Sample records for cabench-to-bedside web application

  1. Bedside ultrasound training using web-based e-learning and simulation early in the curriculum of residents.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Yanick; Laprise, Réjean; Drolet, Pierre; Thivierge, Robert L; Serri, Karim; Albert, Martin; Lamontagne, Alain; Bélliveau, Marc; Denault, André-Yves; Patenaude, Jean-Victor

    2015-01-01

    Focused bedside ultrasound is rapidly becoming a standard of care to decrease the risks of complications related to invasive procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess whether adding to the curriculum of junior residents an educational intervention combining web-based e-learning and hands-on training would improve the residents' proficiency in different clinical applications of bedside ultrasound as compared to using the traditional apprenticeship teaching method alone. Junior residents (n = 39) were provided with two educational interventions (vascular and pleural ultrasound). Each intervention consisted of a combination of web-based e-learning and bedside hands-on training. Senior residents (n = 15) were the traditionally trained group and were not provided with the educational interventions. After the educational intervention, performance of the junior residents on the practical tests was superior to that of the senior residents. This was true for the vascular assessment (94% ± 5% vs. 68% ± 15%, unpaired student t test: p < 0.0001, mean difference: 26 (95% CI: 20 to 31)) and even more significant for the pleural assessment (92% ± 9% vs. 57% ± 25%, unpaired student t test: p < 0.0001, mean difference: 35 (95% CI: 23 to 44)). The junior residents also had a significantly higher success rate in performing ultrasound-guided needle insertion compared to the senior residents for both the transverse (95% vs. 60%, Fisher's exact test p = 0.0048) and longitudinal views (100% vs. 73%, Fisher's exact test p = 0.0055). Our study demonstrated that a structured curriculum combining web-based education, hands-on training, and simulation integrated early in the training of the junior residents can lead to better proficiency in performing ultrasound-guided techniques compared to the traditional apprenticeship model.

  2. Web-Based Evidence Based Practice Educational Intervention to Improve EBP Competence among BSN-Prepared Pediatric Bedside Nurses: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laibhen-Parkes, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    For pediatric nurses, their competence in EBP is critical for providing high-quality care and maximizing patient outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess and refine a Web-based EBP educational intervention focused on improving EBP beliefs and competence in BSN-prepared pediatric bedside nurses, and to examine the feasibility,…

  3. Medical student appraisal: applications for bedside patient education.

    PubMed

    Markman, T M; Sampognaro, P J; Mitchell, S L; Weeks, S R; Khalifian, S; Dattilo, J R

    2013-01-01

    Medical students are often afforded the privilege of counselling patients. In the past resources were limited to pen and paper or anatomic models. The evolution of mobile applications allows for limitless access to resources that facilitate bedside patient education. To evaluate the utility of six applications in patient education and promote awareness of implementing mobile resources in clinical care. Six medical students rotating on various clerkships evaluated a total of six mobile applications. Strengths, limitations, and suggested uses in clinical care were identified. Applications included Meditoons™, VisiblePatient™, DrawMD™, CardioTeach™, Visual Anatomy™, and 360° Patient Education Suite™. Data was generated from narrative responses supplied by each student during their evaluation period. Bedside teaching was enhanced by professional illustrations and animations depicting anatomy and pathophysiology. Impromptu teaching was facilitated, as resources were conveniently available on a student's smartphone or tablet. The ability to annotate and modify images and subsequently email to patients was an extraordinary improvement in provider-patient communication. Universal limitations included small smartphone screens and the novelty of new technology. Mobile applications have the potential to greatly enhance patient education and simultaneously build rapport. Endless opportunities exist for their integration in clinical practice, particularly for new diagnoses, consent for procedures, and at time of discharge. Providers should be encouraged to try new applications and utilize them with patients.

  4. Flipping the Physical Examination: Web-Based Instruction and Live Assessment of Bedside Technique.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dustyn E; Thornton, John W

    2016-01-01

    The skill of physicians teaching the physical examination skill has decreased, with newer faculty underperforming compared to their seniors. Improved methods of instruction with an emphasis on physical examinations are necessary to both improve the quality of medical education and alleviate the teaching burden of faculty physicians. We developed a curriculum that combines web-based instruction with real-life practice and features individualized feedback. This innovative medical education model should allow the physical examination to be taught and assessed in an effective manner. The model is under study at Baton Rouge General Medical Center. Our goals are to limit faculty burden, maximize student involvement as learners and evaluators, and effectively develop students' critical skills in performing bedside assessments.

  5. Bedside handover: quality improvement strategy to "transform care at the bedside".

    PubMed

    Chaboyer, Wendy; McMurray, Anne; Johnson, Joanne; Hardy, Linda; Wallis, Marianne; Sylvia Chu, Fang Ying

    2009-01-01

    This quality improvement project implemented bedside handover in nursing. Using Lewin's 3-Step Model for Change, 3 wards in an Australian hospital changed from verbal reporting in an isolated room to bedside handover. Practice guidelines and a competency standard were developed. The change was received positively by both staff and patients. Staff members reported that bedside handover improved safety, efficiency, teamwork, and the level of support from senior staff members.

  6. Attending Rounds and Bedside Case Presentations: Medical Student and Medicine Resident Experiences and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, Jed D.; Masters, Philip A.; Simons, Richard J.; Chuang, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Attending rounds have transitioned away from the patient's bedside toward the hallway and conference rooms. This transition has brought into question how to best teach on medicine services. Purpose The purpose is to describe learner experiences and attitudes regarding bedside attending rounds at an academic medical institution. Method: Cross-sectional Web-based survey of 102 medical students and 51 internal medicine residents (75% response rate). Results The mean time spent at the bedside during attending rounds was 27.7% (SD = 20.1%). During 73% of the rotations, case presentations occurred at the bedside 25% of the time or less. Learners experiencing bedside case presentations were more likely to prefer bedside case presentations. Despite their stated concerns, learners believe bedside rounds are important for learning core clinical skills. Conclusions Timespentatthe bedside is waning despite learners’ beliefs that bedside learning is important for professional development. Our findings suggest the necessity to re-examine our current teaching methods on internal medicine services. PMID:19330687

  7. Cardiac Limited Ultrasound Examination Techniques to Augment the Bedside Cardiac Physical Examination.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Bruce J; Shaw, David J; Amundson, Stan A; Phan, James N; Blanchard, Daniel G; DeMaria, Anthony N

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of physical diagnosis is dependent on physician skills and biases, inductive reasoning, and time efficiency. Although the clinical utility of echocardiography is well known, few data exist on how to integrate 2-dimensional screening "quick-look" ultrasound applications into a novel, modernized cardiac physical examination. We discuss the evidence basis behind ultrasound "signs" pertinent to the cardiovascular system and elemental in synthesis of bedside diagnoses and propose the application of a brief cardiac limited ultrasound examination based on these signs. An ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination can be taught in traditional medical education and has the potential to improve bedside diagnosis and patient care. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Integration of evidence-based practice in bedside teaching paediatrics supported by e-learning.

    PubMed

    Potomkova, Jarmila; Mihal, Vladimir; Zapletalova, Jirina; Subova, Dana

    2010-03-01

    Bedside teaching with evidence-based practice elements, supported by e-learning activities, can play an important role in modern medical education. Teachers have to incorporate evidence from the medical literature to increase student motivation and interactivity. An integral part of the medical curricula at Palacky University Olomouc (Czech Republic) are real paediatric scenarios supplemented with a review of current literature to enhance evidence-based bedside teaching & learning. Searching for evidence is taught through librarian-guided interactive hands-on sessions and/or web-based tutorials followed by clinical case presentations and feedback. Innovated EBM paediatric clerkship demonstrated students' preferences towards web-based interactive bedside teaching & learning. In two academic years (2007/2008, 2008/2009), learning-focused feedback from 106 and 131 students, resp. was obtained about their attitudes towards evidence-based bedside teaching. The assessment included among others the overall level of instruction, quality of practical evidence-based training, teacher willingness and impact of instruction on increased interest in the specialty. There was some criticism about excessive workload. A parallel survey was carried out on the perceived values of different forms of information skills training (i.e. demonstration, online tutorials, and librarian-guided interactive search sessions) and post-training self-reported level of search skills. The new teaching/learning paediatric portfolio is a challenge for further activities, including effective knowledge translation, continuing medical & professional development of teachers, and didactic, clinically integrated teaching approaches.

  9. Comparing portable computers with bedside computers when administering medications using bedside medication verification.

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Beymer, Patti; Williams, Phillip; Stimac, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This research examined bedside medication verification administration in 2 adult critical care units, using portable computers and permanent bedside computers. There were no differences in the number of near-miss errors, the time to administer the medications, or nurse perception of ease of medication administration, care of patients, or reliability of technology. The percentage of medications scanned was significantly higher with the use of permanent bedside computers, and nurses using permanent bedside computers were more likely to agree that the computer was always available.

  10. Variable Access to Immediate Bedside Ultrasound in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Brad E.; Ginde, Adit A.; Raja, Ali S.; Sullivan, Ashley F.; Espinola, Janice A.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Use of bedside emergency department (ED) ultrasound has become increasingly important for the clinical practice of emergency medicine (EM). We sought to evaluate differences in the availability of immediate bedside ultrasound based on basic ED characteristics and physician staffing. Methods: We surveyed ED directors in all 351 EDs in Colorado, Georgia, Massachusetts, and Oregon between January and April 2009. We assessed access to bedside ED ultrasound by the question: “Is bedside ultrasound available immediately in the ED?” ED characteristics included location, visit volume, admission rate, percent uninsured, total emergency physician full-time equivalents and proportion of EM board-certified (BC) or EM board-eligible (BE) physicians. Data analysis used chi-square tests and multivariable logistical regression to compare differences in access to bedside ED ultrasound by ED characteristics and staffing. Results: We received complete responses from 298 (85%) EDs. Immediate access to bedside ultrasound was available in 175 (59%) EDs. ED characteristics associated with access to bedside ultrasound were: location (39% for rural vs. 71% for urban, P<0.001); visit volume (34% for EDs with low volume [<1 patient/hour] vs. 79% for EDs with high volume [≥3 patients/hour], P<0.001); admission rate (39% for EDs with low [0–10%] admission rates vs. 84% for EDs with high [>20%] rates, P<0.001); and EM BC/BE physicians (26% for EDs with a low percentage [0–20%] vs.74% for EDs with a high percentage [≥80%], P<0.001). Conclusion: U.S. EDs differ significantly in their access to immediate bedside ultrasound. Smaller, rural EDs and those staffed by fewer EM BC/BE physicians more frequently lacked access to immediate bedside ultrasound in the ED. PMID:21691479

  11. Bedside teaching-making it an effective instructional tool.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ishtiaq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Bedside teaching is defined as any teaching in the presence of patient and is the core teaching strategy during the clinical years of a medical student. Although it is considered the most effective method to teach clinical and communication skills but its quality is deteriorating with the passage of time. The objective of this study is to explore faculty's perceptions about bedside teaching. This study was conducted in clinical disciplines of Ayub Medical College and hospital Abbottabad, Pakistan from January 2012 to July 2012. Pragmatic paradigm was selected to gather both quantitative and qualitative information. Data was collected sequentially to validate findings. Perceptions of all professors of clinical subjects about bed side teaching were recorded on a close-ended structured questionnaire. Then in-depth interviews were taken from 5 professors using an open ended questionnaire. Quantitative data was analysed using, SPSS-16. Qualitative research data was analysed through content analysis. Out of 20 professors of clinical departments 18 agreed to respond to the questionnaire assessing their perceptions about bed side teaching. Non-existence of bedside teaching curriculum, lack of discipline in students and faculty, lack of accountability, poor job satisfaction and low salary were identified as major factors responsible for decline in quality of bedside teaching. Most of them advocated that curriculum development, planning bedside teaching, implementation of discipline and accountability, improved job satisfaction and performance based promotions will improve quality of clinical teaching. Curriculum development for bedside teaching, institutional discipline, application of best planning strategies, performance based appraisal of faculty and good job satisfaction can make bedside teaching an effective instructional tool.

  12. A Secure Web Application Providing Public Access to High-Performance Data Intensive Scientific Resources - ScalaBLAST Web Application

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Curtis, Darren S.; Peterson, Elena S.; Oehmen, Chris S.

    2008-05-04

    This work presents the ScalaBLAST Web Application (SWA), a web based application implemented using the PHP script language, MySQL DBMS, and Apache web server under a GNU/Linux platform. SWA is an application built as part of the Data Intensive Computer for Complex Biological Systems (DICCBS) project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). SWA delivers accelerated throughput of bioinformatics analysis via high-performance computing through a convenient, easy-to-use web interface. This approach greatly enhances emerging fields of study in biology such as ontology-based homology, and multiple whole genome comparisons which, in the absence of a tool like SWA, require a heroicmore » effort to overcome the computational bottleneck associated with genome analysis. The current version of SWA includes a user account management system, a web based user interface, and a backend process that generates the files necessary for the Internet scientific community to submit a ScalaBLAST parallel processing job on a dedicated cluster.« less

  13. The return of bedside rounds: an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Chuang, Cynthia H; Huang, Grace; Smith, Christopher

    2010-08-01

    Bedside rounds have decreased in frequency on teaching services. Perceived barriers toward bedside rounds are inefficiency and patient and house staff lack of preference for this mode of rounding. To evaluate the impact of a bedside rounding intervention on the frequency of bedside rounding, duration of patient encounters and rounding sessions, and patient and resident attitudes toward bedside rounds. A pre- and postintervention design, with a bedside rounding workshop midway through two consecutive internal medicine rotations, with daily resident interviews, patient surveys, and an end-of-the-year survey given to all Medicine house staff. Medicine house staff and medicine patients. Frequency of bedside rounds, duration of new patient encounters and rounding sessions, and patient and house staff attitudes regarding bedside rounds. Forty-four residents completed the bedside rounding workshop. Comparing the preintervention and postintervention phases, bedside rounds increased from <1% to 41% (p < 0.001). The average duration of walk rounding encounters was 16 min, and average duration of bedside rounding encounters was 15 min (p = 0.42). Duration of rounds was 95 and 98 min, respectively (p = 0.52). Patients receiving bedside rounds preferred bedside rounds (99% vs. 83%, p = 0.03) and perceived more time spent at the bedside by their team (p < 0.001). One hundred twelve house staff (71%) responded, with 73% reporting that bedside rounds are better for patient care. House staff performing bedside rounds were less likely to believe that bedside rounds were more educational (53% vs. 78%, p = 0.01). Bedside rounding increased after an educational intervention, and the time to complete bedside rounding encounters was similar to alternative forms of rounding. Patients preferred bedside rounds and perceived more time spent at the bedside when receiving bedside rounds. Medicine residents performing bedside rounds were less likely to believe bedside rounds were more

  14. The Return of Bedside Rounds: An Educational Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, Jed D.; Chuang, Cynthia H.; Huang, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Background Bedside rounds have decreased in frequency on teaching services. Perceived barriers toward bedside rounds are inefficiency and patient and house staff lack of preference for this mode of rounding. Objectives To evaluate the impact of a bedside rounding intervention on the frequency of bedside rounding, duration of patient encounters and rounding sessions, and patient and resident attitudes toward bedside rounds. Design A pre- and postintervention design, with a bedside rounding workshop midway through two consecutive internal medicine rotations, with daily resident interviews, patient surveys, and an end-of-the-year survey given to all Medicine house staff. Participants Medicine house staff and medicine patients. Measures Frequency of bedside rounds, duration of new patient encounters and rounding sessions, and patient and house staff attitudes regarding bedside rounds. Results Forty-four residents completed the bedside rounding workshop. Comparing the preintervention and postintervention phases, bedside rounds increased from <1% to 41% (p < 0.001). The average duration of walk rounding encounters was 16 min, and average duration of bedside rounding encounters was 15 min (p = 0.42). Duration of rounds was 95 and 98 min, respectively (p = 0.52). Patients receiving bedside rounds preferred bedside rounds (99% vs. 83%, p = 0.03) and perceived more time spent at the bedside by their team (p < 0.001). One hundred twelve house staff (71%) responded, with 73% reporting that bedside rounds are better for patient care. House staff performing bedside rounds were less likely to believe that bedside rounds were more educational (53% vs. 78%, p = 0.01). Conclusions Bedside rounding increased after an educational intervention, and the time to complete bedside rounding encounters was similar to alternative forms of rounding. Patients preferred bedside rounds and perceived more time spent at the bedside when receiving bedside rounds. Medicine

  15. Enablers and barriers to implementing bedside reporting: insights from nurses.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Cardoso, Roberta; Beswick, Susan; Acott, Ashley; Simpson, Elisa; Campbell, Heather; Lo, Joyce; Ferris, Ella

    2013-09-01

    As part of efforts to improve patient safety, quality of care and patient- and family-centred care, there is a growing interest in moving away from traditional taped nursing reports or reporting at the nursing station to reporting at the bedside. Although a body of knowledge exists regarding what nurses view as benefits and challenges experienced in nurse-to-nurse bedside reporting, less is known about the perceptions of nurses who have experienced this change in reporting practice on their unit. In this context, a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken to explore nurses' perceptions of a newly implemented nurse-to-nurse bedside reporting practice at one acute care hospital. A total of 43 interviews were conducted on four units with seven nurses from respirology, 10 from obstetrics and gynecology, 10 from nephrology and 16 from general surgery. Data were analyzed using a directed content analysis approach. Three themes emerged that captured nurses' perceptions of the implementation of nurse-to-nurse bedside reporting: (a) being supported to change and embrace bedside reporting, (b) maintaining confidentiality and respecting patients' preferences and (c) experiencing challenges with bedside reporting. Our findings provide insight for other organizations in their efforts to change reporting practices. Specifically, there is a need for multi-pronged initiatives including leadership support, educational opportunities and ongoing monitoring and feedback mechanisms. Future research is required to examine how enablers can be leveraged and barriers mitigated or removed to ensure successful implementation and sustainability of nurse-to-nurse bedside reporting. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  16. Bedside manners: do we care?

    PubMed

    Farooq, Zerwa; Mustaf, Tajammal; Akram, Alia; Khan, Mariha; Amjad, Rabbia; Naveed, Maryam; Azhar, Ayesha; Chaudhry, Abdul Majeed; Khan, M Amir Zaman; Rafiq, Farida

    2013-01-01

    Teaching bedside manner might prove to be one of the most challenging tasks in medical education as it is not easy to structure or formalise such training. Besides, the rigorous training process for acquiring clinical and technical skills often overshadows the humanistic aspect of medical care. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of final year medical students as well as the faculty regarding the teaching and practice of bedside manner including a brief evaluation of students' bedside manner. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving final year medical students from five medical colleges (n = 193) and faculty from a single institution (n=29). Sample was selected using systematic random or convenient sampling techniques. Data was collected using self administered, anonymous, structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using SPSS-17. While evaluating students' bedside manner, 85% of the students reported they always take consent while interacting with a patient whereas, only 17% of the faculty members agreed with this. Only 3% of the faculty members reported that students take care of privacy of patients and none of them thought that students reassure a patient during an encounter whereas the percentages among students were 76% and 48%, respectively. Though students thought they need to improve, majority (56%) of them was confident of their bedside manner. On the other hand, 83% of the faculty members rated students' bedside manner from fair to poor. A large proportion (69%) of the faculty members were not satisfied with the quality of teaching regarding bedside manner, reporting lack of focus on this particular aspect of medical care as the most important cause. Majority of the students (87%) believed doctors have a better bedside manner in private as compared to public hospitals. Students have an inflated evaluation of their bedside manner but majority felt a need to improve. A sharp contrast exists between students' and faculty's opinion

  17. XMM-Newton Mobile Web Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, A.; Kennedy, M.; Rodríguez, P.; Hernández, C.; Saxton, R.; Gabriel, C.

    2013-10-01

    We present the first XMM-Newton web mobile application, coded using new web technologies such as HTML5, the Query mobile framework, and D3 JavaScript data-driven library. This new web mobile application focuses on re-formatted contents extracted directly from the XMM-Newton web, optimizing the contents for mobile devices. The main goals of this development were to reach all kind of handheld devices and operating systems, while minimizing software maintenance. The application therefore has been developed as a web mobile implementation rather than a more costly native application. New functionality will be added regularly.

  18. Computerized Tomography-Guided Paracentesis: An Effective Alternative to Bedside Paracentesis?

    PubMed

    Gaduputi, Vinaya; Tariq, Hassan; Chandrala, Chaitanya; Sakam, Sailaja; Abbas, Naeem; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-02-01

    Ascites remains the most common cause of hospitalization among patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Paracentesis is a relatively safe procedure with low complication rates. Computerized tomography (CT)-guided therapeutic paracentesis could be a safe and effective alternative to unaided or aided (ultrasonogram-guided) bedside paracentesis. In this retrospective study, we aimed to compare the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of CT-guided paracentesis with bedside paracentesis. The period of study was from 2002 to 2012. All patients with cirrhosis who underwent therapeutic paracentesis were included in the study. These patients were divided into two groups. Group I consisted of patients who underwent CT-guided pigtail catheter insertion with ascitic fluid drainage. Group II consisted of patients who underwent beside therapeutic paracentesis after localization of fluid either by physical examination or sonographic localization. We measured the efficacy of CT-guided paracentesis and bedside paracentesis in terms of volume of fluid removed, length of stay, discharge doses of diuretics (spironolactone and furosemide) and number of days to readmission for symptomatic ascites. We also computed the cost-effectiveness of CT-guided therapeutic paracentesis when compared to a bedside procedure. Fischer exact test was used to analyze the distribution of categorical data and unpaired t -test was used for comparison of means. There were a total of 546 unique patients with diagnosed cirrhosis who were admitted to the hospital with symptomatic ascites and underwent therapeutic paracentesis. Two hundred and forty-seven patients underwent CT-guided paracentesis, while 272 patients underwent bedside paracentesis. There was significant inverse correlation between the amount of ascitic fluid removed and total length of stay in the hospital. We found that the volume of fluid removed via a CT-guided pigtail insertion and drainage (2.72 ± 2.02 L) is significantly higher when

  19. Acceptance of a Mobile Application Supporting Nurses Workflow at Patient Bedside: Results from a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frederic; Ducloux, Pascal; Wu, Danny T Y; Lovis, Christian; Blondon, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Supporting caregivers' workflow with mobile applications (apps) is a growing trend. At the bedside, apps can provide new ways to support the documentation process rather than using a desktop computer in a nursing office. Although these applications show potential, few existing reports have studied the real impact of such solutions. At the University Hospitals of Geneva, we developed BEDside Mobility, a mobile application supporting nurses' daily workflow. In a pilot study, the app was trialed in two wards for a period of one month. We collected data of the actual usage of the app and asked the users to complete a tailored technology acceptance model questionnaire at the end of the study period. Results show that participation remain stable with time with participants using in average the tool for almost 29 minutes per day. The technology acceptance questionnaires revealed a high usability of the app and good promotion from the institution although users did not perceive any increase in productivity. Overall, intent of use was divergent between promoters and antagonist. Furthermore, some participants considered the tool as an addition to their workload. This evaluation underlines the importance of helping all end users perceive the benefits of a new intervention since coworkers strong influence each other.

  20. Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Bedside Handover and Their Implication for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Tobiano, Georgia; Whitty, Jennifer A; Bucknall, Tracey; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-10-01

    Bedside handover during the change of shift allows nurses to visualize patients and facilitate patient participation, both purported to improve patient safety. But, bedside handover does not always occur and when it does, it may not involve the patient. To explore and understand barriers nurses perceive in undertaking bedside handover. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 200 nurses working on medical wards, recruited from two Australian hospitals, one private and one public. As part of the survey, there was one open-ended question asking about perceived barriers to bedside handover. Content analysis was used to analyze data. Barriers were assessed using a determinant framework. The open-ended question was answered by 176 (88%) participants. Three categories were identified. First, censoring the message showed nurses were concerned about patients and third-parties hearing sensitive information. In the second category, disrupting the communication flow, nurses perceived patients, family members, other nurses and external sources, interrupted the flow of handover and increased its duration. Finally, inhibiting characteristics demonstrated that individual patient and nurse views or capabilities hindered bedside handover. Barriers to bedside handover were determined to relate to individual nurse factors, patient factors, social, political and legal factors, and guideline factors. Suggestions for enhancing bedside handover include debunking nurses' misconceptions, reflecting on nurses' viewpoints, using active educational approaches, and promotion of legal requirements to heighten nurses' confidence dealing with sensitive information. Regular patient rounding, and standardized handover may enable patient involvement in handover. Finally, reviewing the local context to ensure organizational processes support bedside handover is recommended. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Biotool2Web: creating simple Web interfaces for bioinformatics applications.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohammad; Alam, Intikhab; Fuellen, Georg

    2006-01-01

    Currently there are many bioinformatics applications being developed, but there is no easy way to publish them on the World Wide Web. We have developed a Perl script, called Biotool2Web, which makes the task of creating web interfaces for simple ('home-made') bioinformatics applications quick and easy. Biotool2Web uses an XML document containing the parameters to run the tool on the Web, and generates the corresponding HTML and common gateway interface (CGI) files ready to be published on a web server. This tool is available for download at URL http://www.uni-muenster.de/Bioinformatics/services/biotool2web/ Georg Fuellen (fuellen@alum.mit.edu).

  2. Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB): enhancing direct care and value-added care.

    PubMed

    Dearmon, Valorie; Roussel, Linda; Buckner, Ellen B; Mulekar, Madhuri; Pomrenke, Becky; Salas, Sheri; Mosley, Aimee; Brown, Stephanie; Brown, Ann

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a Transforming Care at the Bedside initiative from a unit perspective. Improving patient outcomes and nurses' work environments are the goals of Transforming Care at the Bedside. Transforming Care at the Bedside creates programs of change originating at the point of care and directly promoting engagement of nurses to transform work processes and quality of care on medical-surgical units. This descriptive comparative study draws on multiple data sources from two nursing units: a Transforming Care at the Bedside unit where staff tested, adopted and implemented improvement ideas, and a control unit where staff continued traditional practices. Change theory provided the framework for the study. Direct care and value-added care increased on Transforming Care at the Bedside unit compared with the control unit. Transforming Care at the Bedside unit decreased in incidental overtime. Nurses reported that the process challenged old ways of thinking and increased nursing innovations. Hourly rounding, bedside reporting and the use of pain boards were seen as positive innovations. Evidence supported the value-added dimension of the Transforming Care at the Bedside process at the unit level. Nurses recognized the significance of their input into processes of change. Transformational leadership and frontline projects provide a vehicle for innovation through application of human capital. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Back to the Bedside: Developing a Bedside Aid for Concussion and Brain Injury Decisions in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Edward R.; Lopez, Kevin; Hess, Erik P.; Abujarad, Fuad; Brandt, Cynthia A.; Shiffman, Richard N.; Post, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Current information-rich electronic health record (EHR) interfaces require large, high-resolution screens running on desktop computers. This interface compromises the provider’s already limited time at the bedside by physically separating the patient from the doctor. The case study presented here describes a patient-centered clinical decision support (CDS) design process that aims to bring the physician back to the bedside by integrating a patient decision aid with CDS for shared use by the patient and provider on a touchscreen tablet computer for deciding whether or not to obtain a CT scan for minor head injury in the emergency department, a clinical scenario that could benefit from CDS but has failed previous implementation attempts. Case Description: This case study follows the user-centered design (UCD) approach to build a bedside aid that is useful and usable, and that promotes shared decision-making between patients and their providers using a tablet computer at the bedside. The patient-centered decision support design process focuses on the prototype build using agile software development, but also describes the following: (1) the requirement gathering phase including triangulated qualitative research (focus groups and cognitive task analysis) to understand current challenges, (2) features for patient education, the physician, and shared decision-making, (3) system architecture and technical requirements, and (4) future plans for formative usability testing and field testing. Lessons Learned: We share specific lessons learned and general recommendations from critical insights gained in the patient-centered decision support design process about early stakeholder engagement, EHR integration, external expert feedback, challenges to two users on a single device, project management, and accessibility. Conclusions: Successful implementation of this tool will require seamless integration into the provider’s workflow. This protocol can create an

  4. Back to the Bedside: Developing a Bedside Aid for Concussion and Brain Injury Decisions in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Edward R; Lopez, Kevin; Hess, Erik P; Abujarad, Fuad; Brandt, Cynthia A; Shiffman, Richard N; Post, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Current information-rich electronic health record (EHR) interfaces require large, high-resolution screens running on desktop computers. This interface compromises the provider's already limited time at the bedside by physically separating the patient from the doctor. The case study presented here describes a patient-centered clinical decision support (CDS) design process that aims to bring the physician back to the bedside by integrating a patient decision aid with CDS for shared use by the patient and provider on a touchscreen tablet computer for deciding whether or not to obtain a CT scan for minor head injury in the emergency department, a clinical scenario that could benefit from CDS but has failed previous implementation attempts. This case study follows the user-centered design (UCD) approach to build a bedside aid that is useful and usable, and that promotes shared decision-making between patients and their providers using a tablet computer at the bedside. The patient-centered decision support design process focuses on the prototype build using agile software development, but also describes the following: (1) the requirement gathering phase including triangulated qualitative research (focus groups and cognitive task analysis) to understand current challenges, (2) features for patient education, the physician, and shared decision-making, (3) system architecture and technical requirements, and (4) future plans for formative usability testing and field testing. We share specific lessons learned and general recommendations from critical insights gained in the patient-centered decision support design process about early stakeholder engagement, EHR integration, external expert feedback, challenges to two users on a single device, project management, and accessibility. Successful implementation of this tool will require seamless integration into the provider's workflow. This protocol can create an effective interface for shared decision-making and safe resource

  5. Project Assessment Skills Web Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to utilize Ruby on Rails to create a web application that will replace a spreadsheet keeping track of training courses and tasks. The goal is to create a fast and easy to use web application that will allow users to track progress on training courses. This application will allow users to update and keep track of all of the training required of them. The training courses will be organized by group and by user, making readability easier. This will also allow group leads and administrators to get a sense of how everyone is progressing in training. Currently, updating and finding information from this spreadsheet is a long and tedious task. By upgrading to a web application, finding and updating information will be easier than ever as well as adding new training courses and tasks. Accessing this data will be much easier in that users just have to go to a website and log in with NDC credentials rather than request the relevant spreadsheet from the holder. In addition to Ruby on Rails, I will be using JavaScript, CSS, and jQuery to help add functionality and ease of use to my web application. This web application will include a number of features that will help update and track progress on training. For example, one feature will be to track progress of a whole group of users to be able to see how the group as a whole is progressing. Another feature will be to assign tasks to either a user or a group of users. All of these together will create a user friendly and functional web application.

  6. Opal web services for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jingyuan; Williams, Nadya; Clementi, Luca; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred W

    2010-07-01

    Biomedical applications have become increasingly complex, and they often require large-scale high-performance computing resources with a large number of processors and memory. The complexity of application deployment and the advances in cluster, grid and cloud computing require new modes of support for biomedical research. Scientific Software as a Service (sSaaS) enables scalable and transparent access to biomedical applications through simple standards-based Web interfaces. Towards this end, we built a production web server (http://ws.nbcr.net) in August 2007 to support the bioinformatics application called MEME. The server has grown since to include docking analysis with AutoDock and AutoDock Vina, electrostatic calculations using PDB2PQR and APBS, and off-target analysis using SMAP. All the applications on the servers are powered by Opal, a toolkit that allows users to wrap scientific applications easily as web services without any modification to the scientific codes, by writing simple XML configuration files. Opal allows both web forms-based access and programmatic access of all our applications. The Opal toolkit currently supports SOAP-based Web service access to a number of popular applications from the National Biomedical Computation Resource (NBCR) and affiliated collaborative and service projects. In addition, Opal's programmatic access capability allows our applications to be accessed through many workflow tools, including Vision, Kepler, Nimrod/K and VisTrails. From mid-August 2007 to the end of 2009, we have successfully executed 239,814 jobs. The number of successfully executed jobs more than doubled from 205 to 411 per day between 2008 and 2009. The Opal-enabled service model is useful for a wide range of applications. It provides for interoperation with other applications with Web Service interfaces, and allows application developers to focus on the scientific tool and workflow development. Web server availability: http://ws.nbcr.net.

  7. The Role of the Web Server in a Capstone Web Application Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umapathy, Karthikeyan; Wallace, F. Layne

    2010-01-01

    Web applications have become commonplace in the Information Systems curriculum. Much of the discussion about Web development for capstone courses has centered on the scripting tools. Very little has been discussed about different ways to incorporate the Web server into Web application development courses. In this paper, three different ways of…

  8. Testing Web Applications with Mutation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praphamontripong, Upsorn

    2017-01-01

    Web application software uses new technologies that have novel methods for integration and state maintenance that amount to new control flow mechanisms and new variables scoping. While modern web development technologies enhance the capabilities of web applications, they introduce challenges that current testing techniques do not adequately test…

  9. A Mobile App (BEDSide Mobility) to Support Nurses’ Tasks at the Patient's Bedside: Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Thomas; Joe, Jonathan; Lovis, Christian; Blondon, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Background The introduction of clinical information systems has increased the amount of clinical documentation. Although this documentation generally improves patient safety, it has become a time-consuming task for nurses, which limits their time with the patient. On the basis of a user-centered methodology, we have developed a mobile app named BEDSide Mobility to support nurses in their daily workflow and to facilitate documentation at the bedside. Objective The aim of the study was to assess the usability of the BEDSide Mobility app in terms of the navigation and interaction design through usability testing. Methods Nurses were asked to complete a scenario reflecting their daily work with patients. Their interactions with the app were captured with eye-tracking glasses and by using the think aloud protocol. After completing the tasks, participants filled out the system usability scale questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize task completion rates and the users’ performance. Results A total of 10 nurses (aged 21-50) participated in the study. Overall, they were satisfied with the navigation, layout, and interaction design of the app, with the exception of one user who was unfamiliar with smartphones. The problems identified were related to the ambiguity of some icons, the navigation logic, and design inconsistency. Conclusions Besides the usability issues identified in the app, the participants’ results do indicate good usability, high acceptance, and high satisfaction with the developed app. However, the results must be taken with caution because of the poor ecological validity of the experimental setting. PMID:29563074

  10. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Joel D.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    The study of diabetic cardiomyopathy (diabetic CM) is an area of significant interest given the strong association between diabetes and the risk of heart failure. Many unanswered questions remain regarding the clinical definition and pathogenesis of this metabolic cardiomyopathy. This article reviews the current understanding of diabetic CM with a particular emphasis on the unresolved issues that have limited translation of scientific discovery to patient bedside. PMID:22999244

  11. WebViz: A web browser based application for collaborative analysis of 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruegg, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    In the age of high speed Internet where people can interact instantly, scientific tools have lacked technology which can incorporate this concept of communication using the web. To solve this issue a web application for geological studies has been created, tentatively titled WebViz. This web application utilizes tools provided by Google Web Toolkit to create an AJAX web application capable of features found in non web based software. Using these tools, a web application can be created to act as piece of software from anywhere in the globe with a reasonably speedy Internet connection. An application of this technology can be seen with data regarding the recent tsunami from the major japan earthquakes. After constructing the appropriate data to fit a computer render software called HVR, WebViz can request images of the tsunami data and display it to anyone who has access to the application. This convenience alone makes WebViz a viable solution, but the option to interact with this data with others around the world causes WebViz to be taken as a serious computational tool. WebViz also can be used on any javascript enabled browser such as those found on modern tablets and smart phones over a fast wireless connection. Due to the fact that WebViz's current state is built using Google Web Toolkit the portability of the application is in it's most efficient form. Though many developers have been involved with the project, each person has contributed to increase the usability and speed of the application. In the project's most recent form a dramatic speed increase has been designed as well as a more efficient user interface. The speed increase has been informally noticed in recent uses of the application in China and Australia with the hosting server being located at the University of Minnesota. The user interface has been improved to not only look better but the functionality has been improved. Major functions of the application are rotating the 3D object using buttons

  12. Web 2.0 Applications in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Dongsheng; Liu, Chen

    Since 2005, the term Web 2.0 has gradually become a hot topic on the Internet. Web 2.0 lets users create web contents as distinct from webmasters or web coders. Web 2.0 has come to our work, our life and even has become an indispensable part of our web-life. Its applications have already been widespread in many fields on the Internet. So far, China has about 137 million netizens [1], therefore its Web 2.0 market is so attractive that many sources of venture capital flow into the Chinese Web 2.0 market and there are also a lot of new Web 2.0 companies in China. However, the development of Web 2.0 in China is accompanied by some problems and obstacles. In this paper, we will mainly discuss Web 2.0 applications in China, with their current problems and future development trends.

  13. Web Services Provide Access to SCEC Scientific Research Application Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Gupta, V.; Okaya, D.; Kamb, L.; Maechling, P.

    2003-12-01

    Web services offer scientific communities a new paradigm for sharing research codes and communicating results. While there are formal technical definitions of what constitutes a web service, for a user community such as the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), we may conceptually consider a web service to be functionality provided on-demand by an application which is run on a remote computer located elsewhere on the Internet. The value of a web service is that it can (1) run a scientific code without the user needing to install and learn the intricacies of running the code; (2) provide the technical framework which allows a user's computer to talk to the remote computer which performs the service; (3) provide the computational resources to run the code; and (4) bundle several analysis steps and provide the end results in digital or (post-processed) graphical form. Within an NSF-sponsored ITR project coordinated by SCEC, we are constructing web services using architectural protocols and programming languages (e.g., Java). However, because the SCEC community has a rich pool of scientific research software (written in traditional languages such as C and FORTRAN), we also emphasize making existing scientific codes available by constructing web service frameworks which wrap around and directly run these codes. In doing so we attempt to broaden community usage of these codes. Web service wrapping of a scientific code can be done using a "web servlet" construction or by using a SOAP/WSDL-based framework. This latter approach is widely adopted in IT circles although it is subject to rapid evolution. Our wrapping framework attempts to "honor" the original codes with as little modification as is possible. For versatility we identify three methods of user access: (A) a web-based GUI (written in HTML and/or Java applets); (B) a Linux/OSX/UNIX command line "initiator" utility (shell-scriptable); and (C) direct access from within any Java application (and with the

  14. Improving nurse-physician teamwork through interprofessional bedside rounding.

    PubMed

    Henkin, Stanislav; Chon, Tony Y; Christopherson, Marie L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Worden, Lindsey M; Ratelle, John T

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork between physicians and nurses has a positive association with patient satisfaction and outcomes, but perceptions of physician-nurse teamwork are often suboptimal. To improve nurse-physician teamwork in a general medicine inpatient teaching unit by increasing face-to-face communication through interprofessional bedside rounds. From July 2013 through October 2013, physicians (attendings and residents) and nurses from four general medicine teams in a single nursing unit participated in bedside rounding, which involved the inclusion of nurses in morning rounds with the medicine teams at the patients' bedside. Based on stakeholder analysis and feedback, a checklist for key patient care issues was created and utilized during bedside rounds. To assess the effect of bedside rounding on nurse-physician teamwork, a survey of selected items from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to participants before and after the implementation of bedside rounds. The number of pages to the general medicine teams was also measured as a marker of physician-nurse communication. Participation rate in bedside rounds across the four medicine teams was 58%. SAQ response rates for attendings, residents, and nurses were 36/36 (100%), 73/73 (100%), and 32/73 (44%) prior to implementation of bedside rounding and 36 attendings (100%), 72 residents (100%), and 14 (19%) nurses after the implementation of bedside rounding, respectively. Prior to bedside rounding, nurses provided lower teamwork ratings (percent agree) than residents and attendings on all SAQ items; but after the intervention, the difference remained significant only on SAQ item 2 ("In this clinical area, it is not difficult to speak up if I perceive a problem with patient care", 64% for nurses vs 79% for residents vs 94% for attendings, P=0.02). Also, resident responses improved on SAQ item 1 ("Nurse input is well received in this area", 62% vs 82%, P=0.01). Increasing face-to-face communication through

  15. Just-in-time Database-Driven Web Applications

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    "Just-in-time" database-driven Web applications are inexpensive, quickly-developed software that can be put to many uses within a health care organization. Database-driven Web applications garnered 73873 hits on our system-wide intranet in 2002. They enabled collaboration and communication via user-friendly Web browser-based interfaces for both mission-critical and patient-care-critical functions. Nineteen database-driven Web applications were developed. The application categories that comprised 80% of the hits were results reporting (27%), graduate medical education (26%), research (20%), and bed availability (8%). The mean number of hits per application was 3888 (SD = 5598; range, 14-19879). A model is described for just-in-time database-driven Web application development and an example given with a popular HTML editor and database program. PMID:14517109

  16. Medical students' perceptions of bedside teaching.

    PubMed

    Gray, David; Cozar, Octavian; Lefroy, Janet

    2017-06-01

    Bedside teaching is recognised as a valuable tool in medical education by both students and faculty members. Bedside teaching is frequently delivered by consultants; however, junior doctors are increasingly engaging in this form of clinical teaching, and their value in this respect is becoming more widely recognised. The aim of this study was to supplement work completed by previous authors who have begun to explore students' satisfaction with bedside teaching, and their perceptions of the relationship with the clinical teachers. Specifically, we aimed to identify how students perceive bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants. We aimed to identify how students perceived bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all third-year medical students at Keele University via e-mail. Responses were submitted anonymously. Forty-six students responded (37.4%), 73.3 per cent of whom said that they felt more comfortable having bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors than by consultants. Consultants were perceived as more challenging by 60 per cent of respondents. Students appeared to value feedback on their performance, trust the validity of taught information, and to value the overall educational experience equally, regardless of the clinical grade of the teacher. Student preference does not equate to the value that they place on their bedside teaching. Junior doctors are perceived as being more in touch with students and the curriculum, whereas consultants are perceived as having higher expectations and as being both stricter and more knowledgeable. The clinical teacher's approachable manner and enthusiasm for teaching are more important than clinical grade, as is the ability to deliver well-structured constructive feedback. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Successful strategies for integrating bedside ultrasound into undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Palma, James K

    2015-04-01

    Nearly all physician specialties currently utilize bedside ultrasound, and its applications continue to expand. Bedside ultrasound is becoming a core skill for physicians; as such, it should be taught during undergraduate medical education. When ultrasound is integrated in a longitudinal manner beginning in the preclerkship phase of medical school, it not only enhances teaching the basic science topics of anatomy, physiology, and pathology but also ties those skills and knowledge to the clerkship phase and medical decision-making. Bedside ultrasound is a natural bridge from basic science to clinical science. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine is currently in its fourth year of implementing an integrated ultrasound curriculum in the school of medicine. In our experience, successful integration of a bedside ultrasound curriculum should: align with unique focuses of a medical schools' mission, simplify complex anatomy through multimodal teaching, correlate to teaching of the physical examination, solidify understanding of physiology and pathology, directly link to other concurrent content, narrow differential diagnoses, enhance medical decision-making, improve procedural skills, match to year-group skillsets, develop teaching and leadership abilities, and have elective experiences for advanced topics. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Bedside Reporting: Protocols for Improving Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Teresa D; Howell, Teresa L

    2015-12-01

    Bedside reporting continues to gain much attention and is being investigated to support the premise that "hand-off" communications enhance efficacy in delivery of patient care. Patient inclusion in shift reports enhances good patient outcomes, increased satisfaction with care delivery, enhanced accountability for nursing professionals, and improved communications between patients and their direct care providers. This article discusses the multiple benefits of dynamic dialogue between patients and the health care team, challenges often associated with bedside reporting, and protocols for managing bedside reporting with the major aim of improving patient care. Nursing research supporting the concept of bedside reporting is examined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Mobile App (BEDSide Mobility) to Support Nurses' Tasks at the Patient's Bedside: Usability Study.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frederic; Weinhold, Thomas; Joe, Jonathan; Lovis, Christian; Blondon, Katherine

    2018-03-21

    The introduction of clinical information systems has increased the amount of clinical documentation. Although this documentation generally improves patient safety, it has become a time-consuming task for nurses, which limits their time with the patient. On the basis of a user-centered methodology, we have developed a mobile app named BEDSide Mobility to support nurses in their daily workflow and to facilitate documentation at the bedside. The aim of the study was to assess the usability of the BEDSide Mobility app in terms of the navigation and interaction design through usability testing. Nurses were asked to complete a scenario reflecting their daily work with patients. Their interactions with the app were captured with eye-tracking glasses and by using the think aloud protocol. After completing the tasks, participants filled out the system usability scale questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize task completion rates and the users' performance. A total of 10 nurses (aged 21-50) participated in the study. Overall, they were satisfied with the navigation, layout, and interaction design of the app, with the exception of one user who was unfamiliar with smartphones. The problems identified were related to the ambiguity of some icons, the navigation logic, and design inconsistency. Besides the usability issues identified in the app, the participants' results do indicate good usability, high acceptance, and high satisfaction with the developed app. However, the results must be taken with caution because of the poor ecological validity of the experimental setting. ©Frederic Ehrler, Thomas Weinhold, Jonathan Joe, Christian Lovis, Katherine Blondon. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 21.03.2018.

  20. Prototyping a bedside documentation system.

    PubMed

    Bachand, P; Bobis, K

    1993-01-01

    The implementation of a comprehensive bedside documentation system is a major project that demands careful analysis and planning. Since the cost of a typical bedside system can easily exceed $3 million, a design oversight could have disastrous effects on the benefits of the system.

  1. A web access script language to support clinical application development.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, K C; McColligan, E E

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a script language to support the implementation of decentralized, clinical information applications on the World Wide Web (Web). The goal of this work is to facilitate construction of low overhead, fully functional clinical information systems that can be accessed anywhere by low cost Web browsers to search, retrieve and analyze stored patient data. The Web provides a model of network access to data bases on a global scale. Although it was originally conceived as a means to exchange scientific documents, Web browsers and servers currently support access to a wide variety of audio, video, graphical and text based data to a rapidly growing community. Access to these services is via inexpensive client software browsers that connect to servers by means of the open architecture of the Internet. In this paper, the design and implementation of a script language that supports the development of low cost, Web-based, distributed clinical information systems for both Inter- and Intra-Net use is presented. The language is based on the Mumps language and, consequently, supports many legacy applications with few modifications. Several enhancements, however, have been made to support modern programming practices and the Web interface. The interpreter for the language also supports standalone program execution on Unix, MS-Windows, OS/2 and other operating systems.

  2. Web services in the U.S. geological survey streamstats web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guthrie, J.D.; Dartiguenave, C.; Ries, Kernell G.

    2009-01-01

    StreamStats is a U.S. Geological Survey Web-based GIS application developed as a tool for waterresources planning and management, engineering design, and other applications. StreamStats' primary functionality allows users to obtain drainage-basin boundaries, basin characteristics, and streamflow statistics for gaged and ungaged sites. Recently, Web services have been developed that provide the capability to remote users and applications to access comprehensive GIS tools that are available in StreamStats, including delineating drainage-basin boundaries, computing basin characteristics, estimating streamflow statistics for user-selected locations, and determining point features that coincide with a National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) reach address. For the state of Kentucky, a web service also has been developed that provides users the ability to estimate daily time series of drainage-basin average values of daily precipitation and temperature. The use of web services allows the user to take full advantage of the datasets and processes behind the Stream Stats application without having to develop and maintain them. ?? 2009 IEEE.

  3. Transitioning Client Based NALCOMIS to a Multi Function Web Based Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS TRANSITIONING CLIENT- BASED NALCOMIS TO A MULTI-FUNCTION WEB- BASED APPLICATION by Aaron P...TITLE AND SUBTITLE TRANSITIONING CLIENT- BASED NALCOMIS TO A MULTI-FUNCTION WEB- BASED APPLICATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Aaron P. Schnetzler 7...NALCOMIS. NALCOMIS has two configurations that are used by organizational and intermediate level maintenance activi- ties, Optimized Organizational

  4. Patient-Centered Bedside Rounds and the Clinical Examination.

    PubMed

    Lichstein, Peter R; Atkinson, Hal H

    2018-05-01

    Bedside hospital rounds promote patient-centered care in teaching and nonteaching settings. Patients and families prefer bedside rounds and provider acceptance is increasing. Efficient bedside rounds with an interprofessional team or with learners requires preparation of the patient and the rounding team. Bedside "choreography" provides structure and sets expectations for time spent in the room. By using relationship-centered communication, rounds can be both patient proximate and patient centered. The clinical examination can be integrated into the flow of the presentation and case discussion. Patient and provider experience can be enhanced through investing time at the bedside. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Specification Patent Management for Web Application Platform Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Yoshiaki; Isshiki, Masao; Takeda, Hideaki; Ohmukai, Ikki; Kokuryo, Jiro

    Diversified usage of web applications has encouraged disintegration of web platform into management of identification and applications. Users make use of various kinds of data linked to their identity with multiple applications on certain social web platforms such as Facebook or MySpace. There has emerged competition among web application platforms. Platformers can design relationship with developers by controlling patent of their own specification and adopt open technologies developed external organizations. Platformers choose a way to open according to feature of the specification and their position. Patent management of specification come to be a key success factor to build competitive web application platforms. Each way to attract external developers such as standardization, open source has not discussed and analyzed all together.

  6. [Priority setting and bedside rationing: a discussion of empirical findings].

    PubMed

    Strech, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In addition to empirical forecasts on the extent of the current and future limitations on health care resources, empirical data on the status quo of bedside rationing play a significant role in developing suitable alternatives in dealing with limited financial resources. This article presents and discusses selected results of the international and German survey research on bedside rationing. Survey studies among physicians could prove world-wide that rationing decisions are made already today by individual physicians in the in- and out-patient services. In German hospitals, rationing is also a wide-spread though non-transparent and not (yet) very common phenomenon for an individual physician. Varying criteria for bedside rationing contribute to the fact that the current approach to bedside rationing leads to dissatisfaction on the part of physicians and to a potential disadvantage of certain patient groups. Explicit, i.e. transparent and systematic, ways of rationing could remedy these deficiencies and are therefore clearly preferable in this context. However, further specification of the methods of explicit rationing and a critical evaluation of their application in practice are needed. Moreover, it is mainly the quality of the underlying evidence that determines whether or not the actual decisions become more reasonable and fair by means of more explicit rationing approaches. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Bench-to-bedside review: Inhaled nitric oxide therapy in adults

    PubMed Central

    Creagh-Brown, Benedict C; Griffiths, Mark JD; Evans, Timothy W

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous mediator of vascular tone and host defence. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) results in preferential pulmonary vasodilatation and lowers pulmonary vascular resistance. The route of administration delivers NO selectively to ventilated lung units so that its effect augments that of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and improves oxygenation. This 'Bench-to-bedside' review focuses on the mechanisms of action of iNO and its clinical applications, with emphasis on acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Developments in our understanding of the cellular and molecular actions of NO may help to explain the hitherto disappointing results of randomised controlled trials of iNO. PMID:19519946

  8. Creating Web-Based Scientific Applications Using Java Servlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many advantages to developing web-based scientific applications. Any number of people can access the application concurrently. The application can be accessed from a remote location. The application becomes essentially platform-independent because it can be run from any machine that has internet access and can run a web browser. Maintenance and upgrades to the application are simplified since only one copy of the application exists in a centralized location. This paper details the creation of web-based applications using Java servlets. Java is a powerful, versatile programming language that is well suited to developing web-based programs. A Java servlet provides the interface between the central server and the remote client machines. The servlet accepts input data from the client, runs the application on the server, and sends the output back to the client machine. The type of servlet that supports the HTTP protocol will be discussed in depth. Among the topics the paper will discuss are how to write an http servlet, how the servlet can run applications written in Java and other languages, and how to set up a Java web server. The entire process will be demonstrated by building a web-based application to compute stagnation point heat transfer.

  9. Capturing Trust in Social Web Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donovan, John

    The Social Web constitutes a shift in information flow from the traditional Web. Previously, content was provided by the owners of a website, for consumption by the end-user. Nowadays, these websites are being replaced by Social Web applications which are frameworks for the publication of user-provided content. Traditionally, Web content could be `trusted' to some extent based on the site it originated from. Algorithms such as Google's PageRank were (and still are) used to compute the importance of a website, based on analysis of underlying link topology. In the Social Web, analysis of link topology merely tells us about the importance of the information framework which hosts the content. Consumers of information still need to know about the importance/reliability of the content they are reading, and therefore about the reliability of the producers of that content. Research into trust and reputation of the producers of information in the Social Web is still very much in its infancy. Every day, people are forced to make trusting decisions about strangers on the Web based on a very limited amount of information. For example, purchasing a product from an eBay seller with a `reputation' of 99%, downloading a file from a peer-to-peer application such as Bit-Torrent, or allowing Amazon.com tell you what products you will like. Even something as simple as reading comments on a Web-blog requires the consumer to make a trusting decision about the quality of that information. In all of these example cases, and indeed throughout the Social Web, there is a pressing demand for increased information upon which we can make trusting decisions. This chapter examines the diversity of sources from which trust information can be harnessed within Social Web applications and discusses a high level classification of those sources. Three different techniques for harnessing and using trust from a range of sources are presented. These techniques are deployed in two sample Social Web

  10. Implementation of a pediatric critical care focused bedside ultrasound training program in a large academic PICU.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Thomas W; Himebauch, Adam S; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Chen, Aaron E; Dean, Anthony J; Panebianco, Nova; Darge, Kassa; Cohen, Meryl S; Greeley, William J; Berg, Robert A; Nishisaki, Akira

    2015-03-01

    To determine the feasibility and describe the process of implementing a pediatric critical care bedside ultrasound program in a large academic PICU and to evaluate the impact of bedside ultrasound on clinical management. Retrospective case series, description of program implementation. Single-center quaternary noncardiac PICU in a children's hospital. Consecutive patients from January 22, 2012, to July 22, 2012, with bedside ultrasounds performed and interpreted by pediatric critical care practitioners. A pediatric critical care bedside ultrasound program consisting of a 2-day immersive course followed by clinical performance with internal quality assurance review was implemented. Studies performed in the PICU following training were documented and reviewed against reference standards including subspecialist-performed ultrasound or clinical response. Seventeen critical care faculties and eight fellows recorded 201 bedside ultrasound studies over 6 months in defined core applications: 57 procedural (28%), 76 hemodynamic (38%), 35 thoracic (17%), and 33 abdominal (16%). A quality assurance review identified 23 studies (16% of all nonprocedural studies) as critical (affected clinical management or gave valuable information). Forty-eight percent of those studies (11/23) were within the hemodynamic core. The proportion of critical studies were not significantly different across the applications (hemodynamic, 11/76 [15%] vs thoracic and abdominal, 12/68 [18%]; p = 0.65). Examples of critical studies include evidence of tamponade secondary to pleural effusions, identification of pulmonary hypertension, hemodynamic assessment before tracheal intubation, recognition of hypovolemia and systemic vascular resistance abnormalities, determination of pneumothorax, location of chest tube and urinary catheter, and differentiation of pleural fluid from pulmonary consolidation. Implementation of a critical care bedside ultrasound program for critical care providers in a large

  11. Time to Add a Fifth Pillar to Bedside Physical Examination: Inspection, Palpation, Percussion, Auscultation, and Insonation.

    PubMed

    Narula, Jagat; Chandrashekhar, Y; Braunwald, Eugene

    2018-04-01

    Inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation have been the 4 pillars of clinical bedside medicine. Although these basic methods of physical examination have served us well, traditional bedside examination, for a number of reasons including diminishing interest and expertise, performs well less than what is required of a modern diagnostic strategy. Improving the performance of physical examination is vital given that it is crucial to guide diagnostic possibilities and further testing. Current efforts at improving physical examination skills during medical training have not been very successful, and incorporating appropriate technology at the bedside might improve its performance. Selective use of bedside ultrasound (or insonation) can be one such strategy that could be incorporated as the fifth component of the physical examination. Seeing pathology through imaging might improve interest in physical examination among trainees, and permit appropriate downstream testing and possibly superior decision making. Current ultrasound technology makes this feasible, and further miniaturization of ultrasound devices and reduced cost will allow for routine use at the bedside. It is time to have a wider debate and a possible consensus about updates required to enhance current paradigms of physical examination.

  12. A nursing pilot study on bedside reporting to promote best practice and patient/family-centered care.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Tracy; Edwards, Jessica; Snider, Emily; Lindsey, Connie; Reed, Ann; Scroggins, Iva; Zarski, Christy; Brigance, Joe

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of bedside nursing report implementation on a pediatric neuroscience unit. The change-of-shift nursing report often involves only nurse-to-nurse communication, occurs far away from the patient's bedside, and includes little or no patient/family involvement. Studies show that the bedside nursing report is a more comprehensive and patient-centered approach (C. D. Anderson & R. R. Mangino, 2006). Patient and nurse satisfaction and nursing overtime were measured 6 months before and 6 months after the implementation of bedside reporting. Data were analyzed using paired t test, chi-square test, and Fisher's exact tests to determine significant changes. Patients, families, and nurses reported an increase in satisfaction after the implementation of bedside reporting. Overtime decreased and represented a potential cost savings of nearly $13,000 annually. Bedside reporting saves money, improves patient and nurse satisfaction, and is a more comprehensive approach to change-of-shift reporting.

