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Sample records for cadmium sulfide solar

  1. Cadmium sulfide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Development, fabrication and applications of CdS solar cells are reviewed in detail. The suitability of CdS cells for large solar panels and microcircuitry, and their low cost, are emphasized. Developments are reviewed by manufacturer-developer. Vapor phase deposition of thin-film solar cells, doping and co-evaporation, sputtering, chemical spray, and sintered layers are reviewed, in addition to spray deposition, monograin layer structures, and silk screening. Formation of junctions by electroplating, evaporation, brushing, CuCl dip, and chemiplating are discussed, along with counterelectrode fabrication, VPD film structures, the Cu2S barrier layer, and various photovoltaic effects (contact photovoltage, light intensity variation, optical enhancement), and various other CdS topics.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF THIN FILM CADMIUM SULFIDE SOLAR CELLS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SOLAR CELLS , *CADMIUM COMPOUNDS, FILMS, SULFIDES, VAPOR PLATING, VACUUM APPARATUS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, TITANIUM, COPPER COMPOUNDS, CHLORIDES, INDIUM, MOLYBDENUM, SILICON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ENERGY CONVERSION.

  3. Integrated thin film cadmium sulfide solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Abbott, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication and tests of flexible integrated thin-film cadmium sulfide solar cells and modules are discussed. The development of low cost and high production rate methods for interconnecting cells into large solar arrays is described. Chromium thin films were applied extensively in the deposited cell structures as a means to: (1) achieve high adherence between the cadmium sulfide films and the vacuum-metallized copper substrates, (2) obtain an ohmic contact to the cadmium sulfide films, and (3) improve the adherence of gold films as grids or contact areas.

  4. A study of the stability of cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide and cadmium sulfide copper-indium-diselenide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, G.; Richard, N.; Gaines, G.

    1984-08-01

    Groups of high efficiency cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide solar cells were exposed to combinations of stresses designed to isolate and accelerate intrinsic degradation mechanisms. Stresses included elevated temperature, illumination intensity, and cell loading conditions. All stress exposures and tests were conducted in a benign (high purity argon) atmosphere. Two primary intrinsic modes of degradation were identified: degradation of the open circuit voltage under continuous illumination and nonzero loading was found to be self recovering upon interruption of illumination or upon shorting or reverse biasing the cells. It was attributed to traps in the depletion region. Recovery from decay of light generated current was not spontaneous but could be partially accomplished by annealing in a reducing (hydrogen) environment. It was attributed to changes in the stoichiometry of the copper sulfide under the influence of electric fields and currents.

  5. Simulated space environment tests on cadmium sulfide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D. R.; Oman, H.

    1971-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (Cu2s - CdS) solar cells were tested under simulated space environmental conditions. Some cells were thermally cycled with illumination from a Xenon-arc solar simulator. A cycle was one hour of illumination followed immediately with one-half hour of darkness. In the light, the cells reached an equilibrium temperature of 60 C (333 K) and in the dark the cell temperature dropped to -120 C (153 K). Other cells were constantly illuminated with a Xenon-arc solar simulator. The equilibrium temperature of these cells was 55 C (328 K). The black vacuum chamber walls were cooled with liquid nitrogen to simulate a space heat sink. Chamber pressure was maintained at 0.000001 torr or less. Almost all of the solar cells tested degraded in power when exposed to a simulated space environment of either thermal cycling or constant illumination. The cells tested the longest were exposed to 10.050 thermal cycles.

  6. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  7. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1992-07-07

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  8. Cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by close spaced sublimation and cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinskiy, Dmitriy Nikolaevich

    1998-12-01

    One of the applications of CdS films is as a window layer in CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Sesb2 solar cells. The study of the optical and structural properties of CdS films deposited by close spaced sublimation as well as their influence on CdS/CdTe solar cell performance is part of the CdTe solar cell program at the University of South Florida. CdS films have been deposited by the close-spaced sublimation technique. The influence of the main process parameters, the substrate and source temperatures, and the ambient in the deposition chamber has been investigated. As-deposited films have been subjected to heat treatments in Hsb2 ambient, in CdClsb2 atmosphere, and in atmosphere with small amounts of oxygen. A special annealing chamber was built to carry out the annealing experiments in the presence of CdClsb2 vapor and oxygen. Several CSS chambers were assembled to study the influence of various process parameters simultaneously and validate the results. Results of scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements have been used as the primary characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and transmission measurements have also been carried out. It was found that as deposited CdS films have a hexagonal structure independent of the process parameters used. The presence of a CdO phase was detected in the samples grown with the highest oxygen concentration in the ambient. The resistivity of CdS films is controlled by intergrain barriers. Photoluminescence measurements showed the presence of oxygen-acceptor transition and a wide variation in the intensity of deep emission bands. The variation in the intensities was correlated with the variation in the deposition and annealing conditions. However, no correlation was found between the PL intensities of defect bands and cell performance. CdS/CdTe junctions have been fabricated using standard deposition and postgrowth techniques developed in the USF solar cells laboratory. All cells have

  9. Method of epitaxially depositing cadmium sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, Frank Z. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A single crystal layer of either cadmium sulfide or an alloy of cadmium sulfide and indium phosphide is epitaxially deposited on a substrate of cadmium sulfide by liquid phase epitaxy using indium as the solvent.

  10. From front contact to back contact in cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide solar cells: Buffer layer and interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussillon, Yann

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) polycrystalline thin film solar cells, with their near optimum direct band-gap of 1.4 eV matching almost perfectly the sun radiation spectrum, are a strong contender as a less expensive alternative, among photovoltaic materials, than the more commonly used silicon-based cells. Polycrystalline solar cells are usually deposited over large areas. Such devices often exhibit strong fluctuations (nonuniformities) in electronic properties, which originate from deposition and post-deposition processes, and are detrimental to the device performance. Therefore their effects need to be constrained. A new approach in this work was, when a CdS/CdTe solar cell is exposed to light and immersed in a proper electrolyte, fluctuations in surface potential can drive electrochemical reactions which result in a nonuniform interfacial layer that could balance the original nonuniformity. This approach improved the device efficiency for CdS/CdTe photovoltaic devices from 1--3% to 11--12%. Cadmium sulfide (CdS), used as a window layer and heterojunction partner to CdTe, is electrically inactive and absorb light energies above its band-gap of 2.4 eV. Therefore, to maximize the device efficiency, a thin US layer needs to be used. However, more defects, such as pinholes, are likely to be present in the film, leading to shunts. A resistive transparent layer, called buffer layer, is therefore deposited before CdS. A key observation was that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for cells made using a buffer layer was high, around 800 mV, similar to cells without buffer layer after Cu doping. The standard p-n junction theory cannot explain this phenomena, therefore an alternative junction mechanism, similar to metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, was developed. Furthermore, alternative Cu-free back-contacts were used in conjunction with a buffer layer. The Voc of the devices was found to be dependent of the back contact used. This change occurs as the back-contact junction

  11. Electrical Properties of Polycrystalline Cadmium Sulfide Films Produced by Laser-Driven Physical Vapor Deposition for Cadmium Sulfide/cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsien, Li-Hua

    1992-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, carrier density, and mobilities have been measured for CdS films grown on glass substrates by laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD). This work was part of an overall effort to gain a better understanding of the processes that are important in determining the efficiency of CdTe-based thin film solar cells. Films were grown from several target materials including pure CdS, CdS doped with indium, and CdS mixed with cadmium chloride. Some films were also subjected to post-growth chemical and thermal treatments. Generally, grain boundary effects dominate the mobility between 80K and 350K. The data is interpreted using a model for polycrystalline and powdered semiconductors which was developed by Orton and Powell (J. S. Orton and M. J. Powell, Rep. Prog. Phys. 43, 81 (1980)) and is discussed using the concept of effective doping levels.

  12. Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Szedon, J. R.; Biter, W. J.; Dickey, H. C.

    1982-03-08

    The most important accomplishments during this period were to demonstrate and to elucidate further the complex effects that occur during the aging of Cu/sub 2/S/CdS thin-film solar cells in flowing wet oxygen. There are two distinct effects. At constant illumination, the short-circuit current of cells aged at room temperature consistently decreases with time. The second effect, related to diode opposing current, is more involved and may result from several competing mechanisms. Over the short term (approx. 4 to 5 hours), the magnitude of diode opposing current decreases. After approx. 20 hours of aging, opposing current generally returns to the level achieved after hydrogen annealing which immediately preceded the aging sequence. Optical measurements of the spectral transmission of the Cu/sub 2/S layers in a cell content have been made using a silicon detector epoxied to the back of a CdS cell after the copper foil substrate was removed. There is no significant change in Cu/sub 2/S transmission behavior for wavelengths ranging from 525 to 1000 nm during wet-oxygen aging for periods of 2 to 36 hours. This suggests that the decrease in J/sub SC/ at constant illumination, for the aging experiments in a flowing wet-oxygen ambient, arises because of changes in minority-carrier transport properties of the Cu/sub 2/S. Before developing a method for using an epoxied silicon detector to measure optical behavior of the Cu/sub 2/S layer, we explored the possibility of using a junction-containing wafer of silicon as a substrate for deposited CdS films. Some monolithic structures were successfully fabricated. Comparisons were made of CdS grain structure details in the junction detector area and in an adjacent metallized area.

  13. Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Szedon, J.R.; Biter, W.J.; Abel, J.A.; Dickey, H.C.; Shirland, F.A.

    1981-02-27

    The purpose of this work has been to identify aspects of cell fabrication and treatment which are critical for achieving high efficiency Cu/sub 2/S/CdS solar cells. In approaching the problem several comparisons were made of the effects of specific steps in two methods of cell fabrication. These methods had previously given cells of about 6% and a maximum of 9% efficiency. Three areas requiring special attention and specific means to achieve acceptable results were identified. (1) The Cu/sub 2/S/CdS heterojunction area must be minimized. If single source evaporations of CdS are made on substrates whose temperatures (approx. 220/sup 0/C) are monitored and controlled using welded thermocouples, the CdS films will have adequately large grains (grain diameter greater than or equal to 2 ..mu..m) and will not develop significant etch pits during texturing in a mild etchant solution. (2) The termination of the wet barrier processing steps must be done carefully. An acceptable termination involves minimizing the amount of cuprous chloride retained on the cell surface during transfer to a rinsing stage while providing adequate exclusion of air from the space above the surface of the cuprous chloride solution. (3) Once formed, the Cu/sub 2/S layer should not be exposed to high temperatures (>100/sup 0/C) for long periods of time (> 5 min) if surface adsorbed moisture or oxygen are present. Heat treatments in ampoules under flowing hydrogen atmospheres should be preceded and followed by periods of at least 30 minutes at room temperature in the reducing ambient. If all these precautions are taken, wet chemical barrier processing of thermally evaporated CdS films on zinc-plated copper foil substrates yields cells of nearly 8% conversion efficiency without AR coating.

  14. Stability studies of cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetali, Bhaskar Reddy

    CdTe/CdS solar cells have shown great potential for terrestrial solar power applications. To be commercially viable they need to operate efficiently for about 30 years. CdS/CdTe solar cells fabricated at USF have shown record efficiencies upto 16.5% [46]. This research involves the study of thermal stress (TS) and light soaking (LS) on the stability of high efficiency (>10%) solar cells. The change in key electrical parameters Voc, FF, J sc, A and Jo are quantified for more than 2000 hours of stressing. The device degradation was found to increase with stress temperature for TS. Below 100°C, the changes were due to collection and recombination losses. Above 100°C, "shunting" mechanisms were found to start affecting the device performance. A fast drop in performance within the first 500 hours was observed. It is believed to be due to an increase in deep-level Cu-related defects that increase with stress temperature. Diffusion of Cu i+ ions from the back contact along CdTe grain boundaries had been previously reported [16]. An increase in light/dark J-V crossover and bulk Rs with stress time and temperature was observed. A slow degradation component attributed to Cu-related substitutional defect [23] formation/diffusion to the junction and CdS is proposed. This should compensate the CdS over time and increase its photoconductivity/resistivity. An improvement in the current collection and FF within 100 hours of LS was observed. This is possibly due to the enhancement of Cui + diffusion into the junction and CdS during LS as previously reported [16]. A reduction in light/dark J-V crossover was observed, possibly due to an increase in CdS doping and reduction in the CdS/SnO2 front contact barrier. However, a fast decrease in Voc and increase in recombination current was also observed in the first 1000 hours of LS. This is possibly due to the existence of higher concentration of Cu-related deep level defects at the junction. A larger decrease in Voc was found for LS

  15. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, D.H.; Nelson, A.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-07-30

    A process is described for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness. 12 figs.

  16. Infrared birefringence spectra for cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide.

    PubMed

    Chenault, D B; Chipman, R A

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of the birefringence spectra for cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide from 2.5 to 16.5µm obtained with a rotating sample spectropolarimeter are presented. Because of the similarity in the birefringence spectra for cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide, a highly achromatic IR retarder can be constructed from a combination of these materials. The ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices for cadmium sulfide are estimated in the region from 10.6 to 15 µm and for cadmium selenide from 10.6 to 16.5 µm by combining these birefringence data with an extrapolation of previous dispersion relations.

  17. Evolution of oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) during high-temperature CdTe solar cell fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Meysing, Daniel M.; Reese, Matthew O.; Warren, Charles W.; Abbas, Ali; Burst, James M.; Mahabaduge, Hasitha P.; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Walls, John M.; Lonergan, Mark C.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Wolden, Colin A.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) produced by reactive sputtering has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional CdS for use as the n-type window layer in CdTe solar cells. Here, complementary techniques are used to expose the window layer (CdS or CdS:O) in completed superstrate devices and combined with a suite of materials characterization to elucidate its evolution during high temperature device processing. During device fabrication amorphous CdS:O undergoes significant interdiffusion with CdTe and recrystallization, forming CdS1-yTey nanocrystals whose Te fraction approaches solubility limits. Significant oxygen remains after processing, concentrated in sulfate clusters dispersed among the CdS1-yTey alloy phase, accounting for ~30% of the post-processed window layer based on cross-sectional microscopy. Interdiffusion and recrystallization are observed in devices with un-oxygenated CdS, but to a much lesser extent. Etching experiments suggest that the CdS thickness is minimally changed during processing, but the CdS:O window layer is reduced from 100 nm to 60-80 nm, which is confirmed by microscopy. Alloying reduces the band gap of the CdS:O window layer to 2.15 eV, but reductions in thickness and areal density improve its transmission spectrum, which is well matched to device quantum efficiency. The changes to the window layer in the reactive environments of device fabrication are profoundly different than what occurs by thermal annealing in an inert environment, which produced films with a band gap of 2.4 eV for both CdS and CdS:O. These results illustrate for the first time the significant changes that occur to the window layer during processing that are critical to the performance of CdTe solar cells.

  18. Cadmium stannate selective optical films for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haacke, G.

    1975-01-01

    Efforts concentrated on reducing the electrical sheet resistance of sputtered cadmium stannate films, installing and testing equipment for spray coating experiments, and sputter deposition of thin cadmium sulfide layers onto cadmium stannate electrodes. In addition, single crystal silicon wafers were coated with cadmium stannate. Work also continued on the development of the backwall CdS solar cell.

  19. Impact of back-contact materials on performance and stability of cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demtsu, Samuel H.

    Thin-film CdTe based solar cells are one of the leading contenders for providing lowcost and pollution-free energy, The formation of a stable, low resistance, non-rectifying contact to p-CdTe thin-film is one of the major and critical challenges associated with this technology in the fabrication of efficient and stable solar cells. The premise of this thesis is a systematic study of the impact of back-contact materials on the initial performance and the degradation of CdS/CdTe solar cells. Two different back-contact structures that incorporate Cu as a key element are investigated in this study: (a) Cu1.4Te:HgTe-doped graphite and (b) evaporated-Cu back contacts. The effect of Cu inclusion is not limited to the back-contact layer where it is deposited. Cu is a known fast diffuser in p-CdTe, and therefore, a significant amount of Cu reaches both the CdTe and US layers. Hence, the effect of the presence of Cu on the individual layers: back-contact, the absorber (CdTe), and the window (CdS) layers is discussed respectively. The effect of different metals used to form the current-carrying electrode following the Cu layer is also evaluated. Devices are studied through current-voltage (JV) measurements at different temperatures and intensities, quantum efficiency (QE) measurements under light and voltage bias, capacitance-voltage (CV), drive-level-capacitance-profiling (DLCP), and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements. Numerical simulation is also used to reproduce and explain some of the experimental results. In devices made without Cu, a current-limiting effect, rollover (distortion) in the current-voltage characteristic, was observed. With the inclusion of a small amount of Cu (5-nm), however, the distortion disappeared, and higher FF was obtained. The performance of these devices was comparable to devices made with the standard Cu-doped graphite paste contacts when the same CdTe absorber is used. Small amount of Cu (5-20 nm) partially diffused into the

  20. Development of Polyaniline Using Electrochemical Technique for Plugging Pinholes in Cadmium Sulfide/Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Manaf, N. A.; Echendu, O. K.; Fauzi, F.; Bowen, L.; Dharmadasa, I. M.

    2014-11-01

    Polyaniline (PAni) thin films were prepared by using an electrochemical polymerization technique on glass/FTO substrates by varying the deposition potential, deposition time, pH concentrations and heat treatment conditions. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of electrodeposited PAni films were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, UV-VIS spectroscopy, optical profilometry and D.C. conductivity measurements. Structural analysis shows the formation of the highest crystallinity for PAni thin film grown at V g 1654 mV. Optical absorption measurements have demonstrated a wide variety of energy band gaps ( E g), varying from ˜0.50 eV to 2.40 eV for PAni grown by tuning the pH value during the deposition. The electrical resistivity showed an increase from 0.37 × 106 Ω cm to 3.91 × 106 Ω cm when the pH increased from 2.00 to 6.50. The diode structures of glass/FTO/CdS/CdTe/PAni/Au were fabricated incorporating PAni as a pinhole plugging layer, and assessed for their photovoltaic activities. The results showed the enhancement of all device parameters, especially of open circuit voltage and fill factors. This improvement offers a great potential for enhancing solar cell performance and the device lifetime, and the latest results are presented in this paper.

  1. SINGLE CRYSTAL CADMIUM SULFIDE AND CADMIUM SELENIDE INSULATED-GATE FIELD-EFFECT TRIODES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Insulated-gate field-effect triodes were fabricated on single crystal cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide . Both bulk crystals and platelets were...used for single crystal samples. Chromium and aluminum were found to make low impedance contacts to cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide . The...polycrystalline cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide IGFET’s. The characteristics of the fabricated devices were unstable with respect to time and temperature

  2. Photoluminescence study of copper-doped cadmium-telluride and related stability issues for cadmium-sulfide/cadmium-telluride solar-cell devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Dan S.

    Lifetime predictions for CdTe photovoltaic modules represent a complex problem, partly due to the fact that a fundamental understanding of the CdTe material properties and device operation is far from being complete. One of the stability issues actively investigated is the use of Cu for the formation of a back contact. Cu is one of the few good p-dopants for CdTe, which, by forming a p+ layer at the surface of the CdTe, relaxes the requirement for a high work function metal at the back contact. On the other hand, it is known that Cu is a fast diffuser in CdTe and it was suggested that Cu migration within the device could lead to some of the observed degradation effects. in this work, we explore Cu states and migration effects in CdTe and CdS/CdTe devices using photoluminescence (PL) as the main investigative method. We confirm the assignment of several Cu-related PL transitions observed in the CdTe spectrum, namely, a bound exciton transition (X, CUCd) at 1.59eV and a donor-acceptor pair (DAP) (D, CuCd) at 1.45eV. In addition, we observe and characterize new effects related to Cu diffusion in CdTe: (a) the quenching of a DAP, Cd-vacancy related band, at 1.55eV, and (b) the formation of a new strong lattice-coupled transition at 1.555eV. These effects, we suggest, are consistent with Cu atoms occupying substitutional positions on the Cd sublattice and/or forming Frenkel pairs of the type CUi-VCd- with Cd vacancies. Similar spectral characteristics are observed for the low-S-content CdS-CdTe alloy existent in the vicinity of the junction in solar-cell devices. Using Cu-induced changes in the PL spectrum, we propose that Cu diffuses rapidly through an interstitial mechanism, as a positively charged ion, throughout the CdTe and possibly the CdS layer during the back-contact fabrication procedure. Applied electrical fields can reverse the direction of Cu migration leading to device performance degradation. In addition, it was found that Cu-doped CdTe samples exhibit a

  3. Properties of reactively sputtered oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) and their impact on CdTe solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Meysing, Daniel M. Wolden, Colin A.; Griffith, Michelle M.; Mahabaduge, Hasitha; Pankow, Joel; Reese, Matthew O.; Burst, James M.; Rance, William L.; Barnes, Teresa M.

    2015-03-15

    Oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) is commonly used as the n-type window layer in high-performance CdTe heterojunction solar cells. This layer is deposited by reactive sputtering, but the optimal amount of oxygen in the sputtering ambient is highly dependent on the specific system and process employed. In this work, the intrinsic properties of CdS:O were measured as a function of the oxygen content (0%–10%) in the sputtering ambient and correlated to device performance with the goal of better defining optimal CdS:O properties for CdTe solar cells. Optimal performance was found using CdS:O films that contained ∼40 at. % oxygen as measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed these results and showed that oxygen is incorporated primarily as oxygenated sulfur compounds (SO{sub x}). Device efficiency improved from 10.5% using CdS to >14% with CdS:O due largely to increases in short-circuit current density as well as a modest improvement in open-circuit voltage. The transparency of the CdS:O films was well correlated with observed improvements in blue quantum efficiency with increasing oxygen content. The optical bandgap of as-deposited CdS:O was identified as a simple metric for process optimization and transfer, with 2.8 eV being ideal for the device architecture employed.

  4. Cadmium sulphide solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, P.J.; Verheijen, A.W.

    1984-07-31

    The invention relates to the manufacture of cadmium sulphide solar cells. A cell is formed of a glass substrate 10, a front contact 12 made, for example, of tin oxide, a cadmium sulphide layer 14 and a copper sulphide layer 16, the junction between the layers 14 and 16 is photovoltaic. In order to form a rear contact 18 on the copper sulphide layer, the invention proposes vapor depositing a mixed layer of copper and copper oxide onto the sulphide layer. The invention also describes a method of heat treatment following the formation of the rear contact in order to optimise the electrical performance of the cell.

  5. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.

    1992-05-12

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  6. Impurity Studies in Single Crystal Cadmium Sulfide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    widths and relative intensities carried out. While studying the exciton emission from pure cadmium sulfide at low temper- atures, Bliel and Broser ...A Ŗ ® tor ® i* or® 0 I jourt! 45 . leeOialdl Split ting Diatitdnl for lon i :d Donor in Cadmni um Sul1$idte AFML-TR-79-4104 B9-19-72(b) H I c CdS...Chem. Phys. 29, 1375 (1958). 4. C. E. Bleil and 1. Broser , Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors

  7. Optimization of chemical bath deposited cadmium sulfide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Oladeji, I.O.; Chow, L.

    1997-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is known to be an excellent heterojunction partner of p-type cadmium telluride (CdTe) or p-type copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) due essentially to its high electron affinity. It is widely used as a window material in high efficiency thin-film solar cells based on CdTe or CuInSe{sub 2} owing to its transparency and photoconductivity among other properties. The authors report the optimization of CdS thin film grown by chemical bath deposition where homogeneous reactions are minimized. The optimum parameters have enabled them to maximize the thickness of the deposited film in a single dip and to grow thicker films by periodically replenishing the concentration of reactants while the substrate remains continuously dipped in the reaction bath. Characterization results reveal the deposited CdS films exhibit improved optical and electrical properties.

  8. Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhaohui Zhu, Huaiyong; Shi, Jeffrey; Parkinson, Gordon; Lu, G.Q.

    2007-03-15

    The preparation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that have a moderate pore size is reported. This preparation method involves a hydrothermal process that produces a precursor mixture and a following acid treatment of the precursor to get the porous material. The majority of the particles have a pore size close to 20nm, which complements and fills in the gap between the existing cadmium sulfide materials, which usually have a pore size either less than 10nm or are well above 100nm.

  9. Cadmium sulfide nanowires for the window semiconductor layer in thin film CdS-CdTe solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Piao; Singh, Vijay P; Jarro, Carlos A; Rajaputra, Suresh

    2011-04-08

    Thin film CdS/CdTe heterojunction device is a leading technology for the solar cells of the next generation. We report on two novel device configurations for these cells where the traditional CdS window layer is replaced by nanowires (NW) of CdS, embedded in an aluminum oxide matrix or free-standing. An estimated 26.8% improvement in power conversion efficiency over the traditional device structure is expected, primarily because of the enhanced spectral transmission of sunlight through the NW-CdS layer and a reduction in the junction area/optical area ratio. In initial experiments, nanostructured devices of the two designs were fabricated and a power conversion efficiency value of 6.5% was achieved.

  10. Cobalt-doped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles as efficient strategy to enhance performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firoozi, Najmeh; Dehghani, Hossein; Afrooz, Malihe

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Co2+ ion incorporation into CdS layer on the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC). Quantum dots are deposited by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method on the mesoporous TiO2 film. The doped system modifies the structure of photoanode that leads to an increase in short circuit current density (Jsc) from 13.16 mA cm-2 to 16.6 mA cm-2 in the un-doped system. Electrochemical impedance analysis (EIS) reveals a decrease in charge transfer resistance at the TiO2/QDs/electrolyte interface that arises from the presence of an internal recombination pathway. The highest energy conversion efficiency (η) of 3.16% is obtained under standard air mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) simulated sun light by doping the optimized amount of Co2+ ion in CdS nanoparticles, corresponding to efficiency increment (35%) compared to the un-doped system. The origin of the increase in the efficiency is attributed to the dominance of charge collection to recombination. To further investigation of the electron transport time in the photoanode, the intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) is performed under standard conditions. Our obtained results can help to develop a simple and effective method to enhance the efficiency in the QDSSCs.

  11. Room temperature chemical bath deposition of cadmium selenide, cadmium sulfide and cadmium sulfoselenide thin films with novel nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHyde, Cephas A.; Sartale, S. D.; Patil, Jayant M.; Ghoderao, Karuna P.; Sawant, Jitendra P.; Kale, Rohidas B.

    2015-10-01

    A simple, convenient and low cost chemical synthesis route has been used to deposit nanostructured cadmium sulfide, selenide and sulfoselenide thin films at room temperature. The films were deposited on glass substrates, using cadmium acetate as cadmium ion and sodium selenosulfate/thiourea as a selenium/sulfur ion sources. Aqueous ammonia was used as a complex reagent and also to adjust the pH of the final solution. The as-deposited films were uniform, well adherent to the glass substrate, specularly reflective and red/yellow in color depending on selenium and sulfur composition. The X-ray diffraction pattern of deposited cadmium selenide thin film revealed the nanocrystalline nature with cubic phase; cadmium sulfide revealed mixture of cubic along with hexagonal phase and cadmium sulfoselenide thin film were grown with purely hexagonal phase. The morphological observations revealed the growth and formation of interesting one, two and three-dimensional nanostructures. The band gap of thin films was calculated and the results are reported.

  12. Vertical growth of cadmium sulfide crystals on a silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    The results of the technological and microscopy studies of the mechanisms of the vertical growth of cadmium sulfide crystals during vacuum synthesis from the vapor phase were reported. Whisker crystals with a diameter from 10 nm to a few micrometers and with a length of dozens of millimeters can be grown by the vacuum vapor phase synthesis in a quasi-closed volume. The results of studies are satisfactorily explained in terms of the classical vapor-liquid-crystal model. The SEM micrographs are presented.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of cadmium sulfide clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Joswig, J.O.; Springborg, M.; Seifert, G.

    2000-03-30

    Crystalline cadmium sulfide is a semiconductor for which the wurtzite and zinc blend structures are energetically almost degenerate. Due to quantum-confinement effects, it is possible to tune the optical properties of finite cadmium sulfide clusters by varying their size. The authors report results of a theoretical study devoted to the properties of stoichiometric Cd{sub n}S{sub n} clusters as a function of their size n. The authors have optimized the structure, whereby the initial structures are spherical parts of either of the two crystal structures, and have studied systems with up to almost 200 atoms. The calculations were performed by using a simplified LCAO-DFT-LDA scheme. The results include the structure, electronic energy levels (in particular the frontier orbitals HOMO and LUMO), and stability as a function of size. The results allow for a unique definition of a surface region. The Mulliken populations indicate that the bonds within this region are more ionic than in the bulk. Furthermore, whereas the HOMO is delocalized over major parts of the nanoparticle, the LUMO is a surface state, which confirms recent experimental findings. Finally, the relative stability of the zinc blend and wurtzite structures is strongly dependent on the size of the system, and there is a close connection between the HOMO-LUMO energy gap and stability.

  14. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  15. Cadmium Telluride, Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide Core/Shell, and Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide/Zinc Sulfide Core/Shell/Shell Quantum Dots Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yueran

    CdTe, CdTe/CdS core/shell, and CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs) are potential candidates for bio-imaging and solar cell applications because of some special physical properties in these nano materials. For example, the band gap energy of the bulk CdTe is about 1.5 eV, so that principally they can emit 790 nm light, which is in the near-infrared range (also called biological window). Moreover, theoretically hot exciton generated by QDs is possible to be caught since the exciton relaxation process in QDs is slower than in bulk materials due to the large intraband energy gap in QDs. In this dissertation, we have synthesized the CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs, characterized their structure, and analyzed their photophysical properties. We used organometallic methods to synthesize the CdTe QDs in a noncoordinating solvent. To avoid being quenched by air, ligands, solvent, or other compounds, CdS shell was successfully deposited on the CdTe QDs by different methods, including the slow injection method, the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, and thermal-cycling coupled single precursor method (TC-SP). Our final product, quasi-type- II CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were able to emit at 770 nm with a fluorescence quantum yield as high as 70%. We also tried to deposit a second shell ZnS on CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs since some compounds can quench CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs. Even though different methods were used to deposit ZnS shell on the CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs, CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs still can be quenched. Furthermore, the CdTe/CdS core/shell and CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs were transferred into aqueous phase, phosphate buffered saline or deionized water, by switching the hydrophilic ligands (thiol or PEG ligands). The thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs can be kept in aqueous phase with high fluorescence quantum yield (60%--70%) for more than two months. However, some other compounds in organic or

  16. Photo-enhanced field electron emission of cadmium sulfide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinling; Lv, Yinghua; Liu, Ning; Li, Yanqing; Gao, Peng; Bai, Xuedong

    2011-11-01

    The response of field electron emission of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires (NWs) to visible light has been investigated. It is found that, upon light illumination, the turn-on voltage drops, emission current increases obviously, and the Fowler-Nordheim behavior deviates from a straight line. A process of field emission coupled with semiconducting properties of CdS NWs is proposed. Photon-excited electron transition from the valence band to the conductance band of CdS nanowires increases the quantity of emitting electrons, and the photoemission decreases the effective work function of CdS emitters, which largely enhances the field emission performance. The response of field emission of CdS NWs to light illumination suggests an approach for tuning field emission of semiconductor emitters.

  17. In situ synthesis of binary cobalt-ruthenium nanofiber alloy counter electrode for electrolyte-free cadmium sulfide quantum dot solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Nan; Ren, Lei; Sun, Weifu; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Qing; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Wei, Taihuei; Li, Qinghua

    2015-06-01

    A facile, low-cost and low-temperature fabrication approach of counter electrode is essential for pursuing robust photovoltaic devices. Herein, we develop a hydrothermal in situ growth of Cobalt-Ruthenium (Co-Ru) alloy nanofiber electrode for quantum dot solar cell (QDSC) applications. Colloidal CdS QDs with tunable absorption band edge are synthesized and used as light absorber. After optimizing the QDs with the highest photoluminescence quantum yield accompanied by considerable solar light absorption ability, QDSC based on Co-Ru alloy electrode delivers a much higher power conversion efficiency than its counterparts, i.e., either pure Co or Ru metal electrodes. In detail, Co-Ru alloy electrode exhibits high specific area, excellent electrical behavior, intimate interface contact, and good stability, thus leading to notable improved device performances. The impressive robust function of Co-Ru alloy with simple manufacturing procedure highlights its potential applications in robust QDSCs.

  18. Effect of temperature and illumination of streamer discharges in cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gladyshchuk, A.A.; Gurskii, A.L.; Parashchuk, V.V.; Yablonskii, G.P.

    1986-12-01

    The excitation conditions, the orientation, the radiation spectra of streamer discharges and the effect of laser illumination and temperature on the properties of streamers in cadmium sulfide single crystals has appeared in previous studies. Light generation in CdSe single crystals and in the mixed compounds CdS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/ was obtained with streamer excitation through detailed information on the crystallographic orientation of the streamers and radiation spectra of these crystals. In this paper, the authors present new data on the effect of the temperature and illumination in the region 77-520/sup 0/K on the probability of excitation and the orientation of streamer discharges in cadmium sulfide crystals; the characteristic features of excitation, orientation, and luminescence spectra of streamer discharges in CdS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/. The crystals were illuminated with radiation from an incandescent lamp with controllable intensity in the spectral range 560-580 nm and by impulsive radiation from an LGT-21 nitrogen laser (wavelength = 337.1 nm and I/sub e/ = 30 kW/cm/sup 2/. The resistivity of the crystalline plates as a function of the illumination intensity was determined from measurements of the photoconductivity. The streamer illumination of the discharge was separated from the illumination background by interference light filters.

  19. Titanium Dioxide/Upconversion Nanoparticles/Cadmium Sulfide Nanofibers Enable Enhanced Full-Spectrum Absorption for Superior Solar Light Driven Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu; Zhang, Chuan-Ling; Wang, Wan-Ni; Cong, Huai-Ping; Qian, Hai-Sheng

    2016-06-22

    In this work, we demonstrate an electrospinning technique to fabricate TiO2 /upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs)/CdS nanofibers on large scale. In addition, the as-prepared TiO2 nanofibers are incorporated with a high population of UCNPs and CdS nanospheres; this results in Förster resonance energy-transfer configurations of the UCNPs, TiO2 , and CdS nanospheres that are in close proximity. Hence, strong fluorescent emissions for the Tm(3+) ions including the (1) G4 →(3) H6 transition are efficiently transferred to TiO2 and the CdS nanoparticles through an energy-transfer process. The as-prepared TiO2 /UCNPs/CdS nanofibers exhibit full-spectrum solar-energy absorption and enable the efficient degradation of organic dyes by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the UCNPs and TiO2 (or CdS). The UCNPs/TiO2 /CdS nanofibers may also have enhanced energy-transfer efficiency for wide applications in solar cells, bioimaging, photodynamics, and chemotherapy.

  20. Experimental simulations of sulfide formation in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Lauretta, D S; Lodders, K; Fegley, B

    1997-07-18

    Sulfurization of meteoritic metal in H2S-H2 gas produced three different sulfides: monosulfide solid solution [(Fe,Ni)1-xS], pentlandite [(Fe,Ni)9-xS8], and a phosphorus-rich sulfide. The composition of the remnant metal was unchanged. These results are contrary to theoretical predictions that sulfide formation in the solar nebula produced troilite (FeS) and enriched the remaining metal in nickel. The experimental sulfides are chemically and morphologically similar to sulfide grains in the matrix of the Alais (class CI) carbonaceous chondrite, suggesting that these meteoritic sulfides may be condensates from the solar nebula.

  1. 3.88% efficient tin sulfide solar cells using congruent thermal evaporation.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Vera; Jaramillo, R; Hartman, Katy; Chakraborty, Rupak; Brandt, Riley E; Poindexter, Jeremy R; Lee, Yun Seog; Sun, Leizhi; Polizzotti, Alexander; Park, Helen Hejin; Gordon, Roy G; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2014-11-26

    Tin sulfide (SnS), as a promising absorber material in thin-film photovoltaic devices, is described. Here, it is confirmed that SnS evaporates congruently, which provides facile composition control akin to cadmium telluride. A SnS heterojunction solar cell is demons trated, which has a power conversion efficiency of 3.88% (certified), and an empirical loss analysis is presented to guide further performance improvements.

  2. A Satellite Borne Cadmium Sulfide Total Corpuscular Energy Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John W.

    1961-01-01

    The properties of single crystals of cadmium sulfide as radiation detectors are described. It has been found possible to select crystals such that: (a) The ratio of increase of conductivity under irradiation to the rate of absorption of energy in the crystal is substantially independent of particle energy (over the examined ranges of 500 ev to 80 kev for electrons and 5 kev to 180 kev for protons) and of the magnitude of energy flux (over the range from.005 to 10 ergs/cm(sup 2 -sec); and (b) The above ration is substantially the same for protons, electrons, alpha particles, x-rays, and gamma-rays. For a driving voltage of 100 volts, typical crystal yield currents of 10(sup -7) to 10(sup- 6) amperes for each erg/cm(sup 2-sec) of energy absorbed by the crystal. The threshold of such crystal detectors (resulting from dark currents of the order of 10(sup 10 amp) is typically 10(sup -3) ergs/cm(sup 2- sec). For the selected crystals a response-temperature coefficient of -0.25% per degree centigrade is found for the temperature range -50 deg C to + 50 deg C. A description is given of a complete CdS total corpuscular energy detector for the study of geomagnetically trapped radiation by means of a satellite. The detector described has a dynamic range great than 10(sup 4), a solid angle of 10(exp -3) steradian, and a detection threshold of approximately 1 erg/cm(sup 2-sec-sterad). A similar detector employing a small magnet for the selective exclusion of electrons is also described. Noteworthy practical features of these detectors for satellite and space probe experiments are: (a) Use of bare crystals, without covering foils, in order to detect charged particles having energies as low as hundreds of electron volts. (b) Simplicity of electronic auxiliaries. (c) Compactness, lightweight and nechanical ruggedness. (d) Low electrical power requirements; and (e) Conversion of conduction current to the rate of a twostate relaxation oscillator in order to facilitate telemetric

  3. Biexciton in nanosystem of quantum dots of cadmium sulfide in a dielectric matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokutnii, S. I.

    2016-11-01

    A significant increase in the binding energy of the singlet ground state of biexciton (of spatially separated electrons and holes) in a nanosystem that consists of CdS quantum dots grown in a borosilicate glass matrix has been predicted; the effect is almost two orders of magnitude larger than the binding energy of biexciton in a sulfide cadmium single crystal.

  4. Release of dissolved cadmium and sulfur nanoparticles from oxidizing sulfide minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium enrichment (relative to Fe and Zn) in paddy rice grain occurs during the pre-harvest drainage of flooded soil, which causes oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals present in reduced soil. We investigated this process over a range of environmentally realistic Cdcontain...

  5. Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaney, W. E.; Mickelsen, R. A.; Chen, W. S.; Stanbery, B. J.; Stewart, J. M.; Lytle, F. W.; Burnett, A. F.

    1987-11-01

    This is the final technical progress report on a thirty-two month research program on CuInSe2 and CuInGaSe2 based thin-film polycrystalline heterojunction solar cells. CuInGaSe2 films incorporating Ga fractions (x in CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2) from 0.04 to 1.0 have been prepared and characterized. CuInGaSe2/CdZnS heterojunction devices have been fabricated for a range of Ga contents and show the expected variations in Voc and spectral response with Ga content. An efficiency of 10.2 percent (SERI test, ASTM87) has been measured for a cell with Ga fraction of 0.23, the highest efficiency reported for this material. A CuInSe2/CdZnS monolithically interconnected four cell series string of 91 sq cm area has been fabricated with a total area efficiency of 9.5 percent (SERI test, ASTM87). Results are presented on Ion-Assisted Deposition of the selenide and sulfide, on a new design for the Se evaporation source, on ITO reactive sputter deposition, and on CdZnS films prepared from an E-Gun Evaporation source. Spectral response and I-V characteristic variations with selenide composition before and after heat-treatment are discussed for the CuInSe2/CdZnS devices. The highest AM1 total area efficiency for the CuInSe2/CdZnS cell is now 11.9 percent (Boeing test, AM1 spectrum) with five cells measured over the previously reported high of 10.9 percent. Room Temperature Photoluminescence, Voltage Contrast Imaging of junction cross sections, Raman spectroscopy, and EXAFS measurements on the CuInSe2/CdZnS devices are also presented and discussed.

  6. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems.

