". In the introduction, the need for and the aim of education on mental diseases is explained. Detailed information on the social aspects of psychiatric patients is also given. This book consists of 56 lectures to medical students and meanwhile it provides information about the psychiatry education during the period.

  17. Combining Ca2+ imaging with -glutamate photorelease

    PubMed Central

    Canepari, Marco; De Waard, Michel; Ogden, David

    2013-01-01

    We describe simple configurations and methods to measure optical Ca2+ signals in response to photorelease of L-glutamate. This photostimulation allows activation of postsynaptic glutamate receptors without activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels permitting the separation and the analysis of different Ca2+ components. We give details of basic microscopy configurations and of tools to efficiently illuminate the preparation while preserving the healthy conditions of the tissues. We also suggest methodological procedures and we discuss protocols of linear optics to achieve simultaneous imaging and uncaging in relation to protocols using two photon illumination. PMID:24298028

  18. Ontogeny of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingbo; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Tibbits, Glen F

    2008-02-01

    It is commonly accepted that L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) is the dominant mode of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in the adult mammalian heart and that there is no appreciable CICR in neonates. However, we have observed that cell contraction in the neonatal heart was significantly decreased after sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) depletion with caffeine. Therefore, the present study investigated the developmental changes of CICR in rabbit ventricular myocytes at 3, 10, 20, and 56 days of age. We found that the inhibitory effect of the L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) inhibitor nifedipine (Nif; 15 microM) caused an increasingly larger reduction of Ca(2+) transients on depolarization in older age groups [from approximately 15% in 3-day-old (3d) myocytes to approximately 90% in 56-day-old (56d) myocytes]. The remaining Ca(2+) transient in the presence of Nif in younger age groups was eliminated by the inhibition of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) with the subsequent addition of 10 microM KB-R7943 (KB-R). Furthermore, Ca(2+) transients were significantly reduced in magnitude after the depletion of SR Ca(2+) with caffeine in all age groups, although the effect was significantly greater in the older age groups (from approximately 40% in 3d myocytes up to approximately 70% in 56d myocytes). This SR Ca(2+)-sensitive Ca(2+) transient in the earliest developmental stage was insensitive to Nif but was sensitive to the subsequent addition of KB-R, indicating the presence of NCX-mediated CICR that decreased significantly with age (from approximately 37% in 3d myocytes to approximately 0.5% in 56d myocytes). In contrast, the I(Ca)-mediated CICR increased significantly with age (from approximately 10% in 3d myocytes to approximately 70% in 56d myocytes). The CICR gain as estimated by the integral of the CICR Ca(2+) transient divided by the integral of its Ca(2+) transient trigger was smaller when mediated by NCX ( approximately 1.0 for 3d

  19. Regulated release of Ca2+ from respiring mitochondria by Ca2+/2H+ antiport.

    PubMed

    Fiskum, G; Lehninger, A L

    1979-07-25

    Simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption and transmembrane transport of Ca2+, H+, and phosphate show that the efflux of Ca2+ from respiring tightly coupled rat liver mitochondria takes place by an electroneutral Ca2+/2H+ antiport process that is ruthenium red-insensitive and that is regulated by the oxidation-reduction state of the mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides. When mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides are kept in a reduced steady state, the efflux of Ca2+ is inhibited; when they are in an oxidized state, Ca2+ efflux is activated. These processes were demonstrated by allowing phosphate-depleted mitochondria respiring on succinate in the presence of rotenone to take up Ca2+ from the medium. Upon subsequent addition of ruthenium red to block Ca2+ transport via the electrophoretic influx pathway, and acetoacetate, to bring mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides into the oxidized state, Ca2+ efflux and H+ influx ensued. The observed H+ influx/Ca2+ efflux ratio was close to the value 2.0 predicted for the operation of an electrically neutral Ca2+/2H+ antiport process.

  20. Activation of Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channel ANO1 by localized Ca(2+) signals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Shah, Sihab; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) regulate numerous physiological processes including epithelial transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory processing. Anoctamin-1 (ANO1, TMEM16A) is a principal CaCC subunit in many cell types, yet our understanding of the mechanisms of ANO1 activation and regulation are only beginning to emerge. Ca(2+) sensitivity of ANO1 is rather low and at negative membrane potentials the channel requires several micromoles of intracellular Ca(2+) for activation. However, global Ca(2+) levels in cells rarely reach such levels and, therefore, there must be mechanisms that focus intracellular Ca(2+) transients towards the ANO1 channels. Recent findings indeed indicate that ANO1 channels often co-localize with sources of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. Interestingly, it appears that in many cell types ANO1 is particularly tightly coupled to the Ca(2+) release sites of the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Such preferential coupling may represent a general mechanism of ANO1 activation in native tissues.

  1. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Joel P.; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C.; Hoppa, Michael B.; Ryan, Timothy A.; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ influx without significantly altering the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca2+]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e). Lowering external Ca2+ to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca2+ entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca2+ entry without significant direct effects on Ca2+-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca2+ influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  2. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca2+ signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca2+ buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca2+ signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca2+ imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca2+-binding ratio (∼15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca2+ from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca2+ signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca2+ buffering enables fast active zone Ca2+ signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca2+ buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  3. Aging and CaMKII Alter Intracellular Ca2+ Transients and Heart Rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A.; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  4. Aging and CaMKII alter intracellular Ca2+ transients and heart rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility.

  5. Endogenous Ca2+ buffer concentration and Ca2+ microdomains in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Kukley, Maria; Stausberg, Pia; Beck, Heinz; Müller, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Dirk

    2005-01-19

    Ca2+-binding proteins are ubiquitously expressed throughout the CNS and serve as valuable immunohistochemical markers for certain types of neurons. However, the functional role of most Ca2+-binding proteins has to date remained obscure because their concentration in central neurons is not known. In this study, we investigate the intracellular concentration of the widely expressed Ca2+-binding protein calbindin-D28k in adult hippocampal slices using patch-clamp recordings and immunohistochemistry. First, we show that calbindin-D28k freely exchanges between patch pipette and cytoplasm during whole cell patch-clamp recordings with a time constant of approximately 10 min. Substituting known concentrations of recombinant calbindin-D28k in patch pipettes enabled us to determine the endogenous calbindin-D28k concentration by postrecording immunohistochemistry. Using this calibration procedure, we find that mature granule cells (doublecortin-) contain approximately 40 microm, and newborn granule cells (doublecortin+) contain 0-20 microm calbindin-D28k. CA3 stratum radiatum interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cells enclose approximately 47 and approximately 45 microm calbindin-D28k, respectively. Numerical simulations showed that 40 microm calbindin-D28k is capable of tuning Ca2+ microdomains associated with action potentials at the mouth of single or clustered Ca2+ channels: calbindin-D28k reduces the increment in free Ca2+ at a distance of 100 and 200 nm by 20 and 35%, respectively, and strongly accelerates the collapse of the Ca2+ gradient after cessation of Ca2+ influx. These data suggest that calbindin-D28k equips hippocampal neurons with approximately 160 microm mobile, high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites (kappa(S) approximately 200) that slow and reduce global Ca2+ signals while they enhance the spatiotemporal fidelity of submicroscopic Ca2+ signals.

  6. Selective Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibition prevents Ca2+ overload-induced triggered arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Norbert; Kormos, Anita; Kohajda, Zsófia; Szebeni, Áron; Szepesi, Judit; Pollesello, Piero; Levijoki, Jouko; Acsai, Károly; Virág, László; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Tóth, András

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Augmented Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity may play a crucial role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis; however, data regarding the anti-arrhythmic efficacy of NCX inhibition are debatable. Feasible explanations could be the unsatisfactory selectivity of NCX inhibitors and/or the dependence of the experimental model on the degree of Ca2+i overload. Hence, we used NCX inhibitors SEA0400 and the more selective ORM10103 to evaluate the efficacy of NCX inhibition against arrhythmogenic Ca2+i rise in conditions when [Ca2+]i was augmented via activation of the late sodium current (INaL) or inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump. Experimental Approach Action potentials (APs) were recorded from canine papillary muscles and Purkinje fibres by microelectrodes. NCX current (INCX) was determined in ventricular cardiomyocytes utilizing the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Ca2+i transients (CaTs) were monitored with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye, Fluo-4. Key Results Enhanced INaL increased the Ca2+ load and AP duration (APD). SEA0400 and ORM10103 suppressed INCX and prevented/reversed the anemone toxin II (ATX-II)-induced [Ca2+]i rise without influencing APD, CaT or cell shortening, or affecting the ATX-II-induced increased APD. ORM10103 significantly decreased the number of strophanthidin-induced spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ release events; however, SEA0400 failed to restrict the veratridine-induced augmentation in Purkinje-ventricle APD dispersion. Conclusions and Implications Selective NCX inhibition – presumably by blocking revINCX (reverse mode NCX current) – is effective against arrhythmogenesis caused by [Na+]i-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, without influencing the AP waveform. Therefore, selective INCX inhibition, by significantly reducing the arrhythmogenic trigger activity caused by the perturbed Ca2+i handling, should be considered as a promising anti-arrhythmic therapeutic strategy. PMID:25073832