  13. Patient and provider perspectives on Bedsider.org, an online contraceptive information tool, in a low income, racially diverse clinic population.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Gregory M; Lundsberg, Lisbet S; Illuzzi, Jessica L; Danton, Cheryl M; Sheth, Sangini S; Xu, Xiao; Gariepy, Aileen

    2014-12-01

    To explore patient and provider perspectives regarding a new Web-based contraceptive support tool. We conducted a qualitative study at an urban Medicaid-based clinic among sexually active women interested in starting a new contraceptive method, clinic providers and staff. All participants were given the opportunity to explore Bedsider, an online contraceptive support tool developed for sexually active women ages 18-29 by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy and endorsed by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Focus groups were conducted separately among patient participants and clinic providers/staff using open-ended structured interview guides to identify specific themes and key concepts related to use of this tool in an urban clinic setting. Patient participants were very receptive to this online contraceptive support tool, describing it as trustworthy, accessible and empowering. In contrast, clinic providers and staff had concerns regarding the Website's legitimacy, accessibility, ability to empower patients and applicability, which limited their willingness to recommend its use to patients. Contrasting opinions regarding Bedsider may point to a potential disconnect between how providers and patients view contraception information tools. Further qualitative and quantitative studies are needed to explore women's perspectives on contraceptive education and counseling and providers' understanding of these perspectives. This study identifies a contrast between how patients and providers in an urban clinic setting perceive a Web-based contraceptive tool. Given a potential patient-provider discrepancy in preferred methods and approaches to contraceptive counseling, additional research is needed to enhance this important arena of women's health care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bedside Treatment of Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Using Radiographic Characteristics to Revisit the Twist Drill.

    PubMed

    Garber, Sarah; McCaffrey, Jamie; Quigley, Edward P; MacDonald, Joel D

    2016-05-01

    Conventional treatment strategies for the management of symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) in the elderly include observation, operative burr holes or craniotomy, and bedside twist drill drainage. The decision on which technique to use should be determined by weighing the comorbidities and symptoms of the patient with the potential risks and benefits. The goal of this study was to identify radiographic characteristics on computed tomography scan that might be used to guide surgical decision making in terms of operative versus bedside removal of cSDH. We retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiographic features in patients who underwent bedside twist drill evacuation of a cSDH and those for a cohort of patients who underwent operative intervention via burr holes. We did not identify any clinical features or preoperative imaging characteristics to suggest an advantage of one procedure over the other. Additionally, complete radiographic resolution of cSDH on postoperative imaging is not required to relieve patient symptoms. Although bedside twist drill evacuation may avoid operating room costs and anesthetic complications in an elderly patient population and allow earlier resumption of anticoagulation treatment if necessary, there is also a risk of morbidity if uncontrolled bleeding is encountered or the patient is unable to tolerate the bedside procedure. However, bedside twist drill craniostomy is a reasonable and effective option for the treatment of subacute/chronic SDH in patients who may not be optimal surgical candidates. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Value of Information Web Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    their understanding of VoI attributes (source reliable, information content, and latency). The VoI web application emulates many features of a...only when using the Firefox web browser on those computers (Internet Explorer was not viable due to unchangeable user settings). During testing, the

  16. Advancing translational research with the Semantic Web.

    PubMed

    Ruttenberg, Alan; Clark, Tim; Bug, William; Samwald, Matthias; Bodenreider, Olivier; Chen, Helen; Doherty, Donald; Forsberg, Kerstin; Gao, Yong; Kashyap, Vipul; Kinoshita, June; Luciano, Joanne; Marshall, M Scott; Ogbuji, Chimezie; Rees, Jonathan; Stephens, Susie; Wong, Gwendolyn T; Wu, Elizabeth; Zaccagnini, Davide; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Neumann, Eric; Herman, Ivan; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2007-05-09

    A fundamental goal of the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH) "Roadmap" is to strengthen Translational Research, defined as the movement of discoveries in basic research to application at the clinical level. A significant barrier to translational research is the lack of uniformly structured data across related biomedical domains. The Semantic Web is an extension of the current Web that enables navigation and meaningful use of digital resources by automatic processes. It is based on common formats that support aggregation and integration of data drawn from diverse sources. A variety of technologies have been built on this foundation that, together, support identifying, representing, and reasoning across a wide range of biomedical data. The Semantic Web Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLSIG), set up within the framework of the World Wide Web Consortium, was launched to explore the application of these technologies in a variety of areas. Subgroups focus on making biomedical data available in RDF, working with biomedical ontologies, prototyping clinical decision support systems, working on drug safety and efficacy communication, and supporting disease researchers navigating and annotating the large amount of potentially relevant literature. We present a scenario that shows the value of the information environment the Semantic Web can support for aiding neuroscience researchers. We then report on several projects by members of the HCLSIG, in the process illustrating the range of Semantic Web technologies that have applications in areas of biomedicine. Semantic Web technologies present both promise and challenges. Current tools and standards are already adequate to implement components of the bench-to-bedside vision. On the other hand, these technologies are young. Gaps in standards and implementations still exist and adoption is limited by typical problems with early technology, such as the need for a critical mass of practitioners and installed base

  17. Advancing translational research with the Semantic Web

    PubMed Central

    Ruttenberg, Alan; Clark, Tim; Bug, William; Samwald, Matthias; Bodenreider, Olivier; Chen, Helen; Doherty, Donald; Forsberg, Kerstin; Gao, Yong; Kashyap, Vipul; Kinoshita, June; Luciano, Joanne; Marshall, M Scott; Ogbuji, Chimezie; Rees, Jonathan; Stephens, Susie; Wong, Gwendolyn T; Wu, Elizabeth; Zaccagnini, Davide; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Neumann, Eric; Herman, Ivan; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2007-01-01

    Background A fundamental goal of the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH) "Roadmap" is to strengthen Translational Research, defined as the movement of discoveries in basic research to application at the clinical level. A significant barrier to translational research is the lack of uniformly structured data across related biomedical domains. The Semantic Web is an extension of the current Web that enables navigation and meaningful use of digital resources by automatic processes. It is based on common formats that support aggregation and integration of data drawn from diverse sources. A variety of technologies have been built on this foundation that, together, support identifying, representing, and reasoning across a wide range of biomedical data. The Semantic Web Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLSIG), set up within the framework of the World Wide Web Consortium, was launched to explore the application of these technologies in a variety of areas. Subgroups focus on making biomedical data available in RDF, working with biomedical ontologies, prototyping clinical decision support systems, working on drug safety and efficacy communication, and supporting disease researchers navigating and annotating the large amount of potentially relevant literature. Results We present a scenario that shows the value of the information environment the Semantic Web can support for aiding neuroscience researchers. We then report on several projects by members of the HCLSIG, in the process illustrating the range of Semantic Web technologies that have applications in areas of biomedicine. Conclusion Semantic Web technologies present both promise and challenges. Current tools and standards are already adequate to implement components of the bench-to-bedside vision. On the other hand, these technologies are young. Gaps in standards and implementations still exist and adoption is limited by typical problems with early technology, such as the need for a critical mass of

  18. Comparison of web-based and face-to-face interviews for application to an anesthesiology training program: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Mathew R.; Lenart, John; Stier, Gary R.; Gatling, Jason W.; Applegate II, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study compared admission rates to a United States anesthesiology residency program for applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews during the admissions process. We also explored factors driving applicants to select each interview type. Methods The 211 applicants invited to interview for admission to our anesthesiology residency program during the 2014-2015 application cycle were participants in this pilot observational study. Of these, 141 applicants selected face-to-face interviews, 53 applicants selected web-based interviews, and 17 applicants declined to interview. Data regarding applicants' reasons for selecting a particular interview type were gathered using an anonymous online survey after interview completion. Residency program admission rates and survey answers were compared between applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews. Results One hundred twenty-seven (75.1%) applicants completed face-to-face and 42 (24.9%) completed web-based interviews. The admission rate to our residency program was not significantly different between applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews. One hundred eleven applicants completed post-interview surveys. The most common reasons for selecting web-based interviews were conflict of interview dates between programs, travel concerns, or financial limitations. Applicants selected face-to-face interviews due to a desire to interact with current residents, or geographic proximity to the residency program. Conclusions These results suggest that completion of web-based interviews is a viable alternative to completion of face-to-face interviews, and that choice of interview type does not affect the rate of applicant admission to the residency program. Web-based interviews may be of particular interest to applicants applying to a large number of programs, or with financial limitations. PMID:27039029

  19. Life Cycle Project Plan Outline: Web Sites and Web-based Applications

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This tool is a guideline for planning and checking for 508 compliance on web sites and web based applications. Determine which EIT components are covered or excepted, which 508 standards and requirements apply, and how to implement them.

  20. Recognizing Bedside Events Using Thermal and Ultrasonic Readings

    PubMed Central

    Asbjørn, Danielsen; Jim, Torresen

    2017-01-01

    Falls in homes of the elderly, in residential care facilities and in hospitals commonly occur in close proximity to the bed. Most approaches for recognizing falls use cameras, which challenge privacy, or sensor devices attached to the bed or the body to recognize bedside events and bedside falls. We use data collected from a ceiling mounted 80 × 60 thermal array combined with an ultrasonic sensor device. This approach makes it possible to monitor activity while preserving privacy in a non-intrusive manner. We evaluate three different approaches towards recognizing location and posture of an individual. Bedside events are recognized using a 10-second floating image rule/filter-based approach, recognizing bedside falls with 98.62% accuracy. Bed-entry and exit events are recognized with 98.66% and 96.73% accuracy, respectively. PMID:28598394

  1. Human dimensions in bedside teaching: focus group discussions of teachers and learners.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Subha; Orlander, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this shift. Yet, essential clinical skills, professionalism, and humanistic patient interactions are best taught at the bedside. Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this decline. This study explored perceptions of teachers and learners on the value of bedside teaching and the humanistic dimensions of bedside interactions that make it imperative to shift clinical teaching back to the bedside. Focus group methodology was used to explore teacher and learner opinions. Four teacher groups consisted of (a) Chief Residents, (b) Residency Program Directors, (c) skilled bedside teachers, and (d) a convenience group of other Department of Medicine faculty at Boston University School of Medicine. Six learner groups consisted 2 each of 3rd-year students, PGY1 medicine residents, and PGY2 medicine residents. Each discussion lasted 60 to 90 minutes. Sessions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. Teachers and learners shared several opinions on bedside teaching, particularly around humanistic aspects of bedside interactions. The key themes that emerged included (a) patient involvement in discussions, (b) teachers as role models of humanism, (c) preserving learner autonomy, (d) direct observation and feedback of learners at the bedside, (e) interactions with challenging patients, and (e) admitting limitations. Within these themes, participants noted some behaviors best avoided at the bedside. Teachers and learners regard the bedside as a valuable venue in which to learn core values of medicine. They proposed many strategies to preserve these humanistic values and improve bedside teaching. These strategies are essential for true patient-centered care.

  2. From the Bench to the Bedside: The Role of Semantic Web and Translational Medicine for Enabling the Next Generation Healthcare Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Vipul

    The success of new innovations and technologies are very often disruptive in nature. At the same time, they enable novel next generation infrastructures and solutions. These solutions introduce great efficiencies in the form of efficient processes and the ability to create, organize, share and manage knowledge effectively; and the same time provide crucial enablers for proposing and realizing new visions. In this paper, we propose a new vision of the next generation healthcare enterprise and discuss how Translational Medicine, which aims to improve communication between the basic and clinical sciences, is a key requirement for achieving this vision. This will lead therapeutic insights may be derived from new scientific ideas - and vice versa. Translation research goes from bench to bedside, where theories emerging from preclinical experimentation are tested on disease-affected human subjects, and from bedside to bench, where information obtained from preliminary human experimentation can be used to refine our understanding of the biological principles underpinning the heterogeneity of human disease and polymorphism(s). Informatics and semantic technologies in particular, has a big role to play in making this a reality. We identify critical requirements, viz., data integration, clinical decision support and knowledge maintenance and provenance; and illustrate semantics-based solutions wrt example scenarios and use cases.

  3. Design Options for Multimodal Web Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciulescu, Adrian; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    The capabilities of multimodal applications running on the web are well de-lineated since they are mainly constrained by what their underlying standard mark up language offers, as opposed to hand-made multimodal applications. As the experience in developing such multimodal web applications is growing, the need arises to identify and define major design options of such application to pave the way to a structured development life cycle. This paper provides a design space of independent design options for multimodal web applications based on three types of modalities: graphical, vocal, tactile, and combined. On the one hand, these design options may provide designers with some explicit guidance on what to decide or not for their future user interface, while exploring various design alternatives. On the other hand, these design options have been implemented as graph transformations per-formed on a user interface model represented as a graph. Thanks to a transformation engine, it allows designers to play with the different values of each design option, to preview the results of the transformation, and to obtain the corresponding code on-demand

  4. CircularLogo: A lightweight web application to visualize intra-motif dependencies.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhenqing; Ma, Tao; Kalmbach, Michael T; Dasari, Surendra; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Wang, Liguo

    2017-05-22

    The sequence logo has been widely used to represent DNA or RNA motifs for more than three decades. Despite its intelligibility and intuitiveness, the traditional sequence logo is unable to display the intra-motif dependencies and therefore is insufficient to fully characterize nucleotide motifs. Many methods have been developed to quantify the intra-motif dependencies, but fewer tools are available for visualization. We developed CircularLogo, a web-based interactive application, which is able to not only visualize the position-specific nucleotide consensus and diversity but also display the intra-motif dependencies. Applying CircularLogo to HNF6 binding sites and tRNA sequences demonstrated its ability to show intra-motif dependencies and intuitively reveal biomolecular structure. CircularLogo is implemented in JavaScript and Python based on the Django web framework. The program's source code and user's manual are freely available at http://circularlogo.sourceforge.net . CircularLogo web server can be accessed from http://bioinformaticstools.mayo.edu/circularlogo/index.html . CircularLogo is an innovative web application that is specifically designed to visualize and interactively explore intra-motif dependencies.

  5. Should bedside sonography be used first to diagnose pneumothorax secondary to blunt trauma?

    PubMed

    Donmez, Halil; Tokmak, Turgut Tursem; Yildirim, Afra; Buyukoglan, Hakan; Ozturk, Mehmet; Yaşar Ayaz, Umit; Mavili, Ertugrul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND.: Our purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of bedside sonography (US) in the detection of pneumothorax secondary to blunt thoracic trauma. METHODS.: In this prospective study, 240 hemithoraces of 120 consecutive patients with multiple trauma were evaluated with chest radiographs (CXR) and bedside thoracic US for the diagnosis of pneumothorax. CT examinations were performed in 68 patients. Fifty-two patients who did not undergo CT examinations were excluded from the study. US examinations were performed independently at bedside by two radiologists who were not informed about CXR and CT findings. CXRs were interpreted by two radiologists who were unaware of the US and CT results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CXR and US were calculated. RESULTS.: One hundred thirty-six hemithoraces were assessed in 68 patients. A total of 35 pneumothoraces were detected in 33 patients. On US, the diagnosis of pneumothorax was correct in 32 hemithoraces. In 98 hemithoraces without pneumothorax, US was normal. With US examination, there were three false-positive and three false-negative results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy of US were 91.4%, 97%, 91.4%, 97%, and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CXR were 82.7%, 89.7%, 68.5%, 95%, and 89.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS.: Bedside thoracic US is an accurate method that can be used in trauma patients instead of CXR for the detection of pneumothorax. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Bedside Teaching in Undergraduate Medical Education: Issues, Strategies, and New Models for Better Preparation of New Generation Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Abdus; Siraj, Harlina Halizah; Mohamad, Nabishah; Das, Srijit; Rabeya, Yousuf

    2011-01-01

    Bedside teaching is a vital component of medical education. It is applicable to any situation where teaching is imparted in the presence of patients. In teaching in the patients’ presence, learners have the opportunities to use all of their senses and learn the humanistic aspect of medicine such as role modeling, which is vital but difficult to communicate in words. Unfortunately, bedside teaching has been on the decline. To investigate the reasons for the decline in bedside teaching, its importance and its revival, a review of literature was carried out using PubMed and other data bases. The review revealed that the major concerns of bedside teaching were time constraint, false preceptors’ concern about patients’ comfort, short stay of patients in hospitals, learner distraction by technology, lack of experience and unrealistic faculty expectation. Whatsoever the reasons, bedside teaching cannot be replaced with anything else. There are newer approaches of effective bedside teaching, and the core focus of all such approaches is educational process. A bedside teacher must learn how to involve patients and learners in the educational processes. Moreover, bedside teaching is the process through which learners acquire the skills of communication by asking patients’ permission, establishing ground rules, setting time limit, introducing the team, diagnosing learner, diagnosing patient, conducting focused teaching, using simple language, asking patient if there is any question, closing with encouraging thanks, and giving feedback privately. It is most important to ensure a comfortable environment for all participants, the learner, the patient and the bedside teacher. Ongoing faculty development programs on educational processes and realistic faculty expectations may overcome the problems. PMID:23365470

  7. Bedside teaching in undergraduate medical education: issues, strategies, and new models for better preparation of new generation doctors.

    PubMed

    Salam, Abdus; Siraj, Harlina Halizah; Mohamad, Nabishah; Das, Srijit; Rabeya, Yousuf

    2011-03-01

    Bedside teaching is a vital component of medical education. It is applicable to any situation where teaching is imparted in the presence of patients. In teaching in the patients' presence, learners have the opportunities to use all of their senses and learn the humanistic aspect of medicine such as role modeling, which is vital but difficult to communicate in words. Unfortunately, bedside teaching has been on the decline. To investigate the reasons for the decline in bedside teaching, its importance and its revival, a review of literature was carried out using PubMed and other data bases. The review revealed that the major concerns of bedside teaching were time constraint, false preceptors' concern about patients' comfort, short stay of patients in hospitals, learner distraction by technology, lack of experience and unrealistic faculty expectation. Whatsoever the reasons, bedside teaching cannot be replaced with anything else. There are newer approaches of effective bedside teaching, and the core focus of all such approaches is educational process. A bedside teacher must learn how to involve patients and learners in the educational processes. Moreover, bedside teaching is the process through which learners acquire the skills of communication by asking patients' permission, establishing ground rules, setting time limit, introducing the team, diagnosing learner, diagnosing patient, conducting focused teaching, using simple language, asking patient if there is any question, closing with encouraging thanks, and giving feedback privately. It is most important to ensure a comfortable environment for all participants, the learner, the patient and the bedside teacher. Ongoing faculty development programs on educational processes and realistic faculty expectations may overcome the problems.

  8. A RESTful interface to pseudonymization services in modern web applications.

    PubMed

    Lablans, Martin; Borg, Andreas; Ückert, Frank

    2015-02-07

    Medical research networks rely on record linkage and pseudonymization to determine which records from different sources relate to the same patient. To establish informational separation of powers, the required identifying data are redirected to a trusted third party that has, in turn, no access to medical data. This pseudonymization service receives identifying data, compares them with a list of already reported patient records and replies with a (new or existing) pseudonym. We found existing solutions to be technically outdated, complex to implement or not suitable for internet-based research infrastructures. In this article, we propose a new RESTful pseudonymization interface tailored for use in web applications accessed by modern web browsers. The interface is modelled as a resource-oriented architecture, which is based on the representational state transfer (REST) architectural style. We translated typical use-cases into resources to be manipulated with well-known HTTP verbs. Patients can be re-identified in real-time by authorized users' web browsers using temporary identifiers. We encourage the use of PID strings for pseudonyms and the EpiLink algorithm for record linkage. As a proof of concept, we developed a Java Servlet as reference implementation. The following resources have been identified: Sessions allow data associated with a client to be stored beyond a single request while still maintaining statelessness. Tokens authorize for a specified action and thus allow the delegation of authentication. Patients are identified by one or more pseudonyms and carry identifying fields. Relying on HTTP calls alone, the interface is firewall-friendly. The reference implementation has proven to be production stable. The RESTful pseudonymization interface fits the requirements of web-based scenarios and allows building applications that make pseudonymization transparent to the user using ordinary web technology. The open-source reference implementation implements the

  9. Development and initial validation of the Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System score

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Adverse outcomes following clinical deterioration in children admitted to hospital wards is frequently preventable. Identification of children for referral to critical care experts remains problematic. Our objective was to develop and validate a simple bedside score to quantify severity of illness in hospitalized children. Methods A case-control design was used to evaluate 11 candidate items and identify a pragmatic score for routine bedside use. Case-patients were urgently admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Control-patients had no 'code blue', ICU admission or care restrictions. Validation was performed using two prospectively collected datasets. Results Data from 60 case and 120 control-patients was obtained. Four out of eleven candidate-items were removed. The seven-item Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System (PEWS) score ranges from 0–26. The mean maximum scores were 10.1 in case-patients and 3.4 in control-patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.91, compared with 0.84 for the retrospective nurse-rating of patient risk for near or actual cardiopulmonary arrest. At a score of 8 the sensitivity and specificity were 82% and 93%, respectively. The score increased over 24 hours preceding urgent paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission (P < 0.0001). In 436 urgent consultations, the Bedside PEWS score was higher in patients admitted to the ICU than patients who were not admitted (P < 0.0001). Conclusions We developed and performed the initial validation of the Bedside PEWS score. This 7-item score can quantify severity of illness in hospitalized children and identify critically ill children with at least one hours notice. Prospective validation in other populations is required before clinical application. PMID:19678924

  10. Factors influencing when intensive care unit nurses go to the bedside to investigate patient related alarms: A descriptive qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Despins, Laurel A

    2017-12-01

    This study examines what prompts the intensive care unit (ICU) nurse to go to the patient's bedside to investigate an alarm and the influences on the nurse's determination regarding how quickly this needs to occur. A qualitative descriptive design guided data collection and analysis. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis guided by the Patient Risk Detection Theoretical Framework was applied to the data. Four specialty intensive care units in an academic medical center. ICU nurses go the patient's bedside in response to an alarm to catch patient deterioration and avert harm. Their determination of the immediacy of patient risk and their desire to prioritize their bedside investigations to true alarms influences how quickly they proceed to the bedside. Ready visual access to physiological data and waveform configurations, experience, teamwork, and false alarms are important determinants in the timing of ICU nurses' bedside alarm investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bench to Bedside: Understanding Symptom Response to Acupuncture Treatment and Designing a Successful Acupuncture Treatment Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2014 – 28 Sept 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bench to Bedside ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0533 TITLE: Bench to Bedside : Understanding Symptom Response to Acupuncture Treatment and Designing a Successful...Newton, MA 02458 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT : Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical

  12. Bringing mini-chalk talks to the bedside to enhance clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Michael B; Orlander, Jay D

    2017-01-01

    Chalk talks - where the teacher is equipped solely with a writing utensil and a writing surface - have been used for centuries, yet little has been written about strategies for their use in medical education. Structured education proximal to patient encounters (during rounds, at the bedside, or in between patients in clinic) maximizes the opportunities for clinical learning. This paper presents a strategy to bring mini-chalk talks (MCTs) to the bedside as a practical way to provide relevant clinical teaching by visually framing teachable moments. Grounded in adult learning theory, MCTs leverage teaching scripts to facilitate discussion, involve learners at multiple levels, and embrace the increased retention associated with visual aids. These authors provide specific recommendations for the design and implementation of MCT sessions including what topics work well, how to prepare, and how to involve and engage the learners. ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; MCT: Mini-chalk talks.

  13. Patient participation in bedside reporting on surgical wards.

    PubMed

    Timonen, L; Sihvonen, M

    2000-07-01

    Increasingly nowadays, patients have an opportunity to take part in nurses' reporting sessions via bedside reporting. The aim of this study was to compare nurses' and patients' opinions of the purpose of bedside reports, patient participation in bedside reporting sessions, and factors that promote or prevent their participation. Data were collected by a questionnaire survey of nurses (N = 118) and patients (N = 74). A response rate of 81% was achieved in both groups. Additionally, 76 bedside reporting sessions were observed. According to patients, the main reasons for not participating were tiredness, difficulties in formulating questions, lack of encouragement, difficulties with the language used, nurses concentrating more on their papers than on them, and the reporting sessions were too short. Nurses reported that patients took a more active part in reporting sessions than patients themselves thought. The average time spent on each patient's report was three minutes.

  14. "Back to Bedside": Residents' and Fellows' Perspectives on Finding Meaning in Work.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Dustin M; Rialon, Kristy L; Nevel, Kathryn; Kothari, Anai N; Jardine, Lcdr Dinchen A

    2017-04-01

    Physician burnout is common and associated with significant consequences for physicians and patients. One mechanism to combat burnout is to enhance meaning in work. To provide a trainee perspective on how meaning in work can be enhanced in the clinical learning environment through individual, program, and institutional efforts. "Back to Bedside" resulted from an appreciative inquiry exercise by 37 resident and fellow members of the ACGME's Council of Review Committee Residents (CRCR), which was guided by the memoir When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. The exercise was designed to (1) discover current best practices in existing learning environments; (2) dream of ideal ways to enhance meaning in work; (3) design solutions that move toward this optimal environment; and (4) support trainees in operationalizing innovative solutions. Back to Bedside consists of 5 themes for how the learning environment can enhance meaning in daily work: (1) more time at the bedside, engaged in direct patient care, dialogue with patients and families, and bedside clinical teaching; (2) a shared sense of teamwork and respect among multidisciplinary health professionals and trainees; (3) decreasing the time spent on nonclinical and administrative responsibilities; (4) a supportive, collegial work environment; and (5) a learning environment conducive to developing clinical mastery and progressive autonomy. Participants identified actions to achieve these goals. A national, multispecialty group of trainees developed actionable recommendations for how clinical learning environments can be improved to combat physician burnout by fostering meaning in work. These improvements can be championed by trainees.

  15. PaaS for web applications with OpenShift Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lossent, A.; Rodriguez Peon, A.; Wagner, A.

    2017-10-01

    The CERN Web Frameworks team has deployed OpenShift Origin to facilitate deployment of web applications and to improving efficiency in terms of computing resource usage. OpenShift leverages Docker containers and Kubernetes orchestration to provide a Platform-as-a-service solution oriented for web applications. We will review use cases and how OpenShift was integrated with other services such as source control, web site management and authentication services.

  16. Modelling Safe Interface Interactions in Web Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Marco; Cabot, Jordi; Grossniklaus, Michael

    Current Web applications embed sophisticated user interfaces and business logic. The original interaction paradigm of the Web based on static content pages that are browsed by hyperlinks is, therefore, not valid anymore. In this paper, we advocate a paradigm shift for browsers and Web applications, that improves the management of user interaction and browsing history. Pages are replaced by States as basic navigation nodes, and Back/Forward navigation along the browsing history is replaced by a full-fledged interactive application paradigm, supporting transactions at the interface level and featuring Undo/Redo capabilities. This new paradigm offers a safer and more precise interaction model, protecting the user from unexpected behaviours of the applications and the browser.

  17. Session management for web-based healthcare applications.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L.; Sengupta, S.

    1999-01-01

    In health care systems, users may access multiple applications during one session of interaction with the system. However, users must sign on to each application individually, and it is difficult to maintain a common context among these applications. We are developing a session management system for web-based applications using LDAP directory service, which will allow single sign-on to multiple web-based applications, and maintain a common context among those applications for the user. This paper discusses the motivations for building this system, the system architecture, and the challenges of our approach, such as the session objects management for the user, and session security. PMID:10566511

  18. FPA Depot - Web Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, Edwin M. Martinez; Muniz, Ricardo; Szafran, Jamie; Dalton, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Lines of code (LOC) analysis is one of the methods used to measure programmer productivity and estimate schedules of programming projects. The Launch Control System (LCS) had previously used this method to estimate the amount of work and to plan development efforts. The disadvantage of using LOC as a measure of effort is that one can only measure 30% to 35% of the total effort of software projects involves coding [8]. In the application, instead of using the LOC we are using function point for a better estimation of hours in each software to develop. Because of these disadvantages, Jamie Szafran of the System Software Branch of Control And Data Systems (NE-C3) at Kennedy Space Canter developed a web application called Function Point Analysis (FPA) Depot. The objective of this web application is that the LCS software architecture team can use the data to more accurately estimate the effort required to implement customer requirements. This paper describes the evolution of the domain model used for function point analysis as project managers continually strive to generate more accurate estimates.

  19. Demonstration of the Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) modeling application

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) modeling application is available to the risk assessment community through a user-friendly internet platform (http://epa.gov/ceampubl/fchain/webice/). ICE models are log-linear least square regressions that predict acute...

  20. SSE-GIS v1.03 Web Mapping Application Now Available

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2018-03-16

    SSE-GIS v1.03 Web Mapping Application Now Available Wednesday, July 6, 2016 ... you haven’t already noticed the link to the new SSE-GIS web application on the SSE homepage entitled “GIS Web Mapping Applications and Services”, we invite you to visit the site. ...

  1. Bringing mini-chalk talks to the bedside to enhance clinical teaching

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Michael B.; Orlander, Jay D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chalk talks – where the teacher is equipped solely with a writing utensil and a writing surface – have been used for centuries, yet little has been written about strategies for their use in medical education. Structured education proximal to patient encounters (during rounds, at the bedside, or in between patients in clinic) maximizes the opportunities for clinical learning. This paper presents a strategy to bring mini-chalk talks (MCTs) to the bedside as a practical way to provide relevant clinical teaching by visually framing teachable moments. Grounded in adult learning theory, MCTs leverage teaching scripts to facilitate discussion, involve learners at multiple levels, and embrace the increased retention associated with visual aids. These authors provide specific recommendations for the design and implementation of MCT sessions including what topics work well, how to prepare, and how to involve and engage the learners. Abbreviations: ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; MCT: Mini-chalk talks PMID:28178911

  2. From bench to bedside and to health policies: ethics in translational research.

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2011-01-01

    Translation of biomedical research knowledge to effective clinical treatment is essential to the public good. The first level of translation ("from bench to bedside") corresponds to efficacy studies under controlled conditions with careful attention to internal validity (clinical research). The second level is the translation of results from clinical studies into everyday clinical practice and health decision making. The article summarises the ethical issues involved in the translation of biomedical research advances to clinical applications and to clinical practice. In particular, the article synthesizes theory from clinical ethics, operational design, and philosophy to examine the unique bioethical issues raised by the recent focus on translational research. In this framework safety of study participants and balancing of risk due to treatment with the potential benefits of the research are crucial: in clinical research there is a danger that the emphasis on advancements in scientific knowledge might prevail over the protection of the people who participate in research. These issues involve basic scientists, clinicians and bioethicists because of their application to comparative effectiveness research, clinical trials and evidence-based medicine, as well basic biomedical research.

  3. A Proxy Design to Leverage the Interconnection of CoAP Wireless Sensor Networks with Web Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ludovici, Alessandro; Calveras, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) proxy able to interconnect Web applications based on Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and WebSocket with CoAP based Wireless Sensor Networks. Sensor networks are commonly used to monitor and control physical objects or environments. Smart Cities represent applications of such a nature. Wireless Sensor Networks gather data from their surroundings and send them to a remote application. This data flow may be short or long lived. The traditional HTTP long-polling used by Web applications may not be adequate in long-term communications. To overcome this problem, we include the WebSocket protocol in the design of the CoAP proxy. We evaluate the performance of the CoAP proxy in terms of latency and memory consumption. The tests consider long and short-lived communications. In both cases, we evaluate the performance obtained by the CoAP proxy according to the use of WebSocket and HTTP long-polling. PMID:25585107

  4. Prevalence and Determinants of Physician Bedside Rationing

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Samia A; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Forde, Reidun; Pegoraro, Renzo; Reiter-Theil, Stella; Perrier, Arnaud; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Danis, Marion

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bedside rationing by physicians is controversial. The debate, however, is clouded by lack of information regarding the extent and character of bedside rationing. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We developed a survey instrument to examine the frequency, criteria, and strategies used for bedside rationing. Content validity was assessed through expert assessment and scales were tested for internal consistency. The questionnaire was translated and administered to General Internists in Norway, Switzerland, Italy, and the United Kingdom. Logistic regression was used to identify the variables associated with reported rationing. RESULTS Survey respondents (N =656, response rate 43%) ranged in age from 28 to 82, and averaged 25 years in practice. Most respondents (82.3%) showed some degree of agreement with rationing, and 56.3% reported that they did ration interventions. The most frequently mentioned criteria for rationing were a small expected benefit (82.3%), low chances of success (79.8%), an intervention intended to prolong life when quality of life is low (70.6%), and a patient over 85 years of age (70%). The frequency of rationing by clinicians was positively correlated with perceived scarcity of resources (odds ratio [OR]=1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06 to 1.16), perceived pressure to ration (OR=2.14, 95% CI 1.52 to 3.01), and agreement with rationing (OR=1.13, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.23). CONCLUSION Bedside rationing is prevalent in all surveyed European countries and varies with physician attitudes and resource availability. The prevalence of physician bedside rationing, which presents physicians with difficult moral dilemmas, highlights the importance of discussions regarding how to ration care in the most ethically justifiable manner. PMID:16836629

  5. Development of a Web-based financial application System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. R.; Ibrahimy, M. I.; Motakabber, S. M. A.; Ferdaus, M. M.; Khan, M. N. H.; Mostafa, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    The paper describes a technique to develop a web based financial system, following latest technology and business needs. In the development of web based application, the user friendliness and technology both are very important. It is used ASP .NET MVC 4 platform and SQL 2008 server for development of web based financial system. It shows the technique for the entry system and report monitoring of the application is user friendly. This paper also highlights the critical situations of development, which will help to develop the quality product.

  6. Accountable Information Flow for Java-Based Web Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    runtime library Swift server runtime Java servlet framework HTTP Web server Web browser Figure 2: The Swift architecture introduced an open-ended...On the server, the Java application code links against Swift’s server-side run-time library, which in turn sits on top of the standard Java servlet ...AFRL-RI-RS-TR-2010-9 Final Technical Report January 2010 ACCOUNTABLE INFORMATION FLOW FOR JAVA -BASED WEB APPLICATIONS

  7. Web-4D-QSAR: A web-based application to generate 4D-QSAR descriptors.

    PubMed

    Ataide Martins, João Paulo; Rougeth de Oliveira, Marco Antônio; Oliveira de Queiroz, Mário Sérgio

    2018-06-05

    A web-based application is developed to generate 4D-QSAR descriptors using the LQTA-QSAR methodology, based on molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories and topology information retrieved from the GROMACS package. The LQTAGrid module calculates the intermolecular interaction energies at each grid point, considering probes and all aligned conformations resulting from MD simulations. These interaction energies are the independent variables or descriptors employed in a QSAR analysis. A friendly front end web interface, built using the Django framework and Python programming language, integrates all steps of the LQTA-QSAR methodology in a way that is transparent to the user, and in the backend, GROMACS and LQTAGrid are executed to generate 4D-QSAR descriptors to be used later in the process of QSAR model building. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Two Novel Approaches to Improve Otolaryngology Resident Wellness: The ACGME Back to Bedside Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Emily C; Devare, Jenna; Truesdale, Carl M; Ricker, Ellen; Firn, Janice; Thorne, Marc C; Shuman, Andrew G; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2018-06-01

    Rates of burnout, mental illness, and suicide are disproportionately elevated among physicians, and surgical specialists, including otolaryngologists, are at even higher risk for professional burnout. These trends have been identified at both the trainee and attending level. To combat resident burnout, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Council of Review Committee Residents (CRCR) designed the Back to Bedside Initiative, the goals of which are to foster meaning in the learning environment and to help trainees to engage more deeply with patients. Two funded Back to Bedside proposals involve otolaryngology training programs. Herein, we discuss these 2 approaches in an effort to foster additional novel resident wellness initiatives and awareness thereof across our subspecialty.

  9. NGL Viewer: a web application for molecular visualization

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Alexander S.; Hildebrand, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    The NGL Viewer (http://proteinformatics.charite.de/ngl) is a web application for the visualization of macromolecular structures. By fully adopting capabilities of modern web browsers, such as WebGL, for molecular graphics, the viewer can interactively display large molecular complexes and is also unaffected by the retirement of third-party plug-ins like Flash and Java Applets. Generally, the web application offers comprehensive molecular visualization through a graphical user interface so that life scientists can easily access and profit from available structural data. It supports common structural file-formats (e.g. PDB, mmCIF) and a variety of molecular representations (e.g. ‘cartoon, spacefill, licorice’). Moreover, the viewer can be embedded in other web sites to provide specialized visualizations of entries in structural databases or results of structure-related calculations. PMID:25925569

  10. web cellHTS2: a web-application for the analysis of high-throughput screening data.

    PubMed

    Pelz, Oliver; Gilsdorf, Moritz; Boutros, Michael

    2010-04-12

    The analysis of high-throughput screening data sets is an expanding field in bioinformatics. High-throughput screens by RNAi generate large primary data sets which need to be analyzed and annotated to identify relevant phenotypic hits. Large-scale RNAi screens are frequently used to identify novel factors that influence a broad range of cellular processes, including signaling pathway activity, cell proliferation, and host cell infection. Here, we present a web-based application utility for the end-to-end analysis of large cell-based screening experiments by cellHTS2. The software guides the user through the configuration steps that are required for the analysis of single or multi-channel experiments. The web-application provides options for various standardization and normalization methods, annotation of data sets and a comprehensive HTML report of the screening data analysis, including a ranked hit list. Sessions can be saved and restored for later re-analysis. The web frontend for the cellHTS2 R/Bioconductor package interacts with it through an R-server implementation that enables highly parallel analysis of screening data sets. web cellHTS2 further provides a file import and configuration module for common file formats. The implemented web-application facilitates the analysis of high-throughput data sets and provides a user-friendly interface. web cellHTS2 is accessible online at http://web-cellHTS2.dkfz.de. A standalone version as a virtual appliance and source code for platforms supporting Java 1.5.0 can be downloaded from the web cellHTS2 page. web cellHTS2 is freely distributed under GPL.

  11. WIRM: An Open Source Toolkit for Building Biomedical Web Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jakobovits, Rex M.; Rosse, Cornelius; Brinkley, James F.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an innovative software toolkit that allows the creation of web applications that facilitate the acquisition, integration, and dissemination of multimedia biomedical data over the web, thereby reducing the cost of knowledge sharing. There is a lack of high-level web application development tools suitable for use by researchers, clinicians, and educators who are not skilled programmers. Our Web Interfacing Repository Manager (WIRM) is a software toolkit that reduces the complexity of building custom biomedical web applications. WIRM’s visual modeling tools enable domain experts to describe the structure of their knowledge, from which WIRM automatically generates full-featured, customizable content management systems. PMID:12386108

  12. Web services as applications' integration tool: QikProp case study.

    PubMed

    Laoui, Abdel; Polyakov, Valery R

    2011-07-15

    Web services are a new technology that enables to integrate applications running on different platforms by using primarily XML to enable communication among different computers over the Internet. Large number of applications was designed as stand alone systems before the concept of Web services was introduced and it is a challenge to integrate them into larger computational networks. A generally applicable method of wrapping stand alone applications into Web services was developed and is described. To test the technology, it was applied to the QikProp for DOS (Windows). Although performance of the application did not change when it was delivered as a Web service, this form of deployment had offered several advantages like simplified and centralized maintenance, smaller number of licenses, and practically no training for the end user. Because by using the described approach almost any legacy application can be wrapped as a Web service, this form of delivery may be recommended as a global alternative to traditional deployment solutions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The bedside assistant in robotic surgery--keys to success.

    PubMed

    Yuh, Bertram

    2013-01-01

    Taking on the position of bedside assistant for a surgical robotic team can be a daunting task. Keys to success include preparation, proper operation set up, effective use of instruments to augment the actions of the console surgeon, and readiness for surgical emergencies. Effective communication, repetitive execution, and readiness facilitate the efforts of the surgical team.

  14. An open source Java web application to build self-contained Web GIS sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Romero, O.; Ahmed, A.; Chassignet, E.; Zavala-Hidalgo, J.

    2014-12-01

    This work describes OWGIS, an open source Java web application that creates Web GIS sites by automatically writing HTML and JavaScript code. OWGIS is configured by XML files that define which layers (geographic datasets) will be displayed on the websites. This project uses several Open Geospatial Consortium standards to request data from typical map servers, such as GeoServer, and is also able to request data from ncWMS servers. The latter allows for the displaying of 4D data stored using the NetCDF file format (widely used for storing environmental model datasets). Some of the features available on the sites built with OWGIS are: multiple languages, animations, vertical profiles and vertical transects, color palettes, color ranges, and the ability to download data. OWGIS main users are scientists, such as oceanographers or climate scientists, who store their data in NetCDF files and want to analyze, visualize, share, or compare their data using a website.

  15. COEUS: "semantic web in a box" for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Pedro; Oliveira, José Luís

    2012-12-17

    As the "omics" revolution unfolds, the growth in data quantity and diversity is bringing about the need for pioneering bioinformatics software, capable of significantly improving the research workflow. To cope with these computer science demands, biomedical software engineers are adopting emerging semantic web technologies that better suit the life sciences domain. The latter's complex relationships are easily mapped into semantic web graphs, enabling a superior understanding of collected knowledge. Despite increased awareness of semantic web technologies in bioinformatics, their use is still limited. COEUS is a new semantic web framework, aiming at a streamlined application development cycle and following a "semantic web in a box" approach. The framework provides a single package including advanced data integration and triplification tools, base ontologies, a web-oriented engine and a flexible exploration API. Resources can be integrated from heterogeneous sources, including CSV and XML files or SQL and SPARQL query results, and mapped directly to one or more ontologies. Advanced interoperability features include REST services, a SPARQL endpoint and LinkedData publication. These enable the creation of multiple applications for web, desktop or mobile environments, and empower a new knowledge federation layer. The platform, targeted at biomedical application developers, provides a complete skeleton ready for rapid application deployment, enhancing the creation of new semantic information systems. COEUS is available as open source at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/coeus/.

  16. Semantic-Web Technology: Applications at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashish, Naveen

    2004-01-01

    We provide a description of work at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on building system based on semantic-web concepts and technologies. NASA has been one of the early adopters of semantic-web technologies for practical applications. Indeed there are several ongoing 0 endeavors on building semantics based systems for use in diverse NASA domains ranging from collaborative scientific activity to accident and mishap investigation to enterprise search to scientific information gathering and integration to aviation safety decision support We provide a brief overview of many applications and ongoing work with the goal of informing the external community of these NASA endeavors.

  17. Peer-assisted bedside teaching rounds.

    PubMed

    Doumouras, Aristithes; Rush, Raphael; Campbell, Anthony; Taylor, David

    2015-06-01

    Although postgraduate trainees play a well-accepted role in medical education, little consideration has traditionally been given to senior undergraduate trainees as teachers. Recently, research has shown senior medical students (SMS) can play an effective teaching role for junior medical students (JMS) in non-clinical medical settings. The purpose of our study was to understand the perceptions of SMSs as teachers in a clinical environment for JMS. All students who participated in our peer-led bedside teaching programme from September 2010 to May 2012 were invited to complete a questionnaire following their teaching session. Fifty-six of 70 JMS (80%) and 15 of 15 SMS (100%) participated. Survey questions addressed learning, bedside experiences, teacher effectiveness and the overall usefulness of these sessions. The data collected were analysed for significance of the perceptions reported. We found students reported positive and statistically significant results in all domains examined. JMS reported that sessions were highly valuable learning, improved confidence and comfort at the bedside, had excellent teaching and were a valuable addition to their clinical skills training. SMS reported getting highly valuable learning through preparation and developing improved comfort in a teaching role. Little consideration has traditionally been given to senior undergraduate trainees as teachers Our findings demonstrate that peer-directed learning in undergraduate medical education can be effectively implemented in the clinical arena. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Lessons learned from the implementation of a bedside handoff model.

    PubMed

    Hagman, Jan; Oman, Kathleen; Kleiner, Catherine; Johnson, Elizabeth; Nordhagen, Jamie

    2013-06-01

    At the University of Colorado Hospital, nurse-to-nurse shift reports traditionally occurred in a conference room setting and consisted of nurse-to-nurse verbal communication. Evidence supports moving this information exchange to the patient bedside. This model of report improves clinical effectiveness, patient safety, nurse efficiency, and staff satisfaction. Bedside reporting empowers patients and families to ask questions and contribute to their plan of care and increases patient satisfaction. This article describes the process of implementing and evaluating a model of nurse-to-nurse bedside handoff report.

  19. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earthquake Web Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fee, J.; Martinez, E.

    2015-12-01

    USGS Earthquake web applications provide access to earthquake information from USGS and other Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) contributors. One of the primary goals of these applications is to provide a consistent experience for accessing both near-real time information as soon as it is available and historic information after it is thoroughly reviewed. Millions of people use these applications every month including people who feel an earthquake, emergency responders looking for the latest information about a recent event, and scientists researching historic earthquakes and their effects. Information from multiple catalogs and contributors is combined by the ANSS Comprehensive Catalog into one composite catalog, identifying the most preferred information from any source for each event. A web service and near-real time feeds provide access to all contributed data, and are used by a number of users and software packages. The Latest Earthquakes application displays summaries of many events, either near-real time feeds or custom searches, and the Event Page application shows detailed information for each event. Because all data is accessed through the web service, it can also be downloaded by users. The applications are maintained as open source projects on github, and use mobile-first and responsive-web-design approaches to work well on both mobile devices and desktop computers. http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/map/

  20. Web Application Design Using Server-Side JavaScript

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hampton, J.; Simons, R.

    1999-02-01

    This document describes the application design philosophy for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Research & Development Web Site. This design incorporates object-oriented techniques to produce a flexible and maintainable system of applications that support the web site. These techniques will be discussed at length along with the issues they address. The overall structure of the applications and their relationships with one another will also be described. The current problems and future design changes will be discussed as well.

  1. EpiCollect: linking smartphones to web applications for epidemiology, ecology and community data collection.

    PubMed

    Aanensen, David M; Huntley, Derek M; Feil, Edward J; al-Own, Fada'a; Spratt, Brian G

    2009-09-16

    Epidemiologists and ecologists often collect data in the field and, on returning to their laboratory, enter their data into a database for further analysis. The recent introduction of mobile phones that utilise the open source Android operating system, and which include (among other features) both GPS and Google Maps, provide new opportunities for developing mobile phone applications, which in conjunction with web applications, allow two-way communication between field workers and their project databases. Here we describe a generic framework, consisting of mobile phone software, EpiCollect, and a web application located within www.spatialepidemiology.net. Data collected by multiple field workers can be submitted by phone, together with GPS data, to a common web database and can be displayed and analysed, along with previously collected data, using Google Maps (or Google Earth). Similarly, data from the web database can be requested and displayed on the mobile phone, again using Google Maps. Data filtering options allow the display of data submitted by the individual field workers or, for example, those data within certain values of a measured variable or a time period. Data collection frameworks utilising mobile phones with data submission to and from central databases are widely applicable and can give a field worker similar display and analysis tools on their mobile phone that they would have if viewing the data in their laboratory via the web. We demonstrate their utility for epidemiological data collection and display, and briefly discuss their application in ecological and community data collection. Furthermore, such frameworks offer great potential for recruiting 'citizen scientists' to contribute data easily to central databases through their mobile phone.

  2. BOWS (bioinformatics open web services) to centralize bioinformatics tools in web services.

    PubMed

    Velloso, Henrique; Vialle, Ricardo A; Ortega, J Miguel

    2015-06-02

    Bioinformaticians face a range of difficulties to get locally-installed tools running and producing results; they would greatly benefit from a system that could centralize most of the tools, using an easy interface for input and output. Web services, due to their universal nature and widely known interface, constitute a very good option to achieve this goal. Bioinformatics open web services (BOWS) is a system based on generic web services produced to allow programmatic access to applications running on high-performance computing (HPC) clusters. BOWS intermediates the access to registered tools by providing front-end and back-end web services. Programmers can install applications in HPC clusters in any programming language and use the back-end service to check for new jobs and their parameters, and then to send the results to BOWS. Programs running in simple computers consume the BOWS front-end service to submit new processes and read results. BOWS compiles Java clients, which encapsulate the front-end web service requisitions, and automatically creates a web page that disposes the registered applications and clients. Bioinformatics open web services registered applications can be accessed from virtually any programming language through web services, or using standard java clients. The back-end can run in HPC clusters, allowing bioinformaticians to remotely run high-processing demand applications directly from their machines.

  3. NGL Viewer: a web application for molecular visualization.

    PubMed

    Rose, Alexander S; Hildebrand, Peter W

    2015-07-01

    The NGL Viewer (http://proteinformatics.charite.de/ngl) is a web application for the visualization of macromolecular structures. By fully adopting capabilities of modern web browsers, such as WebGL, for molecular graphics, the viewer can interactively display large molecular complexes and is also unaffected by the retirement of third-party plug-ins like Flash and Java Applets. Generally, the web application offers comprehensive molecular visualization through a graphical user interface so that life scientists can easily access and profit from available structural data. It supports common structural file-formats (e.g. PDB, mmCIF) and a variety of molecular representations (e.g. 'cartoon, spacefill, licorice'). Moreover, the viewer can be embedded in other web sites to provide specialized visualizations of entries in structural databases or results of structure-related calculations. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. An Open-Source and Java-Technologies Approach to Web Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    program for any purpose (Freedom 0). • The freedom to study how the program works, and adapt it to individual needs (Freedom 1). Access to the source...manage information for many purposes. Today a key technology that allows developers to make Web applications is server-side programming to generate a

  5. Bedside Diagnosis of Dysphagia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    O’Horo, John C.; Rogus-Pulia, Nicole; Garcia-Arguello, Lisbeth; Robbins, JoAnne; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is associated with aspiration, pneumonia and malnutrition, but remains challenging to identify at the bedside. A variety of exam protocols and maneuvers are commonly used, but the efficacy of these maneuvers is highly variable. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of seven databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and Scopus, from each database’s earliest inception through June 5th, 2013. Studies reporting diagnostic performance of a bedside examination maneuver compared to a reference gold standard (videofluoroscopic swallow study [VFSS] or flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing [FEEST]) were included for analysis. From each study, data were abstracted based on the type of diagnostic method and reference standard study population and inclusion/exclusion characteristics, design and prediction of aspiration. Results The search strategy identified 38 articles meeting inclusion criteria. Overall, most bedside examinations lacked sufficient sensitivity to be used for screening purposes across all patient populations examined. Individual studies found dysphonia assessments, abnormal pharyngeal sensation assessments, dual axis accelerometry, and one description of water swallow testing to be sensitive tools, but none were reported as consistently sensitive. A preponderance of identified studies was in post-stroke adults, limiting the generalizability of results. Conclusions No bedside screening protocol has been shown to provide adequate predictive value for presence of aspiration. Several individual exam maneuvers demonstrated reasonable sensitivity, but reproducibility and consistency of these protocols was not established. More research is needed to design an optimal protocol for dysphagia detection. PMID:25581840

  6. Bedside diagnosis of dysphagia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    O'Horo, John C; Rogus-Pulia, Nicole; Garcia-Arguello, Lisbeth; Robbins, JoAnne; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-04-01

    Dysphagia is associated with aspiration, pneumonia, and malnutrition, but remains challenging to identify at the bedside. A variety of exam protocols and maneuvers are commonly used, but the efficacy of these maneuvers is highly variable. We conducted a comprehensive search of 7 databases, including MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus, from each database's earliest inception through June 9, 2014. Studies reporting diagnostic performance of a bedside examination maneuver compared to a reference gold standard (videofluoroscopic swallow study or flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing) were included for analysis. From each study, data were abstracted based on the type of diagnostic method and reference standard study population and inclusion/exclusion characteristics, design, and prediction of aspiration. The search strategy identified 38 articles meeting inclusion criteria. Overall, most bedside examinations lacked sufficient sensitivity to be used for screening purposes across all patient populations examined. Individual studies found dysphonia assessments, abnormal pharyngeal sensation assessments, dual axis accelerometry, and 1 description of water swallow testing to be sensitive tools, but none were reported as consistently sensitive. A preponderance of identified studies was in poststroke adults, limiting the generalizability of results. No bedside screening protocol has been shown to provide adequate predictive value for presence of aspiration. Several individual exam maneuvers demonstrated reasonable sensitivity, but reproducibility and consistency of these protocols was not established. More research is needed to design an optimal protocol for dysphagia detection. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  7. a Web Api and Web Application Development for Dissemination of Air Quality Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, K.; Işıkdağ, U.

    2017-11-01

    Various studies have been carried out since 2005 under the leadership of Ministry of Environment and Urbanism of Turkey, in order to observe the quality of air in Turkey, to develop new policies and to develop a sustainable air quality management strategy. For this reason, a national air quality monitoring network has been developed providing air quality indices. By this network, the quality of the air has been continuously monitored and an important information system has been constructed in order to take precautions for preventing a dangerous situation. The biggest handicap in the network is the data access problem for instant and time series data acquisition and processing because of its proprietary structure. Currently, there is no service offered by the current air quality monitoring system for exchanging information with third party applications. Within the context of this work, a web service has been developed to enable location based querying of the current/past air quality data in Turkey. This web service is equipped with up-todate and widely preferred technologies. In other words, an architecture is chosen in which applications can easily integrate. In the second phase of the study, a web-based application was developed to test the developed web service and this testing application can perform location based acquisition of air-quality data. This makes it possible to easily carry out operations such as screening and examination of the area in the given time-frame which cannot be done with the national monitoring network.

  8. Identification of drug interactions in hospitals--computerized screening vs. bedside recording.

    PubMed

    Blix, H S; Viktil, K K; Moger, T A; Reikvam, A

    2008-04-01

    Managing drug interactions in hospitalized patients is important and challenging. The objective of the study was to compare two methods for identification of drug interactions (DDIs)--computerized screening and prospective bedside recording--with regard to capability of identifying DDIs. Patient characteristics were recorded for patients admitted to five hospitals. By bedside evaluation drug-related problems, including DDIs, were prospectively recorded by pharmacists and discussed in multidisciplinary teams. A computer screening programme was used to identify DDIs retrospectively--dividing DDIs into four classes: A, avoid; B, avoid/take precautions; C, take precautions; D, no action needed. Among 827 patients, computer screening identified DDIs in 544 patients (66%); 351 had DDIs introduced in hospital. The 1513 computer-identified DDIs had the following distribution: type A 78; type B 915; type C 38; type D 482. By bedside evaluation, 99 DDIs were identified in 73 patients (9%). The proportions of computer recorded DDIs which were also identified at the bedside were: 5%, 8%, 8%, 2% DDIs of types A, B, C and D respectively. In 10 patients, DDIs not registered by computer screening were identified by bedside evaluation. The drugs most frequently involved in DDIs, identified by computerized screening were acetylsalicylic acid, warfarin, furosemide and digitoxin compared with warfarin, simvastatin, theophylline and carbamazepine, by bedside evaluation. Despite an active prospective bedside search for DDIs, this approach identified less than one in 10 of the DDIs recorded by computer screening, including those regarded as hazardous. However, computer screening overestimates considerably when the objective is to identify clinically relevant DDIs.

  9. Bedside teaching with unwell patients: Can it ever be appropriate?

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Nithish

    2017-03-01

    Bedside teaching has seen a decline in its popularity since the heady days of Boerhaave and Osler; a number of hurdles have been noted in the literature including time constraints on senior clinicians. While organizing a bedside teaching course for final-year medical students, it was apparent that the availability of suitable patients was also a limiting factor. Often, we would be turned away from patients with physical signs because they were deemed to be too unwell for an examination. However, the benefits to medical students of examining unwell patients with physical signs cannot be underestimated. Identifying the unwell patient, and the associated physical signs relevant to the underlying diagnosis, should be a priority; although simulation is increasingly being used in teaching, it cannot fully replicate the learning experience gained in bedside teaching. As long as the patient is not under duress, bedside teaching with unwell patients should be encouraged.

  10. Improving client and nurse satisfaction through the utilization of bedside report.

    PubMed

    Vines, Mary M; Dupler, Alice E; Van Son, Catherine R; Guido, Ginny W

    2014-01-01

    Bedside reporting improves client safety and trust and facilitates nursing teamwork and accountability; however, many nurses do not consider it best practice when caring for their clients. A literature review was conducted to determine whether bedside report is an essential shift handover process that promotes both client and nursing satisfaction. Implications for nurses in professional development are discussed, and strategies for developing and implementing bedside report using Lewin's theory of planned change are provided.

  11. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs. To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR) responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls. Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals - thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls. Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity). Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  12. Using the STOQS Web Application for Access to in situ Oceanographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Using the STOQS Web Application for Access to in situ Oceanographic Data Mike McCann 7 August 2012 With increasing measurement and sampling capabilities of autonomous oceanographic platforms (e.g. Gliders, Autonomous Underwater Vehicles, Wavegliders), the need to efficiently access and visualize the data they collect is growing. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute has designed and built the Spatial Temporal Oceanographic Query System (STOQS) specifically to address this issue. The need for STOQS arises from inefficiencies discovered from using CF-NetCDF point observation conventions for these data. The problem is that access efficiency decreases with decreasing dimension of CF-NetCDF data. For example, the Trajectory Common Data Model feature type has only one coordinate dimension, usually Time - positions of the trajectory (Depth, Latitude, Longitude) are stored as non-indexed record variables within the NetCDF file. If client software needs to access data between two depth values or from a bounded geographic area, then the whole data set must be read and the selection made within the client software. This is very inefficient. What is needed is a way to easily select data of interest from an archive given any number of spatial, temporal, or other constraints. Geospatial relational database technology provides this capability. The full STOQS application consists of a Postgres/PostGIS database, Mapserver, and Python-Django running on a server and Web 2.0 technology (jQuery, OpenLayers, Twitter Bootstrap) running in a modern web browser. The web application provides faceted search capabilities allowing a user to quickly drill into the data of interest. Data selection can be constrained by spatial, temporal, and depth selections as well as by parameter value and platform name. The web application layer also provides a REST (Representational State Transfer) Application Programming Interface allowing tools such as the Matlab stoqstoolbox to retrieve data

  13. Framework for Supporting Web-Based Collaborative Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei

    The article proposes an intelligent framework for supporting Web-based applications. The framework focuses on innovative use of existing resources and technologies in the form of services and takes the leverage of theoretical foundation of services science and the research from services computing. The main focus of the framework is to deliver benefits to users with various roles such as service requesters, service providers, and business owners to maximize their productivity when engaging with each other via the Web. The article opens up with research motivations and questions, analyses the existing state of research in the field, and describes the approach in implementing the proposed framework. Finally, an e-health application is discussed to evaluate the effectiveness of the framework where participants such as general practitioners (GPs), patients, and health-care workers collaborate via the Web.