  7. Investigation of annealing temperature effect on magnetron sputtered cadmium sulfide thin film properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, E.; Ghorannevis, Z.; Abbasi, F.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films are deposited on the fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrate using the radio frequency magnetron sputtering setup. The effects of annealing in air on the structural, morphological, and optical properties of CdS thin film are studied. Optimal annealing temperature is investigated by annealing the CdS thin film at different annealing temperatures of 300, 400, and 500 °C. Thin films of CdS are characterized by X-ray diffractometer analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer and four point probe. The as-grown CdS films are found to be polycrystalline in nature with a mixture of cubic and hexagonal phases. By increasing the annealing temperature to 500 °C, CdS film showed cubic phase, indicating the phase transition of CdS. It is found from physical characterizations that the heat treatment in air increased the mean grain size, the transmission, and the surface roughness of the CdS thin film, which are desired to the application in solar cells as a window layer material.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide modulates cadmium-induced physiological and biochemical responses to alleviate cadmium toxicity in rice

    PubMed Central

    Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Rahman, Anisur; Ansary, Md. Mesbah Uddin; Watanabe, Ayaka; Fujita, Masayuki; Phan Tran, Lam-Son

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the physiological and biochemical mechanisms by which H2S mitigates the cadmium stress in rice. Results revealed that cadmium exposure resulted in growth inhibition and biomass reduction, which is correlated with the increased uptake of cadmium and depletion of the photosynthetic pigments, leaf water contents, essential minerals, water-soluble proteins, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Excessive cadmium also potentiated its toxicity by inducing oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased levels of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde. However, elevating endogenous H2S level improved physiological and biochemical attributes, which was clearly observed in the growth and phenotypes of H2S-treated rice plants under cadmium stress. H2S reduced cadmium-induced oxidative stress, particularly by enhancing redox status and the activities of reactive oxygen species and methylglyoxal detoxifying enzymes. Notably, H2S maintained cadmium and mineral homeostases in roots and leaves of cadmium-stressed plants. By contrast, adding H2S-scavenger hypotaurine abolished the beneficial effect of H2S, further strengthening the clear role of H2S in alleviating cadmium toxicity in rice. Collectively, our findings provide an insight into H2S-induced protective mechanisms of rice exposed to cadmium stress, thus proposing H2S as a potential candidate for managing toxicity of cadmium, and perhaps other heavy metals, in rice and other crops. PMID:26361343

  9. Spectroscopically characterized cadmium sulfide quantum dots lengthening the lag phase of Escherichia coli growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiganesh, T.; Daisy Vimala Rani, J.; Girigoswami, Agnishwar

    2012-06-01

    The present study reports the effect of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots on the life cycle of Escherichia coli. CdS quantum dots were synthesized by pH sensitive organochemical route using cadmium chloride and sodium sulfide as precursors and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as capping agent. It is observed that varying concentration of MPA leads to the production of different sized quantum dots with inverse proportionality and increment in the fluorescence quantum yield. The investigation also shows that CdS quantum dots have no antibacterial activity except it delays the log phase growth of bacteria in terms of size of the particles. The largest synthesized particles significantly elongate the lag phase growth.

  10. Enhanced photoluminescence from ordered arrays of cadmium sulfide nanotubes synthesized using nanoscale chemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Arthur

    2014-06-01

    We report enhanced room temperature photoluminescence from ordered arrays of few micrometers long cadmium sulfide nanotubes fabricated using 'nanoscale chemical reactors' of porous alumina by a unique two-chamber synthesis without using any surfactants. Photoluminescence from these nanotubes is -20 times larger than that of nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide particles prepared by bulk mixing of the same reactants. However, we rule out any quantum size effect as a source of enhanced photoluminescence from these intentionally un-passivated nanotubes. We identify sulfur deficiency in these nanotubes and directional orientation of these ordered nanotube arrays as the main reason for its superior photoluminescence as compared to agglomerated nanocrystallites of CdS prepared by bulk mixing.

  11. Characterization of biological iron sulfide composites and its application in the treatment of cadmium-contaminated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Xie, Yifei; Li, Xudong

    2015-03-01

    A strain of sulfate reducing bacteria, which could generate biological iron sulfide composites, was applied for Cd (II) removal from wastewater. The influence of biological iron sulfide composites dosage, initial pH and temperature on the rate of Cd (II) removal from wastewater by biological iron sulfide composites were investigated. The microscopic morphological characteristics and elemental composition changes of the biological iron sulfide before and after treatment was compared, using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry, then the mechanism of Cd (II) removal was explored. The results showed that Cd (II) reduction rate increased with increase in dosage of biological iron sulfide composites and initial temperature. At 25 degrees C, pH 4.0, with dosage of sulfide and cadmium ions molar equal to 99.93% Cd (II) was removed from cadmium wastewater (100 mg l(-1)), and the residual concentration of cadmium reached Chinese Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996). The present study revealed that bio- precipitation of FeS, the main component of biological iron sulfide composites, played leading role in the process of Cd (II) reduction. Therefore, it is prospective to apply biological iron sulfide composites in the emergency treatment of cadmium-contaminated wastewater.

  12. Acid-volatile sulfide as a factor mediating cadmium and nickel bioavailability in contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Phipps, G.L.; Leonard, E.L.; Benoit, D.A.; Mattson, V.R.

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigated the influence of sulfide, measured as acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), on the bioavailability of cadmium and nickel in sediments. Seventeen samples from an estuarine system heavily contaminated with cadmium and nickel were analyzed for AVS and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) and tested in 10-d exposures with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. Molar SEM(cadmium + nickel)/AVS ratios in the sediments ranged from less than one to greater than 200, with several in the range of 1 to 10. Samples with SEM/AVS ratios greater than one were consistently toxic to Hyalella azteca, whereas sediments with ratios less than one were not. Lumbriculus variegatus was less sensitive to the test sediments than Hyalella azteca, which was consistent with their relative sensitivity to cadmium and nickel in water-only exposures. SEM/AVS ratios in the sediments also appeared to be important in determining bioaccumulation of metals by Lumbriculus variegatus. These results support other studies with metal-spiked samples in demonstrating the importance of AVS in determining metal bioavailability in sediments and suggest that AVS normalization is a reasonable means for assessing the hazard of some sediment-associated metals to aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles by Chemical Precipitation Method.

    PubMed

    Devi, R Aruna; Latha, M; Velumani, S; Oza, Goldie; Reyes-Figueroa, P; Rohini, M; Becerril-Juarez, I G; Lee, Jae-Hyeong; Yi, Junsin

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical precipitation method using cadmium chloride (CdCl2), sodium sulfide (Na2S) and water as a solvent by varying temperatures from 20-80 degrees C. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and UV-Visible spectroscopy. XRD pattern revealed cubic crystal structure for all the synthesized CdS nanoparticles. Raman spectra showed first and second order longitudinal optical (LO) phonon vibrational modes of CdS. The size of CdS nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 15-80 nm by FE-SEM analysis, in all cases. The atomic percentage of cadmium and sulfur was confirmed to be 1:1 from EDS analysis. TEM micrograph depicts the spherical shape of the particles and the size is in the range of 15-85 nm while HR-TEM images of CdS nanoparticles exhibit well-resolved lattice fringes of the cubic structure of CdS. The optical properties of CdS were examined by UV-Visible spectroscopy which showed variation in absorption band from 460-480 nm. The band gap was calculated from the absorption edge and found to be in the range of 3.2-3.5 eV which is greater than the bulk CdS.

  14. Resonant photoactivation of cadmium sulfide and its effect on the surface chemical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giberti, Alessio; Fabbri, Barbara; Gaiardo, Andrea; Guidi, Vincenzo; Malagù, Cesare

    2014-06-01

    Photo-enhanced surface chemical activity of cadmium sulfide gives rise to a wide class of surface-dependent phenomena, such as heterogeneous photocatalysis, chemoresistivity, and chemiluminescence, which have several technological and scientific applications. In this work, the photochemical properties of nanostructured cadmium sulfide films are investigated by means of electrical conductance measurements in controlled atmosphere, while irradiated by light of wavelengths ranging from 400 to 645 nm. Chemisorption of benzene, carbon monoxide, methane, ethanol, and hydrogen sulfide onto CdS surface has been analyzed as a function of the wavelength, in a gas concentration range of the order of parts per million. It resulted that the increase of photoconductance with gas adsorption is resonant with the bandgap energy. It turns out that this resonant enhancement of the surface chemical activity can be of advantage for all the optical and chemical mechanisms that depend upon it. An interpretation of these results, in terms of electronic optical transitions and Fermi level shift induced by light, is proposed.

  15. The static structure and dynamics of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles within poly(styrene-block-isoprene) diblock copolymer melts

    DOE PAGES

    Jang, Woo -Sik; Koo, Peter; Bryson, Kyle; ...

    2015-12-20

    Here, the static structure and dynamic behavior of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles suspended in block copolymer matrix are investigated using transmission electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The transmission electron micro- scopy study shows that cadmium sulfide nanoparticles are preferentially segregated within the polyisoprene domain of a poly(styrene-block-isoprene) diblock copolymer. For the dynamics study, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy captures the relaxation process of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles. The measured characteristic relaxation time reveals that the observed dynamics are hyperdiffusive. The characteristic velocity and corresponding activation energy, which are hallmarks of a hyperdiffusive system, are determined from the relationshipmore » between the characteristic relaxation time and the wavevector.« less

  16. The static structure and dynamics of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles within poly(styrene-block-isoprene) diblock copolymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Woo -Sik; Koo, Peter; Bryson, Kyle; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec R.; Russell, Thomas P.; Mochrie, Simon G.

    2015-12-20

    Here, the static structure and dynamic behavior of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles suspended in block copolymer matrix are investigated using transmission electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The transmission electron micro- scopy study shows that cadmium sulfide nanoparticles are preferentially segregated within the polyisoprene domain of a poly(styrene-block-isoprene) diblock copolymer. For the dynamics study, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy captures the relaxation process of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles. The measured characteristic relaxation time reveals that the observed dynamics are hyperdiffusive. The characteristic velocity and corresponding activation energy, which are hallmarks of a hyperdiffusive system, are determined from the relationship between the characteristic relaxation time and the wavevector.

  17. Cadmium sulfide nanocluster-based electrochemical stripping detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ningning; Zhang, Aiping; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2003-03-01

    A novel, sensitive electrochemical DNA hybridization detection assay, using cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoclusters as the oligonucleotide labeling tag, is described. The assay relies on the hybridization of the target DNA with the CdS nanocluster oligonucleotide DNA probe, followed by the dissolution of the CdS nanoclusters anchored on the hybrids and the indirect determination of the dissolved cadmium ions by sensitive anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) at a mercury-coated glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that only a complementary sequence could form a double-stranded dsDNA-CdS with the DNA probe and give an obvious electrochemical response. A three-base mismatch sequence and non-complementary sequence had negligible response. The combination of the large number of cadmium ions released from each dsDNA hybrid with the remarkable sensitivity of the electrochemical stripping analysis for cadmium at mercury-film GCE allows detection at levels as low as 0.2 pmol L(-1) of the complementary sequence of DNA.

  18. Some aspects of optical feedback with cadmium sulfide and related photoconductors. [for extended frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    A primary limitation of many solid state photoconductors used in electro-optical systems is their slow response in converting varying light intensities into electrical signals. An optical feedback technique is presented which can extend the frequency response of systems that use these detectors by orders of magnitude without adversely affecting overall signal-to-noise ratio performance. The technique is analyzed to predict the improvement possible and a system is implemented using cadmium sulfide to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique and the validity of the analysis.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of luminescent cadmium selenide/zinc selenide/zinc sulfide cholinomimetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Gégout, Claire; McAtee, Maria L; Bennett, Nichole M; Viranga Tillekeratne, L M; Kirchhoff, Jon R

    2012-08-07

    Luminescent quantum dots conjugated with highly selective molecular recognition ligands are widely used for targeting and imaging biological structures. In this paper, water soluble cholinomimetic cadmium selenide (core), zinc selenide/zinc sulfide (shell) quantum dots were synthesized for targeting cholinergic sites. Cholinomimetic specificity was incorporated by conjugation of the quantum dots to an aminated analogue of hemicholinium-15, a well known competitive inhibitor of the high affinity choline uptake transporter. Detailed evaluation of the nanocrystal synthesis and characterization of the final product was conducted by (1)H and (31)P NMR, absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Optical and electrical properties of inverted emulsions based on sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate containing cadmium sulfide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyaeva, O. A.; Poshelyuzhnaya, E. G.; Shubenkova, E. G.; Trenikhin, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    The optical and electrical properties of inverted emulsions based on sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) containing nanoparticles of cadmium sulfide are studied. The particle size of the synthesized samples is determined from UV spectroscopy data. The state of solubilized water in invert emulsions is found to change in the presence of cadmium sulfide due to the formation of aqua complexes. The shape of AOT micelles and the structures formed by drying the invert AOT emulsions are shown to be affected by the degree of hydration and the solubilization of CdS particles.

  1. Rectification effect in poly- p-xylylene-cadmium sulfide graded nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, P. V.; Grigor'ev, E. I.; Zav'yalov, S. A.; Chvalun, S. N.

    2012-11-01

    The hybrid poly- p-xylylene-cadmium sulfide nanocomposites characterized by gradients of concentrations and sizes of CdS nanoparticles along the lines of an applied electric field have been synthesized using the vapor deposition polymerization in an inhomogeneous electric field. The maximum concentration of cadmium sulfide can exceed 10 vol %, while the average effective sizes of the nanoparticles depend on the concentration and do not exceed 5 nm. The synthesized thin-film nanocomposites exhibit a quantum confinement effect. According to the estimates obtained from the shift of the absorption band edge, the radius of nanoparticles is 2.7 nm near the negative electrode and 3.5 nm near the positive electrode. It has been found that the sample formed in an electric field of 10 kV/cm manifests a rectification effect, which can be associated with the gradient of nanoparticle sizes. The measurements of current-voltage characteristics and photoconductivity have demonstrated that the synthesized samples possess high photoconductivity. The photocurrent in the sample prepared in an electric field of 10 kV/cm can exceed the dark current by two orders of magnitude, and the rectification effect in this case disappears.

  2. Morphology and thermal studies of zinc sulfide and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuntokun, Jejenija; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    Zn(II) and Cd(II) metal complexes of 1-cyano-1-carboethoxyethylene-2,2-dithiolato-κS,S'-bis(N,N-dimethylthiourea-κS) have been synthesized and characterized with analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were thermolysed in hexadecylamine at 200 °C to prepare ZnS and CdS nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD). TEM images showed spherically shaped nanoparticles, whose sizes are in the range 4.33-7.21 nm for ZnS and 4.95-7.7 nm CdS respectively and XRD confirmed cubic crystalline phases for the nanoparticles. The optical band gap energy evaluated from the absorption spectra are 2.88 eV (430 nm) and 2.81 eV (440 nm) for the ZnS and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The as-prepared metal sulfide nanoparticles were further incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to give ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA composites. The polymer nanocomposites were studied to investigate their morphology and thermal properties relative to the pure PVA. XRD diffractions indicated that the crystalline phases of the nanoparticles and the sizes in PVA matrices remained unaltered. Infra-red spectra studies revealed interactions between the PVA and the metal sulfide nanoparticles and TGA studies show that the ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA nanocomposites exhibit better thermal stability than the pure PVA.

  3. Aerobic transformation of cadmium through metal sulfide biosynthesis in photosynthetic microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cadmium is a non-essential metal that is toxic because of its interference with essential metals such as iron, calcium and zinc causing numerous detrimental metabolic and cellular effects. The amount of this metal in the environment has increased dramatically since the advent of the industrial age as a result of mining activities, the use of fertilizers and sewage sludge in farming, and discharges from manufacturing activities. The metal bioremediation utility of phototrophic microbes has been demonstrated through their ability to detoxify Hg(II) into HgS under aerobic conditions. Metal sulfides are generally very insoluble and therefore, biologically unavailable. Results When Cd(II) was exposed to cells it was bioconverted into CdS by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and the cyanobacterium, Synechoccocus leopoliensis. Supplementation of the two eukaryotic algae with extra sulfate, but not sulfite or cysteine, increased their cadmium tolerances as well as their abilities to produce CdS, indicating an involvement of sulfate assimilation in the detoxification process. However, the combined activities of extracted serine acetyl-transferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL) used to monitor sulfate assimilation, was not significantly elevated during cell treatments that favored sulfide biosynthesis. It is possible that the prolonged incubation of the experiments occurring over two days could have compensated for the low rates of sulfate assimilation. This was also the case for S. leopoliensis where sulfite and cysteine as well as sulfate supplementation enhanced CdS synthesis. In general, conditions that increased cadmium sulfide production also resulted in elevated cysteine desulfhydrase activities, strongly suggesting that cysteine is the direct source of sulfur for CdS synthesis. Conclusions Cadmium(II) tolerance and CdS formation were significantly enhanced by sulfate supplementation, thus

  4. Studies of Sputtered Cadmium Telluride and Cadmium Selenide Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Dohyoung

    CdTe has recently become the most commercially successful polycrystalline thinfilm solar module material. Its low cost, large-area solar module is reshaping the silicondominated solar panel market; however, CdTe has much room to improve and thus more fundamental understanding is needed. Current thin film solar cell research is focused on two areas: One is identifying loss mechanisms and understanding the polycrystalline nature of single junction device to improve device performance. Another is searching for new materials and fabricating tandem solar cells. In this study, along with other people's work to improve the efficiency of CdTe solar module, I studied loss mechanism and growth mode of CdTe solar cells to have fundamental understanding of polycrystalline films. In addition to that, in an effort to make tandem solar cells, I fabricated and characterized CdSe solar cells, which is considered as an ideal candidate for the top cell with its band gap of 1.7 eV. This dissertation is designed to show similarities and differences between CdTe and CdSe solar cells, side by side. After the introduction (Chapter1), I will review the physical properties of CdTe and CdSe solar cells (Chapter 2). Two primary tools to study defects and surface morphology were photoluminescence (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). PL showed information on the crystallinity and defects of CdTe and CdSe films before and after annealing.(Chapter 3). AFM measurements and their analysis using scaling theory revealed information on the growth modes of CdTe and CdSe films.(Chapter 4). With the goal of exploring suitability for tandem structures with ˜1.7 eV top cell and ˜1.1 eV bottom cell, I fabricated and characterized single-junction CdSe devices. (Chapter 5) In addition, for the bottom cell I fabricated HgCdTe cells with Eg˜1.1 eV. Single junction HgCdTe and two-terminal CdTe/HgCdTe tandem solar cells were fabricated and characterized. (Chapter 5)

  5. Charge Carrier Processes in Photovoltaic Materials and Devices: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots and Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Paul

    Charge separation, transport, and recombination represent fundamental processes for electrons and holes in semiconductor photovoltaic devices. Here, two distinct materials systems, based on lead sulfide quantum dots and on polycrystalline cadmium telluride, are investigated to advance the understanding of their fundamental nature for insights into the material science necessary to improve the technologies. Lead sulfide quantum dots QDs have been of growing interest in photovoltaics, having recently produced devices exceeding 10% conversion efficiency. Carrier transport via hopping through the quantum dot thin films is not only a function of inter-QD distance, but of the QD size and dielectric media of the surrounding materials. By conducting temperature dependent transmission, photoluminescence, and time resolved photoluminescence measurements, we gain insight into photoluminescence quenching and size-dependent carrier transport through QD ensembles. Turning to commercially relevant cadmium telluride (CdTe), we explore the high concentrations of self-compensating defects (donors and acceptors) in polycrystalline thin films via photoluminescence from recombination at defect sites. Low temperature (25 K) photoluminescence measurements of CdTe reveal numerous radiative transitions due to exciton, trap assisted, and donor-acceptor pair recombination events linked with various defect states. Here we explore the difference between films deposited via close space sublimation (CSS) and radio frequency magnetron sputtering, both as-grown and following a cadmium chloride treatment. The as-grown CSS films exhibited a strong donor-acceptor pair transition associated with deep defect states. Constructing photoluminescence spectra as a function of time from time-resolved photoluminescence data, we report on the temporal evolution of this donor-acceptor transition. Having gained insight into the cadmium telluride film quality from low temperature photoluminescence measurements

  6. A sonochemical method for the preparation of cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide nanoparticles in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Kristl, Matjaz; Ban, Irena; Danc, Anita; Danc, Valerija; Drofenik, Miha

    2010-06-01

    Sonochemistry is a branch of chemistry where sound energy in the form of ultrasound is used to influence the course of reactions. A short-term, local increase in temperature occurs when the solutions and suspensions are irradiated by ultrasound. This happens because the substance absorbs the ultrasound waves. The purpose of this research was the synthesis of CdS and CdSe nanoparticles. We used cadmium sulfate hydrate (CdSO(4).8/3H(2)O), elemental S and Se. Aqueous solutions of NaOH, Na(2)SO(3) and EDTA were used as the solvents. During the syntheses, we used a direct immersion ultrasound probe by vibracell. The device operates with a constant frequency of 20 kHz, with the possibility to change the amplitude and with it the input of energy to the time unit. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermal analyses (TGA, SDTA) and TEM analyses.

  7. The synthesis of cadmium sulfide nanoplatelets using a novel continuous flow sonochemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Palanisamy, Barath; Paul, Brian; Chang, Chih -hung

    2015-01-21

    A continuous flow sonochemical reactor was developed capable of producing metastable cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoplatelets with thicknesses at or below 10 nm. The continuous flow sonochemical reactor included the passive in-line micromixing of reagents prior to sonochemical reaction. Synthesis results were compared with those from reactors involving batch conventional heating and batch ultrasound-induced heating. The continuous sonochemical synthesis was found to result in high aspect ratio hexagonal platelets of CdS possessing cubic crystal structures with thicknesses well below 10 nm. The unique shape and crystal structure of the nanoplatelets are suggestive of high localized temperatures within the sonochemical process. As a result, the particle size uniformity and product throughput are much higher for the continuous sonochemical process in comparison to the batch sonochemical process and conventional synthesis processes.

  8. The Potential Application of Raw Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles as CT Photographic Developer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiang; Huang, Lingxin; Li, Zhan; An, Wenzhen; Liu, Dan; Lin, Jin; Tian, Longlong; Wang, Xinling; Liu, Bo; Qi, Wei; Wu, Wangsuo

    2016-12-01

    With the development of science and technology, new applications about nanoparticles should be explored to achieve full-scale knowledge. Therefore, in this work, the toxicity and potential application of raw cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS) in vivo were further studied through ICP-OES and CTs. Surprisingly, CdS exhibited an excellent photographic property, except for finding the accumulation of CdS in the lungs, liver, spleen, and kidney with a strong dependence on time; it is also found that there were a significant uptake in the pancreas for an obvious CT imaging. And the following investigations showed that the raw CdS could damage the tissues accumulating nanoparticles. Through this work, it can be seen that the raw CdS being modified might be an excellent photographic developer for detecting cancers or other diseases.

  9. The Potential Application of Raw Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles as CT Photographic Developer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Huang, Lingxin; Li, Zhan; An, Wenzhen; Liu, Dan; Lin, Jin; Tian, Longlong; Wang, Xinling; Liu, Bo; Qi, Wei; Wu, Wangsuo

    2016-04-01

    With the development of science and technology, new applications about nanoparticles should be explored to achieve full-scale knowledge. Therefore, in this work, the toxicity and potential application of raw cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS) in vivo were further studied through ICP-OES and CTs. Surprisingly, CdS exhibited an excellent photographic property, except for finding the accumulation of CdS in the lungs, liver, spleen, and kidney with a strong dependence on time; it is also found that there were a significant uptake in the pancreas for an obvious CT imaging. And the following investigations showed that the raw CdS could damage the tissues accumulating nanoparticles. Through this work, it can be seen that the raw CdS being modified might be an excellent photographic developer for detecting cancers or other diseases.

  10. Chemical bath deposition of cadmium sulfide on graphene-coated flexible glass substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Won-Oh; Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Jiwan; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-03-31

    We demonstrate a flexible structure of cadmium sulfide (CdS) on graphene-coated glass substrate, where CdS was deposited by the chemical bath deposition method on defective tri-layer graphene. The defects in graphene, confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy, were created by a ultra-violet treatment with varying exposure time from 10 to 60 min. The number of defect sites in the graphene as a seed layer was related to the quality of the CdS thin films determined from the results from X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance, scanning electron microscopy, and room temperature micro-photoluminescence. Our film-on-substrate structure of CdS-graphene-on-glass was maintained up to a tensile strain of 0.3%, where graphene with a high failure strain was employed as a transparent conductive layer.

  11. In situ-synthesized cadmium sulfide nanowire photosensor with a parylene passivation layer for chemiluminescent immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Im, Ju-Hee; Kim, Hong-Rae; An, Byoung-Gi; Chang, Young Wook; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Tae-Geol; Son, Jin Gyeng; Park, Jae-Gwan; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2017-06-15

    The direct in situ synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires (NWs) was presented by direct synthesis of CdS NWs on the gold surface of an interdigitated electrode (IDE). In this work, we investigated the effect of a strong oxidant on the surfaces of the CdS NWs using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. We also fabricated a parylene-C film as a surface passivation layer for in situ-synthesized CdS NW photosensors and investigated the influence of the parylene-C passivation layer on the photoresponse during the coating of parylene-C under vacuum using a quartz crystal microbalance and a photoanalyzer. Finally, we used the in situ-synthesized CdS NW photosensor with the parylene-C passivation layer to detect the chemiluminescence of horseradish peroxidase and luminol and applied it to medical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

  12. The synthesis of cadmium sulfide nanoplatelets using a novel continuous flow sonochemical reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Palanisamy, Barath; Paul, Brian; Chang, Chih -hung

    2015-01-21

    A continuous flow sonochemical reactor was developed capable of producing metastable cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoplatelets with thicknesses at or below 10 nm. The continuous flow sonochemical reactor included the passive in-line micromixing of reagents prior to sonochemical reaction. Synthesis results were compared with those from reactors involving batch conventional heating and batch ultrasound-induced heating. The continuous sonochemical synthesis was found to result in high aspect ratio hexagonal platelets of CdS possessing cubic crystal structures with thicknesses well below 10 nm. The unique shape and crystal structure of the nanoplatelets are suggestive of high localized temperatures within the sonochemical process. Asmore » a result, the particle size uniformity and product throughput are much higher for the continuous sonochemical process in comparison to the batch sonochemical process and conventional synthesis processes.« less

  13. Structural and chemical properties of highly oriented cadmium sulfide (CdS) cauliflower films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, R. S.; Gullapalli, S. K.; Zubia, D.; McClure, J. C.; Ramana, C. V.

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) films have been produced by sputter-deposition varying the sputtering-power ( P) in the range of 60-120 W. The crystal structure, morphology and chemical quality of the CdS films has been investigated employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray spectrometry (EDS). Structural characterization indicates that all the CdS layers exhibit cauliflower morphology. Highly oriented, single phase hexagonal-CdS films can be produced at P = 75-105 W while the films at other power contain mixed phases. Characterization using XPS and EDS indicate that the CdS layers are nearly stoichiometric at P = 75-105 W, at which point S-deficiency is induced resulting in Cd-rich-CdS layers.

  14. Synthesis of cadmium sulfide Q particles in water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.D.; Bhargava, P.A.; Korgel, B.A.; Johnston, K.P.

    1999-09-28

    Semiconductor nanoparticles of cadmium sulfide were synthesized in ammonium perfluoropolyether (PFPE-NH{sub 4}) stabilized water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsions. The particle size was tuned by varying the water-to-surfactant molar ratio ({omega}{sub 0}): {omega}{sub 0} ratios of 5 and 10 yielded nanocrystals with exciton energies of 3.86 and 3.09 eV, corresponding to mean particle radii of 0.9 and 1.8 nm, respectively. These exciton energies are significantly higher than the bulk band gap energy for CdS (2.45 eV) due to quantum confinement effects. Effectively, {omega}{sub 0} controls the size of the compartmentalized water droplets in which the particles grow.

  15. Effects of Liquid Medium and Ablation Wavelength on the Properties of Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles Formed by Pulsed-Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    García Guillén, Grisel; Zuñiga Ibarra, Veronica Anahi; Mendivil Palma, Maria Isabel; Krishnan, Bindu; Avellaneda Avellaneda, David; Shaji, Sadasivan

    2016-11-03

    Pulsed-laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) is a green synthesis technique to obtain semiconductor nanomaterials in colloidal form. Herein, cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles were synthesized by the pulsed-laser ablation of a CdS target in different liquid media by using λ=532 and 1064 nm outputs from a pulsed (10 ns, 10 Hz) Nd:YAG laser at different ablation fluence values. The morphology, structure, crystalline phase, elemental composition, optical, and luminescent properties of CdS nanomaterials were analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. By changing the liquid medium and ablation wavelength, CdS nanoparticles with different morphology and size were formed, as demonstrated by using TEM analysis. The crystallinity and chemical states of the ablation products were confirmed by using XRD and XPS analyses. The optical bandgap of the CdS nanoparticles was dependent on the ablation wavelength and the fluence. These nanocolloids presented different green emissions, which implied the presence of several emission centers. CdS nanocolloids in distilled water catalyzed the photocatalytic decay of methylene blue dye under light irradiation from a solar simulator.

  16. Cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Final report, February 26, 1979-July 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J. A.; Cornog, D. G.

    1980-06-30

    Extensive modifications were made to the multi-source deposition apparatus. These include the installation of a larger vacuum chamber on the existing system. The new chamber provides improved inter-source shielding, an improved substrate mounting and heating system, and a vacuum interlock for introducing substrates. CdS resistivity control by both In doping and off-stoichiometric deposition has been investigated. Indium doping has been achieved both by diffusion from a pre-deposited In layer and by using In doped sputtering targets. Resistivities in the range 0.1 to 5 ..cap omega..-cm have been obtained for target doping levels of from 0.1 to 1 at. percent of In. These resistivities were found to be critically dependent on the H/sub 2/S injection rate, apparently because of compensation by Cd vacancies. Off-stoichiometry CdS coatings with solar-illuminated resistivities of about 10/sup 2/ ..cap omega..-cm have been deposited, using a cyclic reactive sputtering process were the H/sub 2/S injection is periodically switched on and off. The Cu/sub x/S deposition process was found to be sensitive to the period of cathode operation prior to coating deposition, probably because of the conditioning of cathode and shield surfaces. All-sputter-deposited Cd(Zn)S/Cu/sub 2/S cells, with Cd(Zn)S layers deposited using a Cd-0.10 Zn target doped with 2 atomic percent In, have yielded efficiencies of approx. 0.4%. All-sputtered cells with efficiencies of approx. 0.6% have been fabricated, using undoped CdS deposited by the pulse injection process. Efficiencies of approx. 1.2% have been achieved for cells with undoped sputter-deposited CdS and CuCl dry processed Cu/sub 2/S.

  17. Luminescent behavior of cadmium sulfide quantum dots for gallic acid estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suman; Garg, Sourav; Chahal, Jitender; Raheja, Khushboo; Singh, Deepak; Singla, M. L.

    2013-03-01

    Thioglycolic acid capped cadmium sulfide (CdS/T) quantum dots have been synthesized using wet chemistry and their optical behavior has been investigated using UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The role of the capping agent, sulfide source concentration, pH and temperature has been studied and discussed. Studies showed that alkaline pH leads to a decrease in the size of quantum dots and reflux temperature above 70 °C resulted in red-shift of emission spectra which is due to narrowing of the bandgap. Further, to reduce the toxicity and photochemical instability of quantum dots, the quantum dots have been functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG), which resulted in a 20% enhancement of the fluorescence intensity. The application potential of CdS/T-PEG quantum dots was further studied using gallic acid as a model compound. The sensing is based on fluorescence quenching of quantum dots in the presence of gallic acid, and this study showed linearity in the range from 1.3 × 10-8 to 46.5 × 10-8 mM, with a detection limit of 3.6 × 10-8 mM.

  18. Luminescent behavior of cadmium sulfide quantum dots for gallic acid estimation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suman; Garg, Sourav; Chahal, Jitender; Raheja, Khushboo; Singh, Deepak; Singla, M L

    2013-03-22

    Thioglycolic acid capped cadmium sulfide (CdS/T) quantum dots have been synthesized using wet chemistry and their optical behavior has been investigated using UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The role of the capping agent, sulfide source concentration, pH and temperature has been studied and discussed. Studies showed that alkaline pH leads to a decrease in the size of quantum dots and reflux temperature above 70 °C resulted in red-shift of emission spectra which is due to narrowing of the bandgap. Further, to reduce the toxicity and photochemical instability of quantum dots, the quantum dots have been functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG), which resulted in a 20% enhancement of the fluorescence intensity. The application potential of CdS/T-PEG quantum dots was further studied using gallic acid as a model compound. The sensing is based on fluorescence quenching of quantum dots in the presence of gallic acid, and this study showed linearity in the range from 1.3 × 10(-8) to 46.5 × 10(-8) mM, with a detection limit of 3.6 × 10(-8) mM.

  19. Surface modification of cadmium sulfide thin film honey comb nanostructures: Effect of in situ tin doping using chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, K. C.; Basheer Ahamed, M.

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanostructures possess large surface to volume ratio compared to their thin film counterpart, the complicated procedure that demands for the deposition on a substrate kept them back foot in device fabrication techniques. In this work, a honey comb like cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films nanostructure are deposited on glass substrates using simple chemical bath deposition technique at 65 °C. Energy band gaps, film thickness and shell size of the honey comb nanostructures are successfully controlled using tin (Sn) doping and number of shells per unit area is found to be maximum for 5% Sn doped (in the reaction mixture) sample. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption analysis showed that cadmium sulfide and cadmium hydroxide coexist in the samples. TEM measurements showed that CdS nanostructures are embedded in cadmium hydroxide just like "plum pudding". Persistent photoconductivity measurements of the samples are also carried out. The decay constants found to be increased with increases in Sn doping.

  20. Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Michael; Duarte, Fernanda; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa; Wang, Weining

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) solar cell is one of the most promising thin film solar cells and its highest efficiency has reached 21%. To keep improving the efficiency of CdTe solar cells, a few issues need to be addressed, one of which is the back contact. The back contact of CdTe solar cells are mostly Cu-base, and the problem with Cu-based back contact is that Cu diffuses into the grain boundary and into the CdS/CdTe junction, causing degradation problem at high temperature and under illumination. To continue improving the efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cells, a good ohmic back contact with high work function and long term stability is needed. In this work, we report our studies on the potential of conducting polymer being used as the back contact of CdTe/CdS solar cells. Conducting polymers are good candidates because they have high work functions and high conductivities, are easy to process, and cost less, meeting all the requirements of a good ohmic back contact for CdTe. In our studies, we used poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) with different conductivities and compared them with traditional Cu-based back contact. It was observed that the CdTe solar cell performance improves as the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS increase, and the efficiency (9.1%) is approaching those with traditional Cu/Au back contact (12.5%). Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact.

  1. Circular dichroism sensor based on cadmium sulfide quantum dots for chiral identification and detection of penicillamine.

    PubMed

    Ngamdee, Kessarin; Puangmali, Theerapong; Tuntulani, Thawatchai; Ngeontae, Wittaya

    2015-10-22

    A new chemical sensor based on the measuring of circular dichroism signal (CD) was fabricated from cysteamine capped cadmium sulfide quantum dots (Cys-CdS QDs). The chiral-thiol molecules, d-penicillamine (DPA) and l-penicillamine (LPA), were used to evaluate potentials of this sensor. Basically, DPA and LPA provide very low CD signals. However, the CD signals of DPA and LPA can be enhanced in the presence of Cys-CdS QDs. The CD spectra of DPA and LPA exhibited a mirror image profile. Parameters affecting the determination of DPA and LPA were thoroughly investigated in details. Under the optimized condition, the CD signals of DPA and LPA displayed a linear relationship with the concentrations of both enantiomers, ranging from 1 to 35 μM. Detection limits of this sensor were 0.49 and 0.74 μM for DPA and LPA, respectively. To demonstrate a potential application of this sensor, the proposed sensor was used to determine DPA and LPA in real urine samples. It was confirmed that the proposed detection technique was reliable and could be utilized in a broad range of applications.

  2. Fluorescence modulation of cadmium sulfide quantum dots by azobenzene photochromic switches.

    PubMed

    Javed, Hina; Fatima, Kalsoom; Akhter, Zareen; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif; Siddiq, Muhammad; Iqbal, Azhar

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated the attachment of azobenzene photochromic switches on the modified surface of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs). The modification of CdS QDs is done by varying the concentration of the capping agent (mercaptoacetic acid) and NH3 in order to control the size of the QDs. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the crystallite size of CdS QDs ranged from 6 to 10 nm. The azobenzene photochromic derivatives bis(4-hydroxybenzene-1-azo)4,4'(1,1' diphenylmethane) (I) and 4,4'-diazenyldibenzoic acid (II) were synthesized and attached with surface-modified CdS QDs to make fluorophore-photochrome CdS-(I) and CdS-(II) dyad assemblies. Upon UV irradiation, the photochromic compounds (I) and (II) undergo a reversible trans-cis isomerization. The photo-induced trans-cis transformation helps to transfer photo-excited electrons from the conduction band of the CdS QDs to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of cis isomer of photochromic compounds (I) and (II). As a result, the fluorescence of CdS-(I) and CdS-(II) dyads is suppressed approximately five times compared to bare CdS QDs. The fluorescence modulation in such systems could help to design luminescent probes for bioimaging applications.

  3. Direct electrochemical stripping detection of cystic-fibrosis-related DNA linked through cadmium sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Sergio; Merkoçi, Arben

    2009-02-01

    Electrochemical detection of a cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs)-DNA complex connected to paramagnetic microbeads (MB) was performed without the need for chemical dissolving. The method is based on dropping 20 µl of CdS QD-DNA-MB suspension on the surface of a screen-printed electrode. It is followed by magnetic collection on the surface of the working electrode and electrochemical detection using square-wave voltammetry (SWV), giving a well-shaped and sensitive analytical signal. A cystic-fibrosis-related DNA sequence was sandwiched between the two DNA probes. One DNA probe is linked via biotin-streptavidin bonding with MB and the other one via thiol groups with the CdS QD used as tags. Nonspecific signals of DNA were minimized using a blocking agent and the results obtained were successfully employed in a model DNA sensor with an interest in future applications in the clinical field. The developed nanoparticle biosensing system may offer numerous opportunities in other fields where fast, low cost and efficient detection of small volume samples is required.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide and proline cooperate to alleviate cadmium stress in foxtail millet seedlings.

    PubMed

    Tian, Baohua; Qiao, Zengjie; Zhang, Liping; Li, Hua; Pei, Yanxi

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and some functional amino acids in crops have been involved in the defense system against heavy-metal pollution. Here we report the relationships and functions of H2S and proline to cadmium (Cd) stress. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) pretreatment decreased the electrolytic leakage and the malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide contents while enhancing photosynthesis in Cd-treated seedlings. Furthermore, pretreatment with NaHS markedly exacerbated Cd-induced alterations in proline content, the activities of proline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) and proline dehydrogenase (PDH), and the transcript levels of P5CR and PDH. When endogenous H2S was scavenged or inhibited by various H2S modulators, the Cd-induced increase in endogenous proline was weakened. Combined pretreatment with H2S and proline was moderately higher in the Cd-stressed growth status, stomata movements and oxidative damage of seedlings compared to a single treatment with H2S or proline. These results suggest that H2S and proline cooperate to alleviate Cd-damage in foxtail millet.

  5. Direct electrochemical stripping detection of cystic-fibrosis-related DNA linked through cadmium sulfide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Marin, Sergio; Merkoçi, Arben

    2009-02-04

    Electrochemical detection of a cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs)-DNA complex connected to paramagnetic microbeads (MB) was performed without the need for chemical dissolving. The method is based on dropping 20 microl of CdS QD-DNA-MB suspension on the surface of a screen-printed electrode. It is followed by magnetic collection on the surface of the working electrode and electrochemical detection using square-wave voltammetry (SWV), giving a well-shaped and sensitive analytical signal. A cystic-fibrosis-related DNA sequence was sandwiched between the two DNA probes. One DNA probe is linked via biotin-streptavidin bonding with MB and the other one via thiol groups with the CdS QD used as tags. Nonspecific signals of DNA were minimized using a blocking agent and the results obtained were successfully employed in a model DNA sensor with an interest in future applications in the clinical field. The developed nanoparticle biosensing system may offer numerous opportunities in other fields where fast, low cost and efficient detection of small volume samples is required.