  7. Calcium transport in bovine rumen epithelium as affected by luminal Ca concentrations and Ca sources

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja R; Ricken, Gundula E; Leonhard-Marek, Sabine; Fraser, David R; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative role of different segments of the gastrointestinal tract for Ca absorption, the respective mechanisms, and their regulation are not fully identified for ruminants, that is, cattle. In different in vitro experiments the forestomach wall has been demonstrated to be a major site for active Ca absorption in sheep and goats. In order to further clarify the role of the bovine rumen for Ca transport with special attention to luminal Ca concentrations, its ionic form, and pH, electrophysiological and unidirectional flux rate measurements were performed with isolated bovine rumen epithelial tissues. For Ca flux studies (Jms, Jsm) in vitro Ussing chamber technique was applied. Standard RT-PCR method was used to characterize TRPV6 and PMCA1 as potential contributors to transepithelial active Ca transport. At Ca concentrations of 1.2 mmol L−1 on both sides of the tissues, Jms were higher than Jsm resulting under some conditions in significant Ca net flux rates (Jnet), indicating the presence of active Ca transport. In the absence of an electrical gradient, Jnet could significantly be stimulated in the presence of luminal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Increasing the luminal Ca concentrations up to 11.2 mmol L−1 resulted in significant increases in Jms without influencing Jsm. Providing Ca in its form as respective chloride, formate, or propionate salts there was no significant effect on Jms. No transcripts specific for Ca channel TRPV6 could be demonstrated. Our results indicate different mechanisms for Ca absorption in bovine rumen as compared with those usually described for the small intestines. PMID:26564067

  8. Pituitary Ca/sup 2 +/ channels: blockade by conventional and novel Ca/sup 2 +/ antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Enyeart, J.J.; Sheu, S.S.; Hinkle, P.M.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have identified several new agents that block Ca/sup 2 +/ channels in the rat pituitary GH/sub 4/C/sub 1/ cell line. These drugs, which include the diphenylbutylpiperidine antipsychotic pimozide, the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, and the steroidal Na/sup +/ channel toxin veratridine, were compared with several conventional Ca/sup 2 +/ antagonists in /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake, prolactin secretion, and whole cell patch voltage-clamp experiments. Pimozide, the most potent of these novel Ca/sup 2 +/ antagonists, inhibited depolarization-dependent /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and prolactin secretion half maximally at a concentration of 100 nM, whereas calmidazolium and veratridine produced 50% inhibition at concentrations of 500 nM and 1 ..mu..M. In comparison, the three organic Ca/sup 2 +/ antagonists nitrendipine, verapamil, and diltiazem blocked /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake half maximally at concentrations of 2.5 nM, 1 ..mu..M, and 2.5 ..mu..M, respectively. All of the antagonists inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and prolactin secretion stimulated by the dihydropyridine Ca/sup 2 +/ agonist BAY-K 8644 less potently than KCl-stimulated responses. In patch-clamp experiments, pimozide, veratridine, and nitrendipine blocked Ca/sup 2 +/ current through the slowly inactivating Ca/sup 2 +/ channels of GH/sub 4/C/sub 1/ cells. These results demonstrate that Ca/sup 2 +/ channels in an endocrine cell line can be blocked by a variety of molecules including sodium channel toxins and calmodulin antagonists. The data extend the pharmacological similarity between Ca/sup 2 +/ channels in pituitary and other excitable cells and suggest a structural similarity among several cellular proteins.

  9. Ca Isotope Fractionation in the Hawaiian Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, B. A.; Chadwick, O. A.; Vitousek, P. M.; Wooden, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of the nutrient budgets in Hawaiian soils show the sources of major cations to be weathering of volcanic rock, marine aerosols, and Asian dust inputs. Especially at deeply weathered sites older than 150 ka, soils show strong depletion of the macronutrient calcium. Most of the calcium supply in these soils is of atmospheric origin (marine aerosols and continental dust). In contrast, younger soils are mainly supplied by calcium from weathering of volcanic bedrock. Based on the results of previous studies using strontium isotopic signatures and Sr/Ca ratios (e.g. Kennedy et al. 1998, Chadwick et al. 1999, Whipkey et al. 2000, Stewart et al. 2001) we have conducted research focusing on the isotope composition of calcium as a new tool for the investigation of sources of calcium and biogeochemical processes effecting Ca isotope fractionation in the plant-soil system. The study combines δ 44Ca with 87Sr/86Sr and Sr/Ca data of soils (bulk compositions and extractable Ca and Sr from soil exchange sites) and different plant species including native Ohia trees (Metrosideros polymorpha) from a soil chronosequence along the Hawaiian Island chain. The study sites differ in age of the underlying substrate from 0.3 ka to 4,100 ka, but show similar recent climate (mean annual temperature of 16 ° C) and amount of precipitation (about 2,500 mm/y). 44Ca/40Ca ratios were measured on a MAT262 at Stanford University, using a 42Ca-48Ca double spike, and are reported as δ 44Ca values relative to seawater (δ 44Ca = 0 ‰ ). Results of the extractable, plant available calcium from six soil sites show δ 44Ca values in the range of +1.2 ‰ to -1.3 ‰ with generally more negative values related to younger soil sites where calcium is mainly derived from weathering of volcanic rocks. Bulk soil samples, however, show δ 44Ca values between -0.1 ‰ and -2.5 ‰ , indicating differences in composition as a result of contributions from volcanic minerals, continental dust, and

  10. Motion of the Ca2+-pump captured.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    Studies of ion pumps, such as ATP synthetase and Ca(2+)-ATPase, have a long history. The crystal structures of several kinds of ion pump have been resolved, and provide static pictures of mechanisms of ion transport. In this study, using fast-scanning atomic force microscopy, we have visualized conformational changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) in real time at the single-molecule level. The analyses of individual SERCA molecules in the presence of both ATP and free Ca(2+) revealed up-down structural changes corresponding to the Albers-Post scheme. This fluctuation was strongly affected by the ATP and Ca(2+) concentrations, and was prevented by an inhibitor, thapsigargin. Interestingly, at a physiological ATP concentrations, the up-down motion disappeared completely. These results indicate that SERCA does not transit through the shortest structure, and has a catalytic pathway different from the ordinary Albers-Post scheme under physiological conditions.

  11. Role of Ca++ in Shoot Gravitropism. [avena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayle, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    A cornerstone in the argument that Ca(2+) levels may regulate growth is the finding the EGTA promotes straight growth. The usual explanation for these results is that Ca(2+) chelation from cell walls results in wall loosening and thus accelerated straight growth. The ability of frozen-thawed Avena coleoptile tissue (subjected to 15g tension) to extend in response to EGTA and Quin II was examined. The EGTA when applied in weakly buffered (i.e., 0.1mM) neutral solutions initiates rapid extension. When the buffer strength is increased, similar concentrations of EGTA produce no growth response. This implies when EGTA liberated protons are released upon Ca(2+) chelation they can either initiate acid growth (low buffer conditions) or if consumed (high buffer conditions) have no effect. Thus Ca(2+) chelation in itself apparently does not result in straight growth.

  12. TU-E-201-03: Eye Lens Dosimetry in Radiotherapy Using Contact Lens-Shaped Applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.

    2015-06-15

    awareness can lead to avoidance or even prevention. Learning Objectives: To understand recent changes in eye lens dose limits and thresholds for tissue reactions To understand different approaches to dose estimation for eye lens To learn about challenges in eye lens opacities among staff in interventional fluoroscopy Di Zhang, Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA, USA Eye lens radiation dose from brain perfusion CT exams CT perfusion imaging requires repeatedly exposing one location of the head to monitor the uptake and washout of iodinated contrast. The accumulated radiation dose to the eye lens can be high, leading to concerns about potential radiation injury from these scans. CTDIvol assumes continuous z coverage and can overestimate eye lens dose in CT perfusion scans where the table do not increment. The radiation dose to the eye lens from clinical CT brain perfusion studies can be estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models. MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers were simulated and the eye lens doses were estimated using the AAPM posted clinical protocols. They were also compared to CTDIvol values to evaluate the overestimation from CTDIvol. The efficacy of eye lens dose reduction techniques such as tilting the gantry and moving the scan location away from the eyelens were also investigated. Eye lens dose ranged from 81 mGy to 279 mGy, depending on the scanner and protocol used. It is between 59% and 63% of the CTDIvol values reported by the scanners. The eye lens dose is significantly reduced when the eye lenses were not directly irradiated. CTDIvol should not be interpreted as patient dose; this study has shown it to overestimate dose to the eye lens. These results may be used to provide more accurate estimates of actual dose to ensure that protocols are operated safely below thresholds. Tilting the gantry or moving the scanning region further away from the eyes are effective for reducing lens dose in clinical practice

  13. TU-E-201-01: Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionists

    SciTech Connect

    Rehani, M.