  14. QuickEval: a web application for psychometric scaling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ngo, Khai; Storvik, Jehans J.; Dokkeberg, Christopher A.; Farup, Ivar; Pedersen, Marius

    2015-01-01

    QuickEval is a web application for carrying out psychometric scaling experiments. It offers the possibility of running controlled experiments in a laboratory, or large scale experiment over the web for people all over the world. It is a unique one of a kind web application, and it is a software needed in the image quality field. It is also, to the best of knowledge, the first software that supports the three most common scaling methods; paired comparison, rank order, and category judgement. It is also the first software to support rank order. Hopefully, a side effect of this newly created software is that it will lower the threshold to perform psychometric experiments, improve the quality of the experiments being carried out, make it easier to reproduce experiments, and increase research on image quality both in academia and industry. The web application is available at www.colourlab.no/quickeval.

  15. Network-Based Learning and Assessment Applications on the Semantic Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, David

    2005-01-01

    Today's Web applications are already "aware" of the network of computers and data on the Internet, in the sense that they perceive, remember, and represent knowledge external to themselves. However, Web applications are generally not able to respond to the meaning and context of the information in their memories. As a result, most applications are…

  16. The Effect of Bedside Presentations in the Emergency Department on Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Schranz, Craig I.; Sobehart, Robert J.; Fallgatter, Kiva; Riffenburgh, Robert H.; Matteucci, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to increasing time constraints, the use of bedside presentations in resident education has declined. We examined whether patient satisfaction in the emergency department is affected when first-year residents present at the bedside with attendings. Methods We performed an observational, prospective, nonblinded study in the emergency department of a military teaching hospital. We alternately assigned first-year residents to present a convenience sample of 248 patients to the attending physician at the patient's bedside or away from the patient. We measured patient satisfaction by using the Patient Satisfaction Questionaire-18 (PSQ-18), a validated survey instrument that utilizes a Likert scale, and additional nonvalidated survey questions involving Likert and visual analog scales. Results While the median PSQ-18 score of 74 (95% confidence interval [CI], 72–76) was higher for patient satisfaction when residents made bedside presentations than that for standard presentations, 72 (95% CI, 70–74), the difference did not reach statistical significance (P  =  .33). Conclusion There was no significant difference in overall patient satisfaction between residents' bedside presentations and presentations to attendings away from the patient. Although not significant, the differences noted in PSQ-18 subscales of communication, general satisfaction, and interpersonal manner warrant further investigation. Patients did not appear to be uncomfortable with having their care discussed and with having subsequent resident education at the bedside. Future research on patient satisfaction after implementation of standardized bedside teaching techniques 5 help further elucidate this relationship. PMID:23205195

  17. System Testing of Desktop and Web Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, James M.

    2011-01-01

    We want our students to experience system testing of both desktop and web applications, but the cost of professional system-testing tools is far too high. We evaluate several free tools and find that AutoIt makes an ideal educational system-testing tool. We show several examples of desktop and web testing with AutoIt, starting with simple…

  18. Imaging Neuroinflammation – from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a central role in a variety of neurological diseases, including stroke, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and malignant CNS neoplasms, among many other. Different cell types and molecular mediators participate in a cascade of events in the brain that is ultimately aimed at control, regeneration and repair, but leads to damage of brain tissue under pathological conditions. Non-invasive molecular imaging of key players in the inflammation cascade holds promise for identification and quantification of the disease process before it is too late for effective therapeutic intervention. In this review, we focus on molecular imaging techniques that target inflammatory cells and molecules that are of interest in neuroinflammation, especially those with high translational potential. Over the past decade, a plethora of molecular imaging agents have been developed and tested in animal models of (neuro)inflammation, and a few have been translated from bench to bedside. The most promising imaging techniques to visualize neuroinflammation include MRI, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and optical imaging methods. These techniques enable us to image adhesion molecules to visualize endothelial cell activation, assess leukocyte functions such as oxidative stress, granule release, and phagocytosis, and label a variety of inflammatory cells for cell tracking experiments. In addition, several cell types and their activation can be specifically targeted in vivo, and consequences of neuroinflammation such as neuronal death and demyelination can be quantified. As we continue to make progress in utilizing molecular imaging technology to study and understand neuroinflammation, increasing efforts and investment should be made to bring more of these novel imaging agents from the “bench to bedside.” PMID:25525560

  19. ReSTful OSGi Web Applications Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Khawaja; Norris, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation accompanies a tutorial on the ReSTful (Representational State Transfer) web application. Using Open Services Gateway Initiative (OSGi), ReST uses HTTP protocol to enable developers to offer services to a diverse variety of clients: from shell scripts to sophisticated Java application suites. It also uses Eclipse for the rapid development, the Eclipse debugger, the test application, and the ease of export to production servers.

  20. A quantitative assessment of patient and nurse outcomes of bedside nursing report implementation.

    PubMed

    Sand-Jecklin, Kari; Sherman, Jay

    2014-10-01

    To quantify quantitative outcomes of a practice change to a blended form of bedside nursing report. The literature identifies several benefits of bedside nursing shift report. However, published studies have not adequately quantified outcomes related to this process change, having either small or unreported sample sizes or not testing for statistical significance. Quasi-experimental pre- and postimplementation design. Seven medical-surgical units in a large university hospital implemented a blend of recorded and bedside nursing report. Outcomes monitored included patient and nursing satisfaction, patient falls, nursing overtime and medication errors. We found statistically significant improvements postimplementation in four patient survey items specifically impacted by the change to bedside report. Nursing perceptions of report were significantly improved in the areas of patient safety and involvement in care and nurse accountability postimplementation. However, there was a decline in nurse perception that report took a reasonable amount of time after bedside report implementation; contrary to these perceptions, there was no significant increase in nurse overtime. Patient falls at shift change decreased substantially after the implementation of bedside report. An intervening variable during the study period invalidated the comparison of medication errors pre- and postintervention. There was some indication from both patients and nurses that bedside report was not always consistently implemented. Several positive outcomes were documented in relation to the implementation of a blended bedside shift report, with few drawbacks. Nurse attitudes about report at the final data collection were more positive than at the initial postimplementation data collection. If properly implemented, nursing bedside report can result in improved patient and nursing satisfaction and patient safety outcomes. However, managers should involve staff nurses in the implementation process and

  1. [Yes, we should keep ABO agglutination test within bedside transfusion checks].

    PubMed

    Daurat, G

    2008-11-01

    ABO incompatible transfusions are still a frequent cause of serious adverse transfusion reactions. Bedside check is intended to detect patient errors and prevent ABO mismatch. France is one of the few countries that includes ABO agglutination test for red blood cells in bedside checks. Evaluation of this ABO agglutination test, performed with a special card, shows that, on the field, despite frequent users' mishandling, it can detect up to 93% of ABO incompatibilities. This is not enough to rely on this sole test for bedside checks. But, linking it with an another test, currently, checks that the right blood is given to the right patient, rises the sensitivity of the whole bedside procedure up to an estimated 99.65%, for detection of ABO incompatibilities. This linkage has been introduced in the French regulation in 2003. Since then, the incidence of ABO incompatible transfusions has decreased dramatically and faster than in any other country, so France has now, probably, the lowest rate of ABO incompatible transfusions. The investigation of the few ABO accidents that still occur, shows that professionals have always bypassed this linkage. On the other hand, introducing bedside recipient and blood products barcode or radio-chip checks in all the 1500 French hospitals, though technically possible, would provide very little enhancement and lead to major difficulties and expenses. Linkage of ABO agglutination test to patient and blood checks within the bedside procedure has proved to be efficient and should be kept.

  2. Point-of-care cardiac ultrasound techniques in the physical examination: better at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Bruce J

    2017-07-01

    The development of hand-carried, battery-powered ultrasound devices has created a new practice in ultrasound diagnostic imaging, called 'point-of-care' ultrasound (POCUS). Capitalising on device portability, POCUS is marked by brief and limited ultrasound imaging performed by the physician at the bedside to increase diagnostic accuracy and expediency. The natural evolution of POCUS techniques in general medicine, particularly with pocket-sized devices, may be in the development of a basic ultrasound examination similar to the use of the binaural stethoscope. This paper will specifically review how POCUS improves the limited sensitivity of the current practice of traditional cardiac physical examination by both cardiologists and non-cardiologists. Signs of left ventricular systolic dysfunction, left atrial enlargement, lung congestion and elevated central venous pressures are often missed by physical techniques but can be easily detected by POCUS and have prognostic and treatment implications. Creating a general set of repetitive imaging skills for these entities for application on all patients during routine examination will standardise and reduce heterogeneity in cardiac bedside ultrasound applications, simplify teaching curricula, enhance learning and recollection, and unify competency thresholds and practice. The addition of POCUS to standard physical examination techniques in cardiovascular medicine will result in an ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination that reaffirms the value of bedside diagnosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Bedside Ultrasound in the Emergency Department to Detect Hydronephrosis for the Evaluation of Suspected Ureteric Colic.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, R; Shakya, R M; Khan A, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal colic is a common emergency department presentation. Hydronephrosis is indirect sign of urinary obstruction which may be due to obstructing ureteric calculus and can be detected easily by bedside ultrasound with minimal training. Objective To compare the accuracy of detection of hydronephrosis performed by the emergency physician with that of radiologist's in suspected renal colic cases. Method This was a prospective observational study performed over a period of 6 months. Patients >8 years with provisional diagnosis of renal colic with both the bedside ultrasound and the formal ultrasound performed were included. Presence of hydronephrosis in both ultrasounds and size and location of ureteric stone if present in formal ultrasound was recorded. The accuracy of the emergency physician detection of hydronephrosis was determined using the scan reported by the radiologists as the "gold standard" as computed tomography was unavailable. Statistical analysis was executed using SPSS 17.0. Result Among the 111 included patients, 56.7% had ureteric stone detected in formal ultrasound. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of bedside ultrasound performed by emergency physician for detection of hydronephrosis with that of formal ultrasound performed by radiologist was 90.8%., 78.3%, 85.5% and 85.7% respectively. Bedside ultrasound and formal ultrasound both detected hydronephrosis more often in patients with larger stones and the difference was statistically significant (p=.000). Conclusion Bedside ultrasound can be potentially used as an important tool in detecting clinically significant hydronephrosis in emergency to evaluate suspected ureteric colic. Focused training in ultrasound could greatly improve the emergency management of these patients.

  4. Using the World Wide Web: Applications for Marketing Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, William A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article introduces potential uses of the World Wide Web for marketing education, presents tips for navigating the web, and provides a sample of useful applications. Also provides suggestions for monitoring student use of the web. (JOW)

  5. Toward Exposing Timing-Based Probing Attacks in Web Applications.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Yue; Shi, Futian; Jia, Yaoqi; Liang, Zhenkai

    2017-02-25

    Web applications have become the foundation of many types of systems, ranging from cloud services to Internet of Things (IoT) systems. Due to the large amount of sensitive data processed by web applications, user privacy emerges as a major concern in web security. Existing protection mechanisms in modern browsers, e.g., the same origin policy, prevent the users' browsing information on one website from being directly accessed by another website. However, web applications executed in the same browser share the same runtime environment. Such shared states provide side channels for malicious websites to indirectly figure out the information of other origins. Timing is a classic side channel and the root cause of many recent attacks, which rely on the variations in the time taken by the systems to process different inputs. In this paper, we propose an approach to expose the timing-based probing attacks in web applications. It monitors the browser behaviors and identifies anomalous timing behaviors to detect browser probing attacks. We have prototyped our system in the Google Chrome browser and evaluated the effectiveness of our approach by using known probing techniques. We have applied our approach on a large number of top Alexa sites and reported the suspicious behavior patterns with corresponding analysis results. Our theoretical analysis illustrates that the effectiveness of the timing-based probing attacks is dramatically limited by our approach.

  6. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  7. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  8. Do Bedside Visual Tools Improve Patient and Caregiver Satisfaction? A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Anupama A; Tur, Komalpreet; Mann, Jason; Townsend, Whitney; Flanders, Scott A; Chopra, Vineet

    2017-11-01

    Although common, the impact of low-cost bedside visual tools, such as whiteboards, on patient care is unclear. To systematically review the literature and assess the influence of bedside visual tools on patient satisfaction. Medline, Embase, SCOPUS, Web of Science, CINAHL, and CENTRAL. Studies of adult or pediatric hospitalized patients reporting physician identification, understanding of provider roles, patient-provider communication, and satisfaction with care from the use of visual tools were included. Outcomes were categorized as positive, negative, or neutral based on survey responses for identification, communication, and satisfaction. Two reviewers screened studies, extracted data, and assessed the risk of study bias. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Visual tools included whiteboards (n = 4), physician pictures (n = 7), whiteboard and picture (n = 1), electronic medical record-based patient portals (n = 3), and formatted notepads (n = 1). Tools improved patients' identification of providers (13/13 studies). The impact on understanding the providers' roles was largely positive (8/10 studies). Visual tools improved patient-provider communication (4/5 studies) and satisfaction (6/8 studies). In adults, satisfaction varied between positive with the use of whiteboards (2/5 studies) and neutral with pictures (1/5 studies). Satisfaction related to pictures in pediatric patients was either positive (1/3 studies) or neutral (1/3 studies). Differences in tool format (individual pictures vs handouts with pictures of all providers) and study design (randomized vs cohort) may explain variable outcomes. The use of bedside visual tools appears to improve patient recognition of providers and patient-provider communication. Future studies that include better design and outcome assessment are necessary before widespread use can be recommended. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  9. Teaching at the Bedside. Maximal Impact in Minimal Time.

    PubMed

    Carlos, William G; Kritek, Patricia A; Clay, Alison S; Luks, Andrew M; Thomson, Carey C

    2016-04-01

    Academic physicians encounter many demands on their time including patient care, quality and performance requirements, research, and education. In an era when patient volume is prioritized and competition for research funding is intense, there is a risk that medical education will become marginalized. Bedside teaching, a responsibility of academic physicians regardless of professional track, is challenged in particular out of concern that it generates inefficiency, and distractions from direct patient care, and can distort physician-patient relationships. At the same time, the bedside is a powerful location for teaching as learners more easily engage with educational content when they can directly see its practical relevance for patient care. Also, bedside teaching enables patients and family members to engage directly in the educational process. Successful bedside teaching can be aided by consideration of four factors: climate, attention, reasoning, and evaluation. Creating a safe environment for learning and patient care is essential. We recommend that educators set expectations about use of medical jargon and engagement of the patient and family before they enter the patient room with trainees. Keep learners focused by asking relevant questions of all members of the team and by maintaining a collective leadership style. Assess and model clinical reasoning through a hypothesis-driven approach that explores the rationale for clinical decisions. Focused, specific, real-time feedback is essential for the learner to modify behaviors for future patient encounters. Together, these strategies may alleviate challenges associated with bedside teaching and ensure it remains a part of physician practice in academic medicine.

  10. Development and evaluation of a dynamic web-based application.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yichuan; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2007-10-11

    Traditional consumer health informatics (CHI) applications that were developed for lay public on the Web were commonly written in a Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). As genetics knowledge rapidly advances and requires updating information in a timely fashion, a different content structure is therefore needed to facilitate information delivery. This poster will present the process of developing a dynamic database-driven Web CHI application.

  11. COEUS: “semantic web in a box” for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As the “omics” revolution unfolds, the growth in data quantity and diversity is bringing about the need for pioneering bioinformatics software, capable of significantly improving the research workflow. To cope with these computer science demands, biomedical software engineers are adopting emerging semantic web technologies that better suit the life sciences domain. The latter’s complex relationships are easily mapped into semantic web graphs, enabling a superior understanding of collected knowledge. Despite increased awareness of semantic web technologies in bioinformatics, their use is still limited. Results COEUS is a new semantic web framework, aiming at a streamlined application development cycle and following a “semantic web in a box” approach. The framework provides a single package including advanced data integration and triplification tools, base ontologies, a web-oriented engine and a flexible exploration API. Resources can be integrated from heterogeneous sources, including CSV and XML files or SQL and SPARQL query results, and mapped directly to one or more ontologies. Advanced interoperability features include REST services, a SPARQL endpoint and LinkedData publication. These enable the creation of multiple applications for web, desktop or mobile environments, and empower a new knowledge federation layer. Conclusions The platform, targeted at biomedical application developers, provides a complete skeleton ready for rapid application deployment, enhancing the creation of new semantic information systems. COEUS is available as open source at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/coeus/. PMID:23244467

  12. Web-Based Intelligent E-Learning Systems: Technologies and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Zongmin

    2006-01-01

    Collecting and presenting the latest research and development results from the leading researchers in the field of e-learning systems, Web-Based Intelligent E-Learning Systems: Technologies and Applications provides a single record of current research and practical applications in Web-based intelligent e-learning systems. This book includes major…

  13. Development of spatial density maps based on geoprocessing web services: application to tuberculosis incidence in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Dominkovics, Pau; Granell, Carlos; Pérez-Navarro, Antoni; Casals, Martí; Orcau, Angels; Caylà, Joan A

    2011-11-29

    Health professionals and authorities strive to cope with heterogeneous data, services, and statistical models to support decision making on public health. Sophisticated analysis and distributed processing capabilities over geocoded epidemiological data are seen as driving factors to speed up control and decision making in these health risk situations. In this context, recent Web technologies and standards-based web services deployed on geospatial information infrastructures have rapidly become an efficient way to access, share, process, and visualize geocoded health-related information. Data used on this study is based on Tuberculosis (TB) cases registered in Barcelona city during 2009. Residential addresses are geocoded and loaded into a spatial database that acts as a backend database. The web-based application architecture and geoprocessing web services are designed according to the Representational State Transfer (REST) principles. These web processing services produce spatial density maps against the backend database. The results are focused on the use of the proposed web-based application to the analysis of TB cases in Barcelona. The application produces spatial density maps to ease the monitoring and decision making process by health professionals. We also include a discussion of how spatial density maps may be useful for health practitioners in such contexts. In this paper, we developed web-based client application and a set of geoprocessing web services to support specific health-spatial requirements. Spatial density maps of TB incidence were generated to help health professionals in analysis and decision-making tasks. The combined use of geographic information tools, map viewers, and geoprocessing services leads to interesting possibilities in handling health data in a spatial manner. In particular, the use of spatial density maps has been effective to identify the most affected areas and its spatial impact. This study is an attempt to demonstrate how web

  14. Development of spatial density maps based on geoprocessing web services: application to tuberculosis incidence in Barcelona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Health professionals and authorities strive to cope with heterogeneous data, services, and statistical models to support decision making on public health. Sophisticated analysis and distributed processing capabilities over geocoded epidemiological data are seen as driving factors to speed up control and decision making in these health risk situations. In this context, recent Web technologies and standards-based web services deployed on geospatial information infrastructures have rapidly become an efficient way to access, share, process, and visualize geocoded health-related information. Methods Data used on this study is based on Tuberculosis (TB) cases registered in Barcelona city during 2009. Residential addresses are geocoded and loaded into a spatial database that acts as a backend database. The web-based application architecture and geoprocessing web services are designed according to the Representational State Transfer (REST) principles. These web processing services produce spatial density maps against the backend database. Results The results are focused on the use of the proposed web-based application to the analysis of TB cases in Barcelona. The application produces spatial density maps to ease the monitoring and decision making process by health professionals. We also include a discussion of how spatial density maps may be useful for health practitioners in such contexts. Conclusions In this paper, we developed web-based client application and a set of geoprocessing web services to support specific health-spatial requirements. Spatial density maps of TB incidence were generated to help health professionals in analysis and decision-making tasks. The combined use of geographic information tools, map viewers, and geoprocessing services leads to interesting possibilities in handling health data in a spatial manner. In particular, the use of spatial density maps has been effective to identify the most affected areas and its spatial impact. This

  15. Web Application Software for Ground Operations Planning Database (GOPDb) Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanham, Clifton; Kallner, Shawn; Gernand, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    A Web application facilitates collaborative development of the ground operations planning document. This will reduce costs and development time for new programs by incorporating the data governance, access control, and revision tracking of the ground operations planning data. Ground Operations Planning requires the creation and maintenance of detailed timelines and documentation. The GOPDb Web application was created using state-of-the-art Web 2.0 technologies, and was deployed as SaaS (Software as a Service), with an emphasis on data governance and security needs. Application access is managed using two-factor authentication, with data write permissions tied to user roles and responsibilities. Multiple instances of the application can be deployed on a Web server to meet the robust needs for multiple, future programs with minimal additional cost. This innovation features high availability and scalability, with no additional software that needs to be bought or installed. For data governance and security (data quality, management, business process management, and risk management for data handling), the software uses NAMS. No local copy/cloning of data is permitted. Data change log/tracking is addressed, as well as collaboration, work flow, and process standardization. The software provides on-line documentation and detailed Web-based help. There are multiple ways that this software can be deployed on a Web server to meet ground operations planning needs for future programs. The software could be used to support commercial crew ground operations planning, as well as commercial payload/satellite ground operations planning. The application source code and database schema are owned by NASA.

  16. Strategies from bedside nurse perspectives in conducting evidence-based practice projects to improve care.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Susan T; Zarnowsky, Colleen D; Green, Renee C; Lim, Mei-Lin Chen; Holtzer, Brenda M; Ely, Elizabeth A

    2013-06-01

    This article presents the bedside nurses' perspectives on their experience with conducting an evidence based practice project. This is especially important in the climate of hospitals working to achieve Magnet Recognition. The facilitators and barriers to project design and completion are discussed in detail. Strategies to overcome barriers are presented. Facilitators for bedside nurses include motivation and professional development. Most common barriers were lack of time and limited knowledge about the process. Interventions aimed at research utilization can be successful when mindful of commonly understood barriers to project completion with steps taken to resolve those barriers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics to the Airways-From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yingshan; Lam, Jenny K W; Leung, Susan W S; Liang, Wanling

    2016-09-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a potent and specific post-transcriptional gene silencing process. Since its discovery, tremendous efforts have been made to translate RNAi technology into therapeutic applications for the treatment of different human diseases including respiratory diseases, by manipulating the expression of disease-associated gene(s). Similar to other nucleic acid-based therapeutics, the major hurdle of RNAi therapy is delivery. Pulmonary delivery is a promising approach of delivering RNAi therapeutics directly to the airways for treating local conditions and minimizing systemic side effects. It is a non-invasive route of administration that is generally well accepted by patients. However, pulmonary drug delivery is a challenge as the lungs pose a series of anatomical, physiological and immunological barriers to drug delivery. Understanding these barriers is essential for the development an effective RNA delivery system. In this review, the different barriers to pulmonary drug delivery are introduced. The potential of RNAi molecules as new class of therapeutics, and the latest preclinical and clinical studies of using RNAi therapeutics in different respiratory conditions are discussed in details. We hope this review can provide some useful insights for moving inhaled RNAi therapeutics from bench to bedside.

  18. A Semantic Sensor Web for Environmental Decision Support Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alasdair J. G.; Sadler, Jason; Kit, Oles; Kyzirakos, Kostis; Karpathiotakis, Manos; Calbimonte, Jean-Paul; Page, Kevin; García-Castro, Raúl; Frazer, Alex; Galpin, Ixent; Fernandes, Alvaro A. A.; Paton, Norman W.; Corcho, Oscar; Koubarakis, Manolis; De Roure, David; Martinez, Kirk; Gómez-Pérez, Asunción

    2011-01-01

    Sensing devices are increasingly being deployed to monitor the physical world around us. One class of application for which sensor data is pertinent is environmental decision support systems, e.g., flood emergency response. For these applications, the sensor readings need to be put in context by integrating them with other sources of data about the surrounding environment. Traditional systems for predicting and detecting floods rely on methods that need significant human resources. In this paper we describe a semantic sensor web architecture for integrating multiple heterogeneous datasets, including live and historic sensor data, databases, and map layers. The architecture provides mechanisms for discovering datasets, defining integrated views over them, continuously receiving data in real-time, and visualising on screen and interacting with the data. Our approach makes extensive use of web service standards for querying and accessing data, and semantic technologies to discover and integrate datasets. We demonstrate the use of our semantic sensor web architecture in the context of a flood response planning web application that uses data from sensor networks monitoring the sea-state around the coast of England. PMID:22164110

  19. AmWeb: a novel interactive web tool for antimicrobial resistance surveillance, applicable to both community and hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Ironmonger, Dean; Edeghere, Obaghe; Gossain, Savita; Bains, Amardeep; Hawkey, Peter M

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is recognized as one of the most significant threats to human health. Local and regional AMR surveillance enables the monitoring of temporal changes in susceptibility to antibiotics and can provide prescribing guidance to healthcare providers to improve patient management and help slow the spread of antibiotic resistance in the community. There is currently a paucity of routine community-level AMR surveillance information. The HPA in England sponsored the development of an AMR surveillance system (AmSurv) to collate local laboratory reports. In the West Midlands region of England, routine reporting of AMR data has been established via the AmSurv system from all diagnostic microbiology laboratories. The HPA Regional Epidemiology Unit developed a web-enabled database application (AmWeb) to provide microbiologists, pharmacists and other stakeholders with timely access to AMR data using user-configurable reporting tools. AmWeb was launched in the West Midlands in January 2012 and is used by microbiologists and pharmacists to monitor resistance profiles, perform local benchmarking and compile data for infection control reports. AmWeb is now being rolled out to all English regions. It is expected that AmWeb will become a valuable tool for monitoring the threat from newly emerging or currently circulating resistant organisms and helping antibiotic prescribers to select the best treatment options for their patients.

  20. Explaining why nurses remain in or leave bedside nursing: a critical ethnography.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Paula; McPherson, Gladys

    2014-09-01

    To describe the application of critical ethnography to explain nurses' decisions to remain in or leave bedside nursing, and to describe researcher positioning and reflexivity. Enquiry into hospital nurses' decisions to remain in or leave bedside nursing positions has been conducted from a variety of theoretical perspectives by researchers adopting a range of methodological approaches. This research helps to explain how work environments can affect variables such as job satisfaction and turnover, but provides less insight into how personal and professional factors shape decisions to remain in or leave bedside nursing. A critical theoretical perspective was taken to examine the employment decisions made by nurses in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Data was collected from nurses (n=31) through semi-structured interviews and unobtrusive observation. The authors describe critical ethnography as a powerful research framework for enquiry that allowed them to challenge assumptions about why nurses remain in or leave their jobs, and to explore how issues of fairness and equity contribute to these decisions. Critical ethnography offers a powerful methodology for investigations into complex interactions, such as those between nurses in a PICU. In adopting this methodology, researchers should be sensitised to manifestations of power, attend to their stance and location, and reflexion. The greatest challenges from this research included how to make sense of the insider position, how to acknowledge assumptions and allow these to be challenged, and how to ensure that power relationships in the environment and in the research were attended to.

  1. Displaying R spatial statistics on Google dynamic maps with web applications created by Rwui.

    PubMed

    Newton, Richard; Deonarine, Andrew; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2012-09-24

    The R project includes a large variety of packages designed for spatial statistics. Google dynamic maps provide web based access to global maps and satellite imagery. We describe a method for displaying directly the spatial output from an R script on to a Google dynamic map. This is achieved by creating a Java based web application which runs the R script and then displays the results on the dynamic map. In order to make this method easy to implement by those unfamiliar with programming Java based web applications, we have added the method to the options available in the R Web User Interface (Rwui) application. Rwui is an established web application for creating web applications for running R scripts. A feature of Rwui is that all the code for the web application being created is generated automatically so that someone with no knowledge of web programming can make a fully functional web application for running an R script in a matter of minutes. Rwui can now be used to create web applications that will display the results from an R script on a Google dynamic map. Results may be displayed as discrete markers and/or as continuous overlays. In addition, users of the web application may select regions of interest on the dynamic map with mouse clicks and the coordinates of the region of interest will automatically be made available for use by the R script. This method of displaying R output on dynamic maps is designed to be of use in a number of areas. Firstly it allows statisticians, working in R and developing methods in spatial statistics, to easily visualise the results of applying their methods to real world data. Secondly, it allows researchers who are using R to study health geographics data, to display their results directly onto dynamic maps. Thirdly, by creating a web application for running an R script, a statistician can enable users entirely unfamiliar with R to run R coded statistical analyses of health geographics data. Fourthly, we envisage an

  2. Clinical review: Bedside lung ultrasound in critical care practice

    PubMed Central

    Bouhemad, Bélaïd; Zhang, Mao; Lu, Qin; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Lung ultrasound can be routinely performed at the bedside by intensive care unit physicians and may provide accurate information on lung status with diagnostic and therapeutic relevance. This article reviews the performance of bedside lung ultrasound for diagnosing pleural effusion, pneumothorax, alveolar-interstitial syndrome, lung consolidation, pulmonary abscess and lung recruitment/derecruitment in critically ill patients with acute lung injury. PMID:17316468

  3. SSE Announcement - New GIS Web Mapping Applications and Services

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-30

    Dear SSE Users, We are excited to announce SSE-GIS v1.0.3 is now available! If you haven’t already noticed the link to the new SSE-GIS web application on the SSE homepage entitled “GIS Web Mapping ...

  4. web-based interactive data processing: application to stable isotope metrology.

    PubMed

    Verkouteren, R M; Lee, J N

    2001-08-01

    To address a fundamental need in stable isotope metrology, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has established a web-based interactive data-processing system accessible through a common gateway interface (CGI) program on the internet site http://www. nist.gov/widps-co2. This is the first application of a web-based tool that improves the measurement traceability afforded by a series of NIST standard materials. Specifically, this tool promotes the proper usage of isotope reference materials (RMs) and improves the quality of reported data from extensive measurement networks. Through the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), we have defined standard procedures for stable isotope measurement and data-processing, and have determined and applied consistent reference values for selected NIST and IAEA isotope RMs. Measurement data of samples and RMs are entered into specified fields on the web-based form. These data are submitted through the CGI program on a NIST Web server, where appropriate calculations are performed and results returned to the client. Several international laboratories have independently verified the accuracy of the procedures and algorithm for measurements of naturally occurring carbon-13 and oxygen-18 abundances and slightly enriched compositions up to approximately 150% relative to natural abundances. To conserve the use of the NIST RMs, users may determine value assignments for a secondary standard to be used in routine analysis. Users may also wish to validate proprietary algorithms embedded in their laboratory instrumentation, or specify the values of fundamental variables that are usually fixed in reduction algorithms to see the effect on the calculations. The results returned from the web-based tool are limited in quality only by the measurements themselves, and further value may be realized through the normalization function. When combined with stringent measurement protocols, two- to threefold improvements have been

  5. Economic analysis of bedside ultrasonography (US) implementation in an Internal Medicine department.

    PubMed

    Testa, Americo; Francesconi, Andrea; Giannuzzi, Rosangela; Berardi, Silvia; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The economic crisis, the growing healthcare demand, and Defensive Medicine wastefulness, strongly recommend the restructuring of the entire medical network. New health technology, such as bedside ultrasonography, might successfully integrate the clinical approach optimizing the use of limited resources, especially in a person-oriented vision of medicine. Bedside ultrasonography is a safe and reliable technique, with worldwide expanding employment in various clinical settings, being considered as "the stethoscope of the 21st century". However, at present, bedside ultrasonography lacks economic analysis. We performed a Cost-Benefit Analysis "ex ante", with a break-even point computing, of bedside ultrasonography implementation in an Internal Medicine department in the mid-term. Number and kind estimation of bedside ultrasonographic studies were obtained by a retrospective study, whose data results were applied to the next 3-year period (foresight study). All 1980 foreseen bedside examinations, with prevailing multiorgan ultrasonographic studies, were considered to calculate direct and indirect costs, while specific and generic revenues were considered only after the first semester. Physician professional training, equipment purchase and working time represented the main fixed and variable cost items. DRG increase/appropriateness, hospitalization stay shortening and reduction of traditional ultrasonography examination requests mainly impacted on calculated revenues. The break-even point, i.e. the volume of activity at which revenues exactly equal total incurred costs, was calculated to be 734 US examinations, corresponding to € 81,998 and the time considered necessary to reach it resulting 406 days. Our economic analysis clearly shows that bedside ultrasonography implementation in clinical daily management of an Internal Medicine department can produce consistent savings, or economic profit according to managerial choices (i.e., considering public or private targets

  6. Access Control of Web- and Java-Based Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tso, Kam S.; Pajevski, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cybersecurity has become a great concern as threats of service interruption, unauthorized access, stealing and altering of information, and spreading of viruses have become more prevalent and serious. Application layer access control of applications is a critical component in the overall security solution that also includes encryption, firewalls, virtual private networks, antivirus, and intrusion detection. An access control solution, based on an open-source access manager augmented with custom software components, was developed to provide protection to both Web-based and Javabased client and server applications. The DISA Security Service (DISA-SS) provides common access control capabilities for AMMOS software applications through a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) and network- accessible security services for authentication, single sign-on, authorization checking, and authorization policy management. The OpenAM access management technology designed for Web applications can be extended to meet the needs of Java thick clients and stand alone servers that are commonly used in the JPL AMMOS environment. The DISA-SS reusable components have greatly reduced the effort for each AMMOS subsystem to develop its own access control strategy. The novelty of this work is that it leverages an open-source access management product that was designed for Webbased applications to provide access control for Java thick clients and Java standalone servers. Thick clients and standalone servers are still commonly used in businesses and government, especially for applications that require rich graphical user interfaces and high-performance visualization that cannot be met by thin clients running on Web browsers

  7. High-use supplies at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Stefancyk, Amanda L

    2009-02-01

    This is the sixth in a series of articles from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston describing one general medical unit's experiences with Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB). An initiative begun by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, TCAB was developed as a way to improve care on medical-surgical units, patients' and family members' experience of care, and teamwork among care team members and to increase nurse satisfaction and retention. The TCAB philosophy engages all care leaders, but empowers bedside nurses to generate ideas and solutions for change. Mass General is one of 68 hospitals participating in a two-year TCAB initiative led by the American Organization of Nurse Executives and funded with a grant from the RWJF. For more information on TCAB, go to www.rwjf.org/pr/product.jsp?id=31512.

  8. The value of bedside shift reporting enhancing nurse surveillance, accountability, and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Acott, Ashley; Simpson, Elisa; Campbell, Heather; Irwin, Terri; Lo, Joyce; Beswick, Susan; Cardoso, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    A study was undertaken to explore nurses' experiences and perceptions associated with implementation of bedside nurse-to-nurse shift handoff reporting. Interviews were conducted with nurses and analyzed using directed content analysis. Two themes emerged that illustrated the value of bedside shift reporting. These themes included clarifying information and intercepting errors and visualizing patients and prioritizing care. Nurse leaders can leverage study findings in their efforts to embed nurse-to-nurse bedside shift reporting in their respective organizations.

  9. Toward Exposing Timing-Based Probing Attacks in Web Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Yue; Shi, Futian; Jia, Yaoqi; Liang, Zhenkai

    2017-01-01

    Web applications have become the foundation of many types of systems, ranging from cloud services to Internet of Things (IoT) systems. Due to the large amount of sensitive data processed by web applications, user privacy emerges as a major concern in web security. Existing protection mechanisms in modern browsers, e.g., the same origin policy, prevent the users’ browsing information on one website from being directly accessed by another website. However, web applications executed in the same browser share the same runtime environment. Such shared states provide side channels for malicious websites to indirectly figure out the information of other origins. Timing is a classic side channel and the root cause of many recent attacks, which rely on the variations in the time taken by the systems to process different inputs. In this paper, we propose an approach to expose the timing-based probing attacks in web applications. It monitors the browser behaviors and identifies anomalous timing behaviors to detect browser probing attacks. We have prototyped our system in the Google Chrome browser and evaluated the effectiveness of our approach by using known probing techniques. We have applied our approach on a large number of top Alexa sites and reported the suspicious behavior patterns with corresponding analysis results. Our theoretical analysis illustrates that the effectiveness of the timing-based probing attacks is dramatically limited by our approach. PMID:28245610

  10. Displaying R spatial statistics on Google dynamic maps with web applications created by Rwui

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The R project includes a large variety of packages designed for spatial statistics. Google dynamic maps provide web based access to global maps and satellite imagery. We describe a method for displaying directly the spatial output from an R script on to a Google dynamic map. Methods This is achieved by creating a Java based web application which runs the R script and then displays the results on the dynamic map. In order to make this method easy to implement by those unfamiliar with programming Java based web applications, we have added the method to the options available in the R Web User Interface (Rwui) application. Rwui is an established web application for creating web applications for running R scripts. A feature of Rwui is that all the code for the web application being created is generated automatically so that someone with no knowledge of web programming can make a fully functional web application for running an R script in a matter of minutes. Results Rwui can now be used to create web applications that will display the results from an R script on a Google dynamic map. Results may be displayed as discrete markers and/or as continuous overlays. In addition, users of the web application may select regions of interest on the dynamic map with mouse clicks and the coordinates of the region of interest will automatically be made available for use by the R script. Conclusions This method of displaying R output on dynamic maps is designed to be of use in a number of areas. Firstly it allows statisticians, working in R and developing methods in spatial statistics, to easily visualise the results of applying their methods to real world data. Secondly, it allows researchers who are using R to study health geographics data, to display their results directly onto dynamic maps. Thirdly, by creating a web application for running an R script, a statistician can enable users entirely unfamiliar with R to run R coded statistical analyses of health geographics

  11. Using Qualitative Methods to Create a Home Health Web Application User Interface for Patients with Low Computer Proficiency.

    PubMed

    Baier, Rosa R; Cooper, Emily; Wysocki, Andrea; Gravenstein, Stefan; Clark, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Despite the investment in public reporting for a number of healthcare settings, evidence indicates that consumers do not routinely use available data to select providers. This suggests that existing reports do not adequately incorporate recommendations for consumer-facing reports or web applications. Healthcentric Advisors and Brown University undertook a multi-phased approach to create a consumer-facing home health web application in Rhode Island. This included reviewing the evidence base review to identify design recommendations and then creating a paper prototype and wireframe. We performed qualitative research to iteratively test our proposed user interface with two user groups, home health consumers and hospital case managers, refining our design to create the final web application. To test our prototype, we conducted two focus groups, with a total of 13 consumers, and 28 case manager interviews. Both user groups responded favorably to the prototype, with the majority commenting that they felt this type of tool would be useful. Case managers suggested revisions to ensure the application conformed to laws requiring Medicare patients to have the freedom to choose among providers and could be incorporated into hospital workflow. After incorporating changes and creating the wireframe, we conducted usability testing interviews with 14 home health consumers and six hospital case managers. We found that consumers needed prompting to navigate through the wireframe; they demonstrated confusion through both their words and body language. As a result, we modified the web application's sequence, navigation, and function to provide additional instructions and prompts. Although we designed our web application for low literacy and low health literacy, using recommendations from the evidence base, we overestimated the extent to which older adults were familiar with using computers. Some of our key learnings and recommendations run counter to general web design principles

  12. U.S. EPA National Stormwater Calculator Mobile Web Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation gives a brief overview of the new mobile web application version of EPA's National Stormwater Calculator. It is meant to give an overview of the development of the mobile web app and to demonstrate potential uses of the new version of the National Stormwater Cal...

  13. Development of a web application for water resources based on open source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delipetrev, Blagoj; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri P.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents research and development of a prototype web application for water resources using latest advancements in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), open source software and web GIS. The web application has three web services for: (1) managing, presenting and storing of geospatial data, (2) support of water resources modeling and (3) water resources optimization. The web application is developed using several programming languages (PhP, Ajax, JavaScript, Java), libraries (OpenLayers, JQuery) and open source software components (GeoServer, PostgreSQL, PostGIS). The presented web application has several main advantages: it is available all the time, it is accessible from everywhere, it creates a real time multi-user collaboration platform, the programing languages code and components are interoperable and designed to work in a distributed computer environment, it is flexible for adding additional components and services and, it is scalable depending on the workload. The application was successfully tested on a case study with concurrent multi-users access.

  14. SOCRAT Platform Design: A Web Architecture for Interactive Visual Analytics Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Alexandr A.; Palanimalai, Selvam; Dinov, Ivo D.

    2018-01-01

    The modern web is a successful platform for large scale interactive web applications, including visualizations. However, there are no established design principles for building complex visual analytics (VA) web applications that could efficiently integrate visualizations with data management, computational transformation, hypothesis testing, and knowledge discovery. This imposes a time-consuming design and development process on many researchers and developers. To address these challenges, we consider the design requirements for the development of a module-based VA system architecture, adopting existing practices of large scale web application development. We present the preliminary design and implementation of an open-source platform for Statistics Online Computational Resource Analytical Toolbox (SOCRAT). This platform defines: (1) a specification for an architecture for building VA applications with multi-level modularity, and (2) methods for optimizing module interaction, re-usage, and extension. To demonstrate how this platform can be used to integrate a number of data management, interactive visualization, and analysis tools, we implement an example application for simple VA tasks including raw data input and representation, interactive visualization and analysis. PMID:29630069

  15. SOCRAT Platform Design: A Web Architecture for Interactive Visual Analytics Applications.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Alexandr A; Palanimalai, Selvam; Dinov, Ivo D

    2017-04-01

    The modern web is a successful platform for large scale interactive web applications, including visualizations. However, there are no established design principles for building complex visual analytics (VA) web applications that could efficiently integrate visualizations with data management, computational transformation, hypothesis testing, and knowledge discovery. This imposes a time-consuming design and development process on many researchers and developers. To address these challenges, we consider the design requirements for the development of a module-based VA system architecture, adopting existing practices of large scale web application development. We present the preliminary design and implementation of an open-source platform for Statistics Online Computational Resource Analytical Toolbox (SOCRAT). This platform defines: (1) a specification for an architecture for building VA applications with multi-level modularity, and (2) methods for optimizing module interaction, re-usage, and extension. To demonstrate how this platform can be used to integrate a number of data management, interactive visualization, and analysis tools, we implement an example application for simple VA tasks including raw data input and representation, interactive visualization and analysis.

  16. User Interface Design in Medical Distributed Web Applications.

    PubMed

    Serban, Alexandru; Crisan-Vida, Mihaela; Mada, Leonard; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lacramioara

    2016-01-01

    User interfaces are important to facilitate easy learning and operating with an IT application especially in the medical world. An easy to use interface has to be simple and to customize the user needs and mode of operation. The technology in the background is an important tool to accomplish this. The present work aims to creating a web interface using specific technology (HTML table design combined with CSS3) to provide an optimized responsive interface for a complex web application. In the first phase, the current icMED web medical application layout is analyzed, and its structure is designed using specific tools, on source files. In the second phase, a new graphic adaptable interface to different mobile terminals is proposed, (using HTML table design (TD) and CSS3 method) that uses no source files, just lines of code for layout design, improving the interaction in terms of speed and simplicity. For a complex medical software application a new prototype layout was designed and developed using HTML tables. The method uses a CSS code with only CSS classes applied to one or multiple HTML table elements, instead of CSS styles that can be applied to just one DIV tag at once. The technique has the advantage of a simplified CSS code, and a better adaptability to different media resolutions compared to DIV-CSS style method. The presented work is a proof that adaptive web interfaces can be developed just using and combining different types of design methods and technologies, using HTML table design, resulting in a simpler to learn and use interface, suitable for healthcare services.

  17. Development of grid-like applications for public health using Web 2.0 mashup techniques.

    PubMed

    Scotch, Matthew; Yip, Kevin Y; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2008-01-01

    Development of public health informatics applications often requires the integration of multiple data sources. This process can be challenging due to issues such as different file formats, schemas, naming systems, and having to scrape the content of web pages. A potential solution to these system development challenges is the use of Web 2.0 technologies. In general, Web 2.0 technologies are new internet services that encourage and value information sharing and collaboration among individuals. In this case report, we describe the development and use of Web 2.0 technologies including Yahoo! Pipes within a public health application that integrates animal, human, and temperature data to assess the risk of West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreaks. The results of development and testing suggest that while Web 2.0 applications are reasonable environments for rapid prototyping, they are not mature enough for large-scale public health data applications. The application, in fact a "systems of systems," often failed due to varied timeouts for application response across web sites and services, internal caching errors, and software added to web sites by administrators to manage the load on their servers. In spite of these concerns, the results of this study demonstrate the potential value of grid computing and Web 2.0 approaches in public health informatics.

  18. Ajax and Firefox: New Web Applications and Browsers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Alternative browsers are gaining significant market share, and both Apple and Microsoft are releasing OS upgrades which portend some interesting changes in Web development. Of particular interest for language learning professionals may be new developments in the area of Web browser based applications, particularly using an approach dubbed "Ajax."…

  19. Bedside, classroom and bench: collaborative strategies to generate evidence-based knowledge for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Charlotte A; Warren, Judith J; Delaney, Connie

    2005-12-01

    The rise of evidence-base practice (EBP) as a standard for care delivery is rapidly emerging as a global phenomenon that is transcending political, economic and geographic boundaries. Evidence-based nursing (EBN) addresses the growing body of nursing knowledge supported by different levels of evidence for best practices in nursing care. Across all health care, including nursing, we face the challenge of how to most effectively close the gap between what is known and what is practiced. There is extensive literature on the barriers and difficulties of translating research findings into practical application. While the literature refers to this challenge as the "Bench to Bedside" lag, this paper presents three collaborative strategies that aim to minimize this gap. The Bedside strategy proposes to use the data generated from care delivery and captured in the massive data repositories of electronic health record (EHR) systems as empirical evidence that can be analysed to discover and then inform best practice. In the Classroom strategy, we present a description for how evidence-based nursing knowledge is taught in a baccalaureate nursing program. And finally, the Bench strategy describes applied informatics in converting paper-based EBN protocols into the workflow of clinical information systems. Protocols are translated into reference and executable knowledge with the goal of placing the latest scientific knowledge at the fingertips of front line clinicians. In all three strategies, information technology (IT) is presented as the underlying tool that makes this rapid translation of nursing knowledge into practice and education feasible.

  20. Workflow and web application for annotating NCBI BioProject transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    Vera Alvarez, Roberto; Medeiros Vidal, Newton; Garzón-Martínez, Gina A.; Barrero, Luz S.; Landsman, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The volume of transcriptome data is growing exponentially due to rapid improvement of experimental technologies. In response, large central resources such as those of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) are continually adapting their computational infrastructure to accommodate this large influx of data. New and specialized databases, such as Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly Sequence Database (TSA) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA), have been created to aid the development and expansion of centralized repositories. Although the central resource databases are under continual development, they do not include automatic pipelines to increase annotation of newly deposited data. Therefore, third-party applications are required to achieve that aim. Here, we present an automatic workflow and web application for the annotation of transcriptome data. The workflow creates secondary data such as sequencing reads and BLAST alignments, which are available through the web application. They are based on freely available bioinformatics tools and scripts developed in-house. The interactive web application provides a search engine and several browser utilities. Graphical views of transcript alignments are available through SeqViewer, an embedded tool developed by NCBI for viewing biological sequence data. The web application is tightly integrated with other NCBI web applications and tools to extend the functionality of data processing and interconnectivity. We present a case study for the species Physalis peruviana with data generated from BioProject ID 67621. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/physalis/ PMID:28605765

  1. Migrating Department of Defense (DoD) Web Service Based Applications to Mobile Computing Platforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Geolocation API to identify the device’s location and then center the map on the device. Finally, we modify the entry...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xii List of Acronyms and Abbreviations API Application Programming Interface CSS Cascading Style Sheets CLIMO...Java API for XML Web Services Reference Implementation JS JavaScript JSNI JavaScript Native Interface METOC Meteorological and Oceanographic MAA Mobile

  2. LISA, the next generation: from a web-based application to a fat client.

    PubMed

    Pierlet, Noëlla; Aerts, Werner; Vanautgaerden, Mark; Van den Bosch, Bart; De Deurwaerder, André; Schils, Erik; Noppe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The LISA application, developed by the University Hospitals Leuven, permits referring physicians to consult the electronic medical records of their patients over the internet in a highly secure way. We decided to completely change the way we secured the application, discard the existing web application and build a completely new application, based on the in-house developed hospital information system, used in the University Hospitals Leuven. The result is a fat Java client, running on a Windows Terminal Server, secured by a commercial SSL-VPN solution.

  3. Increased capture of pediatric surgical complications utilizing a novel case-log web application to enhance quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jason C; Kuenzler, Keith A; Tomita, Sandra S; Sinha, Prashant; Shah, Paresh; Ginsburg, Howard B

    2017-01-01

    Documenting surgical complications is limited by multiple barriers and is not fostered in the electronic health record. Tracking complications is essential for quality improvement (QI) and required for board certification. Current registry platforms do not facilitate meaningful complication reporting. We developed a novel web application that improves accuracy and reduces barriers to documenting complications. We deployed a custom web application that allows pediatric surgeons to maintain case logs. The program includes a module for entering complication data in real time. Reminders to enter outcome data occur at key postoperative intervals to optimize recall of events. Between October 1, 2014, and March 31, 2015, frequencies of surgical complications captured by the existing hospital reporting system were compared with data aggregated by our application. 780 cases were captured by the web application, compared with 276 cases registered by the hospital system. We observed an increase in the capture of major complications when compared to the hospital dataset (14 events vs. 4 events). This web application improved real-time reporting of surgical complications, exceeding the accuracy of administrative datasets. Custom informatics solutions may help reduce barriers to self-reporting of adverse events and improve the data that presently inform pediatric surgical QI. Diagnostic study/Retrospective study. Level III - case control study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. WALK 2.0 - using Web 2.0 applications to promote health-related physical activity: a randomised controlled trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Kolt, Gregory S; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Savage, Trevor N; Maeder, Anthony J; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Duncan, Mitch J; Caperchione, Cristina M; Tague, Rhys; Hooker, Cindy; Mummery, W Kerry

    2013-05-03

    Physical inactivity is one of the leading modifiable causes of death and disease in Australia. National surveys indicate less than half of the Australian adult population are sufficiently active to obtain health benefits. The Internet is a potentially important medium for successfully communicating health messages to the general population and enabling individual behaviour change. Internet-based interventions have proven efficacy; however, intervention studies describing website usage objectively have reported a strong decline in usage, and high attrition rate, over the course of the interventions. Web 2.0 applications give users control over web content generated and present innovative possibilities to improve user engagement. There is, however, a need to assess the effectiveness of these applications in the general population. The Walk 2.0 project is a 3-arm randomised controlled trial investigating the effects of "next generation" web-based applications on engagement, retention, and subsequent physical activity behaviour change. 504 individuals will be recruited from two sites in Australia, randomly allocated to one of two web-based interventions (Web 1.0 or Web 2.0) or a control group, and provided with a pedometer to monitor physical activity. The Web 1.0 intervention will provide participants with access to an existing physical activity website with limited interactivity. The Web 2.0 intervention will provide access to a website featuring Web 2.0 content, including social networking, blogs, and virtual walking groups. Control participants will receive a logbook to record their steps. All groups will receive similar educational material on setting goals and increasing physical activity. The primary outcomes are objectively measured physical activity and website engagement and retention. Other outcomes measured include quality of life, psychosocial correlates, and anthropometric measurements. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 3, 12 and 18 months. The

  5. Workflow and web application for annotating NCBI BioProject transcriptome data.

    PubMed

    Vera Alvarez, Roberto; Medeiros Vidal, Newton; Garzón-Martínez, Gina A; Barrero, Luz S; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    The volume of transcriptome data is growing exponentially due to rapid improvement of experimental technologies. In response, large central resources such as those of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) are continually adapting their computational infrastructure to accommodate this large influx of data. New and specialized databases, such as Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly Sequence Database (TSA) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA), have been created to aid the development and expansion of centralized repositories. Although the central resource databases are under continual development, they do not include automatic pipelines to increase annotation of newly deposited data. Therefore, third-party applications are required to achieve that aim. Here, we present an automatic workflow and web application for the annotation of transcriptome data. The workflow creates secondary data such as sequencing reads and BLAST alignments, which are available through the web application. They are based on freely available bioinformatics tools and scripts developed in-house. The interactive web application provides a search engine and several browser utilities. Graphical views of transcript alignments are available through SeqViewer, an embedded tool developed by NCBI for viewing biological sequence data. The web application is tightly integrated with other NCBI web applications and tools to extend the functionality of data processing and interconnectivity. We present a case study for the species Physalis peruviana with data generated from BioProject ID 67621. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/physalis/. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Application of Mobile Agents in Web-Based Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong Hong, Kinshuk; He, Xiaoqin; Patel, Ashok; Jesshope, Chris

    Web-based learning environments are strongly driven by the information revolution and the Internet, but they have a number of common deficiencies, such as slow access, no adaptivity to the individual student, limitation by bandwidth, and more. This paper outlines the benefits of mobile agents technology, and describes its application in Web-based…

  7. Alternatives for the Bedside Schwartz Equation to Estimate Glomerular Filtration Rate in Children.

    PubMed

    Pottel, Hans; Dubourg, Laurence; Goffin, Karolien; Delanaye, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    The bedside Schwartz equation has long been and still is the recommended equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in children. However, this equation is probably best suited to estimate GFR in children with chronic kidney disease (reduced GFR) but is not optimal for children with GFR >75 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Moreover, the Schwartz equation requires the height of the child, information that is usually not available in the clinical laboratory. This makes automatic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) along with serum creatinine impossible. As the majority of children (even children referred to nephrology clinics) have GFR >75 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , it might be interesting to evaluate possible alternatives to the bedside Schwartz equation. The pediatric form of the Full Age Spectrum (FAS) equation offers an alternative to Schwartz, allowing automatic reporting of eGFR since height is not necessary. However, when height is involved in the FAS equation, the equation is essentially equal to the Schwartz equation for children, but there are large differences for adolescents. Combining standardized biomarkers increases the prediction performance of eGFR equations for children, reaching P10 ≈ 45% and P30 ≈ 90%. There are currently good and simple alternatives to the bedside Schwartz equation, but the more complex equations combining serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, and height show the highest accuracy and precision. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. Materials and methods An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Results Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%). Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (P<0.01). Seventy-eight percent of the study group agreed that clinical simulation is a good learning tool for clinical examination. Seventy percent of students felt junior doctors were as able as senior doctors to teach. Lack of confidence was identified as the commonest barrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. Conclusion This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the hospital wards as a supportive environment for student learning. PMID:26082672

  9. Bottleneck limitations for microRNA-based therapeutics from bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Hongliang; Tan, Zhijun; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that repress expression of a broad array of target genes. Research into the role and underlying molecular events of microRNAs in disease processes and the potential of microRNAs as drug targets has expanded rapidly. Significant advances have been made in identifying the associations of microRNAs with cancers, viral infections, immune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, wound healing, biological development and other areas of medicine. However, because of intense competition and financial risks, there is a series of stringent criteria and conditions that must be met before microRNA-based therapeutics could be pursued as new drug candidates. In this review, we specifically emphasized the obstacles for bench-based microRNA to the bedside, including common barriers in basic research, application limitations while moving to the clinic at the aspects of vector delivery, off-target effects, toxicity mediation, immunological activation and dosage determination, which should be overcome before microRNA-based therapeutics take their place in the clinic.

  10. 77 FR 74278 - Proposed Information Collection (Internet Student CPR Web Registration Application); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... (Internet Student CPR Web Registration Application); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration... web registration application. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection.... Title: Internet Student CPR Web Registration Application, VA Form 10-0468. OMB Control Number: 2900-0746...

  11. CellMiner Companion: an interactive web application to explore CellMiner NCI-60 data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Gribskov, Michael; Hazbun, Tony R; Pascuzzi, Pete E

    2016-08-01

    The NCI-60 human tumor cell line panel is an invaluable resource for cancer researchers, providing drug sensitivity, molecular and phenotypic data for a range of cancer types. CellMiner is a web resource that provides tools for the acquisition and analysis of quality-controlled NCI-60 data. CellMiner supports queries of up to 150 drugs or genes, but the output is an Excel file for each drug or gene. This output format makes it difficult for researchers to explore the data from large queries. CellMiner Companion is a web application that facilitates the exploration and visualization of output from CellMiner, further increasing the accessibility of NCI-60 data. The web application is freely accessible at https://pul-bioinformatics.shinyapps.io/CellMinerCompanion The R source code can be downloaded at https://github.com/pepascuzzi/CellMinerCompanion.git ppascuzz@purdue.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Bedside ABG, electrolytes, lactate and procalcitonin in emergency pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Prerna; Dwivedi, Ajeet Kumar; Thakur, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Point of care testing, is the term commonly applied to the bedside tests performed in sick patients. Common clinical conditions encountered in pediatric emergency rooms are respiratory, gastro-intestinal, infections and cardiac. Emergencies at most of the places, especially developing countries are overburdened. Availability of tests like arterial blood gas, lactate, electrolytes and procalcitonin, bedside tests or point of care tests can help identify sick patients quickly. Abnormalities like acid-base disturbances and dyselectrolytemias can be dealt with instantly, thus improving the overall prognosis. Lactate levels in emergency give the earliest clue to cardiovascular compromise and poor tissue perfusion. Procalcitonin has recently gained significant importance as an acute phase reactant for early identification of sepsis. Decisions for initiating or withholding antibiotic therapy can also be taken based on procalcitonin levels in emergency. Bedside estimation of serum electrolytes, blood gas analysis and procalcitonin thus facilitate the clinical evaluation and management of critical patients. An extensive literature review of current status of these investigations as point of care tests is appraised here. PMID:25337488

  13. AMP: a science-driven web-based application for the TeraGrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitaszek, M.; Metcalfe, T.; Shorrock, I.