  6. An amperometric chloramphenicol immunosensor based on cadmium sulfide nanoparticles modified-dendrimer bonded conducting polymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Rahman, Md Aminur; Do, Minh Hien; Ban, Changill; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2010-03-15

    An amperometric chloramphenicol (CAP) immunosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilizing anti-chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (anti-CAT) antibody on cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS) modified-dendrimer that was bonded to the conducting polymer (poly 5, 2': 5', 2''-terthiophene-3'-carboxyl acid (poly-TTCA)) layer. The AuNPs, dendrimers, and CdS nanoparticles were deposited onto the polymer layer in order to enhance the sensitivity of the sensor probes. The particle sizes were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The immobilization of dendrimers, CdS, and anti-CAT were confirmed using energy disruptive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques. The detection of CAP was based on the competitive immuno-interaction between the free- and labeled-CAP for active sites of the anti-CAT. Hydrazine was used as the label for CAP, and it electrochemically catalyzed the reduction of H(2)O(2) at -0.35 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Under optimized conditions, the proposed immunosensor exhibited a linear range of CAP detection between 50 pg/mL and 950 pg/mL, and the detection limit was 45 pg/mL. The immunosensor was examined in real meat samples for the analysis of CAP.

  7. Synthesis, structural and optical properties of Sm{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+} doped cadmium sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    L, Saravanan; R, Jayavel; A, Pandurangan; Jih-Hsin, Liu; Hsin-Yuan, Miao

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: Samarium (Sm{sup 3+}) and neodymium (Nd{sup 3+}) doped cadmium sulfide nanocrystals have been prepared via precipitation method. The structural and the luminescent properties of the as-synthesised nanocrystals have been discussed. - Highlights: • Cubic phase lanthanide ion doped cadmium sulfide nanocrystals were prepared by co-precipitation method. • HRTEM displays randomly aggregated nanoparticles with well-defined lattice fringes. • Energy gap and optical properties were affected by the different doping ions. • Effect of Sm and Nd ion doping on photo-emission of CdS nanocrystals was clarified. - Abstract: Cubic phase samarium (Sm{sup 3+}) and neodymium (Nd{sup 3+}) doped cadmium sulfide nanocrystals were synthesized through the chemical co-precipitation method. The crystallite size computed with high intense (1 1 1) peak using Scherrer formula was ∼3 nm. Morphology was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images further established the formation of nanoclusters and EDAX spectra confirms the presence of cadmium, sulphide and rare earth elements in the sample. SAED pattern shows the crystallinity of the synthesized sample. Blue shift in the bandgap energy in the reflectance UV spectra, illustrates size quantization effect and dopant ion incorporation into the host lattice. The effect of doping concentrations of Sm{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+} on the luminescence spectra of CdS was studied. The emission spectra revealed that the intensity increased considerably in the presence of dopant ions. The variation in the optical properties and the enhancement in the luminescence were discussed for different doping levels.

  8. Polycrystalline thin film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefny, J. U.; Furtak, T. E.; Williamson, D. L.; Kim, D.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the principal results of work performed during the second year of a 3-year program at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). The work on transparent conducting oxides was carried out primarily by CSM students at NREL and is described in three publications listed in Appendix C. The high-quality ZnO produced from the work was incorporated into a copper indium diselenide cell that exhibited a world-record efficiency of 16.4%. Much of the time was devoted to the improvement of cadmium sulfide films deposited by chemical bath deposition methods and annealed with or without a cadmium chloride treatment. Progress was also made in the electrochemical deposition of cadmium telluride. High-quality films yielding CdS/CdTe/Au cells of greater than 10% efficiency are now being produced on a regular basis. We explored the use of zinc telluride back contacts to form an n-i-p cell structure as previously used by Ametek. We began small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies to characterize crystal structures, residual stresses, and microstructures of both CdTe and CdS. Large SAXS signals were observed in CdS, most likely because of scattering from gain boundaries. The signals observed to date from CdTe are much weaker, indicating a more homogeneous microstructure. We began to use the ADEPT modeling program, developed at Purdue University, to guide our understanding of the CdS/CdTe cell physics and the improvements that will most likely lead to significantly enhanced efficiencies.

  9. Alloys in cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Douglas Garth

    Alloys formed intentionally or unintentionally during the fabrication of CdTe/CdS solar cells were investigated. The primary focuses were (1) characterizing thin films of CdTesb{1-x}Ssb{x} since these alloys appear to be present in all high-efficiency CdTe/CdS solar cells, and (2) investigating how these alloys affect solar cell performance. Thin films of CdTesb{1-x}Ssb{x} were fabricated and subjected to heat treatments under conditions identical to those used for making CdTe/CdS solar cells. The films were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and optical measurements. The as-deposited CdTesb{1-x}Ssb{x} films were generally single-phase even when x was well within the miscibility gap shown on CdTe-CdS pseudo-binary phase diagrams. Heat treatments at 415sp°C in the presence of CdClsb2 promoted phase segregation. From diffraction analysis of the phase-segregated films, the solubility limits at 415sp°C of CdS in CdTe, and of CdTe in CdS were found to be 5.8± 0.2% and 3± 1%, respectively. Conventional CdTe/CdS solar cells and novel solar cells made by depositing CdTesb{1-x}Ssb{x}, in place of CdTe were fabricated, tested, characterized, and compared. For the conventional solar cells, diffusion of CdS into the CdTe layer during the fabrication process converted the CdTe to CdTesb{1-x}Ssb{x} with x ranging from the 5.8% solubility limit near the junction to {<}1% near the back contact. Similarly, the CdS layer was converted to CdSsb{1-y}Tesb{y} with y near the 3% solubility limit, in some cases, and {<}1% in cases where the CdS film was annealed with CdClsb2 prior to depositing CdTe. The performance of CdTesb{1-x}Ssb{x}/CdS cells made with x = 0.05-0.06 throughout the absorber layer was nearly identical to the CdTe/CdS cells. This indicates that the operation of conventional devices is largely controlled by the alloys formed by interdiffusion. For the CdTesb{1-x}Ssb{x}/CdS devices, less CdS was consumed by

  10. Photocurrent spectroscopy of cadmium sulfide/plastic, cadmium sulfide/glass, and zinc telluride/gallium arsenide hetero-pairs formed with pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Krishna Prasad

    This dissertation presents photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy of thin-film cadmium sulfide (CdS) on plastic, CdS on glass, and zinc telluride (ZnTe) on gallium arsenide (GaAs) hetero-pairs. All samples have been prepared with pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) and the thesis is organized into three principal sections. The first section presents the PLD essentials and characterization of CdS thin films on transparent plastic substrates. The second part focuses on the exploitation of CdS films on glass to quench or modulate alternating photocurrent (APC) by additional constant blue light illumination. Finally, PC spectra modification of n-GaAs due to ZnTe PLD will be investigated. First, the merger of a transparent plastic substrate with thin-film CdS for photonic application was realized using low-temperature PLD, where low-temperature PLD means the substrates were not externally heated. Although plastic is not considered to be a favored substrate material for semiconductor thin-film formation, the deposited CdS film possessed good adhesion to the plastic substrates and showed a blue-shifted photosensitivity with peak at 2.54 eV. The CdS deposition rate was monitored at different laser fluences and the maximum rate was found at 2.68 J/cm2. The visualization of the surface using an atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed its mosaic structure and electron probe microanalysis showed that target composition was maintained in the film. The study of thickness distribution revealed that the film deposition area is significantly increased with increase in laser fluence. The achieved results demonstrate the capability of PLD to form novel heterostructures with appealing and useful technological properties such as plasticity and low weight. In the second part, APC control via blue light illumination employing thin-film PLD CdS on a glass is introduced. In fact, the APC driven through the CdS film in conjunction with bias was quenched when the sample was additionally illuminated with a

  11. Electrodeposited cobalt sulfide hole collecting layer for polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zampetti, Andrea; De Rossi, Francesca; Brunetti, Francesca; Reale, Andrea; Di Carlo, Aldo; Brown, Thomas M.

    2014-08-11

    In polymer solar cells based on the blend of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, the hole collecting layer has to be endowed with its ionization potential close to or greater than that of P3HT (∼5 eV). Conductive polymer blends such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and metal oxides such as vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) satisfy this requirement and have been the most common materials used so far in bulk heterojunction structures. We report here cobalt sulfide (CoS) to be a promising hole collecting material deposited by convenient and room temperature electrodeposition. By simply tuning the CoS electrodeposition parameters, power conversion efficiencies similar (within 15%) to a reference structure with PEDOT:PSS were obtained.

  12. Effects of different annealing atmospheres on the properties of cadmium sulfide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yücel, E.; Kahraman, S.; Güder, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effects of different annealing atmospheres (air and sulfur) on the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdS thin films were studied at three different pH values. - Highlights: • Compactness and smoothness of the films were enhanced after sulfur annealing. • Micro-strain values of some films were improved after sulfur annealing. • Dislocation density values of some films were improved after sulfur annealing. • Band gap values of the films were improved after sulfur annealing. - Abstract: Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films were prepared on glass substrates by using chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The effects of different annealing atmospheres (air and sulfur) on the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdS thin films were studied at three different pH values. Compactness and smoothness of the films (especially for pH 10.5 and 11) enhanced after sulfur annealing. pH value of the precursor solution remarkably affected the roughness, uniformity and particle sizes of the films. Based on the analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the films, micro-strain and dislocation density values of the sulfur-annealed films (pH 10.5 and 11) were found to be lower than those of air-annealed films. Air-annealed films (pH 10.5, 11 and 11.5) exhibited higher transmittance than sulfur-annealed films in the wavelength region of 550–800 nm. Optical band gap values of the films were found between 2.31 eV and 2.36 eV.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates cadmium-induced morpho-physiological and ultrastructural changes in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Basharat; Gill, Rafaqat A; Yang, Su; Gill, Muhammad B; Ali, Shafaqat; Rafiq, Muhammad T; Zhou, Weijun

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in alleviating cadmium (Cd) induced stress in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was studied under greenhouse conditions. Plants were grown hydroponically under three levels (0, 100, and 500µM) of Cd and three levels (0, 100 and 200µM) of H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). Results showed that application of H2S significantly improved the plant growth, root morphology, chlorophyll contents, elements uptake and photosynthetic activity in B. napus plants under Cd stress. Moreover, addition of H2S reduced the Cd concentration in the leaves and roots of B. napus plants under Cd-toxicity. Exogenously applied H2S decreased the production of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species in the leaves and roots by improving the enzymatic antioxidant activities under Cd stress conditions. The microscopic examination indicated that application of exogenous H2S improved the cell structures and enabled a clean mesophyll cell having a well developed chloroplast with thylakoid membranes, and a number of mitochondria could be observed in the micrographs. A number of modifications could be found in root tip cell i.e. mature mitochondria, long endoplasmic reticulum and golgibodies under combined application of H2S and Cd. On the basis of these findings, it can be concluded that application of exogenous H2S has a protective role on plant growth, photosynthetic parameters, elements uptake, antioxidants enzyme activities and ultrastructural changes in B. napus under high Cd stress conditions.

  14. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots stabilized by castor oil and ricinoleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyobe, Joseph William; Mubofu, Egid Beatus; Makame, Yahya M. M.; Mlowe, Sixberth; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2016-02-01

    Castor oil and ricinoleic acid (an isolate of castor oil) are environmentally friendly bio-based organic surfactants that have been used as capping agents to prepare nearly spherical cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) at 230, 250 and 280 °C. The prepared quantum dots were characterized by Ultra violet-visible (UV-vis), Photoluminescence (PL), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) giving an overall CdS QDs average size of 5.14±0.39 nm. The broad XRD pattern and crystal lattice fringes in the HRTEM images showed a hexagonal phase composition of the CdS QDs. The calculated/estimated average size of the prepared castor oil capped CdS QDs for various techniques were 4.64 nm (TEM), 4.65 nm (EMA), 5.35 nm (UV-vis) and 6.46 nm (XRD). For ricinoleic acid capped CdS QDs, the average sizes were 5.56 nm (TEM), 4.78 nm (EMA), 5.52 nm (UV-vis) and 8.21 nm (XRD). Optical properties of CdS QDs showed a change of band gap energy from its bulk band gap of 2.42-2.82 eV due to quantum size confinement effect for temperature range of 230-280 °C. Similarly, a blue shift was observed in the photoluminescence spectra. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations show that the as-synthesized CdS QDs structures are spherical in shape. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) studies confirms the formation of castor oil and ricinoleic acid capped CdS QDs.

  15. Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research. Final report, April 1, 1980-August 25, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Chen, W. S.

    1982-08-01

    The properties of polycrystalline, thin-film CuInSe/sub 2//CdS and CuInSe/sub 2//Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S solar cells prepared by vacuum-evaporation techniques onto metallized-alumina substrates are described. An efficiency of 10.6% for a 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell and 8.3% for an 8 cm/sup 2/ cell when tested under simulated AM1 illumination is reported. The mixed-sulfide cells are described as exhibiting increased open-circuit voltages, slightly higher short-circuit currents, and improved efficiencies. Mixed-sulfide film preparation by evaporation of CdS and ZnS powders from a single source and from two sources is discussed with preference given to the later technique. Selenide-film preparation in a planetary or rotating substrate vacuum-deposition apparatus is described. A 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell without AR-coating produced by the planetary approach is reported to demonstrate a 7.5% efficiency. The results of cell heat-treatment studies showing a strong environmental dependence are presented and indicate the desirability of an oxygen-containing atmosphere. An automatic, computer-controlled, cell-measurement system for I-V, C-V, and spectral-response analysis is described. The results of the cell-analysis and cell-modeling studies on both the plain CdS and mixed Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S thin-film devices are presented. Finally, data obtained from constant illumination and elevated temperature life-tests on the thin-film cells showing little degradation after 9300 hours is reported.

  16. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chong; Zhai, Yong; Li, Chunxi; Li, Fumin

    2014-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte.

  17. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte. PMID:25411566

  18. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Zhai, Yong; Li, Chunxi; Li, Fumin

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte.

  19. CADMIUM SOLUBILITY IN PADDY SOILS: EFFECTS OF SOIL OXIDATION, METAL SULFIDES AND COMPETITIVE IONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element for human nutrition and is an agricultural soil contaminant. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils affects Cd accumulation in the grain of rice. This is a human health risk, exacerbated by the fact that rice grains are deficient in iron (Fe) an...

  20. Horizon-specific oxidation of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) in relation to the toxicity of cadmium spiked into a freshwater sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, E.N.; Mattson, V.R.; Ankley, G.T.

    1994-12-31

    To evaluate the effects of oxidative processes on acid volatile sulfide concentrations in various horizons of whole sediment cores, in relation to the toxicity of a metal (cadmium), the authors used an artificial system to ``age`` Cd-spiked sediment samples under a constant flow of fresh Lake Superior water. Sediments from Pequaywan Lake, MN (ca. 12 umol AVS/g) were spiked so as to achieve (nominal) cadmium: AVS molar ratios of 0.02 (control), 0.2, 0.8, 1.2 and 3.0. At 0, 24 and 48 days post-spiking, sediment cores were removed from the aging system and tested for toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca. At the same time, horizons from replicate sediment cores were prepared for analysis by freezing, and then cutting them into 10--20 mm increments. The sediment horizons were analyzed for AVS and simultaneously extracted cadmium concentrations, and pore water concentrations of cadmium. Relatively little oxidation of surficial AVS concentrations was observed, even at aging times up to 48 d. By 48 d, pore water concentrations of cadmium were slightly elevated at all spiking concentrations, but were increased greatly at cadmium:AVS ratios greater than one. Hyalella azteca mortality was generally predictable based on surficial cadmium:AVS ratios or pore water cadmium concentrations.

  1. Flow-injection chemiluminescence analysis for sensitive determination of atenolol using cadmium sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khataee, Alireza; Lotfi, Roya; Hasanzadeh, Aliyeh; Iranifam, Mortaza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive, rapid and simple flow-injection chemiluminescence (CL) system based on the light emitted from KMnO4-cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) reaction in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in acidic medium was developed as a CL probe for the sensitive determination of atenolol. Optical and structural features of CdS QDs capped with L-cysteine, which synthesized via hydrothermal approach, were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL), and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The CL intensity of KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB was remarkably enhanced in the presence of trace level of atenolol. Under optimum experimental conditions, there is a linear relationship between the increase in CL intensity of KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB system and atenolol concentration in a range of 0.001 to 4.0 mg L- 1 and 4.0 to 18.0 mg L- 1, with a detection limit (3σ) of 0.0010 mg L- 1. A possible mechanism for KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB-atenolol CL reaction is proposed. To prove the practical application of the KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB CL method, the method was applied for the determination of atenolol in spiked environmental water samples and commercial pharmaceutical formulation. Furthermore, corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) technique was utilized for determination of atenolol. Figure S2. Optimization of the CL reaction conditions: (a) effect of KMnO4 concentration. Conditions: the concentrations of H2SO4, CdS QDs and atenolol were 1 mol L-1, 0.35 mol L-1, and 4.0 mg L-1, respectively; (b) effect of acidic media. Conditions: the concentrations of KMnO4 was 0.04 mmol L-1, other conditions were as in (a); (c) effect of CdS QDs concentration. Conditions: H2SO4 concentration was 1.0 mol L-1, other conditions were as in (b), and (d) effect of CTAB concentration. Conditions: CdS QDs concentration was 0.35 mmol L-1, other conditions were as in (c). Figure S3. UV-Vis absorption spectra of KMnO4-CdS QDs-atenolol CL system

  2. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  3. Lossless synthesis of graphene nanosheets decorated with tiny cadmium sulfide quantum dots with excellent nonlinear optical properties.

    PubMed

    Feng, Miao; Sun, Ruiqing; Zhan, Hongbing; Chen, Yu

    2010-02-19

    The implantation and growth of metal nanoparticles on graphene nanosheets (GNS) leads directly to severe damage to the regular structure of the graphene sheets, which disrupts the extended pi conjugation, resulting in an impaired device performance. In this paper, we describe a facile approach for achieving the lossless formation of graphene composite decorated with tiny cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) with excellent nonlinear optical properties by using benzyl mercaptan (BM) as the interlinker. The mercapto substituent of BM binds to the CdS QDs during their nucleation and growth process, and then the phenyl comes into contact with the GNS via the pi-pi stacking interaction. Using this strategy, CdS QDs with an average diameter of 3 nm are uniformly dispersed over the surface of graphene, and the resulting QD-graphene composite exhibits excellent optical limiting properties, mainly contributed by nonlinear scattering and nonlinear absorption, upon both 532 and 1064 nm excitations, in the nanosecond laser pulse regime.

  4. The influence of pH and cadmium sulfide on the photocatalytic degradation of 2-chlorophenol in titanium dioxide suspensions.

    PubMed

    Doong, R A; Chen, C H; Maithreepala, R A; Chang, S M

    2001-08-01

    The influence of pH and cadmium sulfide on the photocatalytic degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in titanium dioxide suspensions was investigated to evaluate the feasibility of mixed semiconductors on the photodegradation of chlorinated organics in aqueous solution. Apparent first-order rate constants (k(obs)) and initial rate constants were used to evaluate the degradation efficiency of 2-CP. Higher degradation efficiency of 2-CP was observed at higher pH values. The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant was 0.036 min(-1) at pH 12.5 in TiO2/UV system, while a 2- to 9-fold decrease in k(obs) was observed over the pH range of 2.5-9.5. The addition of phosphate buffer solutions at different pH values have different effects on the degradation of 2-CP. H2PO4- has little effect on the photodegradation of 2-CP, while HPO4(2-) could inhibit the photodegradation efficiency of 2-CP. Chlorocatechol, hydroquinone, benzoquinone and phenol were identified as the predominant aromatic intermediates for the photocatalytic degradation of 2-CP. Moreover, less aromatic intermediates at higher pH were observed. Direct oxidation contributed significantly to the photodegradation of 2-CP. An addition of a semiconductor decreased the initial and apparent first-order rate constants of 2-CP. The cutoff of wavelength of 320nm could diminish the contribution of direct photolysis of 2-CP. The combination of cadmium sulfide and titanium dioxide can lead to an enhanced rate of disappearance of 2-CP compared to those in single semiconductor system. A 1.2 to 2.5-fold increase in rate constant in coupled semiconductor system relative to the single semiconductor system was obtained.

  5. Solar decomposition of cadmium oxide for hydrogen production. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J. D.; Yudow, B. D.; Carty, R. H.; Whaley, T. P.; Pangborn, J. B.

    1981-11-01

    The reactor developed for this study performed satisfactorily in establishing the feasibility of cadmium oxide decomposition under the realistic conditions of the solar-furnace environment. The solar-furnace environment is very appropriate for the evaluation of design concepts. However, the solar furnace probably cannot give precise rate data. The flux is too nonuniform, so temperatures of reactant and corresponding reaction rates are also nonuniform. One of the most important results of this project was the recovery of samples from the quench heat exchanger that contained a surprisingly large amount of metallic cadmium. The fact that the sample taken from the quench heat exchanger was metallic in appearance and contained between 67% and 84% metallic cadmium would tend to indicate recombination of cadmium vapor and oxygen can be effectively prevented by the quenching operation. It would also tend to confirm recent studies that show cadmium oxide does not sublime appreciably. Determination of the decomposition rate of cadmium oxide was severely limited by fluctuating and nonuniform reactant temperatures and baseline drift in the oxygen sensor. However, the estimated rate based on a single run seemed to follow a typical solid decomposition rate pattern with an initial acceleratory period, followed by a longer deceleratory period. From a preliminary flowsheet analysis of the cadmium-cadmium oxide cycle, it was determined that at a cadmium oxide decomposition temperature of 1400/sup 0/C and a requirement of 0.2 V in the electrolyzer the efficiency was 41%, assuming total quenching of the cadmium oxide decomposition products. This efficiency could increase to a maximum of 59% if total recovery of the latent heats of vaporization and fusion of the decomposition products is possible.

  6. Phytochelatins in Cadmium-Sensitive and Cadmium-Tolerant Silene vulgaris (Chain Length Distribution and Sulfide Incorporation).

    PubMed Central

    De Knecht, J. A.; Van Dillen, M.; Koevoets, PLM.; Schat, H.; Verkleij, JAC.; Ernst, WHO.

    1994-01-01

    In response to a range of Cd concentrations, the root tips of Cd-tolerant plants of Silene vulgaris exhibit a lower rate of PC production accompanied by a lower rate of longer chain PC synthesis than those of Cd-sensitive plants. At the same Cd exposure level, stable PC-Cd complexes are more rapidly formed in the roots of Cd-sensitive plants than in those of tolerant plants. At an equal PC concentration in the roots, the PC composition and the amount of sulfide incorporated per unit of PC-thiol is the same in both populations. Although these compounds might play some role in mechanisms that contribute to Cd detoxification, the ability to produce these compounds in greater amounts is not, itself, the mechanism that produces increased Cd tolerance in tolerant S. vulgaris plants. PMID:12232077

  7. Photocatalytic Activities of Copper Doped Cadmium Sulfide Microspheres Prepared by a Facile Ultrasonic Spray-Pyrolysis Method.

    PubMed

    Su, Jinzhan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yufeng; Chen, Yubin; Liu, Maochang

    2016-06-15

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is a superior method for preparing and synthesizing spherical particles of metal oxide or sulfide semiconductors. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) photocatalysts with different sizes and doped-CdS with different dopants and doping levels have been synthesized to study their properties of photocatalytic hydrogen production from water. The CdS photocatalysts were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence-spectrometry (XRF), UV-Vis absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study their morphological and optical properties. The sizes of the prepared CdS particles were found to be proportional to the concentration of the metal nitrates in the solution. The CdS photocatalyst with smaller size showed a better photocatalytic activity. In addition, Cu doped CdS were also deposited and their photocatalytic activities were also investigated. Decreased bandgaps of CdS synthesized with this method were found and could be due to high density surface defects originated from Cd vacancies. Incorporating the Cu elements increased the bandgap by taking the position of Cd vacancies and reducing the surface defect states. The optimal Cu-doped level was found to be 0.5 mol % toward hydrogen evolution from aqueous media in the presence of sacrificial electron donors (Na₂S and Na₂SO₃) at a pH of 13.2. This study demonstrated that ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is a feasible approach for large-scale photocatalyst synthesis and corresponding doping modification.

  8. Effects of Buffer Salt Concentration on the Dominated Deposition Mechanism and Optical Characteristics of Chemically Deposited Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakhaki, Z. Makhdoumi; Youzbashi, A.; Sangpour, P.; Kazemzadeh, A.; Naderi, N.; Bazargan, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Effects of buffer salt concentration on the rate of deposition, dominated deposition mechanism and subsequently the structural, morphological, and optical properties of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) on glass substrate were investigated. The precursors were chosen to be cadmium chloride (CdCl2) as the cadmium source, thiourea (CS(NH2)2) as the sulfur source, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) as the buffer salt and ammonia as the complexing agent and the pH controller. The influence of the NH4NO3 concentration on the structure, morphology, film uniformity, stoichiometry and optical properties of CdS thin films was also studied by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, uv-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopes. The XRD studies revealed that all the deposited films exhibited a (002)h/(111)c preferred orientation. The crystallite size was increased from 20nm to 30nm by the increase of concentration of NH4NO3 from 0.5M to 2.5M. The morphology of CdS thin films were agglomerated spherical particles consisted of smaller particles. The surface of thin films deposited at the NH4NO3 concentration of 0.5M was compact and smooth. The increase of the concentration of NH4NO3 decreased the packing density of the films. The optical band gap was in the range of 2.25-2.4eV, which was decreased by the decrement of packing density. The PL spectra showed two peaks centered at 400nm and 500nm which are attributed to violet and band-to-band emissions, respectively.

  9. High temperature solar thermochemical processing - Hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noring, J. E.; Fletcher, E. A.

    1982-08-01

    Sunlight, concentrated to high intensities, has a rarely recognized potential for adding process heat to reactors at high temperatures. Hydrogen sulfide is a by-product of the sweetening of fossil fuels. In this paper, by way of example, the production of hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide is used as a device for showing how solar processing might be considered as a successor to a currently used industrial process, the Claus process. It is concluded that this and other processes should be explored as means of using as well as storing solar energy.

  10. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Sulfide Synthesis Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Medicago sativa by Reestablishment of Reduced (Homo)glutathione and Reactive Oxygen Species Homeostases

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Weiti; Chen, Huiping; Zhu, Kaikai; Jin, Qijiang; Xie, Yanjie; Cui, Jin; Xia, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Until now, physiological mechanisms and downstream targets responsible for the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mediated by endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been elusive. To address this gap, a combination of pharmacological, histochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches was applied. The perturbation of reduced (homo)glutathione homeostasis and increased H2S production as well as the activation of two H2S-synthetic enzymes activities, including L-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) and D-cysteine desulfhydrase (DCD), in alfalfa seedling roots were early responses to the exposure of Cd. The application of H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), not only mimicked intracellular H2S production triggered by Cd, but also alleviated Cd toxicity in a H2S-dependent fashion. By contrast, the inhibition of H2S production caused by the application of its synthetic inhibitor blocked NaHS-induced Cd tolerance, and destroyed reduced (homo)glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostases. Above mentioned inhibitory responses were further rescued by exogenously applied glutathione (GSH). Meanwhile, NaHS responses were sensitive to a (homo)glutathione synthetic inhibitor, but reversed by the cotreatment with GSH. The possible involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in NaHS responses was also suggested. In summary, LCD/DCD-mediated H2S might be an important signaling molecule in the enhancement of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings mainly by governing reduced (homo)glutathione and ROS homeostases. PMID:25275379

  11. Hydrogen sulfide - cysteine cycle system enhances cadmium tolerance through alleviating cadmium-induced oxidative stress and ion toxicity in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Honglei; Wang, Xiaofeng; Dou, Yanhua; Liu, Dan; Si, Wantong; Fang, Hao; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Shaolin; Xi, Jiejun; Li, Jisheng

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a common toxic heavy metal ion. We investigated the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and cysteine (Cys) in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The expression of H2S synthetic genes LCD and DES1 were induced by Cd2+ within 3 h, and endogenous H2S was then rapidly released. H2S promoted the expression of Cys synthesis-related genes SAT1 and OASA1, which led to endogenous Cys accumulation. The H2S and Cys cycle system was stimulated by Cd2+ stress, and it maintained high levels in plant cells. H2S inhibited the ROS burst by inducing alternative respiration capacity (AP) and antioxidase activity. H2S weakened Cd2+ toxicity by inducing the metallothionein (MTs) genes expression. Cys promoted GSH accumulation and inhibited the ROS burst, and GSH induced the expression of phytochelatin (PCs) genes, counteracting Cd2+ toxicity. In summary, the H2S and Cys cycle system played a key role in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The Cd2+ tolerance was weakened when the cycle system was blocked in lcddes1-1 and oasa1 mutants. This paper is the first to describe the role of the H2S and Cys cycle system in Cd2+ stress and to explore the relevant and specificity mechanisms of H2S and Cys in mediating Cd2+ stress. PMID:28004782

  12. Cadmium-induced hydrogen sulfide synthesis is involved in cadmium tolerance in Medicago sativa by reestablishment of reduced (homo)glutathione and reactive oxygen species homeostases.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiti; Chen, Huiping; Zhu, Kaikai; Jin, Qijiang; Xie, Yanjie; Cui, Jin; Xia, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Until now, physiological mechanisms and downstream targets responsible for the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mediated by endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been elusive. To address this gap, a combination of pharmacological, histochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches was applied. The perturbation of reduced (homo)glutathione homeostasis and increased H2S production as well as the activation of two H2S-synthetic enzymes activities, including L-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) and D-cysteine desulfhydrase (DCD), in alfalfa seedling roots were early responses to the exposure of Cd. The application of H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), not only mimicked intracellular H2S production triggered by Cd, but also alleviated Cd toxicity in a H2S-dependent fashion. By contrast, the inhibition of H2S production caused by the application of its synthetic inhibitor blocked NaHS-induced Cd tolerance, and destroyed reduced (homo)glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostases. Above mentioned inhibitory responses were further rescued by exogenously applied glutathione (GSH). Meanwhile, NaHS responses were sensitive to a (homo)glutathione synthetic inhibitor, but reversed by the cotreatment with GSH. The possible involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in NaHS responses was also suggested. In summary, LCD/DCD-mediated H2S might be an important signaling molecule in the enhancement of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings mainly by governing reduced (homo)glutathione and ROS homeostases.

  13. Study of upscaling possibilities for antimony sulfide solid state sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulou, Archontoula; Raptis, Dimitrios; Dracopoulos, Vasilios; Sygellou, Lamprini; Andrikopoulos, Konstantinos S.; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Solid state solar cells of inverted structure were constructed by successive deposition of nanoparticulate titania, antimony sulfide sensitizer and P3HT on FTO electrodes with PEDOT:PSS:Ag as counter electrode. Sensitized photoanode electrodes were characterized by XRD, Raman, XPS, FESEM and UV-vis. Small laboratory scale cells were first constructed and optimized. Functional cells were obtained by annealing the antimony sulfide film either in air or in inert atmosphere. High short-circuit currents were recorded in both cases with air-annealed sample producing more current but lower voltage. Small unit cells were combined to form cell modules. Connection of unit cells in parallel increased current but not proportionally to that of the unit cell. Connection in series preserved current and generated voltage multiplication. Cells were constructed and studied under ambient conditions, without encapsulation. The results encourage upscaling of antimony sulfide solar cells.

  14. Integration of Semiconducting Sulfides for Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-23

    The full harvest of solar energy by semiconductors requires a material that simultaneously absorbs across the whole solar spectrum and collects photogenerated electrons and holes separately. The stepwise integration of three semiconducting sulfides, namely ZnS, CdS, and Cu2-x S, into a single nanocrystal, led to a unique ternary multi-node sheath ZnS-CdS-Cu2-x S heteronanorod for full-spectrum solar energy absorption. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nonstoichiometric copper sulfide nanostructures enables effective NIR absorption. More significantly, the construction of pn heterojunctions between Cu2-x S and CdS leads to staggered gaps, as confirmed by first-principles simulations. This band alignment causes effective electron-hole separation in the ternary system and hence enables efficient solar energy conversion.

  15. Facile covalent immobilization of cadmium sulfide quantum dots on graphene oxide nanosheets: preparation, characterization, and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Choi, Byung Choon; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2010-11-01

    A facile approach for the preparation of a novel hybrid material containing graphene and an inorganic semiconducting material, cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs), is demonstrated for the first time. First, amino-functionalized CdS QDs were prepared by modifications of the kinetic trapping method. Then, pristine graphite was oxidized and exfoliated to obtain graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS), which were then acylated with thionyl chloride to introduce acyl chloride groups on their surface. Subsequently, immobilization of the CdS QDs on the GONS surface was achieved through an amidation reaction between the amino groups located on the CdS QDs surface and the acyl chloride groups bound to the GONS surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy were employed to investigate the changes in the surface functionalities, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to study the morphologies and distribution of the CdS QDs on the GONS surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to characterize the weight loss of the samples on heating. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to study the optical properties of the prepared CdS QDs and the CdS-graphene hybrid material.

  16. Facile covalent immobilization of cadmium sulfide quantum dots on graphene oxide nanosheets: preparation, characterization, and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Choi, Byung Choon; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2010-11-19

    A facile approach for the preparation of a novel hybrid material containing graphene and an inorganic semiconducting material, cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs), is demonstrated for the first time. First, amino-functionalized CdS QDs were prepared by modifications of the kinetic trapping method. Then, pristine graphite was oxidized and exfoliated to obtain graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS), which were then acylated with thionyl chloride to introduce acyl chloride groups on their surface. Subsequently, immobilization of the CdS QDs on the GONS surface was achieved through an amidation reaction between the amino groups located on the CdS QDs surface and the acyl chloride groups bound to the GONS surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy were employed to investigate the changes in the surface functionalities, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to study the morphologies and distribution of the CdS QDs on the GONS surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to characterize the weight loss of the samples on heating. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to study the optical properties of the prepared CdS QDs and the CdS-graphene hybrid material.

  17. Size-controlled one-pot synthesis of fluorescent cadmium sulfide semiconductor nanoparticles in an apoferritin cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahori, K.; Yamashita, I.

    2008-12-01

    A simple size-controlled synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticle (NP) cores in the cavity of apoferritin from horse spleen (HsAFr) was performed by a slow chemical reaction synthesis and a two-step synthesis protocol. We found that the CdS NP core synthesis was slow and that premature CdS NP cores were formed in the apoferritin cavity when the concentration of ammonia water was low. It was proven that the control of the ammonia water concentration can govern the CdS NP core synthesis and successfully produce size-controlled CdS NP cores with diameters from 4.7 to 7.1 nm with narrow size dispersion. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) observation characterized the CdS NP cores obtained as cubic polycrystalline NPs, which showed photoluminescence with red shifts depending on their diameters. From the research of CdS NP core synthesis in the recombinant apoferritins, the zeta potential of apoferritin is important for the biomineralization of CdS NP cores in the apoferritin cavity. These synthesized CdS NPs with different photoluminescence properties will be applicable in a wide variety of nano-applications.

  18. The Proteomic Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dots, and Its Correlation with the Transcriptomic Response

    PubMed Central

    Marmiroli, Marta; Imperiale, Davide; Pagano, Luca; Villani, Marco; Zappettini, Andrea; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    A fuller understanding of the interaction between plants and engineered nanomaterials is of topical relevance because the latter are beginning to find applications in agriculture and the food industry. There is a growing need to establish objective safety criteria for their use. The recognition of two independent Arabidopsis thaliana mutants displaying a greater level of tolerance than the wild type plant to exposure to cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) has offered the opportunity to characterize the tolerance response at the physiological, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels. Here, a proteomics-based comparison confirmed the conclusions drawn from an earlier transcriptomic analysis that the two mutants responded to CdS QD exposure differently both to the wild type and to each other. Just over half of the proteomic changes mirrored documented changes at the level of gene transcription, but a substantial number of transcript/gene product pairs were altered in the opposite direction. An interpretation of the discrepancies is given, along with some considerations regarding the use and significance of -omics when monitoring the potential toxicity of ENMs for health and environment. PMID:26732871

  19. A circular dichroism sensor for Ni(2+) and Co(2+) based on L-cysteine capped cadmium sulfide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tedsana, Wimonsiri; Tuntulani, Thawatchai; Ngeontae, Wittaya

    2015-03-31

    A new circular dichroism sensor for detecting Ni(2+) and Co(2+) was proposed for the first time using chiral chelating quantum dots. The detection principle was based on changing of circular dichroism signals of the chiral quantum dots when forming a chiral complex with Ni(2+) or Co(2+). L-Cysteine capped cadmium sulfide quantum dots (L-Cyst-CdS QDs) were proposed as a chiral probe. The CD spectrum of L-Cyst-CdS QDs was significantly changed in the presence of Ni(2+) and Co(2+). On the other hand, other studied cations did not alter the original CD spectrum. Moreover, when increasing the concentration of Ni(2+) or Co(2+), the intensity of the CD spectrum linearly increased as a function of concentration and could be useful for the quantitative analysis. The proposed CD sensor showed linear working concentration ranges of 10-60 μM and 4-80 μM with low detection limits of 7.33 μМ and 1.13 μM for the detection of Ni(2+) and Co(2+), respectively. Parameters possibly affected the detection sensitivity such as solution pH and incubation time were studied and optimized. The proposed sensor was applied to detect Ni(2+) and Co(2+) in real water samples, and the results agreed well with the analysis using the standard ICP-OES.

  20. Cadmium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cadmium ; CASRN 7440 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  1. Ternary spinel cadmium stannate, cadmium indate, and zinc stannate and binary tin oxide and indium oxide transparent conducting oxides as front contact materials for cadmium sulfide/cadmium tellurium photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamazza, Robert, Jr.

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCO's) of Cd2SnO 4 (cadmium stannate), CdIn2O4 (cadmium indate), and Zn2SnO4 (zinc stannate) thin films were investigated from a materials and applications point of view through. All films were deposited by co-sputtering using either binary oxide or metallic (reactive sputtering) targets. The film properties were investigated as a function of film composition and stoichiometry. The effect of process parameters such as deposition temperatures, and post-deposition heat treatments on the structural and electro-optical properties of the films were also investigated extensively. All as-deposited films were found to be amorphous independent of substrate deposition temperature. The electro-optical and crystallographic properties were heavily dependant on the post deposition heat treatments. Cd2SnO4, Zn 2SnO4, and CdIn2O4 all produced highly transparent films with average transmission values (400--900 nm range) of 92%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. Cd2SnO4 and CdIn 2O4 were highly conductive with resistivity values as low as 2.01 x 10-4 O-cm and 2.90 x 10 -4 O-cm, respectively. Conversely, Zn2SnO 4 was not able to produce highly conductive films, with the lowest resistivity being 4.3 x 10-3 O-cm. CdTe solar cells were fabricated using al the above materials as front contacts or as high-ρ layers in bi-layer structures. All cells were of the superstrate configuration: Low-ρ TCO/high-ρ TCO/CdS/CdTe/Back contact. Only the TCO layers were varied; the remainder of the device was held constant. In most cases the inclusion of a high-ρ TCO layer was found to improve solar cell performance, especially in regard to the open circuit voltage. Cd2SnO4 was the exception. The incorporation of Zn2SnO4 as a high-ρ layer enabled a greatest current collection from high energy wavelengths through an apparent thinning effect on the CdS. This increased the overall short circuit current density to values in excess of 24.9 mA/cm2. The standard device consisted of

  2. Cadmium-sulfide crystallites in Cd-. gamma. -glutamyl peptide complexes from Lycopersicon and Daucus

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, R.N. ); Winge, D.R. )

    1989-04-01

    Hydroponically-grown tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum P. Mill. cv stone) and suspension-cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota L.) exposed to 100 {mu}M cadmium salts produced metal-{gamma}-glutamyl peptide complexes containing acid labile sulfur. The properties of the complexes resemble the Cd-{gamma}-glutamyl complexes from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Candida glabrata, known to contain a CdS crystallite core. The crystallite core is stabilized by a coating of peptides of the general structure ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub n}-Gly. The Cd-peptide complexes contain predominantly peptides of n{sub 2}, n{sub 3}, n{sub 4} and n{sub 3}desGly. Zn-peptide complexes were also isolated from carrot cultures grown in MS medium supplemented with 2 mM Zn and cysteine. Results of preliminary characterization of these complexes are consistent with the presence of a colloidal particle similar to that of the Cd-complexes.