    2015-06-15

    awareness can lead to avoidance or even prevention. Learning Objectives: To understand recent changes in eye lens dose limits and thresholds for tissue reactions To understand different approaches to dose estimation for eye lens To learn about challenges in eye lens opacities among staff in interventional fluoroscopy Di Zhang, Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA, USA Eye lens radiation dose from brain perfusion CT exams CT perfusion imaging requires repeatedly exposing one location of the head to monitor the uptake and washout of iodinated contrast. The accumulated radiation dose to the eye lens can be high, leading to concerns about potential radiation injury from these scans. CTDIvol assumes continuous z coverage and can overestimate eye lens dose in CT perfusion scans where the table do not increment. The radiation dose to the eye lens from clinical CT brain perfusion studies can be estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models. MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers were simulated and the eye lens doses were estimated using the AAPM posted clinical protocols. They were also compared to CTDIvol values to evaluate the overestimation from CTDIvol. The efficacy of eye lens dose reduction techniques such as tilting the gantry and moving the scan location away from the eyelens were also investigated. Eye lens dose ranged from 81 mGy to 279 mGy, depending on the scanner and protocol used. It is between 59% and 63% of the CTDIvol values reported by the scanners. The eye lens dose is significantly reduced when the eye lenses were not directly irradiated. CTDIvol should not be interpreted as patient dose; this study has shown it to overestimate dose to the eye lens. These results may be used to provide more accurate estimates of actual dose to ensure that protocols are operated safely below thresholds. Tilting the gantry or moving the scanning region further away from the eyes are effective for reducing lens dose in clinical practice

  14. Efficient 41Ca measurements for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Schulze-König, T.; Synal, H.-A.; Aeberli, I.; Zimmermann, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    We present the performance of 41Ca measurements using low-energy Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the 500 kV facility TANDY at ETH Zurich. We optimized the measurement procedure for biomedical applications where reliability and high sample throughput is required. The main challenge for AMS measurements of 41Ca is the interfering stable isobar 41K. We use a simplified sample preparation procedure to produce calcium fluoride (CaF2) and extract calcium tri-fluoride ions (CaF3-) ions to suppress the stable isobar 41K. Although 41K is not completely suppressed we reach 41Ca/40Ca background level in the 10-12 range which is adequate for biomedical studies. With helium as a stripper gas we can use charge state 2+ at high transmission (∼50%). The new measurement procedure with the approximately 10 × improved efficiency and the higher accuracy due to 41K correction allowed us to measure more than 600 samples for a large biomedical study within only a few weeks of measurement time.

  15. Ca2+ transients in cardiac myocytes measured with high and low affinity Ca2+ indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, J R; Konishi, M

    1993-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) transients were measured in voltage-clamped rat cardiac myocytes with fura-2 or furaptra to quantitate rapid changes in [Ca2+]i. Patch electrode solutions contained the K+ salt of fura-2 (50 microM) or furaptra (300 microM). With identical experimental conditions, peak amplitude of stimulated [Ca2+]i transients in furaptra-loaded myocytes was 4- to 6-fold greater than that in fura-2-loaded cells. To determine the reason for this discrepancy, intracellular fura-2 Ca2+ buffering, kinetics of Ca2+ binding, and optical properties were examined. Decreasing cellular fura-2 concentration by lowering electrode fura-2 concentration 5-fold, decreased the difference between the amplitudes of [Ca2+]i transients in fura-2 and furaptra-loaded myocytes by twofold. Thus, fura-2 buffers [Ca2+]i under these conditions; however, Ca2+ buffering is not the only factor that explains the different amplitudes of the [Ca2+]i transients measured with these indicators. From the temporal comparison of the [Ca2+]i transients measured with fura-2 and furaptra, the apparent reverse rate constant for Ca2+ binding of fura-2 was at least 65s-1, much faster than previously reported in skeletal muscle fibers. These binding kinetics do not explain the difference in the size of the [Ca2+]i transients reported by fura-2 and furaptra. Parameters for fura-2 calibration, Rmin, Rmax, and beta, were obtained in salt solutions (in vitro) and in myocytes exposed to the Ca2+ ionophore, 4-Br A23187, in EGTA-buffered solutions (in situ). Calibration of fura-2 fluorescence signals with these in situ parameters yielded [Ca2+]i transients whose peak amplitude was 50-100% larger than those calculated with in vitro parameters. Thus, in vitro calibration of fura-2 fluorescence significantly underestimates the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient. These data suggest that the difference in amplitude of [Ca2+]i transients in fura-2 and furaptra-loaded myocytes is due, in part, to Ca2

  16. Identification of the neighborhood and CA rules from spatio-temporal CA patterns.

    PubMed

    Billings, S A; Yang, Yingxu

    2003-01-01

    Extracting the rules from spatio-temporal patterns generated by the evolution of cellular automata (CA) usually produces a CA rule table without providing a clear understanding of the structure of the neighborhood or the CA rule. In this paper, a new identification method based on using a modified orthogonal least squares or CA-OLS algorithm to detect the neighborhood structure and the underlying polynomial form of the CA rules is proposed. The Quine-McCluskey method is then applied to extract minimum Boolean expressions from the polynomials. Spatio-temporal patterns produced by the evolution of 1D, 2D, and higher dimensional binary CAs are used to illustrate the new algorithm, and simulation results show that the CA-OLS algorithm can quickly select both the correct neighborhood structure and the corresponding rule.

  17. X-Ray Data on Extraterrestrial CA Dialuminate (CaAl4O7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, D.; Ross, C. R., II; Bischoff, A.

    1993-07-01

    After the first discovery of Ca-dialuminate (CaAl4O7) in Allende [1], in recent years this phase has been found in several carbonaceous chondrites. Ca- dialuminate is a major phase in Ca,Al-rich inclusions from ALH85085 (e.g., [2]) and a dominating phase in CAIs from Acfer 182 ([3,4]). X-ray data on Ca-dialuminate are known from synthetic (e.g., [5-8]; cell constants) and terrestrial CaAl4O7 ([9]; only d-spacings), but are not available from extraterrestrial Ca-dialuminate. We report here the results of the first X-ray study of extraterrestrial Ca- dialuminate. The data (Table 1) were obtained by microdiffraction using a Rigaku PSPC microdiffractometer at the Bayerisches Geoinstitut. Ni-filtered Cr radiation was used with a direct beam diameter of about 50 micrometers. This powder diffraction method allows in situ measurement of polycrystalline Ca- dialuminate in a thin section. The CaAl4O7-rich inclusion 022/9 described in [4], consisting of a ~200-micrometer-sized core of Ca-dialuminate surrounded by layers of melilite and Ca-pyroxene, was chosen for analysis. The polycrystalline core contains only a small number of tiny inclusions (especially perovskite) and is therefore an excellent candidate for an X-ray study. For determination of the d-spacings of Ca-dialuminate an external standard (Ag6Ge10P12) was used for detector calibration. A large number of reflections could be indexed based upon comparison with the X-ray pattern of synthetic CaAl4O7 available in the JCPDS compilation [7]. The comparison was simplified because of the high purity of CaAl4O7 in inclusion 022/9 [4], and suggests the same structure for synthetic and extraterrestrial Ca-dialuminate. For determination of lattice parameters (cell constants, cell volume) refinement calculations were made based on 14 reflections (Table 1). The data for extraterrestrial CaAl4O7 shown in Table 1 indicate a close similarity to those obtained for synthetic CaAl4O7. The cell constants a, b, and therefore the cell

  18. Autophosphorylation-based Calcium (Ca2+) Sensitivity Priming and Ca2+/Calmodulin Inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana Ca2+-dependent Protein Kinase 28 (CPK28)*♦

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, R. Kevin; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Derbyshire, Paul; Menke, Frank L. H.; Zipfel, Cyril; Goshe, Michael B.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Huber, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    Plant calcium (Ca2+)-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) represent the primary Ca2+-dependent protein kinase activities in plant systems. CPKs are composed of a dual specificity (Ser/Thr and Tyr) kinase domain tethered to a calmodulin-like domain (CLD) via an autoinhibitory junction (J). Although regulation of CPKs by Ca2+ has been extensively studied, the contribution of autophosphorylation in controlling CPK activity is less well understood. Furthermore, whether calmodulin (CaM) contributes to CPK regulation, as is the case for Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinases outside the plant lineage, remains an open question. We therefore screened a subset of plant CPKs for CaM binding and found that CPK28 is a high affinity Ca2+/CaM-binding protein. Using synthetic peptides and native gel electrophoresis, we coarsely mapped the CaM-binding domain to a site within the CPK28 J domain that overlaps with the known site of intramolecular interaction between the J domain and the CLD. Peptide kinase activity of fully dephosphorylated CPK28 was Ca2+-responsive and was inhibited by Ca2+/CaM. Using in situ autophosphorylated protein, we expand on the known set of CPK28 autophosphorylation sites, and we demonstrate that, unexpectedly, autophosphorylated CPK28 had enhanced kinase activity at physiological concentrations of Ca2+ compared with the dephosphorylated protein, suggesting that autophosphorylation functions to prime CPK28 for Ca2+ activation and might also allow CPK28 to remain active when Ca2+ levels are low. Furthermore, CPK28 autophosphorylation substantially reduced sensitivity of the kinase to Ca2+/CaM inhibition. Overall, our analyses uncover new complexities in the control of CPK28 and provide mechanistic support for Ca2+ signaling specificity through Ca2+ sensor priming. PMID:28154194