    The Asteroseismic Modeling Portal (AMP) provides a web-based interface for astronomers to run and view simulations that derive the properties of Sun-like stars from observations of their pulsation frequencies. In this paper, we describe the architecture and implementation of AMP, highlighting the lightweight design principles and tools used to produce a functional fully-custom web-based science application in less than a year. Targeted as a TeraGrid science gateway, AMP's architecture and implementation are intended to simplify its orchestration of TeraGrid computational resources. AMP's web-based interface was developed as a traditional standalone database-backed web application using the Python-based Django web development framework, allowing us to leverage the Django framework's capabilities while cleanly separating the user interface development from the grid interface development. We have found this combination of tools flexible and effective for rapid gateway development and deployment.

  14. Implementation and assessment of a curriculum for bedside ultrasound training.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizabeth E; Fox, J Christian; Rosen, Mark; Allen, Angela; Rosen, Sasha; Anderson, Craig

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed a curriculum for bedside ultrasound (US) and compared outcomes from 2 common training pathways. The program consisted of e-learning paired with expert-led hands-on training administered to pulmonary/critical care and cardiology fellows with no prior formal training in bedside US. This "simulation-based learner" group completed a survey of attitudes and confidence before and after training, and knowledge and skills were assessed after training. The surveys and scores of the simulation-based learners were compared to the scores of "experts," who were US-trained emergency physicians, and "apprentice learners," who were intensivist physicians informally trained in bedside US on the job during fellowships. There was a significant difference in the self-reported level of prior training between the groups (simulation-based learners, 2.8; apprentice learners, 3.7; experts, 4.1, on a scale of 1-5 [P= .02]) but no difference in the interest level or perceived importance of bedside US. The study curriculum was successful, as shown by scores that exceeded the comparison groups in the cardiac and pulmonary courses (cardiac: simulation-based learners, 80%; apprentice learners, 73%; experts, 62% [P= .001]; pulmonary: 84%, 75%, and 72%, respectively [P =.02]). The simulation-based learners gained confidence in skills, whereas the comparison groups lost confidence after testing (P < .005); however, the simulation-based learners gained confidence in US subject areas that were not taught (abdomen [P <.002] and miscellaneous [P =.005]). The simulation-based learner curriculum resulted in comparable or greater knowledge and confidence in each area of US versus the comparison groups. Findings of overgeneralization of confidence highlight the importance of quality assurance and supervision in bedside US training programs. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Harnessing modern web application technology to create intuitive and efficient data visualization and sharing tools.

    PubMed

    Wood, Dylan; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Courtney, William; Wang, Runtang; Kelly, Ross; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscientists increasingly need to work with big data in order to derive meaningful results in their field. Collecting, organizing and analyzing this data can be a major hurdle on the road to scientific discovery. This hurdle can be lowered using the same technologies that are currently revolutionizing the way that cultural and social media sites represent and share information with their users. Web application technologies and standards such as RESTful webservices, HTML5 and high-performance in-browser JavaScript engines are being utilized to vastly improve the way that the world accesses and shares information. The neuroscience community can also benefit tremendously from these technologies. We present here a web application that allows users to explore and request the complex datasets that need to be shared among the neuroimaging community. The COINS (Collaborative Informatics and Neuroimaging Suite) Data Exchange uses web application technologies to facilitate data sharing in three phases: Exploration, Request/Communication, and Download. This paper will focus on the first phase, and how intuitive exploration of large and complex datasets is achieved using a framework that centers around asynchronous client-server communication (AJAX) and also exposes a powerful API that can be utilized by other applications to explore available data. First opened to the neuroscience community in August 2012, the Data Exchange has already provided researchers with over 2500 GB of data.

  16. Harnessing modern web application technology to create intuitive and efficient data visualization and sharing tools

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Dylan; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Courtney, William; Wang, Runtang; Kelly, Ross; Turner, Jessica A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscientists increasingly need to work with big data in order to derive meaningful results in their field. Collecting, organizing and analyzing this data can be a major hurdle on the road to scientific discovery. This hurdle can be lowered using the same technologies that are currently revolutionizing the way that cultural and social media sites represent and share information with their users. Web application technologies and standards such as RESTful webservices, HTML5 and high-performance in-browser JavaScript engines are being utilized to vastly improve the way that the world accesses and shares information. The neuroscience community can also benefit tremendously from these technologies. We present here a web application that allows users to explore and request the complex datasets that need to be shared among the neuroimaging community. The COINS (Collaborative Informatics and Neuroimaging Suite) Data Exchange uses web application technologies to facilitate data sharing in three phases: Exploration, Request/Communication, and Download. This paper will focus on the first phase, and how intuitive exploration of large and complex datasets is achieved using a framework that centers around asynchronous client-server communication (AJAX) and also exposes a powerful API that can be utilized by other applications to explore available data. First opened to the neuroscience community in August 2012, the Data Exchange has already provided researchers with over 2500 GB of data. PMID:25206330

  17. Web Platform Application

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Paulsworth, Ashley; Kurtz, Jim; Brun de Pontet, Stephanie

    Sunvestment Energy Group (previously called Sunvestment Group) was established to create a web application that brings together site hosts, those who will obtain the energy from the solar array, with project developers and funders, including affinity investors. Sunvestment Energy Group (SEG) uses a community-based model that engages with investors who have some affinity with the site host organization. In addition to a financial return, these investors receive non-financial value from their investments and are therefore willing to offer lower cost capital. This enables the site host to enjoy more savings from solar through these less expensive Community Power Purchase Agreementsmore » (CPPAs). The purpose of this award was to develop an online platform to bring site hosts and investors together virtually.« less

  18. Designing and developing portable large-scale JavaScript web applications within the Experiment Dashboard framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, J.; Dzhunov, I.; Karavakis, E.; Kokoszkiewicz, L.; Nowotka, M.; Saiz, P.; Tuckett, D.

    2012-12-01

    Improvements in web browser performance and web standards compliance, as well as the availability of comprehensive JavaScript libraries, provides an opportunity to develop functionally rich yet intuitive web applications that allow users to access, render and analyse data in novel ways. However, the development of such large-scale JavaScript web applications presents new challenges, in particular with regard to code sustainability and team-based work. We present an approach that meets the challenges of large-scale JavaScript web application design and development, including client-side model-view-controller architecture, design patterns, and JavaScript libraries. Furthermore, we show how the approach leads naturally to the encapsulation of the data source as a web API, allowing applications to be easily ported to new data sources. The Experiment Dashboard framework is used for the development of applications for monitoring the distributed computing activities of virtual organisations on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. We demonstrate the benefits of the approach for large-scale JavaScript web applications in this context by examining the design of several Experiment Dashboard applications for data processing, data transfer and site status monitoring, and by showing how they have been ported for different virtual organisations and technologies.

  19. Breaking and Fixing Origin-Based Access Control in Hybrid Web/Mobile Application Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Martin; Jana, Suman; Shmatikov, Vitaly

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid mobile applications (apps) combine the features of Web applications and "native" mobile apps. Like Web applications, they are implemented in portable, platform-independent languages such as HTML and JavaScript. Like native apps, they have direct access to local device resources-file system, location, camera, contacts, etc. Hybrid apps are typically developed using hybrid application frameworks such as PhoneGap. The purpose of the framework is twofold. First, it provides an embedded Web browser (for example, WebView on Android) that executes the app's Web code. Second, it supplies "bridges" that allow Web code to escape the browser and access local resources on the device. We analyze the software stack created by hybrid frameworks and demonstrate that it does not properly compose the access-control policies governing Web code and local code, respectively. Web code is governed by the same origin policy, whereas local code is governed by the access-control policy of the operating system (for example, user-granted permissions in Android). The bridges added by the framework to the browser have the same local access rights as the entire application, but are not correctly protected by the same origin policy. This opens the door to fracking attacks, which allow foreign-origin Web content included into a hybrid app (e.g., ads confined in iframes) to drill through the layers and directly access device resources. Fracking vulnerabilities are generic: they affect all hybrid frameworks, all embedded Web browsers, all bridge mechanisms, and all platforms on which these frameworks are deployed. We study the prevalence of fracking vulnerabilities in free Android apps based on the PhoneGap framework. Each vulnerability exposes sensitive local resources-the ability to read and write contacts list, local files, etc.-to dozens of potentially malicious Web domains. We also analyze the defenses deployed by hybrid frameworks to prevent resource access by foreign-origin Web content

  20. Breaking and Fixing Origin-Based Access Control in Hybrid Web/Mobile Application Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Martin; Jana, Suman; Shmatikov, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid mobile applications (apps) combine the features of Web applications and “native” mobile apps. Like Web applications, they are implemented in portable, platform-independent languages such as HTML and JavaScript. Like native apps, they have direct access to local device resources—file system, location, camera, contacts, etc. Hybrid apps are typically developed using hybrid application frameworks such as PhoneGap. The purpose of the framework is twofold. First, it provides an embedded Web browser (for example, WebView on Android) that executes the app's Web code. Second, it supplies “bridges” that allow Web code to escape the browser and access local resources on the device. We analyze the software stack created by hybrid frameworks and demonstrate that it does not properly compose the access-control policies governing Web code and local code, respectively. Web code is governed by the same origin policy, whereas local code is governed by the access-control policy of the operating system (for example, user-granted permissions in Android). The bridges added by the framework to the browser have the same local access rights as the entire application, but are not correctly protected by the same origin policy. This opens the door to fracking attacks, which allow foreign-origin Web content included into a hybrid app (e.g., ads confined in iframes) to drill through the layers and directly access device resources. Fracking vulnerabilities are generic: they affect all hybrid frameworks, all embedded Web browsers, all bridge mechanisms, and all platforms on which these frameworks are deployed. We study the prevalence of fracking vulnerabilities in free Android apps based on the PhoneGap framework. Each vulnerability exposes sensitive local resources—the ability to read and write contacts list, local files, etc.—to dozens of potentially malicious Web domains. We also analyze the defenses deployed by hybrid frameworks to prevent resource access by foreign

  1. Robust image obfuscation for privacy protection in Web 2.0 applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poller, Andreas; Steinebach, Martin; Liu, Huajian

    2012-03-01

    We present two approaches to robust image obfuscation based on permutation of image regions and channel intensity modulation. The proposed concept of robust image obfuscation is a step towards end-to-end security in Web 2.0 applications. It helps to protect the privacy of the users against threats caused by internet bots and web applications that extract biometric and other features from images for data-linkage purposes. The approaches described in this paper consider that images uploaded to Web 2.0 applications pass several transformations, such as scaling and JPEG compression, until the receiver downloads them. In contrast to existing approaches, our focus is on usability, therefore the primary goal is not a maximum of security but an acceptable trade-off between security and resulting image quality.

  2. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests.

    PubMed

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline; Lindegren, Gunnel; Stoltz, Malin Lundahl; Salata, Cristiano; Kran, Anne-Marte Bakken; Dudman, Susanne Gjeruldsen; Mirazimi, Ali; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2016-10-01

    Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using the QIAamp viral RNA minikit. We present an easy and convenient method for bedside inactivation using available blood collection vacuum tubes and reagents. We propose to use this simple method for fast, safe, and easy bedside inactivation of Ebola virus for safe transport and routine nucleic acid detection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Assessment of bedside transfusion practices at a tertiary care center: A step closer to controlling the chaos

    PubMed Central

    Khetan, Dheeraj; Katharia, Rahul; Pandey, Hem Chandra; Chaudhary, Rajendra; Harsvardhan, Rajesh; Pandey, Hemchandra; Sonkar, Atul

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion chain can be divided into three phases: preanalytical (patient bedside), analytical (steps done at transfusion services), and postanalytical (bedside). Majority (~70%) of events due to blood transfusion have been attributed to errors in bedside blood administration practices. Survey of bedside transfusion practices (pre-analytical and post analytical phase) was done to assess awareness and compliance to guidelines regarding requisition and administration of blood components. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Interview-based questionnaire of ward staff and observational survey of actual transfusion of blood components in total 26 wards of the institute was carried out during November–December 2013. All the collected data were coded (to maintain confidentiality) and analyzed using SPSS (v 20). For analysis, wards were divided into three categories: medical, surgical, and others (including all intensive care units). RESULTS: A total of 104 (33 resident doctors and 71 nursing) staff members were interviewed and observational survey could be conducted in 25 wards during the study period. In the preanalytical phase, major issues were as follows: lack of awareness for institute guidelines (80.6% not aware), improper sampling practices (67.3%), and prescription related (56.7%). In the postanalytical phase, major issues were found to be lack of consent for blood transfusion (72%), improper warming of blood component (~80%), and problems in storage and discarding of blood units. CONCLUSION: There is need to create awareness about policies and guidelines of bed side transfusion among the ward staff. Regular audits are necessary for compliance to guidelines among clinical staff. PMID:29563672

  4. From bench to FDA to bedside: US regulatory trends for new stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Knoepfler, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    The phrase "bench-to-bedside" is commonly used to describe the translation of basic discoveries such as those on stem cells to the clinic for therapeutic use in human patients. However, there is a key intermediate step in between the bench and the bedside involving governmental regulatory oversight such as by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States (US). Thus, it might be more accurate in most cases to describe the stem cell biological drug development process in this way: from bench to FDA to bedside. The intermediate development and regulatory stage for stem cell-based biological drugs is a multifactorial, continually evolving part of the process of developing a biological drug such as a stem cell-based regenerative medicine product. In some situations, stem cell-related products may not be classified as biological drugs in which case the FDA plays a relatively minor role. However, this middle stage is generally a major element of the process and is often colloquially referred to in an ominous way as "The Valley of Death". This moniker seems appropriate because it is at this point, and in particular in the work that ensues after Phase 1, clinical trials that most drug product development is terminated, often due to lack of funding, diseases being refractory to treatment, or regulatory issues. Not surprisingly, workarounds to deal with or entirely avoid this difficult stage of the process are evolving both inside and outside the domains of official regulatory authorities. In some cases these efforts involve the FDA invoking new mechanisms of accelerating the bench to beside process, but in other cases these new pathways bypass the FDA in part or entirely. Together these rapidly changing stem cell product development and regulatory pathways raise many scientific, ethical, and medical questions. These emerging trends and their potential consequences are reviewed here. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Regional Geology Web Map Application Development: Javascript v2.0

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Russell, Glenn

    This is a milestone report for the FY2017 continuation of the Spent Fuel, Storage, and Waste, Technology (SFSWT) program (formerly Used Fuel Disposal (UFD) program) development of the Regional Geology Web Mapping Application by the Idaho National Laboratory Geospatial Science and Engineering group. This application was developed for general public use and is an interactive web-based application built in Javascript to visualize, reference, and analyze US pertinent geological features of the SFSWT program. This tool is a version upgrade from Adobe FLEX technology. It is designed to facilitate informed decision making of the geology of continental US relevant to themore » SFSWT program.« less

  6. A web-based application for initial screening of living kidney donors: development, implementation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moore, D R; Feurer, I D; Zavala, E Y; Shaffer, D; Karp, S; Hoy, H; Moore, D E

    2013-02-01

    Most centers utilize phone or written surveys to screen candidates who self-refer to be living kidney donors. To increase efficiency and reduce resource utilization, we developed a web-based application to screen kidney donor candidates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of this web-based application. Method and time of referral were tabulated and descriptive statistics summarized demographic characteristics. Time series analyses evaluated use over time. Between January 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012, 1200 candidates self-referred to be living kidney donors at our center. Eight hundred one candidates (67%) completed the web-based survey and 399 (33%) completed a phone survey. Thirty-nine percent of donors accessed the application on nights and weekends. Postimplementation of the web-based application, there was a statistically significant increase (p < 0.001) in the number of self-referrals via the web-based application as opposed to telephone contact. Also, there was a significant increase (p = 0.025) in the total number of self-referrals post-implementation from 61 to 116 per month. An interactive web-based application is an effective strategy for the initial screening of donor candidates. The web-based application increased the ability to interface with donors, process them efficiently and ultimately increased donor self-referral at our center. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  7. Some Programs Should Not Run on Laptops - Providing Programmatic Access to Applications Via Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Gupta, N.; Gupta, S.; Field, E.; Maechling, P.

    2003-12-01

    Modern laptop computers, and personal computers, can provide capabilities that are, in many ways, comparable to workstations or departmental servers. However, this doesn't mean we should run all computations on our local computers. We have identified several situations in which it preferable to implement our seismological application programs in a distributed, server-based, computing model. In this model, application programs on the user's laptop, or local computer, invoke programs that run on an organizational server, and the results are returned to the invoking system. Situations in which a server-based architecture may be preferred include: (a) a program is written in a language, or written for an operating environment, that is unsupported on the local computer, (b) software libraries or utilities required to execute a program are not available on the users computer, (c) a computational program is physically too large, or computationally too expensive, to run on a users computer, (d) a user community wants to enforce a consistent method of performing a computation by standardizing on a single implementation of a program, and (e) the computational program may require current information, that is not available to all client computers. Until recently, distributed, server-based, computational capabilities were implemented using client/server architectures. In these architectures, client programs were often written in the same language, and they executed in the same computing environment, as the servers. Recently, a new distributed computational model, called Web Services, has been developed. Web Services are based on Internet standards such as XML, SOAP, WDSL, and UDDI. Web Services offer the promise of platform, and language, independent distributed computing. To investigate this new computational model, and to provide useful services to the SCEC Community, we have implemented several computational and utility programs using a Web Service architecture. We have

  8. StreamStats in Georgia: a water-resources web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Musser, Jonathan W.

    2015-07-31

    StreamStats is being implemented on a State-by-State basis to allow for customization of the data development and underlying datasets to address their specific needs, issues, and objectives. The USGS, in cooperation with the Georgia Environmental Protection Division and Georgia Department of Transportation, has implemented StreamStats for Georgia. The Georgia StreamStats Web site is available through the national StreamStats Web-page portal at http://streamstats.usgs.gov. Links are provided on this Web page for individual State applications, instructions for using StreamStats, definitions of basin characteristics and streamflow statistics, and other supporting information.

  9. Web Mining: Machine Learning for Web Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Chau, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Presents an overview of machine learning research and reviews methods used for evaluating machine learning systems. Ways that machine-learning algorithms were used in traditional information retrieval systems in the "pre-Web" era are described, and the field of Web mining and how machine learning has been used in different Web mining…

  10. Bedside functional brain imaging in critically-ill children using high-density EEG source modeling and multi-modal sensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Eytan, Danny; Pang, Elizabeth W; Doesburg, Sam M; Nenadovic, Vera; Gavrilovic, Bojan; Laussen, Peter; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain injury is a common cause of death and critical illness in children and young adults. Fundamental management focuses on early characterization of the extent of injury and optimizing recovery by preventing secondary damage during the days following the primary injury. Currently, bedside technology for measuring neurological function is mainly limited to using electroencephalography (EEG) for detection of seizures and encephalopathic features, and evoked potentials. We present a proof of concept study in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care setting, featuring a bedside functional imaging set-up designed to map cortical brain activation patterns by combining high density EEG recordings, multi-modal sensory stimulation (auditory, visual, and somatosensory), and EEG source modeling. Use of source-modeling allows for examination of spatiotemporal activation patterns at the cortical region level as opposed to the traditional scalp potential maps. The application of this system in both healthy and brain-injured participants is demonstrated with modality-specific source-reconstructed cortical activation patterns. By combining stimulation obtained with different modalities, most of the cortical surface can be monitored for changes in functional activation without having to physically transport the subject to an imaging suite. The results in patients in an intensive care setting with anatomically well-defined brain lesions suggest a topographic association between their injuries and activation patterns. Moreover, we report the reproducible application of a protocol examining a higher-level cortical processing with an auditory oddball paradigm involving presentation of the patient's own name. This study reports the first successful application of a bedside functional brain mapping tool in the intensive care setting. This application has the potential to provide clinicians with an additional dimension of information to manage critically-ill children

  11. Statistical Validation of a Web-Based GIS Application and Its Applicability to Cardiovascular-Related Studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Eun; Sung, Jung Hye; Malouhi, Mohamad

    2015-12-22

    There is abundant evidence that neighborhood characteristics are significantly linked to the health of the inhabitants of a given space within a given time frame. This study is to statistically validate a web-based GIS application designed to support cardiovascular-related research developed by the NIH funded Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) Translational Research Network (RTRN) Data Coordinating Center (DCC) and discuss its applicability to cardiovascular studies. Geo-referencing, geocoding and geospatial analyses were conducted for 500 randomly selected home addresses in a U.S. southeastern Metropolitan area. The correlation coefficient, factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha (α) were estimated to quantify measures of the internal consistency, reliability and construct/criterion/discriminant validity of the cardiovascular-related geospatial variables (walk score, number of hospitals, fast food restaurants, parks and sidewalks). Cronbach's α for CVD GEOSPATIAL variables was 95.5%, implying successful internal consistency. Walk scores were significantly correlated with number of hospitals (r = 0.715; p < 0.0001), fast food restaurants (r = 0.729; p < 0.0001), parks (r = 0.773; p < 0.0001) and sidewalks (r = 0.648; p < 0.0001) within a mile from homes. It was also significantly associated with diversity index (r = 0.138, p = 0.0023), median household incomes (r = -0.181; p < 0.0001), and owner occupied rates (r = -0.440; p < 0.0001). However, its non-significant correlation was found with median age, vulnerability, unemployment rate, labor force, and population growth rate. Our data demonstrates that geospatial data generated by the web-based application were internally consistent and demonstrated satisfactory validity. Therefore, the GIS application may be useful to apply to cardiovascular-related studies aimed to investigate potential impact of geospatial factors on diseases and/or the long-term effect of clinical trials.

  12. A feasibility study on bedside upper airway ultrasonography compared to waveform capnography for verifying endotracheal tube location after intubation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In emergency settings, verification of endotracheal tube (ETT) location is important for critically ill patients. Ignorance of oesophageal intubation can be disastrous. Many methods are used for verification of the endotracheal tube location; none are ideal. Quantitative waveform capnography is considered the standard of care for this purpose but is not always available and is expensive. Therefore, this feasibility study is conducted to compare a cheaper alternative, bedside upper airway ultrasonography to waveform capnography, for verification of endotracheal tube location after intubation. Methods This was a prospective, single-centre, observational study, conducted at the HRPB, Ipoh. It included patients who were intubated in the emergency department from 28 March 2012 to 17 August 2012. A waiver of consent had been obtained from the Medical Research Ethics Committee. Bedside upper airway ultrasonography was performed after intubation and compared to waveform capnography. Specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value and likelihood ratio are calculated. Results A sample of 107 patients were analysed, and 6 (5.6%) had oesophageal intubations. The overall accuracy of bedside upper airway ultrasonography was 98.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 93.0% to 100.0%). The kappa value (Κ) was 0.85, indicating a very good agreement between the bedside upper airway ultrasonography and waveform capnography. Thus, bedside upper airway ultrasonography is in concordance with waveform capnography. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of bedside upper airway ultrasonography were 98.0% (95% CI 93.0% to 99.8%), 100% (95% CI 54.1% to 100.0%), 100% (95% CI 96.3% to 100.0%) and 75.0% (95% CI 34.9% to 96.8%). The likelihood ratio of a positive test is infinite and the likelihood ratio of a negative test is 0.0198 (95% CI 0.005 to 0.0781). The mean confirmation time by ultrasound is 16.4 s. No adverse effects

  13. AnnotateGenomicRegions: a web application.

    PubMed

    Zammataro, Luca; DeMolfetta, Rita; Bucci, Gabriele; Ceol, Arnaud; Muller, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic technologies produce large amounts of data that can be mapped to specific regions in the genome. Among the first steps in interpreting the results is annotation of genomic regions with known features such as genes, promoters, CpG islands etc. Several tools have been published to perform this task. However, using these tools often requires a significant amount of bioinformatics skills and/or downloading and installing dedicated software. Here we present AnnotateGenomicRegions, a web application that accepts genomic regions as input and outputs a selection of overlapping and/or neighboring genome annotations. Supported organisms include human (hg18, hg19), mouse (mm8, mm9, mm10), zebrafish (danRer7), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sacCer2, sacCer3). AnnotateGenomicRegions is accessible online on a public server or can be installed locally. Some frequently used annotations and genomes are embedded in the application while custom annotations may be added by the user. The increasing spread of genomic technologies generates the need for a simple-to-use annotation tool for genomic regions that can be used by biologists and bioinformaticians alike. AnnotateGenomicRegions meets this demand. AnnotateGenomicRegions is an open-source web application that can be installed on any personal computer or institute server. AnnotateGenomicRegions is available at: http://cru.genomics.iit.it/AnnotateGenomicRegions.

  14. SBMLmod: a Python-based web application and web service for efficient data integration and model simulation.

    PubMed

    Schäuble, Sascha; Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Bockwoldt, Mathias; Puntervoll, Pål; Heiland, Ines

    2017-06-24

    Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is the standard model representation and description language in systems biology. Enriching and analysing systems biology models by integrating the multitude of available data, increases the predictive power of these models. This may be a daunting task, which commonly requires bioinformatic competence and scripting. We present SBMLmod, a Python-based web application and service, that automates integration of high throughput data into SBML models. Subsequent steady state analysis is readily accessible via the web service COPASIWS. We illustrate the utility of SBMLmod by integrating gene expression data from different healthy tissues as well as from a cancer dataset into a previously published model of mammalian tryptophan metabolism. SBMLmod is a user-friendly platform for model modification and simulation. The web application is available at http://sbmlmod.uit.no , whereas the WSDL definition file for the web service is accessible via http://sbmlmod.uit.no/SBMLmod.wsdl . Furthermore, the entire package can be downloaded from https://github.com/MolecularBioinformatics/sbml-mod-ws . We envision that SBMLmod will make automated model modification and simulation available to a broader research community.

  15. Introduction to the Application of Web-Based Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, Annemarie

    This paper discusses some basic assumptions and issues concerning web-based surveys. Discussion includes: assumptions regarding cost and ease of use; disadvantages of web-based surveys, concerning the inability to compensate for four common errors of survey research: coverage error, sampling error, measurement error and nonresponse error; and…

  16. A Sample WebQuest Applicable in Teaching Topological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Sevda Goktepe; Korpeoglu, Seda Goktepe

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, WebQuests have received a great deal of attention and have been used effectively in teaching-learning process in various courses. In this study, a WebQuest that can be applicable in teaching topological concepts for undergraduate level students was prepared. A number of topological concepts, such as countability, infinity, and…

  17. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  18. Specification and Verification of Web Applications in Rewriting Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpuente, María; Ballis, Demis; Romero, Daniel

    This paper presents a Rewriting Logic framework that formalizes the interactions between Web servers and Web browsers through a communicating protocol abstracting HTTP. The proposed framework includes a scripting language that is powerful enough to model the dynamics of complex Web applications by encompassing the main features of the most popular Web scripting languages (e.g. PHP, ASP, Java Servlets). We also provide a detailed characterization of browser actions (e.g. forward/backward navigation, page refresh, and new window/tab openings) via rewrite rules, and show how our models can be naturally model-checked by using the Linear Temporal Logic of Rewriting (LTLR), which is a Linear Temporal Logic specifically designed for model-checking rewrite theories. Our formalization is particularly suitable for verification purposes, since it allows one to perform in-depth analyses of many subtle aspects related to Web interaction. Finally, the framework has been completely implemented in Maude, and we report on some successful experiments that we conducted by using the Maude LTLR model-checker.

  19. Using a web-based application to define the accuracy of diagnostic tests when the gold standard is imperfect.

    PubMed

    Lim, Cherry; Wannapinij, Prapass; White, Lisa; Day, Nicholas P J; Cooper, Ben S; Peacock, Sharon J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of the sensitivity and specificity for new diagnostic tests based on evaluation against a known gold standard are imprecise when the accuracy of the gold standard is imperfect. Bayesian latent class models (LCMs) can be helpful under these circumstances, but the necessary analysis requires expertise in computational programming. Here, we describe open-access web-based applications that allow non-experts to apply Bayesian LCMs to their own data sets via a user-friendly interface. Applications for Bayesian LCMs were constructed on a web server using R and WinBUGS programs. The models provided (http://mice.tropmedres.ac) include two Bayesian LCMs: the two-tests in two-population model (Hui and Walter model) and the three-tests in one-population model (Walter and Irwig model). Both models are available with simplified and advanced interfaces. In the former, all settings for Bayesian statistics are fixed as defaults. Users input their data set into a table provided on the webpage. Disease prevalence and accuracy of diagnostic tests are then estimated using the Bayesian LCM, and provided on the web page within a few minutes. With the advanced interfaces, experienced researchers can modify all settings in the models as needed. These settings include correlation among diagnostic test results and prior distributions for all unknown parameters. The web pages provide worked examples with both models using the original data sets presented by Hui and Walter in 1980, and by Walter and Irwig in 1988. We also illustrate the utility of the advanced interface using the Walter and Irwig model on a data set from a recent melioidosis study. The results obtained from the web-based applications were comparable to those published previously. The newly developed web-based applications are open-access and provide an important new resource for researchers worldwide to evaluate new diagnostic tests.

  20. A Web Application For Visualizing Empirical Models of the Space-Atmosphere Interface Region: AtModWeb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D.; Kilcommons, L. M.; Damas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a simple and user-friendly web application to visualize output from empirical atmospheric models that describe the lower atmosphere and the Space-Atmosphere Interface Region (SAIR). The Atmospheric Model Web Explorer (AtModWeb) is a lightweight, multi-user, Python-driven application which uses standard web technology (jQuery, HTML5, CSS3) to give an in-browser interface that can produce plots of modeled quantities such as temperature and individual species and total densities of neutral and ionized upper-atmosphere. Output may be displayed as: 1) a contour plot over a map projection, 2) a pseudo-color plot (heatmap) which allows visualization of a variable as a function of two spatial coordinates, or 3) a simple line plot of one spatial coordinate versus any number of desired model output variables. The application is designed around an abstraction of an empirical atmospheric model, essentially treating the model code as a black box, which makes it simple to add additional models without modifying the main body of the application. Currently implemented are the Naval Research Laboratory NRLMSISE00 model for neutral atmosphere and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI). These models are relevant to the Low Earth Orbit environment and the SAIR. The interface is simple and usable, allowing users (students and experts) to specify time and location, and choose between historical (i.e. the values for the given date) or manual specification of whichever solar or geomagnetic activity drivers are required by the model. We present a number of use-case examples from research and education: 1) How does atmospheric density between the surface and 1000 km vary with time of day, season and solar cycle?; 2) How do ionospheric layers change with the solar cycle?; 3 How does the composition of the SAIR vary between day and night at a fixed altitude?

  1. Procedural instruction in invasive bedside procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis of effective teaching approaches.

    PubMed

    Huang, Grace C; McSparron, Jakob I; Balk, Ethan M; Richards, Jeremy B; Smith, C Christopher; Whelan, Julia S; Newman, Lori R; Smetana, Gerald W

    2016-04-01

    Optimal approaches to teaching bedside procedures are unknown. To identify effective instructional approaches in procedural training. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library through December 2014. We included research articles that addressed procedural training among physicians or physician trainees for 12 bedside procedures. Two independent reviewers screened 9312 citations and identified 344 articles for full-text review. Two independent reviewers extracted data from full-text articles. We included measurements as classified by translational science outcomes T1 (testing settings), T2 (patient care practices) and T3 (patient/public health outcomes). Due to incomplete reporting, we post hoc classified study outcomes as 'negative' or 'positive' based on statistical significance. We performed meta-analyses of outcomes on the subset of studies sharing similar outcomes. We found 161 eligible studies (44 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), 34 non-RCTs and 83 uncontrolled trials). Simulation was the most frequently published educational mode (78%). Our post hoc classification showed that studies involving simulation, competency-based approaches and RCTs had higher frequencies of T2/T3 outcomes. Meta-analyses showed that simulation (risk ratio (RR) 1.54 vs 0.55 for studies with vs without simulation, p=0.013) and competency-based approaches (RR 3.17 vs 0.89, p<0.001) were effective forms of training. This systematic review of bedside procedural skills demonstrates that the current literature is heterogeneous and of varying quality and rigour. Evidence is strongest for the use of simulation and competency-based paradigms in teaching procedures, and these approaches should be the mainstay of programmes that train physicians to perform procedures. Further research should clarify differences among instructional methods (eg, forms of hands-on training) rather than among educational modes (eg, lecture vs simulation). Published by the BMJ Publishing

  2. Recent advancements on the development of web-based applications for the implementation of seismic analysis and surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friberg, P. A.; Luis, R. S.; Quintiliani, M.; Lisowski, S.; Hunter, S.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, a novel set of modules has been included in the Open Source Earthworm seismic data processing system, supporting the use of web applications. These include the Mole sub-system, for storing relevant event data in a MySQL database (see M. Quintiliani and S. Pintore, SRL, 2013), and an embedded webserver, Moleserv, for serving such data to web clients in QuakeML format. These modules have enabled, for the first time using Earthworm, the use of web applications for seismic data processing. These can greatly simplify the operation and maintenance of seismic data processing centers by having one or more servers providing the relevant data as well as the data processing applications themselves to client machines running arbitrary operating systems.Web applications with secure online web access allow operators to work anywhere, without the often cumbersome and bandwidth hungry use of secure shell or virtual private networks. Furthermore, web applications can seamlessly access third party data repositories to acquire additional information, such as maps. Finally, the usage of HTML email brought the possibility of specialized web applications, to be used in email clients. This is the case of EWHTMLEmail, which produces event notification emails that are in fact simple web applications for plotting relevant seismic data.Providing web services as part of Earthworm has enabled a number of other tools as well. One is ISTI's EZ Earthworm, a web based command and control system for an otherwise command line driven system; another is a waveform web service. The waveform web service serves Earthworm data to additional web clients for plotting, picking, and other web-based processing tools. The current Earthworm waveform web service hosts an advanced plotting capability for providing views of event-based waveforms from a Mole database served by Moleserve.The current trend towards the usage of cloud services supported by web applications is driving improvements in Java

  3. Translational research: understanding the continuum from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Brian C; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2011-01-01

    The process of translating basic scientific discoveries to clinical applications, and ultimately to public health improvements, has emerged as an important, but difficult, objective in biomedical research. The process is best described as a "translation continuum" because various resources and actions are involved in this progression of knowledge, which advances discoveries from the bench to the bedside. The current model of this continuum focuses primarily on translational research, which is merely one component of the overall translation process. This approach is ineffective. A revised model to address the entire continuum would provide a methodology to identify and describe all translational activities (eg, implementation, adoption translational research, etc) as well their place within the continuum. This manuscript reviews and synthesizes the literature to provide an overview of the current terminology and model for translation. A modification of the existing model is proposed to create a framework called the Biomedical Research Translation Continuum, which defines the translation process and describes the progression of knowledge from laboratory to health gains. This framework clarifies translation for readers who have not followed the evolving and complicated models currently described. Authors and researchers may use the continuum to understand and describe their research better as well as the translational activities within a conceptual framework. Additionally, the framework may increase the advancement of knowledge by refining discussions of translation and allowing more precise identification of barriers to progress. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Comparison between Quantity Surveying and Information Technology Students on Web Application in Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keng, Tan Chin; Ching, Yeoh Kah

    2015-01-01

    The use of web applications has become a trend in many disciplines including education. In view of the influence of web application in education, this study examines web application technologies that could enhance undergraduates' learning experiences, with focus on Quantity Surveying (QS) and Information Technology (IT) undergraduates. The…

  5. Parental Presence at the Bedside of Critically Ill Children in a Unit With Unrestricted Visitation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jennifer R; AlOthmani, Farhana I; Seabrook, Jamie A; AlOfisan, Tariq; AlGarni, Yasser M; Sarpal, Amrita

    2018-06-11

    To determine the percentage of time that critically ill children have a parent at the bedside and to identify extrinsic factors that are associated with percent of time with parental presence at the bedside. Prospective cohort study. PICU in a single tertiary care children's hospital. Primary two parents of all children admitted to the PICU on 12 preselected days during a 1-year period from 2014 to 2015. None. A total of 111 observations of 108 unique PICU admissions and families were performed. Children had at least one parent present a mean of 58.2% (SD, 34.6%) of the time. Mothers spent more time at the bedside (56.3% [SD, 31.0%]) than fathers (37.3% [SD, 29.5%]) (p = 0.0001). Percent of time with parental presence at the bedside was positively correlated with age (rs = 0.23; p = 0.02) and negatively associated with Pediatric Risk of Mortality III score (rs = -0.26; p = 0.01). Percent of time with parental presence at the bedside was lower for children who were mechanically ventilated (42.8% [SD, 35.5%]) than not (64.5% [SD, 32.2%]) (p = 0.01) and whose parent(s) were single (45.5% [SD, 27.5%]) or cohabitating/common-law (35.7% [SD, 26.4%]) compared with parents who were married (64.2% [SD, 34.2%]) or separated/divorced (68.3% [SD, 28.8%]) (p = 0.02). Percent of time with parental presence at the bedside was higher for children with chronic illnesses (63.4% [SD, 32.9%] vs 50.1% [SD, 35.8%] without; p = 0.04), when there was a bed in the patient room (61.4% [SD, 34.0%] vs 32.5% [SD, 28.3%] without; p = 0.01), and when parents slept in the patient room (90.3% [SD, 11.2%]) compared with their own home (37.6% [SD, 34.4%]) (p < 0.0001). Percent of time with parental presence at the bedside was not correlated with day of PICU stay, number of siblings, previous PICU admission, isolation status, or nursing ratio. Children had a parent present at the bedside approximately 60% of the time. The parents of younger, sicker children may benefit from supportive interventions

  6. A Qualitative Study of the Change-of-Shift Report at the Patients' Bedside.

    PubMed

    Grimshaw, John; Hatch, Daniel; Willard, Melissa; Abraham, Sam

    Concerns about patient bedside change-of-shift reporting at a community hospital in northern Indiana stimulated the development of this qualitative phenomenological study. A review of the literature revealed a research deficit in acute care nurses' perceptions of bedside reporting in relation to compliance. The research question addressed in this study was, "What are acute care nurses' perceptions of the change-of-shift report at the patients' bedside?" Personal interviews were conducted on 7 medical, surgical, and intensive care unit nurse participants at a community hospital in northern Indiana. Five themes were identified from the collected data, which included the time factor, continuity of care, visualization, and challenges in the communication of discreet information.

  7. A novel bedside cardiopulmonary physical diagnosis curriculum for internal medicine postgraduate training.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian Thomas; Niessen, Timothy; Gelber, Allan Charles; Clark, Bennett; Lee, Yizhen; Madrazo, Jose Alejandro; Manesh, Reza Sedighi; Apfel, Ariella; Lau, Brandyn D; Liu, Gigi; Canzoniero, Jenna VanLiere; Sperati, C John; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Brotman, Daniel J; Traill, Thomas A; Cayea, Danelle; Durso, Samuel C; Stewart, Rosalyn W; Corretti, Mary C; Kasper, Edward K; Desai, Sanjay V

    2017-10-06

    Physicians spend less time at the bedside in the modern hospital setting which has contributed to a decline in physical diagnosis, and in particular, cardiopulmonary examination skills. This trend may be a source of diagnostic error and threatens to erode the patient-physician relationship. We created a new bedside cardiopulmonary physical diagnosis curriculum and assessed its effects on post-graduate year-1 (PGY-1; interns) attitudes, confidence and skill. One hundred five internal medicine interns in a large U.S. internal medicine residency program participated in the Advancing Bedside Cardiopulmonary Examination Skills (ACE) curriculum while rotating on a general medicine inpatient service between 2015 and 2017. Teaching sessions included exam demonstrations using healthy volunteers and real patients, imaging didactics, computer learning/high-fidelity simulation, and bedside teaching with experienced clinicians. Primary outcomes were attitudes, confidence and skill in the cardiopulmonary physical exam as determined by a self-assessment survey, and a validated online cardiovascular examination (CE). Interns who participated in ACE (ACE interns) by mid-year more strongly agreed they had received adequate training in the cardiopulmonary exam compared with non-ACE interns. ACE interns were more confident than non-ACE interns in performing a cardiac exam, assessing the jugular venous pressure, distinguishing 'a' from 'v' waves, and classifying systolic murmurs as crescendo-decrescendo or holosystolic. Only ACE interns had a significant improvement in score on the mid-year CE. A comprehensive bedside cardiopulmonary physical diagnosis curriculum improved trainee attitudes, confidence and skill in the cardiopulmonary examination. These results provide an opportunity to re-examine the way physical examination is taught and assessed in residency training programs.

  8. AnnotateGenomicRegions: a web application

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern genomic technologies produce large amounts of data that can be mapped to specific regions in the genome. Among the first steps in interpreting the results is annotation of genomic regions with known features such as genes, promoters, CpG islands etc. Several tools have been published to perform this task. However, using these tools often requires a significant amount of bioinformatics skills and/or downloading and installing dedicated software. Results Here we present AnnotateGenomicRegions, a web application that accepts genomic regions as input and outputs a selection of overlapping and/or neighboring genome annotations. Supported organisms include human (hg18, hg19), mouse (mm8, mm9, mm10), zebrafish (danRer7), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sacCer2, sacCer3). AnnotateGenomicRegions is accessible online on a public server or can be installed locally. Some frequently used annotations and genomes are embedded in the application while custom annotations may be added by the user. Conclusions The increasing spread of genomic technologies generates the need for a simple-to-use annotation tool for genomic regions that can be used by biologists and bioinformaticians alike. AnnotateGenomicRegions meets this demand. AnnotateGenomicRegions is an open-source web application that can be installed on any personal computer or institute server. AnnotateGenomicRegions is available at: http://cru.genomics.iit.it/AnnotateGenomicRegions. PMID:24564446

  9. BIOSMILE web search: a web application for annotating biomedical entities and relations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hong-Jie; Huang, Chi-Hsin; Lin, Ryan T K; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2008-07-01

    BIOSMILE web search (BWS), a web-based NCBI-PubMed search application, which can analyze articles for selected biomedical verbs and give users relational information, such as subject, object, location, manner, time, etc. After receiving keyword query input, BWS retrieves matching PubMed abstracts and lists them along with snippets by order of relevancy to protein-protein interaction. Users can then select articles for further analysis, and BWS will find and mark up biomedical relations in the text. The analysis results can be viewed in the abstract text or in table form. To date, BWS has been field tested by over 30 biologists and questionnaires have shown that subjects are highly satisfied with its capabilities and usability. BWS is accessible free of charge at http://bioservices.cse.yzu.edu.tw/BWS.

  10. Lexical Link Analysis (LLA) Application: Improving Web Service to Defense Acquisition Visibility Environment (DAVE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    1 LEXICAL LINK ANALYSIS (LLA) APPLICATION: IMPROVING WEB SERVICE TO DEFENSE ACQUISITION VISIBILITY ENVIRONMENT(DAVE) May 13-14, 2015 Dr. Ying...REPORT DATE MAY 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lexical Link Analysis (LLA) Application...Making 3 2 1 3 L L A Methods • Lexical Link Analysis (LLA) Core – LLA Reports and Visualizations • Collaborative Learning Agents (CLA) for

  11. Feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness and effectiveness of patient participation at bedside shift reporting: mixed-method research protocol.

    PubMed

    Malfait, Simon; Eeckloo, Kristof; Lust, Elisa; Van Biesen, Wim; Van Hecke, Ann

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness and effectiveness of bedside shift reporting in a minimum of five interventions and five control wards. Hospitals continually improve their quality of care. Next to improvements in clinical performance, more patient participation is stimulated through different methods. Methods to enhance patient participation such as bedside shift reporting lack rigorously performed research to determine their feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness and effectiveness. Small-scale research and a previous pilot study indicate that bedside shift reporting improves patient participation, nurse-nurse communication and nurse-patient communication. The development, implementation and evaluation of bedside shift report are based on the Medical Research Council framework for complex interventions in health care. A matched, controlled, mixed-method, longitudinal study design will be used. The Feasibility-Appropriateness-Meaningfulness-Effectiveness framework will be applied for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of bedside shift report. A tailored intervention and implementation process for bedside shift report will be developed using diagnostic interviews, co-design and acceptability testing. The intervention will be evaluated before implementation and three times after implementation. Individual and focus group interviews will be performed. Questionnaires, observations and analysis of the medical records and administrative databases will be completed. This study was funded in October 2015. Research Ethics Committee approval was granted in March 2016. There is a pressing need for rigorous research into the effects of interventions for improving patient participation. This study addresses the significance of bedside shift report as an intervention to improve quality of care, communication and patient participation within a large-scale, matched, controlled research design. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The evolution of nurse-to-nurse bedside report on a medical-surgical cardiology unit.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eva M

    2007-02-01

    Change of shift report is unique to the nursing profession. During report, nurses transfer critical information to promote patient safety and best practices. Nurse-to-nurse bedside report is described as a strategy that includes the patient in the reporting process and is an innovative alternative to traditional shift report.

  13. Use of Web Technology to Access and Update College Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valeau, Edward J.; Luan, Jing

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the process and outcome of a web-based planning application, called Ports of Call, are discussed. The application allows college management to create, edit, and report out activities relating to college plans, all through a web browser. Its design was based on best practices in modern web technology and the application can be easily…

  14. Has Bedside Teaching Had Its Day?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qureshi, Zeshan; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Though a diverse array of teaching methods is now available, bedside teaching is arguably the most favoured. Students like it because it is patient-centred, and it includes a high proportion of relevant skills. It is on the decline, coinciding with declining clinical skills of junior doctors. Several factors might account for this: busier…

  15. New and Improved Version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-06

    ... and Improved Version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application Friday, June 24, 2016 A new and improved version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application has been released. New features include: Versions 5 and 6 ...

  16. Usage and applications of Semantic Web techniques and technologies to support chemistry research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The drug discovery process is now highly dependent on the management, curation and integration of large amounts of potentially useful data. Semantics are necessary in order to interpret the information and derive knowledge. Advances in recent years have mitigated concerns that the lack of robust, usable tools has inhibited the adoption of methodologies based on semantics. Results This paper presents three examples of how Semantic Web techniques and technologies can be used in order to support chemistry research: a controlled vocabulary for quantities, units and symbols in physical chemistry; a controlled vocabulary for the classification and labelling of chemical substances and mixtures; and, a database of chemical identifiers. This paper also presents a Web-based service that uses the datasets in order to assist with the completion of risk assessment forms, along with a discussion of the legal implications and value-proposition for the use of such a service. Conclusions We have introduced the Semantic Web concepts, technologies, and methodologies that can be used to support chemistry research, and have demonstrated the application of those techniques in three areas very relevant to modern chemistry research, generating three new datasets that we offer as exemplars of an extensible portfolio of advanced data integration facilities. We have thereby established the importance of Semantic Web techniques and technologies for meeting Wild’s fourth “grand challenge”. PMID:24855494

  17. Usage and applications of Semantic Web techniques and technologies to support chemistry research.

    PubMed

    Borkum, Mark I; Frey, Jeremy G

    2014-01-01

    The drug discovery process is now highly dependent on the management, curation and integration of large amounts of potentially useful data. Semantics are necessary in order to interpret the information and derive knowledge. Advances in recent years have mitigated concerns that the lack of robust, usable tools has inhibited the adoption of methodologies based on semantics. THIS PAPER PRESENTS THREE EXAMPLES OF HOW SEMANTIC WEB TECHNIQUES AND TECHNOLOGIES CAN BE USED IN ORDER TO SUPPORT CHEMISTRY RESEARCH: a controlled vocabulary for quantities, units and symbols in physical chemistry; a controlled vocabulary for the classification and labelling of chemical substances and mixtures; and, a database of chemical identifiers. This paper also presents a Web-based service that uses the datasets in order to assist with the completion of risk assessment forms, along with a discussion of the legal implications and value-proposition for the use of such a service. We have introduced the Semantic Web concepts, technologies, and methodologies that can be used to support chemistry research, and have demonstrated the application of those techniques in three areas very relevant to modern chemistry research, generating three new datasets that we offer as exemplars of an extensible portfolio of advanced data integration facilities. We have thereby established the importance of Semantic Web techniques and technologies for meeting Wild's fourth "grand challenge".

  18. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A final program summary is reported for test and evaluation activities that were conducted for space shuttle web selection. Large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of advanced composite shear web construction to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners and logitudinal aluminum stiffening. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs.

  19. A Web of applicant attraction: person-organization fit in the context of Web-based recruitment.

    PubMed

    Dineen, Brian R; Ash, Steven R; Noe, Raymond A

    2002-08-01

    Applicant attraction was examined in the context of Web-based recruitment. A person-organization (P-O) fit framework was adopted to examine how the provision of feedback to individuals regarding their potential P-O fit with an organization related to attraction. Objective and subjective P-O fit, agreement with fit feedback, and self-esteem also were examined in relation to attraction. Results of an experiment that manipulated fit feedback level after a self-assessment provided by a fictitious company Web site found that both feedback level and objective P-O fit were positively related to attraction. These relationships were fully mediated by subjective P-O fit. In addition, attraction was related to the interaction of objective fit, feedback, and agreement and objective fit, feedback, and self-esteem. Implications and future Web-based recruitment research directions are discussed.

  20. Web data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibonele, Kasanda J.; Zhang, Yanqing

    2002-03-01

    A web data mining system using granular computing and ASP programming is proposed. This is a web based application, which allows web users to submit survey data for many different companies. This survey is a collection of questions that will help these companies develop and improve their business and customer service with their clients by analyzing survey data. This web application allows users to submit data anywhere. All the survey data is collected into a database for further analysis. An administrator of this web application can login to the system and view all the data submitted. This web application resides on a web server, and the database resides on the MS SQL server.

  1. StreamStats in North Carolina: a water-resources Web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J. Curtis; Terziotti, Silvia; Kolb, Katharine R.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2012-01-01

    A statewide StreamStats application for North Carolina was developed in cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Transportation following completion of a pilot application for the upper French Broad River basin in western North Carolina (Wagner and others, 2009). StreamStats for North Carolina, available at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/north_carolina.html, is a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) application developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in consultation with Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (Esri) to provide access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resources planning and management (Ries and others, 2008). The StreamStats application provides an accurate and consistent process that allows users to easily obtain streamflow statistics, basin characteristics, and descriptive information for USGS data-collection sites and user-selected ungaged sites. In the North Carolina application, users can compute 47 basin characteristics and peak-flow frequency statistics (Weaver and others, 2009; Robbins and Pope, 1996) for a delineated drainage basin. Selected streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for data-collection sites have been compiled from published reports and also are immediately accessible by querying individual sites from the web interface. Examples of basin characteristics that can be computed in StreamStats include drainage area, stream slope, mean annual precipitation, and percentage of forested area (Ries and others, 2008). Examples of streamflow statistics that were previously available only through published documents include peak-flow frequency, flow-duration, and precipitation data. These data are valuable for making decisions related to bridge design, floodplain delineation, water-supply permitting, and sustainable stream quality and ecology. The StreamStats application also allows users to identify stream reaches upstream and downstream from user-selected sites

  2. The Double Parallel Curriculum in Palliative Care: Teaching Learners to Teach End-of-Life Care at the Bedside.

    PubMed

    Healy, Jennifer; Chappell, Phylliss; Lee, Shuko; Ross, Jeanette; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    Dying is a natural process, yet physicians are often uncomfortable caring for dying patients. Learners have limited exposure to curriculum on caring for dying patients and often navigate these encounters without appropriate skills and confidence. We developed and implemented the Double Parallel Curriculum in Palliative Care (DP-PC): End-of-Life (EOL) module. The DP-PC focuses on teaching third-year medical students (MS3) to not only take care of patients in their last hours of life but give learners the confidence to teach patient's families what to expect as they hold vigil at their loved one's bedside. To develop and implement an educational intervention that improves learners' knowledge and confidence in EOL patient and family care. To expand learner confidence to a dual level (learners become teachers) with a simplified and culturally sensitive electronic bedside teaching tool designed to guide learners and patients/families conversations. Curriculum was completed during MS3 ambulatory rotation and included pre-/posttests, an online case-based module, faculty demonstration, and learner role-play using the bedside teaching tool. A total of 247 participants took the pretest, 222 participants took the posttest, and 222 participants matched the pre-/posttest surveys. Students' knowledge of EOL care and the confidence to teach other learners and families about EOL care significantly improved after completing the curriculum. The DP-PC is a technology-savvy educational intervention that improves learner confidence and knowledge toward caring for dying patients and their families. Easy access, technology-based teaching tools may enhance bedside teaching of health-care learners and improve the care of patients and their families at the end of life.

  3. Using food network unfolding to evaluate food-web complexity in terms of biodiversity: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshikazu; Kondoh, Michio; Ishikawa, Naoto F; Togashi, Hiroyuki; Kohmatsu, Yukihiro; Yoshimura, Mayumi; Yoshimizu, Chikage; Haraguchi, Takashi F; Osada, Yutaka; Ohte, Nobuhito; Tokuchi, Naoko; Okuda, Noboru; Miki, Takeshi; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2018-07-01

    Food-web complexity often hinders disentangling functionally relevant aspects of food-web structure and its relationships to biodiversity. Here, we present a theoretical framework to evaluate food-web complexity in terms of biodiversity. Food network unfolding is a theoretical method to transform a complex food web into a linear food chain based on ecosystem processes. Based on this method, we can define three biodiversity indices, horizontal diversity (D H ), vertical diversity (D V ) and range diversity (D R ), which are associated with the species diversity within each trophic level, diversity of trophic levels, and diversity in resource use, respectively. These indices are related to Shannon's diversity index (H'), where H' = D H  + D V  - D R . Application of the framework to three riverine macroinvertebrate communities revealed that D indices, calculated from biomass and stable isotope features, captured well the anthropogenic, seasonal, or other within-site changes in food-web structures that could not be captured with H' alone. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  4. OpenGL in Multi-User Web-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostek, K.; Piórkowski, A.

    In this article construction and potential of OpenGL multi-user web-based application are presented. The most common technologies like: .NET ASP, Java and Mono were used with specific OpenGL libraries to visualize tree-dimensional medical data. The most important conclusion of this work is that server side applications can easily take advantage of fast GPU and produce efficient results of advanced computation just like the visualization.

  5. ICU Bedside Nurses' Involvement in Palliative Care Communication: A Multicenter Survey.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Wendy G; Puntillo, Kathleen; Boyle, Deborah; Barbour, Susan; Turner, Kathleen; Cimino, Jenica; Moore, Eric; Noort, Janice; MacMillan, John; Pearson, Diana; Grywalski, Michelle; Liao, Solomon; Ferrell, Bruce; Meyer, Jeannette; O'Neil-Page, Edith; Cain, Julia; Herman, Heather; Mitchell, William; Pantilat, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Successful and sustained integration of palliative care into the intensive care unit (ICU) requires the active engagement of bedside nurses. To describe the perspectives of ICU bedside nurses on their involvement in palliative care communication. A survey was designed, based on prior work, to assess nurses' perspectives on palliative care communication, including the importance and frequency of their involvement, confidence, and barriers. The 46-item survey was distributed via e-mail in 2013 to bedside nurses working in ICUs across the five academic medical centers of the University of California, U.S. The survey was sent to 1791 nurses; 598 (33%) responded. Most participants (88%) reported that their engagement in discussions of prognosis, goals of care, and palliative care was very important to the quality of patient care. A minority reported often discussing palliative care consultations with physicians (31%) or families (33%); 45% reported rarely or never participating in family meeting discussions. Participating nurses most frequently cited the following barriers to their involvement in palliative care communication: need for more training (66%), physicians not asking their perspective (60%), and the emotional toll of discussions (43%). ICU bedside nurses see their involvement in discussions of prognosis, goals of care, and palliative care as a key element of overall quality of patient care. Based on the barriers participants identified regarding their engagement, interventions are needed to ensure that nurses have the education, opportunities, and support to actively participate in these discussions. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. StreamStats: A water resources web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ries, Kernell G.; Guthrie, John G.; Rea, Alan H.; Steeves, Peter A.; Stewart, David W.

    2008-01-01

    . Streamflow measurements are collected systematically over a period of years at partial-record stations to estimate peak-flow or low-flow statistics. Streamflow measurements usually are collected at miscellaneous-measurement stations for specific hydrologic studies with various objectives.StreamStats is a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) application that was created by the USGS, in cooperation with Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI)1, to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resources planning and management. StreamStats functionality is based on ESRI’s ArcHydro Data Model and Tools, described on the Web at http://resources.arcgis.com/en/communities/hydro/01vn0000000s000000.htm. StreamStats allows users to easily obtain streamflow statistics, basin characteristics, and descriptive information for USGS data-collection stations and user-selected ungaged sites. It also allows users to identify stream reaches that are upstream and downstream from user-selected sites, and to identify and obtain information for locations along the streams where activities that may affect streamflow conditions are occurring. This functionality can be accessed through a map-based user interface that appears in the user’s Web browser, or individual functions can be requested remotely as Web services by other Web or desktop computer applications. StreamStats can perform these analyses much faster than historically used manual techniques.StreamStats was designed so that each state would be implemented as a separate application, with a reliance on local partnerships to fund the individual applications, and a goal of eventual full national implementation. Idaho became the first state to implement StreamStats in 2003. By mid-2008, 14 states had applications available to the public, and 18 other states were in various stages of implementation.