  3. Single-enzyme biomineralization of cadmium sulfide nanocrystals with controlled optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Dunleavy, Robert; Lu, Li; Kiely, Christopher J.; McIntosh, Steven; Berger, Bryan W.

    2016-01-01

    Nature has evolved several unique biomineralization strategies to direct the synthesis and growth of inorganic materials. These natural systems are complex, involving the interaction of multiple biomolecules to catalyze biomineralization and template growth. Herein we describe the first report to our knowledge of a single enzyme capable of both catalyzing mineralization in otherwise unreactive solution and of templating nanocrystal growth. A recombinant putative cystathionine γ-lyase (smCSE) mineralizes CdS from an aqueous cadmium acetate solution via reactive H2S generation from l-cysteine and controls nanocrystal growth within the quantum confined size range. The role of enzymatic nanocrystal templating is demonstrated by substituting reactive Na2S as the sulfur source. Whereas bulk CdS is formed in the absence of the enzyme or other capping agents, nanocrystal formation is observed when smCSE is present to control the growth. This dual-function, single-enzyme, aerobic, and aqueous route to functional material synthesis demonstrates the powerful potential of engineered functional material biomineralization. PMID:27118834

  4. Fluorescent properties of a hybrid cadmium sulfide-dendrimer nanocomposite and its quenching with nitromethane.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruno B; Algarra, Manuel; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2010-01-01

    A fluorescent hybrid cadmium sulphide quantum dots (QDs) dendrimer nanocomposite (DAB-CdS) synthesised in water and stable in aqueous solution is described. The dendrimer, DAB-G5 dendrimer (polypropylenimine tetrahexacontaamine) generation 5, a diaminobutene core with 64 amine terminal primary groups. The maximum of the excitation and emission spectra, Stokes' shift and the emission full width of half maximum of this nanocomposite are, respectively: 351, 535, 204 and 212 nm. The fluorescence time decay was complex and a four component decay time model originated a good fit (chi = 1.20) with the following lifetimes: tau (1) = 657 ps; tau (2) = 10.0 ns; tau (3) = 59.42 ns; and tau (4) = 265 ns. The fluorescence intensity of the nanocomposite is markedly quenched by the presence of nitromethane with a dynamic Stern-Volmer constant of 25 M(-1). The quenching profiles show that about 81% of the CdS QDs are located in the external layer of the dendrimer accessible to the quencher. PARAFAC analysis of the excitation emission matrices (EEM) acquired as function of the nitromethane concentration showed a trilinear data structure with only one linearly independent component describing the quenching which allows robust estimation of the excitation and emission spectra and of the quenching profiles. This water soluble and fluorescent nanocomposite shows a set of favourable properties to its use in sensor applications.

  5. Porous copper zinc tin sulfide thin film as photocathode for double junction photoelectrochemical solar cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Guan; Chen, Yuncheng; Jiang, Hechun; Feng, Zhenyu; Lin, Zhaojun; Zhan, Jinhua

    2012-03-21

    Porous copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) thin film was prepared via a solvothermal approach. Compared with conventional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), double junction photoelectrochemical cells using dye-sensitized n-type TiO(2) (DS-TiO(2)) as the photoanode and porous p-type CZTS film as the photocathode shows an increased short circuit current, external quantum efficiency and power conversion efficiency.

  6. Inorganic-organic solar cells based on quaternary sulfide as absorber materials.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhifeng; Yan, Weiguo; Liu, Junqi; Zhang, Xueqi

    2015-12-14

    We report a novel promising quaternary sulfide (CuAgInS) to serve as a semiconductor sensitizer material in the photoelectrochemical field. In this study, CuAgInS (CAIS) sulfide sensitized ZnO nanorods were fabricated on ITO substrates through a facile and low-cost hydrothermal chemical method and applied on photoanodes for solar cells for the first time. The component and stoichiometry were key factors in determining the photoelectric performance of CAIS sulfide, which were controlled by modulating their reaction time. ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 nanoarrays exhibit an enhanced optical and photoelectric performance and the power conversion efficiency of ITO/ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2/P3HT/Pt solid-state solar cell was up to 1.80%. The remarkable performance stems from improved electron transfer, a higher efficiency of light-harvesting and appropriate band gap alignment at the interface of the ZnO/Cu0.7Ag0.3InS2 NTs. The research indicates that CAIS as an absorbing material has enormous potential in solar cell systems.

  7. Roles of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in the alleviation of cadmium-induced oxidative damage in alfalfa seedling roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Wang, Yanqin; Shen, Wenbiao

    2012-06-01

    Despite hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and nitric oxide (NO) are important endogenous signals or bioregulators involved in many vital aspects of plant growth and responses against abiotic stresses, little information was known about their interaction. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of H(2)S and NO on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants exposed to cadmium (Cd) stress. Pretreatment with an H(2)S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and well-known NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) decreased the Cd toxicity. This conclusion was supported by the decreases of lipid peroxidation as well as the amelioration of seedling growth inhibition and Cd accumulation, in comparison with the Cd-stressed alone plants. Total activities and corresponding transcripts of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase were modulated differentially, thus leading to the alleviation of oxidative damage. Effects of H(2)S above were reversed by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO), the specific scavenger of NO. By using laser confocal scanning microscope combined with Greiss reagent method, further results showed that NO production increased significantly after the NaHS pretreatment regardless of whether Cd was applied or not, all of which were obviously inhibited by cPTIO. These decreases of NO production were consistent with the exaggerated syndromes associated with Cd toxicity. Together, above results suggested that NO was involved in the NaHS-induced alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings, and also indicated that there exists a cross-talk between H(2)S and NO responsible for the increased abiotic stress tolerance.

  8. Cinnamaldehyde Ameliorates Cadmium-Inhibited Root Elongation in Tobacco Seedlings via Decreasing Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Production.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xie-Feng; Xue, Yanfeng; Ling, Tianxiao; Wang, Yong; Yu, Xiao-Na; Cheng, Changxin; Feng, Guosheng; Hu, Liangbin; Shi, Zhiqi; Chen, Jian

    2016-12-24

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is natural plant-derived compound that has been highly appreciated for its medicinal properties. However, little information is known about the regulation of plant intrinsic physiology by CA. To address these gaps, physiological, histochemical, and biochemical approaches were applied to investigate CA-facilitated cadmium (Cd) tolerance in the roots of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seedlings. Treatment with CdCl₂ at 20 μM for 72 h resulted in the significant decrease in root elongation by 40.39% as compared to control. CA alleviated Cd-inhibited root elongation in dose- and time-dependent manners. The addition of CA at 20 μM induced significant increase in root elongation by 42.58% as compared to Cd treatment alone. CA abolished Cd-induced ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation, lipid peroxidation, loss of membrane integrity, cell death, and free Cd(2+) accumulation in roots. CA blocked the Cd-induced increase in the endogenous H₂S level through the down-regulation of d-cysteine desulfhydrase (DCD) expression. H₂S scavenger hypotaurine (HT) or potent H₂S-biosynthetic inhibitor dl-propargylglicine (PAG) were able mimic the action of CA on the blockade of Cd-induced H₂S accumulation, cell death, and growth inhibition. Enhancement of the endogenous H₂S level with NaHS (H₂S donor) abrogated all the beneficial capabilities of CA, HT, and PAG. Collectively, these results suggest that CA has great potential to confer plant tolerance against Cd stress, which is closely associated with its capability to inhibit Cd-induced H₂S production. This study not only provides evidences for the regulation of plant physiology by CA but also sheds new light on the cross-talk between CA and H₂S in physiological modulations.

  9. A comparative study of the annealing behavior of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} based solar cells with an indium sulfide buffer layer, partly submitted to wet chemical treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Hönes, C.; Hackenberg, J.; Zweigart, S.; Wachau, A.; Hergert, F.; Siebentritt, S.

    2015-03-07

    Indium sulfide thin films deposited via thermal evaporation from compound source material have been successfully utilized as a cadmium free buffer layer for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} based solar cells. However, high efficiencies are only reached after an additional annealing step. In this work, the annealing behavior of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} based indium sulfide buffered solar cells is compared to the annealing behavior of similar cells, which were submitted to wet chemical treatments partly containing cadmium ions. Upon annealing a significant improvement of the initial solar cell characteristics is observed for the untreated cell and is related to the increase of activation energy for the carrier recombination process and a decrease of the ideality factor within the one diode model. It is shown here that this improvement can also be achieved by wet treatments of the absorber prior to buffer layer deposition. Upon annealing these treated cells still gain in collection length but lose open circuit voltage, which is explained here within a model including a highly p-doped absorber surface layer and supported by simulations showing that a decrease in doping density of such a surface layer would lead to the observed effects.

  10. Workshop proceedings: Photovoltaic conversion of solar energy for terrestrial applications. Volume 1: Working group and panel reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Technological aspects of solar energy conversion by photovoltaic cells are considered. The advantage of the single crystal silicon solar cell approach is developed through comparisons with polycrystalline silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide thin film cells, and other materials and devices.

  11. Studies of rf sputtered zinc tellurium:nitrogen and cadmium sulfide for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drayton, Jennifer

    Photovoltaics based on thin film semiconductors are a renewable energy source with possible widespread applications. Semiconducting thin films from the II-VI family have the capability of being excellent candidates for this application as they are n-type, like CdS, which can be used with CdTe, another II-VI material which is p-type, to form a p-n junction. Other II-VI materials can be doped p-type, as in the case of ZnTe:N, which can be used as part of a back contact to a CdTe-based single junction solar cell and also as part of a recombination junction in a CdTe-based tandem solar cell. This dissertation investigates the properties of reactively rf sputtered ZnTe:N films and examines structures that utilize ZnTe:N as part of a back contact or as part of a recombination junction. The use of optical emission spectroscopy to determine which excited species of the N2 molecule are present in the plasma during reactive sputtering of ZnTe:N is also investigated. The use of optical emission spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to monitor film quality by identifying contaminants in the sputtering system is also presented. The optimization of deposition parameters for CdTe, CdS, and ZnTe:N films fabricated in a new deposition system is presented. The effort to improve the CdS layer by increasing its resistivity is explored. By changing the deposition parameters but not adding any dopant we attempted to deposit highly resistive polycrystalline CdS. The resistivity measurements led to the discovery that CdS exhibits piezoelectric properties when used in CdTe-based photovoltaics. These important properties, which had not been observed previously, will be presented and discussed.

  12. High-performance cadmium sulphide-based planar perovskite solar cell and the cadmium sulphide/perovskite interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haitao; Sun, Weihai; Li, Yunlong; Yan, Weibo; Yu, Pingrong; Zhou, Huanping; Bian, Zuqiang; Huang, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Planar heterojunction perovskite solar cell is one of the most competitive photovoltaic technologies, while charge transport materials play a crucial role. We successfully demonstrated an effective electron transport material, namely chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide (CdS) film under low temperature, in perovskite-based solar cells. Power conversion efficiency of 16.1% has been achieved, which is comparable to that of devices based on TiO2 film prepared via low-temperature processes. Electronic impedance spectra reveal that the CdS-based device presents a higher recombination resistance than TiO2-based devices, which reduces carrier recombination and increases the open circuit voltage. The interface between CdS and perovskite was characterized with improved characteristics when compared to TiO2, e.g., efficient carrier extraction and reduced surface defect-associated degradation in the devices, which help to alleviate anomalous hysteresis and long-term instability. Furthermore, the entire device was fabricated via solution process with a processing temperature below 100°C, suggesting a promising method of further development of perovskite solar cells and commercial manufacturing.

  13. Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research. Final report, January 8, 1979-June 7, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Dual source, Se and CuInSe/sub 2/, coevaporation and flash evaporation of stoichiometric CuInSe/sub 2/ powder were investigated to develop a process of fabricating large area CdS/CuInSe/sub 2/ heterojunction solar cells. CuInSe/sub 2/ was seen to decompose upon evaporation, producing layered films in the dual source system. Annealing of these films and alternative dual sources have been considered. Single phase p type films have been produced but no devices have been made from such films. Flash evaporation circumvents the decomposition problem, and if one bakes the powder to obtain a small Cu excess as well as getting a Se excess in the film, p type CuInSe/sub 2/ films can be obtained. A 1% efficient device of 6 cm/sup 2/ area was made using a flash evaporated CuInSe/sub 2/ film. Annealing studies and measurements of spatial uniformity of this device are reported.

  14. Cadmium telluride solar cells: Record-breaking voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, the performance of CdTe solar cells — cheaper alternatives to silicon photovoltaics — is hampered by their low output voltages, which are normally well below the theoretical limit. Now, record voltages of over 1 V have been reported in single-crystal CdTe heterostructure solar cells, which are close to those of benchmark GaAs cells.

  15. Yellow-light generation and engineering in zinc-doped cadmium sulfide nanobelts with low-threshold two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Li, Jing; Li, Qisong; Chen, Bingkun; Song, Guangli; Zhang, Wensheng; Shi, Lijie; Zou, Bingsuo; Liu, Ruibin

    2014-08-15

    Through a simple doping route with zinc ion as a dopant in cadmium sulfide nanobelts, a bright yellow-colored light was obtained. The detailed chromaticity and brightness of the light can be engineered by the dopant concentration and the pumping power, which are used to control the dominant wavelength to any fine yellow color, and even cover the sodium-yellow-line of 589 nm. The nanobelts were synthesized through a chemical vapor deposition method. The peak shift of the XRD result proves that the zinc ions as a dopant exist in the nanobelts rather than in the ZnCdS alloy formation. Time-resolved photoluminescence of the nanobelt reveals the existence of the defect-related state, which induces a red band to further mix with green band-edge emission to form the yellow light. Moreover, low-threshold two-photon excitation was observed in the proper Zn-doped cadmium sulfide nanobelts. The dopant and pumping power-tuned generation and engineering of the yellow light makes it possible to use this kind of material as yellow light-emitting source.

  16. Chemically deposited thin films of sulfides and selenides of antimony and bismuth as solar energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, M. T.; Nair, Padmanabhan K.; Garcia, V. M.; Pena, Y.; Arenas, O. L.; Garcia, J. C.; Gomez-Daza, O.

    1997-10-01

    Chemical bath deposition techniques for bismuth sulfide, bismuth selenide, antimony sulfide, and antimony selenide thin films of about 0.20 - 0.25 micrometer thickness are reported. All these materials may be considered as solar absorber films: strong optical absorption edges, with absorption coefficient, (alpha) , greater than 104 cm-1, are located at 1.31 eV for Bi2Se3, 1.33 eV for Bi2S3, 1.8 eV for Sb2S3, and 1.35 eV for Sb2Se3. As deposited, all the films are nearly amorphous. However, well defined crystalline peaks matching bismuthinite (JCPDS 17- 0320), paraguanajuatite (JCPDS 33-0214), and stibnite (JCPDS 6-0474) and antimony selenide (JCPDS 15-0861) for Bi2S3, Bi2Se3, Sb2S3 and Sb2Se3 respectively, are observed when the films are annealed in nitrogen at 300 degrees Celsius. This is accompanied by a substantial modification of the electrical conductivity in the films: from 10-7 (Omega) -1 cm-1 (in as prepared films) to 10 (Omega) -1 cm-1 in the case of bismuth sulfide and selenide films, and enhancement of photosensitivity in the case of antimony sulfide films. The chemical deposition of a CuS/CuxSe film on these Vx- VIy films and subsequent annealing at 300 degrees Celsius for 1 h at 1 torr of nitrogen leads to the formation of p-type films (conductivity of 1 - 100 (Omega) -1 cm-1) of multinary composition. Among these, the formation of Cu3BiS3 (JCPDS 9-0488) and Cu3SbS4 (JCPDS 35- 0581), CuSbS2 (JCPDS 35-0413) have been clearly detected. Solar energy applications of these films are suggested.

  17. Structural, photoconductivity and photoluminescence characterization of cadmium sulfide quantum dots prepared by a co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sheo K.; Srivastava, Rajneesh K.; Prakash, S. G.; Yadav, Raghvendra S.; Panday, A. C.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) are synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the formation of a cubical zinc blend structure of CdS nanoparticles. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images revealed that the CdS QDs are of 2-5 nm in size. The UV-vis absorption spectra showed an absorption peak at 427 nm (˜2.90 eV) indicating a blue shift of 0.48 eV as compared to bulk CdS. We estimated the particle sizes with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns (3.665 nm) and the shift of the band gap absorption in the UV-vis spectrum (4.276 nm), which is very close to the TEM micrograph result. The photoluminescence spectrum shows three major emission peaks centered at 453 nm (˜2.73 eV), 526 nm (˜2.35 eV) and 551 nm (˜2.24 eV) at room temperature, which may be attributed to excitonic transitions, donor-acceptor (D-A) pairs recombination and the sulphur interstitial defects (Is) present in the band gap. To study the photoconductivity, the field dependence of the photocurrent and the dark-current was assessed, as was the time-resolved rise and decay photocurrent spectrum and wavelength-dependence photocurrent spectrum assessment of the CdS QDs. The time-resolved rise and decay photocurrent spectra exhibited negative photoconductivity (NPC) behavior when the CdS QDs were illuminated with 490 nm light. Such anomalous NPC may be attributed to the light-induced desorption of water molecules. The wavelength-dependence of the photocurrent was found to be close to the absorption and PL spectrum. The photoconductivity properties of the CdS QDs were measured using a thick film of powder without any binder. These CdS QDs can find potential application in optoelectronic devices and photodetectors.

  18. Device Engineering Towards Improved Tin Sulfide Solar Cell Performance and Performance Reproducibility

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, Vera; Chakraborty, Rupak; Rekemeyer, Paul; Siol, Sebastian; Martinot, Loic; Polizzotti, Alex; Yang, Chuanxi; Hartman, Katy; Gradecak, Silvija; Zakutayev, Andriy; Gordon, Roy G.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-11-21

    As novel absorber materials are developed and screened for their photovoltaic (PV) properties, the challenge remains to rapidly test promising candidates in high-performing PV devices. There is a need to engineer new compatible device architectures, including the development of novel transparent conductive oxides and buffer layers. Here, we consider the two approaches of a substrate-style and a superstrate-style device architecture for novel thin-film solar cells. We use tin sulfide as a test absorber material. Upon device engineering, we demonstrate new approaches to improve device performance and performance reproducibility.

  19. Improved performance of silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots/organic hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhaoyun; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Renqi; Xue, Zhaoguo; Wang, Hongyu; Xu, Jun; Yu, Yao; Su, Weining; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji

    2015-04-01

    We fabricated silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs)/organic hybrid solar cells and investigated their structure and electrical properties. Transmission electron microscope revealed that CdTe QDs were uniformly distributed on the surface of the silicon nanowires, which made PEDOT:PSS easily filled the space between SiNWs. The current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of hybrid solar cells were investigated both in dark and under illumination. The result shows that the performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layer has an obvious improvement. The optimal short-circuit current density (Jsc) of solar cells with CdTe QDs layer can reach 33.5 mA/cm2. Compared with the solar cells without CdTe QDs, Jsc has an increase of 15.1%. Power conversion efficiency of solar cells also increases by 28.8%. The enhanced performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layers are ascribed to down-shifting effect of CdTe QDs and the modification of the silicon nanowires surface with CdTe QDs. The result of our experiments suggests that hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs modified are promising candidates for solar cell application.

  20. Photoemf in cadmium sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeer, K. W.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations on CdS single crystals and CuxS:CdS photovoltaic cells prepared from CdS single crystals by a chemical-dip procedure are described. The studies are aimed at clarifying cell mechanisms which affect key cell properties (efficiency, reliability, and lifetime) by examining the properties of intrinsic and extrinsic defects in the junction and surface regions and their effects on carrier transport through these regions. The experimental research described includes studies of thermal, infrared, and field quenching of acceptor-doped CdS crystals; investigation of optical and electrical properties of CuxS:CdS photovoltaic cells (current-voltage characteristics, spectral distribution of photocurrent and photovoltage) and the dependence of these properties on temperature and light intensity; measurement of changes, as a result of heat treatment in ultrahigh vacuum, in the spectral distribution of photoconductivity at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature, the luminescence spectrum at liquid nitrogen temperature, and the thermally stimulated current curves of CdS crystals; determination of the effect of irradiation with 150 keV (maximum) X-rays on the spectral distribution of photoconductivity and thermally-stimulated current of CdS crystals; and studies of the effect of growth conditions on the photoconductive properties of CdS crystals.

  1. Photoluminescence Excitation Spectroscopy Characterization of Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, James E.; Wang, Xufeng; Grubbs, Elizabeth K.; Drayton, Jennifer; Johnston, Steve; Levi, Dean; Lundstrom, Mark S.; Bermel, Peter

    2016-11-21

    The use of steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy as a contactless characterization tool, suitable for inline optical characterization, has been previously demonstrated for high efficiency solar cells such as GaAs. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of PLE characterization on a thin film CdS/CdTe np heterojunction solar cell, and compare the results to measured EQE and I-V data. In contrast to previous work on high-quality GaAs, the PLE and EQE spectra do not match closely here. We still find, however, that reliable material parameters can be extracted from the PLE measurements. We also provide a physical explanation of the limits defining the cases when the PLE and EQE spectra may be expected to match.

  2. Improved performance of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells adopting a highly efficient cobalt sulfide/nickel sulfide composite thin film counter electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee-Je; Kim, Su-Weon; Gopi, Chandu V. V. M.; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Rao, S. Srinivasa; Jeong, Myeong-Soo

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt sulfide (CoS), nickel sulfide (NiS), and cobalt sulfide/nickel sulfide (CoS/NiS) were deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate using a facile chemical bath deposition method and utilized as counter electrodes (CEs) for polysulfide redox reactions in CdS/CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). The thickness of 750 nm and 695 nm are optimized for NiS and CoS electrodes to prepare the CoS/NiS CE. Compared to a platinum (Pt) electrode, the CoS, NiS, and composite CoS/NiS electrodes provide higher electrocatalytic activity and lower charge-transfer resistance. The combination of a QDSSC with composite CoS/NiS CE shows an improved power conversion efficiency of 3.40% under the illumination of one sun (100 mW cm-2), which is higher than the CoS (2.53%), NiS (2.61%), and Pt (1.47%) CEs. This enhancement is mainly attributed to the NiS nanoparticles deposited on CoS film, due to which the composite structure exhibits a lower charge transfer resistance (7.61 Ω) at the interface of the CE and the electrolyte, along with superior electrochemical catalytic ability. This is well supported by the cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Tafel polarization measurements.

  3. Workshop proceedings: Photovoltaic conversion of solar energy for terrestrial applications. Volume 2: Invited papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A photovoltaic device development plan is reported that considers technological as well as economical aspects of single crystal silicon, polycrystal silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide thin films, as well as other materials and devices for solar cell energy conversion systems.

  4. Effects of piezoelectricity on cadmium sulphide-copper sulphide solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the effects of applied uniform and non-uniform stresses on copper sulphide-cadmium sulphide solar cells predict that uniform stress will not affect their performance, while non-uniform stress will. Changes in open-circuit voltage and capacitance resulting from piezoelectric effects are predicted to be proportional to the divergence of the piezoelectric polarization. Experiments performed on single crystal cells verified these calculations for uniform stresses, and for a particular non-uniform stress (uniaxial bending). The changes in the latter case were less than 1%. These experiments were extended to determine the growth face of crystallites in polycrystalline cells.

  5. Direct Synthesis of Novel and Reactive Sulfide-modified Nano Iron through Nanoparticle Seeding for Improved Cadmium-Contaminated Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yiming; Adeleye, Adeyemi S.; Huang, Yuxiong; Zhou, Xuefei; Keller, Arturo A.; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic sulfide-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (S-nZVI) is of great technical and scientific interest because of its promising application in groundwater remediation, although its synthesis is still a challenge. We develop a new nanoparticle seeding method to obtain a novel and reactive nanohybrid, which contains an Fe(0) core covered by a highly sulfidized layer under high extent of sulfidation. Syntheses monitoring experiments show that seeding accelerates the reduction rate from Fe2+ to Fe0 by 19%. X-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analyses demonstrate the hexahedral Fe-Fe bond (2.45 and 2.83 Å) formation through breaking down of the 1.99 Å Fe-O bond both in crystalline and amorphous iron oxide. The XANES analysis also shows 24.2% (wt%) of FeS with bond length of 2.4 Å in final nanohybrid. Both X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer analyses further confirm that increased nanoparticle seeding results in formation of more Fe0 crystals. Nano-SiO2 seeding brings down the size of single Fe0 grain from 32.4 nm to 18.7 nm, enhances final Fe0 content from 5.9% to 55.6%, and increases magnetization from 4.7 to 65.5 emu/g. The synthesized nanohybrid has high cadmium removal capacity and holds promising prospects for treatment of metal-contaminated water. PMID:27095387

  6. Atomic layer deposition of titanium sulfide and its application in extremely thin absorber solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahuli, Neha; Sarkar, Shaibal K.

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiS{sub 2} is investigated with titanium tetrachloride and hydrogen sulfide precursors. In-situ quartz crystal microbalance and ex-situ x-ray reflectivity measurements are carried out to study self-limiting deposition chemistry and material growth characteristics. The saturated growth rate is found to be ca. 0.5 Å/cycle within the ALD temperature window of 125–200 °C. As grown material is found poorly crystalline. ALD grown TiS{sub 2} is applied as a photon harvesting material for solid state sensitized solar cells with TiO{sub 2} as electron transport medium. Initial results with Spiro-OMeTAD as hole conducting layer show ca. 0.6% energy conversion efficiency under 1 sun illumination.

  7. Annealed single-crystal cadmium selenide electrodes in liquid junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, S.; Colbow, K.; Mackintosh, A.

    1984-12-01

    I-V characteristics, voltage dependence of the quantum efficiency, and spectral response were compared for annealed single-crystal CdSe photoanodes. Annealing in cadmium atmosphere improved the overall solar response considerably, while annealing under vacuum revealed a poor response for photon energies larger than 1.8 eV and a high quantum efficiency for near-bandgap energies. This behavior may be attributed to electron-hole pai generation from interbandgap states and a large density of minority carrier recombination centers near the crystal surface, owing to a high nonstoichiometry and a selenium layer at the surface. Annealing in selenium atmosphere resulted in very poor solar response caused by compensation. Simultaneous illumination of the electrodes with a He-Ne lase strongly enhanced the quantum efficiency for vacuum-annealed crystals for near-bandgap photons. We attribute this to electron trapping in the selenium-rich surface, with a resulting increase in depletion-layer width in the cadmium selenide.

  8. Lead-Sulfide-Selenide Quantum Dots and Gold-Copper Alloy Nanoparticles Augment the Light-Harvesting Ability of Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Deepa, Melepurath; Ghosal, Partha

    2017-01-10

    Lead-sulfide-selenide (PbSSe) quantum dots (QDs) and gold-copper (AuCu) alloy nanoparticles (NPs) were incorporated into a cadmium sulfide (CdS)/titanium oxide (TiO2 ) photoanode for the first time to achieve enhanced conversion of solar energy into electricity. PbSSe QDs with a band gap of 1.02 eV extend the light-harvesting range of the photoanode from the visible region to the near-infrared region. The conduction band (CB) edge of the PbSSe QDs is wedged between the CBs of TiO2 and CdS; this additional level coupled with the good electrical conductivity of the dots facilitate charge transport and collection, and a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.44 % is achieved for the champion cell with the TiO2 /PbSSe/CdS electrode. Upon including AuCu alloy NPs in the QD-sensitized electrodes, light absorption is enhance by plasmonic and light-scattering effects and also by the injection of hot electrons to the CBs of the QDs. Comparison of the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency enhancement factors in addition to fluorescence decay and impedance studies reveal that the PbSSe QDs and AuCu alloy NPs promote charge injection to the current collector and increase the photogenerated charges produced, which thus enables the TiO2 /PbSSe/CdS/AuCu cell to deliver the highest PCE of 5.26 % among all the various photoanode compositions used.

  9. Single-material zinc sulfide bi-layer antireflection coatings for GaAs solar cells.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jung Woo; Jun, Dong-Hwan; Heo, Jonggon; Park, Won-Kyu; Park, Jin-Hong; Cho, Woo Jin; Kim, Do Eok; Yu, Jae Su

    2013-09-09

    We demonstrated the efficiency improvement of GaAs single-junction (SJ) solar cells with the single-material zinc sulfide (ZnS) bi-layer based on the porous/dense film structure, which was fabricated by the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) method, as an antireflection (AR) coating layer. The porous ZnS film with a low refractive index was formed at a high incident vapor flux angle of 80° in the GLAD. Each optimum thickness of ZnS bi-layer was determined by achieving the lowest solar weighted reflectance (SWR) using a rigorous coupled-wave analysis method in the wavelength region of 350-900 nm, extracting the thicknesses of 20 and 50 nm for dense and porous films, respectively. The ZnS bi-layer with a low SWR of ~5.8% considerably increased the short circuit current density (J(sc)) of the GaAs SJ solar cell to 25.57 mA/cm(2), which leads to a larger conversion efficiency (η) of 20.61% compared to the conventional one without AR layer (i.e., SWR~31%, J(sc) = 18.81 mA/cm(2), and η = 14.82%). Furthermore, after the encapsulation, its J(sc) and η values were slightly increased to 25.67 mA/cm(2) and 20.71%, respectively. For the fabricated solar cells, angle-dependent reflectance properties and external quantum efficiency were also studied.

  10. Synthesis of Copper-Antimony-Sulfide Nanocrystals for Solution-Processed Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Satoshi; Horita, Keisuke; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Tooru; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Ishiwata, Yoichi; Shimanoe, Kengo; Kida, Tetsuya

    2015-08-17

    The p-type nanocrystals (NCs) of copper-based chalcogenides, such as CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have attracted increasing attention in photovoltaic applications due to their potential to produce cheap solution-processed solar cells. Herein, we report the synthesis of copper-antimony-sulfide (CAS) NCs with different crystal phases including CuSbS2, Cu3SbS4, and Cu12Sb4S13. In addition, their morphology, crystal phase, and optical properties were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, UV-vis-near-IR spectroscopy, and photoemission yield spectroscopy. The morphology, crystal phase, and electronic structure were significantly dependent on the chemical composition in the CAS system. Devices were fabricated using particulate films consisting of CAS NCs prepared by spin coating without a high-temperature treatment. The CAS NC-based devices exhibited a diode-like current-voltage characteristic when coupled with an n-type CdS layer. In particular, the CuSbS2 NC devices exhibited photovoltaic responses under simulated sunlight, demonstrating its applicability for use in solution-processed solar cells.

  11. Synthesis and structural characterization of magnetic cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, and study of its activity for dyes degradation under ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite (CdS/CFO) nanocomposite was easily synthesized by one-step hydrothermal decomposition of cadmium diethyldithiocarbamate complex on the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at 200 °C. Spectroscopic techniques of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and magnetic measurements were applied for characterizing the structure and morphology of the product. The results of FT-IR, XRD and EDX indicated that the CdS/CFO was highly pure. SEM and TEM results revealed that the CdS/CFO nanocomposite was formed from nearly uniform and sphere-like nanoparticles with the size of approximately 20 nm. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the CdS/CFO nanocomposite showed the band gap of 2.21 eV, which made it suitable for sono-/photo catalytic purposes. By using the obtained CdS/CFO nanocomposite, an ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation process (AOP) has been developed for catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB), and methyl orange (MO)) in the presence of H2O2 as a green oxidant. CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited excellent sonocatalytic activity, so that, dyes were completely degraded in less than 10 min. The influences of crucial factors such as the H2O2 amount and catalyst dosage on the degradation efficiency were evaluated. The as-prepared CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited higher catalytic activity than pure CdS nanoparticles. Moreover, the magnetic property of CoFe2O4 made the nanocomposite recyclable.

  12. Processing of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystal Dispersions for Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Bryce Arthur

    A scalable and inexpensive renewable energy source is needed to meet the expected increase in electricity demand throughout the developed and developing world in the next 15 years without contributing further to global warming through CO2 emissions. Photovoltaics may meet this need but current technologies are less than ideal requiring complex manufacturing processes and/or use of toxic, rare-earth materials. Copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu 2ZnSnS4, CZTS) solar cells offer a true "green" alternative based upon non-toxic and abundant elements. Solution-based processes utilizing CZTS nanocrystal dispersions followed by high temperature annealing have received significant research attention due to their compatibility with traditional roll-to-roll coating processes. In this work, CZTS nanocrystal (5-35 nm diameters) dispersions were utilized as a production pathway to form solar absorber layers. Aerosol-based coating methods (aerosol jet printing and ultrasonic spray coating) were optimized for formation of dense, crack-free CZTS nanocrystal coatings. The primary variables underlying determination of coating morphology within the aerosol-coating parameter space were investigated. It was found that the liquid content of the aerosol droplets at the time of substrate impingement play a critical role. Evaporation of the liquid from the aerosol droplets during coating was altered through changes to coating parameters as well as to the CZTS nanocrystal dispersions. In addition, factors influencing conversion of CZTS nanocrystal coatings into dense, large-grained polycrystalline films suitable for solar cell development during thermal annealing were studied. The roles nanocrystal size, carbon content, sodium uptake, and sulfur pressure were found to have pivotal roles in film microstructure evolution. The effects of these parameters on film morphology, grain growth rates, and chemical makeup were analyzed from electron microscopy images as well as compositional analysis

  13. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of cadmium-doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles under simulated solar light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xu Chun; Li, Wen Ting; Huang, Wan Zhen; Zhou, Huan; Yin, Hao Yong; Zheng, Yi Fan

    2015-03-01

    Novel cadmium-doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles with different Cd contents have been synthesized by a one-step route using ethylene glycol and water as solvents at 180 °C for 12 h. The as-synthesized samples were characterized in detailed by SEM, XRD, EDS, HRTEM, UV-Vis DRS, BET techniques, and so on. The results shown that with the increase of the Cd2+ addition, the crystal structure, lattice space, and absorption edge were not significantly changed and the calculated band gap value was 2.58 eV. However, the flower-like Bi2WO6 sphere was gradually destroyed. Simultaneously, the surface area and photocurrent responses of the catalysts were greatly increased. Photocatalytic activity of the Cd-doped Bi2WO6 samples was determined by monitoring the change of RhB concentration under simulated solar light. The results revealed that cadmium doping greatly improved the photocatalytic efficiency of Bi2WO6. The Bi2WO6 sample with R Cd = 0.05 displayed the highest photocatalytic activity, and the degradation rate is about two times greater than pure Bi2WO6. Moreover, the Cd-Bi2WO6 photocatalyst remained stable even after five consecutive cycles. A possible mechanism of photocatalytic activity enhancement on basis of the experimental results was proposed.

  14. Thermo-optical characterization of cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots embedded in biocompatible materials.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Viviane; Alves, Leandro P; Iwazaki, Adalberto N; Andrade, Acácio A; Antunes, Andrea; Munin, Egberto

    2013-09-01

    Cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) core-shell quantum dots (QDs) embedded in biocompatible materials were thermally and optically characterized with a thermal lens (TL) technique. Transient TL measurements were performed with a mode-mismatched, dual-beam (excitation and probe) configuration. A thermo-optical study of the CdSe/ZnS QDs was performed for different core diameters (3.5, 4.0, 5.2, and 6.6 nm) in aqueous solution and synthetic saliva, and three different core diameters (2.4, 2.9, and 4.1 nm) embedded in restorative dental resin (0.025% by mass). The thermal diffusivity results are characteristic of the biocompatible matrices. The radiative quantum efficiencies for aqueous solution and biofluid materials are dependent on the core size of the CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs. The results obtained from the fluorescence spectral measurements for the biocompatible materials support the TL results.

  15. Different behavior of Staphylococcus epidermidis in intracellular biosynthesis of silver and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles: more stability and lower toxicity of extracted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rezvani Amin, Zohreh; Khashyarmanesh, Zahra; Fazly Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh

    2016-09-01

    Chemical reagents that are used for synthesis of nanoparticles are often toxic, while biological reagents are safer and cost-effective. Here, the behavior of Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228) was evaluated for biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-NPs) using TEM images intra- and extracellularly. The bacteria only biosynthesized the nanoparticles intracellularly and distributed Ag-NPs throughout the cytoplasm and on outside surface of cell walls, while CdS-NPs only formed in cytoplasm near the cell wall. A new method for purification of the nanoparticles was used. TEM images of pure CdS-NPs confirmed biosynthesis of agglomerated nanoparticles. Biosynthetic Ag-NPs were more stable against bright light and aggregation reaction than synthetic Ag-NPs (prepared chemically) also biosynthetic Ag-NPs displayed lower toxicity in in vitro assays. CdS-NPs indicated no toxicity in in vitro assays. Biosynthetic nanoparticles as product of the detoxification pathway may be safer and more stable for biosensors.

  16. A selective fluorescence probe for mercury ion based on the fluorescence quenching of terbium(III)-doped cadmium sulfide composite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jie; Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi; Bo, Ling; Zhou, Cailing; Chen, Jingguo

    2010-10-15

    A fluorescent probe for mercury(II) ions, based on the quenching of fluorescence of terbium(III) ions doped in CdS nanoparticles, has been developed. The terbium(III)-doped cadmium sulfide composite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through a straightforward one-pot process, with the biomolecule glutathione (GSH) as a capping ligand. In addition, the terbium(III) ions were observed an enhancement of emission intensity, owing to fluorescence energy transfer from the excited CdS particles to the emitting terbium(III). Because of a specific interaction, the fluorescence intensity of terbium(III)-doped CdS particles is obviously reduced in the presence of mercury(II) ions. The fluorescence quenching phenomenon of terbium(III) can be attributed to the fact that the energy transfer system was destroyed by combining with mercury(II). Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescent intensity of terbium(III) ions at 491nm decreased linearly with the concentration of mercury(II) ions ranging from 4.5nmolL(-1) to 550nmolL(-1). The limit of detection for mercury(II) was 0.1nmolL(-1). This method is simple, practical, relatively free of interference from coexisting substances and can be successfully applied to the determination of mercury(II) ions in real water samples. In addition, the probable mechanism of reaction between terbium(III)-doped CdS composite nanoparticles and mercury(II) was also discussed.

  17. Flower-like nickel cobalt sulfide microspheres modified with nickel sulfide as Pt-free counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Jinghao; Wu, Jihuai; Zheng, Min; Tu, Yongguang; Lan, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    The nickel cobalt sulfide/nickel sulfide (NiCo2S4/NiS) microspheres which exhibit flower-like morphologies are synthesized by a two-step hydrothermal method. Then the NiCo2S4/NiS microspheres are deposited on a fluorine doped SnO2 substrate by spin-casting the isopropyl alcohol solution of as-prepared microspheres. The cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel tests are employed to measure the electrochemical performance of NiCo2S4/NiS counter electrode. The NiCo2S4 and NiS all are used to improve the conductivity and electrocatalytic ability of the films, and the NiS can also increase the specific surface area of microspheres. The dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with the NiCo2S4/NiS counter electrode exhibite a power conversion efficiency of 8.8%, which is higher than that of DSSC with Pt counter electrode (8.1%) under the light intensity of 100 mW cm-2 (AM 1.5 G).