  19. Sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels controls the profile of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Balázs; Váczi, Krisztina; Hegyi, Bence; Gönczi, Mónika; Dienes, Beatrix; Kistamás, Kornél; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Baczkó, István; Varró, András; Seprényi, György; Csernoch, László; Nánási, Péter P; Szentandrássy, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current (ICl(Ca)) mediated by TMEM16A and/or Bestrophin-3 may contribute to cardiac arrhythmias. The true profile of ICl(Ca) during an actual ventricular action potential (AP), however, is poorly understood. We aimed to study the profile of ICl(Ca) systematically under physiological conditions (normal Ca(2+) cycling and AP voltage-clamp) as well as in conditions designed to change [Ca(2+)]i. The expression of TMEM16A and/or Bestrophin-3 in canine and human left ventricular myocytes was examined. The possible spatial distribution of these proteins and their co-localization with Cav1.2 was also studied. The profile of ICl(Ca), identified as a 9-anthracene carboxylic acid-sensitive current under AP voltage-clamp conditions, contained an early fast outward and a late inward component, overlapping early and terminal repolarizations, respectively. Both components were moderately reduced by ryanodine, while fully abolished by BAPTA, but not EGTA. [Ca(2+)]i was monitored using Fura-2-AM. Setting [Ca(2+)]i to the systolic level measured in the bulk cytoplasm (1.1μM) decreased ICl(Ca), while application of Bay K8644, isoproterenol, and faster stimulation rates increased the amplitude of ICl(Ca). Ca(2+)-entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels was essential for activation of ICl(Ca). TMEM16A and Bestrophin-3 showed strong co-localization with one another and also with Cav1.2 channels, when assessed using immunolabeling and confocal microscopy in both canine myocytes and human ventricular myocardium. Activation of ICl(Ca) in canine ventricular cells requires Ca(2+)-entry through neighboring L-type Ca(2+) channels and is only augmented by SR Ca(2+)-release. Substantial activation of ICl(Ca) requires high Ca(2+) concentration in the dyadic clefts which can be effectively buffered by BAPTA, but not EGTA.

  20. Functional properties of a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with an altered Ca(2+)-binding mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Azorin, F; Soler, F; Gomez-Fernandez, J C; Fernandez-Belda, F

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles with diethylpyrocarbonate in the presence of a large excess of reagent, at pH 6.2 and at room temperature, reveals both a fast- and a slow-reacting population of protein residues. The loss of the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity is mainly associated with the fast-reacting population being partially sensitive to hydroxylamine. There is also an effect on the Ca(2+)-binding mechanism. Shorter derivatization times (5 min) produce a loss of the positive cooperativity of Ca2+ binding. When the treatment was prolonged for 30 min there was an additional decrease in the overall Ca2+ affinity. Curve-fitting procedures applied to the non-cooperative binding isotherms provide the equilibrium constants for the two Ca2+ sites, although they cannot discriminate between interacting and independent site mechanisms. Prestationary kinetics assays show 2 Ca2+:1 ATP ratios, at any extent of Ca2+ saturation, indicating that the Ca2+ sites are not independent. The Ca2+ dissociation profile after derivatization shows a decrease in the dissociation constant for the release of the second Ca2+, which is consistent with interacting sites. Isotopic exchange experiments show fast and slow components of equal amplitude even at subsaturating Ca2+ concentrations, which is incompatible with independent binding sites. The experimental data suggest a modification of the equilibrium binding constants making them more similar, but keeping the interacting character. The structural position of the external (cytoplasmic) and the internal (lumenal) Ca2+ sites remains unaltered in the absence of positive cooperativity. PMID:7626012

  1. 75 FR 2067 - Airworthiness Directives; Turbomeca S.A. Model Arriel 1B, 1D, and 1D1 Turboshaft Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... incorporating Turbom ca modification TU 232. You may obtain further information by examining the MCAI in the AD... (P/N 0 292 70 779 0) with Pinions incorporating Turbom ca modification TU 232 in accordance...

  2. Modulation of Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) oscillations in HeLa cells and fibroblasts by mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vay, Laura; Hernández-Sanmiguel, Esther; Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Lobatón, Carmen D; Moreno, Alfredo; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2007-04-01

    The recent availability of activators of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter allows direct testing of the influence of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake on the overall Ca(2+) homeostasis of the cell. We show here that activation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake by 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT) or kaempferol stimulates histamine-induced Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that this effect is enhanced if the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger is simultaneously inhibited with CGP37157. This suggests that both Ca(2+) uptake and release from mitochondria control the ability of local Ca(2+) microdomains to produce feedback inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)Rs). In addition, the ability of mitochondria to control Ca(2+) release from the ER allows them to modulate cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations. In histamine stimulated HeLa cells and human fibroblasts, both PPT and kaempferol initially stimulated and later inhibited oscillations, although kaempferol usually induced a more prolonged period of stimulation. Both compounds were also able to induce the generation of Ca(2+) oscillations in previously silent fibroblasts. Our data suggest that cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations are exquisitely sensitive to the rates of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release, which precisely control the size of the local Ca(2+) microdomains around InsP(3)Rs and thus the ability to produce feedback activation or inhibition of Ca(2+) release.

  3. Modulation of Ca2+ release and Ca2+ oscillations in HeLa cells and fibroblasts by mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Vay, Laura; Hernández-SanMiguel, Esther; Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Lobatón, Carmen D; Moreno, Alfredo; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    The recent availability of activators of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter allows direct testing of the influence of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on the overall Ca2+ homeostasis of the cell. We show here that activation of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by 4,4′,4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT) or kaempferol stimulates histamine-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that this effect is enhanced if the mitochondrial Na+–Ca2+ exchanger is simultaneously inhibited with CGP37157. This suggests that both Ca2+ uptake and release from mitochondria control the ability of local Ca2+ microdomains to produce feedback inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs). In addition, the ability of mitochondria to control Ca2+ release from the ER allows them to modulate cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations. In histamine stimulated HeLa cells and human fibroblasts, both PPT and kaempferol initially stimulated and later inhibited oscillations, although kaempferol usually induced a more prolonged period of stimulation. Both compounds were also able to induce the generation of Ca2+ oscillations in previously silent fibroblasts. Our data suggest that cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations are exquisitely sensitive to the rates of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release, which precisely control the size of the local Ca2+ microdomains around InsP3Rs and thus the ability to produce feedback activation or inhibition of Ca2+ release. PMID:17234694

  4. Role of [Ca2+]i in "Ca2+ stores depletion-Ca2+ entry coupling' in fibroblasts expressing the rat neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gailly, P; Hermans, E; Gillis, J M

    1996-01-01

    1. Transfected Chinese hamster ovary fibroblasts expressing the rat neurotensin receptor were used to study the 'Ca2+ stores depletion-Ca2+ entry coupling' which follows stimulation with neurotensin and liberation of InsP3. 2. This coupling could be dissociated in time. Firstly, stores depletion was produced by neurotensin or thapsigargin which caused a first [Ca2+]i transient in a Ca(2+)-free external medium. Secondly, readmission of external Ca2+ produced an influx of Ca2+ and a second [Ca2+]i transient. 3. Various concentrations of thapsigargin (20 nM to 1 microM) were used to produce complete stores depletion with small or large first peaks of [Ca2+]i. Upon return to external Ca2+, small or large second [Ca2+]i peaks were observed. The amplitudes of both peaks were positively correlated. 4. The Ca2+ entry which followed stores depletion could occur at very low basal values of [Ca2+]i, was accelerated by okadaic acid and inhibited by staurosporine and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. 5. It is concluded that the rise in [Ca2+]i during Ca2+ stores depletion is an essential parameter which determines the size of the subsequent Ca2+ entry. PMID:8815199

  5. Physical conditions in CaFe interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnaciński, P.; Krogulec, M.

    2008-01-01

    Interstellar clouds that exhibit strong Ca I and Fe I lines are called CaFe clouds. Ionisation equilibrium equations were used to model the column densities of Ca II, Ca I, K I, Na I, Fe I and Ti II in CaFe clouds. We find that the chemical composition of CaFe clouds is solar and that there is no depletion into dust grains. CaFe clouds have high electron densities, n_e≈1 cm-3, that lead to high column densities of neutral Ca and Fe.

  6. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  7. Negative feedback from CaSR signaling to aquaporin-2 sensitizes vasopressin to extracellular Ca2.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Russo, Annamaria; Centrone, Mariangela; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    We previously described that high luminal Ca(2+) in the renal collecting duct attenuates short-term vasopressin-induced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) trafficking through activation of the Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR). Here, we evaluated AQP2 phosphorylation and permeability, in both renal HEK-293 cells and in the dissected inner medullary collecting duct, in response to specific activation of CaSR with NPS-R568. In CaSR-transfected cells, CaSR activation drastically reduced the basal levels of AQP2 phosphorylation at S256 (AQP2-pS256), thus having an opposite effect to vasopressin action. When forskolin stimulation was performed in the presence of NPS-R568, the increase in AQP2-pS256 and in the osmotic water permeability were prevented. In the freshly isolated inner mouse medullar collecting duct, stimulation with forskolin in the presence of NPS-R568 prevented the increase in AQP2-pS256 and osmotic water permeability. Our data demonstrate that the activation of CaSR in the collecting duct prevents the cAMP-dependent increase in AQP2-pS256 and water permeability, counteracting the short-term vasopressin response. By extension, our results suggest the attractive concept that CaSR expressed in distinct nephron segments exerts a negative feedback on hormones acting through cAMP, conferring high sensitivity of hormone to extracellular Ca(2+).