  7. Leading through partnering: from bedside to community.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Anita B

    2004-01-01

    Partnering as a means of leading requires a particular focus and has particular characteristics. It is unrealistic to think that every person that participates in a partnership would have honed the skills to provide guidance, strength, and support for the process. It is not likely that every partner understands the collaborative process well enough to engage all partners with tact, openness, fairness, and critical, but respectful, reflection. The characteristics depicted in the Leading Through Partnering dome reflect those leaders who have integrated partnering into a coherent framework of action. Stern (2003), in describing her grounded theory research on "attentive partnering" among colleagues, determined that conditions for partnering seem to require the presence of "determined, persuasive leaders who foster growth-enhancing collegial relationships" (pg. 271). The concept of partnering continues to take hold in many forms. Leading Through Partnering as a variant form, whether occurring on a small scale at the bedside or a large scale in the community, is likely to be more than just a passing trend.

  8. REFINE (REducing Falls in In-patieNt Elderly) using bed and bedside chair pressure sensors linked to radio-pagers in acute hospital care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, Opinder; Drummond, Avril; Kendrick, Denise; Grainge, Matthew J.; Vass, Catherine; Sach, Tracey; Gladman, John; Avis, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background: falls in hospitals are a major problem and contribute to substantial healthcare burden. Advances in sensor technology afford innovative approaches to reducing falls in acute hospital care. However, whether these are clinically effective and cost effective in the UK setting has not been evaluated. Methods: pragmatic, parallel-arm, individual randomised controlled trial of bed and bedside chair pressure sensors using radio-pagers (intervention group) compared with standard care (control group) in elderly patients admitted to acute, general medical wards, in a large UK teaching hospital. Primary outcome measure number of in-patient bedside falls per 1,000 bed days. Results: 1,839 participants were randomised (918 to the intervention group and 921 to the control group). There were 85 bedside falls (65 fallers) in the intervention group, falls rate 8.71 per 1,000 bed days compared with 83 bedside falls (64 fallers) in the control group, falls rate 9.84 per 1,000 bed days (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66–1.22; P = 0.51). There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to time to first bedside fall (adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.95; 95% CI: 0.67–1.34; P= 0.12). The mean cost per patient in the intervention group was £7199 compared with £6400 in the control group, mean difference in QALYs per patient, 0.0001 (95% CI: −0.0006–0.0004, P= 0.67). Conclusions: bed and bedside chair pressure sensors as a single intervention strategy do not reduce in-patient bedside falls, time to first bedside fall and are not cost-effective in elderly patients in acute, general medical wards in the UK. Trial registration: isrctn.org identifier: ISRCTN44972300. PMID:24141253

  9. Building and testing a patient-centric electronic bedside communication center.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Patricia C; Carroll, Diane L; Hurley, Ann C; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Pozzar, Rachel; Caligtan, Christine A

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe the development and pilot testing of an electronic bedside communication center (eBCC) prototype to improve access to health information for hospitalized adults and their family caregivers. Focus groups were used to identify improvements for the initial eBCC prototype developed by the research team. Face-to-face bedside interviews and questions were presented while patients used the eBCC for usability testing to drive further development. Qualitative methods within an iterative, participatory approach supported the development of an eBCC prototype that was considered both easy to use and helpful for accessing tailored patient information during an inpatient hospitalization to receive acute care. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. SCALEUS: Semantic Web Services Integration for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Sernadela, Pedro; González-Castro, Lorena; Oliveira, José Luís

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, we have witnessed an explosion of biological data resulting largely from the demands of life science research. The vast majority of these data are freely available via diverse bioinformatics platforms, including relational databases and conventional keyword search applications. This type of approach has achieved great results in the last few years, but proved to be unfeasible when information needs to be combined or shared among different and scattered sources. During recent years, many of these data distribution challenges have been solved with the adoption of semantic web. Despite the evident benefits of this technology, its adoption introduced new challenges related with the migration process, from existent systems to the semantic level. To facilitate this transition, we have developed Scaleus, a semantic web migration tool that can be deployed on top of traditional systems in order to bring knowledge, inference rules, and query federation to the existent data. Targeted at the biomedical domain, this web-based platform offers, in a single package, straightforward data integration and semantic web services that help developers and researchers in the creation process of new semantically enhanced information systems. SCALEUS is available as open source at http://bioinformatics-ua.github.io/scaleus/ .

  11. Bench, Bedside, Curbside, and Home: Translational Research to Include Transformative Change Using Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felege, Christopher; Hahn, Emily; Hunter, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Translational research originated in the medical field during the 1990s to describe taking discovery based research through the steps of applying it to clinical research and patient-oriented care. This model is implicitly linear, depicting the flow of information from researchers' bench, to a clinical trial bedside, to a primary care physician's…

  12. Open chemistry: RESTful web APIs, JSON, NWChem and the modern web application.

    PubMed

    Hanwell, Marcus D; de Jong, Wibe A; Harris, Christopher J

    2017-10-30

    An end-to-end platform for chemical science research has been developed that integrates data from computational and experimental approaches through a modern web-based interface. The platform offers an interactive visualization and analytics environment that functions well on mobile, laptop and desktop devices. It offers pragmatic solutions to ensure that large and complex data sets are more accessible. Existing desktop applications/frameworks were extended to integrate with high-performance computing resources, and offer command-line tools to automate interaction-connecting distributed teams to this software platform on their own terms. The platform was developed openly, and all source code hosted on the GitHub platform with automated deployment possible using Ansible coupled with standard Ubuntu-based machine images deployed to cloud machines. The platform is designed to enable teams to reap the benefits of the connected web-going beyond what conventional search and analytics platforms offer in this area. It also has the goal of offering federated instances, that can be customized to the sites/research performed. Data gets stored using JSON, extending upon previous approaches using XML, building structures that support computational chemistry calculations. These structures were developed to make it easy to process data across different languages, and send data to a JavaScript-based web client.

  13. Open chemistry: RESTful web APIs, JSON, NWChem and the modern web application

    DOE PAGES

    Hanwell, Marcus D.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Harris, Christopher J.

    2017-10-30

    An end-to-end platform for chemical science research has been developed that integrates data from computational and experimental approaches through a modern web-based interface. The platform offers an interactive visualization and analytics environment that functions well on mobile, laptop and desktop devices. It offers pragmatic solutions to ensure that large and complex data sets are more accessible. Existing desktop applications/frameworks were extended to integrate with high-performance computing resources, and offer command-line tools to automate interaction - connecting distributed teams to this software platform on their own terms. The platform was developed openly, and all source code hosted on the GitHub platformmore » with automated deployment possible using Ansible coupled with standard Ubuntu-based machine images deployed to cloud machines. The platform is designed to enable teams to reap the benefits of the connected web - going beyond what conventional search and analytics platforms offer in this area. It also has the goal of offering federated instances, that can be customized to the sites/research performed. Data gets stored using JSON, extending upon previous approaches using XML, building structures that support computational chemistry calculations. These structures were developed to make it easy to process data across different languages, and send data to a JavaScript-based web client.« less

  14. Open chemistry: RESTful web APIs, JSON, NWChem and the modern web application

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hanwell, Marcus D.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Harris, Christopher J.

    An end-to-end platform for chemical science research has been developed that integrates data from computational and experimental approaches through a modern web-based interface. The platform offers an interactive visualization and analytics environment that functions well on mobile, laptop and desktop devices. It offers pragmatic solutions to ensure that large and complex data sets are more accessible. Existing desktop applications/frameworks were extended to integrate with high-performance computing resources, and offer command-line tools to automate interaction - connecting distributed teams to this software platform on their own terms. The platform was developed openly, and all source code hosted on the GitHub platformmore » with automated deployment possible using Ansible coupled with standard Ubuntu-based machine images deployed to cloud machines. The platform is designed to enable teams to reap the benefits of the connected web - going beyond what conventional search and analytics platforms offer in this area. It also has the goal of offering federated instances, that can be customized to the sites/research performed. Data gets stored using JSON, extending upon previous approaches using XML, building structures that support computational chemistry calculations. These structures were developed to make it easy to process data across different languages, and send data to a JavaScript-based web client.« less

  15. Internal Medicine Residents' Retention of Knowledge and Skills in Bedside Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Town, James A; Bergl, Paul A; Narang, Akhil; McConville, John F

    2016-10-01

    The long-term retention of knowledge and skills in bedside ultrasound by internal medicine residents after ultrasound training is not well understood. We sought to determine whether knowledge and skills acquired from focused training in bedside ultrasound are retained over time, and whether retention is related to independent practice. We conducted a prospective observational trial of 101 internal medicine residents at an academic medical center who participated in a bedside ultrasound workshop followed by 12 months of independent practice. Performance was measured on image-based knowledge and skills assessment using direct observation, both before the workshop and 12 months later. Individual usage data were obtained along with a survey on attitudes toward bedside ultrasound. Participants' mean knowledge assessment score increased from a baseline of 63.7% to 84.5% immediately after training ( P  < .001). At 12 months, mean knowledge score fell to 73.0%, significantly different from both prior assessments ( P  < .001). Despite knowledge decline, the mean skills assessment score improved from a baseline of 30.5% to 50.4% at 12 months ( P  < .001). Residents reporting more ultrasound use (> 25 examinations) had higher scores in baseline knowledge and skills assessments than those with lower usage (< 25 examinations). Change in knowledge and image acquisition skills between assessments was equal in both subgroups. Residents' knowledge of ultrasound improved after brief training but decayed over time, whereas skills showed marginal improvement over the study, with minimal support. Growth and retention of ultrasound abilities were not impacted by usage rates.

  16. Internal Medicine Residents' Retention of Knowledge and Skills in Bedside Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Town, James A.; Bergl, Paul A.; Narang, Akhil; McConville, John F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background  The long-term retention of knowledge and skills in bedside ultrasound by internal medicine residents after ultrasound training is not well understood. Objective  We sought to determine whether knowledge and skills acquired from focused training in bedside ultrasound are retained over time, and whether retention is related to independent practice. Methods  We conducted a prospective observational trial of 101 internal medicine residents at an academic medical center who participated in a bedside ultrasound workshop followed by 12 months of independent practice. Performance was measured on image-based knowledge and skills assessment using direct observation, both before the workshop and 12 months later. Individual usage data were obtained along with a survey on attitudes toward bedside ultrasound. Results  Participants' mean knowledge assessment score increased from a baseline of 63.7% to 84.5% immediately after training (P < .001). At 12 months, mean knowledge score fell to 73.0%, significantly different from both prior assessments (P < .001). Despite knowledge decline, the mean skills assessment score improved from a baseline of 30.5% to 50.4% at 12 months (P < .001). Residents reporting more ultrasound use (> 25 examinations) had higher scores in baseline knowledge and skills assessments than those with lower usage (< 25 examinations). Change in knowledge and image acquisition skills between assessments was equal in both subgroups. Conclusions  Residents' knowledge of ultrasound improved after brief training but decayed over time, whereas skills showed marginal improvement over the study, with minimal support. Growth and retention of ultrasound abilities were not impacted by usage rates. PMID:27777666

  17. Using Web2.0 Applications to Close the Digital Divide in Western Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trinidad, Sue; Broadley, Tania

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this paper documents the use of Web2.0 applications with six Western Australian schools that are considered to be regional and/or remote. With a population of two million people within an area of 2,525,500 square kilometres Western Australia has a number of towns that are classified as regional and remote. Each of the…

  18. Web-based recruitment: effects of information, organizational brand, and attitudes toward a Web site on applicant attraction.

    PubMed

    Allen, David G; Mahto, Raj V; Otondo, Robert F

    2007-11-01

    Recruitment theory and research show that objective characteristics, subjective considerations, and critical contact send signals to prospective applicants about the organization and available opportunities. In the generating applicants phase of recruitment, critical contact may consist largely of interactions with recruitment sources (e.g., newspaper ads, job fairs, organization Web sites); however, research has yet to fully address how all 3 types of signaling mechanisms influence early job pursuit decisions in the context of organizational recruitment Web sites. Results based on data from 814 student participants searching actual organization Web sites support and extend signaling and brand equity theories by showing that job information (directly) and organization information (indirectly) are related to intentions to pursue employment when a priori perceptions of image are controlled. A priori organization image is related to pursuit intentions when subsequent information search is controlled, but organization familiarity is not, and attitudes about a recruitment source also influence attraction and partially mediate the effects of organization information. Theoretical and practical implications for recruitment are discussed. (c) 2007 APA

  19. Development of Web-Based Learning Application for Generation Z

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hariadi, Bambang; Dewiyani Sunarto, M. J.; Sudarmaningtyas, Pantjawati

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a web-based learning application as a form of learning revolution. The form of learning revolution includes the provision of unlimited teaching materials, real time class organization, and is not limited by time or place. The implementation of this application is in the form of hybrid learning by using Google Apps for…

  20. Development of a multichemical food web model: application to PBDEs in Lake Ellasjoen, Bear Island, Norway.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nilima; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Gewurtz, Sarah B; Diamond, Miriam L; Evenset, Anita; Christensen, Guttorm N; Gregor, Dennis

    2006-08-01

    A multichemical food web model has been developed to estimate the biomagnification of interconverting chemicals in aquatic food webs. We extended a fugacity-based food web model for single chemicals to account for reversible and irreversible biotransformation among a parent chemical and transformation products, by simultaneously solving mass balance equations of the chemicals using a matrix solution. The model can be applied to any number of chemicals and organisms or taxonomic groups in a food web. The model was illustratively applied to four PBDE congeners, BDE-47, -99, -100, and -153, in the food web of Lake Ellasjøen, Bear Island, Norway. In Ellasjøen arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), the multichemical model estimated PBDE biotransformation from higher to lower brominated congeners and improved the correspondence between estimated and measured concentrations in comparison to estimates from the single-chemical food web model. The underestimation of BDE-47, even after considering bioformation due to biotransformation of the otherthree congeners, suggests its formation from additional biotransformation pathways not considered in this application. The model estimates approximate values for congener-specific biotransformation half-lives of 5.7,0.8,1.14, and 0.45 years for BDE-47, -99, -100, and -153, respectively, in large arctic char (S. alpinus) of Lake Ellasjøen.

  1. AMBIT RESTful web services: an implementation of the OpenTox application programming interface.

    PubMed

    Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin

    2011-05-16

    The AMBIT web services package is one of the several existing independent implementations of the OpenTox Application Programming Interface and is built according to the principles of the Representational State Transfer (REST) architecture. The Open Source Predictive Toxicology Framework, developed by the partners in the EC FP7 OpenTox project, aims at providing a unified access to toxicity data and predictive models, as well as validation procedures. This is achieved by i) an information model, based on a common OWL-DL ontology ii) links to related ontologies; iii) data and algorithms, available through a standardized REST web services interface, where every compound, data set or predictive method has a unique web address, used to retrieve its Resource Description Framework (RDF) representation, or initiate the associated calculations.The AMBIT web services package has been developed as an extension of AMBIT modules, adding the ability to create (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models and providing an OpenTox API compliant interface. The representation of data and processing resources in W3C Resource Description Framework facilitates integrating the resources as Linked Data. By uploading datasets with chemical structures and arbitrary set of properties, they become automatically available online in several formats. The services provide unified interfaces to several descriptor calculation, machine learning and similarity searching algorithms, as well as to applicability domain and toxicity prediction models. All Toxtree modules for predicting the toxicological hazard of chemical compounds are also integrated within this package. The complexity and diversity of the processing is reduced to the simple paradigm "read data from a web address, perform processing, write to a web address". The online service allows to easily run predictions, without installing any software, as well to share online datasets and models. The downloadable web application

  2. AMBIT RESTful web services: an implementation of the OpenTox application programming interface

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The AMBIT web services package is one of the several existing independent implementations of the OpenTox Application Programming Interface and is built according to the principles of the Representational State Transfer (REST) architecture. The Open Source Predictive Toxicology Framework, developed by the partners in the EC FP7 OpenTox project, aims at providing a unified access to toxicity data and predictive models, as well as validation procedures. This is achieved by i) an information model, based on a common OWL-DL ontology ii) links to related ontologies; iii) data and algorithms, available through a standardized REST web services interface, where every compound, data set or predictive method has a unique web address, used to retrieve its Resource Description Framework (RDF) representation, or initiate the associated calculations. The AMBIT web services package has been developed as an extension of AMBIT modules, adding the ability to create (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models and providing an OpenTox API compliant interface. The representation of data and processing resources in W3C Resource Description Framework facilitates integrating the resources as Linked Data. By uploading datasets with chemical structures and arbitrary set of properties, they become automatically available online in several formats. The services provide unified interfaces to several descriptor calculation, machine learning and similarity searching algorithms, as well as to applicability domain and toxicity prediction models. All Toxtree modules for predicting the toxicological hazard of chemical compounds are also integrated within this package. The complexity and diversity of the processing is reduced to the simple paradigm "read data from a web address, perform processing, write to a web address". The online service allows to easily run predictions, without installing any software, as well to share online datasets and models. The downloadable web application

  3. HTSstation: a web application and open-access libraries for high-throughput sequencing data analysis.

    PubMed

    David, Fabrice P A; Delafontaine, Julien; Carat, Solenne; Ross, Frederick J; Lefebvre, Gregory; Jarosz, Yohan; Sinclair, Lucas; Noordermeer, Daan; Rougemont, Jacques; Leleu, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The HTSstation analysis portal is a suite of simple web forms coupled to modular analysis pipelines for various applications of High-Throughput Sequencing including ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, 4C-seq and re-sequencing. HTSstation offers biologists the possibility to rapidly investigate their HTS data using an intuitive web application with heuristically pre-defined parameters. A number of open-source software components have been implemented and can be used to build, configure and run HTS analysis pipelines reactively. Besides, our programming framework empowers developers with the possibility to design their own workflows and integrate additional third-party software. The HTSstation web application is accessible at http://htsstation.epfl.ch.

  4. Dynamic Space for Rent: Using Commercial Web Hosting to Develop a Web 2.0 Intranet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgins, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The explosion of Web 2.0 into libraries has left many smaller academic libraries (and other libraries with limited computing resources or support) to work in the cloud using free Web applications. The use of commercial Web hosting is an innovative approach to the problem of inadequate local resources. While the idea of insourcing IT will seem…

  5. Development of a bedside viable ultrasound protocol to quantify appendicular lean tissue mass

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Michael T.; Lafleur, Benoit; Dubin, Joel A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Ultrasound is a non‐invasive and readily available tool that can be prospectively applied at the bedside to assess muscle mass in clinical settings. The four‐site protocol, which images two anatomical sites on each quadriceps, may be a viable bedside method, but its ability to predict musculature has not been compared against whole‐body reference methods. Our primary objectives were to (i) compare the four‐site protocol's ability to predict appendicular lean tissue mass from dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry; (ii) optimize the predictability of the four‐site protocol with additional anatomical muscle thicknesses and easily obtained covariates; and (iii) assess the ability of the optimized protocol to identify individuals with low lean tissue mass. Methods This observational cross‐sectional study recruited 96 university and community dwelling adults. Participants underwent ultrasound scans for assessment of muscle thickness and whole‐body dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry scans for assessment of appendicular lean tissue. Ultrasound protocols included (i) the nine‐site protocol, which images nine anterior and posterior muscle groups in supine and prone positions, and (ii) the four‐site protocol, which images two anterior sites on each quadriceps muscle group in a supine position. Results The four‐site protocol was strongly associated (R 2 = 0.72) with appendicular lean tissue mass, but Bland–Altman analysis displayed wide limits of agreement (−5.67, 5.67 kg). Incorporating the anterior upper arm muscle thickness, and covariates age and sex, alongside the four‐site protocol, improved the association (R 2 = 0.91) with appendicular lean tissue and displayed narrower limits of agreement (−3.18, 3.18 kg). The optimized protocol demonstrated a strong ability to identify low lean tissue mass (area under the curve = 0.89). Conclusions The four‐site protocol can be improved with the addition of the anterior upper

  6. 77 FR 73345 - Safety Standard for Bedside Sleepers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... product-related issues, such as non- levelness of the product (two reports), instability of leg extensions...) Segmented Mattress Flatness Requirement and Test Method; (2) Removable Bassinet Bed Stability; and (3) Stability Test Dummy. Because bedside sleepers are already required to be tested to the bassinet standard...

  7. Web 2.0 applications in medicine: trends and topics in the literature.

    PubMed

    Boudry, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The World Wide Web has changed research habits, and these changes were further expanded when "Web 2.0" became popular in 2005. Bibliometrics is a helpful tool used for describing patterns of publication, for interpreting progression over time, and the geographical distribution of research in a given field. Few studies employing bibliometrics, however, have been carried out on the correlative nature of scientific literature and Web 2.0. The aim of this bibliometric analysis was to provide an overview of Web 2.0 implications in the biomedical literature. The objectives were to assess the growth rate of literature, key journals, authors, and country contributions, and to evaluate whether the various Web 2.0 applications were expressed within this biomedical literature, and if so, how. A specific query with keywords chosen to be representative of Web 2.0 applications was built for the PubMed database. Articles related to Web 2.0 were downloaded in Extensible Markup Language (XML) and were processed through developed hypertext preprocessor (PHP) scripts, then imported to Microsoft Excel 2010 for data processing. A total of 1347 articles were included in this study. The number of articles related to Web 2.0 has been increasing from 2002 to 2012 (average annual growth rate was 106.3% with a maximum of 333% in 2005). The United States was by far the predominant country for authors, with 514 articles (54.0%; 514/952). The second and third most productive countries were the United Kingdom and Australia, with 87 (9.1%; 87/952) and 44 articles (4.6%; 44/952), respectively. Distribution of number of articles per author showed that the core population of researchers working on Web 2.0 in the medical field could be estimated at approximately 75. In total, 614 journals were identified during this analysis. Using Bradford's law, 27 core journals were identified, among which three (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, Journal of Medical Internet Research, and Nucleic Acids

  8. Tank Information System (tis): a Case Study in Migrating Web Mapping Application from Flex to Dojo for Arcgis Server and then to Open Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulsani, B. R.

    2017-11-01

    Tank Information System is a web application which provides comprehensive information about minor irrigation tanks of Telangana State. As part of the program, a web mapping application using Flex and ArcGIS server was developed to make the data available to the public. In course of time as Flex be-came outdated, a migration of the client interface to the latest JavaScript based technologies was carried out. Initially, the Flex based application was migrated to ArcGIS JavaScript API using Dojo Toolkit. Both the client applications used published services from ArcGIS server. To check the migration pattern from proprietary to open source, the JavaScript based ArcGIS application was later migrated to OpenLayers and Dojo Toolkit which used published service from GeoServer. The migration pattern noticed in the study especially emphasizes upon the use of Dojo Toolkit and PostgreSQL database for ArcGIS server so that migration to open source could be performed effortlessly. The current ap-plication provides a case in study which could assist organizations in migrating their proprietary based ArcGIS web applications to open source. Furthermore, the study reveals cost benefits of adopting open source against commercial software's.

  9. WebEAV: automatic metadata-driven generation of web interfaces to entity-attribute-value databases.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, P M; Brandt, C M; Marenco, L

    2000-01-01

    The task of creating and maintaining a front end to a large institutional entity-attribute-value (EAV) database can be cumbersome when using traditional client-server technology. Switching to Web technology as a delivery vehicle solves some of these problems but introduces others. In particular, Web development environments tend to be primitive, and many features that client-server developers take for granted are missing. WebEAV is a generic framework for Web development that is intended to streamline the process of Web application development for databases having a significant EAV component. It also addresses some challenging user interface issues that arise when any complex system is created. The authors describe the architecture of WebEAV and provide an overview of its features with suitable examples.

  10. Pred-Skin: A Fast and Reliable Web Application to Assess Skin Sensitization Effect of Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Braga, Rodolpho C; Alves, Vinicius M; Muratov, Eugene N; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Trospsha, Alexander; Andrade, Carolina Horta

    2017-05-22

    Chemically induced skin sensitization is a complex immunological disease with a profound impact on quality of life and working ability. Despite some progress in developing alternative methods for assessing the skin sensitization potential of chemical substances, there is no in vitro test that correlates well with human data. Computational QSAR models provide a rapid screening approach and contribute valuable information for the assessment of chemical toxicity. We describe the development of a freely accessible web-based and mobile application for the identification of potential skin sensitizers. The application is based on previously developed binary QSAR models of skin sensitization potential from human (109 compounds) and murine local lymph node assay (LLNA, 515 compounds) data with good external correct classification rate (0.70-0.81 and 0.72-0.84, respectively). We also included a multiclass skin sensitization potency model based on LLNA data (accuracy ranging between 0.73 and 0.76). When a user evaluates a compound in the web app, the outputs are (i) binary predictions of human and murine skin sensitization potential; (ii) multiclass prediction of murine skin sensitization; and (iii) probability maps illustrating the predicted contribution of chemical fragments. The app is the first tool available that incorporates quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models based on human data as well as multiclass models for LLNA. The Pred-Skin web app version 1.0 is freely available for the web, iOS, and Android (in development) at the LabMol web portal ( http://labmol.com.br/predskin/ ), in the Apple Store, and on Google Play, respectively. We will continuously update the app as new skin sensitization data and respective models become available.

  11. WeBIAS: a web server for publishing bioinformatics applications.

    PubMed

    Daniluk, Paweł; Wilczyński, Bartek; Lesyng, Bogdan

    2015-11-02

    One of the requirements for a successful scientific tool is its availability. Developing a functional web service, however, is usually considered a mundane and ungratifying task, and quite often neglected. When publishing bioinformatic applications, such attitude puts additional burden on the reviewers who have to cope with poorly designed interfaces in order to assess quality of presented methods, as well as impairs actual usefulness to the scientific community at large. In this note we present WeBIAS-a simple, self-contained solution to make command-line programs accessible through web forms. It comprises a web portal capable of serving several applications and backend schedulers which carry out computations. The server handles user registration and authentication, stores queries and results, and provides a convenient administrator interface. WeBIAS is implemented in Python and available under GNU Affero General Public License. It has been developed and tested on GNU/Linux compatible platforms covering a vast majority of operational WWW servers. Since it is written in pure Python, it should be easy to deploy also on all other platforms supporting Python (e.g. Windows, Mac OS X). Documentation and source code, as well as a demonstration site are available at http://bioinfo.imdik.pan.pl/webias . WeBIAS has been designed specifically with ease of installation and deployment of services in mind. Setting up a simple application requires minimal effort, yet it is possible to create visually appealing, feature-rich interfaces for query submission and presentation of results.

  12. Patient and nurse preferences for implementation of bedside handover: Do they agree? Findings from a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Whitty, Jennifer A; Spinks, Jean; Bucknall, Tracey; Tobiano, Georgia; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-08-01

    To describe and compare patients' and nurses' preferences for the implementation of bedside handover. Discrete choice experiment describing handover choices using six characteristics: whether the patient is invited to participate; whether a family member/carer/friend is invited; the number of nurses present; the level of patient involvement; the information content; and privacy. Two Australian hospitals. Adult patients (n=401) and nurses (n=200) recruited from medical wards. Mean importance scores for handover characteristics estimated using mixed multinomial logit regression of the choice data. Both patient and nurse participants preferred handover at the bedside rather than elsewhere (P<.05). Being invited to participate, supporting strong two-way communication, having a family member/carer/friend present and having two nurses rather than the nursing team present were most important for patients. Patients being invited to participate and supporting strong two-way communication were most important for nurses. However, contrary to patient preferences, having a family member/carer/friend present was not considered important by nurses. Further, while patients expressed a weak preference to have sensitive information handed over quietly at the bedside, nurses expressed a relatively strong preference for handover of sensitive information verbally away from the bedside. All participants strongly support handover at the bedside and want patients to participate although patient and nurse preferences for various aspects of bedside handover differ. An understanding of these preferences is expected to support recommendations for improving the patient hospital experience and the consistent implementation of bedside handover as a safety initiative. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool: A Web Application

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Casson, William H. Jr.

    2012-08-02

    The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool is a type of Google maps for adversaries. It's a web-based Geospatial application similar to Google Maps. It helps the U.S. government plan operations that predict where an adversary might be. It's easily accessible and maintainble and it's simple to use without much training.

  14. A bedside test for methaemoglobinemia improved antidote use in propanil poisoning.

    PubMed

    Shihana, Fathima; Dawson, Andrew H; Dobbins, Timothy; Dissanayake, Dhammika; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2016-08-01

    In 2008, self-poisoning with the herbicide propanil had a case-fatality of around 11% in Sri Lanka. A simple quantitative methaemoglobinemia bedside test was developed so that treatment could be titrated according to the methaemoglobin level. To determine whether the new method influenced patient management and changed the case fatality of propanil self-poisoning. The bedside test (using an inexpensive validated colour chart) was introduced in three hospitals (Anuradhapura, Polonnaruwa and Galle) in Sri Lanka from 2008. Junior ward staff were given a brief training on how to use the chart for quantitative estimation of methaemoglobin in patients with propanil poisoning and utilize the results in the context of the national treatment guidelines for propanil poisoning. It was taught that the bedside test should be done repeatedly from admission until it showed consistently low values of methaemoglobin. Treatment with the antidote methylene blue was suggested for patients whose methaemoglobin was greater than 20%. Limited clinical data on poisoning have been prospectively collected from these hospitals from 2003. The case-fatality and management before and after the change were compared with data up to December 2014. The case-fatality decreased from (38/401) 9.5% to (8/262) 3.1% [difference: -6.4%, 95% CI: -10 to -3]. Methylene blue use increased from under 10% of patients before to 55% of patients after the intervention. More patients received repeat doses and infusions, and few received ascorbic acid and exchange transfusion. The simple bedside test for methaemoglobinemia was readily adopted into routine practice and led to large changes in management. A substantial reduction in mortality from propanil poisoning occurred after this intervention.

  15. Self-reported information needs of anesthesia residency applicants and analysis of applicant-related web sites resources at 131 United States training programs.

    PubMed

    Chu, Larry F; Young, Chelsea A; Zamora, Abby K; Lowe, Derek; Hoang, Dan B; Pearl, Ronald G; Macario, Alex

    2011-02-01

    Despite the use of web-based information resources by both anesthesia departments and applicants, little research has been done to assess these resources and determine whether they are meeting applicant needs. Evidence is needed to guide anesthesia informatics research in developing high-quality anesthesia residency program Web sites (ARPWs). We used an anonymous web-based program (SurveyMonkey, Portland, OR) to distribute a survey investigating the information needs and perceived usefulness of ARPWs to all 572 Stanford anesthesia residency program applicants. A quantitative scoring system was then created to assess the quality of ARPWs in meeting the information needs of these applicants. Two researchers independently analyzed all 131 ARPWs in the United States to determine whether the ARPWs met the needs of applicants based on the scoring system. Finally, a qualitative assessment of the overall user experience of ARPWs was developed to account for the subjective elements of the Web site's presentation. Ninety-eight percent of respondents reported having used ARPWs during the application process. Fifty-six percent reported first visiting the Stanford ARPW when deciding whether to apply to Stanford's anesthesia residency program. Multimedia and Web 2.0 technologies were "very" or "most" useful in "learning intangible aspects of a program, like how happy people are" (42% multimedia and Web 2.0 versus 14% text and photos). ARPWs, on average, contained only 46% of the content items identified as important by applicants. The average (SD) quality scores among all ARPWs was 2.06 (0.59) of 4.0 maximum points. The mean overall qualitative score for all 131 ARPWs was 4.97 (1.92) of 10 points. Only 2% of applicants indicated that the majority (75%-100%) of Web sites they visited provided a complete experience. Anesthesia residency applicants rely heavily on ARPWs to research programs, prepare for interviews, and formulate a rank list. Anesthesia departments can improve their

  16. HTSstation: A Web Application and Open-Access Libraries for High-Throughput Sequencing Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    David, Fabrice P. A.; Delafontaine, Julien; Carat, Solenne; Ross, Frederick J.; Lefebvre, Gregory; Jarosz, Yohan; Sinclair, Lucas; Noordermeer, Daan; Rougemont, Jacques; Leleu, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The HTSstation analysis portal is a suite of simple web forms coupled to modular analysis pipelines for various applications of High-Throughput Sequencing including ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, 4C-seq and re-sequencing. HTSstation offers biologists the possibility to rapidly investigate their HTS data using an intuitive web application with heuristically pre-defined parameters. A number of open-source software components have been implemented and can be used to build, configure and run HTS analysis pipelines reactively. Besides, our programming framework empowers developers with the possibility to design their own workflows and integrate additional third-party software. The HTSstation web application is accessible at http://htsstation.epfl.ch. PMID:24475057

  17. From Web 2.0 to Teacher 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.; Li, Qing

    2008-01-01

    The World Wide Web is evolving in response to users who demand faster and more efficient access to information, portability, and reusability of digital objects between Web-based and computer-based applications and powerful communication, publication, collaboration, and teaching and learning tools. This article reviews current uses of Web-based…

  18. Metabolic impact of shivering during therapeutic temperature modulation: the Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale.

    PubMed

    Badjatia, Neeraj; Strongilis, Evangelia; Gordon, Errol; Prescutti, Mary; Fernandez, Luis; Fernandez, Andres; Buitrago, Manuel; Schmidt, J Michael; Ostapkovich, Noeleen D; Mayer, Stephan A

    2008-12-01

    Therapeutic temperature modulation is widely used in neurocritical care but commonly causes shivering, which can hamper the cooling process and result in increases in systemic metabolism. We sought to validate a grading scale to assist in the monitoring and control of shivering. A simple 4-point Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale was validated against continuous assessments of resting energy expenditure, oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide production as measured by indirect calorimetry. Therapeutic temperature modulation for fever control or the induction of hypothermia was achieved with the use of a surface or endovascular device. Expected energy expenditure was calculated using the Harris-Benedict equation. A hypermetabolic index was calculated from the ratio of resting of energy expenditure to energy expenditure. Fifty consecutive cerebrovascular patients underwent indirect calorimetry between January 2006 and June 2007. Fifty-six percent were women, and mean age 63+/-16 years. The majority underwent fever control (n=40 [80%]) with a surface cooling device (n=44 [87%]) and had signs of shivering (Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale >0, 64% [n=34 of 50]). Low serum magnesium was independently associated with the presence of shivering (Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale >0; OR, 6.8; 95% CI, 1.7 to 28.0; P=0.01). The Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale was independently associated with the hypermetabolic index (W=16.3, P<0.001), oxygen consumption (W=26.3, P<0.001), resting energy expenditure (W=27.2, P<0.001), and carbon dioxide production (W=18.2, P<0.001) with a high level of interobserver reliability (kappa(w)=0.84, 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.86). The Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale is a simple and reliable tool for evaluating the metabolic stress of shivering.

  19. A novel multimedia tool to improve bedside teaching of cardiac auscultation

    PubMed Central

    Woywodt, A; Herrmann, A; Kielstein, J; Haller, H; Haubitz, M; Purnhagen, H

    2004-01-01

    Training in cardiac auscultation is a core element of undergraduate teaching but recent studies have documented a remarkable decline in auscultatory skills. Therefore there is an interest in new ways to teach cardiac auscultation. In analogy to phonocardiography, an electronic system for simultaneous auscultation and visualisation of murmurs was sought. For this purpose, an electronic stethoscope was linked to a laptop computer and software created to visualise auscultatory findings. In a preliminary trial in undergraduate students, this approach greatly facilitated teaching. Amalgamating traditional phonocardiography with a multimedia approach, this system represents a novel tool for bedside teaching of cardiac auscultation. PMID:15192171

  20. Local File Disclosure Vulnerability: A Case Study of Public-Sector Web Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. Imran; Maruf Hassan, Md; Bhuyian, Touhid

    2018-01-01

    Almost all public-sector organisations in Bangladesh now offer online services through web applications, along with the existing channels, in their endeavour to realise the dream of a ‘Digital Bangladesh’. Nations across the world have joined the online environment thanks to training and awareness initiatives by their government. File sharing and downloading activities using web applications have now become very common, not only ensuring the easy distribution of different types of files and documents but also enormously reducing the time and effort of users. Although the online services that are being used frequently have made users’ life easier, it has increased the risk of exploitation of local file disclosure (LFD) vulnerability in the web applications of different public-sector organisations due to unsecure design and careless coding. This paper analyses the root cause of LFD vulnerability, its exploitation techniques, and its impact on 129 public-sector websites in Bangladesh by examining the use of manual black box testing approach.

  1. FASH: A web application for nucleotides sequence search.

    PubMed

    Veksler-Lublinksy, Isana; Barash, Danny; Avisar, Chai; Troim, Einav; Chew, Paul; Kedem, Klara

    2008-05-27

    : FASH (Fourier Alignment Sequence Heuristics) is a web application, based on the Fast Fourier Transform, for finding remote homologs within a long nucleic acid sequence. Given a query sequence and a long text-sequence (e.g, the human genome), FASH detects subsequences within the text that are remotely-similar to the query. FASH offers an alternative approach to Blast/Fasta for querying long RNA/DNA sequences. FASH differs from these other approaches in that it does not depend on the existence of contiguous seed-sequences in its initial detection phase. The FASH web server is user friendly and very easy to operate. FASH can be accessed athttps://fash.bgu.ac.il:8443/fash/default.jsp (secured website).

  2. Pragmatic Computing - A Semiotic Perspective to Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kecheng

    The web seems to have evolved from a syntactic web, a semantic web to a pragmatic web. This evolution conforms to the study of information and technology from the theory of semiotics. The pragmatics, concerning with the use of information in relation to the context and intended purposes, is extremely important in web service and applications. Much research in pragmatics has been carried out; but in the same time, attempts and solutions have led to some more questions. After reviewing the current work in pragmatic web, the paper presents a semiotic approach to website services, particularly on request decomposition and service aggregation.

  3. Bedside ROP screening and telemedicine interpretation integrated to a neonatal transport system: Economic aspects and return on investment analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Gábor; Somogyvári, Zsolt; Maka, Erika; Nagyjánosi, László

    Peter Cerny Ambulance Service - Premature Eye Rescue Program (PCA-PERP) uses digital retinal imaging (DRI) with remote interpretation in bedside ROP screening, which has advantages over binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO) in screening of premature newborns. We aimed to demonstrate that PCA-PERP provides good value for the money and to model the cost ramifications of a similar newly launched system. As DRI was demonstrated to have high diagnostic performance, only the costs of bedside DRI-based screening were compared to those of traditional transport and BIO-based screening (cost-minimization analysis). The total costs of investment and maintenance were analyzed with micro-costing method. A ten-year analysis time-horizon and service provider's perspective were applied. From the launch of PCA-PERP up to the end of 2014, 3722 bedside examinations were performed in the PCA covered central region of Hungary. From 2009 to 2014, PCA-PERP saved 92,248km and 3633 staff working hours, with an annual nominal cost-savings ranging from 17,435 to 35,140 Euro. The net present value was 127,847 Euro at the end of 2014, with a payback period of 4.1years and an internal rate of return of 20.8%. Our model presented the NPVs of different scenarios with different initial investments, annual number of transports and average transport distances. PCA-PERP as bedside screening with remote interpretation, when compared to a transport-based screening with BIO, produced better cost-savings from the perspective of the service provider and provided a return on initial investment within five years after the project initiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Web 2.0 Applications in Medicine: Trends and Topics in the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Wide Web has changed research habits, and these changes were further expanded when “Web 2.0” became popular in 2005. Bibliometrics is a helpful tool used for describing patterns of publication, for interpreting progression over time, and the geographical distribution of research in a given field. Few studies employing bibliometrics, however, have been carried out on the correlative nature of scientific literature and Web 2.0. Objective The aim of this bibliometric analysis was to provide an overview of Web 2.0 implications in the biomedical literature. The objectives were to assess the growth rate of literature, key journals, authors, and country contributions, and to evaluate whether the various Web 2.0 applications were expressed within this biomedical literature, and if so, how. Methods A specific query with keywords chosen to be representative of Web 2.0 applications was built for the PubMed database. Articles related to Web 2.0 were downloaded in Extensible Markup Language (XML) and were processed through developed hypertext preprocessor (PHP) scripts, then imported to Microsoft Excel 2010 for data processing. Results A total of 1347 articles were included in this study. The number of articles related to Web 2.0 has been increasing from 2002 to 2012 (average annual growth rate was 106.3% with a maximum of 333% in 2005). The United States was by far the predominant country for authors, with 514 articles (54.0%; 514/952). The second and third most productive countries were the United Kingdom and Australia, with 87 (9.1%; 87/952) and 44 articles (4.6%; 44/952), respectively. Distribution of number of articles per author showed that the core population of researchers working on Web 2.0 in the medical field could be estimated at approximately 75. In total, 614 journals were identified during this analysis. Using Bradford’s law, 27 core journals were identified, among which three (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, Journal of

  5. Evaluation of dysphagia in early stroke patients by bedside, endoscopic, and electrophysiological methods.

    PubMed

    Umay, Ebru Karaca; Unlu, Ece; Saylam, Guleser Kılıc; Cakci, Aytul; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2013-09-01

    We aimed in this study to evaluate dysphagia in early stroke patients using a bedside screening test and flexible fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FFEES) and electrophysiological evaluation (EE) methods and to compare the effectiveness of these methods. Twenty-four patients who were hospitalized in our clinic within the first 3 months after stroke were included in this study. Patients were evaluated using a bedside screening test [including bedside dysphagia score (BDS), neurological examination dysphagia score (NEDS), and total dysphagia score (TDS)] and FFEES and EE methods. Patients were divided into normal-swallowing and dysphagia groups according to the results of the evaluation methods. Patients with dysphagia as determined by any of these methods were compared to the patients with normal swallowing based on the results of the other two methods. Based on the results of our study, a high BDS was positively correlated with dysphagia identified by FFEES and EE methods. Moreover, the FFEES and EE methods were positively correlated. There was no significant correlation between NEDS and TDS levels and either EE or FFEES method. Bedside screening tests should be used mainly as an initial screening test; then FFEES and EE methods should be combined in patients who show risks. This diagnostic algorithm may provide a practical and fast solution for selected stroke patients.

  6. The construction of power in family medicine bedside teaching: a video observation study.

    PubMed

    Rees, Charlotte E; Ajjawi, Rola; Monrouxe, Lynn V

    2013-02-01

    Bedside teaching is essential for helping students develop skills, reasoning and professionalism, and involves the learning triad of student, patient and clinical teacher. Although current rhetoric espouses the sharing of power, the medical workplace is imbued with power asymmetries. Power is context-specific and although previous research has explored some elements of the enactment and resistance of power within bedside teaching, this exploration has been conducted within hospital rather than general practice settings. Furthermore, previous research has employed audio-recorded rather than video-recorded observation and has therefore focused on language and para-language at the expense of non-verbal communication and human-material interaction. A qualitative design was adopted employing video- and audio-recorded observations of seven bedside teaching encounters (BTEs), followed by short individual interviews with students, patients and clinical teachers. Thematic and discourse analyses of BTEs were conducted. Power is constructed by students, patients and clinical teachers throughout different BTE activities through the use of linguistic, para-linguistic and non-verbal communication. In terms of language, participants construct power through the use of questions, orders, advice, pronouns and medical/health belief talk. With reference to para-language, participants construct power through the use of interruption and laughter. In terms of non-verbal communication, participants construct power through physical positioning and the possession or control of medical materials such as the stethoscope. Using this paper as a trigger for discussion, we encourage students and clinical teachers to reflect critically on how their verbal and non-verbal communication constructs power in bedside teaching. Students and clinical teachers need to develop their awareness of what power is, how it can be constructed and shared, and what it means for the student

  7. Using the USGS Seismic Risk Web Application to estimate aftershock damage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, Sean M.; Luco, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Engineering Risk Assessment Project has developed the Seismic Risk Web Application to combine earthquake hazard and structural fragility information in order to calculate the risk of earthquake damage to structures. Enabling users to incorporate their own hazard and fragility information into the calculations will make it possible to quantify (in near real-time) the risk of additional damage to structures caused by aftershocks following significant earthquakes. Results can quickly be shared with stakeholders to illustrate the impact of elevated ground motion hazard and earthquake-compromised structural integrity on the risk of damage during a short-term, post-earthquake time horizon.

  8. TOKEN: Trustable Keystroke-Based Authentication for Web-Based Applications on Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Mohammad; Ali, Tamleek

    Smartphones are increasingly being used to store personal information as well as to access sensitive data from the Internet and the cloud. Establishment of the identity of a user requesting information from smartphones is a prerequisite for secure systems in such scenarios. In the past, keystroke-based user identification has been successfully deployed on production-level mobile devices to mitigate the risks associated with naïve username/password based authentication. However, these approaches have two major limitations: they are not applicable to services where authentication occurs outside the domain of the mobile device - such as web-based services; and they often overly tax the limited computational capabilities of mobile devices. In this paper, we propose a protocol for keystroke dynamics analysis which allows web-based applications to make use of remote attestation and delegated keystroke analysis. The end result is an efficient keystroke-based user identification mechanism that strengthens traditional password protected services while mitigating the risks of user profiling by collaborating malicious web services.

  9. Mixed methods evaluation of a quality improvement and audit tool for nurse-to-nurse bedside clinical handover in ward settings.

    PubMed

    Redley, Bernice; Waugh, Rachael

    2018-04-01

    Nurse bedside handover quality is influenced by complex interactions related to the content, processes used and the work environment. Audit tools are seldom tested in 'real' settings. Examine the reliability, validity and usability of a quality improvement tool for audit of nurse bedside handover. Naturalistic, descriptive, mixed-methods. Six inpatient wards at a single large not-for-profit private health service in Victoria, Australia. Five nurse experts and 104 nurses involved in 199 change-of-shift bedside handovers. A focus group with experts and pilot test were used to examine content and face validity, and usability of the handover audit tool. The tool was examined for inter-rater reliability and usability using observation audits of handovers across six wards. Data were collected in 2013-2014. Two independent observers for 72 audits demonstrated acceptable inter-observer agreement for 27 (77%) items. Reliability was weak for items examining the handover environment. Seventeen items were not observed reflecting gaps in practices. Across 199 observation audits, gaps in nurse bedside handover practice most often related to process and environment, rather than content items. Usability was impacted by high observer burden, familiarity and non-specific illustrative behaviours. The reliability and validity of most items to audit handover content was acceptable. Gaps in practices for process and environment items were identified. Context specific exemplars and reducing the items used at each handover audit can enhance usability. Further research is needed to develop context specific exemplars and undertake additional reliability testing using a wide range of handover settings. CONTRIBUTION OF THE PAPER. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of left ventricular function by bedside ultrasound in acute toxic myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cara; Budhram, Gavin

    2013-10-01

    Myocarditis can be difficult to diagnose in the Emergency Department (ED) due to the lack of classic symptoms and the wide variation in presentations. Poor cardiac contractility is a common finding in myocarditis and can be evaluated by bedside ultrasound. To demonstrate the utility of fractional shortening measurements as an estimation of left ventricular function during bedside cardiac ultrasound evaluation in the ED. A 54-year-old man presented to the ED complaining of 3 days of chest tightness, palpitations, and dyspnea, as well as persistent abdominal pain and vomiting. An electrocardiogram (ECG) showed sinus tachycardia with presumably new ST-segment elevation and signs of an incomplete right bundle branch block. A bedside echocardiogram was performed by the emergency physician that showed poor left ventricular function by endocardial fractional shortening measurements. On further questioning, the patient revealed that for the past 2 weeks he had been regularly huffing a commercially available compressed air duster. Based on these history and examination findings, the patient was given a presumptive diagnosis of toxic myocarditis. A follow-up echocardiogram approximately 7 weeks later demonstrated resolution of the left ventricular systolic dysfunction and his ECG findings normalized. Cardiac ultrasound findings of severely reduced global function measured by endocardial fractional shortening were seen in this patient and supported the diagnosis of myocarditis. Endocardial fractional shortening is a useful means of easily evaluating and documenting left ventricular function and can be performed at the bedside in the ED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Do-It-Yourself: A Special Library's Approach to Creating Dynamic Web Pages Using Commercial Off-The-Shelf Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeman, Gerald; Connell, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Many librarians may feel that dynamic Web pages are out of their reach, financially and technically. Yet we are reminded in library and Web design literature that static home pages are a thing of the past. This paper describes how librarians at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) library developed a database-driven, dynamic intranet site using commercial off-the-shelf applications. Administrative issues include surveying a library users group for interest and needs evaluation; outlining metadata elements; and, committing resources from managing time to populate the database and training in Microsoft FrontPage and Web-to-database design. Technical issues covered include Microsoft Access database fundamentals, lessons learned in the Web-to-database process (including setting up Database Source Names (DSNs), redesigning queries to accommodate the Web interface, and understanding Access 97 query language vs. Standard Query Language (SQL)). This paper also offers tips on editing Active Server Pages (ASP) scripting to create desired results. A how-to annotated resource list closes out the paper.

  12. Acute graft-versus-host disease: from the bench to the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Blazar, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    During the past decade, progress in basic immunology has been impressive. In parallel, whereas our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has greatly improved, so has our knowledge of the complexities of the immune system. Much of the immunobiology of acute GVHD has been gleaned from preclinical models and far less from correlations with clinical observations or therapeutic interventions. In this review, we summarize some of the major advances in GVHD pathophysiology, including the translation of these from the bench to the bedside, and discuss preclinical approaches that warrant further exploration in the clinic. PMID:19713461

  13. Information Assurance: Detection & Response to Web Spam Attacks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-28

    such as blogs, social bookmarking ( folksonomies ), and wikis continue to gain its popularity, concerns about the rapid proliferation of Web spam has...Attacks Report Title ABSTRACT As online social media applications such as blogs, social bookmarking ( folksonomies ), and wikis continue to gain its... folksonomies ), and wikis continue to gain its popularity, concerns about the rapid proliferation of Web spam has grown in recent years. These applications

  14. The Bedside Sherlock Holmes

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Faith T.; Tierney, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01

    There are a multitude of diagnostic clues contained in clothing, jewelry, possessions and other extracorporeal attachments that each patient brings with him or her to a physician. Because of the emphasis of classic physical diagnosis on the body of a patient solely, and because of modern practices that may have patients stripped of these articles before the first encounter with their physician, these interesting and enlightening findings are often ignored or unavailable. Incorporation of these observations into the panoply of data obtained from the history and physical examination will enhance both the accuracy and adventure of differential diagnosis. Such exercises in observation, moreover, may increase general physical diagnostic skills as well as enliven bedside rounds. PMID:7135953

  15. The bedside Sherlock Holmes.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, F T; Tierney, L M

    1982-08-01

    There are a multitude of diagnostic clues contained in clothing, jewelry, possessions and other extracorporeal attachments that each patient brings with him or her to a physician. Because of the emphasis of classic physical diagnosis on the body of a patient solely, and because of modern practices that may have patients stripped of these articles before the first encounter with their physician, these interesting and enlightening findings are often ignored or unavailable. Incorporation of these observations into the panoply of data obtained from the history and physical examination will enhance both the accuracy and adventure of differential diagnosis. Such exercises in observation, moreover, may increase general physical diagnostic skills as well as enliven bedside rounds.

  16. Using Open Web APIs in Teaching Web Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Li, Xin; Chau, M.; Ho, Yi-Jen; Tseng, Chunju

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of the World Wide Web, many business applications that utilize data mining and text mining techniques to extract useful business information on the Web have evolved from Web searching to Web mining. It is important for students to acquire knowledge and hands-on experience in Web mining during their education in information systems…

  17. Use of bedside ultrasound to assess degree of dehydration in children with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Hsiao, Allen; Langhan, Melissa; Riera, Antonio; Santucci, Karen A

    2010-10-01

    Prospectively identifying children with significant dehydration from gastroenteritis is difficult in acute care settings. Previous work by our group has shown that bedside ultrasound (US) measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and the aorta (Ao) diameter ratio is correlated with intravascular volume. This study was designed to validate the use of this method in the prospective identification of children with dehydration by investigating whether the IVC/Ao ratio correlated with dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis. Another objective was to investigate the interrater reliability of the IVC/Ao measurements. A prospective observational study was carried out in a pediatric emergency department (PED) between November 2007 and June 2009. Children with acute gastroenteritis were enrolled as subjects. A pair of investigators obtained transverse images of the IVC and Ao using bedside US. The ratio of IVC and Ao diameters (IVC/Ao) was calculated. Subjects were asked to return after resolution of symptoms. The difference between the convalescent weight and ill weight was used to calculate the degree of dehydration. Greater than or equal to 5% difference was judged to be significant. Linear regression was performed with dehydration as the dependent variable and the IVC/Ao as the independent variable. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the degree of agreement between observers. A total of 112 subjects were enrolled. Seventy-one subjects (63%) completed follow-up. Twenty-eight subjects (39%) had significant dehydration. The linear regression model resulted in an R² value of 0.21 (p < 0.001) and a slope (B) of 0.11 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.08 to 0.14). An IVC/Ao cutoff of 0.8 produced a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 56% for the diagnosis of significant dehydration. Forty-eight paired measurements of IVC/Ao ratios were made. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.76.   In this pilot study the ratio of IVC to Ao

  18. Photonics Applications and Web Engineering: WILGA 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2017-08-01

    XLth Wilga Summer 2017 Symposium on Photonics Applications and Web Engineering was held on 28 May-4 June 2017. The Symposium gathered over 350 participants, mainly young researchers active in optics, optoelectronics, photonics, modern optics, mechatronics, applied physics, electronics technologies and applications. There were presented around 300 oral and poster papers in a few main topical tracks, which are traditional for Wilga, including: bio-photonics, optical sensory networks, photonics-electronics-mechatronics co-design and integration, large functional system design and maintenance, Internet of Things, measurement systems for astronomy, high energy physics experiments, and other. The paper is a traditional introduction to the 2017 WILGA Summer Symposium Proceedings, and digests some of the Symposium chosen key presentations. This year Symposium was divided to the following topical sessions/conferences: Optics, Optoelectronics and Photonics, Computational and Artificial Intelligence, Biomedical Applications, Astronomical and High Energy Physics Experiments Applications, Material Research and Engineering, and Advanced Photonics and Electronics Applications in Research and Industry.

  19. A Service Oriented Web Application for Learner Knowledge Representation, Management and Sharing Conforming to IMS LIP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarinis, Fotis

    2014-01-01

    iLM is a Web based application for representation, management and sharing of IMS LIP conformant user profiles. The tool is developed using a service oriented architecture with emphasis on the easy data sharing. Data elicitation from user profiles is based on the utilization of XQuery scripts and sharing with other applications is achieved through…

  20. webpic: A flexible web application for collecting distance and count measurements from images

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Despite increasing ability to store and analyze large amounts of data for organismal and ecological studies, the process of collecting distance and count measurements from images has largely remained time consuming and error-prone, particularly for tasks for which automation is difficult or impossible. Improving the efficiency of these tasks, which allows for more high quality data to be collected in a shorter amount of time, is therefore a high priority. The open-source web application, webpic, implements common web languages and widely available libraries and productivity apps to streamline the process of collecting distance and count measurements from images. In this paper, I introduce the framework of webpic and demonstrate one readily available feature of this application, linear measurements, using fossil leaf specimens. This application fills the gap between workflows accomplishable by individuals through existing software and those accomplishable by large, unmoderated crowds. It demonstrates that flexible web languages can be used to streamline time-intensive research tasks without the use of specialized equipment or proprietary software and highlights the potential for web resources to facilitate data collection in research tasks and outreach activities with improved efficiency. PMID:29608592

  1. Web-Based Intervention for Transitioning Smokers From Inpatient to Outpatient Care: An RCT.

    PubMed

    Kathleen F, Harrington; Young-Il, Kim; Meifang, Chen; Rekha, Ramachandran; Maria, Pisu; Rajani S, Sadasivam; Thomas K, Houston; William C, Bailey

    2016-10-01

    Smoking-cessation follow-up care after hospitalization is known to be effective. Cost-effective and disseminable interventions adoptable by hospitals are needed. RCT. Fourteen hundred eighty-eight current smokers recruited during a tertiary care hospital stay were randomly assigned to Usual Care (UC) or Usual Care plus Web-Based Intervention (WI). Data were collected in 2011-2013 and analyzed in 2014-2015. UC provided brief bedside advice to quit, a quit plan template, and quitline contact information. WI included access to a website with asynchronous e-message communication with a tobacco counselor, use of interactive self-assessments, helpful cessation information, and access to additional web resources, as well as automated e-mail messages tailored for health concern and readiness to quit. Self-reported 30-day abstinence at 6 months was the primary outcome; a subset was verified by saliva cotinine. Six-month follow-up was completed by 83% of participants. No difference was found between study arms for self-reported abstinence rates in intent-to-treat (25.4% WI vs 26.8% UC) and complete case (31.3% WI vs 31.4% UC) analyses. Reduced smoking was reported by 45.5% (WI, n=276) and 47% (UC, n=296) of non-abstinent responders (p=0.59). Using a 10-ng/mL cotinine cut off, abstinence was verified in 52.1% of WI and 62.5% of UC (p=0.11). Significant covariates associated with abstinence at 6 months were being male, not smoking during hospitalization, being very confident in quitting, planning to quit/stay quit, smoking fewer days in the past 30 days, fewer years of smoking, and having cerebrovascular or connective tissue rheumatic disease as primary hospital diagnosis. Lack of difference between treatment arms suggests a strong effect for UC, WI was not effective, or both. Low intervention engagement may be partially responsible. Self-reported abstinence rates were relatively high in both arms, although the biochemically verified rates indicate over-reporting of abstinence

  2. Using ChEMBL web services for building applications and data processing workflows relevant to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Nowotka, Michał M; Gaulton, Anna; Mendez, David; Bento, A Patricia; Hersey, Anne; Leach, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    ChEMBL is a manually curated database of bioactivity data on small drug-like molecules, used by drug discovery scientists. Among many access methods, a REST API provides programmatic access, allowing the remote retrieval of ChEMBL data and its integration into other applications. This approach allows scientists to move from a world where they go to the ChEMBL web site to search for relevant data, to one where ChEMBL data can be simply integrated into their everyday tools and work environment. Areas covered: This review highlights some of the audiences who may benefit from using the ChEMBL API, and the goals they can address, through the description of several use cases. The examples cover a team communication tool (Slack), a data analytics platform (KNIME), batch job management software (Luigi) and Rich Internet Applications. Expert opinion: The advent of web technologies, cloud computing and micro services oriented architectures have made REST APIs an essential ingredient of modern software development models. The widespread availability of tools consuming RESTful resources have made them useful for many groups of users. The ChEMBL API is a valuable resource of drug discovery bioactivity data for professional chemists, chemistry students, data scientists, scientific and web developers.