  18. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L. )

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  19. Solar light-driven photocatalytic hydrogen evolution over ZnIn2S4 loaded with transition-metal sulfides

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A series of Pt-loaded MS/ZnIn2S4 (MS = transition-metal sulfide: Ag2S, SnS, CoS, CuS, NiS, and MnS) photocatalysts was investigated to show various photocatalytic activities depending on different transition-metal sulfides. Thereinto, CoS, NiS, or MnS-loading lowered down the photocatalytic activity of ZnIn2S4, while Ag2S, SnS, or CuS loading enhanced the photocatalytic activity. After loading 1.0 wt.% CuS together with 1.0 wt.% Pt on ZnIn2S4, the activity for H2 evolution was increased by up to 1.6 times, compared to the ZnIn2S4 only loaded with 1.0 wt.% Pt. Here, transition-metal sulfides such as CuS, together with Pt, acted as the dual co-catalysts for the improved photocatalytic performance. This study indicated that the application of transition-metal sulfides as effective co-catalysts opened up a new way to design and prepare high-efficiency and low-cost photocatalysts for solar-hydrogen conversion. PMID:21711804

  20. Cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide heterojunction cell research by sputter deposition. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1981-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.A.; Anderson, W.W.; Meakin, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    A second series of hybrid cells with sputter-deposited Cu/sub 2/S layers has been fabricated. An efficiency of about 4 3/4%, without antireflection coating, was achieved for one of the cells. This result approaches the 5 3/4% which was achieved in the first set (different Cu/sub 2/S deposition conditions) and confirms the viability of the sputtering process for this application. Significant progress has been made in fabricating all-sputtered cells with CdS layers deposited by planar magnetron reactive sputtering. Efficiencies of approximately 3%, without antireflection coatings, have been achieved in the as-deposited state for seven cells. Individual cells have yielded a J/sub sc/ of 12 mA/cm/sup 2/, a V/sub oc/ of 0.53V, and a fill factor of 0.72. Taken together these parameters would yield an efficiency of 4 1/2%. A strong coupling is found between the properties of the Cu/sub 2/S and CdS layers. However, the conditions which maximize J/sub sc/, V/sub oc/ and the fill factor do not appear to be mutually exclusive. Reflectance measurements indicate that 30% or more of the incident radiation is being reflected from the front surface of the cells over the wavelength range of the solar spectrum. Thus optimization of the cell parameters with a suitable antireflection coating should yield cell efficiencies of about 6%. Characterization of the junctions formed in the all-sputtered cells under near-optimum deposition conditions indicates that they have remarkable properties in their as-deposited state, being very similar to high performance conventional cells after heat treatment. Junction ideality factors are about unity in the light, with J/sub 0/ values of about 2 x 10/sup -8/ mA/cm/sup 2/. Interface recombination velocities are as low as a few times 10/sup 5/ cm/sec. CdS depletion layer widths are about 2000 nm in the dark and collapse to about 200 nm under illumination.

  1. Zelda and company - Petrogenesis of sulfide-rich Fremdlinge and constraints on solar nebula processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, John T.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed petrographic and chemical study of Zelda (a gigantic sulfide-rich Fremdling from the Allende Ca-rich inclusion, CAI, Egg 6) and its contact with the host was conducted using analytical SEM and electron-microprobe techniques, and the results were compared with those obtained on other sulfide-rich and oxide-rich Fremdlinge. Strong evidence is presented that Zelda, a type-example of sulfide-rich Fremdlinge, has been formed from a preexisting Ur-Fremdling, similar by composition to Willy, by closed-system sulfidization of magnetite and metal. At least two different sulfidization mechanisms appear to have occurred in altering Fremdlinge: one producing compositionally homogeneous equigranular objects such as Zelda, the other producing compositionally and texturally heterogeneous objects.

  2. Lead Sulfide Cathode for Quantum Dot Solar Cells: Electrosynthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Le, Nghiem; Nguyen, Hoang Thai; Le, Hai Viet; Nguyen, Thoa Thi Phuong

    2017-01-01

    Deposition of lead sulfide (PbS) nanocrystalline thin films onto conducting fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass has been performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.5 mM solution of lead nitrate and sodium thiosulfate at 100 mV s-1 scan rate in the potential range of -1.0 V to 0.0 V versus saturated calomel electrode. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy revealed formation of cubic PbS crystals with size of 100 nm to 150 nm after 50 cycles. High electrocatalytic activity of the synthesized PbS film for the S2-/S n 2- redox couple, used as a mediator for quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs), was demonstrated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and CV measurements. The prepared PbS/FTO was used as a counterelectrode to fabricate PbS-QDSCs with a photoanode consisting of CdS/CdSe quantum dots adsorbed on mesoporous TiO2 film and a polysulfide solution electrolyte. The performance of the PbS-QDSC was compared with a QDSC with a platinum counterelectrode (Pt-QDSC). It was found that, using the same fabrication conditions, the performance of the PbS-QDSC was better than that of the Pt-QDSC. At 1 sun (100 mW cm-2) simulated light, average energy conversion efficiency of 2.14%, short-circuit current of 9.22 mA cm-2, open-circuit potential of 0.50 V, and fill factor of 0.47 were achieved by the fabricated PbS-QDSC.

  3. Cadmium sulfide/graphitic carbon nitride heterostructure nanowire loading with a nickel hydroxide cocatalyst for highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production in water under visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhiping; Sun, Zijun; Liu, Xiang; Jia, Hongxing; Du, Pingwu

    2016-02-01

    Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water in a noble-metal-free system has attracted much attention in recent years. Herein we report on the use of core/shell cadmium sulfide/graphitic carbon nitride (CdS/g-C3N4) heterojunction nanorods modified by nickel hydroxide (Ni(OH)2) as a highly efficient photocatalyst for visible light-driven hydrogen production from water. Due to efficient separation of the photoexcited charge carriers in the CdS/g-C3N4 core/shell nanorods and the synergistic effect of Ni(OH)2, the optimal hydrogen evolution rate over Ni(OH)2-CdS/g-C3N4 is 115.18 μmol h-1 mg-1 under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm), which is ~26 times higher than the CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite without Ni(OH)2 and ~7 times better than the 0.5 wt% Pt-CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite. The apparent quantum efficiency is ~16.7% at an excitation of 450 nm. During photocatalysis, no degradation of Ni(OH)2 was observed based on the XPS data, indicating that it is a robust cocatalyst. Moreover, the present photocatalyst showed excellent photocatalytic stability for hydrogen production and the turnover number (TON) reached ~24 600 over 90 hours.Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water in a noble-metal-free system has attracted much attention in recent years. Herein we report on the use of core/shell cadmium sulfide/graphitic carbon nitride (CdS/g-C3N4) heterojunction nanorods modified by nickel hydroxide (Ni(OH)2) as a highly efficient photocatalyst for visible light-driven hydrogen production from water. Due to efficient separation of the photoexcited charge carriers in the CdS/g-C3N4 core/shell nanorods and the synergistic effect of Ni(OH)2, the optimal hydrogen evolution rate over Ni(OH)2-CdS/g-C3N4 is 115.18 μmol h-1 mg-1 under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm), which is ~26 times higher than the CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite without Ni(OH)2 and ~7 times better than the 0.5 wt% Pt-CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite. The apparent quantum efficiency is ~16.7% at an

  4. Effect of the Concentration on the X-ray Luminescence Efficiency of a Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) Quantum Dot Nanoparticle Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valais, I.; Michail, C.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Fountzoula, C.; Bakas, A.; Yannakopoulos, P.; Fountos, G.; Panayiotakis, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2015-09-01

    In the current study preliminary results on the luminescence efficiency (LE) of toluene dissolved Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide (CdSe/ZnS, Sigma-Aldrich, Lumidot 694622) quantum dot samples (QDs) after exposure to X-rays of variable radiation flux are shown. The distinctive influence of the weight over volume (w/v) concentration of the samples in LE was investigated. The light emission of the QDs was additionally measured after UV irradiation. The distribution of the emitted light was symmetrical with a maximum at 590 nm. The w/v concentration of the QDs varied between 7.1×10-5 mg/mL to 28.4×10-5 mg/mL. The samples were handled in a cubic 12.5×12.5×45mm3 quartz cuvette. Each sample was excited under X-ray irradiation, in the energy range from 50 to 130 kVp using a BMI General Medical Merate tube with rotating Tungsten anode and inherent filtration equivalent to 2 mm Al. The X-ray LE, induced by the 28.4×10-5 mg/mL QDs found higher, however, the distinction was vague in the highly concentrated samples. The maximum efficiency was obtained at the 90 kVp for QDs with 21.3×10-5 mg/mL w/v concentration. In the high energy range (120-130 kVp) all concentration levels exhibited comparable X-ray induced LE. The luminescence properties of the investigated QDs appear promising for X-ray detection applications.

  5. Efficient solution-processed small molecule: Cadmium selenide quantum dot bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vinay; Upreti, Tanvi; Chand, Suresh

    2013-12-16

    We report bulk heterojunction solar cells based on blends of solution-processed small molecule [7,7′-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-2,6-diyl) bis(6-fluoro-4-(5′-hexyl-[2,2′-bithiophen]-5yl)benzo[c] [1,2,5] thiadiazole)] p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}: Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) (70:30, 60:40, 50:50, and 40:60) in the device configuration: Indium Tin Oxide /poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)/p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}: CdSe/Ca/Al. The optimized ratio of p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}:CdSe::60:40 leads to a short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) = 5.45 mA/cm{sup 2}, open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) = 0.727 V, and fill factor (FF) = 51%, and a power conversion efficiency = 2.02% at 100 mW/cm{sup 2} under AM1.5G illumination. The J{sub sc} and FF are sensitive to the ratio of p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}:CdSe, which is a crucial factor for the device performance.

  6. Process for removing cadmium from scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    A process for the recovery of a metal, in particular, cadmium contained in scrap, in a stable form. The process comprises the steps of mixing the cadmium-containing scrap with an ammonium carbonate solution, preferably at least a stoichiometric amount of ammonium carbonate, and/or free ammonia, and an oxidizing agent to form a first mixture so that the cadmium will react with the ammonium carbonate to form a water-soluble ammine complex; evaporating the first mixture so that ammine complex dissociates from the first mixture leaving carbonate ions to react with the cadmium and form a second mixture that includes cadmium carbonate; optionally adding water to the second mixture to form a third mixture; adjusting the pH of the third mixture to the acid range whereby the cadmium carbonate will dissolve; and adding at least a stoichiometric amount of sulfide, preferably in the form of hydrogen sulfide or an aqueous ammonium sulfide solution, to the third mixture to precipitate cadmium sulfide. This mixture of sulfide is then preferably digested by heating to facilitate precipitation of large particles of cadmium sulfide. The scrap may be divided by shredding or breaking up to exposure additional surface area. Finally, the precipitated cadmium sulfide can be mixed with glass formers and vitrified for permanent disposal.

  7. Process for removing cadmium from scrap metal

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-04-11

    A process is described for the recovery of a metal, in particular, cadmium contained in scrap, in a stable form. The process comprises the steps of mixing the cadmium-containing scrap with an ammonium carbonate solution, preferably at least a stoichiometric amount of ammonium carbonate, and/or free ammonia, and an oxidizing agent to form a first mixture so that the cadmium will react with the ammonium carbonate to form a water-soluble ammine complex; evaporating the first mixture so that ammine complex dissociates from the first mixture leaving carbonate ions to react with the cadmium and form a second mixture that includes cadmium carbonate; optionally adding water to the second mixture to form a third mixture; adjusting the pH of the third mixture to the acid range whereby the cadmium carbonate will dissolve; and adding at least a stoichiometric amount of sulfide, preferably in the form of hydrogen sulfide or an aqueous ammonium sulfide solution, to the third mixture to precipitate cadmium sulfide. This mixture of sulfide is then preferably digested by heating to facilitate precipitation of large particles of cadmium sulfide. The scrap may be divided by shredding or breaking up to expose additional surface area. Finally, the precipitated cadmium sulfide can be mixed with glass formers and vitrified for permanent disposal. 2 figures.

  8. Radiation resistance of thin-film solar cells for space photovoltaic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and amorphous silicon alloy solar cells have achieved noteworthy performance and are currently being studied for space power applications. Cadmium sulfide cells had been the subject of much effort but are no longer considered for space applications. A review is presented of what is known about the radiation degradation of thin film solar cells in space. Experimental cadmium telluride and amorphous silicon alloy cells are reviewed. Damage mechanisms and radiation induced defect generation and passivation in the amorphous silicon alloy cell are discussed in detail due to the greater amount of experimental data available.

  9. Cadmium Disrupts the Balance between Hydrogen Peroxide and Superoxide Radical by Regulating Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide in the Root Tip of Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wenjing; Yang, Lifei; Xu, Cunfa; Shi, Zhiqi; Shao, Jinsong; Xian, Ming; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Cd (cadmium) stress always alters the homeostasis of ROS (reactive oxygen species) including H2O2 (hydrogen sulfide) and O2•– (superoxide radical), leading to the oxidative injury and growth inhibition in plants. In addition to triggering oxidative injury, ROS has been suggested as important regulators modulating root elongation. However, whether and how Cd stress induces the inhibition of root elongation by differentially regulating endogenous H2O2 and O2•–, rather than by inducing oxidative injury, remains elusive. To address these gaps, histochemical, physiological, and biochemical approaches were applied to investigate the mechanism for Cd to fine-tune the balance between H2O2 and O2•– in the root tip of Brassica rapa. Treatment with Cd at 4 and 16 μM significantly inhibited root elongation, while only 16 μM but not 4 μM of Cd induced oxidative injury and cell death in root tip. Fluorescent and pharmaceutical tests suggested that H2O2 and O2•– played negative and positive roles, respectively, in the regulation of root elongation in the presence of Cd (4 μM) or not. Treatment with Cd at 4 μM led to the increase in H2O2 and the decrease in O2•– in root tip, which may be attributed to the up-regulation of Br_UPB1s and the down-regulation of their predicted targets (four peroxidase genes). Cd at 4 μM resulted in the increase in endogenous H2S in root tip by inducing the up-regulation of LCDs and DCDs. Treatment with H2S biosynthesis inhibitor or H2S scavenger significantly blocked Cd (4 μM)-induced increase in endogenous H2S level, coinciding with the recovery of root elongation, the altered balance between H2O2 and O2•–, and the expression of Br_UPB1s and two peroxidase genes. Taken together, it can be proposed that endogenous H2S mediated the phytotoxicity of Cd at low concentration by regulating Br_UPB1s-modulated balance between H2O2 and O2•– in root tip. Such findings shed new light on the regulatory role of endogenous H2S in

  10. Cadmium Disrupts the Balance between Hydrogen Peroxide and Superoxide Radical by Regulating Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide in the Root Tip of Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenjing; Yang, Lifei; Xu, Cunfa; Shi, Zhiqi; Shao, Jinsong; Xian, Ming; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Cd (cadmium) stress always alters the homeostasis of ROS (reactive oxygen species) including H2O2 (hydrogen sulfide) and [Formula: see text] (superoxide radical), leading to the oxidative injury and growth inhibition in plants. In addition to triggering oxidative injury, ROS has been suggested as important regulators modulating root elongation. However, whether and how Cd stress induces the inhibition of root elongation by differentially regulating endogenous H2O2 and [Formula: see text], rather than by inducing oxidative injury, remains elusive. To address these gaps, histochemical, physiological, and biochemical approaches were applied to investigate the mechanism for Cd to fine-tune the balance between H2O2 and [Formula: see text] in the root tip of Brassica rapa. Treatment with Cd at 4 and 16 μM significantly inhibited root elongation, while only 16 μM but not 4 μM of Cd induced oxidative injury and cell death in root tip. Fluorescent and pharmaceutical tests suggested that H2O2 and [Formula: see text] played negative and positive roles, respectively, in the regulation of root elongation in the presence of Cd (4 μM) or not. Treatment with Cd at 4 μM led to the increase in H2O2 and the decrease in [Formula: see text] in root tip, which may be attributed to the up-regulation of Br_UPB1s and the down-regulation of their predicted targets (four peroxidase genes). Cd at 4 μM resulted in the increase in endogenous H2S in root tip by inducing the up-regulation of LCDs and DCDs. Treatment with H2S biosynthesis inhibitor or H2S scavenger significantly blocked Cd (4 μM)-induced increase in endogenous H2S level, coinciding with the recovery of root elongation, the altered balance between H2O2 and [Formula: see text], and the expression of Br_UPB1s and two peroxidase genes. Taken together, it can be proposed that endogenous H2S mediated the phytotoxicity of Cd at low concentration by regulating Br_UPB1s-modulated balance between H2O2 and [Formula: see text] in root

  11. Discovery of Hg-Cu-bearing metal-sulfide assemblages in a primitive H-3 chondrite: Towards a new insight in early solar system processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillet Komorowski, Catherine; El Goresy, Ahmed; Miyahara, Masaaki; Boudouma, Omar; Ma, Chi

    2012-10-01

    We report here the discovery of a novel meteoritic paragenesis consisting of sub-micrometric HgS, Cu sulfides, and Hg metal, associated with polycrystalline fine-grained native Cu in opaque mineral aggregates heterogeneously distributed in the matrix of the H-3 Tieschitz unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (UOC). The systematic association of Hg with Cu in Tieschitz chondrite provides a unique opportunity to place robust constraints on the origin of these assemblages either by condensation and sulfidation in a local nebular reservoir of non-solar composition, followed by gentle and fast accretion, or by sublimation of Hg from the hot interior of the asteroid and recondensation in its cold outer regions. The sulfide phase relations support low temperature conditions (<300 °C), implying that subsequent to accretion indigenous hydrothermal processing, oxidation/sulfidation, transportation, or shock-induced thermal processing of the assemblage on the parent body earlier proposed are very unlikely and unrealistic. Origin of HgS by sublimation of Hg from the hotter asteroid interior and precipitation as cinnabar in the colder surface regions is discrepant with our findings and can be ruled out because cinnabar occurs only in Tieschitz matrix in alternating rhythmic intergrowth with Cu-sulfide. The sublimation scenario calls for co-evaporation of both the highly volatile Hg as HgS and Hg metal and the moderately volatile Cu both as Cu metal, or their sulfides and deposition as sulfides in alternating episodes. Our findings provide further ample evidence refuting the repeated claim of formation of native copper in chondritic metal by shock-induced impact melting. Cold accretion is the only reasonable possibility to preserve the delicate accretionary intergrowth textures, the polycrystallinity of FeNi-metal, native Cu, Hg-Cu-sulfides and native Hg globules and the high Hg concentration retained in this meteorite. Our findings strongly suggest that Tieschitz resided near the

  12. Space-based solar power conversion and delivery systems study. Volume 4: Energy conversion systems studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Solar cells and optical configurations for the SSPS were examined. In this task, three specific solar cell materials were examined: single crystal silicon, single crystal gallium arsenide, and polycrystalline cadmium sulfide. The comparison of the three different cells on the basis of a subsystem parametric cost per kW of SSPS-generated power at the terrestrial utility interface showed that gallium arsenide was the most promising solar cell material at high concentration ratios. The most promising solar cell material with no concentration, was dependent upon the particular combination of parameters representing cost, mass and performance that were chosen to represent each cell in this deterministic comparative analysis. The potential for mass production, based on the projections of the present state-of-the-art would tend to favor cadmium sulfide in lieu of single crystal silicon or gallium arsenide solar cells.

  13. A metal sulfide photocatalyst composed of ubiquitous elements for solar hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Y; Umezawa, N; Srinivasan, N; Koyasu, S; Sakai, E; Miyauchi, M

    2016-06-14

    A visible-light-sensitive tin sulfide photocatalyst was designed based on a ubiquitous element strategy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Computational analysis suggested that tin monosulfide (SnS) would be more efficient than SnS2 as a photocathode for hydrogen production because of the low ionization potential and weak ionic character of SnS. To test this experimentally, nanoparticles of SnS were loaded onto a mesoporous electrode using a wet chemical method, and the bandgap of the synthesized SnS quantum dots was found to be tunable by adjusting the number of successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) cycles, which controls the magnitude of the quantum confinement effect. Efficient hydrogen production was achieved when the bandgap of SnS was wider than that of the bulk form.

  14. The 100 kW space station. [regenerative fuel cells and nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium batteries for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckhann, G.

    1977-01-01

    Solar array power systems for the space construction base are discussed. Nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen batteries are equally attractive relative to regenerative fuel cell systems at 5 years life. Further evaluation of energy storage system life (low orbit conditions) is required. Shuttle and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology appears adequate; large units (approximately four times shuttle) are most appropriate and should be studied for a 100 KWe SCB system. A conservative NiH2 battery DOD (18.6%) was elected due to lack of test data and offers considerable improvement potential. Multiorbit load averaging and reserve capacity requirements limit nominal DOD to 30% to 50% maximum, independent of life considerations.

  15. An efficient and transparent copper sulfide nanosheet film counter electrode for bifacial quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Weijun; Fang, Guojia; Lei, Hongwei; Qin, Pingli; Tao, Hong; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2014-02-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) with nanosheet structure has been synthesized at a low temperature in situ on copper (Cu) film coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass and bifacial quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) were herein developed by using these CuS as counter electrodes (CEs). CuS is an environmental compatible and low toxic material. The obtained two-dimensional CuS nanosheet film presents high carrier mobility and exhibits highly catalytic performance for the polysulfide-based electrolyte. The QDSSC based on a CuS CE presents a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.65% by optimizing the thickness of the Cu film under front illumination. The QDSSC based on a CuS CE prepared with a 200 nm thick Cu film shows a very close PCE under front and rear illuminations in which the values are as high as 2.70% and 2.40%, respectively. All the PCEs of the CuS CEs are much higher than that of the Pt CE (1.34%).

  16. Highly effective nickel sulfide counter electrode catalyst prepared by optimal hydrothermal treatment for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, Chandu V. V. M.; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Punnoose, Dinah; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-02-01

    Nickel sulfide (NiS) thin film has been deposited on a fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate by a hydrothermal method using 3-mercaptopropionic acid and used as an efficient counter electrode (CE) for polysulfide redox reactions in quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). NiS has low toxicity and environmental compatibility. In the present study, the size of the NiS nanoparticle increases with the hydrothermal deposition time. The performance of the QDSSCs is examined in detail using polysulfide electrolyte with the NiS CE. A TiO2/CdS/CdSe/ZnS-based QDSSC using the NiS CE shows enhanced photovoltaic performance with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.03%, which is superior to that of a cell with Pt CE (PCE 2.20%) under one sun illumination (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm-2). The improved photovoltaic performance of the NiS-based QDSSC may be attributed to a low charge transfer resistance (5.08 Ω) for the reduction of polysulfide on the CE, indicating greater electrocatalytic activity of the NiS. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and Tafel-polarization measurements were used to investigate the electrocatalytic activity of the NiS and Pt CEs.

  17. Efficient Nickel Sulfide and Graphene Counter Electrodes Decorated with Silver Nanoparticles and Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Gentian; Li, Fumin; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Weifeng

    2016-05-01

    We reported a facile two-step electrochemical-chemical approach for in situ growth of nickel sulfide and graphene counter electrode (CE) decorated with silver nanoparticles (signed NiS/Gr-Ag) and served in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Under optimum conditions, the DSSC achieved a remarkable power conversion efficiency of 8.36 % assembled with the NiS/Gr-Ag CE, much higher than that based on the Pt CE (7.76 %). The surface morphology of NiS/Gr-Ag CE exhibited a smooth surface with cross-growth of NiS, graphene, and Ag nanoparticles, which was beneficial to the fast mass transport of electrolytes; increased the contact area of electrolytes and active materials; and enabled to speed up the reduction of triiodide to iodide. The research on the electrochemical properties also showed that the NiS/Gr-Ag CE possessed lower charge transfer resistance and more excellent electrocatalytic activity in iodide/triiodide electrolyte compared to the Pt electrode.

  18. Titanium dioxide/zinc indium sulfide hetero-junction: An efficient photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Wenjing; Xiao, Yaoming; Han, Gaoyi; Zhang, Ying; Chang, Yunzhen

    2016-10-01

    A facile strategy is developed for the fabrication of titanium dioxide/zinc indium sulfide (TiO2/ZnIn2S4) hetero-junction photoanode with an adjustable ZnIn2S4 doping content and application in the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Comparing to the pure TiO2, TiO2/ZnIn2S4 hetero-junction materials demonstrate an enhanced light utilizing efficiency, a reduced recombination rate of electron-hole pairs, and an accelerated migration process of photoinduced electrons. Due to above merits, DSSC based on TiO2/ZnIn2S4 hetero-junction photoanode achieves a greatly enhanced short-circuit current density, leading to an improved photoelectric conversion efficiency of 8.09% under full sunlight illumination (100 mW cm-2, AM 1.5 G), which is almost 14.43% higher than that of the pure TiO2-based DSSC (7.07%).

  19. Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells. Thirteenth technical progress report, July 1, 1982-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Szedon, J. R.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; McMullin, P. G.

    1983-06-01

    During this period we modified the characteristics of a completed cell by laser treatment in order to alter the sensitivity of the heterojunction behavior to the aging effects of oxygen and moisture. Previously we associated the changes in opposing current which affect the open-circuit voltage of the cells during aging with an increased value of the electric field in the space charge region. The present work demonstrates a strong correlation between the short-circuit current behavior and the density of deep donor states which control open-circuit voltage behavior. Practically speaking, the general degradation trends in the short-circuit current and the opposing current behavior, which we observed in control cells earlier, occur after substantial delay in the laser-treated cell. The laser treatment reduced the rate of the degradation effects in question by at least one order of magnitude. Furthermore, during the early stages of aging in wet oxygen, the laser-treated cell performance was enhanced in terms of both short-circuit current and opposing current.

  20. Green synthesis of wurtzite copper zinc tin sulfide nanocones for improved solar photovoltaic utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Leena; Gupta, Poonam; Chhikara, Nitu; Singh, Om Pal; Muhunthan, N.; Singh, V. N.; Singh, B. P.; Jain, Kiran; Chand, S.

    2015-02-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is considered to be one of the most promising light absorbing materials for low-cost and high-efficiency thin-film solar cells. It is composed of earth abundant, non-toxic elements. In the present study, wurtzite CZTS nanocone has been synthesized by a green chemistry route. The nanocones have been characterized for its optical, structural and microstructural properties using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Optical absorption result shows a band gap of 1.42 eV. XRD and Raman results show wurtzite structure and TEM studies reveal the nanocone structure of the grown material. Growing vertically aligned nanocone structure having smaller diameter shall help in enhancing the light absorption in broader range which shall enhance the efficiency of solar cell. This study is a step in this direction.

  1. Electric field modulation of photoluminescence in cadmium selenide liquid junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garuthara, R.; Tomkiewicz, M.; Silberstein, R.P.

    1983-11-01

    We have utilized photoluminescence, modulated by small periodic changes of electrode potential, to study the potential distribution at the surface of single crystal cadmium selenide in contact with an electrolyte. We have shown that at reverse bias and at electrode potentials, not far from the flat-band potential, the modulated photoluminescence is described by the ''dead layer'' theory, in which the electric field in the space-charge layer quenches completely the photoluminescence in that region. The electrical characterization of the interface, based on modulated photoluminescence, agrees well with more conventional impedance measurements.

  2. Transparent conductive oxides of tin, indium, and cadmium for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorley, Peter; Khomyak, Volodymyr; Horley, Paul; Bilichuk, Sergiy; Bojko, Vyacheslav

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents the investigation results for the technology to obtain the films of SnO II, ITO, and CdO by magnetron sputtering in the pure argon and oxygen-argon mixture, as well as the physical characteristics of the films. For the deposition we have used the substrates made from the quartz glass, sital and silicon. Pure metallic tin, indium and cadmium were used as targets together with the synthesized powder oxides. The authors determined the optimal technological regimes allowing to obtain reproducible high-quality thin films of tin, indium and cadmium oxides with the following electrical and optical parameters: SnO II - specific resistivity ρ = 1.5 - 6.0•10 -4 Ω•cm, optical transmission T = 90 - 95% in transparency region; ITO - ρ = 4.0 - 6.0•10 -4 Ω•cm, T = 90 - 95%; CdO - ρ = 2.0 - 3.0•10 -4 Ω•cm, T = 80 - 90%.

  3. Study of copper sulfide counter electrode on the performances of CdS/CdSe/ZnS-sensitized hierarchical TiO2 spheres quantum dots solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatong, Nattha; Tang, I.-Ming; Pon-On, Weeraphat

    2015-07-01

    The effects of using copper sulfide (CuS) counter electrodes on the performances of solar cells made with CdS/CdSe/ZnS quantum dots co-sensitized onto hierarchical TiO2 spheres (HTS) used as photoelectrode is reported. The HTS in the QDSSCs is composed of an assembly of numerous TiO2 spheres made by the solvolthermal method. The photoelectrical performance of HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to CuS counter electrode was compared to those coupled to Pt CE. The HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to the CuS CE showed the highest power conversion efficiency η (of 1.310 %.) which is significantly higher than those using a standard Pt CE (η = 0.374%) (3.50 fold). This higher efficiency is the results of the higher electrocatalytic activities when the copper sulfide CEs is used.

  4. Ferrocene-graphene sheets for high-efficiency quenching of electrochemiluminescence from Au nanoparticles functionalized cadmium sulfide flower-like three dimensional assemblies and sensitive detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiu-Jun; Cao, Jun-Tao; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yan-Ming; Ren, Shu-Wei

    2017-05-15

    A signal-switchable electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor was presented for sensitive prostate specific antigen (PSA) assay using ferrocene-graphene sheets (Fc-GNs) for high-efficiency quenching of ECL from Au nanoparticles functionalized cadmium sulfide flower-like three dimensional (3D) assemblies (Au-CdS flower-like 3D assemblies). Au-CdS flower-like 3D assemblies were synthesized and employed as luminophore, exhibiting strong and stable ECL intensity, and followed by assembling captured DNA (cDNA) and hybridizing it with half of base sequence of PSA aptamer on the Au-CdS flower-like 3D assemblies modified electrode. The remaining part of the non-complementary base of the aptamer could preferentially adsorb GN with the signal switched "off" state. While in the presence of the PSA, the binding of PSA with aptamer caused desorption of aptamer from the surface of Fc-GNs and was then released from electrode surface, thus allowing the ECL signal enhancement. With the transformation of luminescence signal from "off" to "on", the aptasensor displays high sensitivity for PSA detection with a linear range from 1pgmL(-1) to 25ngmL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.38pgmL(-1)S/N=3). Moreover, this developed method could be successfully applied to the determination of PSA in human serum samples with recoveries of 85.8-104.0%, suggesting great potential applications in biochemical analysis.

  5. Solar electric and thermal conversion system in close proximity to the consumer. [solar panels on house roofs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeer, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Solar cells may be used to convert sunlight directly into electrical energy and into lowgrade heat to be used for large-scale terrestrial solar-energy conversion. Both forms of energy can be utilized if such cells are deployed in close proximity to the consumer (rooftop). Cadmium-sulfide/copper-sulfide (CdS/Cu2S) solar cells are an example of cells which may be produced inexpensively enough to become economically attractive. Cell parameters relevant for combined solar conversion are presented. Critical issues, such as production yield, life expectancy, and stability of performance, are discussed. Systems-design parameters related to operating temperatures are analyzed. First results obtained on Solar One, the experimental house of the University of Delaware, are given. Economic aspects are discussed. Different modes of operation are discussed in respect to the power utility and consumer incentives.

  6. PHOTOVOLTAIC AND THERMOELECTRIC SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION USING THIN FILMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Solar energy conversion by the use of thin films in photovoltaic and thermoelectric devices is discussed. Experimental work is presented on the fabrication of a thin film cadmium sulfide cell which utilizes the photovoltaic effect. A theoretical investigation is made of the temperature differences obtainable in space by using thin, light-weight plastic sheets, and the use of such plastics for thermoelectric generators is discussed. Temperature differences of several hundred centrigrade degrees can be obtained. (Author)

  7. Concentrations of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in the free upper troposphere and lower stratosphere deduced from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results on the volume mixing ratio profiles of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, deduced from the spectroscopic analysis of IR solar absorption spectra obtained in the occultation mode with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during its mission aboard Spacelab 3. A comparison of the ATMOS measurements for both northern and southern latitudes with previous field investigations at low midlatitudes shows a relatively good agreement. Southern Hemisphere volume mixing ratio profiles for both molecules were obtained for the first time, as were the profiles for the Northern Hemisphere covering the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere simultaneously.

  8. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  9. High efficiency cadmium and zinc telluride-based thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Summers, C.J.; Erbil, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S. . School of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-10-01

    Polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te and Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te films with a band gap of 1.7 eV were successfully grown on glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), respectively. Polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te films grown by MBE resulted in uniform composition and sharp interfaces. However, polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te films grown by MOCVD showed nonuniform compositions and evidence of manganese accumulation at the Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te/CdS interface. We found that manganese interdiffuses and replaces cadmium in the CdS film. By improving the CdTe/CdS interface and, thus, reducing the collection function effects, the efficiency of the MOCVD CdTe cell can be improved to about 13.5%. MBE-grown CdTe cells also produced 8%--9% efficiencies. The standard CdTe process was not optimum for ternary films and resulted in a decrease in the band gap. Recent results indicate that CdCl{sub 2} + ZnCl{sub 2} chemical treatment may prevent the band-gap reduction, and that chromate etch (rather than bromine etch) may provide the solution to contact resistance in the ternary cells.

  10. The role of acid-volatile sulfide and interstitial water metal concentrations in determining bioavailability of cadmium and nickel from contaminated sediments to the marine polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Pesch, C.E.; Hansen, D.J.; Boothman, W.S. . Environmental Research Lab.); Berry, W.J. ); Mahony, J.D. . Chemistry Dept.)

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and interstitial water (IW) metal concentrations on bioavailability and toxicity of Cd and Ni to an infaunal sediment-ingesting marine worm, Neanthes Arenaceodentata. Ten-d exposures were conducted with sediments, contaminated primarily with Cd and Ni, from Foundry Cove (Hudson River, NY), and with uncontaminated sediments spiked with Cd or Ni. Molar ratios of simultaneously extracted metal (SEM)/AVS ranged from < 0.02 to 44 for Cd-spiked, 0.02 to 241 for Ni-spiked, and <0.06 to 125 for Foundry Cove sediments. In all experiments, significant mortality was not observed when SEM/AVS ratios were <1.0 and interstitial water toxic units (IWTU) were <1.0. In the Cd and Ni-spiked experiments, when SEM/AVS ratios or IWTUs were >1.0, sediments were either lethal or worms did not burrow. Mortality of worms in Foundry Cove sediments was [le] 20%, and worms burrowed in all these sediments. However, IW contained <1.0 TU (Ni + Cd) in all Foundry Cove sediments except one (IWTU = 1.69). Metal concentrations in worms generally increased with increases in sediment metal concentration, SEM/AVS molar ratio, and IW metal concentration. The presence of metal in worms from sediments from SEM/AVS ratios <1.0 may be evidence of release of Cd or Ni from oxidized metal sulfide (a result of burrowing), uptake of metal from ingested sediment, or adsorption to body surfaces. These results support the hypothesis that when the concentration of AVS in sediments exceeds that of divalent metals sediments will not be acutely toxic. However, a greater number of sediments was correctly predicted to be nontoxic when interstitial water metal concentration of <1.0 TU was used.

  11. Platinum-Free Counter Electrode Comprised of Metal-Organic-Framework (MOF)-Derived Cobalt Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shao-Hui; Li, Chun-Ting; Chien, Heng-Ta; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated a highly efficient (with a solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 8.1%) Pt-free dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The counter electrode was made of cobalt sulfide (CoS) nanoparticles synthesized via surfactant-assisted preparation of a metal organic framework, ZIF-67, with controllable particle sizes (50 to 320 nm) and subsequent oxidation and sulfide conversion. In contrast to conventional Pt counter electrodes, the synthesized CoS nanoparticles exhibited higher external surface areas and roughness factors, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) element mapping, and electrochemical analysis. Incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) results showed an increase in the open circuit voltage (VOC) and a decrease in the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) for CoS-based DSSCs compared to Pt-based DSSCs, resulting in a similar power conversion efficiency. The CoS-based DSSC fabricated in the study show great potential for economically friendly production of Pt-free DSSCs. PMID:25382139

  12. Platinum-Free Counter Electrode Comprised of Metal-Organic-Framework (MOF)-Derived Cobalt Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shao-Hui; Li, Chun-Ting; Chien, Heng-Ta; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2014-11-01

    We fabricated a highly efficient (with a solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 8.1%) Pt-free dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The counter electrode was made of cobalt sulfide (CoS) nanoparticles synthesized via surfactant-assisted preparation of a metal organic framework, ZIF-67, with controllable particle sizes (50 to 320 nm) and subsequent oxidation and sulfide conversion. In contrast to conventional Pt counter electrodes, the synthesized CoS nanoparticles exhibited higher external surface areas and roughness factors, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) element mapping, and electrochemical analysis. Incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) results showed an increase in the open circuit voltage (VOC) and a decrease in the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) for CoS-based DSSCs compared to Pt-based DSSCs, resulting in a similar power conversion efficiency. The CoS-based DSSC fabricated in the study show great potential for economically friendly production of Pt-free DSSCs.

  13. Exploring the main function of reduced graphene oxide nano-flakes in a nickel cobalt sulfide counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Man-Ning; Lin, Jeng-Yu; Wei, Tzu-Chien

    2016-11-01

    Addition of carbonaceous materials into transition metal sulfide counter electrode (CE) of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a common method to improve the performance of the CE and consequent photovoltaic performance. This improvement is almost without exception attributed to the improvement of overall conductivity after the carbonaceous material addition; however, the root function of these carbonaceous materials in promoting the solar cell efficiency is seldom discussed. In this study, highly crystallized nickel cobalt sulfide (NCS) micro-particles were mixed with a small portion of home-made reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nano-flakes. This NCS/rGO hybrid is subjected to extensive characterizations including X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the rGO acts bi-functionally including a co-catalyst in accelerating the tri-iodide reduction for the main NCS catalysts, conductivity promotor to decrease the series resistance of the CE. Proved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, it is confirmed that the decrease in series resistance is less insignificant than that in charge transfer resistance, indicating rGO functions more profoundly as a co-catalyst than as a conductivity promotor. Moreover, an argument to highlight the requirement of a CE in a dim-light optimized DSSC is also proposed.

  14. Drift Mobility Measurements and Electrical Characterization in Thin Film Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Qi

    Thin film CdTe solar cells are leading the production in the thin film photovoltaic industry for the recent few years. The electric properties and mechanism for fabrication of high efficiency solar cells are still not well established. In this thesis, I'll report electron and hole drift mobilities measurements in thin film CdTe solar cells based on two characterization methods: time-of-flight and photocapacitance. For a deposition process similar to that used for high-efficiency cells, the electron drift mobilities are in the range 10-1 -- 100 cm2/Vs, and holes are in the range 100 -- 101 cm2/Vs. The electron drift mobilities are three orders of magnitude smaller than those measured in single crystal CdTe, the hole mobilities are about ten times smaller. Cells were examined before and after a vapor phase treatment with CdCl2; treatment had little effect on the hole drift mobility, but decreased the electron mobility. The electron mobility shows an interesting inverse correlation with the open-circuit voltage for the CdTe coupons with and without the CdCl2 treatment. We speculate that this correlation is due to the diffusion limited recombination. We also discuss the mechanisms reducing the mobilities from the single crystal values. In this thesis, we are able to exclude bandtail trapping and dispersion as a mechanism for the small drift mobilities in thin film CdTe. Other mechanisms like classic scattering, grain boundaries effect, and also polaron interaction will also be discussed in this thesis. All mechanisms mentioned above show little evidence on the influence to the mobility value. The true reason for such a huge change of the drift mobility from its single crystal values still need more interpretations.

  15. Preparation, crystal structure, and thermal stability of the cadmium sulfide nanoclusters Cd6S44+ and Cd2Na2S4+in the sodalite cavities of zeolite A (LTA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Han; Heo, Nam Ho; Kim, Ghyung Hwa; Hong, Suk Bong; Seff, Karl

    2006-12-28

    The crystal structure and thermal stability of two cadmium sulfide nanoclusters prepared in zeolite A (LTA) have been studied by XPS, TGA, and single-crystal and powder XRD. The crystal structures of Cd2.4Na3.2(Cd6S4)0.4(Cd2Na2S)0.6(H2O)> or =5.8[Si12Al12O48]-LTA (a = 12.2919(7) A, crystal 1 (hydrated)) and /Cd4Na2(Cd2O)(Na2O)/[Si12Al12O48]-LTA (a = 12.2617(4) A, crystal 2 (dehydrated)) were determined by single-crystal methods in the cubic space group Pm3m at 294(1) K. Crystal 1 was prepared by ion exchange of Na12-LTA in an aqueous stream 0.05 M in Cd2+, followed by washing in a stream of water, followed by reaction in an aqueous stream 0.05 M in Na2S. Crystal 2 was made by dehydrating crystal 1 at 623 K and 1 x 10(-6) Torr for 3 days. In crystal 1, Cd6S4(4+) nanoclusters were found in and extending out of about 40% of the sodalite cavities. Central to each Cd6S4(4+) cluster is a Cd4S4 unit (interpenetrating Cd2+ and S2- tetrahedra with near Td symmetry, Cd-S = 2.997(24) A, Cd-S-Cd = 113.8(12) degrees, and S-Cd-S = 58.1(24) degrees). Each of the two remaining Cd2+ ions bonds radially through a 6-ring of the zeolite framework to a sulfide ion of this Cd4S4 unit (Cd-S = 2.90(8) A). In each of the remaining 60% of the sodalite cavities of crystal 1, a planar Cd2Na2S4+ cluster was found (Cd-S/Na-S = 2.35(5)/2.56(14) A and Cd-S-Cd/Na-S-Na = 122(5)/92(7) degrees). Cd6S4(4+) and Cd2Na2S4+ are stable within the zeolite up to about 700 K in air. Upon vacuum dehydration at 623 K, all sulfur was lost (crystal 2). Instead as anions, only two oxide ions remain per sodalite unit. One bridges between two Cd2+ ions (Cd2O2+, Cd-O = 2.28(3) A) and the other between two Na+ ions (Na2O, Na-O = 2.21(10) A).