  8. Spatial Ca(2+) profiling: decrypting the universal cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillation.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Krishna; Parekh, Anant B

    2016-11-17

    Stimulation of cell-surface receptors that couple to phospholipase C to generate the second messenger inositol trisphosphate often evokes repetitive oscillations in cytosolic Ca(2+) . Signalling information is encoded in both the amplitude and frequency of the Ca(2+) spikes. Recent studies have revealed that the spatial profile of the oscillation also imparts signalling power; Ca(2+) microdomains near store-operated CRAC channels in the plasma membrane and inositol trisphosphate-gated channels in the endoplasmic reticulum both signal to distinct downstream targets. Spatial profiling therefore increases the transduction power of the universal oscillatory cytosolic Ca(2+) signal.

  9. Radioisotope tracer studies of inorganic carbon and Ca in microbially derived CaCO3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    1999-01-01

    Microbial calcification significantly impacts the cycling and deposition of inorganic carbon. This research employs 45Ca and 14C techniques as radioisotopic tracers to examine the role of cellular cycling of Ca2+ and inorganic carbon in CaCO3 precipitation by the unicellular green alga Nannochloris atomus. Implications of the effects of these physiological aspects on CaCO3 precipitation and the effects of microbial calcification on CaCO3 δ13C ratios are discussed. Results from pulse/chase experiments indicate that intracellular Ca2+ is incorporated into extracellular CaCO3. Intracellular inorganic carbon leaks from cells within 10 to 12 s after injection of unlabelled NaHCO3, providing a source of inorganic carbon for extracellular CaCO3. Cellular expulsion of calcium plays a key role in increasing the CaCO3 saturation state at the site of calcification. The δ13C ratios of microbial carbonates may vary depending on the amount of photorespiratory CO2 incorporated.

  10. Mg/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.; Marco-Barba, J.; Mezquita, F.

    2007-12-01

    Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative ion concentrations. Hence, waters with identical Mg/Ca may have very different concentrations of Mg and Ca and very different anions. Here we use two examples to focus on the effects of ion chemistry on Mg/Ca partitioning in continental ostracode shells and we ignore the complexities of solute evolution, which can change Mg/Ca over timescales of minutes to millennia. Palacios-Fest and Dettman (2001) conducted a monthly study of ,Cypridopsis vidua at El Yeso Lake in Sonora, Mexico. They established a relation between temperature and average shell Mg/Ca using regression analyses on averaged data. When their Mg/Ca-temperature relation is applied to monthly ,C. vidua data from Page Pond near Cleveland, Ohio, water temperatures of -8 to -1°C are obtained. The observed Mg/Ca ranges for El Yeso Lake (0.31 to 0.46) and Page Pond (0.33 to 0.46) are similar, as are their specific conductivities (700 to 850μS for El Yeso Lake; 400 to 600μS for Page Pond). However, [Ca] is 140-260 mg/L for El Yeso, but only 70-90 mg/L for Page Pond. Page Pond data, in fact, shows a good temperature shell Mg/Ca relation for .C. vidua, but the relation is different from that at El Yeso. Hence, shell Mg/Ca is a multi-valued, family of curves function of temperature and Mg/Ca of water that depends on the [Mg] and [Ca] values in water and perhaps other factors. Our second example comes from sites near Valencia, Spain and involves shell data for ,Cyprideis torosa, an estuarine ostracode that is tolerant of a wide range of salinity and can live in continental waters as long as the carbonate alkalinity to Ca ratio is

  11. The Phosphatase-Resistant Isoform of CaMKI, Ca²⁺/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Iδ (CaMKIδ), Remains in Its "Primed" Form without Ca²⁺ Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Senga, Yukako; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Shigeri, Yasushi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2015-06-16

    Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI) is known to play pivotal roles in Ca²⁺ signaling pathways. Four isoforms of CaMKI (α, β, γ, and δ) have been reported so far. CaMKI is activated through phosphorylation by the upstream kinase, CaMK kinase (CaMKK), and phosphorylates downstream targets. When CaMKI was transiently expressed in 293T cells, CaMKIα was not phosphorylated at all under low-Ca²⁺ conditions in the cells. In contrast, we found that CaMKIδ was significantly phosphorylated and activated to phosphorylate cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) under the same conditions. Herein, we report that the sustained activation of CaMKIδ is ascribed to its phosphatase resistance resulting from the structure of its N-terminal region. First, we examined whether CaMKIδ is more readily phosphorylated by CaMKK than CaMKIα, but no significant difference was observed. Next, to compare the phosphatase resistance between CaMKIα and CaMKIδ, we assessed the dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated CaMKIs by CaMK phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F). Surprisingly, CaMKIδ was hardly dephosphorylated by CaMKP, whereas CaMKIα was significantly dephosphorylated under the same conditions. To date, there have been no detailed reports concerning dephosphorylation of CaMKI. Through extensive analysis of CaMKP-catalyzed dephosphorylation of various chimeric and point mutants of CaMKIδ and CaMKIα, we identified the amino acid residues responsible for the phosphatase resistance of CaMKIδ (Pro-57, Lys-62, Ser-66, Ile-68, and Arg-76). These results also indicate that the phosphatase resistance of CaMKI is largely affected by only several amino acids in its N-terminal region. The phosphatase-resistant CaMKI isoform may play a physiological role under low-Ca²⁺ conditions in the cells.

  12. Causes-of-death analysis of patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy: an analysis of the CeRtiTuDe cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Marijon, Eloi; Leclercq, Christophe; Narayanan, Kumar; Boveda, Serge; Klug, Didier; Lacaze-Gadonneix, Jonathan; Defaye, Pascal; Jacob, Sophie; Piot, Olivier; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Perier, Marie-Cecile; Mulak, Genevieve; Hermida, Jean-Sylvain; Milliez, Paul; Gras, Daniel; Cesari, Olivier; Hidden-Lucet, Françoise; Anselme, Frederic; Chevalier, Philippe; Maury, Philippe; Sadoul, Nicolas; Bordachar, Pierre; Cazeau, Serge; Chauvin, Michel; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Jouven, Xavier; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Aims The choice of resynchronization therapy between with (CRT-D) and without (CRT-P) a defibrillator remains a contentious issue. Cause-of-death analysis among CRT-P, compared with CRT-D, patients could help evaluate the extent to which CRT-P patients would have additionally benefited from a defibrillator in a daily clinical practice. Methods and results A total of 1705 consecutive patients implanted with a CRT (CRT-P: 535 and CRT-D: 1170) between 2008 and 2010 were enrolled in CeRtiTuDe, a multicentric prospective follow-up cohort study, with specific adjudication for causes of death at 2 years. Patients with CRT-P compared with CRT-D were older (P < 0.0001), less often male (P < 0.0001), more symptomatic (P = 0.0005), with less coronary artery disease (P = 0.003), wider QRS (P = 0.002), more atrial fibrillation (P < 0.0001), and more co-morbidities (P = 0.04). At 2-year follow-up, the annual overall mortality rate was 83.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 73.41–94.19] per 1000 person-years. The crude mortality rate among CRT-P patients was double compared with CRT-D (relative risk 2.01, 95% CI 1.56–2.58). In a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, CRT-P remained associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio 1.54, 95% CI 1.07–2.21, P = 0.0209), although other potential confounders may persist. By cause-of-death analysis, 95% of the excess mortality among CRT-P subjects was related to an increase in non-sudden death. Conclusion When compared with CRT-D patients, excess mortality in CRT-P recipients was mainly due to non-sudden death. Our findings suggest that CRT-P patients, as currently selected in routine clinical practice, would not potentially benefit with the addition of a defibrillator. PMID:26330420

  13. Comparison of genomes of Brucella melitensis M28 and the B. melitensis M5-90 derivative vaccine strain highlights the translation elongation factor Tu gene tuf2 as an attenuation-related gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangkun; Qiao, Zujian; Hu, Sen; Liu, Wenxing; Zheng, Huajun; Liu, Sidang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Bu, Zhigao

    2013-08-01

    Brucella melitensis causes brucellosis, a disease affecting sheep, cattle, and sometimes humans. Attenuated B. melitensis strain M5-90, derived from virulent strain M28, is widely used as a live vaccine in ruminants in China. Genetic differences between the strains may cast light on the mechanism of attenuation. We recently reported the complete genomic sequences of M28 and M5-90. Genome organization is highly conserved between these isolates, and also with virulent strains 16 M and ATCC 23457. Analysis revealed 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with consistent differences between M5-90 and the virulent strains. Notably, the tuf2 gene encoding translation elongation factor EF-Tu from M5-90 contained 50 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 9 gaps (indels) compared to tuf2 of M28 or of the other virulent strains. There were no changes in tuf1. To evaluate the potential role of EF-Tu in pathogenesis, tuf1 and tuf2 mutants of M28 and an M5-90 strain harboring wild-type tuf2 were constructed, and their virulence/attenuation was evaluated in vivo. We report that the tuf2 gene plays an important role in the attenuation of M5-90 virulence.