  3. Development of a bedside viable ultrasound protocol to quantify appendicular lean tissue mass.

    PubMed

    Paris, Michael T; Lafleur, Benoit; Dubin, Joel A; Mourtzakis, Marina

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound is a non-invasive and readily available tool that can be prospectively applied at the bedside to assess muscle mass in clinical settings. The four-site protocol, which images two anatomical sites on each quadriceps, may be a viable bedside method, but its ability to predict musculature has not been compared against whole-body reference methods. Our primary objectives were to (i) compare the four-site protocol's ability to predict appendicular lean tissue mass from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; (ii) optimize the predictability of the four-site protocol with additional anatomical muscle thicknesses and easily obtained covariates; and (iii) assess the ability of the optimized protocol to identify individuals with low lean tissue mass. This observational cross-sectional study recruited 96 university and community dwelling adults. Participants underwent ultrasound scans for assessment of muscle thickness and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans for assessment of appendicular lean tissue. Ultrasound protocols included (i) the nine-site protocol, which images nine anterior and posterior muscle groups in supine and prone positions, and (ii) the four-site protocol, which images two anterior sites on each quadriceps muscle group in a supine position. The four-site protocol was strongly associated (R 2  = 0.72) with appendicular lean tissue mass, but Bland-Altman analysis displayed wide limits of agreement (-5.67, 5.67 kg). Incorporating the anterior upper arm muscle thickness, and covariates age and sex, alongside the four-site protocol, improved the association (R 2  = 0.91) with appendicular lean tissue and displayed narrower limits of agreement (-3.18, 3.18 kg). The optimized protocol demonstrated a strong ability to identify low lean tissue mass (area under the curve = 0.89). The four-site protocol can be improved with the addition of the anterior upper arm muscle thickness, sex, and age when predicting appendicular lean tissue mass

  4. Lexical Link Analysis Application: Improving Web Service to Acquisition Visibility Portal Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    bäÉîÉåíÜ=^ååì~ä=^Åèìáëáíáçå= oÉëÉ~êÅÜ=póãéçëáìã= qÜìêëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=ff= = Lexical Link Analysis Application: Improving Web Service to...DATE 30 APR 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lexical Link Analysis Application: Improving...vocabulary or lexicon, to describe the attributes and surrounding environment of the system. Lexical Link Analysis (LLA) is a form of text mining in which

  5. Concept Mapping Your Web Searches: A Design Rationale and Web-Enabled Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Y.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Although it has become very common to use World Wide Web-based information in many educational settings, there has been little research on how to better search and organize Web-based information. This paper discusses the shortcomings of Web search engines and Web browsers as learning environments and describes an alternative Web search environment…

  6. Free web-based modelling platform for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Catalin; Junghanns, Ralf; Glaß, Jana; Sallwey, Jana; Fatkhutdinov, Aybulat; Fichtner, Thomas; Barquero, Felix; Moreno, Miguel; Bonilla, José; Kwoyiga, Lydia

    2017-04-01

    Managed aquifer recharge represents a valuable instrument for sustainable water resources management. The concept implies purposeful infiltration of surface water into underground for later recovery or environmental benefits. Over decades, MAR schemes were successfully installed worldwide for a variety of reasons: to maximize the natural storage capacity of aquifers, physical aquifer management, water quality management, and ecological benefits. The INOWAS-DSS platform provides a collection of free web-based tools for planning, management and optimization of main components of MAR schemes. The tools are grouped into 13 specific applications that cover most relevant challenges encountered at MAR sites, both from quantitative and qualitative perspectives. The applications include among others the optimization of MAR site location, the assessment of saltwater intrusion, the restoration of groundwater levels in overexploited aquifers, the maximization of natural storage capacity of aquifers, the improvement of water quality, the design and operational optimization of MAR schemes, clogging development and risk assessment. The platform contains a collection of about 35 web-based tools of various degrees of complexity, which are either included in application specific workflows or used as standalone modelling instruments. Among them are simple tools derived from data mining and empirical equations, analytical groundwater related equations, as well as complex numerical flow and transport models (MODFLOW, MT3DMS and SEAWAT). Up to now, the simulation core of the INOWAS-DSS, which is based on the finite differences groundwater flow model MODFLOW, is implemented and runs on the web. A scenario analyser helps to easily set up and evaluate new management options as well as future development such as land use and climate change and compare them to previous scenarios. Additionally simple tools such as analytical equations to assess saltwater intrusion are already running online

  7. Pathophysiology of septic shock: From bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kevin W; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of sepsis and its resultant outcomes remains a paradox. On the one hand, we know more about the pathophysiology of sepsis than ever before. However, this knowledge has not been successfully translated to the bedside, as the vast majority of clinical trials for sepsis have been negative. Yet even in the general absence of positive clinical trials, mortality from sepsis has fallen to its lowest point in history, in large part due to educational campaigns that stress timely antibiotics and hemodynamic support. While additional improvements in outcome will assuredly result from further compliance with evidence based practices, a deeper understanding of the science that underlies the host response in sepsis is critical to the development of novel therapeutics. In this review, we outline immunopathologic abnormalities in sepsis, and then look at potential approaches to therapeutically modulate them. Ultimately, an understanding of the science underlying sepsis should allow the critical care community to utilize precision medicine to combat this devastating disease on an individual basis leading to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathophysiology of Septic Shock: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Kevin W.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of sepsis and its resultant outcomes remains a paradox. On the one hand, we know more about the pathophysiology of sepsis than ever before. However, this knowledge has not successfully translated to the bedside, as the vast majority of clinical trials for sepsis have been negative. Yet even in the general absence of positive clinical trials, mortality from sepsis has fallen to its lowest point in history, in large part due to educational campaigns that stress timely antibiotics and hemodynamic support. While additional improvements in outcome will assuredly result from further compliance with evidence based practices, a deeper understanding of the science that underlies the host response in sepsis is critical to the development of novel therapeutics. In this review, we outline immunopathologic abnormalities in sepsis, and then look at potential approaches to therapeutically modulate them. Ultimately, an understanding of the science underlying sepsis should allow the critical care community to utilize precision medicine to combat this devastating disease on an individual basis leading to improved outcomes. PMID:27085986

  9. Web-based applications for building, managing and analysing kinetic models of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Yup; Saha, Rajib; Yusufi, Faraaz Noor Khan; Park, Wonjun; Karimi, Iftekhar A

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical modelling and computational analysis play an essential role in improving our capability to elucidate the functions and characteristics of complex biological systems such as metabolic, regulatory and cell signalling pathways. The modelling and concomitant simulation render it possible to predict the cellular behaviour of systems under various genetically and/or environmentally perturbed conditions. This motivates systems biologists/bioengineers/bioinformaticians to develop new tools and applications, allowing non-experts to easily conduct such modelling and analysis. However, among a multitude of systems biology tools developed to date, only a handful of projects have adopted a web-based approach to kinetic modelling. In this report, we evaluate the capabilities and characteristics of current web-based tools in systems biology and identify desirable features, limitations and bottlenecks for further improvements in terms of usability and functionality. A short discussion on software architecture issues involved in web-based applications and the approaches taken by existing tools is included for those interested in developing their own simulation applications.

  10. Access Control of Web and Java Based Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tso, Kam S.; Pajevski, Michael J.; Johnson, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Cyber security has gained national and international attention as a result of near continuous headlines from financial institutions, retail stores, government offices and universities reporting compromised systems and stolen data. Concerns continue to rise as threats of service interruption, and spreading of viruses become ever more prevalent and serious. Controlling access to application layer resources is a critical component in a layered security solution that includes encryption, firewalls, virtual private networks, antivirus, and intrusion detection. In this paper we discuss the development of an application-level access control solution, based on an open-source access manager augmented with custom software components, to provide protection to both Web-based and Java-based client and server applications.

  11. Multicentre validation of the bedside paediatric early warning system score: a severity of illness score to detect evolving critical illness in hospitalised children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The timely provision of critical care to hospitalised patients at risk for cardiopulmonary arrest is contingent upon identification and referral by frontline providers. Current approaches require improvement. In a single-centre study, we developed the Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System (Bedside PEWS) score to identify patients at risk. The objective of this study was to validate the Bedside PEWS score in a large patient population at multiple hospitals. Methods We performed an international, multicentre, case-control study of children admitted to hospital inpatient units with no limitations on care. Case patients had experienced a clinical deterioration event involving either an immediate call to a resuscitation team or urgent admission to a paediatric intensive care unit. Control patients had no events. The scores ranged from 0 to 26 and were assessed in the 24 hours prior to the clinical deterioration event. Score performance was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUCROC) curve by comparison with the retrospective rating of nurses and the temporal progression of scores in case patients. Results A total of 2,074 patients were evaluated at 4 participating hospitals. The median (interquartile range) maximum Bedside PEWS scores for the 12 hours ending 1 hour before the clinical deterioration event were 8 (5 to 12) in case patients and 2 (1 to 4) in control patients (P < 0.0001). The AUCROC curve (95% confidence interval) was 0.87 (0.85 to 0.89). In case patients, mean scores were 5.3 at 20 to 24 hours and 8.4 at 0 to 4 hours before the event (P < 0.0001). The AUCROC curve (95% CI) of the retrospective nurse ratings was 0.83 (0.81 to 0.86). This was significantly lower than that of the Bedside PEWS score (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The Bedside PEWS score identified children at risk for cardiopulmonary arrest. Scores were elevated and continued to increase in the 24 hours before the clinical deterioration event

  12. Effects of "minimally invasive curricular surgery" - a pilot intervention study to improve the quality of bedside teaching in medical education.

    PubMed

    Raupach, Tobias; Anders, Sven; Pukrop, Tobias; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Harendza, Sigrid

    2009-09-01

    Bedside teaching is an important element of undergraduate medical education. However, the impact of curricular course structure on student outcome needs to be determined. This study assessed changes in fourth-year medical students' evaluations of clinical teaching sessions before and after the introduction of a new course format. The curricular structure of bedside teaching sessions in cardiology was modified without changing the amount of teaching time. Clinical teachers were instructed about the new teaching format and learning objectives. The new format implemented for adult but not paediatric cardiology sessions was piloted with 143 students in winter 2007/08. By computing effect sizes, evaluation results were compared to data obtained from 185 students before the intervention. Significant rating increases were observed for adult cardiology teaching sessions (Cohen's d = 0.66) but not paediatric cardiology sessions (d = 0.22). In addition to improving the structure and organization of the course, the intervention significantly impacted on students' perceptions of their learning outcome regarding practical skills (d = 0.69). Minimal curricular changes combined with basic faculty development measures significantly increase students' perception of learning outcome. Curricular structure needs to be considered when planning bedside teaching sessions in medical undergraduate training.

  13. Improving Nursing Satisfaction with Bedside-Information, Technology-Enhanced Handoffs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Yvonne L.

    2014-01-01

    Due to renewed national focus on patient safety and patient outcomes, the advent of the electronic health record (EHR) and standardization of data management has prompted the utilization of information technology (IT) tools to enhance nursing bedside handoff. However, there is limited literature regarding the nurses' satisfaction with the…

  14. Adding Processing Functionality to the Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasch, Christoph; Pross, Benjamin; Jirka, Simon; Gräler, Benedikt

    2017-04-01

    The Sensor Web allows discovering, accessing and tasking different kinds of environmental sensors in the Web, ranging from simple in-situ sensors to remote sensing systems. However, (geo-)processing functionality needs to be applied to integrate data from different sensor sources and to generate higher level information products. Yet, a common standardized approach for processing sensor data in the Sensor Web is still missing and the integration differs from application to application. Standardizing not only the provision of sensor data, but also the processing facilitates sharing and re-use of processing modules, enables reproducibility of processing results, and provides a common way to integrate external scalable processing facilities or legacy software. In this presentation, we provide an overview on on-going research projects that develop concepts for coupling standardized geoprocessing technologies with Sensor Web technologies. At first, different architectures for coupling sensor data services with geoprocessing services are presented. Afterwards, profiles for linear regression and spatio-temporal interpolation of the OGC Web Processing Services that allow consuming sensor data coming from and uploading predictions to Sensor Observation Services are introduced. The profiles are implemented in processing services for the hydrological domain. Finally, we illustrate how the R software can be coupled with existing OGC Sensor Web and Geoprocessing Services and present an example, how a Web app can be built that allows exploring the results of environmental models in an interactive way using the R Shiny framework. All of the software presented is available as Open Source Software.

  15. Establishing and Applying Criteria for Evaluating the Ease of Use of Dynamic Platforms for Teaching Web Application Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dehinbo, Johnson

    2011-01-01

    The widespread use of the Internet and the World Wide Web led to the availability of many platforms for developing dynamic Web application and the problem of choosing the most appropriate platform that will be easy to use for undergraduate students of web applications development in tertiary institutions. Students beginning to learn web…

  16. The design and implementation of web mining in web sites security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Guo-Yin; Gu, Guo-Chang; Li, Jian-Li

    2003-06-01

    The backdoor or information leak of Web servers can be detected by using Web Mining techniques on some abnormal Web log and Web application log data. The security of Web servers can be enhanced and the damage of illegal access can be avoided. Firstly, the system for discovering the patterns of information leakages in CGI scripts from Web log data was proposed. Secondly, those patterns for system administrators to modify their codes and enhance their Web site security were provided. The following aspects were described: one is to combine web application log with web log to extract more information, so web data mining could be used to mine web log for discovering the information that firewall and Information Detection System cannot find. Another approach is to propose an operation module of web site to enhance Web site security. In cluster server session, Density-Based Clustering technique is used to reduce resource cost and obtain better efficiency.

  17. Practicing evidence based medicine at the bedside: a randomized controlled pilot study in undergraduate medical students assessing the practicality of tablets, smartphones, and computers in clinical life.

    PubMed

    Friederichs, Hendrik; Marschall, Bernhard; Weissenstein, Anne

    2014-12-05

    Practicing evidence-based medicine is an important aspect of providing good medical care. Accessing external information through literature searches on computer-based systems can effectively achieve integration in clinical care. We conducted a pilot study using smartphones, tablets, and stationary computers as search devices at the bedside. The objective was to determine possible differences between the various devices and assess students' internet use habits. In a randomized controlled pilot study, 120 students were divided in three groups. One control group solved clinical problems on a computer and two intervention groups used mobile devices at the bedside. In a questionnaire, students were asked to report their internet use habits as well as their satisfaction with their respective search tool using a 5-point Likert scale. Of 120 surveys, 94 (78.3%) complete data sets were analyzed. The mobility of the tablet (3.90) and the smartphone (4.39) was seen as a significant advantage over the computer (2.38, p < .001). However, for performing an effective literature search at the bedside, the computer (3.22) was rated superior to both tablet computers (2.13) and smartphones (1.68). No significant differences were detected between tablets and smartphones except satisfaction with screen size (tablet 4.10, smartphone 2.00, p < .001). Using a mobile device at the bedside to perform an extensive search is not suitable for students who prefer using computers. However, mobility is regarded as a substantial advantage, and therefore future applications might facilitate quick and simple searches at the bedside.

  18. Family bedside orientations: An innovative peer support model to enhance a culture of family-centred care at the Stollery Children's Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wodinski, Lindsay M; Mattson McCrady, Heather M; Oswald, Christie M; Lyste, Nicole J M; Forbes, Karen L L

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents family bedside orientations, an innovative bedside peer support model for families of paediatric patients piloted in one unit at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta. The model invites family members of former patients back to the hospital as volunteer peer mentors responsible for meeting one-on-one with current inpatient families to provide a listening presence, discuss patient safety practices and encourage families to participate in their child's care. Using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, the model was evaluated over 1 year (December 2014 to December 2015). Data sources included peer mentor field notes (from 163 visits) detailing the number of family bedside orientations completed by peer mentors and how they interacted with families, as well as post-visit family (n=35) surveys, Hospital-Child Inpatient Experience Survey data, peer mentor (n=6) questionnaires, focus groups with unit staff (n=10) and interviews with members of the project leadership team (n=5). Our findings indicated that family bedside orientations became an established practice in the pilot unit and positively impacted family care experiences. We attribute these successes to championing and support from unit staff and our multidisciplinary project leadership team. We discuss how our team addressed family privacy and confidentiality while introducing peer mentors in the unit. We also highlight strategies used to integrate peer mentors as part of the staff team and enhance peer support culture in the pilot unit. Practical considerations for implementing this model in other paediatric environments are provided.

  19. Acceptability of Bedside Resuscitation With Intact Umbilical Cord to Clinicians and Patients' Families in the United States.

    PubMed

    Katheria, Anup C; Sorkhi, Samuel R; Hassen, Kasim; Faksh, Arij; Ghorishi, Zahra; Poeltler, Debra

    2018-01-01

    While delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants has shown to improve long-term neurological outcomes, infants who are thought to need resuscitation do not receive delayed cord clamping even though they may benefit the most. A mobile resuscitation platform allows infants to be resuscitated at the mother's bedside with the cord intact. The newborn is supplied with placental blood during the resuscitation in view of the mother. The objective of the study is to assess the usability and acceptability of mobile resuscitation platform, LifeStart trolley, among the infants' parents and perinatal providers. A resuscitation platform was present during every delivery that required advanced neonatal providers for high-risk deliveries. Perinatal providers and parents of the infants were given a questionnaire shortly after the delivery. 60 neonatal subjects were placed on the trolley. The majority of deliveries were high risk for meconium-stained amniotic fluid (43%), and non-reassuring fetal heart rate (45%). About 50% of neonatal providers felt that there were some concerns regarding access to the baby. No parents were uncomfortable with the bedside neonatal interventions, and most parents perceived that communication was improved because of the proximity to the care team. Bedside resuscitation with umbilical cord intact through the use of a mobile resuscitation trolley is feasible, safe, and effective, but about half of the perinatal providers expressed concerns. Logistical issues such as improved space management and/or delivery setup should be considered in centers planning to perform neonatal resuscitation with an intact cord.

  20. The exciting "bench to bedside" journey of cell therapies for acute kidney injury and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dellepiane, Sergio; Medica, Davide; Quercia, Alessandro Domenico; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by an increasing incidence and poor outcomes in both developed and undeveloped countries. AKI is also acquiring importance in the setting of kidney transplantation (KT): besides all the classical forms of AKI that KT patients may undergo, several transplant-specific injuries can also lead to the loss of graft function. The mechanisms of tissue damage in native and grafted kidneys share several common pathogenic elements. Since appropriate therapeutic treatments are still lacking-probably due to the disease complexity-clinicians are forced to provide only supportive care. In this composite scenario, cell therapies represent an evolving frontier for AKI treatment in native and transplanted kidneys: ex-vivo manipulated stem or immune cells are able to counteract renal dysfunction by a wide range of biological mechanisms. In this review, we will discuss the potential applications of cell therapies in AKI and KT by analyzing the available clinical data and the most promising experimental prospects from a "bench to bedside" perspective.

  1. Advancements in web-database applications for rabies surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rees, Erin E; Gendron, Bruno; Lelièvre, Frédérick; Coté, Nathalie; Bélanger, Denise

    2011-08-02

    Protection of public health from rabies is informed by the analysis of surveillance data from human and animal populations. In Canada, public health, agricultural and wildlife agencies at the provincial and federal level are responsible for rabies disease control, and this has led to multiple agency-specific data repositories. Aggregation of agency-specific data into one database application would enable more comprehensive data analyses and effective communication among participating agencies. In Québec, RageDB was developed to house surveillance data for the raccoon rabies variant, representing the next generation in web-based database applications that provide a key resource for the protection of public health. RageDB incorporates data from, and grants access to, all agencies responsible for the surveillance of raccoon rabies in Québec. Technological advancements of RageDB to rabies surveillance databases include (1) automatic integration of multi-agency data and diagnostic results on a daily basis; (2) a web-based data editing interface that enables authorized users to add, edit and extract data; and (3) an interactive dashboard to help visualize data simply and efficiently, in table, chart, and cartographic formats. Furthermore, RageDB stores data from citizens who voluntarily report sightings of rabies suspect animals. We also discuss how sightings data can indicate public perception to the risk of racoon rabies and thus aid in directing the allocation of disease control resources for protecting public health. RageDB provides an example in the evolution of spatio-temporal database applications for the storage, analysis and communication of disease surveillance data. The database was fast and inexpensive to develop by using open-source technologies, simple and efficient design strategies, and shared web hosting. The database increases communication among agencies collaborating to protect human health from raccoon rabies. Furthermore, health agencies have real

  2. Advancements in web-database applications for rabies surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protection of public health from rabies is informed by the analysis of surveillance data from human and animal populations. In Canada, public health, agricultural and wildlife agencies at the provincial and federal level are responsible for rabies disease control, and this has led to multiple agency-specific data repositories. Aggregation of agency-specific data into one database application would enable more comprehensive data analyses and effective communication among participating agencies. In Québec, RageDB was developed to house surveillance data for the raccoon rabies variant, representing the next generation in web-based database applications that provide a key resource for the protection of public health. Results RageDB incorporates data from, and grants access to, all agencies responsible for the surveillance of raccoon rabies in Québec. Technological advancements of RageDB to rabies surveillance databases include 1) automatic integration of multi-agency data and diagnostic results on a daily basis; 2) a web-based data editing interface that enables authorized users to add, edit and extract data; and 3) an interactive dashboard to help visualize data simply and efficiently, in table, chart, and cartographic formats. Furthermore, RageDB stores data from citizens who voluntarily report sightings of rabies suspect animals. We also discuss how sightings data can indicate public perception to the risk of racoon rabies and thus aid in directing the allocation of disease control resources for protecting public health. Conclusions RageDB provides an example in the evolution of spatio-temporal database applications for the storage, analysis and communication of disease surveillance data. The database was fast and inexpensive to develop by using open-source technologies, simple and efficient design strategies, and shared web hosting. The database increases communication among agencies collaborating to protect human health from raccoon rabies

  3. Guest editorial: From neuroscience to neuro-rehabilitation: transferring basic neuroscientific principles from laboratory to bedside.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Alexander; Luft, Andreas; Cajigas, Iahn

    2013-01-21

    Several new approaches for treatment of Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders are currently under investigation, including the use of rehabilitation training strategies, which are often combined with electrical and/or pharmacological modulation of spinal locomotor circuitries. While these approaches show great promise in the laboratory setting, there still exists a large gap in knowledge on how to transfer these treatments to daily clinical use. This thematic series presents a cross section of cutting edge approaches with the goal of transferring basic neuroscience principles from the laboratory to the proverbial "bedside".

  4. BioPortal: enhanced functionality via new Web services from the National Center for Biomedical Ontology to access and use ontologies in software applications.

    PubMed

    Whetzel, Patricia L; Noy, Natalya F; Shah, Nigam H; Alexander, Paul R; Nyulas, Csongor; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) is one of the National Centers for Biomedical Computing funded under the NIH Roadmap Initiative. Contributing to the national computing infrastructure, NCBO has developed BioPortal, a web portal that provides access to a library of biomedical ontologies and terminologies (http://bioportal.bioontology.org) via the NCBO Web services. BioPortal enables community participation in the evaluation and evolution of ontology content by providing features to add mappings between terms, to add comments linked to specific ontology terms and to provide ontology reviews. The NCBO Web services (http://www.bioontology.org/wiki/index.php/NCBO_REST_services) enable this functionality and provide a uniform mechanism to access ontologies from a variety of knowledge representation formats, such as Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) format. The Web services provide multi-layered access to the ontology content, from getting all terms in an ontology to retrieving metadata about a term. Users can easily incorporate the NCBO Web services into software applications to generate semantically aware applications and to facilitate structured data collection.

  5. Bedside teaching and the acquisition of practical skills in mid-sixteenth-century Padua.

    PubMed

    Stolberg, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Very little is known to this point about the practical skills which sixteenth-century physicians needed and applied at the bedside and even less about how these skills were taught to students. Drawing on student notebooks and on printed collections of consilia by Padua professors, this paper outlines the different settings in which case-centered and, more specifically, bedside teaching was imparted in mid-sixteenth-century Padua. It describes the range of diagnostic and therapeutic skills that students acquired thanks to this hands-on training at the patient's bedside, from uroscopy and feeling the pulse to the manual exploration of the patient's abdomen, which, historians have wrongly believed, physicians performed very rarely or not at all, and surgical skills. Taking a closer look, more specifically, at the role of teaching in the Hospital of San Francesco in Padua, the paper provides evidence that not only Giovanna Battista da Monte but also at least one other mid-sixteenth-century professor, Antonio Fracanzani, made systematic use of the teaching opportunities which the hospital offered. Ultimately, the paper will argue that clinical teaching in the hospital did not differ fundamentally from forms of bedside teaching in the patients' homes, however. Both became increasingly popular in Padua and elsewhere at the time, reflecting a growing appreciation for the practical and sensory skills which future physicians needed in addition to theoretical learning if they hoped to be successful in the highly contested early modern medical marketplace. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Health Care Applicability of a Patient-Centric Web Portal for Patients' Medication Experience.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song Hee; Lee, Woojung; AlRuthia, Yazed

    2016-07-22

    With the advent of the patient-centered care paradigm, it is important to examine what patients' reports of medication experience (PROME) mean to patient care. PROME available through a Web portal provide information on medication treatment options and outcomes from the patient's perspective. Patients who find certain PROME compelling are likely to mention them at their physician visit, triggering a discussion between the patient and the physician. However, no studies have examined PROME's potential applicability to patient care. This study aimed to examine older (≥50 years) adults' perceptions of the health care applicability of a hypothetical PROME Web portal. Specifically, this study investigated whether PROME would facilitate patient-physician communication, and identified the preferred reporting items and the trusted sponsors of such a PROME Web portal. We used a cross-sectional, self-administered, 5-point Likert scale survey to examine participants' perceptions of a hypothetical PROME Web portal that compared PROME for 5 common antihypertensive medications. Between August and December 2013, we recruited 300 members of 7 seniors' centers in a metropolitan area of a southeastern state of the United States to participate in the survey. An overwhelming majority of study participants (243/300, 81.0%) had a favorable perception of PROME's health care applicability. They were mostly positive that PROME would facilitate patient-physician communication, except for the perception that physicians would be upset by the mention of PROME (n=133, 44.3%). Further, 85.7% (n=257) of participants considered the PROME information trustworthy, and 72.0% (n=216) were willing to participate by reporting their own medication experiences. Study participants wanted the PROME Web portal to report the number of reviews, star ratings, and individual comments concerning different medication attributes such as side effects (224/809, 27.7%), cost (168/809, 20.8%), and effectiveness (153

  7. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE platelet function assay: performance and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wei C; Walker, C Ty; Obilby, David; Wash, Mark M; Carville, David G M; Guyer, Kirk E; Bates, Eric R

    2002-01-01

    Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin) that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate). Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (%) of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91) and collagen (r=0.88). Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions.

  8. Web-based application for inverting one-dimensional magnetotelluric data using Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanto, Wiwit; Irnaka, Theodosius Marwan

    2016-11-01

    One-dimensional modeling of magnetotelluric (MT) data has been performed using an online application on a web-based virtual private server. The application was developed with the Python language using the Django framework with HTML and CSS components. The input data, including the apparent resistivity and phase as a function of period or frequency with standard deviation, can be entered through an interactive web page that can be freely accessed at https://komputasi.geofisika.ugm.ac.id. The subsurface models, represented by resistivity as a function of depth, are iteratively improved by changing the model parameters, such as the resistivity and the layer depth, based on the observed apparent resistivity and phase data. The output of the application displayed on the screen presents resistivity as a function of depth and includes the RMS error for each iteration. Synthetic and real data were used in comparative tests of the application's performance, and it is shown that the application developed accurate subsurface resistivity models. Hence, this application can be used for practical one-dimensional modeling of MT data.

  9. The Design and Application of a Web-Based Self- And Peer-Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Kuo-En; Chiou, Shen-Kuan; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the web-based self- and peer-assessments system, or the Web-SPA, which has been shown to provide teachers with a flexible interface with which to arrange various self- and peer-assessment procedures. Secondly, this study examines the effects of the application of the progressively focused self- and peer-assessment (PFSPA)…

  10. Responding to User's Expectation in the Library: Innovative Web 2.0 Applications at JUIT Library: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Shri; Anbu K., John Paul; Kataria, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to provide an insight into the implementation of some of the innovative Web 2.0 applications at Jaypee University of Information Technology with the aim of exploring the expectations of the users and their awareness and usage of such applications. Design/methodology/approach: The study was undertaken at the Learning…

  11. Bedside interprofessional rounds: perceptions of benefits and barriers by internal medicine nursing staff, attending physicians, and housestaff physicians.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Kuperman, Ethan; Lehman, Erik; Haidet, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Interprofessional collaboration improves the quality of care, but integration into workflow is challenging. Although a shared conceptualization regarding bedside interprofessional rounds may enhance implementation, little work has investigated providers' perceptions of this activity. To evaluate the perceptions of nurses, attending physicians, and housestaff physicians regarding the benefits/barriers to bedside interprofessional rounds. Observational, cross-sectional survey of hospital-based medicine nurses, attending physicians, and housestaff physicians. Descriptive, nonparametric Wilcoxon rank sum and nonparametric correlation were used. Bedside interprofessional rounds were defined as "encounters including 2 physicians plus a nurse or other care provider discussing the case at the patient's bedside." Eighteen items related to "benefits" and 21 items related to "barriers" associated with bedside interprofessional rounds. Of 171 surveys sent, 149 were completed (87%). Highest-ranked benefits were related to communication/coordination, including "improves communication between nurses-physicians;" lowest-ranked benefits were related to efficiency, process, and outcomes, including "decreases length-of-stay" and "improves timeliness of consultations." Nurses reported most favorable ratings for all items (P < 0.05). Rank order for 3 provider groups showed high correlation (r = 0.92, P < 0.001). Highest-ranked barriers were related to time, including "nursing staff have limited time;" lowest-ranked barriers were related to provider- and patient-related factors, including "patient lack of comfort." Rank order of barriers among all groups showed moderate correlation (r = 0.62-0.82). Although nurses perceived greater benefit for bedside interprofessional rounds than physicians, all providers perceived coordination/teamwork benefits higher than outcomes. To the extent the results are generalizable, these findings lay the foundation for facilitating

  12. Losing New Graduate Bedside Nurses: A Practice Improvement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Beverly

    2017-01-01

    New graduate nurses (NGNs) at bedside are faced with numerous challenges, which prompt them to leave jobs in their first year. The transition from being a student to competent nurse requires a NGN to have the necessary skills and experience. Subsequently, hospitals continue to face shortages of staff because of high turnover and low retention…

  13. Update on Small Modular Reactors Dynamic System Modeling Tool: Web Application

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hale, Richard Edward; Cetiner, Sacit M.; Fugate, David L.

    Previous reports focused on the development of component and system models as well as end-to-end system models using Modelica and Dymola for two advanced reactor architectures: (1) Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor and (2) fluoride high-temperature reactor (FHR). The focus of this report is the release of the first beta version of the web-based application for model use and collaboration, as well as an update on the FHR model. The web-based application allows novice users to configure end-to-end system models from preconfigured choices to investigate the instrumentation and controls implications of these designs and allows for the collaborative development of individualmore » component models that can be benchmarked against test systems for potential inclusion in the model library. A description of this application is provided along with examples of its use and a listing and discussion of all the models that currently exist in the library.« less

  14. Don't Be Afraid to Explore Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, John

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 is a hot topic. The term "Web 2.0" refers to the next generation of Internet applications that allow the average Internet user to collaborate and share information online. Web 2.0 sites allow anyone to contribute content and to participate with other users in editing and even combining or remixing existing content with other material to…

  15. Photonics applications and web engineering: WILGA Summer 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2016-09-01

    Wilga Summer 2016 Symposium on Photonics Applications and Web Engineering was held on 29 May - 06 June. The Symposium gathered over 350 participants, mainly young researchers active in optics, optoelectronics, photonics, electronics technologies and applications. There were presented around 300 presentations in a few main topical tracks including: bio-photonics, optical sensory networks, photonics-electronics-mechatronics co-design and integration, large functional system design and maintenance, Internet of Thins, and other. The paper is an introduction the 2016 WILGA Summer Symposium Proceedings, and digests some of the Symposium chosen key presentations.

  16. Photonics applications and web engineering: WILGA Summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2015-09-01

    Wilga Summer 2015 Symposium on Photonics Applications and Web Engineering was held on 23-31 May. The Symposium gathered over 350 participants, mainly young researchers active in optics, optoelectronics, photonics, electronics technologies and applications. There were presented around 300 presentations in a few main topical tracks including: bio-photonics, optical sensory networks, photonics-electronics-mechatronics co-design and integration, large functional system design and maintenance, Internet of Thins, and other. The paper is an introduction the 2015 WILGA Summer Symposium Proceedings, and digests some of the Symposium chosen key presentations.

  17. A simple bedside test to assess the swallowing dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanna, S Vinoth; Bhanu, K

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing changes are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Early identification is essential to avoid complications of aspiration. To evaluate the swallowing ability of the PD patients and to correlate it with the indicators of disease progression. A total of 100 PD patients (70 males and 30 females) aged between 50 years and 70 years with varying stage, duration, and severity were enrolled in a cross-sectional study carried out between January and May 2012. A simple bedside water swallowing test was performed using standard 150 ml of water. Swallowing process was assessed under three categories-swallowing speeds (ml/s), swallowing volume (ml/swallow) and swallowing duration (s/swallow). Equal number of age and sex matched controls were also evaluated. All of them completed the task of swallowing. A mean swallowing speed (27.48 ml/s), swallowing volume (28.5 ml/s), and swallowing duration (1.05 s/swallow) was established by the control group. The PD patients showed decreased swallowing speed (7.15 ml/s in males and 6.61 ml/s in females), decreased swallowing volume (14.59 ml/swallow and 14 ml/swallow in females), and increased swallowing duration (2.37 s/swallow and 2.42 s/swallow) which are statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between the severity, duration, and staging of the disease with the swallowing performance and a poor correlation between the subjective reports of dysphagia and the objective performance on water swallow test. The water swallowing test is a simple bedside test to identify the swallowing changes early in PD. It is recommended to do the test in all PD Patients to detect dysphagia early and to intervene appropriately.

  18. Web Applications and Thin Clients in the Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    say thank you to his family and shipmates for all the encouragement and distractions, when he needed them the most. xviii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY...to take full advantage of touch screen features, like journal software that converts handwriting to standard text (Mallick, 2003). 5. Smart Pads...outsourcing Web Applications have no direct control or access to the system and therefore no say in how the network is managed (Clouse, n.d.). Any issues

  19. DADOS-Survey: an open-source application for CHERRIES-compliant Web surveys

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anand; Jacobs, Danny O; Martins, Henrique; Harker, Matthew; Menezes, Andreia; McCready, Mariana; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Background The Internet has been increasingly utilized in biomedical research. From online searching for literature to data sharing, the Internet has emerged as a primary means of research for many physicians and scientists. As a result, Web-based surveys have been employed as an alternative to traditional, paper-based surveys. We describe DADOS-Survey, an open-source Web-survey application developed at our institution that, to the best of our knowledge, is the first to be compliant with the Checklist for Reporting Results of Internet E-Surveys (CHERRIES). DADOS-Survey was designed with usability as a priority, allowing investigators to design and execute their own studies with minimal technical difficulties in doing so. Results To date, DADOS-Survey has been successfully implemented in five Institutional Review Board-approved studies conducted by various departments within our academic center. Each of these studies employed a Web-survey design as their primary methodology. Our initial experience indicates that DADOS-Survey has been used with relative ease by each of the investigators and survey recipients. This has been further demonstrated through formal and field usability testing, during which time suggestions for improvement were incorporated into the software design. Conclusion DADOS-Survey has the potential to have an important role in the future direction of Web-survey administration in biomedical research. This CHERRIES-compliant application is tailored to the emerging requirements of quality data collection in medicine. PMID:16978409

  20. Caching strategies for improving performance of web-based Geographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Brodzik, M.; Collins, J. A.; Lewis, S.; Oldenburg, J.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Operation IceBridge mission collects airborne remote sensing measurements to bridge the gap between NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission and the upcoming ICESat-2 mission. The IceBridge Data Portal from the National Snow and Ice Data Center provides an intuitive web interface for accessing IceBridge mission observations and measurements. Scientists and users usually do not have knowledge about the individual campaigns but are interested in data collected in a specific place. We have developed a high-performance map interface to allow users to quickly zoom to an area of interest and see any Operation IceBridge overflights. The map interface consists of two layers: the user can pan and zoom on the base map layer; the flight line layer that overlays the base layer provides all the campaign missions that intersect with the current map view. The user can click on the flight campaigns and download the data as needed. The OpenGIS® Web Map Service Interface Standard (WMS) provides a simple HTTP interface for requesting geo-registered map images from one or more distributed geospatial databases. Web Feature Service (WFS) provides an interface allowing requests for geographical features across the web using platform-independent calls. OpenLayers provides vector support (points, polylines and polygons) to build a WMS/WFS client for displaying both layers on the screen. Map Server, an open source development environment for building spatially enabled internet applications, is serving the WMS and WFS spatial data to OpenLayers. Early releases of the portal displayed unacceptably poor load time performance for flight lines and the base map tiles. This issue was caused by long response times from the map server in generating all map tiles and flight line vectors. We resolved the issue by implementing various caching strategies on top of the WMS and WFS services, including the use of Squid (www.squid-cache.org) to cache frequently-used content

  1. Going, Going, Still There: Using the WebCite Service to Permanently Archive Cited Web Pages

    PubMed Central

    Trudel, Mathieu

    2005-01-01

    applications for research assessment exercises, being able to measure the impact of Web services and published Web documents through access and Web citation metrics. PMID:16403724

  2. Going, going, still there: using the WebCite service to permanently archive cited web pages.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther; Trudel, Mathieu

    2005-12-30

    Scholars are increasingly citing electronic "web references" which are not preserved in libraries or full text archives. WebCite is a new standard for citing web references. To "webcite" a document involves archiving the cited Web page through www.webcitation.org and citing the WebCite permalink instead of (or in addition to) the unstable live Web page. This journal has amended its "instructions for authors" accordingly, asking authors to archive cited Web pages before submitting a manuscript. Almost 200 other journals are already using the system. We discuss the rationale for WebCite, its technology, and how scholars, editors, and publishers can benefit from the service. Citing scholars initiate an archiving process of all cited Web references, ideally before they submit a manuscript. Authors of online documents and websites which are expected to be cited by others can ensure that their work is permanently available by creating an archived copy using WebCite and providing the citation information including the WebCite link on their Web document(s). Editors should ask their authors to cache all cited Web addresses (Uniform Resource Locators, or URLs) "prospectively" before submitting their manuscripts to their journal. Editors and publishers should also instruct their copyeditors to cache cited Web material if the author has not done so already. Finally, WebCite can process publisher submitted "citing articles" (submitted for example as eXtensible Markup Language [XML] documents) to automatically archive all cited Web pages shortly before or on publication. Finally, WebCite can act as a focussed crawler, caching retrospectively references of already published articles. Copyright issues are addressed by honouring respective Internet standards (robot exclusion files, no-cache and no-archive tags). Long-term preservation is ensured by agreements with libraries and digital preservation organizations. The resulting WebCite Index may also have applications for research

  3. A web-based intervention to promote applications for rehabilitation: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Spanier, Katja; Streibelt, Marco; Ünalan, Firat; Bethge, Matthias

    2015-09-29

    The German welfare system follows the principle "rehabilitation rather than pension," but more than the half of all disability pensioners did not utilize medical rehabilitation before their early retirement. A major barrier is the application procedure. Lack of information about the opportunity to utilize rehabilitation services restricts the chance to improve work ability and to prevent health-related early retirement by rehabilitation programs. The establishment of new access paths to medical rehabilitation services was, therefore, identified as a major challenge for rehabilitation research in a recent expertise. Thus, a web-based information guide was developed to support the application for a medical rehabilitation program. For this study, the development of a web-based information guide was based on the health action process approach. Four modules were established. Three modules support forming an intention by strengthening risk perception (module 1), positive outcome expectancies (module 2) and self-efficacy (module 3). A fourth module aims at the realization of actual behavior by offering instructions on how to plan and to push the application process. The study on the effectiveness of the web-based information guide will be performed as a randomized controlled trial. Persons aged 40 to 59 years with prior sick leave benefits during the preceding year will be included. A sample of 16,000 persons will be randomly drawn from the registers of 3 pension insurance agencies. These persons will receive a questionnaire to determine baseline characteristics. Respondents of this first survey will be randomly allocated either to the intervention or the control group. Both study groups will then receive letters with general information about rehabilitation. The intervention group will additionally receive a link to the web-based information guide. After 1 year, a second survey will be conducted. Additionally, administrative data will be used to determine if participants

  4. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 3 Summary report: Shear web component testing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Three large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of the design concept to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs. An approximate analysis of prebuckling deflections is presented and computer-aided design results, which consider prebuckling deformations, indicate that the design concept offers a theoretical weight saving of 31 percent relative to all metal construction. Recommendations are made for design concept options and analytical methods that are appropriate for production hardware.

  5. Effects of customization on application decisions and applicant pool characteristics in a web-based recruitment context.

    PubMed

    Dineen, Brian R; Noe, Raymond A

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined 2 forms of customization in a Web-based recruitment context. Hypotheses were tested in a controlled study in which participants viewed multiple Web-based job postings that each included information about multiple fit categories. Results indicated that customization of information regarding person-organization (PO), needs-supplies, and demands-abilities (DA) fit (fit information customization) and customization of the order in which these fit categories were presented (configural customization) had differential effects on outcomes. Specifically, (a) applicant pool PO and DA fit were greater when fit information customization was provided, (b) applicant pool fit in high- versus low-relevance fit categories was better differentiated when configural customization was provided, and (c) overall application rates were lower when either or both forms of customization were provided. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Enhancing Web applications in radiology with Java: estimating MR imaging relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Dagher, A P; Fitzpatrick, M; Flanders, A E; Eng, J

    1998-01-01

    Java is a relatively new programming language that has been used to develop a World Wide Web-based tool for estimating magnetic resonance (MR) imaging relaxation times, thereby demonstrating how Java may be used for Web-based radiology applications beyond improving the user interface of teaching files. A standard processing algorithm coded with Java is downloaded along with the hypertext markup language (HTML) document. The user (client) selects the desired pulse sequence and inputs data obtained from a region of interest on the MR images. The algorithm is used to modify selected MR imaging parameters in an equation that models the phenomenon being evaluated. MR imaging relaxation times are estimated, and confidence intervals and a P value expressing the accuracy of the final results are calculated. Design features such as simplicity, object-oriented programming, and security restrictions allow Java to expand the capabilities of HTML by offering a more versatile user interface that includes dynamic annotations and graphics. Java also allows the client to perform more sophisticated information processing and computation than is usually associated with Web applications. Java is likely to become a standard programming option, and the development of stand-alone Java applications may become more common as Java is integrated into future versions of computer operating systems.

  7. Web application for detailed real-time database transaction monitoring for CMS condition data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gruttola, Michele; Di Guida, Salvatore; Innocente, Vincenzo; Pierro, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    In the upcoming LHC era, database have become an essential part for the experiments collecting data from LHC, in order to safely store, and consistently retrieve, a wide amount of data, which are produced by different sources. In the CMS experiment at CERN, all this information is stored in ORACLE databases, allocated in several servers, both inside and outside the CERN network. In this scenario, the task of monitoring different databases is a crucial database administration issue, since different information may be required depending on different users' tasks such as data transfer, inspection, planning and security issues. We present here a web application based on Python web framework and Python modules for data mining purposes. To customize the GUI we record traces of user interactions that are used to build use case models. In addition the application detects errors in database transactions (for example identify any mistake made by user, application failure, unexpected network shutdown or Structured Query Language (SQL) statement error) and provides warning messages from the different users' perspectives. Finally, in order to fullfill the requirements of the CMS experiment community, and to meet the new development in many Web client tools, our application was further developed, and new features were deployed.

  8. Jflow: a workflow management system for web applications.

    PubMed

    Mariette, Jérôme; Escudié, Frédéric; Bardou, Philippe; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Noirot, Céline; Trotard, Marie-Stéphane; Gaspin, Christine; Klopp, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Biologists produce large data sets and are in demand of rich and simple web portals in which they can upload and analyze their files. Providing such tools requires to mask the complexity induced by the needed High Performance Computing (HPC) environment. The connection between interface and computing infrastructure is usually specific to each portal. With Jflow, we introduce a Workflow Management System (WMS), composed of jQuery plug-ins which can easily be embedded in any web application and a Python library providing all requested features to setup, run and monitor workflows. Jflow is available under the GNU General Public License (GPL) at http://bioinfo.genotoul.fr/jflow. The package is coming with full documentation, quick start and a running test portal. Jerome.Mariette@toulouse.inra.fr. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. U.S. Seismic Design Maps Web Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, E.; Fee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The application computes earthquake ground motion design parameters compatible with the International Building Code and other seismic design provisions. It is the primary method for design engineers to obtain ground motion parameters for multiple building codes across the country. When designing new buildings and other structures, engineers around the country use the application. Users specify the design code of interest, location, and other parameters to obtain necessary ground motion information consisting of a high-level executive summary as well as detailed information including maps, data, and graphs. Results are formatted such that they can be directly included in a final engineering report. In addition to single-site analysis, the application supports a batch mode for simultaneous consideration of multiple locations. Finally, an application programming interface (API) is available which allows other application developers to integrate this application's results into larger applications for additional processing. Development on the application has proceeded in an iterative manner working with engineers through email, meetings, and workshops. Each iteration provided new features, improved performance, and usability enhancements. This development approach positioned the application to be integral to the structural design process and is now used to produce over 1800 reports daily. Recent efforts have enhanced the application to be a data-driven, mobile-first, responsive web application. Development is ongoing, and source code has recently been published into the open-source community on GitHub. Open-sourcing the code facilitates improved incorporation of user feedback to add new features ensuring the application's continued success.

  10. JavaScript Access to DICOM Network and Objects in Web Browser.

    PubMed

    Drnasin, Ivan; Grgić, Mislav; Gogić, Goran

    2017-10-01

    Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) 3.0 standard provides the baseline for the picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). The development of Internet and various communication media initiated demand for non-DICOM access to PACS systems. Ever-increasing utilization of the web browsers, laptops and handheld devices, as opposed to desktop applications and static organizational computers, lead to development of different web technologies. The DICOM standard officials accepted those subsequently as tools of alternative access. This paper provides an overview of the current state of development of the web access technology to the DICOM repositories. It presents a different approach of using HTML5 features of the web browsers through the JavaScript language and the WebSocket protocol by enabling real-time communication with DICOM repositories. JavaScript DICOM network library, DICOM to WebSocket proxy and a proof-of-concept web application that qualifies as a DICOM 3.0 device were developed.

  11. Between the bench, the bedside and the office: The need to build bridges between working neuroscientists and ethicists.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Caragh; Cribb, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents findings from an empirical study that explored the meaning of ethics in the everyday work of neuroscientists. Observation and interviews were carried out in one neuroscience research group that was involved in bench-to-bedside translational research. We focus here specifically on the scientists' perceptions of bioethics. Interviewees were often unfamiliar with bioethics as a discipline, particularly the more junior members of the group. Those who were aware of its existence largely viewed it as something distant from them, and as either too abstract, not relevant or an alien imposition on their work. Some interviewees themselves pointed to the need for better 'bridge building' between ethical principles and real-world examples drawn from scientific practice, and we argue that this space is where a more empirically grounded ethics may be useful in terms of actually engaging scientists at both the bench and the bedside.

  12. Bedside risk estimation of morbidly adherent placenta using simple calculator.

    PubMed

    Maymon, R; Melcer, Y; Pekar-Zlotin, M; Shaked, O; Cuckle, H; Tovbin, J

    2018-03-01

    To construct a calculator for 'bedside' estimation of morbidly adherent placenta (MAP) risk based on ultrasound (US) findings. This retrospective study included all pregnant women with at least one previous cesarean delivery attending in our US unit between December 2013 and January 2017. The examination was based on a scoring system which determines the probability for MAP. The study population included 471 pregnant women, and 41 of whom (8.7%) were diagnosed with MAP. Based on ROC curve, the most effective US criteria for detection of MAP were the presence of the placental lacunae, obliteration of the utero-placental demarcation, and placenta previa. On the multivariate logistic regression analysis, US findings of placental lacunae (OR = 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2-9.5; P = 0.01), obliteration of the utero-placental demarcation (OR = 12.4; 95% CI, 3.7-41.6; P < 0.0001), and placenta previa (OR = 10.5; 95% CI, 3.5-31.3; P < 0.0001) were associated with MAP. By combining these three parameters, the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated, yielding an area under the curve of 0.93 (95% CI, 0.87-0.97). Accordingly, we have constructed a simple calculator for 'bedside' estimation of MAP risk. The calculator is mounted on the hospital's internet website ( http://www.assafh.org/Pages/PPCalc/index.html ). The risk estimation of MAP varies between 1.5 and 87%. The present calculator enables a simple 'bedside' MAP estimation, facilitating accurate and adequate antenatal risk assessment.

  13. EpiCollect+: linking smartphones to web applications for complex data collection projects

    PubMed Central

    Aanensen, David M.; Huntley, Derek M.; Menegazzo, Mirko; Powell, Chris I.; Spratt, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have described the development of the generic mobile phone data gathering tool, EpiCollect, and an associated web application, providing two-way communication between multiple data gatherers and a project database. This software only allows data collection on the phone using a single questionnaire form that is tailored to the needs of the user (including a single GPS point and photo per entry), whereas many applications require a more complex structure, allowing users to link a series of forms in a linear or branching hierarchy, along with the addition of any number of media types accessible from smartphones and/or tablet devices (e.g., GPS, photos, videos, sound clips and barcode scanning). A much enhanced version of EpiCollect has been developed (EpiCollect+). The individual data collection forms in EpiCollect+ provide more design complexity than the single form used in EpiCollect, and the software allows the generation of complex data collection projects through the ability to link many forms together in a linear (or branching) hierarchy. Furthermore, EpiCollect+ allows the collection of multiple media types as well as standard text fields, increased data validation and form logic. The entire process of setting up a complex mobile phone data collection project to the specification of a user (project and form definitions) can be undertaken at the EpiCollect+ website using a simple ‘drag and drop’ procedure, with visualisation of the data gathered using Google Maps and charts at the project website. EpiCollect+ is suitable for situations where multiple users transmit complex data by mobile phone (or other Android devices) to a single project web database and is already being used for a range of field projects, particularly public health projects in sub-Saharan Africa. However, many uses can be envisaged from education, ecology and epidemiology to citizen science. PMID:25485096

  14. EpiCollect+: linking smartphones to web applications for complex data collection projects.

    PubMed

    Aanensen, David M; Huntley, Derek M; Menegazzo, Mirko; Powell, Chris I; Spratt, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have described the development of the generic mobile phone data gathering tool, EpiCollect, and an associated web application, providing two-way communication between multiple data gatherers and a project database. This software only allows data collection on the phone using a single questionnaire form that is tailored to the needs of the user (including a single GPS point and photo per entry), whereas many applications require a more complex structure, allowing users to link a series of forms in a linear or branching hierarchy, along with the addition of any number of media types accessible from smartphones and/or tablet devices (e.g., GPS, photos, videos, sound clips and barcode scanning). A much enhanced version of EpiCollect has been developed (EpiCollect+). The individual data collection forms in EpiCollect+ provide more design complexity than the single form used in EpiCollect, and the software allows the generation of complex data collection projects through the ability to link many forms together in a linear (or branching) hierarchy. Furthermore, EpiCollect+ allows the collection of multiple media types as well as standard text fields, increased data validation and form logic. The entire process of setting up a complex mobile phone data collection project to the specification of a user (project and form definitions) can be undertaken at the EpiCollect+ website using a simple 'drag and drop' procedure, with visualisation of the data gathered using Google Maps and charts at the project website. EpiCollect+ is suitable for situations where multiple users transmit complex data by mobile phone (or other Android devices) to a single project web database and is already being used for a range of field projects, particularly public health projects in sub-Saharan Africa. However, many uses can be envisaged from education, ecology and epidemiology to citizen science.

  15. Incorporating bedside reporting into change-of-shift report.

    PubMed

    Laws, Dawn; Amato, Shelly

    2010-01-01

    Communication failures during shift reports are a leading cause of sentinel events in the United States. Providing adequate information during change-of-shift reporting is essential to promoting patient safety. In addition, patients want to be more involved in decisions regarding their plan of care. The purpose of the article is to discuss how a stroke rehabilitation unit was able to implement bedside change-of-shift reporting to meet both of these goals.

  16. Assessing the implementation of a bedside service handoff on an academic hospitalist service.

    PubMed

    Wray, Charlie M; Arora, Vineet M; Hedeker, Donald; Meltzer, David O

    2018-06-01

    Inpatient service handoffs are a vulnerable transition during a patients' hospitalization. We hypothesized that performing the service handoff at the patients' bedside may be one mechanism to more efficiently transfer patient information between physicians, while further integrating the patient into their hospital care. We performed a 6-month prospective study of performing a bedside handoff (BHO) at the service transition on a non-teaching hospitalist service. On a weekly basis, transitioning hospitalists co-rounded at patient's bedsides. Post-handoff surveys assessed for completeness of handoff, communication, missed information, and adverse events. A control group who performed the handoff via email, phone or face-to-face was also surveyed. Chi-square and item-response theory (IRT) analysis assessed for differences between BHO and control groups. Narrative responses were elicited to qualitatively describe the BHO. In total, 21/31 (67%) scheduled BHOs were performed. On average, 4 out of 6 eligible patients experienced a BHO, with a total of 90 patients experiencing a BHO. Of those asked to perform the BHO, 52% stated the service transition took 31-60 min compared to 24% in the control group. Controlling for the nesting of observations within physicians, IRT analysis found that BHO respondents had statistically significant greater odds of: reporting increased patient awareness of the service handoff, more certainty in the plan for each patient, less discovery of missed information, and less time needed to learn about the patient on the first day compared to control methods. Narrative responses described a more patient-centered handoff with improved communication that was time-consuming and often logistically difficult to implement. Despite its time-intensive nature, performing the service handoff at the patient's bedside may lead to a more complete and efficient service transition. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Learning Clinical Skills during Bedside Teaching Encounters in General Practice: A Video-Observational Study with Insights from Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajjawi, Rola; Rees, Charlotte; Monrouxe, Lynn V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore how opportunities for learning clinical skills are negotiated within bedside teaching encounters (BTEs). Bedside teaching, within the medical workplace, is considered essential for helping students develop their clinical skills. Design/methodology/approach: An audio and/or video observational study examining…

  18. BioTapestry now provides a web application and improved drawing and layout tools

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Suzanne M.; Leinonen, Kalle; Longabaugh, William J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) control embryonic development, and to understand this process in depth, researchers need to have a detailed understanding of both the network architecture and its dynamic evolution over time and space. Interactive visualization tools better enable researchers to conceptualize, understand, and share GRN models. BioTapestry is an established application designed to fill this role, and recent enhancements released in Versions 6 and 7 have targeted two major facets of the program. First, we introduced significant improvements for network drawing and automatic layout that have now made it much easier for the user to create larger, more organized network drawings. Second, we revised the program architecture so it could continue to support the current Java desktop Editor program, while introducing a new BioTapestry GRN Viewer that runs as a JavaScript web application in a browser. We have deployed a number of GRN models using this new web application. These improvements will ensure that BioTapestry remains viable as a research tool in the face of the continuing evolution of web technologies, and as our understanding of GRN models grows. PMID:27134726

  19. BioTapestry now provides a web application and improved drawing and layout tools.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Suzanne M; Leinonen, Kalle; Longabaugh, William J R

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) control embryonic development, and to understand this process in depth, researchers need to have a detailed understanding of both the network architecture and its dynamic evolution over time and space. Interactive visualization tools better enable researchers to conceptualize, understand, and share GRN models. BioTapestry is an established application designed to fill this role, and recent enhancements released in Versions 6 and 7 have targeted two major facets of the program. First, we introduced significant improvements for network drawing and automatic layout that have now made it much easier for the user to create larger, more organized network drawings. Second, we revised the program architecture so it could continue to support the current Java desktop Editor program, while introducing a new BioTapestry GRN Viewer that runs as a JavaScript web application in a browser. We have deployed a number of GRN models using this new web application. These improvements will ensure that BioTapestry remains viable as a research tool in the face of the continuing evolution of web technologies, and as our understanding of GRN models grows.

  20. Usage, Barriers, and Training of Web 2.0 Technology Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Christopher G.; Pritchett, Christal C.; Wohleb, Elisha C.