  16. A ternary photocatalyst of graphitic carbon nitride/cadmium sulfide/titania based on the electrostatic assembly using two-dimensional semiconductor nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenjuan; Qian, Jiajia; Yan, Jing; Dong, Xiaoping; Zhou, Baocheng

    2017-04-01

    Herein, we employed the exfoliated two-dimensional (2D) graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) and titania nanosheets (TNS) as building blocks, and these negatively charged nanosheets were flocculated by Cd(2+) ions with a followed sulfidation treatment to produce a ternary heterostructure photocatalyst of CNNS/CdS/TNS. This novel nanocomposite exhibited outstanding absorption in visible spectral region, and meanwhile its gradient band structure and the closed interface promoted the separation of photo-generated charge. The relative content of CNNS and TNS in the ternary nanocomposite was optimized, and the optimal photocatalyst with a CNNS/TNS mass ratio of 98:2 could rapidly remove 10mgL(-1) rhodamine B (RhB) in 20min under visible light irradiation. The calculated rate constant of CNNS/CdS/TNS was 56.87, 12.18, and 6.67 times higher than those of the restacked CNNS and TNS and the individual CdS, as well as 8.31, 6.22 and 2.57 times higher than those of binary CNNS/TNS, CdS/TNS and CdS/CNNS photocatalysts, respectively. Moreover, this nanocomposite possessed a superior durability and universality for degradation of RhB in different concentration and other organic pollutants, including dyes and colorless compounds. Finally, the possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed based on the theoretical calculation and the active species quenching experiment.

  17. Study of copper-free back contacts to thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    The goals of this project are to study Cu free back contact alternatives for CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells, and to research dry etching for CdTe surface preparation before contact application. In addition, an attempt has been made to evaluate the stability of some of the contacts researched. The contacts studied in this work include ZnTe/Cu2Te, Sb2Te 3, and Ni-P alloys. The ZnTe/Cu2Te contact system is studied as basically an extension of the earlier work done on Cu2Te at USF. RF sputtering from a compound target of ZnTe and Cu2Te respectively deposits these layers on etched CdTe surface. The effect of Cu2Te thickness and deposition temperature on contact and cell performance will be studied with the ZnTe depositions conditions kept constant. C-V measurements to study the effect of contact deposition conditions on CdTe doping will also be performed. These contacts will then be stressed to high temperatures (70--100°C) and their stability with stress time is analyzed. Sb2Te3 will be deposited on glass using RF sputtering, to study film properties with deposition temperature. The Sb2Te 3 contact performance will also be studied as a function of the Sb 2Te3 deposition temperature and thickness. The suitability of Ni-P alloys for back contacts to CdTe solar cells was studied by forming a colloidal mixture of Ni2P in graphite paste. The Ni-P contacts, painted on Br-methanol etched CdTe surface, will be studied as a function of Ni-P concentration (in the graphite paste), annealing temperature and time. Some of these cells will undergo temperature stress testing to determine contact behavior with time. Dry etching of CdTe will be studied as an alternative for wet etching processes currently used for CdTe solar cells. The CdTe surface is isotropically etched in a barrel reactor in N2, Ar or Ar:O 2 ambient. The effect of etching ambient, pressure, plasma power and etch time on contact performance will be studied.

  18. Development of window layer for high efficiency high bandgap cadmium selenide solar cell for 4-terminal tandem solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakkalanka, Sridevi A.

    Tandem solar cells fabricated from thin films provide promise of improved efficiency while keeping the processing costs low. CdSe as top cell are investigated in this work. CIGS has been a standardized process with lab efficiencies reaching 18% [53]. This dissertation focuses on the development of conductive window layer for the development of a high performance, high bandgap solar cell. ZnSe, Cu2-xSe, and ZnSexTe1-x are investigated as viable window layers of the top cell. ZnSe in undoped form forms a good junction with CdSe films, but the Voc from these devices could never exceed the 360mV mark, while the current densities approached 17.5mA/cm2 [61].To improve Voc's, the high contact energy at the ZnSe/Cu interface has to be overcome by replacing Cu with a metal having higher work function or doping the window layer to form a tunneling contact with Copper. Deposition of ZnSe from binary sources in presence of nitrogen plasma resulted in films with proper stoichiometry. However, doping could not be accomplished. ZnTe is easily dopable, and was the next alternative. ZnTe doping in presence of Nitrogen plasma resulted in Zn rich films. Hence doping of the ternary compound ZnSexTe1-x was considered. This work focuses on studying the effects of compositional variation on the conductivity of the ZnSexTe1-x films. ZnSexTe1-x films were doped using Nitrogen. Films were deposited by co-evaporation from ZnTe, ZnSe and Se sources. Te/Se ratio was varied by varying the ZnTe thickness and Se Thickness. Films with Zn/Group VI ratio close to 1 were measured for conductivity using IV measurements. Highest conductivity of 2* 10 -8 O-cm was obtained at ZnSe, ZnTe, and Se thicknesses of 2000A, 1500A, and 500A respectively. The actual carrier concentration could be concealed by the current limiting Cu contacts. All films with Zn/Group VI ratio close to 1 showed slight conductivity in the 10-10 O-cm range. Layered ZnSexTe1-x Films doped with Nitrogen had targeted Zn/Group VI ratio of

  19. Polycrystalline thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Trefny, J.U.; Mao, D.

    1998-01-01

    During the past year, Colorado School of Mines (CSM) researchers performed systematic studies of the growth and properties of electrodeposition CdS and back-contact formation using Cu-doped ZnTe, with an emphasis on low Cu concentrations. CSM also started to explore the stability of its ZnTe-Cu contacted CdTe solar cells. Researchers investigated the electrodeposition of CdS and its application in fabricating CdTe/CdS solar cells. The experimental conditions they explored in this study were pH from 2.0 to 3.0; temperatures of 80 and 90 C; CdCl{sub 2} concentration of 0.2 M; deposition potential from {minus}550 to {minus}600 mV vs. Ag/AgCl electrode; [Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}] concentration between 0.005 and 0.05 M. The deposition rate increases with increase of the thiosulfate concentration and decrease of solution pH. Researchers also extended their previous research of ZnTe:Cu films by investigating films doped with low Cu concentrations (< 5 at. %). The low Cu concentration enabled them to increase the ZnTe:Cu post-annealing temperature without causing excessive Cu diffusion into CdTe or formation of secondary phases. The effects of Cu doping concentration and post-deposition annealing temperature on the structural, compositional, and electrical properties of ZnTe were studied systematically using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, electron microprobe, Hall effect, and conductivity measurements.

  20. Analysis of advanced vapor source for cadmium telluride solar cell manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetani, Tejas Harshadkumar

    A thin film CdS/CdTe solar cell manufacturing line has been developed in the Materials Engineering Laboratory at Colorado State University. The original design incorporated infrared lamps for heating the vapor source. This system has been redesigned to improve the energy efficiency of the system, allow co-sublimation and allow longer run time before the sources have to be replenished. The advanced vapor source incorporates conduction heating with heating elements embedded in graphite. The advanced vapor source was modeled by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). From these models, the required maximum operating temperature of the element was determined to be 720 C for the processing of CdS/CdTe solar cells. Nichrome and Kanthal A1 were primarily selected for this application at temperature of 720 °C in vacuum with oxygen partial pressure. Research on oxidation effects and life due to oxidation as well as creep deformation was done, and Nichrome was found more suitable for this application. A study of the life of the Nichrome heating elements in this application was conducted and the estimate of life is approximately 1900 years for repeated on-off application. This is many orders of magnitude higher than the life of infrared heat lamps. Ceramic cement based on aluminum oxide (Resbond 920) is used for bonding the elements to the graphite. Thermodynamic calculations showed that this cement is inert to the heating element. An earlier design of the advanced source encountered failure of the element. The failed element was studies by scanning electron microscopy and the failure was attributed to loss of adhesion between the graphite and the ceramic element. The design has been modified and the advanced vapor source is currently in operation.

  1. Radio-frequency magnetron triode sputtering of cadmium telluride and zinc telluride films and solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Adam Lee

    The n-CdS/p-CdTe solar cell has been researched for many years now. Research groups use a variety of processes to fabricate thin-film CdS/CdTe cells, including physical vapor deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and RF diode sputtering. One of the central areas of investigation concerning CdS/CdTe cells is the problem of a Schottky barrier at the back contact. Even cells fabricated with ohmic back contacts degrade into Schottky barriers as the devices are used. This severely degrades power generation. One possible solution is to use p+-ZnTe as an interlayer between CdTe and the back contact. ZnTe is easily doped with Cu to be p-type. However, even contacts with this ZnTe interlayer degrade over time, because Cu is highly mobile and diffuses away from the contact towards the CdS/CdTe junction. Another possibility is to dope ZnTe with N. It has been demonstrated using molecular beam epitaxy and RF diode sputtering. In this study, CdTe films are fabricated using a variation of RF diode sputtering called triode sputtering. This technique allows for control of ion bombardment to the substrate during deposition. Also, a higher plasma density near the target is achieved allowing depositions at lower pressures. These films are characterized structurally to show the effects of the various deposition parameters. N-doped ZnTe films are also fabricated using this technique. These films are characterized electrically to show the effects of the various deposition parameters. Also, the effects of post-deposition annealing are observed. It is found that annealing at the right temperature can increase the conductivity of the films by a factor of 3 or more. However, annealing at higher temperatures decreases the conductivity to as low as 12% of the initial conductivity. Finally, RF triode sputtered N-doped ZnTe films are used as an interlayer at the back contact of a CdS/CdTe solar cell. The effects of annealing the device before and after contact deposition are observed

  2. Role of the copper-oxygen defect in cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwine, Caroline R.

    Thin-film CdTe is one of the leading materials used in photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. One way to improve device performance and stability is through understanding how various device processing steps alter defect states in the CdTe layer. Photoluminescence (PL) studies can be used to examine radiative defects in materials. This study uses low-temperature PL to probe the defects present in thin-film CdTe deposited for solar cells. One key defect seen in the thin-film CdTe was reproduced in single-crystal (sX) CdTe by systematic incorporation of known impurities in the thin-film growth process, hence demonstrating that both copper and oxygen were necessary for its formation. Polycrystalline (pX) thin-film glass/SnO2:F/CdS/CdTe structures were examined. The CdTe layer was grown via close-spaced sublimation (CSS), vapor transport deposition (VTD), and physical vapor deposition (PVD). After CdTe deposition, followed by a standard CdC12 treatment and a ZnTe:Cu back contact, a PL peak was seen at ˜1.46 eV from the free back surface of all samples (1.456 eV for CSS and PVD, 1.460-1.463 eV for VTD). However, before the Cu-containing contact was added, this peak was not seen from the front of the CdTe (the CdS/CdTe junction region) in any device with CdTe thickness greater than 4 mum. The CdCl2 treatment commonly used to increase CdTe grain size did not enhance or reduce the peak at ˜1.46 eV relative to the rest of the PL spectrum. When the Cu-containing contact was applied, the PL spectra from both the front and back of the CdTe exhibited the peak at 1.456 eV. The PL peak at ˜1.46 eV was present in thin-film CdTe after deposition, when the dominant impurities are expected to be both Cu from the CdTe source material and O introduced in the chamber during growth to assist in CdTe film density. Since Cu and/or O appeared to be involved in this defect, PL studies were done with sX CdTe to distinguish between the separate effects of Cu or O and the combined effect of Cu and O

  3. Cadmium Sulfide and Nickel Synergetic Co-catalysts Supported on Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xinzheng; Yi, Shasha; Wang, Runwei; Zhang, Zongtao; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-02-01

    Design and preparation of noble-metal-free photocatalysts is of great importance for photocatalytic water splitting harvesting solar energy. Here, we report the high visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution upon the hybrid photocatalyst system consisting of CdS nanocrystals and Ni@NiO nanoparticles grown on the surface of g-C3N4. The hybrid system shows a high H2-production rate of 1258.7 μmol h‑1 g‑1 in the presence of triethanolamine as a sacrificial electron donor under visible light irradiation. The synergetic catalytic mechanism has been studied and the results of photovoltaic and photoluminescence properties show that efficient electron transfer could be achieved from g-C3N4 to CdS nanocrystals and subsequently to Ni@NiO hybrid.

  4. Cadmium Sulfide and Nickel Synergetic Co-catalysts Supported on Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xinzheng; Yi, Shasha; Wang, Runwei; Zhang, Zongtao; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-01-01

    Design and preparation of noble-metal-free photocatalysts is of great importance for photocatalytic water splitting harvesting solar energy. Here, we report the high visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution upon the hybrid photocatalyst system consisting of CdS nanocrystals and Ni@NiO nanoparticles grown on the surface of g-C3N4. The hybrid system shows a high H2-production rate of 1258.7 μmol h−1 g−1 in the presence of triethanolamine as a sacrificial electron donor under visible light irradiation. The synergetic catalytic mechanism has been studied and the results of photovoltaic and photoluminescence properties show that efficient electron transfer could be achieved from g-C3N4 to CdS nanocrystals and subsequently to Ni@NiO hybrid. PMID:26923439

  5. Cadmium Sulfide and Nickel Synergetic Co-catalysts Supported on Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xinzheng; Yi, Shasha; Wang, Runwei; Zhang, Zongtao; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-02-29

    Design and preparation of noble-metal-free photocatalysts is of great importance for photocatalytic water splitting harvesting solar energy. Here, we report the high visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution upon the hybrid photocatalyst system consisting of CdS nanocrystals and Ni@NiO nanoparticles grown on the surface of g-C3N4. The hybrid system shows a high H2-production rate of 1258.7 μmol h(-1) g(-1) in the presence of triethanolamine as a sacrificial electron donor under visible light irradiation. The synergetic catalytic mechanism has been studied and the results of photovoltaic and photoluminescence properties show that efficient electron transfer could be achieved from g-C3N4 to CdS nanocrystals and subsequently to Ni@NiO hybrid.

  6. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200–400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process. PMID:27827402

  7. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-11-01

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200–400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process.

  8. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-11-09

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200-400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process.

  9. CuxS counter electrodes in-situ prepared via the sulfidation of magnetron sputtering Cu film for quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanqiang; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang; Wang, Hongzhi

    2016-06-01

    The nanosheet-structured CuxS thin films used as counter electrodes (CEs) for CdS/CdSe quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have been in situ prepared via the sulfidation of Cu nanoparticles deposited on F-doped SnO2 glass (FTO glass) substrate by magnetron sputtering method. The thickness of the deposited Cu film affects the morphology and thickness of the obtained CuxS films. The CuxS nanosheet films have good adhesion with FTO glass and the surface exhibits uniform morphology. The characteristics of QDSSCs are studied in more detail by photocurrent-voltage performance measurements, incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The CuxS on FTO glass (CuxS/FTO) CEs show much higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and IPCE than those of the Pt on FTO (Pt/FTO) CE because of their superior carrier mobility and electro-catalytic ability for the polysulfide redox reactions. Based on an optimal CuxS film thickness of 2.7 μm obtained by the sulfidation of the Cu film thickness of 300 nm on FTO, the best photovoltaic performance with PCE of 3.67% (Jsc = 16.47 mA cm-2, Voc = 0.481 V, FF = 0.46) under full one-sun illumination is achieved.

  10. Spectral analysis of the effects of 1.7 MeV electron irradiation on the current transfer characteristic of cadmium telluride solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jin-Xiu; Zeng, Guang-Gen; He, Xu-Lin; Zhang, Jing-Quan; Wu, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Li, Bing; Wang, Wen-Wu; Feng, Liang-Huan

    2014-04-01

    The effects of device performance of 1.7 MeV electron irradiation on cadmium telluride polycrystalline thin film solar cells with the structure of anti-radiation glass/ITO/ZnO/CdS/CdTe/ZnTe/ZnTe : Cu/Ni have been studied. Light and dark I-V characteristics, dark C-V characteristics, quantum efficiency (QE), admittance spectrum (AS) and other testing methods were used to analyze cells performance such as the open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Isc), fill factor (FF) and conversion efficiency (eta). It was explored to find out the effects of irradiation on the current transfer characteristic of solar cells combined with the dark current density (Jo), diode ideal factor (A), quantum efficiency, carrier concentration and the depletion layer width. The decline in short-circuit current was very large and the efficiency of solar cells decreased obviously after irradiation. Reverse saturation current density increased, which indicates that p-n junction characteristics of solar cells were damaged, and diode ideal factor was almost the same, so current transport mechanism of solar cells has not changed. Quantum efficiency curves proved that the damage of solar cells' p-n junction influenced the collection of photo-generated carriers. Irradiation made carrier concentration reduce to 40.6%. The analyses have shown that. A new defect was induced by electron irradiation, whose position is close to 0.58 eV above the valence band in the forbidden band, and capture cross section is 1.78 x 10(-16) cm2. These results indicate that irradiation influences the generation of photo-generated carriers, increases the risk of the carrier recombination and the reverse dark current, and eventually makes the short-circuit current of solar cells decay.

  11. One-step fabrication of copper sulfide nanoparticles decorated on graphene sheets as highly stable and efficient counter electrode for CdS-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessein, Amr; Wang, Feiju; Masai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Kazunari; Abd El-Moneim, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are thin-film photovoltaics and highly promising as next-generation solar cells owing to their high theoretical efficiency, easy fabrication process, and low production cost. However, the practical photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) of QDSSCs are still far below the theoretically estimated value owing to the lack of an applicable design of the materials and electrodes. In this work, we developed a highly stable and efficient counter electrode (CE) from copper sulfide nanocrystals and reduced graphene oxide (Cu x S@RGO) for QDSSC applications. The Cu x S@RGO electrocatalyst was successfully prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method, then directly applied to a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrate by the simple drop-casting technique. Owing to the synergistic effect between Cu x S nanocrystals and conductive RGO sheets, the Cu x S@RGO CE showed high electrocatalytic activity for polysulfide electrolyte reduction. A CdS QDSSC based on the Cu x S@RGO CE yielded a high and reproducible PCE of 2.36%, exceeding those of 1.57 and 1.33% obtained with the commonly used Cu2S/brass and Pt CEs, respectively. Moreover, the QDSSC with the Cu x S@RGO CE showed excellent photostability in a light-soaking test without any obvious decay in the photocurrent, whereas the cell based on the Cu2S/brass CE was severely degraded.

  12. High-efficiency cadmium-free Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cells with chemically deposited ZnS buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, Tokio; Furumi, Keisuke; Kunioka, Akio

    1999-10-01

    Cadmium-free Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin-film solar cells with a MgF{sub 2}/ZnO:Al/CBD-ZnS/CIGS/Mo/SLG structure have been fabricated using chemical bath deposition (CBD)-ZnS buffer layers and high-quality CIGS absorber layers grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. The use of CBD-ZnS, which is a wider band gap material than CBD-CdS, improved the quantum efficiency of fabricated cells at short wavelengths, leading to an increase in the short-circuit current. The best cell at present yielded an active area efficiency of 16.9% which is the highest value reported previously for Cd-free CIGS thin-film solar cells. The as-fabricated solar cells exhibited a reversible light-soaking effect under AM 1.5, 100 mW/cm{sup 2} illumination. This paper also presents a discussion of the issues relating to the use of the CBD-ZnS buffer material for improving device performance.

  13. Cadmium toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lichuan; Zhang, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is a well-known environmental pollutant with distinctly toxic effects on plants. It can displace certain essential metals from a wealth of metalloproteins, and thus disturb many normal physiological processes and cause severe developmental aberrant. The harmful effects of cadmium stress include, but are not limited to: reactive oxygen species overproduction, higher lipid hydroperoxide contents, and chloroplast structure change, which may lead to cell death. Plants have developed diverse mechanisms to alleviate environmental cadmium stress, e.g., cadmium pump and transporting cadmium into the leaf vacuoles. This mini-review focuses on the current research into understanding the cellular mechanisms of cadmium toxicity on cytoskeleton, vesicular trafficking and cell wall formation in plants. PMID:22499203

  14. Mineral of the month: cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klimasauskas, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium, which was once used almost exclusively for pigments, now has many diverse applications. Cadmium’s low melting point, excellent electrical conductivity and resistance to corrosion make it valuable for many products including batteries, electroplated coatings, stabilizers for plastics, solar cells and nonferrous alloys. Today’s cadmium is primarily used in rechargeable batteries, accounting for about 78 percent of consumption in 2004. In 2000, an estimated 3.5 billion consumer batteries were sold in the United States, of which almost 10 percent were nickel-cadmium batteries.

  15. Lead antimony sulfide (Pb5Sb8S17) solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with an efficiency of over 4%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Suriyawong, Nipapon; Aragaw, Belete Asefa; Shi, Jen-Bin; Chen, Peter; Lee, Ming-Way

    2016-04-01

    Lead antimony sulfides are rare in nature and relatively unexplored ternary semiconductors. This work investigates the photovoltaic performance of Pb-Sb-S quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles are grown on mesoporous TiO2 electrodes using the successive ionic layer adsorption reaction process. The synthesized Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles exhibit two attractive features for a good solar absorber material: a high optical absorption coefficient and a near optimal energy gap. Solid-state QDSCs are fabricated from the synthesized Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles using Spiro-OMeTAD as the hole-transporting material. The best cell yields a short-circuit current density Jsc of 11.92 mA cm-2, an open-circuit voltage Voc of 0.48 V, a fill factor FF of 30.7% and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.76% under 1sun. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) spectrum covers a spectral range of 350-800 nm with a maximal EQE = 65% at λ = 450 nm. At the reduced light intensity of 10% sun, the PCE increases to 4.14% with Jsc = 2.0 mA cm-2 (which could be normalized to 20 mA cm-2 under 1 sun). This PCE is 65% higher than the best previous result. The respectable PCE and Jsc indicate that Pb5Sb8S17 could be a potential candidate for a solar absorber material.

  16. Cadmium Alternatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    including cadmium! Cadmium Replacements (With MIL-DTL-38999 Designations) Zn/Ni (Class Z) Per ASTM B 841, type D (black) Electroless Nickel plus... Electroless nickel / PTFE (Durmalon®) Electroplated Aluminum (Alumiplate®) Electroplated tin-zinc (SnZn) Control: cadmium with hexavalent chromate... electroless nickel / PTFE performed well Electroplated aluminum performed did not perform well on connectors Electroplated aluminum did not

  17. Biosorption of lead, copper and cadmium using the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) of Bacillus sp., from solar salterns.

    PubMed

    Shameer, Syed

    2016-12-01

    Extracellular Polysaccharides (EPS) from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes have a great deal of research interest as they protect the producer from different stresses including antibiotics, ionic stress, desiccation and assist in bio-film formation, pathogenesis, adhesion, etc. In this study haloalkaliphilic Bacillus sp., known to cope with osmophilic stress, was selected and screened for EPS production. The EPS were isolated, partially purified and chemical characteristics were documented using liquid FT-IR followed by assessment of heavy metal biosorption (lead, copper and cadmium) using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The EPS extracted from three isolates B. licheniformis NSPA5, B. cereus NSPA8 and B. subtilis NSPA13 showed maximum biosorption of Lead followed by Copper and Cadmium. Of the tested isolates, the EPS from isolate B. cereus NSPA8 showed maximum (90 %) biosorption of the lead.

  18. Investigation of photoresponse in cadmium sulfide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Sheo K. E-mail: dr.sheokmishra@gmail.com; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Shukla, R. K.; Srivastava, Rajneesh K.; Dubey, K. C.

    2015-06-24

    In this work, we report on the photo-response of CdS nanoparticles prepared by simple solid state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) study has confirmed the formation of cubical zinc blende (c) phase. In the photo-response study, voltage dependence of photocurrent and darkcurrent as well as temporal rise and decay of photocurrent of CdS nanoparticles have been investigated. The photo-response of prepared sample has been measured under visible illumination using thick film of powder with out any binder. The photocurrent (I{sub pc}) and darkcurrent (I{sub dc}) follow power law with applied voltage i.e. I α V{sup r}. The rise and decay of photocurrent show negative photoconductivity.

  19. Investigation of photoresponse in cadmium sulfide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sheo K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Srivastava, Rajneesh K.; Dubey, K. C.; Shukla, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we report on the photo-response of CdS nanoparticles prepared by simple solid state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) study has confirmed the formation of cubical zinc blende (c) phase. In the photo-response study, voltage dependence of photocurrent and darkcurrent as well as temporal rise and decay of photocurrent of CdS nanoparticles have been investigated. The photo-response of prepared sample has been measured under visible illumination using thick film of powder with out any binder. The photocurrent (Ipc) and darkcurrent (Idc) follow power law with applied voltage i.e. I α Vr. The rise and decay of photocurrent show negative photoconductivity.

  20. The Triboluminescence of Zinc Cadmium Sulfide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    iHon o I. 20 1. The light output is proportional to phosphor thickness and appears to be...CM CM 1 =3 < -a c n3 CD O) c o c o en (/) OJ c u s_ o to > 3 cr ai en ( UJD/M^) indino iHon 22 o o o o O o O o G 0...O O o m o CM o o o 00 o o o CM J0 -Jo o — [ mo/^-H) indino iHon u o OJ +J 011^ U M <u •^ •■-3 E o ’ D- in > > Of- 00 »o —

  1. Sulfidation of Cadmium at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Smith, Rachel; Yin, Yadong; Zheng, Haimei; Reinhard, Bjorn; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-05-22

    We investigate the evolution of structures that result when spherical Cd nanoparticles of a few hundred nanometers in diameter react with dissolved molecular sulfur species in solution to form hollow CdS. Over a wide range of temperatures and concentrations, we find that rapid Cd diffusion through the growing CdS shell localizes the reaction front at the outermost CdS/S interface, leading to hollow particles when all the Cd is consumed. When we examine partially reacted particles, we find that this system differs significantly from others in which the nanoscale Kirkendall effect has been used to create hollow particles. In previously reported systems, partial reaction creates a hollow particle with a spherically symmetric metal core connected to the outer shell by filaments. In contrast, here we obtain a lower symmetry structure, in which the unreacted metal core and the coalesced vacancies separate into two distinct spherical caps, minimizing the metal/void interface. This pattern of void coalescence is likely to occur in situations where the metal/vacancy self-diffusivities in the core are greater than the diffusivity of the cations through the shell.

  2. Optimized approach to retrieve information on the tropospheric and stratospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) vertical distributions above Jungfraujoch from high-resolution FTIR solar spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeune, Bernard; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Servais, Christian; Duchatelet, Pierre; Demoulin, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), which is produced in the troposphere from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, is the most abundant gaseous sulfur species in the unpolluted atmosphere. Due to its low chemical reactivity and water solubility, a significant fraction of OCS is able to reach the stratosphere where it is converted to SO2 and ultimately to H2SO4 aerosols (Junge layer). These aerosols have the potential to amplify stratospheric ozone destruction on a global scale and may influence Earth's radiation budget and climate through increasing solar scattering. The transport of OCS from troposphere to stratosphere is thought to be the primary mechanism by which the Junge layer is sustained during nonvolcanic periods. Because of this, long-term trends in atmospheric OCS concentration, not only in the troposphere but also in the stratosphere, are of great interest. A new approach has been developed and optimized to retrieve atmospheric abundance of OCS from high-resolution ground-based infrared solar spectra by using the SFIT-2 (v3.91) algorithm, including a new model for solar lines simulation (solar lines often produce significant interferences in the OCS microwindows). The strongest lines of the ν3 fundamental band of OCS at 2062 cm-1 have been systematically evaluated with objective criteria to select a new set of microwindows, assuming the HITRAN 2004 spectroscopic parameters with an increase in the OCS line intensities of the ν3band main isotopologue 16O12C32S by 15.79% as compared to HITRAN 2000 (Rothman et al., 2008, and references therein). Two regularization schemes have further been compared (deducted from ATMOS and ACE-FTS measurements or based on a Tikhonov approach), in order to select the one which optimizes the information content while minimizing the error budget. The selected approach has allowed us to determine updated OCS long-term trend from 1988 to 2009 in both the troposphere and the stratosphere, using spectra recorded on a regular basis with

  3. Dip coated nanocrystalline CdZnS thin films for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongre, J. K.; Chaturvedi, Mahim; Patil, Yuvraj; Sharma, Sandhya; Jain, U. K.

    2015-07-01

    Nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide (CdS) and zinc cadmium sulfide (ZnCdS) thin films have been grown via simple and low cost dip coating technique. The prepared films are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopic (AFM) and UV-VIS spectrophotometer techniques to reveal their structural, morphological and optical properties. XRD shows that both samples grown have zinc blende structure. The grain size is calculated as 6.2 and 8 nm using Scherrer's formula. The band gap value of CdS and CdZnS film is estimated to be 2.58 and 2.69 eV respectively by UV-vis spectroscopy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) investigations are carried out using cell configuration as n-CdZnS/(1M NaOH + 1M Na2S + 1M S)/C. The photovoltaic output characteristic is used to calculate fill-factor (FF) and solar conversion efficiency (η).

  4. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  5. Room-temperature preparation of trisilver-copper-sulfide/polymer based heterojunction thin film for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yan; Yang, Xiaogang; Gu, Longyan; Jia, Huimin; Ge, Suxiang; Xiao, Pin; Fan, Xiaoli; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    Solar cells devices based on inorganic/polymer heterojunction can be a possible solution to harvest solar energy and convert to electric energy with high efficiency through a cost-effective fabrication. The solution-process method can be easily used to produce large area devices. Moreover, due to the intrinsic different charge separation, diffusion or recombination in various semiconductors, the interfaces between each component may strongly influence the inorganic/polymer heterojunction performance. Here we prepared a n-type Ag3CuS2 (Eg = 1.25 eV) nanostructured film through a room-temperature element reaction process, which was confirmed as direct bandgap semiconductor through density function theory simulation. This Ag3CuS2 film was spin-coated with an organic semiconducting poly(3-hexythiophene) (P3HT) or polythieno[3,4-b]-thiophene-co-benzodithiophene (PTB7) film, which formed an inorganic/polymer heterojunction. After constructing it to a solar cell device, the power conversion efficiencies of 0.79% and 0.31% were achieved with simulated solar illumination on Ag3CuS2/P3HT and Ag3CuS2/PTB7, respectively. A possible mechanism was discussed and we showed the charge separation at interface of inorganic and polymer semiconductors played an important role.

  6. Methods for improving solar cell open circuit voltage

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, John F.; Singh, Vijay P.

    1979-01-01

    A method for producing a solar cell having an increased open circuit voltage. A layer of cadmium sulfide (CdS) produced by a chemical spray technique and having residual chlorides is exposed to a flow of hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) heated to a temperature of 400.degree.-600.degree. C. The residual chlorides are reduced and any remaining CdCl.sub.2 is converted to CdS. A heterojunction is formed over the CdS and electrodes are formed. Application of chromium as the positive electrode results in a further increase in the open circuit voltage available from the H.sub.2 S-treated solar cell.

  7. Carbonyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbonyl sulfide ; CASRN 463 - 58 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  8. Selenium sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium sulfide ; CASRN 7446 - 34 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  9. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 005 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ( CAS No . 7783 - 06 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revie

  10. Chemical Bath Deposited Zinc Sulfide Buffer Layers for Copper Indium Gallium Sulfur-selenide Solar Cells and Device Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Sambhu N.; Olsen, Larry C.

    2005-01-03

    Cd free CIGSS thin film solar cell structures with a MgF2/TCO/CGD-ZnS/CIGSS/Mo/SLG structure have been fabricated using chemical bath deposited (CBD)-ZnS buffer layers and high quality CIGSS absorber layers supplied from Shell Solar Industries. The use of CBD-ZnS, which is a higher band gap materials than CdS, improved the quantum efficiency of fabricated cells at lower wavelengths, leading to an increase in short circuit current. The best cell to date yielded an active area (0.43 cm2) efficiency of 13.3%. This paper also presents a discussion of the issues relating to the use of the CBD-ZnS buffer materials for improving device performance.

  11. Routes to copper zinc tin sulfide Cu2ZnSnS4 a potential material for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Karthik; Malik, Mohammad A; O'Brien, Paul

    2012-06-11

    Power generation through photovoltaics (PV) has been growing at an average rate of 40% per year over the last decade; but has largely been fuelled by conventional Si-based technologies. Such cells involve expensive processing and many alternatives use either toxic, less-abundant and or expensive elements. Kesterite Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS) has been identified as a solar energy material composed of both less toxic and more available elements. Power conversion efficiencies of 8.4% (vacuum processing) and 10.1% (non-vacuum processing) from cells constructed using CZTS have been achieved to date. In this article, we review various deposition methods for CZTS thin films and the synthesis of CZTS nanoparticles. Studies of direct relevance to solar cell applications are emphasised and characteristic properties are collated.

  12. Wurtzite copper-zinc-tin sulfide as a superior counter electrode material for dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Wurtzite and kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals were employed as counter electrode (CE) materials for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Compared to kesterite CZTS, the wurtzite CZTS exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity for catalyzing reduction of iodide electrolyte and better conductivity. Accordingly, the DSSC with wurtzite CZTS CE generated higher power conversion efficiency (6.89%) than that of Pt (6.23%) and kesterite CZTS (4.89%) CEs. PMID:24191954

  13. The Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Stack Gases, Iodometric Titration After Sulfite Removal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robles, E. G.

    The determination of hydrogen sulfide in effluents from coal-fired furnaces and incinerators is complicated by the presence of sulfur oxides (which form acids). Organic compounds also may interfere with or prevent the formation of the cadmium sulfide precipitate or give false positive results because of reaction with iodine. The report presents a…

  14. In-situ growth of antimony sulfide in carbon nanoparticle matrix: Enhanced electrocatalytic activity as counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Panpan; Zhang, Ming; Ai, Changzhi; Wu, Zhixin; Lu, Shuang; Zhang, Xintong; Huang, Niu; Sun, Yihua; Sun, Xiaohua

    2016-07-01

    Considering the undesirable electrocatalytic activity toward I-/I3- redox system of prinstine antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) fabricated with the existing conditions, a mesoporous carbon nanoparticle film (CNP) is introduced here for in-situ growth of Sb2S3 to construct a Sb2S3@CNP hybrid catalyst. Based on a Sb-thiourea precursor solution, in-situ growth of Sb2S3 can be achieved via solution deposition (denoted as Sb2S3@CNP-S) as well as atmospheric pressure thermal evaporation (denoted as Sb2S3@CNP-T) in CNP matrix. Structural characterizations indicate that Sb2S3 particles have well dispersed in the pores of CNP matrix. Because of the introduction of porous and conductive CNP matrix to support Sb2S3, the hybrid catalyst exhibits lower charge transfer resistance at the catalyst/electrolyte interface and higher electrocatalytic activity. When used as counter electrode (CE) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), devices using Sb2S3@CNP hybrid catalyst as CE produce fill factor of 67.6% and 66.3%, which is significantly higher than that using pristine Sb2S3 fabricated in our previous work (52.8%). Finally, the corresponding power conversion efficiencies reach 6.69% (Sb2S3@CNP-S) and 6.24% (Sb2S3@CNP-T), respectively, which are comparable to that using Pt CE measured under the same conditions (6.74%).

  15. A Photoelectrochemical Solar Cell Consisting of a Cadmium Sulfide Photoanode and a Ruthenium-2,2'-Bipyridine Redox Shuttle in a Non-aqueous Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Kageshima, Yosuke; Kumagai, Hiromu; Minegishi, Tsutomu; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2015-06-26

    A photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell consisting of an n-type CdS single-crystal electrode and a Pt counter electrode with the ruthenium-2,2'-bipyridine complex [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) as the redox shuttle in a non-aqueous electrolyte was studied to obtain a higher open-circuit voltage (V(OC)) than the onset voltage for water splitting. A V(OC) of 1.48 V and a short-circuit current (I(SC)) of 3.88 mA cm(-2) were obtained under irradiation by a 300 W Xe lamp with 420-800 nm visible light. This relatively high voltage was presumably due to the difference between the Fermi level of photo-irradiated n-type CdS and the redox potential of the Ru complex at the Pt electrode. The smooth redox reaction of the Ru complex with one-electron transfer was thought to have contributed to the high V(OC) and I(SC). The obtained V(OC) was more than the onset voltage of water electrolysis for hydrogen and oxygen generation, suggesting prospects for application in water electrolysis.

  16. A genome-wide screen of genes involved in cadmium tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Patrick J; Vashisht, Ajay A; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Hayles, Jacqueline; Russell, Paul

    2008-11-01

    Cadmium is a worldwide environmental toxicant responsible for a range of human diseases including cancer. Cellular injury from cadmium is minimized by stress-responsive detoxification mechanisms. We explored the genetic requirements for cadmium tolerance by individually screening mutants from the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) haploid deletion collection for inhibited growth on agar growth media containing cadmium. Cadmium-sensitive mutants were further tested for sensitivity to oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide) and osmotic stress (potassium chloride). Of 2649 mutants screened, 237 were sensitive to cadmium, of which 168 were cadmium specific. Most were previously unknown to be involved in cadmium tolerance. The 237 genes represent a number of pathways including sulfate assimilation, phytochelatin synthesis and transport, ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q10) biosynthesis, stress signaling, cell wall biosynthesis and cell morphology, gene expression and chromatin remodeling, vacuole function, and intracellular transport of macromolecules. The ubiquinone biosynthesis mutants are acutely sensitive to cadmium but only mildly sensitive to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that Coenzyme Q10 plays a larger role in cadmium tolerance than just as an antioxidant. These and several other mutants turn yellow when exposed to cadmium, suggesting cadmium sulfide accumulation. This phenotype can potentially be used as a biomarker for cadmium. There is remarkably little overlap with a comparable screen of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid deletion collection, indicating that the two distantly related yeasts utilize significantly different strategies for coping with cadmium stress. These strategies and their relation to cadmium detoxification in humans are discussed.

  17. Cadmium-free junction fabrication process for CuInSe{sub 2} thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, K.V.; Contreras, M.A.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; Keane, J.; Noufi, R.

    1999-09-07

    The present invention provides an economical, simple, dry and controllable semiconductor layer junction forming process to make cadmium free high efficiency photovoltaic cells having a first layer comprised primarily of copper indium diselenide having a thin doped copper indium diselenide n-type region, generated by thermal diffusion with a group II(b) element such as zinc, and a halide, such as chlorine, and a second layer comprised of a conventional zinc oxide bilayer. A photovoltaic device according the present invention includes a first thin film layer of semiconductor material formed primarily from copper indium diselenide. Doping of the copper indium diselenide with zinc chloride is accomplished using either a zinc chloride solution or a solid zinc chloride material. Thermal diffusion of zinc chloride into the copper indium diselenide upper region creates the thin n-type copper indium diselenide surface. A second thin film layer of semiconductor material comprising zinc oxide is then applied in two layers. The first layer comprises a thin layer of high resistivity zinc oxide. The second relatively thick layer of zinc oxide is doped to exhibit low resistivity.

  18. Cadmium-free junction fabrication process for CuInSe.sub.2 thin film solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Ramanathan, Kannan V.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Keane, James; Noufi, Rommel

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an economical, simple, dry and controllable semiconductor layer junction forming process to make cadmium free high efficiency photovoltaic cells having a first layer comprised primarily of copper indium diselenide having a thin doped copper indium diselenide n-type region, generated by thermal diffusion with a group II(b) element such as zinc, and a halide, such as chlorine, and a second layer comprised of a conventional zinc oxide bilayer. A photovoltaic device according the present invention includes a first thin film layer of semiconductor material formed primarily from copper indium diselenide. Doping of the copper indium diselenide with zinc chloride is accomplished using either a zinc chloride solution or a solid zinc chloride material. Thermal diffusion of zinc chloride into the copper indium diselenide upper region creates the thin n-type copper indium diselenide surface. A second thin film layer of semiconductor material comprising zinc oxide is then applied in two layers. The first layer comprises a thin layer of high resistivity zinc oxide. The second relatively thick layer of zinc oxide is doped to exhibit low resistivity.