  14. Ionizing radiation regulates cardiac Ca handling via increased ROS and activated CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Sag, Can M; Wolff, Hendrik A; Neumann, Kay; Opiela, Marie-Kristin; Zhang, Juqian; Steuer, Felicia; Sowa, Thomas; Gupta, Shamindra; Schirmer, Markus; Hünlich, Mark; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F; Anderson, Mark E; Shah, Ajay M; Christiansen, Hans; Maier, Lars S

    2013-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an integral part of modern multimodal anti-cancer therapies. IR involves the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in targeted tissues. This is associated with subsequent cardiac dysfunction when applied during chest radiotherapy. We hypothesized that IR (i.e., ROS)-dependently impaired cardiac myocytes' Ca handling might contribute to IR-dependent cardiocellular dysfunction. Isolated ventricular mouse myocytes and the mediastinal area of anaesthetized mice (that included the heart) were exposed to graded doses of irradiation (sham 4 and 20 Gy) and investigated acutely (after ~1 h) as well as chronically (after ~1 week). IR induced a dose-dependent effect on myocytes' systolic function with acutely increased, but chronically decreased Ca transient amplitudes, which was associated with an acutely unaltered but chronically decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load. Likewise, in vivo echocardiography of anaesthetized mice revealed acutely enhanced left ventricular contractility (strain analysis) that declined after 1 week. Irradiated myocytes showed persistently increased diastolic SR Ca leakage, which was acutely compensated by an increase in SR Ca reuptake. This was reversed in the chronic setting in the face of slowed relaxation kinetics. As underlying cause, acutely increased ROS levels were identified to activate Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Accordingly, CaMKII-, but not PKA-dependent phosphorylation sites of the SR Ca release channels (RyR2, at Ser-2814) and phospholamban (at Thr-17) were found to be hyperphosphorylated following IR. Conversely, ROS-scavenging as well as CaMKII-inhibition significantly attenuated CaMKII-activation, disturbed Ca handling, and subsequent cellular dysfunction upon irradiation. Targeted cardiac irradiation induces a biphasic effect on cardiac myocytes Ca handling that is associated with chronic cardiocellular dysfunction. This appears to be mediated by increased oxidative

  15. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical localization of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4 in Ca2+-transporting epithelia.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R Todd; Beggs, Megan R; Zamani, Reza; Marcussen, Niels; Frische, Sebastian; Dimke, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCAs) participate in epithelial Ca(2+) transport and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. The Pmca4 isoform is enriched in distal nephron isolates and decreased in mice lacking the epithelial transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. We therefore hypothesized that Pmca4 plays a significant role in transcellular Ca(2+) flux and investigated the localization and regulation of Pmca4 in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. Using antibodies directed specifically against Pmca4, we found it expressed only in the smooth muscle layer of mouse and human intestines, whereas pan-specific Pmca antibodies detected Pmca1 in lateral membranes of enterocytes. In the kidney, Pmca4 showed broad localization to the distal nephron. In the mouse, expression was most abundant in segments coexpressing the epithelial ransient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. Significant, albeit lower, expression was also evident in the region encompassing the cortical thick ascending limbs, macula densa, and early distal tubules as well as smooth muscle layers surrounding renal vessels. In the human kidney, a similar pattern of distribution was observed, with the highest PMCA4 expression in Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter-positive tubules. Electron microscopy demonstrated Pmca4 localization in distal nephron cells at both the basolateral membrane and intracellular perinuclear compartments but not submembranous vesicles, suggesting rapid trafficking to the plasma membrane is unlikely to occur in vivo. Pmca4 expression was not altered by perturbations in Ca(2+) balance, pointing to a housekeeping function of the pump in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. In conclusion, Pmca4 shows a divergent expression pattern in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia, inferring diverse roles for this isoform not limited to transepithelial Ca(2+) transport.

  16. CaF2:Yb laser ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, M. Sh.; Basiev, T. T.; Demidenko, A. A.; Doroshenko, M. E.; Fedorov, P. P.; Garibin, E. A.; Gusev, P. E.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Krutov, M. A.; Mironov, I. A.; Osiko, V. V.; Popov, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    CaF2:Yb fluoride laser ceramics, prepared by hot-forming, exhibit the same optical properties as starting single crystals. Slope efficiency of the Сa0.95Yb0.05F2.05 is equal to 35% in the pulsed mode of laser operation. Decrease of ytterbium concentration in CaF2:Yb samples down to 3 mol.% resulted in the essential improvement of Сa0.97Yb0.03F2.03 thermal conductivity from 3.5 to 4.5 W/m K, but slightly decreased (down to 30%) slope efficiency of the samples under both pulsed and CW mode of operation. Alternative hot-pressing synthesis of CaF2:Yb fluoride laser ceramics provided materials with superior mechanical properties (microhardness Н = 3.2 GPa and fracture toughness К1С = 0.65 МPа m1/2) in comparison with hot-formed and/or single crystal CaF2:Yb specimens. For the first time, lasing has been observed for the novel aforementioned hot-pressed CaF2:Yb ceramics.

  17. Analysing force-pCa curves.

    PubMed

    Walker, John S; Li, Xiaotao; Buttrick, Peter M

    2010-07-01

    We investigated three forms of the Hill equation used to fit force-calcium data from skinned muscle experiments; Two hyperbolic forms that relate force to calcium concentration directly, and a sigmoid form that relates force to the -log(10) of the calcium concentration (pCa). The equations were fit to force-calcium data from 39 cardiac myocytes (up to five myocytes from each of nine mice) and the Hill coefficient and the calcium required for half maximal activation, expressed as a concentration (EC(50)) and as a pCa value (pCa(50)) were obtained. The pCa(50) values were normally distributed and the EC(50) values were found to approximate a log-normal distribution. Monte Carlo simulations confirmed that these distributions were intrinsic to the Hill equation. Statistical tests such as the t-test are robust to moderate levels of departure from normality as seen here, and either EC(50) or pCa(50) may be used to test for significant differences so long as it is kept in mind that ΔEC₅₀ is an additive measure of change and that ΔpCa₅₀ is a ratiometric measure of change. The Hill coefficient was found to be sufficiently log-normally distributed that log-transformed values should be used to test for statistically significant differences.

  18. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  19. Modeling the contributions of Ca2+ flows to spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and cortical spreading depression-triggered Ca2+ waves in astrocyte networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in brain functions through Ca(2+) signals, including Ca(2+) waves and Ca(2+) oscillations. Currently the mechanisms of Ca(2+) signals in astrocytes are not fully clear. Here, we present a computational model to specify the relative contributions of different Ca(2+) flows between the extracellular space, the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum of astrocytes to the generation of spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations (CASs) and cortical spreading depression (CSD)-triggered Ca(2+) waves (CSDCWs) in a one-dimensional astrocyte network. This model shows that CASs depend primarily on Ca(2+) released from internal stores of astrocytes, and CSDCWs depend mainly on voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx. It predicts that voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx is able to generate Ca(2+) waves during the process of CSD even after depleting internal Ca(2+) stores. Furthermore, the model investigates the interactions between CASs and CSDCWs and shows that the pass of CSDCWs suppresses CASs, whereas CASs do not prevent the generation of CSDCWs. This work quantitatively analyzes the generation of astrocytic Ca(2+) signals and indicates different mechanisms underlying CSDCWs and non-CSDCWs. Research on the different types of Ca(2+) signals might help to understand the ways by which astrocytes participate in information processing in brain functions.

  20. Calcium-activated K(+) channel (K(Ca)3.1) activity during Ca(2+) store depletion and store-operated Ca(2+) entry in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya-dong; Hanley, Peter J; Rinné, Susanne; Zuzarte, Marylou; Daut, Jurgen

    2010-07-01

    STIM1 'senses' decreases in endoplasmic reticular (ER) luminal Ca(2+) and induces store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry through plasma membrane Orai channels. The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated K(+) channel K(Ca)3.1 (previously known as SK4) has been implicated as an 'amplifier' of the Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) current, especially in T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that human macrophages express K(Ca)3.1, and here we used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to investigate the activity of these channels during Ca(2+) store depletion and store-operated Ca(2+) influx. Using RT-PCR, we found that macrophages express the elementary CRAC channel components Orai1 and STIM1, as well as Orai2, Orai3 and STIM2, but not the putatively STIM1-activated channels TRPC1, TRPC3-7 or TRPV6. In whole-cell configuration, a robust Ca(2+)-induced outwardly rectifying K(+) current inhibited by clotrimazole and augmented by DC-EBIO could be detected, consistent with K(Ca)3.1 channel current (also known as intermediate-conductance IK1). Introduction of extracellular Ca(2+) following Ca(2+) store depletion via P2Y(2) receptors induced a robust charybdotoxin (CTX)- and 2-APB-sensitive outward K(+) current and hyperpolarization. We also found that SOC entry induced by thapsigargin treatment induced CTX-sensitive K(+) current in HEK293 cells transiently expressing K(Ca)3.1. Our data suggest that SOC and K(Ca)3.1 channels are tightly coupled, such that a small Ca(2+) influx current induces a much large K(Ca)3.1 channel current and hyperpolarization, providing the necessary electrochemical driving force for prolonged Ca(2+) signaling and store repletion.

  1. Excitotoxicity through Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors requires Ca2+-dependent JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, M.; Fernandes, J.; Burgeiro, A.; Thomas, G.M.; Huganir, R.L.; Duarte, C.B.; Carvalho, A.L.; Santos, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    The GluA4-containing Ca2+-permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors (Ca-AMPARs) were previously shown to mediate excitotoxicity through mechanisms involving the activator protein-1 (AP-1), a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) substrate. To further investigate JNK involvement in excitotoxic pathways coupled to Ca-AMPARs we used HEK293 cells expressing GluA4-containing Ca-AMPARs (HEK-GluA4). Cell death induced by overstimulation of Ca-AMPARs was mediated, at least in part, by JNK. Importantly, JNK activation downstream of these receptors was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration. In our quest for a molecular link between Ca-AMPARs and the JNK pathway we found that the JNK interacting protein-1 (JIP-1) interacts with the GluA4 subunit of AMPARs through the N-terminal domain. In vivo, the excitotoxin kainate promoted the association between GluA4 and JIP-1 in the rat hippocampus. Taken together, our results show that the JNK pathway is activated by Ca-AMPARs upon excitotoxic stimulation and suggest that JIP-1 may contribute to the propagation of the excitotoxic signal. PMID:20708684

  2. Cultivation of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. africanus', and 'Ca. L. americanus' associated with huanglongbing.