    2013-01-01

    This research study was designed to determine the degree of use of Web 2.0 technology applications by certified education professionals and examine differences among various groups as well as reasons for these differences. A quantitative survey instrument was developed to gather demographic information and data. Participants reported they would be…

  1. Advancing the Implementation of Hydrologic Models as Web-based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, P.; Tarboton, D. G.; Castronova, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Advanced computer simulations are required to understand hydrologic phenomenon such as rainfall-runoff response, groundwater hydrology, snow hydrology, etc. Building a hydrologic model instance to simulate a watershed requires investment in data (diverse geospatial datasets such as terrain, soil) and computer resources, typically demands a wide skill set from the analyst, and the workflow involved is often difficult to reproduce. This work introduces a web-based prototype infrastructure in the form of a web application that provides researchers with easy to use access to complete hydrological modeling functionality. This includes creating the necessary geospatial and forcing data, preparing input files for a model by applying complex data preprocessing, running the model for a user defined watershed, and saving the results to a web repository. The open source Tethys Platform was used to develop the web app front-end Graphical User Interface (GUI). We used HydroDS, a webservice that provides data preparation processing capability to support backend computations used by the app. Results are saved in HydroShare, a hydrologic information system that supports the sharing of hydrologic data, model and analysis tools. The TOPographic Kinematic APproximation and Integration (TOPKAPI) model served as the example for which we developed a complete hydrologic modeling service to demonstrate the approach. The final product is a complete modeling system accessible through the web to create input files, and run the TOPKAPI hydrologic model for a watershed of interest. We are investigating similar functionality for the preparation of input to Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys). Key Words: hydrologic modeling, web services, hydrologic information system, HydroShare, HydroDS, Tethys Platform

  2. MathBrowser: Web-Enabled Mathematical Software with Application to the Chemistry Curriculum, v 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Jack G.

    1997-10-01

    MathSoft: Cambridge, MA, 1996; free via ftp from www.mathsoft.com. The movement to provide computer-based applications in chemistry has come to focus on three main areas: software aimed at specific applications (drawing, simulation, data analysis, etc.), multimedia applications designed to assist in the presentation of conceptual information, and packages to be used in conjunction with a particular textbook at a specific point in the chemistry curriculum. The result is a situation where no single software package devoted to problem solving can be used across a large segment of the curriculum. Adoption of World Wide Web (WWW) technology by a manufacturer of mathematical software, however, has produced software that provides an attractive means of providing a problem-solving resource to students in courses from freshman through senior level.

  3. Returning to the bedside: using the history and physical examination to identify rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Litaker, D; Pioro, M; El Bilbeisi, H; Brems, J

    2000-12-01

    To determine the value of elements of the bedside history and physical examination in predicting arthrography results in older patients with suspected rotator cuff tear (RCT). Retrospective chart review Orthopedic practice limited to disorders of the shoulder 448 consecutive patients with suspected RCT referred for arthrography over a 4-year period Presence of partial or complete RCT on arthrogram 301 patients (67.2%) had evidence of complete or partial RCT. Clinical findings in the univariate analysis most closely associated with rotator cuff tear included infra- and supraspinatus atrophy (P < .001), weakness with either elevation (P < .001) or external rotation (P < .001), arc of pain (P = .004), and impingement sign (P = .01). Stepwise logistic regression based on a derivation dataset (n = 191) showed that weakness with external rotation (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 6.96 (3.09, 13.03)), age > or = 65 (AOR 4.05(2.47, 16.07)), and night pain (AOR 2.61 (1.004, 7.39)) best predicted the presence of RCT. A five-point scoring system developed from this model was applied in the remaining patient sample (n = 216) to test validity. No significant differences in performance were noted using ROC curve comparison. Using likelihood ratios, a clinical score = 4 was superior in predicting RCT to the diagnostic prediction of an expert clinician. This score had specificity equivalent to magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonography in diagnosis of RCT. The presence of three simple features in the history and physical examination of the shoulder can identify RCT efficiently. This approach offers a valuable strategy to diagnosis at the bedside without compromising sensitivity or specificity.

  4. Science gateways for semantic-web-based life science applications.

    PubMed

    Ardizzone, Valeria; Bruno, Riccardo; Calanducci, Antonio; Carrubba, Carla; Fargetta, Marco; Ingrà, Elisa; Inserra, Giuseppina; La Rocca, Giuseppe; Monforte, Salvatore; Pistagna, Fabrizio; Ricceri, Rita; Rotondo, Riccardo; Scardaci, Diego; Barbera, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the architecture of a framework for building Science Gateways supporting official standards both for user authentication and authorization and for middleware-independent job and data management. Two use cases of the customization of the Science Gateway framework for Semantic-Web-based life science applications are also described.

  5. Peritoneal dialysis: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis was first employed in patients with acute renal failure in the 1940s and since the 1960s for those with end-stage renal disease. Its popularity increased enormously after the introduction of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in the end of 1970s. This stimulated both clinical and basic research. In an ideal situation, this should lead to cross-fertilization between the two. The present review describes two examples of interactions: one where it worked out very well and another where basic science missed the link with clinical findings. Those on fluid transport are examples of how old physiological findings on absorption of saline and glucose solutions were adopted in peritoneal dialysis by the use of glucose as an osmotic agent. The mechanism behind this in patients was first solved mathematically by the assumption of ultrasmall intracellular pores allowing water transport only. At the same time, basic science discovered the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP-1), and a few years later, studies in transgenic mice confirmed that AQP-1 was the ultrasmall pore. In clinical medicine, this led to its assessment in patients and the notion of its impairment. Drugs for treatment have been developed. Research on biocompatibility is not a success story. Basic science has focussed on dialysis solutions with a low pH and lactate, and effects of glucose degradation products, although the first is irrelevant in patients and effects of continuous exposure to high glucose concentrations were largely neglected. Industry believed the bench more than the bedside, resulting in ‘biocompatible’ dialysis solutions. These solutions have some beneficial effects, but are evidently not the final answer. PMID:26120456

  6. A simple bedside test to assess the swallowing dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanna, S. Vinoth; Bhanu, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Swallowing changes are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Early identification is essential to avoid complications of aspiration. Objectives: To evaluate the swallowing ability of the PD patients and to correlate it with the indicators of disease progression. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 PD patients (70 males and 30 females) aged between 50 years and 70 years with varying stage, duration, and severity were enrolled in a cross-sectional study carried out between January and May 2012. A simple bedside water swallowing test was performed using standard 150 ml of water. Swallowing process was assessed under three categories-swallowing speeds (ml/s), swallowing volume (ml/swallow) and swallowing duration (s/swallow). Equal number of age and sex matched controls were also evaluated. Results: All of them completed the task of swallowing. A mean swallowing speed (27.48 ml/s), swallowing volume (28.5 ml/s), and swallowing duration (1.05 s/swallow) was established by the control group. The PD patients showed decreased swallowing speed (7.15 ml/s in males and 6.61 ml/s in females), decreased swallowing volume (14.59 ml/swallow and 14 ml/swallow in females), and increased swallowing duration (2.37 s/swallow and 2.42 s/swallow) which are statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between the severity, duration, and staging of the disease with the swallowing performance and a poor correlation between the subjective reports of dysphagia and the objective performance on water swallow test. Conclusion: The water swallowing test is a simple bedside test to identify the swallowing changes early in PD. It is recommended to do the test in all PD Patients to detect dysphagia early and to intervene appropriately. PMID:24753662

  7. Accessing multimedia content from mobile applications using semantic web technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutel, Jörn; Gerlach, Andrea; Klekamp, Stefanie; Schulz, Kristin

    2014-02-01

    We describe the ideas and results of an applied research project that aims at leveraging the expressive power of semantic web technologies as a server-side backend for mobile applications that provide access to location and multimedia data and allow for a rich user experience in mobile scenarios, ranging from city and museum guides to multimedia enhancements of any kind of narrative content, including e-book applications. In particular, we will outline a reusable software architecture for both server-side functionality and native mobile platforms that is aimed at significantly decreasing the effort required for developing particular applications of that kind.

  8. Clever generation of rich SPARQL queries from annotated relational schema: application to Semantic Web Service creation for biological databases.

    PubMed

    Wollbrett, Julien; Larmande, Pierre; de Lamotte, Frédéric; Ruiz, Manuel

    2013-04-15

    In recent years, a large amount of "-omics" data have been produced. However, these data are stored in many different species-specific databases that are managed by different institutes and laboratories. Biologists often need to find and assemble data from disparate sources to perform certain analyses. Searching for these data and assembling them is a time-consuming task. The Semantic Web helps to facilitate interoperability across databases. A common approach involves the development of wrapper systems that map a relational database schema onto existing domain ontologies. However, few attempts have been made to automate the creation of such wrappers. We developed a framework, named BioSemantic, for the creation of Semantic Web Services that are applicable to relational biological databases. This framework makes use of both Semantic Web and Web Services technologies and can be divided into two main parts: (i) the generation and semi-automatic annotation of an RDF view; and (ii) the automatic generation of SPARQL queries and their integration into Semantic Web Services backbones. We have used our framework to integrate genomic data from different plant databases. BioSemantic is a framework that was designed to speed integration of relational databases. We present how it can be used to speed the development of Semantic Web Services for existing relational biological databases. Currently, it creates and annotates RDF views that enable the automatic generation of SPARQL queries. Web Services are also created and deployed automatically, and the semantic annotations of our Web Services are added automatically using SAWSDL attributes. BioSemantic is downloadable at http://southgreen.cirad.fr/?q=content/Biosemantic.

  9. Application of web-GIS approach for climate change study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okladnikov, Igor; Gordov, Evgeny; Titov, Alexander; Bogomolov, Vasily; Martynova, Yuliya; Shulgina, Tamara

    2013-04-01

    Georeferenced datasets are currently actively used in numerous applications including modeling, interpretation and forecast of climatic and ecosystem changes for various spatial and temporal scales. Due to inherent heterogeneity of environmental datasets as well as their huge size which might constitute up to tens terabytes for a single dataset at present studies in the area of climate and environmental change require a special software support. A dedicated web-GIS information-computational system for analysis of georeferenced climatological and meteorological data has been created. It is based on OGC standards and involves many modern solutions such as object-oriented programming model, modular composition, and JavaScript libraries based on GeoExt library, ExtJS Framework and OpenLayers software. The main advantage of the system lies in a possibility to perform mathematical and statistical data analysis, graphical visualization of results with GIS-functionality, and to prepare binary output files with just only a modern graphical web-browser installed on a common desktop computer connected to Internet. Several geophysical datasets represented by two editions of NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis, JMA/CRIEPI JRA-25 Reanalysis, ECMWF ERA-40 Reanalysis, ECMWF ERA Interim Reanalysis, MRI/JMA APHRODITE's Water Resources Project Reanalysis, DWD Global Precipitation Climatology Centre's data, GMAO Modern Era-Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, meteorological observational data for the territory of the former USSR for the 20th century, results of modeling by global and regional climatological models, and others are available for processing by the system. And this list is extending. Also a functionality to run WRF and "Planet simulator" models was implemented in the system. Due to many preset parameters and limited time and spatial ranges set in the system these models have low computational power requirements and could be used in educational workflow for better

  10. Promoting Reflective Thinking Skills by Using Web 2.0 Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate are using Web 2.0 applications promoting reflective thinking skills for higher education student in faculty for education. Although the literature reveals that technology integration is a trend in higher education and researchers and educators have increasingly shared their ideas and examples of implementations of Web…

  11. Bench-to-bedside review: Rapid molecular diagnostics for bloodstream infection - a new frontier?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Among critically ill patients, the diagnosis of bloodstream infection poses a major challenge. Current standard bacterial identification based on blood culture platforms is intrinsically time-consuming and slow. The continuous evolvement of molecular techniques has the potential of providing a faster, more sensitive and direct identification of causative pathogens without prior need for cultivation. This may ultimately impact clinical decision-making and antimicrobial treatment. This review summarises the currently available technologies, their strengths and limitations and the obstacles that have to be overcome in order to develop a satisfactory bedside point-of-care diagnostic tool for detection of bloodstream infection. PMID:22647543

  12. Praedicere Possumus: An Italian web-based application for predictive microbiology to ensure food safety.

    PubMed

    Polese, Pierluigi; Torre, Manuela Del; Stecchini, Mara Lucia

    2018-03-31

    The use of predictive modelling tools, which mainly describe the response of microorganisms to a particular set of environmental conditions, may contribute to a better understanding of microbial behaviour in foods. In this paper, a tertiary model, in the form of a readily available and userfriendly web-based application Praedicere Possumus (PP) is presented with research examples from our laboratories. Through the PP application, users have access to different modules, which apply a set of published models considered reliable for determining the compliance of a food product with EU safety criteria and for optimising processing throughout the identification of critical control points. The application pivots around a growth/no-growth boundary model, coupled with a growth model, and includes thermal and non-thermal inactivation models. Integrated functionalities, such as the fractional contribution of each inhibitory factor to growth probability (f) and the time evolution of the growth probability (P t ), have also been included. The PP application is expected to assist food industry and food safety authorities in their common commitment towards the improvement of food safety.

  13. PROTICdb: a web-based application to store, track, query, and compare plant proteome data.

    PubMed

    Ferry-Dumazet, Hélène; Houel, Gwenn; Montalent, Pierre; Moreau, Luc; Langella, Olivier; Negroni, Luc; Vincent, Delphine; Lalanne, Céline; de Daruvar, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe; Zivy, Michel; Joets, Johann

    2005-05-01

    PROTICdb is a web-based application, mainly designed to store and analyze plant proteome data obtained by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). The purposes of PROTICdb are (i) to store, track, and query information related to proteomic experiments, i.e., from tissue sampling to protein identification and quantitative measurements, and (ii) to integrate information from the user's own expertise and other sources into a knowledge base, used to support data interpretation (e.g., for the determination of allelic variants or products of post-translational modifications). Data insertion into the relational database of PROTICdb is achieved either by uploading outputs of image analysis and MS identification software, or by filling web forms. 2-D PAGE annotated maps can be displayed, queried, and compared through a graphical interface. Links to external databases are also available. Quantitative data can be easily exported in a tabulated format for statistical analyses. PROTICdb is based on the Oracle or the PostgreSQL Database Management System and is freely available upon request at the following URL: http://moulon.inra.fr/ bioinfo/PROTICdb.

  14. Development of a web-based video management and application processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Shermann S.; Wu, Yi; Li, Qing; Zhuang, Yueting

    2001-07-01

    How to facilitate efficient video manipulation and access in a web-based environment is becoming a popular trend for video applications. In this paper, we present a web-oriented video management and application processing system, based on our previous work on multimedia database and content-based retrieval. In particular, we extend the VideoMAP architecture with specific web-oriented mechanisms, which include: (1) Concurrency control facilities for the editing of video data among different types of users, such as Video Administrator, Video Producer, Video Editor, and Video Query Client; different users are assigned various priority levels for different operations on the database. (2) Versatile video retrieval mechanism which employs a hybrid approach by integrating a query-based (database) mechanism with content- based retrieval (CBR) functions; its specific language (CAROL/ST with CBR) supports spatio-temporal semantics of video objects, and also offers an improved mechanism to describe visual content of videos by content-based analysis method. (3) Query profiling database which records the `histories' of various clients' query activities; such profiles can be used to provide the default query template when a similar query is encountered by the same kind of users. An experimental prototype system is being developed based on the existing VideoMAP prototype system, using Java and VC++ on the PC platform.

  15. DICOMweb™: Background and Application of the Web Standard for Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Genereaux, Brad W; Dennison, Donald K; Ho, Kinson; Horn, Robert; Silver, Elliot Lewis; O'Donnell, Kevin; Kahn, Charles E

    2018-05-10

    This paper describes why and how DICOM, the standard that has been the basis for medical imaging interoperability around the world for several decades, has been extended into a full web technology-based standard, DICOMweb. At the turn of the century, healthcare embraced information technology, which created new problems and new opportunities for the medical imaging industry; at the same time, web technologies matured and began serving other domains well. This paper describes DICOMweb, how it extended the DICOM standard, and how DICOMweb can be applied to problems facing healthcare applications to address workflow and the changing healthcare climate.

  16. Development of a nursing handoff tool: a web-based application to enhance patient safety.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Denise; Boomhower, Marc; Lancaster, Diane R; Antonelli, Mary; Kenyon, Mary Anne Murphy; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Dykes, Patricia C

    2010-11-13

    Dynamic and complex clinical environments present many challenges for effective communication among health care providers. The omission of accurate, timely, easily accessible vital information by health care providers significantly increases risk of patient harm and can have devastating consequences for patient care. An effective nursing handoff supports the standardized transfer of accurate, timely, critical patient information, as well as continuity of care and treatment, resulting in enhanced patient safety. The Brigham and Women's/Faulkner Hospital Healthcare Information Technology Innovation Program (HIP) is supporting the development of a web based nursing handoff tool (NHT). The goal of this project is to develop a "proof of concept" handoff application to be evaluated by nurses on the inpatient intermediate care units. The handoff tool would enable nurses to use existing knowledge of evidence-based handoff methodology in their everyday practice to improve patient care and safety. In this paper, we discuss the results of nursing focus groups designed to identify the current state of handoff practice as well as the functional and data element requirements of a web based Nursing Handoff Tool (NHT).

  17. A Role-Playing Virtual World for Web-Based Application Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depradine, Colin

    2007-01-01

    With the rapid development of the information communication and technology (ICT) infrastructure in the Caribbean, there is an increasing demand for skilled software developers to meet the ICT needs of the region. Consequently, the web-based applications course offered at the University of the West Indies, has been redeveloped. One major part of…

  18. ClusterControl: a web interface for distributing and monitoring bioinformatics applications on a Linux cluster.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Gernot; Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2004-03-22

    ClusterControl is a web interface to simplify distributing and monitoring bioinformatics applications on Linux cluster systems. We have developed a modular concept that enables integration of command line oriented program into the application framework of ClusterControl. The systems facilitate integration of different applications accessed through one interface and executed on a distributed cluster system. The package is based on freely available technologies like Apache as web server, PHP as server-side scripting language and OpenPBS as queuing system and is available free of charge for academic and non-profit institutions. http://genome.tugraz.at/Software/ClusterControl

  19. Transforming care at the bedside: implementation and spread model for single-hospital and multihospital systems.

    PubMed

    Martin, Susan Christie; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Merryman, Tamra; Shovel, Judith; Liberi, Cindy A; Konzier, Jeannine

    2007-10-01

    Institute of Medicine reports provide evidence of the failings of the healthcare system in the United States and a vision of the required transformation. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation created the Transforming Care at the Bedside initiative in 2003 to develop and validate a process for transforming care in hospital medical-surgical units. The authors describe Transforming Care at the Bedside as implemented by one of Institute for Healthcare Improvement/Robert Wood Johnson's initial pilot hospitals, including promising outcomes and a model for spreading the initiative.

  20. A Web Geographic Information System to share data and explorative analysis tools: The application to West Nile disease in the Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Savini, Lara; Tora, Susanna; Di Lorenzo, Alessio; Cioci, Daniela; Monaco, Federica; Polci, Andrea; Orsini, Massimiliano; Calistri, Paolo; Conte, Annamaria

    2018-01-01

    In the last decades an increasing number of West Nile Disease cases was observed in equines and humans in the Mediterranean basin and surveillance systems are set up in numerous countries to manage and control the disease. The collection, storage and distribution of information on the spread of the disease becomes important for a shared intervention and control strategy. To this end, a Web Geographic Information System has been developed and disease data, climatic and environmental remote sensed data, full genome sequences of selected isolated strains are made available. This paper describes the Disease Monitoring Dashboard (DMD) web system application, the tools available for the preliminary analysis on climatic and environmental factors and the other interactive tools for epidemiological analysis. WNV occurrence data are collected from multiple official and unofficial sources. Whole genome sequences and metadata of WNV strains are retrieved from public databases or generated in the framework of the Italian surveillance activities. Climatic and environmental data are provided by NASA website. The Geographical Information System is composed by Oracle 10g Database and ESRI ArcGIS Server 10.03; the web mapping client application is developed with the ArcGIS API for Javascript and Phylocanvas library to facilitate and optimize the mash-up approach. ESRI ArcSDE 10.1 has been used to store spatial data. The DMD application is accessible through a generic web browser at https://netmed.izs.it/networkMediterraneo/. The system collects data through on-line forms and automated procedures and visualizes data as interactive graphs, maps and tables. The spatial and temporal dynamic visualization of disease events is managed by a time slider that returns results on both map and epidemiological curve. Climatic and environmental data can be associated to cases through python procedures and downloaded as Excel files. The system compiles multiple datasets through user-friendly web

  1. Web2Quests: Updating a Popular Web-Based Inquiry-Oriented Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Serhat

    2009-01-01

    WebQuest is a popular inquiry-oriented activity in which learners use Web resources. Since the creation of the innovation, almost 15 years ago, the Web has changed significantly, while the WebQuest technique has changed little. This article examines possible applications of new Web trends on WebQuest instructional strategy. Some possible…

  2. Web Application to Monitor Logistics Distribution of Disaster Relief Using the CodeIgniter Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Mohamad; Ridwan Lessy, Mohamad

    2018-03-01

    Disaster management is the responsibility of the central government and local governments. The principles of disaster management, among others, are quick and precise, priorities, coordination and cohesion, efficient and effective manner. Help that is needed by most societies are logistical assistance, such as the assistance covers people’s everyday needs, such as food, instant noodles, fast food, blankets, mattresses etc. Logistical assistance is needed for disaster management, especially in times of disasters. The support of logistical assistance must be timely, to the right location, target, quality, quantity, and needs. The purpose of this study is to make a web application to monitorlogistics distribution of disaster relefusing CodeIgniter framework. Through this application, the mechanisms of aid delivery will be easily controlled from and heading to the disaster site.

  3. MAX UnMix: A web application for unmixing magnetic coercivity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxbauer, Daniel P.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Fox, David L.

    2016-10-01

    It is common in the fields of rock and environmental magnetism to unmix magnetic mineral components using statistical methods that decompose various types of magnetization curves (e.g., acquisition, demagnetization, or backfield). A number of programs have been developed over the past decade that are frequently used by the rock magnetic community, however many of these programs are either outdated or have obstacles inhibiting their usability. MAX UnMix is a web application (available online at http://www.irm.umn.edu/maxunmix), built using the shiny package for R studio, that can be used for unmixing coercivity distributions derived from magnetization curves. Here, we describe in detail the statistical model underpinning the MAX UnMix web application and discuss the programs functionality. MAX UnMix is an improvement over previous unmixing programs in that it is designed to be user friendly, runs as an independent website, and is platform independent.

  4. A Web 2.0 Interface to Ion Stopping Power and Other Physics Routines for High Energy Density Physics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Peter; Veitzer, Seth

    2008-04-01

    We present a new Web 2.0-based interface to physics routines for High Energy Density Physics applications. These routines include models for ion stopping power, sputtering, secondary electron yields and energies, impact ionization cross sections, and atomic radiated power. The Web 2.0 interface allows users to easily explore the results of the models before using the routines within other codes or to analyze experimental results. We discuss how we used various Web 2.0 tools, including the Python 2.5, Django, and the Yahoo User Interface library. Finally, we demonstrate the interface by showing as an example the stopping power algorithms researchers are currently using within the Hydra code to analyze warm, dense matter experiments underway at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  5. Exploration of exposure conditions with a novel wireless detector for bedside digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosmans, Hilde; Nens, Joris; Delzenne, Louis; Marshall, Nicholas; Pauwels, Herman; De Wever, Walter; Oyen, Raymond

    2012-03-01

    We propose, apply and validate an optimization scheme for a new wireless CsI based DR detector in combination with a regular mobile X-ray system for bedside imaging applications. Three different grids were tested in this combination. Signal-difference-to-noise was investigated in two ways, using a 1mm Cu piece in combination with different thicknesses of PMMA and by means of the CDRAD phantom using 10 images per condition and an automated evaluation method. A Figure of Merit (FOM), namely SDNR2/Imparted Energy, was calculated for a large range of exposure conditions, without and with grid in place. Misalignment of the grids was evaluated via the same FOMs. This optimization study was validated with comparative X-ray acquisitions performed on dead bodies. An experienced radiologist scored the quality of several specific aspects for all these exposures. Signal difference to noise ratios measured with the Cu method correlated well with the threshold contrasts from the CDRAD analysis (R2 > 0.9). The analysis showed optimal FOM with detector air kerma rates as typically used in clinical practice. Lower tube voltages provide higher FOM than the higher values but their practical use depends on the limitations of X-ray tubes, linked to patient motion artefacts. The use of high resolution grids should be encouraged, as the FOM increases with 47% at 75kV. These scores from the Visual grading study confirmed the results obtained with the FOM. The switch to (wireless) DR technology for bedside imaging could benefit from devices to improve grid positioning or any scatter reduction technique.

  6. IsoWeb: A Bayesian Isotope Mixing Model for Diet Analysis of the Whole Food Web

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Taku; Osada, Yutaka; Takimoto, Gaku

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative description of food webs provides fundamental information for the understanding of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics. Recently, stable isotope mixing models have been widely used to quantify dietary proportions of different food resources to a focal consumer. Here we propose a novel mixing model (IsoWeb) that estimates diet proportions of all consumers in a food web based on stable isotope information. IsoWeb requires a topological description of a food web, and stable isotope signatures of all consumers and resources in the web. A merit of IsoWeb is that it takes into account variation in trophic enrichment factors among different consumer-resource links. Sensitivity analysis using realistic hypothetical food webs suggests that IsoWeb is applicable to a wide variety of food webs differing in the number of species, connectance, sample size, and data variability. Sensitivity analysis based on real topological webs showed that IsoWeb can allow for a certain level of topological uncertainty in target food webs, including erroneously assuming false links, omission of existent links and species, and trophic aggregation into trophospecies. Moreover, using an illustrative application to a real food web, we demonstrated that IsoWeb can compare the plausibility of different candidate topologies for a focal web. These results suggest that IsoWeb provides a powerful tool to analyze food-web structure from stable isotope data. We provide R and BUGS codes to aid efficient applications of IsoWeb. PMID:22848427

  7. Clever generation of rich SPARQL queries from annotated relational schema: application to Semantic Web Service creation for biological databases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, a large amount of “-omics” data have been produced. However, these data are stored in many different species-specific databases that are managed by different institutes and laboratories. Biologists often need to find and assemble data from disparate sources to perform certain analyses. Searching for these data and assembling them is a time-consuming task. The Semantic Web helps to facilitate interoperability across databases. A common approach involves the development of wrapper systems that map a relational database schema onto existing domain ontologies. However, few attempts have been made to automate the creation of such wrappers. Results We developed a framework, named BioSemantic, for the creation of Semantic Web Services that are applicable to relational biological databases. This framework makes use of both Semantic Web and Web Services technologies and can be divided into two main parts: (i) the generation and semi-automatic annotation of an RDF view; and (ii) the automatic generation of SPARQL queries and their integration into Semantic Web Services backbones. We have used our framework to integrate genomic data from different plant databases. Conclusions BioSemantic is a framework that was designed to speed integration of relational databases. We present how it can be used to speed the development of Semantic Web Services for existing relational biological databases. Currently, it creates and annotates RDF views that enable the automatic generation of SPARQL queries. Web Services are also created and deployed automatically, and the semantic annotations of our Web Services are added automatically using SAWSDL attributes. BioSemantic is downloadable at http://southgreen.cirad.fr/?q=content/Biosemantic. PMID:23586394

  8. Designing a web-application to support home-based care of childhood CKD stages 3-5: qualitative study of family and professional preferences.

    PubMed

    Swallow, Veronica M; Hall, Andrew G; Carolan, Ian; Santacroce, Sheila; Webb, Nicholas J A; Smith, Trish; Hanif, Noreen

    2014-02-18

    There is a lack of online, evidence-based information and resources to support home-based care of childhood CKD stages 3-5. Qualitative interviews were undertaken with parents, patients and professionals to explore their views on content of the proposed online parent information and support (OPIS) web-application. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis, guided by the concept of Self-efficacy. 32 parents, 26 patients and 12 professionals were interviewed. All groups wanted an application that explains, demonstrates, and enables parental clinical care-giving, with condition-specific, continously available, reliable, accessible material and a closed communication system to enable contact between families living with CKD. Professionals advocated a regularly updated application to empower parents to make informed health-care decisions. To address these requirements, key web-application components were defined as: (i) Clinical care-giving support (information on treatment regimens, video-learning tools, condition-specific cartoons/puzzles, and a question and answer area) and (ii) Psychosocial support for care-giving (social-networking, case studies, managing stress, and enhancing families' health-care experiences). Developing a web-application that meets parents' information and support needs will maximise its utility, thereby augmenting parents' self-efficacy for CKD caregiving, and optimising outcomes. Self-efficacy theory provides a schema for how parents' self-efficacy beliefs about management of their child's CKD could potentially be promoted by OPIS.

  9. MySQL/PHP web database applications for IPAC proposal submission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Megan K.; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J.; Silbermann, Nancy A.; Rebull, Luisa M.

    2008-07-01

    The Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) is NASA's multi-mission center of expertise for long-wavelength astrophysics. Proposals for various IPAC missions and programs are ingested via MySQL/PHP web database applications. Proposers use web forms to enter coversheet information and upload PDF files related to the proposal. Upon proposal submission, a unique directory is created on the webserver into which all of the uploaded files are placed. The coversheet information is converted into a PDF file using a PHP extension called FPDF. The files are concatenated into one PDF file using the command-line tool pdftk and then forwarded to the review committee. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. The Timeseries Toolbox - A Web Application to Enable Accessible, Reproducible Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veatch, W.; Friedman, D.; Baker, B.; Mueller, C.

    2017-12-01

    The vast majority of data analyzed by climate researchers are repeated observations of physical process or time series data. This data lends itself of a common set of statistical techniques and models designed to determine trends and variability (e.g., seasonality) of these repeated observations. Often, these same techniques and models can be applied to a wide variety of different time series data. The Timeseries Toolbox is a web application designed to standardize and streamline these common approaches to time series analysis and modeling with particular attention to hydrologic time series used in climate preparedness and resilience planning and design by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. The application performs much of the pre-processing of time series data necessary for more complex techniques (e.g. interpolation, aggregation). With this tool, users can upload any dataset that conforms to a standard template and immediately begin applying these techniques to analyze their time series data.

  11. The Arctic Observing Viewer: A Web-mapping Application for U.S. Arctic Observing Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, R. P.; Manley, W. F.; Gaylord, A. G.; Kassin, A.; Villarreal, S.; Barba, M.; Dover, M.; Escarzaga, S. M.; Habermann, T.; Kozimor, J.; Score, R.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made with various arctic observing efforts, it can be difficult to assess such progress when so many agencies, organizations, research groups and others are making such rapid progress over such a large expanse of the Arctic. To help meet the strategic needs of the U.S. SEARCH-AON program and facilitate the development of SAON and other related initiatives, the Arctic Observing Viewer (AOV; http://ArcticObservingViewer.org) has been developed. This web mapping application compiles detailed information pertaining to U.S. Arctic Observing efforts. Contributing partners include the U.S. NSF, USGS, ACADIS, ADIwg, AOOS, a2dc, AON, ARMAP, BAID, IASOA, INTERACT, and others. Over 7700 observation sites are currently in the AOV database and the application allows users to visualize, navigate, select, advance search, draw, print, and more. During 2015, the web mapping application has been enhanced by the addition of a query builder that allows users to create rich and complex queries. AOV is founded on principles of software and data interoperability and includes an emerging "Project" metadata standard, which uses ISO 19115-1 and compatible web services. Substantial efforts have focused on maintaining and centralizing all database information. In order to keep up with emerging technologies, the AOV data set has been structured and centralized within a relational database and the application front-end has been ported to HTML5 to enable mobile access. Other application enhancements include an embedded Apache Solr search platform which provides users with the capability to perform advance searches and an administration web based data management system that allows administrators to add, update, and delete information in real time. We encourage all collaborators to use AOV tools and services for their own purposes and to help us extend the impact of our efforts and ensure AOV complements other cyber-resources. Reinforcing dispersed but

  12. Bed management team with Kanban web-based application.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Hermano Alexandre Lima; Santos, Ana Kelly Lima da Cruz; Alcântara, Antônia Celia de Castro; Lima, Carmen Sulinete Suliano da Costa; Rocha, Sabrina Gabriele Maia Oliveira; Cardoso, Roberto Melo; Cremonin, Jair Rodrigues

    2018-05-15

    To measure the effectiveness of the bed management process that uses a web-based application with Kanban methodology to reduce hospitalization time of hospitalized patients. Before-after study was performed. The study was conducted between July 2013 and July 2017, at the Unimed Regional Hospital of Fortaleza, which has 300 beds, of which 60 are in the intensive care unit (ICU). It is accredited by International Society for Quality in Healthcare. Patients hospitalized in the referred period. Bed management with an application that uses color logic to signal at which stage of high flow the patients meet, in which each patient is interpreted as a card of the classical Kanban theory. It has an automatic user signaling system for process movement, and a system for monitoring and analyzing discharge forecasts. Length of hospital stay, number of customer complaints related to bed availability. After the intervention, the hospital's overall hospital stay time was reduced from 5.6 days to 4.9 days (P = 0.001). The units with the greatest reduction were the ICUs, with reduction from 6.0 days to 2.0 (P = 0.001). The relative percentage of complaints regarding bed availability in the hospital fell from 27% to 0%. We conclude that the use of an electronic tool based on Kanban methodology and accessed via the web by a bed management team is effective in reducing patients' hospital stay time.

  13. Creating a Prototype Web Application for Spacecraft Real-Time Data Visualization on Mobile Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Jeremy S.; Irving, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices (smart phones, tablets) have become commonplace among almost all sectors of the workforce, especially in the technical and scientific communities. These devices provide individuals the ability to be constantly connected to any area of interest they may have, whenever and wherever they are located. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is attempting to take advantage of this constant connectivity to extend the data visualization component of the Payload Operations and Integration Center (POIC) to a person's mobile device. POIC users currently have a rather unique capability to create custom user interfaces in order to view International Space Station (ISS) payload health and status telemetry. These displays are used at various console positions within the POIC. The Software Engineering team has created a Mobile Display capability that will allow authenticated users to view the same displays created for the console positions on the mobile device of their choice. Utilizing modern technologies including ASP.net, JavaScript, and HTML5, we have created a web application that renders the user's displays in any modern desktop or mobile web browser, regardless of the operating system on the device. Additionally, the application is device aware which enables it to render its configuration and selection menus with themes that correspond to the particular device. The Mobile Display application uses a communication mechanism known as signalR to push updates to the web client. This communication mechanism automatically detects the best communication protocol between the client and server and also manages disconnections and reconnections of the client to the server. One benefit of this application is that the user can monitor important telemetry even while away from their console position. If expanded to the scientific community, this application would allow a scientist to view a snapshot of the state of their particular experiment at any time or place

  14. The Accutrend sensor glucose analyzer may not be adequate in bedside testing for neonatal hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Mark; Ugele, Bernhard; Lipowsky, Gerd; Küster, Helmut

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this prospective observational study was to compare a bedside test with the reference laboratory method in routine postnatal glucose monitoring. Term newborns with increased risk or clinical signs of hypoglycemia were screened with a bedside test. In case of a glucose value below 2.25 mmol/L, a second blood sample was taken and a duplicate glucose measurement done in the laboratory using a bedside test (Accutrend sensor) and the reference laboratory method (hexokinase method) at the same time and from the same sample. From 110 term newborns, 122 blood samples were obtained for duplicate measurements (median 1.69 mmol/L, SD 0.45 mmol/L). Of these 122, Accutrend correctly identified 97% as being <2.25 mmol/L by the laboratory method. A Bland-Altman plot revealed a mean underestimation of the Accutrend of only -0.09 mmol/L. However, due to high scattering, the maximal over- and underestimation was 0.89 and 1.39 mmol/L, respectively. Only 75% of the results from the Accutrend were within +/-20% of the result of the laboratory method. If the cut-off for low glucose concentrations was set 0.6 mmol/L higher for the bedside test as compared to the laboratory method, all patients except one would have been correctly identified as hypoglycemic. When using the Accutrend sensor, single infants with even marked hypoglycemia might be missed. Some delay in receiving accurate measurements might be more helpful for clinical decisions and long-term outcome than immediate but potentially misleading results.

  15. FragFit: a web-application for interactive modeling of protein segments into cryo-EM density maps.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Johanna K S; Rose, Alexander S; Ismer, Jochen; Darvish, Mitra D; Hilal, Tarek; Spahn, Christian M T; Hildebrand, Peter W

    2018-05-21

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a standard method to determine the three-dimensional structures of molecular complexes. However, easy to use tools for modeling of protein segments into cryo-EM maps are sparse. Here, we present the FragFit web-application, a web server for interactive modeling of segments of up to 35 amino acids length into cryo-EM density maps. The fragments are provided by a regularly updated database containing at the moment about 1 billion entries extracted from PDB structures and can be readily integrated into a protein structure. Fragments are selected based on geometric criteria, sequence similarity and fit into a given cryo-EM density map. Web-based molecular visualization with the NGL Viewer allows interactive selection of fragments. The FragFit web-application, accessible at http://proteinformatics.de/FragFit, is free and open to all users, without any login requirements.

  16. Taking advantage of Google's Web-based applications and services.

    PubMed

    Brigham, Tara J

    2014-01-01

    Google is a company that is constantly expanding and growing its services and products. While most librarians possess a "love/hate" relationship with Google, there are a number of reasons you should consider exploring some of the tools Google has created and made freely available. Applications and services such as Google Docs, Slides, and Google+ are functional and dynamic without the cost of comparable products. This column will address some of the issues users should be aware of before signing up to use Google's tools, and a description of some of Google's Web applications and services, plus how they can be useful to librarians in health care.

  17. SU-E-J-114: Web-Browser Medical Physics Applications Using HTML5 and Javascript.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiari, M

    2012-06-01

    Since 2010, there has been a great attention about HTML5. Application developers and browser makers fully embrace and support the web of the future. Consumers have started to embrace HTML5, especially as more users understand the benefits and potential that HTML5 can mean for the future.Modern browsers such as Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari are offering better and more robust support for HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. The idea is to introduce the HTML5 to medical physics community for open source software developments. The benefit of using HTML5 is developing portable software systems. The HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript programming languages were used to develop several applications for Quality Assurance in radiation therapy. The canvas element of HTML5 was used for handling and displaying the images, and JavaScript was used to manipulate the data. Sample application were developed to: 1. analyze the flatness and symmetry of the radiotherapy fields in a web browser, 2.analyze the Dynalog files from Varian machines, 3. visualize the animated Dynamic MLC files, 4. Simulation via Monte Carlo, and 5. interactive image manipulation. The programs showed great performance and speed in uploading the data and displaying the results. The flatness and symmetry program and Dynalog file analyzer ran in a fraction of second. The reason behind this performance is using JavaScript language which is a lower level programming language in comparison to the most of the scientific programming packages such as Matlab. The second reason is that JavaScript runs locally on client side computers not on the web-servers. HTML5 and JavaScript can be used to develop useful applications that can be run online or offline on different modern web-browsers. The programming platform can be also one of the modern web-browsers which are mostly open source (such as Firefox). © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. Making the MagIC (Magnetics Information Consortium) Web Application Accessible to New Users and Useful to Experts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.

    2017-12-01

    Challenges are faced by both new and experienced users interested in contributing their data to community repositories, in data discovery, or engaged in potentially transformative science. The Magnetics Information Consortium (https://earthref.org/MagIC) has recently simplified its data model and developed a new containerized web application to reduce the friction in contributing, exploring, and combining valuable and complex datasets for the paleo-, geo-, and rock magnetic scientific community. The new data model more closely reflects the hierarchical workflow in paleomagnetic experiments to enable adequate annotation of scientific results and ensure reproducibility. The new open-source (https://github.com/earthref/MagIC) application includes an upload tool that is integrated with the data model to provide early data validation feedback and ease the friction of contributing and updating datasets. The search interface provides a powerful full text search of contributions indexed by ElasticSearch and a wide array of filters, including specific geographic and geological timescale filtering, to support both novice users exploring the database and experts interested in compiling new datasets with specific criteria across thousands of studies and millions of measurements. The datasets are not large, but they are complex, with many results from evolving experimental and analytical approaches. These data are also extremely valuable due to the cost in collecting or creating physical samples and the, often, destructive nature of the experiments. MagIC is heavily invested in encouraging young scientists as well as established labs to cultivate workflows that facilitate contributing their data in a consistent format. This eLightning presentation includes a live demonstration of the MagIC web application, developed as a configurable container hosting an isomorphic Meteor JavaScript application, MongoDB database, and ElasticSearch search engine. Visitors can explore the Mag

  19. Cost, staffing and quality impact of bedside electronic medical record (EMR) in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Hicks, Lanis; Petroski, Gregory F; Madsen, Richard W; Alexander, Greg; Galambos, Colleen; Conn, Vicki; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill; Zwygart-Stauffacher, Mary; Greenwald, Leslie

    2010-09-01

    There is growing political pressure for nursing homes to implement the electronic medical record (EMR) but there is little evidence of its impact on resident care. The purpose of this study was to test the unique and combined contributions of EMR at the bedside and on-site clinical consultation by gerontological expert nurses on cost, staffing, and quality of care in nursing homes. Eighteen nursing facilities in 3 states participated in a 4-group 24-month comparison: Group 1 implemented bedside EMR, used nurse consultation; Group 2 implemented bedside EMR only; Group 3 used nurse consultation only; Group 4 neither. Intervention sites (Groups 1 and 2) received substantial, partial financial support from CMS to implement EMR. Costs and staffing were measured from Medicaid cost reports, and staff retention from primary data collection; resident outcomes were measured by MDS-based quality indicators and quality measures. Total costs increased in both intervention groups that implemented technology; staffing and staff retention remained constant. Improvement trends were detected in resident outcomes of ADLs, range of motion, and high-risk pressure sores for both intervention groups but not in comparison groups. Implementation of bedside EMR is not cost neutral. There were increased total costs for all intervention facilities. These costs were not a result of increased direct care staffing or increased staff turnover. Nursing home leaders and policy makers need to be aware of on-going hardware and software costs as well as costs of continual technical support for the EMR and constant staff orientation to use the system. EMR can contribute to the quality of nursing home care and can be enhanced by on-site consultation by nurses with graduate education in nursing and expertise in gerontology. Copyright 2010 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Teaching the internist to see: effectiveness of a 1-day workshop in bedside ultrasound for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Clay, Ryan D; Lee, Elizabeth C; Kurtzman, Marc F; Dversdal, Renee K

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the use of bedside ultrasound for core Internal Medicine procedures and increasingly as augmentation of the physical exam. The literature also supports that trainees, both medical students and residents, can acquire these skills. However, there is no consensus on training approach. To implement and study the effectiveness of a high-yield and expedited curriculum to train internal medicine interns to use bedside ultrasound for physical examination and procedures. The study was conducted at a metropolitan, academic medical center and included 33 Internal Medicine interns. This was a prospective cohort study of a new educational intervention consisting of a single-day intensive bedside ultrasound workshop followed by two optional hour-long workshops later in the year. The investigation was conducted at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon. The intensive day consisted of alternating didactic sessions with small group hands-on ultrasound practice sessions and ultrasound simulations. A 30-question assessment was used to assess ultrasound interpretation knowledge prior to, immediately post, and 6 months post intervention. Thirty-three interns served as their own historical controls. Assessment performance significantly increased after the intervention from a mean pre-test score of 18.3 (60.9 % correct) to a mean post-test score 25.5 (85.0 % correct), P value of <0.0001. This performance remained significantly better at 6 months with a mean score of 23.8 (79.3 % correct), P value <0.0001. There was significant knowledge attrition compared to the immediate post-assessment, P value 0.0099. A single-day ultrasound training session followed by two optional noon conference sessions yielded significantly improved ultrasound interpretation skills in internal medicine interns.

  1. EasyLCMS: an asynchronous web application for the automated quantification of LC-MS data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Downstream applications in metabolomics, as well as mathematical modelling, require data in a quantitative format, which may also necessitate the automated and simultaneous quantification of numerous metabolites. Although numerous applications have been previously developed for metabolomics data handling, automated calibration and calculation of the concentrations in terms of μmol have not been carried out. Moreover, most of the metabolomics applications are designed for GC-MS, and would not be suitable for LC-MS, since in LC, the deviation in the retention time is not linear, which is not taken into account in these applications. Moreover, only a few are web-based applications, which could improve stand-alone software in terms of compatibility, sharing capabilities and hardware requirements, even though a strong bandwidth is required. Furthermore, none of these incorporate asynchronous communication to allow real-time interaction with pre-processed results. Findings Here, we present EasyLCMS (http://www.easylcms.es/), a new application for automated quantification which was validated using more than 1000 concentration comparisons in real samples with manual operation. The results showed that only 1% of the quantifications presented a relative error higher than 15%. Using clustering analysis, the metabolites with the highest relative error distributions were identified and studied to solve recurrent mistakes. Conclusions EasyLCMS is a new web application designed to quantify numerous metabolites, simultaneously integrating LC distortions and asynchronous web technology to present a visual interface with dynamic interaction which allows checking and correction of LC-MS raw data pre-processing results. Moreover, quantified data obtained with EasyLCMS are fully compatible with numerous downstream applications, as well as for mathematical modelling in the systems biology field. PMID:22884039

  2. E-Learning 2.0 Technologies and Web Applications in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelet, Jean-Eric, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered the traditional approach to education, brick and mortar institutions are no longer the norm due to e-learning technologies. Populations are turning into ubiquitous human beings, and educational practices are reflecting this change. "E-Learning 2.0 Technologies and Web Applications in Higher Education" compiles the latest…

  3. Proceedings from the 2009 Genetic Syndromes of the Ras/MAPK Pathway: From Bedside to Bench and Back

    PubMed Central

    Rauen, Katherine A.; Schoyer, Lisa; McCormick, Frank; Lin, Angela E.; Allanson, Judith E.; Stevenson, David A.; Gripp, Karen W.; Neri, Giovanni; Carey, John C.; Legius, Eric; Tartaglia, Marco; Schubbert, Suzanne; Roberts, Amy E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Shannon, Kevin; Gutmann, David H.; McMahon, Martin; Guerra, Carmen; Fagin, James A.; Yu, Benjamin; Aoki, Yoko; Neel, Ben G.; Balmain, Allan; Drake, Richard R.; Nolan, Garry P.; Zenker, Martin; Bollag, Gideon; Sebolt-Leopold, Judith; Gibbs, Jackson B.; Silva, Alcino J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth; Viskochil, David H.; Kieran, Mark W.; Korf, Bruce R.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Packer, Roger J.; Melese, Teri

    2012-01-01

    The RASopathies are a group of genetic syndromes caused by germline mutations in genes that encode components of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Some of these syndromes are neurofibromatosis type 1, Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, LEOPARD syndrome and Legius syndrome. Their common underlying pathogenetic mechanism brings about significant overlap in phenotypic features and includes craniofacial dysmorphology, cardiac, cutaneous, musculoskeletal, GI and ocular abnormalities, and a predisposition to cancer. The proceedings from the symposium “Genetic Syndromes of the Ras/MAPK Pathway: From Bedside to Bench and Back” chronicle the timely and typical research symposium which brought together clinicians, basic scientists, physician-scientists, advocate leaders, trainees, students and individuals with Ras syndromes and their families. The goals, to discuss basic science and clinical issues, to set forth a solid framework for future research, to direct translational applications towards therapy and to set forth best practices for individuals with RASopathies was successfully meet with a commitment to begin to move towards clinical trials. PMID:20014119

  4. Application of World Wide Web (W3) Technologies in Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Charles; Windrem, May; Picinich, Lou

    1996-01-01

    World Wide Web (W3) technologies are considered in relation to their application to space missions. It is considered that such technologies, including the hypertext transfer protocol and the Java object-oriented language, offer a powerful and relatively inexpensive framework for distributed application software development. The suitability of these technologies for payload monitoring systems development is discussed, and the experience gained from the development of an insect habitat monitoring system based on W3 technologies is reported.

  5. Electrochromic properties of polyaniline-coated fiber webs for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Beregoi, Mihaela; Busuioc, Cristina; Evanghelidis, Alexandru; Matei, Elena; Iordache, Florin; Radu, Mihaela; Dinischiotu, Anca; Enculescu, Ionut

    2016-08-30

    By combining the electrospinning method advantages (high surface-to-volume ratio, controlled morphology, varied composition and flexibility for the resulting structures) with the electrical activity of polyaniline, a new core-shell-type material with potential applications in the field of artificial muscles was synthesized. Thus, a poly(methylmethacrylate) solution was electrospun in optimized conditions to obtain randomly oriented polymer fiber webs. Further, a gold layer was sputtered on their surface in order to make them conductive and improve the mechanical properties. The metalized fiber webs were then covered with a PANI layer by in situ electrochemical polymerization starting from aniline and using sulphuric acid as oxidizing agent. By applying a small voltage on PANI-coated fiber webs in the presence of an electrolyte, the oxidation state of PANI changes, which is followed by the device color modification. The morphological, electrical and biological properties of the resulting multilayered material were also investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Training auscultatory skills: computer simulated heart sounds or additional bedside training? A randomized trial on third-year medical students

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study compares the value of additional use of computer simulated heart sounds, to conventional bedside auscultation training, on the cardiac auscultation skills of 3rd year medical students at Oslo University Medical School. Methods In addition to their usual curriculum courses, groups of seven students each were randomized to receive four hours of additional auscultation training either employing a computer simulator system or adding on more conventional bedside training. Cardiac auscultation skills were afterwards tested using live patients. Each student gave a written description of the auscultation findings in four selected patients, and was rewarded from 0-10 points for each patient. Differences between the two study groups were evaluated using student's t-test. Results At the auscultation test no significant difference in mean score was found between the students who had used additional computer based sound simulation compared to additional bedside training. Conclusions Students at an early stage of their cardiology training demonstrated equal performance of cardiac auscultation whether they had received an additional short auscultation course based on computer simulated training, or had had additional bedside training. PMID:20082701

  7. WebDB Component Builder - Lessons Learned

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Macedo, C.

    2000-02-15

    Oracle WebDB is the easiest way to produce web enabled lightweight and enterprise-centric applications. This concept from Oracle has tantalized our taste for simplistic web development by using a purely web based tool that lives nowhere else but in the database. The use of online wizards, templates, and query builders, which produces PL/SQL behind the curtains, can be used straight ''out of the box'' by both novice and seasoned developers. The topic of this presentation will introduce lessons learned by developing and deploying applications built using the WebDB Component Builder in conjunction with custom PL/SQL code to empower a hybridmore » application. There are two kinds of WebDB components: those that display data to end users via reporting, and those that let end users update data in the database via entry forms. The presentation will also discuss various methods within the Component Builder to enhance the applications pushed to the desktop. The demonstrated example is an application entitled HOME (Helping Other's More Effectively) that was built to manage a yearly United Way Campaign effort. Our task was to build an end to end application which could manage approximately 900 non-profit agencies, an average of 4,100 individual contributions, and $1.2 million dollars. Using WebDB, the shell of the application was put together in a matter of a few weeks. However, we did encounter some hurdles that WebDB, in it's stage of infancy (v2.0), could not solve for us directly. Together with custom PL/SQL, WebDB's Component Builder became a powerful tool that enabled us to produce a very flexible hybrid application.« less

  8. Employing WebGL to develop interactive stereoscopic 3D content for use in biomedical visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Semay; Renambot, Luc; Sauter, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Web Graphics Library (WebGL), the forthcoming web standard for rendering native 3D graphics in a browser, represents an important addition to the biomedical visualization toolset. It is projected to become a mainstream method of delivering 3D online content due to shrinking support for third-party plug-ins. Additionally, it provides a virtual reality (VR) experience to web users accommodated by the growing availability of stereoscopic displays (3D TV, desktop, and mobile). WebGL's value in biomedical visualization has been demonstrated by applications for interactive anatomical models, chemical and molecular visualization, and web-based volume rendering. However, a lack of instructional literature specific to the field prevents many from utilizing this technology. This project defines a WebGL design methodology for a target audience of biomedical artists with a basic understanding of web languages and 3D graphics. The methodology was informed by the development of an interactive web application depicting the anatomy and various pathologies of the human eye. The application supports several modes of stereoscopic displays for a better understanding of 3D anatomical structures.

  9. Meta4: a web application for sharing and annotating metagenomic gene predictions using web services.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Emily J; Escalettes, Franck; Fotheringham, Ian; Wallace, Robert J; Watson, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome shotgun metagenomics experiments produce DNA sequence data from entire ecosystems, and provide a huge amount of novel information. Gene discovery projects require up-to-date information about sequence homology and domain structure for millions of predicted proteins to be presented in a simple, easy-to-use system. There is a lack of simple, open, flexible tools that allow the rapid sharing of metagenomics datasets with collaborators in a format they can easily interrogate. We present Meta4, a flexible and extensible web application that can be used to share and annotate metagenomic gene predictions. Proteins and predicted domains are stored in a simple relational database, with a dynamic front-end which displays the results in an internet browser. Web services are used to provide up-to-date information about the proteins from homology searches against public databases. Information about Meta4 can be found on the project website, code is available on Github, a cloud image is available, and an example implementation can be seen at.

  10. MyLabStocks: a web-application to manage molecular biology materials

    PubMed Central

    Chuffart, Florent; Yvert, Gaël

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory stocks are the hardware of research. They must be stored and managed with mimimum loss of material and information. Plasmids, oligonucleotides and strains are regularly exchanged between collaborators within and between laboratories. Managing and sharing information about every item is crucial for retrieval of reagents, for planning experiments and for reproducing past experimental results. We have developed a web-based application to manage stocks commonly used in a molecular biology laboratory. Its functionalities include user-defined privileges, visualization of plasmid maps directly from their sequence and the capacity to search items from fields of annotation or directly from a query sequence using BLAST. It is designed to handle records of plasmids, oligonucleotides, yeast strains, antibodies, pipettes and notebooks. Based on PHP/MySQL, it can easily be extended to handle other types of stocks and it can be installed on any server architecture. MyLabStocks is freely available from: https://forge.cbp.ens-lyon.fr/redmine/projects/mylabstocks under an open source licence. PMID:24643870

  11. Remote Sensing Information Gateway: A free application and web service for fast, convenient, interoperable access to large repositories of atmospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessel, T.; Szykman, J.; Freeman, M.

    2012-12-01

    EPA's Remote Sensing Information Gateway (RSIG) is a widely used free applet and web service for quickly and easily retrieving, visualizing and saving user-specified subsets of atmospheric data - by variable, geographic domain and time range. Petabytes of available data include thousands of variables from a set of NASA and NOAA satellites, aircraft, ground stations and EPA air-quality models. The RSIG applet is used by atmospheric researchers and uses the rsigserver web service to obtain data and images. The rsigserver web service is compliant with the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Coverage Service (OGC-WCS) standard to facilitate data discovery and interoperability. Since rsigserver is publicly accessible, it can be (and is) used by other applications. This presentation describes the architecture and technical implementation details of this successful system with an emphasis on achieving convenience, high-performance, data integrity and security.

  12. pWeb: A High-Performance, Parallel-Computing Framework for Web-Browser-Based Medical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a pWeb - a new language and compiler for parallelization of client-side compute intensive web applications such as surgical simulations. The recently introduced HTML5 standard has enabled creating unprecedented applications on the web. Low performance of the web browser, however, remains the bottleneck of computationally intensive applications including visualization of complex scenes, real time physical simulations and image processing compared to native ones. The new proposed language is built upon web workers for multithreaded programming in HTML5. The language provides fundamental functionalities of parallel programming languages as well as the fork/join parallel model which is not supported by web workers. The language compiler automatically generates an equivalent parallel script that complies with the HTML5 standard. A case study on realistic rendering for surgical simulations demonstrates enhanced performance with a compact set of instructions.

  13. The development and initial validation of a sensitive bedside cognitive screening test.

    PubMed

    Faust, D; Fogel, B S

    1989-01-01

    Brief bedside cognitive examinations such as the Mini-Mental State Examination are designed to detect delirium and dementia but not more subtle or delineated cognitive deficits. Formal neuropsychological evaluation provides greater sensitivity and detects a wider range of cognitive deficits but is too lengthy for efficient use at the bedside or in epidemiological studies. The authors developed the High Sensitivity Cognitive Screen (HSCS), a 20-minute interview-based test, to identify patients who show disorder on formal neuropsychological evaluation. An initial study demonstrated satisfactory test-retest and interrater reliability. The HSCS was then administered to 60 psychiatric and neurological patients with suspected cognitive deficits but without gross impairment, who also completed formal neuropsychological testing. Results of both tests were independently classified as either normal, borderline, or abnormal. The HSCS correctly classified 93% of patients across the normal-abnormal dichotomy and showed promise for characterizing the extent and severity of cognitive dysfunction.

  14. Web Services--A Buzz Word with Potentials

    Treesearch

    János T. Füstös

    2006-01-01

    The simplest definition of a web service is an application that provides a web API. The web API exposes the functionality of the solution to other applications. The web API relies on other Internet-based technologies to manage communications. The resulting web services are pervasive, vendor-independent, language-neutral, and very low-cost. The main purpose of a web API...