  19. I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell utilizing the structure CuInGaSe.sub.2 CdZnS/ZnO

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.; Stewart, John M.

    1992-01-07

    A thin film I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell having a first layer of copper indium gallium selenide, a second layer of cadmium zinc sulfide, a double layer of zinc oxide, and a metallization structure comprised of a layer of nickel covered by a layer of aluminum. An optional antireflective coating may be placed on said metallization structure. The cadmium zinc sulfide layer is deposited by means of an aqueous solution growth deposition process and may actually consist of two layers: a low zinc content layer and a high zinc content layer. Photovoltaic efficiencies of 12.5% at Air Mass 1.5 illumination conditions and 10.4% under AMO illumination can be achieved.

  20. Investigation of II-VI Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Sensitized Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoz, Sabit

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, also referred to as quantum dots (QDs) which have advantages of low-cost, photostability, high molar extinction coefficients and size-dependent optical properties, have been the focus of great scientific and technological efforts in solar cells development. Due to the multi-electron generation effect, the theoretical maximum efficiency of quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) is much higher than that of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Thus QDSSCs have a clear potential to overtake the efficiency of other kinds of solar cells. Doped semiconductor QDs can not only retain nearly all advantages of intrinsic QDs, but also have additional absorption bands for improved efficiency. This approach is particularly important for wide band gap semiconductors, for example, zinc based QDs. Zinc based are desirable candidates as they are inexpensive, earth abundant and nontoxic. When doped, they can cover a broad range of visible spectrum. In my project, I aim at developing novel methods for the preparation of II-VI QDs and investigating the effects of doping on the properties and performances of QDSSCs. Cadmium selenide (CdSe), manganese doped cadmium selenide (Mn:CdSe), and manganese doped zinc sulfide (Mn:ZnS) QDs have been synthesized by laser ablation in water. The structural and luminescent properties of the QDs have been investigated. In addition, QDSSC performances of the samples have been measured using nanowire electrode made of ZnO and Zn2SnO 4. I have also successfully synthesized europium doped zinc sulfide (Eu:ZnS) and manganese doped cadmium sulfide (Mn:CdS) nanoparticles by wet chemical method, and analyzed structural, optical, and magnetic properties as well as the device performance of the nanoparticles.

  1. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1985-11-26

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  2. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  3. CdS and CdS/CdSe sensitized ZnO nanorod array solar cells prepared by a solution ions exchange process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling; Gong, Haibo; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shikuan; Cao, Bingqiang

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdS and CdS/CdSe quantum dots are assembled on ZnO nanorods by ion exchange process. • The CdS/CdSe sensitization of ZnO effectively extends the absorption spectrum. • The performance of ZnO/CdS/CdSe cell is improved by extending absorption spectrum. - Abstract: In this paper, cadmium sulfide (CdS) and cadmium sulfide/cadmium selenide (CdS/CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) are assembled onto ZnO nanorod arrays by a solution ion exchange process for QD-sensitized solar cell application. The morphology, composition and absorption properties of different photoanodes were characterized with scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum and Raman spectrum in detail. It is shown that conformal and uniform CdS and CdS/CdSe shells can grow on ZnO nanorod cores. Quantum dot sensitized solar cells based on ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS/CdSe nanocable arrays were assembled with gold counter electrode and polysulfide electrolyte solution. The CdS/CdSe sensitization of ZnO can effectively extend the absorption spectrum up to 650 nm, which has a remarkable impact on the performance of a photovoltaic device by extending the absorption spectrum. Preliminary results show one fourth improvement in solar cell efficiency.

  4. Direct examination of cadmium bonding in rat tissues dosed with mine wastes and cadmium-containing solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-06-01

    Direct examination by XANES and EXAFS of metal bonding in tissue can be demonstrated by examining cadmium uptake and bonding in animal tissue maintained at cryogenic temperatures. XANES at the K-edge of cadmium were collected at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Rats fed with 1g mine waste containing 8-400 mg/kg cadmium per 200g body weight (b.w.) or dosed by oral gavage with either cadmium chloride solution alone (at 6 mg/kg b.w.) or in combination with other salts (As, Cu or Zn), 5 days/week for 6 weeks, had 0.1-7.5 and 8-86 mg/kg cadmium in the liver or kidney, respectively. Rats given intraperitoneally (ip) or intravenously (iv) 1-4 times with 1 mg/kg b.w. cadmium solution had 30-120 mg/kg cadmium in the liver or kidney. Tissues from rats were kept and transferred at cryogenic temperature and XANES were recorded at 20 K. The spectra for rat liver samples suggested conjugation of cadmium with glutathione or association with the sulfide bond (Cd-S) of proteins and peptides. EXAFS of rat liver fed by Cd and Zn solutions showed that Cd was clearly bound to S ligands with an inter-atomic distance of 2.54 Å for Cd-S that was similar to cadmium sulfide with an inter-atomic distance of 2.52 Å for Cd-S. Liver or kidney of rats fed with mine wastes did not give an edge in the XANES spectra indicating little uptake of cadmium by the animals. Longer and higher dosing regimen may be required in order to observe the same Cd-S bond in the rat tissue from mine wastes, including confirmation by EXAFS.

  5. Cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide/cadmium sulfide nanoparticles stabilized in water with poly(cysteine acrylamide).

    PubMed

    Sherman, Robert L; Chen, Yiyan; Ford, Warren T

    2004-11-01

    Cysteine acrylamide (N-acryloyl L-cysteine) stabilizes CdS nanoparticles as the particles form in aqueous dispersions. Cysteine acrylamide also exchanges for citrate on the surfaces of CdSe and core/shell CdSe/CdS nanoparticles to provide greater stability. Heating of the nanoparticle dispersions polymerizes the cysteine acrylamide on the surface to form a more efficient polydentate stabilizer. The polymer-coated nanoparticle dispersions are colloidally stable even after removal of low molecular weight solutes by dialysis. Emission quantum yields of the polymer-coated CdSe and CdSe/CdS samples were 0.9% and 2.6%, respectively, after aging of the samples in light. CdSe/CdS coated with poly(cysteine acrylamide) is colloidally stable for at least two years in the dark at 5 degrees C.

  6. Surface passivation of lead sulfide nanocrystals with low electron affinity metals: photoluminescence and photovoltaic performance.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Mirfasih, Mohammad Hassan; Hasanzadeh, Soheil; Aashuri, Hossein; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2016-04-28

    During the last decade, solution-processed colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted significant attention for low-cost fabrication of optoelectronic devices. In this study, lead sulfide (PbS) CQDs were synthesized via the hot injection method and the effect of doping elements with low electron affinity, including cadmium, calcium and zinc, on the passivation of trap states was investigated. A red-shift in the luminescence emission was observed by doping through passivation of lead dangling bonds. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements showed that the lifetime of charged carriers was significantly enhanced by cadmium doping (∼80%) which is quite noticeable compared with calcium- and zinc-doped nanocrystals. External quantum efficiency measurements on thin solid films (∼300 nm) prepared by spin coating supported improved lifetime of carriers through passivation of mid-gap trap states. In order to show the potential application of the doping process, bulk heterojunction CQD solar cells were fabricated. It was found that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was improved up to ∼40%; the highest improvement was observed with the Cd treatment. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to study the effect of doping on the density of states. The results showed that doping with low electron affinity metals effectively reduced the deep trap states of PbS QDs.

  7. Insights into cadmium diffusion mechanisms in two-stage diffusion profiles in solar-grade Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Biderman, N. J.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Haldar, Pradeep; Novak, Steven W.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2015-12-07

    Cadmium diffusion experiments were performed on polished copper indium gallium diselenide (Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} or CIGS) samples with resulting cadmium diffusion profiles measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Experiments done in the annealing temperature range between 275 °C and 425 °C reveal two-stage cadmium diffusion profiles which may be indicative of multiple diffusion mechanisms. Each stage can be described by the standard solutions of Fick's second law. The slower cadmium diffusion in the first stage can be described by the Arrhenius equation D{sub 1} = 3 × 10{sup −4} exp (− 1.53 eV/k{sub B}T) cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}, possibly representing vacancy-meditated diffusion. The faster second-stage diffusion coefficients determined in these experiments match the previously reported cadmium diffusion Arrhenius equation of D{sub 2} = 4.8 × 10{sup −4} exp (−1.04 eV/k{sub B}T) cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}, suggesting an interstitial-based mechanism.

  8. The Study of Metal Sulfide as Efficient Counter Electrodes on the Performances of CdS/CdSe/ZnS-co-sensitized Hierarchical TiO2 Sphere Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatong, Nattha; Tang, I.-Ming; Pon-On, Weeraphat

    2017-03-01

    The effects of using different counter electrode metal sulfides on the performances of solar cells made with CdS/CdSe/ZnS quantum dots co-sensitized onto hierarchical TiO2 spheres (HTSs) used as photo-electrode are reported. The HTS in the QDSSCs is composed of an assembly of numerous TiO2 spheres made by the solvolthermal method. The photoelectrical performance of HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to CuS or to Cu2ZnSn(S1 - x Se x )4 with x = 0, 0.5, or 1.0 counter electrodes (CEs) were compared to those coupled to Pt CE. The HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to the CuS CE showed the highest power conversion efficiency η (of 3.46%). The efficiencies η of 1.88, 2.64, and 2.06% were obtained for CZTS ( x = 0), CZTS0.5Se0.5 ( x = 0.5), and CZTSe ( x = 1), respectively. These are significantly higher than those using a standard Pt CE ( η = 0.37%). These higher efficiencies are the results of the higher electrocatalytic activities when the metal sulfide CEs are used.

  9. The Study of Metal Sulfide as Efficient Counter Electrodes on the Performances of CdS/CdSe/ZnS-co-sensitized Hierarchical TiO2 Sphere Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Buatong, Nattha; Tang, I-Ming; Pon-On, Weeraphat

    2017-12-01

    The effects of using different counter electrode metal sulfides on the performances of solar cells made with CdS/CdSe/ZnS quantum dots co-sensitized onto hierarchical TiO2 spheres (HTSs) used as photo-electrode are reported. The HTS in the QDSSCs is composed of an assembly of numerous TiO2 spheres made by the solvolthermal method. The photoelectrical performance of HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to CuS or to Cu2ZnSn(S1 - x Se x )4 with x = 0, 0.5, or 1.0 counter electrodes (CEs) were compared to those coupled to Pt CE. The HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to the CuS CE showed the highest power conversion efficiency η (of 3.46%). The efficiencies η of 1.88, 2.64, and 2.06% were obtained for CZTS (x = 0), CZTS0.5Se0.5 (x = 0.5), and CZTSe (x = 1), respectively. These are significantly higher than those using a standard Pt CE (η = 0.37%). These higher efficiencies are the results of the higher electrocatalytic activities when the metal sulfide CEs are used.

  10. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  11. Handbook of Phase Transition Sulfides, Selenides and Tellurides,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    fCAa24 o c()0 an E -b.Sldln () ahdln - 2 M ; do-a.5ie .I OII A-32. CdSe Cadnim Monoselenlde Cadmium selenide is a metal-nonmetal phase transition...RD-R146 658 HANDBOOK OF PHASE TRANSITION SULFIDES SELENIDES AND 1/3 rELLURIDES(U) TACTICAL WEAPONS GUIDANCE AND CONTROL INFORMATION ANALYSIS CE. W J...CIAL- WE:a\\FONf* C7UIDAt-NCE: & =ONrR DL. INP1:XRMATK3N At-LASIS C:EN*T7R HANDBOOK OF PHASE TRANSITION SULFIDES, SELENIDES AND TELLURIDES WALTER J

  12. Cadmium and the kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, L

    1984-01-01

    The paper is a review of certain aspects of importance of cadmium and the kidney regarding the assessment of risks and understanding of mechanisms of action. The review discusses the following topics: history and etiology of cadmium-induced kidney dysfunction and related disorders; cadmium metabolism, metallothionein and kidney dysfunction; cadmium in urine as indicator of body burden, exposure and kidney dysfunction; cadmium levels in kidney and liver as indicators of kidney dysfunction; characteristics of early kidney dysfunction; the critical concentration concept; critical concentrations of cadmium in kidney cortex; and prognosis. PMID:6734547

  13. CdS: Characterization and recent advances in CdTe solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ferekides, C.; Marinskiy, D.; Morel, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) have been used for the fabrication of high efficiency CdTe and CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin film solar cells. An attractive alternative deposition technology with manufacturing advantages over the CBD is the close spaced sublimation (CSS). In this work CdTe/CdS solar cells prepared entirely by the CSS process exhibited 15.0% efficiencies under global AM1.5 conditions as verified at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This paper reports on studies carried out on as deposited and heat treated CSS CdS films and all CSS CdTe/CdS solar cells using photoluminescence, x-ray diffraction, and I-V-T measurements.

  14. Nanotoxicological evaluation of oxidative responses in rat nephrocytes induced by cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Trabelsi, Hamdi; Azzouz, Inès; Ferchichi, Soumaya; Tebourbi, Olfa; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of cadmium chloride with mineral elements in rat nephrocytes in terms of the biosynthesis of nanocomplexes. The results show that selenium supplementation enhanced cadmium accumulation in kidneys. Analysis of the fluorescence revealed an increase in red fluorescence in the kidneys of rats co-exposed to cadmium and selenium. Interestingly, X-ray diffraction measurements carried out on kidney fractions of co-exposed rats point to the biosynthesis of cadmium selenide and/or sulfide nanoparticles (about 62 nm in size). Oxidative stress assays showed the ability of selenium to reduce lipid peroxidation and to restore glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity in kidneys. Hence, cadmium complexation with selenium and sulfur at a nanoscale level could reduce oxidative stress induced by cadmium in kidneys. PMID:24043937

  15. Sodium antimony sulfide (NaSbS2): Turning an unexpected impurity into a promising, environmentally friendly novel solar absorber material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahayu, Siti Utari; Chou, Chia-Ling; Suriyawong, Nipapon; Aragaw, Belete Asefa; Shi, Jen-Bin; Lee, Ming-Way

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel absorber material—NaSbS2—for solar cells. NaSbS2 is formed as an unexpected byproduct in the chemical synthesis of Sb2S3. However, NaSbS2 has many attractive features for a solar material. Here single phase NaSbS2 nanoparticles were synthesized through solution processing. NaSbS2 semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were demonstrated for the first time. The best cell yielded Jsc = 10.76 mA/cm2, Voc = 0.44 V, FF = 48.6%, and efficiency η = 2.30% under 1 sun. At the reduced 0.1 sun, the η increased to 3.18%—a respectable η for a new solar material.

  16. Cadmium and zinc relationships.

    PubMed

    Elinder, C G; Piscator, M

    1978-08-01

    Cadmium and zinc concentrations in kidney and liver have been measured under different exposure situations in different species including man. The results show that zinc increases almost equimolarly with cadmium in kidney after long-term low-level exposure to cadmium, e.g., in man, horse, pig, and lamb. In contrast, the increase of zinc follows that of cadmium to only a limited extent, e.g., in guinea pig, rabbit, rat, mouse, and chicks. In liver, the cadmium--zinc relationship seems to be reversed in such a way that zinc increases with cadmium more markedly in laboratory animals than in higher mammals. These differences between cadmium and zinc relationships in humans and large farm animals and those in commonly used laboratory animals must be considered carefully before experimental data on cadmium and zinc relationships in laboratory animals can be extrapolated to humans.

  17. Process for fabricating polycrystalline semiconductor thin-film solar cells, and cells produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xuanzhi; Sheldon, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A novel, simplified method for fabricating a thin-film semiconductor heterojunction photovoltaic device includes initial steps of depositing a layer of cadmium stannate and a layer of zinc stannate on a transparent substrate, both by radio frequency sputtering at ambient temperature, followed by the depositing of dissimilar layers of semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide and cadmium telluride, and heat treatment to convert the cadmium stannate to a substantially single-phase material of a spinel crystal structure. Preferably, the cadmium sulfide layer is also deposited by radio frequency sputtering at ambient temperature, and the cadmium telluride layer is deposited by close space sublimation at an elevated temperature effective to convert the amorphous cadmium stannate to the polycrystalline cadmium stannate with single-phase spinel structure.

  18. Process for removing and detoxifying cadmium from scrap metal including mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    Cadmium-bearing scrap from nuclear applications, such as neutron shielding and reactor control and safety rods, must usually be handled as mixed waste since it is radioactive and the cadmium in it is both leachable and highly toxic. Removing the cadmium from this scrap, and converting it to a nonleachable and minimally radioactive form, would greatly simplify disposal or recycling. A process now under development will do this by shredding the scrap; leaching it with reagents which selectively dissolve out the cadmium; reprecipitating the cadmium as its highly insoluble sulfide; then fusing the sulfide into a glassy matrix to bring its leachability below EPA limits before disposal. Alternatively, the cadmium may be recovered for reuse. A particular advantage of the process is that all reagents (except the glass frit) can easily be recovered and reused in a nearly closed cycle, minimizing the risk of radioactive release. The process does not harm common metals such as aluminum, iron and stainless steel, and is also applicable to non-nuclear cadmium-bearing scrap such as nickel-cadmium batteries.

  19. Metal Sulfides as Sensing Materials for Chemoresistive Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gaiardo, Andrea; Fabbri, Barbara; Guidi, Vincenzo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Giberti, Alessio; Gherardi, Sandro; Vanzetti, Lia; Malagù, Cesare; Zonta, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at a broad overview of the results obtained with metal-sulfide materials in the field of chemoresistive gas sensing. Indeed, despite the well-known electrical, optical, structural and morphological features previously described in the literature, metal sulfides present lack of investigation for gas sensing applications, a field in which the metal oxides still maintain a leading role owing to their high sensitivity, low cost, small dimensions and simple integration, in spite of the wide assortment of sensing materials. However, despite their great advantages, metal oxides have shown significant drawbacks, which have led to the search for new materials for gas sensing devices. In this work, Cadmium Sulfide and Tin (IV) Sulfide were investigated as functional materials for thick-film chemoresistive gas-sensors fabrication and they were tested both in thermo- and in photo-activation modes. Furthermore, electrical characterization was carried out in order to verify their gas sensing properties and material stability, by comparing the results obtained with metal sulfides to those obtained by using their metal-oxides counterparts. The results highlighted the possibility to use metal sulfides as a novel class of sensing materials, owing to their selectivity to specific compounds, stability, and the possibility to operate at room temperature. PMID:26927120

  20. Sulfide Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, John

    2007-02-01

    Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Series, Volume 61 David J. Vaughan, Editor Geochemical Society and Mineralogical Society of America; ISBN 0-939950-73-1 xiii + 714 pp.; 2006; $40. Sulfide minerals as a class represent important minor rock-forming minerals, but they are generally known as the chief sources of many economic metallic ores. In the past two decades, sulfide research has been extended to include important roles in environmental geology of sulfide weathering and resultant acid mine drainage, as well as in geomicrobiology in which bacteria make use of sulfides for metabolic energy sources. In the latter respect, sulfides played an important role in early evolution of life on Earth and in geochemical cycling of elements in the Earth's crust and hydrosphere.

  1. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  2. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application.

  3. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application. PMID:26553709

  4. One-step solvothermal tailoring the compositions and phases of nickel cobalt sulfides on conducting oxide substrates as counter electrodes for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Niu; Li, Guowang; Huang, Hua; Sun, Panpan; Xiong, Tianli; Xia, Zhifen; Zheng, Fang; Xu, Jixing; Sun, Xiaohua

    2016-12-01

    Several nickel cobalt sulfide (Ni-Co-S) counter electrodes (CEs) are prepared, and the Ni-Co-S nanoparticles are in-situ grown on SnO2: F (FTO) transparent conductive glasses via a facile solvothermal process, in which thiourea is used as the sulfurizing reagent. The X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometer are employed to measure the microstructure and composition of the Ni-Co-S CEs. When a proper amount of thiourea is adopted, fine crystalline NiCo2S4 CE is obtained. When the amount of thiourea is small or large, (Ni,Co)4S3 or (Ni,Co)3S4 CE is acquired, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Tafel polarization and open-circuit voltage decay (OCVD) measurements all demonstrate that the electrocatalytic activities and electrical conductivities of these Ni-Co-S CEs all approach or exceed those of Pt-pyrolysis CE. Their superior electrochemical performances are further confirmed by fabricating DSSCs with the Ni-Co-S CEs, they display similar or better photo-electric conversion efficiencies to/than the Pt-pyrolysis counterpart.

  5. A Two-Step Absorber Deposition Approach To Overcome Shunt Losses in Thin-Film Solar Cells: Using Tin Sulfide as a Proof-of-Concept Material System

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, Vera; Chakraborty, Rupak; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Hartman, Katy; Brandt, Riley E.; Polizzotti, Alex; Yang, Chuanxi; Moriarty, Tom; Gradečak, Silvija; Gordon, Roy G.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-08-31

    As novel absorber materials are developed and screened for their photovoltaic (PV) properties, the challenge remains to reproducibly test promising candidates for high-performing PV devices. Many early-stage devices are prone to device shunting due to pinholes in the absorber layer, producing 'false-negative' results. Here, we demonstrate a device engineering solution toward a robust device architecture, using a two-step absorber deposition approach. We use tin sulfide (SnS) as a test absorber material. The SnS bulk is processed at high temperature (400 degrees C) to stimulate grain growth, followed by a much thinner, low-temperature (200 degrees C) absorber deposition. At a lower process temperature, the thin absorber overlayer contains significantly smaller, densely packed grains, which are likely to provide a continuous coating and fill pinholes in the underlying absorber bulk. We compare this two-step approach to the more standard approach of using a semi-insulating buffer layer directly on top of the annealed absorber bulk, and we demonstrate a more than 3.5x superior shunt resistance Rsh with smaller standard error ..sigma..Rsh. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements indicate a lower density of pinholes in the SnS absorber bulk when using the two-step absorber deposition approach. We correlate those findings to improvements in the device performance and device performance reproducibility.

  6. Utilization of Metal Sulfide Material of (CuGa)(1-x)Zn(2x)S2 Solid Solution with Visible Light Response in Photocatalytic and Photoelectrochemical Solar Water Splitting Systems.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takaaki; Hakari, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Satoru; Jia, Qingxin; Iwase, Akihide; Kudo, Akihiko

    2015-03-19

    Upon forming a solid solution between CuGaS2 and ZnS, we have successfully developed a highly active (CuGa)(1-x)Zn(2x)S2 photocatalyst for H2 evolution in the presence of sacrificial reagents under visible light irradiation. The Ru-loaded (CuGa)0.8Zn0.4S2 functioned as a H2-evolving photocatalyst in a Z-scheme system with BiVO4 of an O2-evolving photocatalyst and Co complexes of an electron mediator. The Z-scheme system split water into H2 and O2 under visible light and simulated sunlight irradiation. The (CuGa)(1-x)Zn(2x)S2 possessed a p-type semiconductor character. The photoelectrochemical cell with a Ru-loaded (CuGa)0.5ZnS2 photocathode and a CoO(x)-modified BiVO4 photoanode split water even without applying an external bias. Thus, we successfully demonstrated that the metal sulfide material group can be available for Z-scheme and electrochemical systems to achieve solar water splitting into H2 and O2.

  7. Enhancement of Photo-Current Conversion Efficiency in a CdS/CdSe Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cell Incorporated with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunjune; Lee, Jongtaek; Park, Taehee; Lee, Sanghun; Yi, Whikun

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) are sequentially assembled onto a nanocrystalline TiO2 film to create a quantum-dot (QD)-sensitized solar cell application by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The results show that CdS and CdSe QDs have a complementary effect in the performance of light harvest of solar cell. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are incorporated with a CdS/CdSe QDs solar cell by mixing them with TiC2 film to enhance electron transfer. SWNTs are also sprayed onto CdSe QDs (SWNTs onto CdSe) to apply p+ type properties of SWNTs. Absorbance is increased in a wide wavelength range. In particular, cells having the sprayed SWNTs onto the QDs show a clear increase in absorbance at a low wavelength region. The fill factor of CdS/CdSe QDs solar cell with SWNTs is higher than that without SWNTs, indicating the decrease in loss of electron from TiO2 to QDs. Short-circuit current in a QD-sensitized solar cell having SWNTs on CdSe shows maximum value. Photo-current conversion efficiency of cells is increased in both cell types containing SWNTs at 10~17% compared with pristine cells. We expect that solar cells using SWNTs will affect future energy technology and devices.

  8. Design of pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor for the generation of hydrogen from alkaline sulfide wastewater of sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Priya, R; Kanmani, S

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were conducted for photocatalytic generation of renewable fuel hydrogen from sulphide wastewater from the sewage treatment plant. In this study, pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor was designed for treating 1 m3 of sulphide wastewater and also for the simultaneous generation of hydrogen. Bench-scale studies were conducted both in the batch recycle and continuous modes under solar irradiation at similar experimental conditions. The maximum of 89.7% conversion was achieved in the continuous mode. The length of the pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor was arrived using the design parameters such as volumetric flow rate (Q) (11 x 10(-2) m3/s), inlet concentration of sulphide ion (C(in)) (28 mol/m3), conversion (89.7%) and average mass flow destruction rate (3.488 x 10(-6) mol/m2 s). The treatment cost of the process was estimated to be 6 US$/m3. This process would be suitable for India like sub-tropical country where sunlight is abundantly available throughout the year.

  9. Retrospective mortality study of cadmium workers: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Thun, M.J.; Schnorr, T.M.; Halperin, W.E.

    1986-02-06

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted among a group of workers exposed to cadmium (7440439), to determine specific causes of death among these workers. The report reviewed the findings of the study and presented additional findings concerning exposures to other hazards at the facility. The study examined the causes of death for 292 cadmium workers who worked at least 2 years at a small facility that recovered cadmium from bag house dust. Exposures included dusts of cadmium-oxide (1306190) and cadmium-sulfide (1306236) and to fumes of cadmium itself. Over a two fold excess of deaths from respiratory cancer was noted among these workers when compared with the general population and over a three fold excess of deaths from prostatic cancer among the men. A follow up of the study cohort revealed that all cause mortality was slightly below that of the United States male population. The Standardized Mortality Ratio for circulatory disease was 65. Deaths due to respiratory cancer were 65% above the number expected. All of the 20 deaths from respiratory cancer were due to cancer of the lung, trachea and bronchus. Deaths due to genitourinary cancer were 35% above expected levels.

  10. Cadmium in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, L. )

    1992-03-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the cadmium level in tobacco planted in five main tobacco-producing areas, a cadmium polluted area, and in cigarettes produced domestically (54 brands). The results indicate that average cadmium content in tobacco was 1.48 (0.10-4.95 mg/kg), which was similar to that of Indian tobacco (1.24 mg/kg), but the cadmium of tobacco produced in the cadmium polluted area was quite high (8.60 mg/kg). The average cigarette cadmium was 1.05 micrograms/g (with filter tip) and 1.61 micrograms/g (regular cigarette). Therefore special attention should be paid to the soil used in planting tobacco.

  11. Cadmium - a metallohormone?

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that is often referred to as the metal of the 20th Century. It is widely used in industry principally in galvanizing and electroplating, in batteries, in electrical conductors, in the manufacture of alloys, pigments, and plastics, and in the stabilization of phosphate fertilizers. As a byproduct of smelters, cadmium is a prevalent environmental contaminant. In the general population, exposure to cadmium occurs primarily through dietary sources, cigarette smoking, and, to a lesser degree, drinking water. Although the metal has no known physiological function, there is evidence to suggest that the cadmium is a potent metallohormone. This review summarizes the increasing evidence that cadmium mimics the function of steroid hormones, addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium functions as a hormone, and discusses its potential role in development of the hormone dependent cancers. PMID:19362102

  12. Cadmium - A metallohormone?

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that is often referred to as the metal of the 20th century. It is widely used in industry principally in galvanizing and electroplating, in batteries, in electrical conductors, in the manufacture of alloys, pigments, and plastics, and in the stabilization of phosphate fertilizers. As a byproduct of smelters, cadmium is a prevalent environmental contaminant. In the general population, exposure to cadmium occurs primarily through dietary sources, cigarette smoking, and, to a lesser degree, drinking water. Although the metal has no known physiological function, there is evidence to suggest that the cadmium is a potent metallohormone. This review summarizes the increasing evidence that cadmium mimics the function of steroid hormones, addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium functions as a hormone, and discusses its potential role in development of the hormone dependent cancers.

  13. Preparation of SnS/CdS Co-sensitized TiO2 Photoelectrodes for Quantum Dots Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yu-Long; Song, Ping; Zhao, Su-Qing

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 porous films have been prepared by electrophoresis deposition method, while tin sulfide (SnS) and cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) have been deposited by a simple and inexpensive successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method. The CdS and SnS QDs modifications expanded the photoresponse range of TiO2 nanoparticles from the ultraviolet region to visible range. Such prepared SnS/CdS/TiO2 films were used as photo-anodes to assemble QDs sensitized solar cells with I-/I3 - liquid electrolyte and Pt-coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass counter electrode. The best resulting cells had an open circuit voltage of 520 mV, a short circuit current density of 2.972 mA cm-2, a fill factor of 0.61, and with a conversion efficiency of 0.936%.

  14. Fabrication of silver sulfide thin films for efficient organic solar cells with high short-circuit currents based on double heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chong; Zhai, Yong; Li, Fumin; Yue, Gentian

    2015-12-01

    Efficient solar cells based on Ag2S/P3HT and PCBM/P3HT heterojunctions are fabricated, in which the Ag2S nanoparticles are deposited on ITO glass via a newly developed high-speed rotating thermal decomposition method as an electron selective layer and a light absorption material. The ITO/Ag2S(n)/P3HT:PCBM films have a complementary effect in the light absorption due to the narrow band gap of Ag2S. The Ag2S nanoparticles in the upper layer of Ag2S film form a vertical nanotree-structure after many cycles of Ag2S deposition and lead to the formation of Ag2S/P3HT bulk heterojunction, which facilitates exciton dissociation at the P3HT/Ag2S interfaces and made Ag2S nanocrystals electron-transport materials in the active layers. Moreover, the Ag2S make a contribution to the photocurrent as a light absorber. The maximum power conversion efficiency of 3.21% is achieved for the fabricated ITO/Ag2S(50)/P3HT:PCBM/MoO3/Au solar cell with high short-circuit current, which is 1.13 times the best efficiency (2.84%) of the ITO/dense-TiO2/P3HT:PCBM/MoO3/Au cell made by the high-temperature process and is also much higher than that of reported similar hybrid solar cells based on Ag2S/conjugated polymer heterojunction. The improvement of the efficiency may result from the reduced charge recombination and increased light absorption due to the formation of Ag2S.

  15. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  16. Harnessing Sun's Energy with Quantum Dots Based Next Generation Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Halim, Mohammad A

    2012-12-27

    Our energy consumption relies heavily on the three components of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) and nearly 83% of our current energy is consumed from those sources. The use of fossil fuels, however, has been viewed as a major environmental threat because of their substantial contribution to greenhouse gases which are responsible for increasing the global average temperature. Last four decades, scientists have been searching for alternative sources of energy which need to be environmentally clean, efficient, cost-effective, renewable, and sustainable. One of the promising sustainable sources of energy can be achieved by harnessing sun energy through silicon wafer, organic polymer, inorganic dye, and quantum dots based solar cells. Among them, quantum dots have an exceptional property in that they can excite multiple electrons using only one photon. These dots can easily be synthesized, processed in solution, and incorporated into solar cell application. Interestingly, the quantum dots solar cells can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit; however, it is a great challenge for other solar cell materials to exceed the limit. Theoretically, the quantum dots solar cell can boost the power conversion efficiency up to 66% and even higher to 80%. Moreover, in changing the size of the quantum dots one can utilize the Sun's broad spectrum of visible and infrared ranges. This review briefly overviews the present performance of different materials-based solar cells including silicon wafer, dye-sensitized, and organic solar cells. In addition, recent advances of the quantum dots based solar cells which utilize cadmium sulfide/selenide, lead sulfide/selenide, and new carbon dots as light harvesting materials has been reviewed. A future outlook is sketched as to how one could improve the efficiency up to 10% from the current highest efficiency of 6.6%.

  17. Harnessing Sun’s Energy with Quantum Dots Based Next Generation Solar Cell

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    Our energy consumption relies heavily on the three components of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) and nearly 83% of our current energy is consumed from those sources. The use of fossil fuels, however, has been viewed as a major environmental threat because of their substantial contribution to greenhouse gases which are responsible for increasing the global average temperature. Last four decades, scientists have been searching for alternative sources of energy which need to be environmentally clean, efficient, cost-effective, renewable, and sustainable. One of the promising sustainable sources of energy can be achieved by harnessing sun energy through silicon wafer, organic polymer, inorganic dye, and quantum dots based solar cells. Among them, quantum dots have an exceptional property in that they can excite multiple electrons using only one photon. These dots can easily be synthesized, processed in solution, and incorporated into solar cell application. Interestingly, the quantum dots solar cells can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit; however, it is a great challenge for other solar cell materials to exceed the limit. Theoretically, the quantum dots solar cell can boost the power conversion efficiency up to 66% and even higher to 80%. Moreover, in changing the size of the quantum dots one can utilize the Sun’s broad spectrum of visible and infrared ranges. This review briefly overviews the present performance of different materials-based solar cells including silicon wafer, dye-sensitized, and organic solar cells. In addition, recent advances of the quantum dots based solar cells which utilize cadmium sulfide/selenide, lead sulfide/selenide, and new carbon dots as light harvesting materials has been reviewed. A future outlook is sketched as to how one could improve the efficiency up to 10% from the current highest efficiency of 6.6%. PMID:28348320

  18. Synthesis of optimized indium phosphide/zinc sulfide core/shell nanocrystals and titanium dioxide nanotubes for quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungyong

    Synthesis of InP/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals and TiO 2 nanotubes and the optimization study to couple them together were explored for quantum dot sensitized solar cells. Its intrinsic nontoxicity makes the direct band gap InP/ZnS core/shell be one of the most promising semiconductor nanocrystals for optoelectric applications, with the advantage of tuning the optical absorption range in the desired solar spectrum region. Highly luminescent and monodisperse InP/ZnS nanocrystals were synthesized in a non-coordinating solvent. By varying the synthesis scheme, different size InP/ZnS nanocrystals with emission peaks ranging from 520 nm to 620 nm were grown. For the purpose of ensuring air stability, a ZnS shell was grown. The ZnS shell improves the chemical stability in terms of oxidation prevention. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image shows that the nanocrystals are highly crystalline and monodisperse. Free-standing TiO2 nanotubes were produced by an anodization method using ammonium fluoride. The free-standing nanotubes were formed under the condition that the chemical dissolution speed associated with fluoride concentration was faster than the speed of Ti oxidation. Highly ordered free-standing anatase form TiO2 nanotubes, which are transformed by annealing at the optimized temperature, are expected to be ideal for coupling with the prepared InP/ZnS nanocrystals. Electrophoretic deposition was carried out to couple the InP/ZnS nanocrystals with the TiO2 nanotubes. Under the adjusted applied voltage condition, the current during the electrophoretic deposition decreased continuously with time. The amount of the deposited nanocrystals was estimated by calculation and the evenly deposited nanocrystals on the TiO2 nanotubes were observed by TEM.

  19. Crystalline phase transformation of colloidal cadmium sulfide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghali, M.; Eissa, A. M.; Mosaad, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we give a microscopic view concerning influence of the growth conditions on the physical properties of nanocrystals (NCs) thin films made of CdS, prepared using chemical bath deposition CBD technique. We show a crystalline phase transformation of CdS NCs from hexagonal wurtzite (W) structure to cubic zincblende (ZB) when the growth conditions change, particularly the solution pH values. This effect was confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The optical absorption spectra allow calculation of the bandgap value, Eg, where significant increase ˜200 meV in the CdS bandgap when transforming from Hexagonal to Cubic phase was found.

  20. Solid state, transparent, cadmium sulfide-polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothurkar, Nikhil K.

    This dissertation deals with the preparation and characterization of solid state, transparent CdS-polymer nanocomposites for potential applications in optical limiting, lenses and photovoltaics. The focus of this research was controlling CdS aggregation to obtain 1 mm thick, films with a transmittance >85%. CdS-polysulfone nanocomposites gave transparent sols using thiol-capping agents however solid films obtained, were translucent to opaque. CdS-epoxy nanocomposites gave 1 mm thick films with >85% transmittance. Oligomeric polyoxypropylene diamine stabilizers were used to shield the inter particle forces and increase the viscosity of the medium to give air stable sols. Films were obtained by curing the CdS sols with an epoxy resin system. The band edge of the nanocomposites showed a shoulder corresponding to the absorption from the CdS particles. A majority of small amorphous and non-stoichiometric (richer in Cd) particles <5 nm were observed in TEM micrographs. Relatively fewer CdS aggregates in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers were also detected. Aggregates were generally more numerous in films as compared to sols. The two-photon absorption coefficient of the CdS particles in the films showed a 30-fold reduction compared to bulk CdS. This was attributed to the lack of crystallinity of particles. The films were stable up to 300°C. CdS aggregation in the CdS-epoxy system depends on a number of factors including temperature, stabilizer concentration, stabilizer molar mass and US concentration. Effective aggregation control yields transparent films. Factors affecting the band edge and transparency of the films were detected and regression models were fitted to the data. Temperature, stabilizer concentration and CdS concentration had significant effects on the band edge and transparency. Interactions between temperature-stabilizer concentration and temperature-CdS concentration had significant effects on the band edge. Band edge tunability with temperature was demonstrated. An attempt to estimate the particle size from the band edge was made but owing absence of any suitable theoretical models, an accurate estimate was not possible. However a rough estimate was provided. High concentration CdS-epoxy thin and thick films containing up to 21% US were synthesized using two different methods. High transparency of about 85% was obtained in some of them.

  1. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF LINE STRUCTURE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE EDGE EMISSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The temperature dependence of the line structure in Cds edge emission stimulated by UV light was investigated from 4.2 K to 367 K. The spectral... dependence of the primary line groups is a linear function of temperature above 220 K with coefficients of change of 1.27 and 1.8 Angstroms degree K for the...lines observed. Below 220 K the dependence departs from linearity and approaches its limiting value more rapidly with decreasing temperature

  2. Dip coated nanocrystalline CdZnS thin films for solar cell application

    SciTech Connect

    Dongre, J. K. Chaturvedi, Mahim; Patil, Yuvraj; Sharma, Sandhya; Jain, U. K.

    2015-07-31

    Nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide (CdS) and zinc cadmium sulfide (ZnCdS) thin films have been grown via simple and low cost dip coating technique. The prepared films are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopic (AFM) and UV-VIS spectrophotometer techniques to reveal their structural, morphological and optical properties. XRD shows that both samples grown have zinc blende structure. The grain size is calculated as 6.2 and 8 nm using Scherrer’s formula. The band gap value of CdS and CdZnS film is estimated to be 2.58 and 2.69 eV respectively by UV-vis spectroscopy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) investigations are carried out using cell configuration as n-CdZnS/(1M NaOH + 1M Na2S + 1M S)/C. The photovoltaic output characteristic is used to calculate fill-factor (FF) and solar conversion efficiency (η)

  3. Cadmium in zinc deposits: Economic geology of a polluting element

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.O.

    2000-05-01

    The chief host of cadmium in zinc deposits is sphalerite, the cadmium content of which depends on the type of deposit. Sphalerite from Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits has high cadmium concentrations whereas sphalerite from exhalative deposits has low cadmium concentrations. The Cd content of sphalerite depends on the Cd/Zn ratio, ligand activities, and temperature of the ore-forming fluids. The combined effect of variation of temperature, pH, total activity of reduced sulfur, and activity of Cl{sup {minus}} cannot by itself account for either Cd depletion (exhalative deposits) or Cd enrichment (MVT deposits). Variations in the Cd/Zn ratio of the fluid have a significant effect in determining that of sphalerite. Basinal brines, which can be considered to be the recent equivalents of MVT fluids, have high Cd/Zn ratios, and active exhalative systems are characterized by low Cd/Zn ratios. Probably the differences in sphalerite composition between the different deposit types are less a function of temperature and ligand activities than Cd/Zn ratio of the ore-forming fluids. In the hydrothermal environment, the Cd/Zn ratio is generally not high enough to allow crystallization of cadmium sulfides (greenockite or hawleyite). The abundance of greenockite in the supergene alteration zone of hydrothermal zinc deposits can be explained on the basis of Zn scavenging by crystallizing smithsonite.