    PubMed

    Sechler, A; Schuenzel, E L; Cooke, P; Donnua, S; Thaveechai, N; Postnikova, E; Stone, A L; Schneider, W L; Damsteegt, V D; Schaad, N W

    2009-05-01

    A new medium designated Liber A has been designed and used to successfully cultivate all three 'Candidatus Liberibacter spp.,' the suspect causative agents of huanglongbing (HLB) in citrus. The medium containing citrus vein extract and a growth factor sustained growth of 'Ca. Liberibacter spp.' for four or five single-colony transfers before viability declined. Colonies, positive for 'Ca. L. asiaticus' by a 16s-based rDNA real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and sequencing, were irregular-shaped, convex, and 0.1 to 0.3 mm after 3 to 4 days. Suspect 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and 'Ca. L. americanus' cells were observed in infected tissue and on agar culture by scanning electron microscopy. The cells were ovoid to rod shaped, 0.3 to 0.4 by 0.5 to 2.0 microm, often with fimbriae-like appendages. Two strains of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and one of 'Ca. L. americanus' grown on Liber A medium were pathogenic on citrus and could be isolated from noninoculated tissues of inoculated trees and seedlings 9 and 2 months later, respectively. The identity was confirmed by RT-PCR and 16s rDNA sequencing. This is the first report of the cultivation and pathogenicity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and 'Ca. L. americanus' associated with symptoms of HLB.

  3. Intercellular Ca2+ Waves: Mechanisms and Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular calcium (Ca2+) waves (ICWs) represent the propagation of increases in intracellular Ca2+ through a syncytium of cells and appear to be a fundamental mechanism for coordinating multicellular responses. ICWs occur in a wide diversity of cells and have been extensively studied in vitro. More recent studies focus on ICWs in vivo. ICWs are triggered by a variety of stimuli and involve the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. The propagation of ICWs predominately involves cell communication with internal messengers moving via gap junctions or extracellular messengers mediating paracrine signaling. ICWs appear to be important in both normal physiology as well as pathophysiological processes in a variety of organs and tissues including brain, liver, retina, cochlea, and vascular tissue. We review here the mechanisms of initiation and propagation of ICWs, the key intra- and extracellular messengers (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ATP) mediating ICWs, and the proposed physiological functions of ICWs. PMID:22811430

  4. Differential NMDA receptor-dependent calcium loading and mitochondrial dysfunction in CA1 vs. CA3 hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan I.; Winters, Christine A.; Pivovarova, Natalia B.; Andrews, S. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are selectively vulnerable to ischemia, while adjacent CA3 neurons are relatively resistant. Although glutamate receptor-mediated mitochondrial Ca2+ overload and dysfunction is a major component of ischemia-induced neuronal death, no direct relationship between selective neuronal vulnerability and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in intact brain preparations. Here, we show that in organotypic slice cultures NMDA induces much larger Ca2+ elevations in vulnerable CA1 neurons than in resistant CA3. Consequently, CA1 mitochondria exhibit stronger calcium accumulation, more extensive swelling and damage, stronger depolarization of their membrane potential, and a significant increase in ROS generation. NMDA-induced Ca2+ and ROS elevations were abolished in Ca2+-free medium or by NMDAR antagonists, but not by zinc chelation. We conclude that Ca2+-overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction is a determining factor in the selective vulnerability of CA1 neurons. PMID:19879359

  5. Characterizing CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} using ELNES

    SciTech Connect

    Altay, A.; Carter, C.B.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W.-Y.; Arslan, I.; Guelguen, M.A.

    2010-08-15

    Calcium aluminates, compounds in the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase system, are used in high-temperature cements and refractory oxides and have wide range of potential technological applications due to their interesting optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. They are used in both crystalline and glassy form; the glass is an isotropic material while the crystalline materials may be highly anisotropic. This paper will consider two particular crystalline materials, CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6}, but the results should be applicable to all calcium aluminates. Although CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} crystals contain the same chemical species, Ca, Al, and O, the coordination and local environments of these species are different in the two structures and hence they show very different energy-loss near-edge structures (ELNES) when examined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the TEM. The data obtained using ELNES can effectively provide a fingerprint for each compound and a map for their electronic structure. Once such fingerprints are obtained, they can be used to identify nano-sized particles/grains or material at interfaces and grain boundaries. In the present study, the local symmetry fingerprints for CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} structures are reported combining experimental spectra with electronic-structure calculations that allow the different features in the spectra to be interpreted. Al-L{sub 2,3} and O-K edge core-loss spectra from CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} were measured experimentally using electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The near-edge structures were calculated for the different phases using the orthogonalized linear combination of atomic-orbitals method, and took account of core-hole interactions. It is shown that CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} structures exhibit distinctive experimental ELNES fingerprints so that these two phases can be separately identified even when present in small volumes

  6. Design and testing of Ground Penetrating Radar equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications: ongoing activities in Working Group 1 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Manacorda, Guido; Persico, Raffaele

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 1 'Novel GPR instrumentation' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Working Group 1 (WG1) of the Action focuses on the development of innovative GPR equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications. It includes three Projects. Project 1.1 is focused on the 'Design, realisation and optimisation of innovative GPR equipment for the monitoring of critical transport infrastructures and buildings, and for the sensing of underground utilities and voids.' Project 1.2 is concerned with the 'Development and definition of advanced testing, calibration and stability procedures and protocols, for GPR equipment.' Project 1.3 deals with the 'Design, modelling and optimisation of GPR antennas.' During the first year of the Action, WG1 Members coordinated between themselves to address the state of the art and open problems in the scientific fields identified by the above-mentioned Projects [1, 2]. In carrying our this work, the WG1 strongly benefited from the participation of IDS Ingegneria dei Sistemi, one of the biggest GPR manufacturers, as well as from the contribution of external experts as David J. Daniels and Erica Utsi, sharing with the Action Members their wide experience on GPR technology and methodology (First General Meeting, July 2013). The synergy with WG2 and WG4 of the Action was useful for a deep understanding of the problems, merits and limits of available GPR equipment, as well as to discuss how to quantify the reliability of GPR results. An

  7. IP3R, store-operated Ca2+ entry and neuronal Ca2+ homoeostasis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sumita; Hasan, Gaiti

    2012-02-01

    The IP3R (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor) releases Ca2+ from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) store upon binding to its ligand InsP3, which is thought to be generated by activation of certain membrane-bound G-protein-coupled receptors in Drosophila. Depletion of Ca2+ in the ER store also activates SOCE (store-operated Ca2+ entry) from the extracellular milieu across the plasma membrane, leading to a second rise in cytosolic Ca2+, which is then pumped back into the ER. The role of the IP3R and SOCE in mediating Ca2+ homoeostasis in neurons, their requirement in neuronal function and effect on neuronal physiology and as a consequence behaviour, are reviewed in the present article.

  8. Growth rate effects on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios constrained by belemnite calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Multiple temperature proxies from single species are important to achieve robust palaeotemperature estimates. Besides the commonly employed oxygen isotope thermometer, also Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios perform well as proxies for calcification temperature in the shells of some species. While salinity changes affect the ratios of earth alkaline elements much less than the δ18O thermometer, metabolic effects may exert a strong control on the expression of element ratios. Such effects are hard to study because biomineralization experiments have to overcome large intraspecific variability and can hardly ever isolate the controls of a single parameter on shell geochemistry. The unique geometry of the belemnite rostrum constitutes an exception to this rule. Its shape, large size, and the visibility of growth increments as bands enable the analysis of multiple, correlatable, high resolution geochemical profiles in a single fossil. The effects of the growth rate variability amongst these profiles on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios has been tested here. Within a specimen of Passaloteuthis bisulcata (Early Toarcian, Cleveland Basin, UK), Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca data were obtained from four profiles. With respect to growth rate in the first profile, which was taken as a reference, the relative growth rates in the remaining three profiles varied by a factor of 0.9 to 2.7. Results suggest that relative growth rate is linearly correlated with Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, with a decrease of Mg/Ca by 8 % and increase of Sr/Ca by 6 % per 100 % increase in relative growth rate. The observed trends are consistent with abiogenic precipitation experiments and suggest that crystal precipitation rate exerts a significant, predictable control on the element distribution in biogenic calcite.