  15. Prospective implementation of an algorithm for bedside intravascular ultrasound-guided filter placement in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Killingsworth, Christopher D; Taylor, Steven M; Patterson, Mark A; Weinberg, Jordan A; McGwin, Gerald; Melton, Sherry M; Reiff, Donald A; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Rue, Loring W; Jordan, William D; Passman, Marc A

    2010-05-01

    Although contrast venography is the standard imaging method for inferior vena cava (IVC) filter insertion, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is a safe and effective option that allows for bedside filter placement and is especially advantageous for immobilized critically ill patients by limiting resource use, risk of transportation, and cost. This study reviewed the effectiveness of a prospectively implemented algorithm for IVUS-guided IVC filter placement in this high-risk population. Current evidence-based guidelines were used to create a clinical decision algorithm for IVUS-guided IVC filter placement in critically ill patients. After a defined lead-in phase to allow dissemination of techniques, the algorithm was prospectively implemented on January 1, 2008. Data were collected for 1 year using accepted reporting standards and a quality assurance review performed based on intent-to-treat at 6, 12, and 18 months. As defined in the prospectively implemented algorithm, 109 patients met criteria for IVUS-directed bedside IVC filter placement. Technical feasibility was 98.1%. Only 2 patients had inadequate IVUS visualization for bedside filter placement and required subsequent placement in the endovascular suite. Technical success, defined as proper deployment in an infrarenal position, was achieved in 104 of the remaining 107 patients (97.2%). The filter was permanent in 21 (19.6%) and retrievable in 86 (80.3%). The single-puncture technique was used in 101 (94.4%), with additional dual access required in 6 (5.6%). Periprocedural complications were rare but included malpositioning requiring retrieval and repositioning in three patients, filter tilt >/=15 degrees in two, and arteriovenous fistula in one. The 30-day mortality rate for the bedside group was 5.5%, with no filter-related deaths. Successful placement of IVC filters using IVUS-guided imaging at the bedside in critically ill patients can be established through an evidence-based prospectively

  16. Web-enabling technologies for the factory floor: a web-enabling strategy for emanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez, Ricardo; Lastra, Jose L. M.; Tuokko, Reijo O.

    2001-10-01

    This paper is intended to address the different technologies available for Web-enabling of the factory floor. It will give an overview of the importance of Web-enabling of the factory floor, in the application of the concepts of flexible and intelligent manufacturing, in conjunction with e-commerce. As a last section, it will try to define a Web-enabling strategy for the application in eManufacturing. This is made under the scope of the electronics manufacturing industry, so every application, technology or related matter is presented under such scope.

  17. Promoting Bedside Nurse-Led Research Through a Dedicated Neuroscience Nursing Research Fellowship.

    PubMed

    Stutzman, Sonja; Olson, DaiWai; Supnet, Charlene; Harper, Caryn; Brown-Cleere, Shelley; McCulley, Becky; Goldberg, Mark

    2016-12-01

    We hypothesized that nurses would benefit from the fellowship model traditionally used to engage physicians in clinical research. The Neuroscience Nursing Research Center (NNRC) fellowship program was created as a model for engaging nurses at all levels of clinical practice to become active in clinical research. The NNRC was established in 2013 as a novel approach to promote bedside nurses as primary investigators in clinical research. The NNRC developed 4 pathways to nursing research success: research fellowship, student-nurse internship, didactic training, and research consultation. Fellows have enrolled more than 900 participants in 14 studies. Nurses have presented more than 20 abstracts at 12 conferences and submitted 11 manuscripts for publication. The NNRC has provided research training to more than 150 nurses. The NNRC program is successful in engaging nurses in research. It shows promise to continue to develop nursing research that is applicable to clinicians and thus improve patient care.

  18. WebEAV

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Prakash M.; Brandt, Cynthia M.; Marenco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    The task of creating and maintaining a front end to a large institutional entity-attribute-value (EAV) database can be cumbersome when using traditional client-server technology. Switching to Web technology as a delivery vehicle solves some of these problems but introduces others. In particular, Web development environments tend to be primitive, and many features that client-server developers take for granted are missing. WebEAV is a generic framework for Web development that is intended to streamline the process of Web application development for databases having a significant EAV component. It also addresses some challenging user interface issues that arise when any complex system is created. The authors describe the architecture of WebEAV and provide an overview of its features with suitable examples. PMID:10887163

  19. Optical bedside monitoring of cerebral perfusion: technological and methodological advances applied in a study on acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkellner, Oliver; Gruber, Clemens; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Jelzow, Alexander; Steinbrink, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B.; MacDonald, Rainer; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2010-11-01

    We present results of a clinical study on bedside perfusion monitoring of the human brain by optical bolus tracking. We measure the kinetics of the contrast agent indocyanine green using time-domain near-IR spectroscopy (tdNIRS) in 10 patients suffering from acute unilateral ischemic stroke. In all patients, a delay of the bolus over the affected when compared to the unaffected hemisphere is found (mean: 1.5 s, range: 0.2 s to 5.2 s). A portable time-domain near-IR reflectometer is optimized and approved for clinical studies. Data analysis based on statistical moments of time-of-flight distributions of diffusely reflected photons enables high sensitivity to intracerebral changes in bolus kinetics. Since the second centralized moment, variance, is preferentially sensitive to deep absorption changes, it provides a suitable representation of the cerebral signals relevant for perfusion monitoring in stroke. We show that variance-based bolus tracking is also less susceptible to motion artifacts, which often occur in severely affected patients. We present data that clearly manifest the applicability of the tdNIRS approach to assess cerebral perfusion in acute stroke patients at the bedside. This may be of high relevance to its introduction as a monitoring tool on stroke units.

  20. Home monitoring of patients with Parkinson's disease via wearable technology and a web-based application.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shyamal; Chen, Bor-Rong; Buckley, Thomas; Rednic, Ramona; McClure, Doug; Tarsy, Daniel; Shih, Ludy; Dy, Jennifer; Welsh, Matt; Bonato, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Objective long-term health monitoring can improve the clinical management of several medical conditions ranging from cardiopulmonary diseases to motor disorders. In this paper, we present our work toward the development of a home-monitoring system. The system is currently used to monitor patients with Parkinson's disease who experience severe motor fluctuations. Monitoring is achieved using wireless wearable sensors whose data are relayed to a remote clinical site via a web-based application. The work herein presented shows that wearable sensors combined with a web-based application provide reliable quantitative information that can be used for clinical decision making.

  1. The QuakeSim Project: Web Services for Managing Geophysical Data and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Marlon E.; Fox, Geoffrey C.; Aktas, Mehmet S.; Aydin, Galip; Gadgil, Harshawardhan; Qi, Zhigang; Sayar, Ahmet

    2008-04-01

    We describe our distributed systems research efforts to build the “cyberinfrastructure” components that constitute a geophysical Grid, or more accurately, a Grid of Grids. Service-oriented computing principles are used to build a distributed infrastructure of Web accessible components for accessing data and scientific applications. Our data services fall into two major categories: Archival, database-backed services based around Geographical Information System (GIS) standards from the Open Geospatial Consortium, and streaming services that can be used to filter and route real-time data sources such as Global Positioning System data streams. Execution support services include application execution management services and services for transferring remote files. These data and execution service families are bound together through metadata information and workflow services for service orchestration. Users may access the system through the QuakeSim scientific Web portal, which is built using a portlet component approach.

  2. WEBCAP: Web Scheduler for Distance Learning Multimedia Documents with Web Workload Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habib, Sami; Safar, Maytham

    2008-01-01

    In many web applications, such as the distance learning, the frequency of refreshing multimedia web documents places a heavy burden on the WWW resources. Moreover, the updated web documents may encounter inordinate delays, which make it difficult to retrieve web documents in time. Here, we present an Internet tool called WEBCAP that can schedule…

  3. Launch of Village Blue Web Application Shares Water Monitoring Data with Baltimore Community

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have launched their mobile-friendly web application for Village Blue, a project that provides real-time water quality monitoring data to the Baltimore, Maryland community.

  4. CERES Web Links

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-21

    ...   Web Links to Relevant CERES Information Relevant information about CERES, CERES references, ... Instrument Working Group Home Page Aerosol Retrieval Web Page  (Center for Satellite Applications and Research) ...

  5. Web 2.0 and Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Brent I.

    2009-01-01

    New types of social Internet applications (often referred to as Web 2.0) are becoming increasingly popular within higher education environments. Although developed primarily for entertainment and social communication within the general population, applications such as blogs, social video sites, and virtual worlds are being adopted by higher education institutions. These newer applications differ from standard Web sites in that they involve the users in creating and distributing information, hence effectively changing how the Web is used for knowledge generation and dispersion. Although Web 2.0 applications offer exciting new ways to teach, they should not be the core of instructional planning, but rather selected only after learning objectives and instructional strategies have been identified. This paper provides an overview of prominent Web 2.0 applications, explains how they are being used within education environments, and elaborates on some of the potential opportunities and challenges that these applications present. PMID:19960079

  6. Web 2.0 and pharmacy education.

    PubMed

    Cain, Jeff; Fox, Brent I

    2009-11-12

    New types of social Internet applications (often referred to as Web 2.0) are becoming increasingly popular within higher education environments. Although developed primarily for entertainment and social communication within the general population, applications such as blogs, social video sites, and virtual worlds are being adopted by higher education institutions. These newer applications differ from standard Web sites in that they involve the users in creating and distributing information, hence effectively changing how the Web is used for knowledge generation and dispersion. Although Web 2.0 applications offer exciting new ways to teach, they should not be the core of instructional planning, but rather selected only after learning objectives and instructional strategies have been identified. This paper provides an overview of prominent Web 2.0 applications, explains how they are being used within education environments, and elaborates on some of the potential opportunities and challenges that these applications present.

  7. Bedside arterial blood gas monitoring system using fluorescent optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, Daniel J.; Rymut, Russell A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe a bedside arterial blood gas (ABG) monitoring system which uses fluorescent optical sensors in the measurement of blood pH, PCO2 and PO2. The Point-of-Care Arterial Blood Gas Monitoring System consists of the SensiCathTM optical sensor unit manufactured by Optical Sensors Incorporated and the TramTM Critical Care Monitoring System with ABG Module manufactured by Marquette Electronics Incorporated. Current blood gas measurement techniques require a blood sample to be removed from the patient and transported to an electrochemical analyzer for analysis. The ABG system does not require removal of blood from the patient or transport of the sample. The sensor is added to the patient's existing arterial line. ABG measurements are made by drawing a small blood sample from the arterial line in sufficient quantity to ensure an undiluted sample at the sensor. Measurements of pH, PCO2 and PO2 are made within 60 seconds. The blood is then returned to the patient, the line flushed and results appear on the bedside monitor. The ABG system offers several advantages over traditional electrochemical analyzers. Since the arterial line remains closed during the blood sampling procedure the patient's risk of infection is reduced and the caregiver's exposure to blood is eliminated. The single-use, disposable sensor can be measure 100 blood samples over 72 hours after a single two-point calibration. Quality Assurance checks are also available and provide the caregiver the ability to assess system performance even after the sensor is patient attached. The ABG module integrates with an existing bedside monitoring system. This allows ABG results to appear on the same display as ECG, respiration, blood pressure, cardiac output, SpO2, and other clinical information. The small module takes up little space in the crowded intensive care unit. Performance studies compare the ABG system with an electrochemical blood gas analyzer. Study results demonstrated accurate and precise blood

  8. Art at the Bedside: Reflections on Use of Visual Imagery in Hospital Chaplaincy.

    PubMed

    Dodge-Peters Daiss, Susan

    2016-03-01

    'Art at the Bedside' is the name given to a hospital visitation program during which works of art loaded onto a computer are used to start conversations with patients and their families. The article traces the genesis of the program that evolved from the author's dual training in art museum education and hospital chaplaincy through the evolution of the practice, now in its sixth year. Reflections on the practice itself are the focus of this article, from identifying the kinds of responses frequently elicited by the artwork to understanding how these works of art seem to forge immediate connections between the patient and the facilitator. Ultimately posed in this reflection is whether the 'Art at the Bedside' experience might suggest a future for the integration of the visual arts more broadly into hospital - and related - chaplaincy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Apollo: Giving application developers a single point of access to public health models using structured vocabularies and Web services

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Michael M.; Levander, John D.; Brown, Shawn; Hogan, William R.; Millett, Nicholas; Hanna, Josh

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Apollo Web Services and Apollo-SV, its related ontology. The Apollo Web Services give an end-user application a single point of access to multiple epidemic simulators. An end user can specify an analytic problem—which we define as a configuration and a query of results—exactly once and submit it to multiple epidemic simulators. The end user represents the analytic problem using a standard syntax and vocabulary, not the native languages of the simulators. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this design by implementing a set of Apollo services that provide access to two epidemic simulators and two visualizer services. PMID:24551417

  10. Apollo: giving application developers a single point of access to public health models using structured vocabularies and Web services.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael M; Levander, John D; Brown, Shawn; Hogan, William R; Millett, Nicholas; Hanna, Josh

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Apollo Web Services and Apollo-SV, its related ontology. The Apollo Web Services give an end-user application a single point of access to multiple epidemic simulators. An end user can specify an analytic problem-which we define as a configuration and a query of results-exactly once and submit it to multiple epidemic simulators. The end user represents the analytic problem using a standard syntax and vocabulary, not the native languages of the simulators. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this design by implementing a set of Apollo services that provide access to two epidemic simulators and two visualizer services.

  11. Acute graft-versus-host disease: a bench-to-bedside update.

    PubMed

    Holtan, Shernan G; Pasquini, Marcelo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2014-07-17

    Over the past 5 years, many novel approaches to early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) have been translated from the bench to the bedside. In this review, we highlight recent discoveries in the context of current aGVHD care. The most significant innovations that have already reached the clinic are prophylaxis strategies based upon a refinement of our understanding of key sensors, effectors, suppressors of the immune alloreactive response, and the resultant tissue damage from the aGVHD inflammatory cascade. In the near future, aGVHD prevention and treatment will likely involve multiple modalities, including small molecules regulating immunologic checkpoints, enhancement of suppressor cytokines and cellular subsets, modulation of the microbiota, graft manipulation, and other donor-based prophylaxis strategies. Despite long-term efforts, major challenges in treatment of established aGVHD still remain. Resolution of inflammation and facilitation of rapid immune reconstitution in those with only a limited response to corticosteroids is a research arena that remains rife with opportunity and urgent clinical need. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. The Arctic Observing Viewer: A Web-mapping Application for U.S. Arctic Observing Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassin, A.; Gaylord, A. G.; Manley, W. F.; Villarreal, S.; Tweedie, C. E.; Cody, R. P.; Copenhaver, W.; Dover, M.; Score, R.; Habermann, T.

    2014-12-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made with various arctic observing efforts, it can be difficult to assess such progress when so many agencies, organizations, research groups and others are making such rapid progress. To help meet the strategic needs of the U.S. SEARCH-AON program and facilitate the development of SAON and related initiatives, the Arctic Observing Viewer (AOV; http://ArcticObservingViewer.org) has been developed. This web mapping application compiles detailed information pertaining to U.S. Arctic Observing efforts. Contributing partners include the U.S. NSF, USGS, ACADIS, ADIwg, AOOS, a2dc, AON, ARMAP, BAID, IASOA, INTERACT, and others. Over 6100 sites are currently in the AOV database and the application allows users to visualize, navigate, select, advance search, draw, print, and more. AOV is founded on principles of software and data interoperability and includes an emerging "Project" metadata standard, which uses ISO 19115-1 and compatible web services. In the last year, substantial efforts have focused on maintaining and centralizing all database information. In order to keep up with emerging technologies and demand for the application, the AOV data set has been structured and centralized within a relational database; furthermore, the application front-end has been ported to HTML5. Porting the application to HTML5 will now provide access to mobile users utilizing tablets and cell phone devices. Other application enhancements include an embedded Apache Solr search platform which provides users with the capability to perform advance searches throughout the AOV dataset, and an administration web based data management system which allows the administrators to add, update, and delete data in real time. We encourage all collaborators to use AOV tools and services for their own purposes and to help us extend the impact of our efforts and ensure AOV complements other cyber-resources. Reinforcing dispersed but interoperable resources in this

  13. Research on the development and preliminary application of Beijing agricultural sci-tech service hotline WebApp in agricultural consulting services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weishui; Luo, Changshou; Zheng, Yaming; Wei, Qingfeng; Cao, Chengzhong

    2017-09-01

    To deal with the “last kilometer” problem during the agricultural science and technology information service, we analyzed the feasibility, necessity and advantages of WebApp applied to agricultural information service and discussed the modes of WebApp used in agricultural information service based on the requirements analysis and the function of WebApp. To overcome the existing App’s defects of difficult installation and weak compatibility between the mobile operating systems, the Beijing Agricultural Sci-tech Service Hotline WebApp was developed based on the HTML and JAVA technology. The WebApp has greater compatibility and simpler operation than the Native App, what’s more, it can be linked to the WeChat public platform making it spread easily and run directly without setup process. The WebApp was used to provide agricultural expert consulting services and agriculture information push, obtained a good preliminary application achievement. Finally, we concluded the creative application of WebApp in agricultural consulting services and prospected the development of WebApp in agricultural information service.

  14. Utility of pre-procurement bedside liver biopsy in the deceased extended-criteria liver donor.

    PubMed

    Mangus, Richard S; Borup, Tim C; Popa, Sam; Saxena, Romil; Cummings, Oscar; Tector, A Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The Indiana Organ Procurement Organization (IOPO) utilizes preoperative bedside liver biopsies in certain extended-criteria donors (ECDs), obtained by the on-site coordinator, to determine the utility of pursuing donation. This study reports the clinical and financial outcomes for this management strategy. All bedside liver biopsies obtained in ECDs over a five-yr period were reviewed. Study variables included the following: indication for biopsy, biopsy results, taking the case to the operating room, transplantation of the donor liver, and graft survival. All biopsies were processed at a single university center. There were 110 donors biopsied. Primary indications included the following: old age (29%), extensive/current alcohol abuse (26%), hepatitis C-positive serology (21%), obesity (25%), and severely elevated liver function enzymes (18%). Biopsy results demonstrated a potentially transplantable liver in 73 cases (66%), all of whom were taken to the OR (while 37 ruled out for donation based upon liver biopsy [34%]). Of all biopsied livers, 49 ultimately were transplanted (45%). Intra-operative decisions included the following: transplant 51/73 (70%), surgeon decision to exclude 20/73 (27%), nonuse due to finding of malignancy two (3%). Bedside liver biopsy may be a valuable tool to determine the utility in pursuing donation in ECDs, particularly with liver-only donors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Current uses of Web 2.0 applications in transportation : case studies of select state departments of transportation

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-03-01

    Web 2.0 is an umbrella term for websites or online applications that are user-driven and emphasize collaboration and user interactivity. The trend away from static web pages to a more user-driven Internet model has also occurred in the public s...

  16. mORCA: ubiquitous access to life science web services.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Del-Pino, Sergio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Falgueras, Juan

    2018-01-16

    Technical advances in mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets have produced an extraordinary increase in their use around the world and have become part of our daily lives. The possibility of carrying these devices in a pocket, particularly mobile phones, has enabled ubiquitous access to Internet resources. Furthermore, in the life sciences world there has been a vast proliferation of data types and services that finish as Web Services. This suggests the need for research into mobile clients to deal with life sciences applications for effective usage and exploitation. Analysing the current features in existing bioinformatics applications managing Web Services, we have devised, implemented, and deployed an easy-to-use web-based lightweight mobile client. This client is able to browse, select, compose parameters, invoke, and monitor the execution of Web Services stored in catalogues or central repositories. The client is also able to deal with huge amounts of data between external storage mounts. In addition, we also present a validation use case, which illustrates the usage of the application while executing, monitoring, and exploring the results of a registered workflow. The software its available in the Apple Store and Android Market and the source code is publicly available in Github. Mobile devices are becoming increasingly important in the scientific world due to their strong potential impact on scientific applications. Bioinformatics should not fall behind this trend. We present an original software client that deals with the intrinsic limitations of such devices and propose different guidelines to provide location-independent access to computational resources in bioinformatics and biomedicine. Its modular design makes it easily expandable with the inclusion of new repositories, tools, types of visualization, etc.

  17. Taking advantage of HTML5 browsers to realize the concepts of session state and workflow sharing in web-tool applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suftin, I.; Read, J. S.; Walker, J.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists prefer not having to be tied down to a specific machine or operating system in order to analyze local and remote data sets or publish work. Increasingly, analysis has been migrating to decentralized web services and data sets, using web clients to provide the analysis interface. While simplifying workflow access, analysis, and publishing of data, the move does bring with it its own unique set of issues. Web clients used for analysis typically offer workflows geared towards a single user, with steps and results that are often difficult to recreate and share with others. Furthermore, workflow results often may not be easily used as input for further analysis. Older browsers further complicate things by having no way to maintain larger chunks of information, often offloading the job of storage to the back-end server or trying to squeeze it into a cookie. It has been difficult to provide a concept of "session storage" or "workflow sharing" without a complex orchestration of the back-end for storage depending on either a centralized file system or database. With the advent of HTML5, browsers gained the ability to store more information through the use of the Web Storage API (a browser-cookie holds a maximum of 4 kilobytes). Web Storage gives us the ability to store megabytes of arbitrary data in-browser either with an expiration date or just for a session. This allows scientists to create, update, persist and share their workflow without depending on the backend to store session information, providing the flexibility for new web-based workflows to emerge. In the DSASWeb portal ( http://cida.usgs.gov/DSASweb/ ), using these techniques, the representation of every step in the analyst's workflow is stored as plain-text serialized JSON, which we can generate as a text file and provide to the analyst as an upload. This file may then be shared with others and loaded back into the application, restoring the application to the state it was in when the session file

  18. Design, Implementation and Applications of 3d Web-Services in DB4GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, M.; Kuper, P. V.; Dittrich, A.; Wild, P.; Butwilowski, E.; Al-Doori, M.

    2013-09-01

    The object-oriented database architecture DB4GeO was originally designed to support sub-surface applications in the geo-sciences. This is reflected in DB4GeO's geometric data model as well as in its import and export functions. Initially, these functions were designed for communication with 3D geological modeling and visualization tools such as GOCAD or MeshLab. However, it soon became clear that DB4GeO was suitable for a much wider range of applications. Therefore it is natural to move away from a standalone solution and to open the access to DB4GeO data by standardized OGC web-services. Though REST and OGC services seem incompatible at first sight, the implementation in DB4GeO shows that OGC-based implementation of web-services may use parts of the DB4GeO-REST implementation. Starting with initial solutions in the history of DB4GeO, this paper will introduce the design, adaptation (i.e. model transformation), and first steps in the implementation of OGC Web Feature (WFS) and Web Processing Services (WPS), as new interfaces to DB4GeO data and operations. Among its capabilities, DB4GeO can provide data in different data formats like GML, GOCAD, or DB3D XML through a WFS, as well as its ability to run operations like a 3D-to-2D service, or mesh-simplification (Progressive Meshes) through a WPS. We then demonstrate, an Android-based mobile 3D augmented reality viewer for DB4GeO that uses the Web Feature Service to visualize 3D geo-database query results. Finally, we explore future research work considering DB4GeO in the framework of the research group "Computer-Aided Collaborative Subway Track Planning in Multi-Scale 3D City and Building Models".

  19. Applying Web Usage Mining for Personalizing Hyperlinks in Web-Based Adaptive Educational Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Cristobal; Ventura, Sebastian; Zafra, Amelia; de Bra, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, the application of Web mining techniques in e-learning and Web-based adaptive educational systems is increasing exponentially. In this paper, we propose an advanced architecture for a personalization system to facilitate Web mining. A specific Web mining tool is developed and a recommender engine is integrated into the AHA! system in…

  20. Gender Divide and Acceptance of Collaborative Web 2.0 Applications for Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Wen-Hao David; Hood, Denice Ward; Yoo, Sun Joo

    2013-01-01

    Situated in the gender digital divide framework, this survey study investigated the role of computer anxiety in influencing female college students' perceptions toward Web 2.0 applications for learning. Based on 432 college students' "Web 2.0 for learning" perception ratings collected by relevant categories of "Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use…

  1. The bedside examination of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR): An update

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, A.; Zee, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosing dizzy patients remains a daunting challenge to the clinician in spite of modern imaging and increasingly sophisticated electrophysiological testing. Here we review the major bedside tests of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and how, when combined with a proper examination of the other eye movement systems, one can arrive at an accurate vestibular diagnosis. PMID:22981296

  2. CentiServer: A Comprehensive Resource, Web-Based Application and R Package for Centrality Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Mahdi; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Asgari, Yazdan; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Alimoghaddam, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Various disciplines are trying to solve one of the most noteworthy queries and broadly used concepts in biology, essentiality. Centrality is a primary index and a promising method for identifying essential nodes, particularly in biological networks. The newly created CentiServer is a comprehensive online resource that provides over 110 definitions of different centrality indices, their computational methods, and algorithms in the form of an encyclopedia. In addition, CentiServer allows users to calculate 55 centralities with the help of an interactive web-based application tool and provides a numerical result as a comma separated value (csv) file format or a mapped graphical format as a graph modeling language (GML) file. The standalone version of this application has been developed in the form of an R package. The web-based application (CentiServer) and R package (centiserve) are freely available at http://www.centiserver.org/.

  3. CentiServer: A Comprehensive Resource, Web-Based Application and R Package for Centrality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Mahdi; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Asgari, Yazdan; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Alimoghaddam, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Various disciplines are trying to solve one of the most noteworthy queries and broadly used concepts in biology, essentiality. Centrality is a primary index and a promising method for identifying essential nodes, particularly in biological networks. The newly created CentiServer is a comprehensive online resource that provides over 110 definitions of different centrality indices, their computational methods, and algorithms in the form of an encyclopedia. In addition, CentiServer allows users to calculate 55 centralities with the help of an interactive web-based application tool and provides a numerical result as a comma separated value (csv) file format or a mapped graphical format as a graph modeling language (GML) file. The standalone version of this application has been developed in the form of an R package. The web-based application (CentiServer) and R package (centiserve) are freely available at http://www.centiserver.org/ PMID:26571275

  4. Bedside heart type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP): Is an early predictive marker of cardiac syncope.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Bedriye Muge; Ozturk, Derya; Yilmaz, Fevzi; Altinbilek, Ertugrul; Kavalci, Cemil; Durdu, Tamer; Hakbilir, Oktay; Turhan, Turan; Ongar, Murat

    2015-11-01

    To determine the value of bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein in diagnosis of cardiac syncope in patients presenting with syncope or presyncope. The prospective study was conducted at Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between September 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, and comprised patients aged over 18 years who presented with syncope or presyncope. Patients presenting to emergency department within 4 hours of syncope or presyncope underwent a bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein test measurement. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 100 patients evaluated, 22(22%) were diagnosed with cardiac syncope. Of them, 13(59.1%) patients had a positive and 9(40.9%) had a negative heart-type fatty acid binding protein result. Consequently, the test result was 12.64 times more positive in patients with cardiac syncope compared to those without. Bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein, particularly at early phase of myocardial injury, reduces diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainity of cardiac origin in syncope patients.

  5. MyLabStocks: a web-application to manage molecular biology materials.

    PubMed

    Chuffart, Florent; Yvert, Gaël

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory stocks are the hardware of research. They must be stored and managed with mimimum loss of material and information. Plasmids, oligonucleotides and strains are regularly exchanged between collaborators within and between laboratories. Managing and sharing information about every item is crucial for retrieval of reagents, for planning experiments and for reproducing past experimental results. We have developed a web-based application to manage stocks commonly used in a molecular biology laboratory. Its functionalities include user-defined privileges, visualization of plasmid maps directly from their sequence and the capacity to search items from fields of annotation or directly from a query sequence using BLAST. It is designed to handle records of plasmids, oligonucleotides, yeast strains, antibodies, pipettes and notebooks. Based on PHP/MySQL, it can easily be extended to handle other types of stocks and it can be installed on any server architecture. MyLabStocks is freely available from: https://forge.cbp.ens-lyon.fr/redmine/projects/mylabstocks under an open source licence. © 2014 Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire de la Cellule CNRS. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Web-based GIS for spatial pattern detection: application to malaria incidence in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Quang; Pham, Hai Minh

    2016-01-01

    There is a great concern on how to build up an interoperable health information system of public health and health information technology within the development of public information and health surveillance programme. Technically, some major issues remain regarding to health data visualization, spatial processing of health data, health information dissemination, data sharing and the access of local communities to health information. In combination with GIS, we propose a technical framework for web-based health data visualization and spatial analysis. Data was collected from open map-servers and geocoded by open data kit package and data geocoding tools. The Web-based system is designed based on Open-source frameworks and libraries. The system provides Web-based analyst tool for pattern detection through three spatial tests: Nearest neighbour, K function, and Spatial Autocorrelation. The result is a web-based GIS, through which end users can detect disease patterns via selecting area, spatial test parameters and contribute to managers and decision makers. The end users can be health practitioners, educators, local communities, health sector authorities and decision makers. This web-based system allows for the improvement of health related services to public sector users as well as citizens in a secure manner. The combination of spatial statistics and web-based GIS can be a solution that helps empower health practitioners in direct and specific intersectional actions, thus provide for better analysis, control and decision-making.

  7. wHospital: a web-based application with digital signature for drugs dispensing management.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Lorenzo; Margola, Lorenzo; Manzelli, Vacia; Bandera, Alessandra

    2006-01-01

    wHospital is the result of an information technology research project, based on the utilization of a web based application for managing the hospital drugs dispensing. Part of wHospital back bone and its key distinguishing characteristic is the adoption of the digital signature system,initially deployed by the Government of Lombardia, a Northern Italy Region, throughout the distribution of smart cards to all the healthcare and hospital staffs. The developed system is a web-based application with a proposed Health Records Digital Signature (HReDS) handshake to comply with the national law and with the Joint Commission International Standards. The prototype application, for a single hospital Operative Unit (OU), has focused on data and process management, related to drug therapy. Following a multi-faceted selection process, the Infective Disease OU of the Hospital in Busto Arsizio, Lombardia, was chosen for the development and prototype implementation. The project lead time, from user requirement analysis to training and deployment was approximately 8 months. This paper highlights the applied project methodology, the system architecture, and the achieved preliminary results.

  8. Assessing soil erosion risk using RUSLE through a GIS open source desktop and web application.

    PubMed

    Duarte, L; Teodoro, A C; Gonçalves, J A; Soares, D; Cunha, M

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem. An estimation of the expected soil loss by water-caused erosion can be calculated considering the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). Geographical Information Systems (GIS) provide different tools to create categorical maps of soil erosion risk which help to study the risk assessment of soil loss. The objective of this study was to develop a GIS open source application (in QGIS), using the RUSLE methodology for estimating erosion rate at the watershed scale (desktop application) and provide the same application via web access (web application). The applications developed allow one to generate all the maps necessary to evaluate the soil erosion risk. Several libraries and algorithms from SEXTANTE were used to develop these applications. These applications were tested in Montalegre municipality (Portugal). The maps involved in RUSLE method-soil erosivity factor, soil erodibility factor, topographic factor, cover management factor, and support practices-were created. The estimated mean value of the soil loss obtained was 220 ton km(-2) year(-1) ranged from 0.27 to 1283 ton km(-2) year(-1). The results indicated that most of the study area (80 %) is characterized by very low soil erosion level (<321 ton km(-2) year(-1)) and in 4 % of the studied area the soil erosion was higher than 962 ton km(-2) year(-1). It was also concluded that areas with high slope values and bare soil are related with high level of erosion and the higher the P and C values, the higher the soil erosion percentage. The RUSLE web and the desktop application are freely available.

  9. Enhancing UCSF Chimera through web services

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Conrad C.; Meng, Elaine C.; Morris, John H.; Pettersen, Eric F.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating access to web services with desktop applications allows for an expanded set of application features, including performing computationally intensive tasks and convenient searches of databases. We describe how we have enhanced UCSF Chimera (http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/), a program for the interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, through the addition of several web services (http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/docs/webservices.html). By streamlining access to web services, including the entire job submission, monitoring and retrieval process, Chimera makes it simpler for users to focus on their science projects rather than data manipulation. Chimera uses Opal, a toolkit for wrapping scientific applications as web services, to provide scalable and transparent access to several popular software packages. We illustrate Chimera's use of web services with an example workflow that interleaves use of these services with interactive manipulation of molecular sequences and structures, and we provide an example Python program to demonstrate how easily Opal-based web services can be accessed from within an application. Web server availability: http://webservices.rbvi.ucsf.edu/opal2/dashboard?command=serviceList. PMID:24861624

  10. Birth, death, and resurrection of the physical examination: clinical and academic perspectives on bedside diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    The physical examination has a historically prominent role in medical practice, being an important tool in diagnosis and in developing rapport with patients. Yet, physicians have lost bedside skills in recent years, with increasing use of technology at the expense of time spent with the patient. This is concerning, especially in the present era of cost-containment in health care. Approaches to improve bedside diagnosis skills include increased emphasis on instruction in physical examination during medical school and postgraduate training, and careful scrutiny of physical examination techniques, with formal evaluation of their accuracy and reproducibility. Only through education and research will the physical examination recover its central role in the clinical encounter. PMID:11697480

  11. [Evaluation of Web-based software applications for administrating and organising an ophthalmological clinical trial site].

    PubMed

    Kortüm, K; Reznicek, L; Leicht, S; Ulbig, M; Wolf, A

    2013-07-01

    The importance and complexity of clinical trials is continuously increasing, especially in innovative specialties like ophthalmology. Therefore an efficient clinical trial site organisational structure is essential. In modern internet times, this can be accomplished by web-based applications. In total, 3 software applications (Vibe on Prem, Sharepoint and open source software) were evaluated in a clinical trial site in ophthalmology. Assessment criteria were set; they were: reliability, easiness of administration, usability, scheduling, task list, knowledge management, operating costs and worldwide availability. Vibe on Prem customised by the local university met the assessment criteria best. Other applications were not as strong. By introducing a web-based application for administrating and organising an ophthalmological trial site, studies can be conducted in a more efficient and reliable manner. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. New biochemical markers: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Zaninotto, Martina; Mion, Monica Maria; Novello, Enrica; Altinier, Sara; Plebani, Mario

    2007-05-01

    Evaluation of patients presenting to hospital with chest pain or other signs or symptoms suggesting acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is problematic, time-consuming and sometimes expensive, even if new biochemical markers, such as troponins, have improved the ability to detect cardiac injury. However, patients with normal troponin values are not necessarily risk-free for major cardiac events. Recent investigations indicate that the overall patient risk may be assessed earlier than before, thanks to new knowledge acquired concerning the pathobiology of atherosclerosis and molecular events involved in the progression of disease, thus allowing the development of new biochemical markers. Some selected markers are released during the different phases of development of cardiovascular disease and may be useful for the diagnosis of patients with cardiovascular disease. In particular, the identification of emerging markers that provide relevant information on the inflammatory process, and the development of biomarkers whose circulating concentrations suggest the status of plaque instability and rupture, seems to be of particular value in prognosis and risk stratification. The overall expectations for a cardiovascular biochemical marker are not only its biological plausibility but also the availability at a reasonable cost of rapid, high quality assays, and their correct interpretation by clinicians using optimal cut-offs. The crossing from bench to bedside for each new marker discovered, must be associated with concurrent advances in the characterization of analytical features and the development of routine assay, in the assessment of analytical performance and in interpretative reporting of test results as well as in the training of physicians to use the array of biomarkers available appropriately and to interpret them correctly. This approach calls for the coordinated support of clinicians, technology experts, statisticians and the industry so that new biochemical

  13. A Streamflow Statistics (StreamStats) Web Application for Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.; Kula, Stephanie P.; Puskas, Barry M.

    2006-01-01

    A StreamStats Web application was developed for Ohio that implements equations for estimating a variety of streamflow statistics including the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year peak streamflows, mean annual streamflow, mean monthly streamflows, harmonic mean streamflow, and 25th-, 50th-, and 75th-percentile streamflows. StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system application designed to facilitate the estimation of streamflow statistics at ungaged locations on streams. StreamStats can also serve precomputed streamflow statistics determined from streamflow-gaging station data. The basic structure, use, and limitations of StreamStats are described in this report. To facilitate the level of automation required for Ohio's StreamStats application, the technique used by Koltun (2003)1 for computing main-channel slope was replaced with a new computationally robust technique. The new channel-slope characteristic, referred to as SL10-85, differed from the National Hydrography Data based channel slope values (SL) reported by Koltun (2003)1 by an average of -28.3 percent, with the median change being -13.2 percent. In spite of the differences, the two slope measures are strongly correlated. The change in channel slope values resulting from the change in computational method necessitated revision of the full-model equations for flood-peak discharges originally presented by Koltun (2003)1. Average standard errors of prediction for the revised full-model equations presented in this report increased by a small amount over those reported by Koltun (2003)1, with increases ranging from 0.7 to 0.9 percent. Mean percentage changes in the revised regression and weighted flood-frequency estimates relative to regression and weighted estimates reported by Koltun (2003)1 were small, ranging from -0.72 to -0.25 percent and -0.22 to 0.07 percent, respectively.

  14. Educational Applications on the World Wide Web: An Example Using Amphion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Jane

    1998-01-01

    There is a great deal of excitement about using the internet and the World Wide Web in education. There are such exciting possibilities and there is a wealth and variety of material up on the web. There are however many problems, problems of access and resources, problems of quality -- for every excellent resource there are many poor ones, and there are insufficiently explored problems of teacher training and motivation. For example, Wiesenmayer and Meadows report on a study of 347 West Virginia science teachers. These teachers were enrolled in a week-long summer workshop to introduce them to the internet and its educational potential. The teachers were asked to review science sites as to overall quality and then about their usefulness in their own classrooms. The teachers were enthusiastic about the web, and gave two-thirds of the sites high ratings, and essentially all the rest average ratings. But alarmingly, over 80% of these sites were viewed as having no direct applicability in the teacher's own classroom. This summer I was assigned to work on the Amphion project in the Automated Software Engineering Group under the leadership of Michael Lowry. I wished to find educational applications of the Amphion system, which in its current implementation can be used to create fortran programs and animations using the SPICE libraries created by the NAIF group at JPL. I wished to find an application which provided real added educational value, which was in line with educational curriculum standards and which would serve a documented need of the educational community. The application selected was teaching about the causes of the seasons -- at the approximately the fourth, fifth, sixth grade level. This topic was chosen because it is in line with national curriculum standards. The fourth, fifth, sixth grade level was selected to coincide with the grade level served by the Ames Aerospace Encounter, which services 10,000 children a year on field trips. The hope is that

  15. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy of Skin In Vivo: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Marghoob, Ashfaq; Rossi, Anthony; Halpern, Allan C; Nehal, Kishwer S.

    2017-01-01

    Following more than two decades of effort, reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging of skin was granted codes for reimbursement by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Dermatologists in the USA have started billing and receiving reimbursement for the imaging procedure and for the reading and interpretation of images. RCM imaging combined with dermoscopic examination is guiding the triage of lesions into those that appear benign, which are being spared from biopsy, against those that appear suspicious, which are then biopsied. Thus far, a few thousand patients have been spared from biopsy of benign lesions. The journey of RCM imaging from bench to bedside is certainly a success story, but still much more work lies ahead toward wider dissemination, acceptance, and adoption. We present a brief review of RCM imaging and highlight key challenges and opportunities. The success of RCM imaging paves the way for other emerging optical technologies, as well—and our bet for the future is on multimodal approaches. PMID:27785781

  16. Application of a Reference Framework for Integration of Web Resources in Dotlrn--Case Study of Physics--Topic: Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Fabinton Sotelo; Ordóñez, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Previously a framework for integrating web resources providing educational services in dotLRN was presented. The present paper describes the application of this framework in a rural school in Cauca--Colombia. The case study includes two web resources about the topic of waves (physics) which is oriented in secondary education. Web classes and…

  17. Attitudes toward Web application supporting pharmacist-clinician comanagement of postexposure prophylaxis patients.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Crystal M; Turner, Alezandria K; Hernández, Diana; Rivera, Alexis V; Amesty, Silvia; Lewis, Michael D; Feldman, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    To qualitatively explore clinician and pharmacist attitudes toward using a Web application virtual pharmacist-clinician partnership (VPCP) to assist with comanaged care of illicit drug-using patients prescribed postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). Qualitative, descriptive, nonexperimental study. New York City (NYC) from February 2011 to March 2012. Four pharmacists and nine clinicians. In-depth interviews. Potential impact of the VPCP on pharmacist-clinician communication and potential barriers to use of the VPCP when comanaging PEP patients among pharmacists and clinicians. Pharmacists and clinicians were supportive of an interactive Web application that would expand the role of pharmacists to include assistance with PEP access and patient management. Participants noted that the VPCP would facilitate communication between pharmacists and clinicians and have potential to support adherence among patients. Pharmacists and clinicians were concerned about not having time to use the VPCP and security of patient information on the site. Pharmacist and clinician concerns informed final development of the VPCP, including creation of a user-friendly interface, linkage to users' e-mail accounts for timeline notification, and attention to security. Use of Web-based technology to support communication between pharmacists and clinicians was seen as being a potentially feasible method for improving patient care, particularly in the delivery of PEP to drug users and other high-risk groups. These findings highlight the need for further study of a technology-supported partnership, particularly for comanagement of patients who face challenges with adherence.

  18. Web-based interactive visualization in a Grid-enabled neuroimaging application using HTML5.

    PubMed

    Siewert, René; Specovius, Svenja; Wu, Jie; Krefting, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Interactive visualization and correction of intermediate results are required in many medical image analysis pipelines. To allow certain interaction in the remote execution of compute- and data-intensive applications, new features of HTML5 are used. They allow for transparent integration of user interaction into Grid- or Cloud-enabled scientific workflows. Both 2D and 3D visualization and data manipulation can be performed through a scientific gateway without the need to install specific software or web browser plugins. The possibilities of web-based visualization are presented along the FreeSurfer-pipeline, a popular compute- and data-intensive software tool for quantitative neuroimaging.

  19. Administrative gatekeeping - a third way between unrestricted patient advocacy and bedside rationing.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Sigurd

    2009-06-01

    The inevitable need for rationing of healthcare has apparently presented the medical profession with the dilemma of choosing the lesser of two evils. Physicians appear to be obliged to adopt either an implausible version of traditional professional ethics or an equally problematic ethics of bedside rationing. The former requires unrestricted advocacy of patients but prompts distrust, moral hazard and unfairness. The latter commits physicians to rationing at the bedside; but it is bound to introduce unfair inequalities among patients and lack of political accountability towards citizens. In this paper I shall argue that this dilemma is false, since a third intermediate alternative exists. This alternative, which I term 'administrative gatekeeping', makes it possible for physicians to be involved in rationing while at the same time being genuine advocates of their patients. According to this ideal, physicians are required to follow fair rules of rationing adopted at higher organizational levels within healthcare systems. At the same time, however, they are prohibited from including considerations of cost in their clinical decisions.

  20. Integrated Web-Based Access to and use of Satellite Remote Sensing Data for Improved Decision Making in Hydrologic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, W.; Chiu, L.; Kempler, S.; Liu, Z.; Nadeau, D.; Rui, H.

    2006-12-01

    Using NASA satellite remote sensing data from multiple sources for hydrologic applications can be a daunting task and requires a detailed understanding of the data's internal structure and physical implementation. Gaining this understanding and applying it to data reduction is a time-consuming task that must be undertaken before the core investigation can begin. In order to facilitate such investigations, the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) has developed the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure or "Giovanni," which supports a family of Web interfaces (instances) that allow users to perform interactive visualization and analysis online without downloading any data. Two such Giovanni instances are particularly relevant to hydrologic applications: the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Online Visualization and Analysis System (TOVAS) and the Agricultural Online Visualization and Analysis System (AOVAS), both highly popular and widely used for a variety of applications, including those related to several NASA Applications of National Priority, such as Agricultural Efficiency, Disaster Management, Ecological Forecasting, Homeland Security, and Public Health. Dynamic, context- sensitive Web services provided by TOVAS and AOVAS enable users to seamlessly access NASA data from within, and deeply integrate the data into, their local client environments. One example is between TOVAS and Florida International University's TerraFly, a Web-enabled system that serves a broad segment of the research and applications community, by facilitating access to various textual, remotely sensed, and vector data. Another example is between AOVAS and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service (USDA FAS)'s Crop Explorer, the primary decision support tool used by FAS to monitor the production, supply, and demand of agricultural commodities worldwide. AOVAS is also part of GES DISC

  1. SynergyFinder: a web application for analyzing drug combination dose-response matrix data.

    PubMed

    Ianevski, Aleksandr; He, Liye; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Rational design of drug combinations has become a promising strategy to tackle the drug sensitivity and resistance problem in cancer treatment. To systematically evaluate the pre-clinical significance of pairwise drug combinations, functional screening assays that probe combination effects in a dose-response matrix assay are commonly used. To facilitate the analysis of such drug combination experiments, we implemented a web application that uses key functions of R-package SynergyFinder, and provides not only the flexibility of using multiple synergy scoring models, but also a user-friendly interface for visualizing the drug combination landscapes in an interactive manner. The SynergyFinder web application is freely accessible at https://synergyfinder.fimm.fi ; The R-package and its source-code are freely available at http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/synergyfinder.html . jing.tang@helsinki.fi. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Semantic Web applications and tools for the life sciences: SWAT4LS 2010.

    PubMed

    Burger, Albert; Paschke, Adrian; Romano, Paolo; Marshall, M Scott; Splendiani, Andrea

    2012-01-25

    As Semantic Web technologies mature and new releases of key elements, such as SPARQL 1.1 and OWL 2.0, become available, the Life Sciences continue to push the boundaries of these technologies with ever more sophisticated tools and applications. Unsurprisingly, therefore, interest in the SWAT4LS (Semantic Web Applications and Tools for the Life Sciences) activities have remained high, as was evident during the third international SWAT4LS workshop held in Berlin in December 2010. Contributors to this workshop were invited to submit extended versions of their papers, the best of which are now made available in the special supplement of BMC Bioinformatics. The papers reflect the wide range of work in this area, covering the storage and querying of Life Sciences data in RDF triple stores, tools for the development of biomedical ontologies and the semantics-based integration of Life Sciences as well as clinicial data.

  3. ATGC transcriptomics: a web-based application to integrate, explore and analyze de novo transcriptomic data.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Clavijo, Bernardo; Rivarola, Máximo; Moreno, Patricio; Fernandez, Paula; Dopazo, Joaquín; Paniego, Norma

    2017-02-22

    In the last years, applications based on massively parallelized RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) have become valuable approaches for studying non-model species, e.g., without a fully sequenced genome. RNA-seq is a useful tool for detecting novel transcripts and genetic variations and for evaluating differential gene expression by digital measurements. The large and complex datasets resulting from functional genomic experiments represent a challenge in data processing, management, and analysis. This problem is especially significant for small research groups working with non-model species. We developed a web-based application, called ATGC transcriptomics, with a flexible and adaptable interface that allows users to work with new generation sequencing (NGS) transcriptomic analysis results using an ontology-driven database. This new application simplifies data exploration, visualization, and integration for a better comprehension of the results. ATGC transcriptomics provides access to non-expert computer users and small research groups to a scalable storage option and simple data integration, including database administration and management. The software is freely available under the terms of GNU public license at http://atgcinta.sourceforge.net .

  4. Research at the Bedside: It Makes A Difference.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Elizabeth J

    2015-07-01

    Research at the bedside makes a difference for our patients, and also for our nurses. However, it is now time to broaden our focus from research on interventions or events at a narrow point in time to research that addresses care across the continuum. This continuum may start at the point of injury, such as the battlefield through en route care delivered during the 8000-mile journey home for our wounded warriors, or for critically ill patients as they move between the emergency department, operating room, and intensive care unit. This focus also requires researchers to consider "care within context," that is, research- and evidence-based practice tailored to the unique conditions of the care environment. Beyond conducting research and developing new knowledge is the challenge of translating evidence into practice. A culture of inquiry is a critical element in the successful translation of evidence into practice. In a culture of inquiry, nurses are encouraged to question and evaluate their practice, provide evidence-based care, and actively participate in and lead clinical inquiry. This article draws from a program of applied clinical research reflecting care across the continuum within both military and civilian health care settings and discusses how the application of these research findings and the advancement of a culture of inquiry make a difference for both patients and nurses. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  5. GeneXplorer: an interactive web application for microarray data visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Rees, Christian A; Demeter, Janos; Matese, John C; Botstein, David; Sherlock, Gavin

    2004-10-01

    When publishing large-scale microarray datasets, it is of great value to create supplemental websites where either the full data, or selected subsets corresponding to figures within the paper, can be browsed. We set out to create a CGI application containing many of the features of some of the existing standalone software for the visualization of clustered microarray data. We present GeneXplorer, a web application for interactive microarray data visualization and analysis in a web environment. GeneXplorer allows users to browse a microarray dataset in an intuitive fashion. It provides simple access to microarray data over the Internet and uses only HTML and JavaScript to display graphic and annotation information. It provides radar and zoom views of the data, allows display of the nearest neighbors to a gene expression vector based on their Pearson correlations and provides the ability to search gene annotation fields. The software is released under the permissive MIT Open Source license, and the complete documentation and the entire source code are freely available for download from CPAN http://search.cpan.org/dist/Microarray-GeneXplorer/.

  6. Interpretation of bedside chest X-rays in the ICU: is the radiologist still needed?

    PubMed

    Martini, Katharina; Ganter, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco; Winklehner, Anna; Leupi-Skibinski, Katarzyna E; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Nguyen-Kim, Thi Dan Linh

    2015-01-01

    To compare diagnostic accuracy of intensivists to radiologists in reading bedside chest X-rays. In a retrospective trial, 33 bedside chest X-rays were evaluated by five radiologists and five intensivists with different experience. Images were evaluated for devices and lung pathologies. Interobserver agreement and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. Computed tomography served as reference standard. Seniors had higher diagnostic accuracy than residents (mean-ExpB(Senior)=1.456; mean-ExpB(Resident)=1.635). Interobserver agreement for installations was more homogenously distributed between radiologists compared to intensivists (ExpB(Rad)=1.204-1.672; ExpB(Int)=1.005-2.368). Seniors had comparable diagnostic accuracy. No significant difference in diagnostic performance was seen between seniors of both disciplines, whereas the resident intensivists might still benefit from an interdisciplinary dialogue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhancing UCSF Chimera through web services.

    PubMed

    Huang, Conrad C; Meng, Elaine C; Morris, John H; Pettersen, Eric F; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2014-07-01

    Integrating access to web services with desktop applications allows for an expanded set of application features, including performing computationally intensive tasks and convenient searches of databases. We describe how we have enhanced UCSF Chimera (http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/), a program for the interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, through the addition of several web services (http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/docs/webservices.html). By streamlining access to web services, including the entire job submission, monitoring and retrieval process, Chimera makes it simpler for users to focus on their science projects rather than data manipulation. Chimera uses Opal, a toolkit for wrapping scientific applications as web services, to provide scalable and transparent access to several popular software packages. We illustrate Chimera's use of web services with an example workflow that interleaves use of these services with interactive manipulation of molecular sequences and structures, and we provide an example Python program to demonstrate how easily Opal-based web services can be accessed from within an application. Web server availability: http://webservices.rbvi.ucsf.edu/opal2/dashboard?command=serviceList. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Bedside ultrasound curriculum for medical students: report of a blended learning curriculum implementation and validation.

    PubMed

    Blackstock, Uché; Munson, Jaclyn; Szyld, Demian

    2015-03-01

    Medical students on clinical rotations rarely receive formal bedside ultrasound (BUS) training. We designed, implemented, and evaluated a standardized BUS curriculum for medical students on their Emergency Medicine (EM) rotation. Teaching was aimed toward influencing four cognitive and psychomotor learning domains: BUS instrumentation knowledge, image interpretation, image acquisition, and procedural guidance. Participants viewed three instructional Web-based tutorials on BUS instrumentation, the Focused Assessment for Sonography in Trauma (FAST) examination and ultrasound-guided central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Subsequently, participants attended a 3-hour hands-on training session to discuss the same content area and practice with faculty coaches. A Web-based, multiple-choice questionnaire was administered before and after the session. During the final week of the rotation, students returned for skills assessments on FAST image acquisition and CVC placement. Forty-five medical students on an EM rotation were enrolled. Sonographic knowledge overall mean score improved significantly from 66.6% (SD ±11.2) to 85.7% (SD ±10.0), corresponding to a mean difference of 19.1% (95% CI 15.5-22.7; p < 0.001). There were high pass rates for FAST (89.0%, 40/45) and CVC (96.0%, 43/45) skills assessments. There was no significant difference between medical student posttest and EM resident test scores 85.7% (SD ±10.0) and 88.1% (SD ± 7.6) (p = 0.40), respectively. A formal BUS curriculum for medical students on EM rotation positively influenced performance in several key learning domains. As BUS competency is required for residency in EM and other specialties, medical schools could consider routinely incorporating BUS teaching into their clinical rotation curricula. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An Offline-Online Android Application for Hazard Event Mapping Using WebGIS Open Source Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyazadeh, Roya; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Sudmeier-Rieux, Karen; Derron, Marc-Henri; Devkota, Sanjaya

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) plays an important role in better understanding and managing disaster risk reduction around the world. National and local government, NGOs and other stakeholders are increasingly seeking and producing data on hazards. Most of the hazard event inventories and land use mapping are based on remote sensing data, with little ground truthing, creating difficulties depending on the terrain and accessibility. Open Source WebGIS tools offer an opportunity for quicker and easier ground truthing of critical areas in order to analyse hazard patterns and triggering factors. This study presents a secure mobile-map application for hazard event mapping using Open Source WebGIS technologies such as Postgres database, Postgis, Leaflet, Cordova and Phonegap. The objectives of this prototype are: 1. An Offline-Online android mobile application with advanced Geospatial visualisation; 2. Easy Collection and storage of events information applied services; 3. Centralized data storage with accessibility by all the service (smartphone, standard web browser); 4. Improving data management by using active participation in hazard event mapping and storage. This application has been implemented as a low-cost, rapid and participatory method for recording impacts from hazard events and includes geolocation (GPS data and Internet), visualizing maps with overlay of satellite images, viewing uploaded images and events as cluster points, drawing and adding event information. The data can be recorded in offline (Android device) or online version (all browsers) and consequently uploaded through the server whenever internet is available. All the events and records can be visualized by an administrator and made public after approval. Different user levels can be defined to access the data for communicating the information. This application was tested for landslides in post-earthquake Nepal but can be used for any other type of hazards such as flood, avalanche

  10. A web-application for visualizing uncertainty in numerical ensemble models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Koko; Hiemstra, Paul; de Jong, Kor; Karssenberg, Derek

    2013-04-01

    Numerical ensemble models are used in the analysis and forecasting of a wide range of environmental processes. Common use cases include assessing the consequences of nuclear accidents, pollution releases into the ocean or atmosphere, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, or identifying areas at risk from such hazards. In addition to the increased use of scenario analyses and model forecasts, the availability of supplementary data describing errors and model uncertainties is increasingly commonplace. Unfortunately most current visualization routines are not capable of properly representing uncertain information. As a result, uncertainty information is not provided at all, not readily accessible, or it is not communicated effectively to model users such as domain experts, decision makers, policy makers, or even novice users. In an attempt to address these issues a lightweight and interactive web-application has been developed. It makes clear and concise uncertainty visualizations available in a web-based mapping and visualization environment, incorporating aggregation (upscaling) techniques to adjust uncertainty information to the zooming level. The application has been built on a web mapping stack of open source software, and can quantify and visualize uncertainties in numerical ensemble models in such a way that both expert and novice users can investigate uncertainties present in a simple ensemble dataset. As a test case, a dataset was used which forecasts the spread of an airborne tracer across Western Europe. Extrinsic uncertainty representations are used in which dynamic circular glyphs are overlaid on model attribute maps to convey various uncertainty concepts. It supports both basic uncertainty metrics such as standard deviation, standard error, width of the 95% confidence interval and interquartile range, as well as more experimental ones aimed at novice users. Ranges of attribute values can be specified, and the circular glyphs dynamically change size to

  11. Heated Ultrasound Gel and Patient Satisfaction with Bedside Ultrasound Studies: The HUGS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krainin, Benjamin M.; Thaut, Lane C.; April, Michael D.; Curtis, Ryan A.; Kaelin, Andrea L.; Hardy, Garrett B.; Weymouth, Wells L.; Srichandra, Jonathan; Chin, Eric J.; Summers, Shane M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to determine if heated gel for emergency department (ED) bedside ultrasonography improves patient satisfaction compared to room-temperature gel. Methods We randomized a convenience sample of ED patients determined by their treating physician to require a bedside ultrasound (US) study to either heated gel (102.0° F) or room-temperature gel (82.3° F). Investigators performed all US examinations. We informed all subjects that the study entailed investigation into various measures to improve patient satisfaction with ED US examinations but did not inform them of our specific focus on gel temperature. Investigators wore heat-resistant gloves while performing the examinations to blind themselves to the gel temperature. After completion of the US, subjects completed a survey including the primary outcome measure of patient satisfaction as measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A secondary outcome was patient perceptions of sonographer professionalism measured by an ordinal scale (1–5). Results We enrolled 124 subjects; 120 completed all outcome measures. Of these, 59 underwent randomization to US studies with room-temperature gel and 61 underwent randomization to heated US gel. Patient 100-mm VAS satisfaction scores were 83.9 among patients undergoing studies with room-temperature gel versus 87.6 among subjects undergoing studies with heated gel (effect size 3.7, 95% confidence interval −1.3–8.6). There were similarly no differences between the two arms with regard to patient perceptions of sonographer professionalism. Conclusion The use of heated ultrasound gel appears to have no material impact on the satisfaction of ED patients undergoing bedside ultrasound studies. PMID:29085538

  12. Cardiac markers: from enzymes to proteins, diagnosis to prognosis, laboratory to bedside.

    PubMed

    Wu, A H

    1999-01-01

    For many years, serologic markers have been used to assist cardiologists in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiovascular diseases. The use of laboratory markers has evolved and kept pace with the field of cardiology itself. The early markers involved testing for total enzyme activity such as aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Shortly thereafter, the World Health Organization included serial enzyme markers as part of the triad for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It was soon recognized that isoenzymes such as for CK-MB and LD-1 provided more specific organ specificity. The need for reporting rapid results led to the development of totally automated isoenzyme assays, which have evolved from immunoinhibition (INH) techniques to mass assays. The curr