  9. Novel antimigraineur dotarizine releases Ca2+ from caffeine-sensitive Ca2+ stores of chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Novalbos, Jesús; Abad-Santos, Francisco; Zapater, Pedro; Alvarez, Javier; Alonso, María Teresa; Montero, Mayte; García, Antonio G

    1999-01-01

    The novel antimigraineur, dotarizine (30 μM), increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]c, in fura-2-loaded bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. This increase was transient, reached a peak in about 2–5 min (0.53±0.07 μM; n=19) and then declined to basal levels over a further 5 min period.This transient rise of [Ca2+]c was mimicked by 1 μM thapsigargin and by 30 μM cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), but not by 30 μM flunarizine. Both thapsigargin and CPA occluded the effects of dotarizine and vice versa.All three compounds suppressed the transient [Ca2+]c rises induced by caffeine (10 mM, 10 s); blockade induced by thapsigargin was irreversible and that induced by CPA and dotarizine was reversible.Of the three compounds, only dotarizine blocked reversibly the [Ca2+]c spikes induced by short pulses of high K+ (70 mM, 5 s), suggesting that dotarizine blocks voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels but CPA and thapsigargin do not.Dotarizine caused a gradual and reversible depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ in chromaffin cells transfected with ER-targeted aequorin. CPA had a similar effect.These data show that dotarizine shares with thapsigargin and CPA the ability to deplete Ca2+ in the ER; this novel action of dotarizine could be relevant to its prophylactic effects in migraine. Unlike thapsigargin and CPA, however, dotarizine additionally and reversibly blocks Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. PMID:10516641

  10. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in skeletal muscle health and disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingsong; Dhakal, Kamal; Yi, Jianxun

    2016-08-01

    Muscle uses Ca(2+) as a messenger to control contraction and relies on ATP to maintain the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Mitochondria are the major sub-cellular organelle of ATP production. With a negative inner membrane potential, mitochondria take up Ca(2+) from their surroundings, a process called mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria promotes ATP production. Excessive uptake causes mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload, which activates downstream adverse responses leading to cell dysfunction. Moreover, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake could shape spatio-temporal patterns of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Malfunction of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is implicated in muscle degeneration. Unlike non-excitable cells, mitochondria in muscle cells experience dramatic changes of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Besides the sudden elevation of Ca(2+) level induced by action potentials, Ca(2+) transients in muscle cells can be as short as a few milliseconds during a single twitch or as long as minutes during tetanic contraction, which raises the question whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is fast and big enough to shape intracellular Ca(2+) signaling during excitation-contraction coupling and creates technical challenges for quantification of the dynamic changes of Ca(2+) inside mitochondria. This review focuses on characterization of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in skeletal muscle and its role in muscle physiology and diseases.

  11. Electrochemical formation of Mg-Li-Ca alloys by codeposition of Mg, Li and Ca from LiCl-KCl-MgCl2-CaCl2 melts.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong De; Zhang, Mi Lin; Xue, Yun; Han, Wei; Cao, Dian Xue; Jing, Xiao Yan; He, Li Yi; Yuan, Yi

    2009-08-07

    This work presents electrochemical formation of Mg-Li-Ca alloys via codeposition of Mg, Li and Ca on a molybdenum electrode in KCl-LiCl-MgCl(2)-CaCl(2) melts at 943 K. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) showed that the underpotential deposition (UPD) of calcium on pre-deposited magnesium leads to the formation of a liquid Mg-Ca alloy, and the succeeding underpotential deposition of lithium on pre-deposited Mg-Ca alloy leads to the formation of a liquid Mg-Li-Ca solution. Chronopotentiometric measurements indicated that the codepositon of Mg, Li and Ca occurs at current densities more negative than -0.31 A cm(-2) in LiCl-KCl-MgCl(2) (5 wt%) melts containing 1 wt% CaCl(2). Chronoamperograms demonstrated that the onset potential for the codeposition of Mg, Li and Ca is -2.200 V, and the codeposition of Mg, Li and Ca is formed when the applied potentials are more negative than -2.200 V. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that Mg-Li-Ca alloys with different phases were formed via galvanostatic electrolysis. The microstructures of typical alpha and beta phases of Mg-Li-Ca alloys were characterized by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) showed that the element Ca mainly distributes along grain boundary in Mg-Li-Ca alloys. The results of inductively coupled plasma analysis determined that the chemical compositions of Mg-Li-Ca alloys correspond with the phase structures of XRD patterns, and the lithium and calcium contents of Mg-Li-Ca alloys depend on the concentrations of MgCl(2) and CaCl(2).

  12. Single-Channel Monitoring of Reversible L-Type Ca2+ Channel CaVα1-CaVβ Subunit Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Kuzmenkina, Elza; Böhnke, Ann Kristin; Herzig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are heteromultimers of CaVα1 (pore), CaVβ- and CaVα2δ-subunits. The stoichiometry of this complex, and whether it is dynamically regulated in intact cells, remains controversial. Fortunately, CaVβ-isoforms affect gating differentially, and we chose two extremes (CaVβ1a and CaVβ2b) regarding single-channel open probability to address this question. HEK293α1C cells expressing the CaV1.2 subunit were transiently transfected with CaVα2δ1 alone or with CaVβ1a, CaVβ2b, or (2:1 or 1:1 plasmid ratio) combinations. Both CaVβ-subunits increased whole-cell current and shifted the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation to hyperpolarization. Time-dependent inactivation was accelerated by CaVβ1a-subunits but not by CaVβ2b-subunits. Mixtures induced intermediate phenotypes. Single channels sometimes switched between periods of low and high open probability. To validate such slow gating behavior, data were segmented in clusters of statistically similar open probability. With CaVβ1a-subunits alone, channels mostly stayed in clusters (or regimes of alike clusters) of low open probability. Increasing CaVβ2b-subunits (co-)expressed (1:2, 1:1 ratio or alone) progressively enhanced the frequency and total duration of high open probability clusters and regimes. Our analysis was validated by the inactivation behavior of segmented ensemble averages. Hence, a phenotype consistent with mutually exclusive and dynamically competing binding of different CaVβ-subunits is demonstrated in intact cells. PMID:22261054

  13. Inhibitors of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase family (CaMKP and CaMKP-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Takao, Toshihiko; Nimura, Takaki; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Numano, Takamasa; Shigeri, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Takanobu; Kameshita, Isamu Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2007-11-23

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP) and its nuclear isoform CaMKP-N are unique Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that negatively regulate the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) cascade by dephosphorylating multifunctional CaMKI, II, and IV. However, the lack of specific inhibitors of these phosphatases has hampered studies on these enzymes in vivo. In an attempt to obtain specific inhibitors, we searched inhibitory compounds and found that Evans Blue and Chicago Sky Blue 6B served as effective inhibitors for CaMKP. These compounds also inhibited CaMKP-N, but inhibited neither protein phosphatase 2C, another member of PPM family phosphatase, nor calcineurin, a typical PPP family phosphatase. The minimum structure required for the inhibition was 1-amino-8-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid. When Neuro2a cells cotransfected with CaMKIV and CaMKP-N were treated with these compounds, the dephosphorylation of CaMKIV was strongly suppressed, suggesting that these compounds could be used as potent inhibitors of CaMKP and CaMKP-N in vivo as well as in vitro.

  14. Ca²⁺ waves in the heart.

    PubMed

    Izu, Leighton T; Xie, Yuanfang; Sato, Daisuke; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2013-05-01

    Ca(2+) waves were probably first observed in the early 1940s. Since then Ca(2+) waves have captured the attention of an eclectic mixture of mathematicians, neuroscientists, muscle physiologists, developmental biologists, and clinical cardiologists. This review discusses the current state of mathematical models of Ca(2+) waves, the normal physiological functions Ca(2+) waves might serve in cardiac cells, as well as how the spatial arrangement of Ca(2+) release channels shape Ca(2+) waves, and we introduce the idea of Ca(2+) phase waves that might provide a useful framework for understanding triggered arrhythmias.

  15. Ca2+-induced Ca2+ Release Phenomena in Mammalian Sympathetic Neurons Are Critically Dependent on the Rate of Rise of Trigger Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Escobar, Ariel L.; Jiménez, Nicolás

    1997-01-01

    The role of ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores present in nonmuscular cells is not yet completely understood. Here we examine the physiological parameters determining the dynamics of caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in individual fura-2–loaded sympathetic neurons. Two ryanodine-sensitive release components were distinguished: an early, transient release (TR) and a delayed, persistent release (PR). The TR component shows refractoriness, depends on the filling status of the store, and requires caffeine concentrations ≥10 mM. Furthermore, it is selectively suppressed by tetracaine and intracellular BAPTA, which interfere with Ca2+-mediated feedback loops, suggesting that it constitutes a Ca2+-induced Ca2+-release phenomenon. The dynamics of release is markedly affected when Sr2+ substitutes for Ca2+, indicating that Sr2+ release may operate with lower feedback gain than Ca2+ release. Our data indicate that when the initial release occurs at an adequately fast rate, Ca2+ triggers further release, producing a regenerative response, which is interrupted by depletion of releasable Ca2+ and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. A compartmentalized linear diffusion model can reproduce caffeine responses: When the Ca2+ reservoir is full, the rapid initial Ca2+ rise determines a faster occupation of the ryanodine receptor Ca2+ activation site giving rise to a regenerative release. With the store only partially loaded, the slower initial Ca2+ rise allows the inactivating site of the release channel to become occupied nearly as quickly as the activating site, thereby suppressing the initial fast release. The PR component is less dependent on the store's Ca2+ content. This study suggests that transmembrane Ca2+ influx in rat sympathetic neurons does not evoke widespread amplification by CICR because of its inability to raise [Ca2+] near the Ca2+ release channels sufficiently fast to overcome their Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Conversely, caffeine-induced Ca2+ release can