  4. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  5. Nonstoichiometry of crystalline cadmium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Kharif, Ya.L.; Brezhnev, V.Yu.; Kovtunenko, P.V.

    1987-08-01

    A highly sensitive physicochemical method is developed for determining the cadmium concentration (10/sup -5/ at. % for a 10 g sample weight), dissolved in cadmium selenide. The nonstoichiometry of cadmium selenide crystals is studied after high-temperature annealing at 870-1370/sup 0/K in cadmium vapor. For the first time, it is discovered that in the investigated crystals the dissolved cadmium exists primarily in the form of electrically neutral defects, which are presumably clusters of selenium vacancies with low mobility.

  6. Wet oxidation of oil-bearing sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Hotz, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    Oil-bearing metal sulfide sludges produced in treatment of an industrial wastewater, which includes plating wastes, have yielded to treatment by electrooxidation and hydrogen peroxide processes. The oxidation can be controlled to be mild enough to avoid decomposition of the organic phase while oxidizing the sulfides to sulfates. The pH is controlled to near neutral conditions where iron, aluminum and chromium(III) precipitate as hydrous oxides. Other metals, such as lead and barium, may be present as sulfate precipitates with limited solubility, while metals such as nickel and cadmium would be present as complexed ions in a sulfate solution. The oxidations were found to proceed smoothly, without vigorous reaction; heat liberation was minimal. 2 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  8. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  9. Solar heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanson, R.

    Brief discussions of the major components of a solar powered, chemical ground source heat pump are presented. The components discussed are the solar collectors and the chemical heat storage battery. Sodium sulfide is the medium used for heat storage. Catalog information which provides a description of all of the heat pump systems is included.

  10. Enhanced performance of cadmium selenide quantum dot-sensitized solar cells by incorporating long afterglow europium, dysprosium co-doped strontium aluminate phosphors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hengchao; Pan, Likun; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo

    2014-02-15

    CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cells based on an efficient bifunctional structured layer composed of long afterglow SrAl2O4:Eu,Dy phosphors on top of a transparent layer of nanocrystalline TiO2 were fabricated and their photovoltaic performances were investigated. The results show that a high power conversion efficiency of 1.22% is achieved for the cell with SrAl2O4:Eu,Dy at one sun illumination (AM 1.5 G, 100 mW cm(-2)), which is an increase of 48% compared to the cell without SrAl2O4:Eu,Dy (0.82%). After one sun illumination for 1 min and subsequent turn off of the light source, the cell with SrAl2O4:Eu,Dy still shows an efficiency of 0.04% under dark condition due to the irradiation by the long persistent light from SrAl2O4:Eu,Dy. The present strategy should provide a possibility to fulfill the operation of solar cells even in the dark.

  11. Influences of dietary uptake and reactive sulfides on metal bioavailability from aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, B.-G.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how animals are exposed to the large repository of metal pollutants in aquatic sediments is complicated and is important in regulatory decisions. Experiments with four types of invertebrates showed that feeding behavior and dietary uptake control bioaccumulation of cadmium, silver, nickel, and zinc. Metal concentrations in animal tissue correlated with metal concentrations extracted from sediments, but not with metal in porewater, across a range of reactive sulfide concentrations, from 0.5 to 30 micromoles per gram. These results contradict the notion that metal bioavailability in sediments is controlled by geochemical equilibration of metals between porewater and reactive sulfides, a proposed basis for regulatory criteria for metals.

  12. Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Annual report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    The primary goal of this program, increasing the conversion efficiency of a thin-film cell based on CdS/Cu/sub 2/S, has been achieved. A number of (CdZn)S/Cu/sub 2/S cells have been made with conversion efficiencies in excess of 10% when tested in collimated sunlight. The highest efficiency achieved was 10.2% for a cell with 16% Zinc which had the following parameters; V/sub oc/ = 0.60V, J/sub sc/ = 22.8 mA/cm/sup 2/ (pro-rated to 100 mW/cm/sup 2/) FF = 74.9%. Further improvement in the performance of CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells beyond the previously reported 9.2%, was found to be limited by deficiencies in the fundamental knowledge and control of the Cu/sub 2/S layer. A number of process changes in the production of CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells have been explored and are reported on. Transient capacitance measurements on CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells and further development of an integral encapsulation are also reported.

  13. Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Quarterly progress report, March 1-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    A complete statistical analysis of the yield of CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells produced by the standard processes is presented. Progress has been made on producing (CdZn)S films with the appropriate properties to yield high efficiency cells. Further studies of capacitance and transient-capacitance are reported. Defects in electron beam deposited glass are shown to be responsible for lack of effective sealing against atmospheric attack.

  14. Mineral commodity profiles: Cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Plachy, Jozef

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Cadmium is a soft, low-melting-point metal that has many uses. It is similar in abundance to antimony and bismuth and is the 63d element in order of crustal abundance. Cadmium is associated in nature with zinc (and, less closely, with lead and copper) and is extracted mainly as a byproduct of the mining and processing of zinc. In 2000, it was refined in 27 countries, of which the 8 largest accounted for two-thirds of world production. The United States was the third largest refiner after Japan and China. World production in 2000 was 19,700 metric tons (t) and U.S. production was 1,890 t. In the United States, one company in Illinois and another in Tennessee refined primary cadmium. A Pennsylvania company recovered cadmium from scrap, mainly spent nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries. The supply of cadmium in the world and in the United States appears to be adequate to meet future industrial needs; the United States has about 23 percent of the world reserve base.

  15. Polymer/Nanocrystal Hybrid Solar Cells: Influence of Molecular Precursor Design on Film Nanomorphology, Charge Generation and Device Performance.

    PubMed

    MacLachlan, Andrew J; Rath, Thomas; Cappel, Ute B; Dowland, Simon A; Amenitsch, Heinz; Knall, Astrid-Caroline; Buchmaier, Christine; Trimmel, Gregor; Nelson, Jenny; Haque, Saif A

    2015-01-01

    In this work, molecular tuning of metal xanthate precursors is shown to have a marked effect on the heterojunction morphology of hybrid poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)/CdS blends and, as a result, the photochemical processes and overall performance of in situ fabricated hybrid solar cells. A series of cadmium xanthate complexes is synthesized for use as in situ precursors to cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in hybrid P3HT/CdS solar cells. The formation of CdS domains is studied by simultaneous GIWAXS (grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering) and GISAXS (grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering), revealing knowledge about crystal growth and the formation of different morphologies observed using TEM (transmission electron microscopy). These measurements show that there is a strong relationship between precursor structure and heterojunction nanomorphology. A combination of TAS (transient absorption spectroscopy) and photovoltaic device performance measurements is used to show the intricate balance required between charge photogeneration and percolated domains in order to effectively extract charges to maximize device power conversion efficiencies. This study presents a strong case for xanthate complexes as a useful route to designing optimal heterojunction morphologies for use in the emerging field of hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells, due to the fact that the nanomorphology can be tuned via careful design of these precursor materials.

  16. Polymer/Nanocrystal Hybrid Solar Cells: Influence of Molecular Precursor Design on Film Nanomorphology, Charge Generation and Device Performance

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Andrew J; Rath, Thomas; Cappel, Ute B; Dowland, Simon A; Amenitsch, Heinz; Knall, Astrid-Caroline; Buchmaier, Christine; Trimmel, Gregor; Nelson, Jenny; Haque, Saif A

    2015-01-01

    In this work, molecular tuning of metal xanthate precursors is shown to have a marked effect on the heterojunction morphology of hybrid poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)/CdS blends and, as a result, the photochemical processes and overall performance of in situ fabricated hybrid solar cells. A series of cadmium xanthate complexes is synthesized for use as in situ precursors to cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in hybrid P3HT/CdS solar cells. The formation of CdS domains is studied by simultaneous GIWAXS (grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering) and GISAXS (grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering), revealing knowledge about crystal growth and the formation of different morphologies observed using TEM (transmission electron microscopy). These measurements show that there is a strong relationship between precursor structure and heterojunction nanomorphology. A combination of TAS (transient absorption spectroscopy) and photovoltaic device performance measurements is used to show the intricate balance required between charge photogeneration and percolated domains in order to effectively extract charges to maximize device power conversion efficiencies. This study presents a strong case for xanthate complexes as a useful route to designing optimal heterojunction morphologies for use in the emerging field of hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells, due to the fact that the nanomorphology can be tuned via careful design of these precursor materials. PMID:25866496

  17. High efficiency cadmium telluride and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells. Annual subcontract report, 1 March 1990--28 February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.A.; Chou, H.C.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to improve the basic understanding of CdTe and ZnTe alloys by growing and characterizing these films along with cell fabrication. The major objective was to develop wide-band-gap (1.6--1.8 eV) material for the top cell, along with compatible window material and transparent ohmic contacts, so that a cascade cell design can be optimized. Front-wall solar cells were fabricated with a glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS window, where the CdS film is thin to maximize transmission and current. Wide-band-gap absorber films (E{sub g} = 1.75 eV) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques, which provided excellent control for tailoring the film composition and properties. CdZnTe films were grown by both MBE and MOCVD. All the as-grown films were characterized by several techniques (surface photovoltage spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) for composition, bulk uniformity, thickness, and film and interface quality. Front-wall-type solar cells were fabricated in collaboration with Ametek Materials Research Laboratory using CdTe and CdZnTe polycrystalline absorber films. The effects of processing on ternary film were studied by AES and XPS coupled with capacitance voltage and current voltage measurements as a function of temperature. Bias-dependent spectral response and electrical measurements were used to test some models in order to identify and quantify dominant loss mechanisms.

  18. Cadmium migration in aerospace nickel cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of temperature, the nature of separator material, charge and discharge, carbonate contamination, and the mode of storage are studied with respect to the migration of active material from the negative toward the positive plate. A theoretical model is proposed which takes into account the solubility of cadmium in various concentrations of hydroxide and carbonate at different temperatures, the generation of the cadmiate ion, Cd(OH)3(-), during discharge, the migration of the cadmiate ion and particulate Cd(OH)2 due to electrophoretic effects and the movement of electrolyte in and out of the negative plate and, finally, the recrystallization of cadmiate ion in the separator as Cd(OH)2. Application of the theoretical model to observations of cadmium migration in cycled cells is also discussed.

  19. Studies of adsorbate effects on the photoluminescence of cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongju

    1993-12-31

    The electronic properties of semiconductors and their surface and photoluminescence properties are introduced. A short introduction to chemisorption and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model is presented. The properties of II-VI semiconductors are briefly reviewed. Adsorption from CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution of a family of ring-substituted, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) derivatives onto the surface of etched, single-crystal n-CdSe quenches the band gap photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the semiconductor. PL quenching increases with the electron-withdrawing ability of the ring substituent. The C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} fullerenes can also be adsorbed from toluene solution onto the surfaces of n-CdS, and n-CdSe, causing quenching of the PL intensity. Quantitiatively, the magnitude of the PL quenching can be fit to a dead-layer model, permitting an estimate of maximum expansions in dead-layer thickness caused by adsorption of TCNQ derivatives and C{sub 60} onto the n-CdSe surface to reach {approximately}140 {angstrom} and 130 {angstrom}, respectively. The PL intensity changes are concentration-dependent and give good fits to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, yielding equilibrium binding constants on the order of {approximately}10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} M{sup {minus}1} for TCNQ derivatives and fullerenes, among the largest reported to date.

  20. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  1. Biotreatment of refinery spent sulfidic caustics

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, K.L.; Rajganesh, B.; Woolsey, M.; Plato, A.

    1995-12-31

    Caustics are used in petroleum refinering to remove hydrogen sulfide from various hydrocarbon streams. Spent sulfidic caustics from two Conoco refineries have been successfully biotreated on bench and pilot scale, resulting in neutralization and removal of active sulfides. Sulfides were completely oxidized to sulfate by Thiobacillus denitrificans. Microbial oxidation of sulfide produced acid, which at least partially neutralized the caustic.

  2. Suicide with hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sams, Ralph Newton; Carver, H Wayne; Catanese, Charles; Gilson, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    This presentation will address the recent rise of suicide deaths resulting from the asphyxiation by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas.Hydrogen sulfide poisoning has been an infrequently encountered cause of death in medical examiner practice. Most H2S deaths that have been reported occurred in association with industrial exposure.More recently, H2S has been seen in the commission of suicide, particularly in Japan. Scattered reports of this phenomenon have also appeared in the United States.We have recently observed 2 intentional asphyxial deaths in association with H2S. In both cases, the decedents committed suicide in their automobiles. They generated H2S by combining a sulfide-containing tree spray with toilet bowl cleaner (with an active ingredient of hydrogen chloride acid). Both death scenes prompted hazardous materials team responses because of notes attached to the victims' car windows indicating the presence of toxic gas. Autopsy findings included discoloration of lividity and an accentuation of the gray matter of the brain. Toxicology testing confirmed H2S exposure with the demonstration of high levels of thiosulfate in blood.In summary, suicide with H2S appears to be increasing in the United States.

  3. Mechanical Activation-Assisted Reductive Leaching of Cadmium from Zinc Neutral Leaching Residue Using Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Mi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, zinc neutral leaching residue was mechanically activated by ball-milling. The subsequent leaching behavior and kinetics of cadmium extraction in a mixed SO2-H2SO4 system were studied. Changes in the crystalline phase, lattice distortion, particle size and morphology, which were induced by mechanical activation, were also investigated. The activated samples showed different physicochemical characteristics, and cadmium extraction was found to be easier than for the un-activated samples. Under the same conditions, mechanical activation contributed to higher cadmium leaching. The cadmium extraction kinetics at 75-95°C was found to fit the shrinking core model. The raw neutral leaching residue, and the samples activated for 60 min and 120 min had a calculated activation energy of 65.02 kJ/mol, 59.45 kJ/mol and 53.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The leaching residue was characterized by ICP, XRD and SEM analysis. According to XRD analysis, the main phases in the residue were lead sulfate (PbSO4), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS).

  4. Polycrystalline thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition. Annual subcontract report, 20 March 1992--19 March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Trefny, J.U.; Furtak, T.E.; Wada, N.; Williamson, D.L.; Kim, D.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes progress during the first year of a 3-year program at Colorado School of Mines, based upon earlier studies performed by Ametek Corporation, to develop specific layers of the Ametek n-i-p structure as well as additional studies of several transparent conducting oxides. Thin films of ZnO and ZnO:Al were deposited under various conditions. For the n-layer of the Ametek structure, a dip-coating method was developed for the deposition of CdS films. The authors also present data on the characterization of these films by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and other techniques. They made progress in the electrodeposition of the CdTe i-layer of the Ametek structure. They developed appropriate electrochemical baths and are beginning to understand the role of the many experimental parameters that must be controlled to obtain high-quality films of this material. They explored the possibility of using an electrochemical process for fabricating the ZnTe p-layer. Some preliminary success was achieved, and this step will be pursued in the next phase. Finally, they fabricated a number of ``dot`` solar cells with the structure glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS/CdTe/Au. Several cells with efficiencies in the range of 5%-6% were obtained, and they are confident, given recent progress, that cells with efficiencies in excess of 10% will be achieved in the near future.

  5. High-efficiency cadmium and zinc-telluride-based thin-film solar cells. Annual subcontract report, 1 March 1990--28 February 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.

    1992-02-01

    This report describes research into polycrystalline CdTe solar cells grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Efficiencies of {approximately}10% were achieved using both p-i-n and p-n structures. A pre-heat treatment of CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass substrates at 450{degrees}C in hydrogen atmosphere prior to the CdTe growth was found to be essential for high performance because this heat treatment reduces oxygen-related defects from the CdS surface. However, this treatment also resulted in a Cd-deficient CdS surface, which may in part limit the CdTe cell efficiency to 10% due to Cd vacancy-related interface defects. Preliminary model calculations suggest that removing these states can increase the cell efficiency from 10% to 13.5%. Photon absorption in the CdS film also limits the cell performance, and eliminating this loss mechanism can result in CdTe efficiencies in excess of 18%. Polycrystalline, 1.7-e, CdZnTe films were also grown for tandem-cell applications. CdZnTe/CdS cells processed using the standard CdTe cell fabrication procedure resulted in 4.4% efficiency, high series resistance, and a band-gap shift to 1.55 eV. The formation of Zn-O at and near the CdZnTe surface is the source of high contact resistance. A saturated dichromate each prior to contact deposition was found to solve the contact resistance problem. The CdCl{sub 2} treatment was identified as the cause of the observed band-gap shift due to the preferred formation of ZnCl{sub 2}. 59 refs.

  6. High transmittance cadmium oxysulfide Cd(S,O) buffer layer grown by triton X-100 mediated chemical bath deposition for thin-film heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballipinar, Faruk; Rastogi, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Polycrystalline 100-190 nm Cd(S,O) n-type semiconductor thin films of high transparency in the visible range are deposited by a surfactant Triton X-100 mediated chemical bath deposition process. The crystalline structure of the films revealed by X-ray diffraction data shows a cubic-CdO phase signified by (111) and (200) planes alongside the (002), (220), and (110) planes from hexagonal-CdS. The invariance of the 2θ position of the (002) CdS diffraction is interpreted in terms of the growth of the composite film essentially by the formation of a dilute interstitial alloy of CdO and CdS. This is confirmed by Raman spectra which, besides the CdS 1LO and 2LO modes at 300 and 600 cm-1, also show Raman lines from CdO at 1098 cm-1 and 952 cm-1 assigned as overtone of 2LO phonon modes and 556 cm-1 due to band crossing between LO and TO modes of CdO. Optical spectra of Cd(S,O) films show a median transmittance of >85% compared to ˜70% for CdS films in the 550-1000 nm wavelength range. The Cd(S,O) films show optical bandgap varying from 2.34 to 2.26 eV with increasing CdO fraction but retain high sub-bandgap transmission and sharp band edge threshold. The Cd(S,O) films thus offer an alternative to the CdS buffer layer in the heterojunction solar cells, which has major shortcoming of poor stability and high sub-bandgap absorption. The photoluminescence spectra of Cd(S,O) films show three green bands, of which one is the near band edge transition at 511.5 nm, the same as in CdS, the second band at 526.0 nm that red shifted from the CdS position is due to shallow donor-acceptor defects arising from structural change due to CdO, and the third band at 543.6 nm (2.28 eV) originates from direct band transition in CdO. The growth mechanism of Cd(S,O) films is described, which invokes that the Triton X-100 molecule modifies the microenvironment around adsorbed [Cd(NH3)4]2+ species, thereby inducing two concurrent reactions, one with SH- species that cause CdS formation and the

  7. Effect of bioturbation on metal-sulfide oxidation in surficial freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.S.; Ankley, G.T.; Leonard, E.N.

    1996-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the role of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) in controlling the bioavailability of several cationic metals in anoxic sediments. However, metal-sulfide complexes can be relatively labile with respect to oxidation associated with factors such as seasonal changes in rates of oxidation/production of AVS. Another potentially important mechanism of AVS oxidation in surficial sediments is bioturbation. The authors used different densities of the burrowing oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus in a series of laboratory experiments to evaluate the effect of bioturbation on oxidation of AVS and subsequent bioavailability of cadmium and zinc spiked into freshwater sediments. Metal bioavailability was determined directly by bioaccumulation in the test organisms and indirectly through analysis of interstitial (pore) water metal concentrations. In the studies, horizon-specific sediment analyses were conducted to assess spatial differences in AVS and pore-water metal concentrations specifically related to organism activity. Burrowing activity of the oligochaete significantly reduced AVS concentrations in surficial sediments in a density-dependent manner and resulted in elevated interstitial water concentrations of cadmium but not zinc. Concentrations of cadmium in pore water from deeper horizons were consistently lower than those in the surficial sediments. The bioaccumulation of cadmium, but not zinc, but the oligochaetes. Overall, the results indicate that bioturbation can enhance the bioavailability of some cationic metals in surficial sediments, via oxidation of AVS, and demonstrate the importance of analyzing surficial sediments when assessing bioavailability of metals in sediments.

  8. Cadmium in the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nriagu, J.O.; Sprague, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume presents a comprehensive account of current research on the chemistry and toxicology of cadmium in natural waters. The first four chapters focus on the sources (natural vs. anthropogenic), behavior, and fate of cadmium in natural waters. These are followed by three chapters on the biocycling and effects of cadmium on freshwater biota. The ecotoxicity of cadmium to marine biota are covered by the next two chapters. The final chapter presents a succinct review of the analytical chemistry of cadmium in natural waters.

  9. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  10. CADMIUM PHOSPHATE GLASS

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.

    1963-04-01

    A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate glass that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)

  11. Cadmium plating replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  12. Cadmium plating replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Mary J.; Groshart, Earl C.

    1995-01-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  13. A statistical approach for optimizing parameters for electrodeposition of indium (III) sulfide (In2S3) films, potential low-hazard buffer layers for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, Maqsood Ali

    Clean and environmentally friendly technologies are centralizing industry focus towards obtaining long term solutions to many large-scale problems such as energy demand, pollution, and environmental safety. Thin film solar cell (TFSC) technology has emerged as an impressive photovoltaic (PV) technology to create clean energy from fast production lines with capabilities to reduce material usage and energy required to manufacture large area panels, hence, lowering the costs. Today, cost ($/kWh) and toxicity are the primary challenges for all PV technologies. In that respect, electrodeposited indium sulfide (In2S3) films are proposed as an alternate to hazardous cadmium sulfide (CdS) films, commonly used as buffer layers in solar cells. This dissertation focuses upon the optimization of electrodeposition parameters to synthesize In2S3 films of PV quality. The work describe herein has the potential to reduce the hazardous impact of cadmium (Cd) upon the environment, while reducing the manufacturing cost of TFSCs through efficient utilization of materials. Optimization was performed through use of a statistical approach to study the effect of varying electrodeposition parameters upon the properties of the films. A robust design method referred-to as the "Taguchi Method" helped in engineering the properties of the films, and improved the PV characteristics including optical bandgap, absorption coefficient, stoichiometry, morphology, crystalline structure, thickness, etc. Current density (also a function of deposition voltage) had the most significant impact upon the stoichiometry and morphology of In2S3 films, whereas, deposition temperature and composition of the solution had the least significant impact. The dissertation discusses the film growth mechanism and provides understanding of the regions of low quality (for example, cracks) in films. In2S3 films were systematically and quantitatively investigated by varying electrodeposition parameters including bath

  14. Electrostatic Field Influence on Luminescence Features of Cadmium Sulphide Quantum Dots in Silica Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznesenskiy, S. S.; Sergeev, A. A.; Postnova, I. V.; Shchipunov, Y. A.

    The effect of electrostatic field on optical properties of silicate nanocomposite with cadmium sulfide quantum dots was investigated. It was found that the electrostatic field causes quantum dot orientation along the field force lines leading to changes in the polarized components of the luminescence spectrum. The influence of field force line direction on photoinduced absorption characteristics arised from λ = 405.9 nm laser radiation exposure to nanocomposite was shown.

  15. Fabrication and investigation of the optoelectrical properties of MoS2/CdS heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weixia; Yang, Fan; Wu, Chen; Zhang, Yi; Shi, Miaoyuan; Ma, Xiying

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2)/cadmium sulfide (CdS) heterojunction solar cells were successfully synthesized via chemical bath deposition (CBD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The as-grown CdS film on a fluorine tin oxide (FTO) substrate deposited by CBD is continuous and compact. The MoS2 film deposited by CVD is homogeneous and continuous, with a uniform color and a thickness of approximately 10 nm. The optical absorption range of the MoS2/CdS heterojunction covers the visible and near-infrared spectral regions of 350 to 800 nm, which is beneficial for the improvement of solar cell efficiency. Moreover, the MoS2/CdS solar cell exhibits good current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and pronounced photovoltaic behavior, with an open-circuit voltage of 0.66 V and a short-circuit current density of 0.227 × 10(-6) A/cm(2), comparable to the results obtained from other MoS2-based solar cells. This research is critical to investigate more efficient and stable solar cells based on graphene-like materials in the future.

  16. Commercialization of a thick-film solar cell. Final technical report, September 15, 1980-April 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    No technical problems were encountered in the preparation of screen printed cadmium sulfide layers. High conductivity (less than 5 ohm cm resistivities) adherent layers could be produced on 7059 glass, Nesatron and tin oxide coated glass. No macro pinholes were observed in thick films. Solar cells produced from screen printed CdS had a maximum open circuit voltage of 0.44 volt and a maximum observed short circuit current of 8 ma/cm/sup 2/ under AM 1 illumination. A maximum cell efficiency of 2.2% was obtained. This performance is not felt to be a limitation produced by the screen printing approach but to be reflective of an unoptimized procedure for producing Cu/sub 2/S on the CdS film and the lack of a suitable post thermal treatment technique.

  17. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  18. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamraiz, Umair; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin

    2016-06-01

    This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite).

  19. Sulfides and oxides in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Metal abundances associated with Sun-grazing P/comet Ikeya-Seki 1965f, the mineralogy of chrondritic interplanetary dust particles and cosmochemical affinities of Co, V, Cr, and Ni in extraterrestrial materials and probable vaporization data for nonsilicate minerals are used to evaluate the putative dearth of nonsilicates in short-period comets. It is concluded that sulfides and oxides are common, albeit minor, constituents of these comets. Sulfides and oxides can form in situ during perihelion passage in the nucleus of active short-period comets by sulfidation of Mg, Fe-silicates.

  20. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1987-01-06

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  1. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1987-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  2. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  3. Chemically Deposited Thin-Film Solar Cell Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R.; Junek, W.; Gorse, J.; Thompson, T.; Harris, J.; Hehemann, D.; Hepp, A.; Rybicki, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have been working on the development of thin film photovoltaic solar cell materials that can be produced entirely by wet chemical methods on low-cost flexible substrates. P-type copper indium diselenide (CIS) absorber layers have been deposited via electrochemical deposition. Similar techniques have also allowed us to incorporate both Ga and S into the CIS structure, in order to increase its optical bandgap. The ability to deposit similar absorber layers with a variety of bandgaps is essential to our efforts to develop a multi-junction thin-film solar cell. Chemical bath deposition methods were used to deposit a cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layers on our CIS-based absorber layers. Window contacts were made to these CdS/CIS junctions by the electrodeposition of zinc oxide (ZnO). Structural and elemental determinations of the individual ZnO, CdS and CIS-based films via transmission spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy will be presented. The electrical characterization of the resulting devices will be discussed.

  4. Cadmium sulfite hexahydrate revisited

    PubMed Central

    Baggio, Sergio; Ibáñez, Andrés; Baggio, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    The present structural revision of the title compound, tetra­cadmium tetra­sulfite hexa­hydrate, [Cd4(SO3)4(H2O)5]·H2O, is a low-temperature upgrade (T = 100 K and R = 0.017) of the original room-temperature structure reported by Kiers & Vos [Cryst. Struct. Commun. (1978). 7, 399–403; T = 293 K and R = 0.080). The compound is a three-dimensional polymer with four independent cadmium centres, four sulfite anions and six water mol­ecules, five of them coordinated to two cadmium centres and the remaining one an unbound solvent mol­ecule which completes the asymmetric unit. There are two types of cadmium environment: CdO8 (through four chelating sulfite ligands) and CdO6 (by way of six monocoordinated ligands). The former groups form planar arrays [parallel to (001) and separated by half a unit cell translation along c], made up of chains running along [110] and [10], respectively. These chains are, in turn, inter­connected both in an intra­planar as well as in an inter­planar fashion by the latter CdO6 polyhedra into a tight three-dimensional framework. There is, in addition, an extensive network of hydrogen bonds, in which all 12 water H atoms act as donors and eight O atoms from all four sulfite groups and two water mol­ecules act as acceptors. PMID:21202728

  5. Hydrogen sulfide in signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata

    2015-01-15

    For a long time hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) was considered a toxic compound, but recently H₂S (at low concentrations) has been found to play an important function in physiological processes. Hydrogen sulfide, like other well-known compounds - nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is a gaseous intracellular signal transducer. It regulates the cell cycle, apoptosis and the oxidative stress. Moreover, its functions include neuromodulation, regulation of cardiovascular system and inflammation. In this review, I focus on the metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (including enzymatic pathways of H₂S synthesis from l- and d-cysteine) and its signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system and the nervous system. I also describe how hydrogen sulfide may be used as therapeutic agent, i.e. in the cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example.

  7. Thermoelectric Properties of Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, R.; Parker, J. B.; Zoltan, A.; Zoltan, L. D.; Danielson, L.; Raag, V.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes measurement of Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall effect in gamma-phase lanthanum sulfide with composition of La3-x S4. Results of study, part of search for high-temperature thermoelectric energy-conversion materials, indicate this sulfide behaves like extrinsic semiconductor over temperature range of 300 to 1,400 K, with degenerate carrier concentration controlled by stoichiometric ratio of La to S.

  8. Hydrogen from solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, R.G.

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes those portions of the Photo/Thermochemical Research Program that possibly apply to the production of hydrogen from sources such as water or hydrogen sulfide. That research centers around understanding high flux solids decomposition reactions and how to best exploit photoreactions so the energy contained in the entire solar spectrum is used. 2 references, 4 figures.

  9. Ecofriendly and Nonvacuum Electrostatic Spray-Assisted Vapor Deposition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 Thin Film Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Anower; Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2015-10-14

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGSSe) thin films have been deposited by a novel, nonvacuum, and cost-effective electrostatic spray-assisted vapor deposition (ESAVD) method. The generation of a fine aerosol of precursor solution, and their controlled deposition onto a molybdenum substrate, results in adherent, dense, and uniform Cu(In,Ga)S2 (CIGS) films. This is an essential tool to keep the interfacial area of thin film solar cells to a minimum value for efficient charge separation as it helps to achieve the desired surface smoothness uniformity for subsequent cadmium sulfide and window layer deposition. This nonvacuum aerosol based approach for making the CIGSSe film uses environmentally benign precursor solution, and it is cheaper for producing solar cells than that of the vacuum-based thin film solar technology. An optimized CIGSSe thin film solar cell with a device configuration of molybdenum-coated soda-lime glass substrate/CIGSSe/CdS/i-ZnO/AZO shows the photovoltaic (j-V) characteristics of Voc=0.518 V, jsc=28.79 mA cm(-2), fill factor=64.02%, and a promising power conversion efficiency of η=9.55% under simulated AM 1.5 100 mW cm(-2) illuminations, without the use of an antireflection layer. This demonstrates the potential of ESAVD deposition as a promising alternative approach for making thin film CIGSSe solar cells at a lower cost.

  10. Improved performance of CdS/CdSe quantum dots sensitized solar cell by incorporation of ZnO nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as photoelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoreishi, F. S.; Ahmadi, V.; Samadpour, M.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present novel quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC) based on ZnO nanoparticles (NPs)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposite photoanodes for better light harvesting and energy conversion. Photoelectrodes are prepared by doctor blading ZnO NPs/GO nanocomposite paste on a fluorine doped tin oxide substrate which are then sintered at 450 °C to obtain ZnO NPs/RGO nanocomposites. The partial reduction of GO after thermal reduction, is studied by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots are deposited on the films through successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction and chemical bath deposition methods, respectively. The unique properties of ZnO NPs/RGO photoanodes, lead to a significant enhancement in the photovoltaic properties of solar cells in comparison with bare ZnO photoanodes. Current-voltage characteristics of cells are studied and the best results are obtained from ZnO NPs-RGO/CdS/CdSe with photoelectric conversion efficiency of 2.20% which is almost two times higher than cells which are made by pure ZnO NPs as photoanode (1.28%). Electrochemical impedance measurements show that the enhancement can be attributed to the increase of electron transfer rate in the ZnO NPs/RGO nanocomposite photoanode which arises from the ultrahigh electron mobility in graphene (RGO) sheets.

  11. Crystallinity of Fe-Ni Sulfides in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Le, Loan

    2008-01-01

    The main long-term goal of this research is to understand the physical conditions in the early solar nebula through the detailed characterization of a key class of mineral present in all primitive materials: Fe-Ni sulfides [1&2]. Fe-Ni sulfides can take dozens of structures, depending on the temperature of formation, as well as other physico-chemical factors which are imperfectly understood. Add to this the additional varying factor of Ni content, and we have a potentially sensitive cosmothermometer [3]. Unfortunately, this tool requires exact knowledge of the crystal structure of each grain being considered, and there have been few (none?) studies of the detailed structures of sulfides in chondritic materials. We report here on coordinated compositional and crystallographic investigation of Fe-Ni sulfides in diverse carbonaceous chondrites, initially Acfer 094 (the most primitive CM2 [4]) Tagish Lake (a unique type C2 [5]), a C1 lithology in Kaidun [6], Bali (oxidized CV3 [7]), and Efremovka (reduced CV3 [7]).

  12. A study on the optics of copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells with ultra-thin absorber layers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Man; Wachters, Arthur J H; van Deelen, Joop; Mourad, Maurice C D; Buskens, Pascal J P

    2014-03-10

    We present a systematic study of the effect of variation of the zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) layer thickness on the absorption characteristics of CIGS solar cells using a simulation program based on finite element method (FEM). We show that the absorption in the CIGS layer does not decrease monotonically with its layer thickness due to interference effects. Ergo, high precision is required in the CIGS production process, especially when using ultra-thin absorber layers, to accurately realize the required thickness of the ZnO, cadmium sulfide (CdS) and CIGS layer. We show that patterning the ZnO window layer can strongly suppress these interference effects allowing a higher tolerance in the production process.

  13. Ti3C2 MXene co-catalyst on metal sulfide photo-absorbers for enhanced visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jingrun; Gao, Guoping; Li, Fa-Tang; Ma, Tian-Yi; Du, Aijun; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2017-01-03

    Scalable and sustainable solar hydrogen production through photocatalytic water splitting requires highly active and stable earth-abundant co-catalysts to replace expensive and rare platinum. Here we employ density functional theory calculations to direct atomic-level exploration, design and fabrication of a MXene material, Ti3C2 nanoparticles, as a highly efficient co-catalyst. Ti3C2 nanoparticles are rationally integrated with cadmium sulfide via a hydrothermal strategy to induce a super high visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen production activity of 14,342 μmol h(-1 )g(-1) and an apparent quantum efficiency of 40.1% at 420 nm. This high performance arises from the favourable Fermi level position, electrical conductivity and hydrogen evolution capacity of Ti3C2 nanoparticles. Furthermore, Ti3C2 nanoparticles also serve as an efficient co-catalyst on ZnS or ZnxCd1-xS. This work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant MXene family materials to construct numerous high performance and low-cost photocatalysts/photoelectrodes.

  14. Ti3C2 MXene co-catalyst on metal sulfide photo-absorbers for enhanced visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Jingrun; Gao, Guoping; Li, Fa-Tang; Ma, Tian-Yi; Du, Aijun; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Scalable and sustainable solar hydrogen production through photocatalytic water splitting requires highly active and stable earth-abundant co-catalysts to replace expensive and rare platinum. Here we employ density functional theory calculations to direct atomic-level exploration, design and fabrication of a MXene material, Ti3C2 nanoparticles, as a highly efficient co-catalyst. Ti3C2 nanoparticles are rationally integrated with cadmium sulfide via a hydrothermal strategy to induce a super high visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen production activity of 14,342 μmol h-1 g-1 and an apparent quantum efficiency of 40.1% at 420 nm. This high performance arises from the favourable Fermi level position, electrical conductivity and hydrogen evolution capacity of Ti3C2 nanoparticles. Furthermore, Ti3C2 nanoparticles also serve as an efficient co-catalyst on ZnS or ZnxCd1-xS. This work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant MXene family materials to construct numerous high performance and low-cost photocatalysts/photoelectrodes.

  15. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  16. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  17. Photovoltaic effect in individual asymmetrically contacted lead sulfide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Sedat; Bielewicz, Thomas; Lebedeva, Vera; Klinke, Christian

    2015-03-21

    Solution-processable, two-dimensional semiconductors are promising optoelectronic materials which could find application in low-cost solar cells. Lead sulfide nanocrystals raised attention since the effective band gap can be adapted over a wide range by electronic confinement and observed multi-exciton generation promises higher efficiencies. We report on the influence of the contact metal work function on the properties of transistors based on individual two-dimensional lead sulfide nanosheets. Using palladium we observed mobilities of up to 31 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Furthermore, we demonstrate that asymmetrically contacted nanosheets show photovoltaic effect and that the nanosheets' height has a decisive impact on the device performance. Nanosheets with a thickness of 5.4 nm contacted with platinum and titanium show a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.94% (EQE 75.70%). The results underline the high hopes put on such materials.

  18. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  19. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-07

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  20. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  1. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  2. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown, as defined in § 250.490 of this...

  3. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  4. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  5. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604...-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  6. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  7. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  8. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504...-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  9. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) leaching behavior and surface chemistry in response to pH and O2.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao; Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) are increasingly being applied in photovoltaic solar cells and electronic components. A major concern is the public health and ecological risks associated with the potential release of toxic cadmium, tellurium, and/or selenium species. In this study, different tests were applied to investigate the leaching behavior of CdTe and CdSe in solutions simulating landfill leachate. CdTe showed a comparatively high leaching potential. In the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Waste Extraction Test (WET), the concentrations of cadmium released from CdTe were about 1500 and 260 times higher than the regulatory limit (1 mg/L). In contrast, CdSe was relatively stable and dissolved selenium in both leaching tests was below the regulatory limit (1 mg/L). Nonetheless, the regulatory limit for cadmium was exceeded by 5- to 6- fold in both tests. Experiments performed under different pH and redox conditions confirmed a marked enhancement in CdTe and CdSe dissolution both at acidic pH and under aerobic conditions. These findings are in agreement with thermodynamic predictions. Taken as a whole, the results indicate that recycling of decommissioned CdTe-containing devices is desirable to prevent the potential environmental release of toxic cadmium and tellurium in municipal landfills.

  10. Cadmium effects on the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Jancic, Snezana A; Stosic, Bojan Z

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium has been listed as one of the 126 priority pollutants and a category I carcinogen. Carcinogenic effects of cadmium on the lungs, testicles, and prostate are widely recognized, but there has been insufficient research on the effect of cadmium on the thyroid gland. Cadmium has the affinity to accumulate not only in the liver, kidneys, and pancreas but also in the thyroid gland. It has been established that cadmium blood concentration correlates positively with its accumulation in the thyroid gland. Women of fertile age have higher cadmium blood and urine concentrations than men. In spite of its redox inertia, cadmium brings about oxidative stress and damage to the tissue by indirect mechanisms. Mitochondria are considered to be the main intracellular targets for cadmium. Colloid cystic goiter, adenomatoid follicular hyperplasia with low-grade dysplasia and thyroglobulin hypo- and asecretion, and parafollicular cell diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and hypertrophy are often found in chronic cadmium toxicity.

  11. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  12. A field investigation of the relationship between zinc and acid volatile sulfide concentrations in freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ankley, Gerald T.; Liber, Karsten; Call, Daniel J.; Markee, Thomas P.; Canfield, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    1996-01-01

    Understanding relationships between cationic metals such as cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc, and amorphous iron sulfides, measured as acid volatile sulfide (AVS), is key to predicting metal bioavailability and toxicity insediments. The objective of the present study was to assess seasonal and spatial variations of AVS in freshwater sediments contaminated with zinc. Sediments were sampled from three streams with varying levels of zinc contamination at two different times, March and June of 1995, representing cold- and warm-weather situations. Interstitial (pore) water concentrations of zinc, and solid phase concentrations of AVS and zinc were measured in surficial and deep sediment horizons. Toxicity tests (10-d) with the amphipodHyalella azteca were conducted using intact cores. Sediment zinc concentrations from six sites within the primary test stream differed by about five-fold, and also varied seasonally. Acid volatile sulfide concentrations were generally lower than those of zinc, and pore water zinc concentrations typically were elevated. There was a positive correlation between solid-phase AVS and zinc concentrations, suggesting that the system was dominated by zinc, as opposed to iron sulfides. In contrast to expectations arising from some studies of seasonal variations of AVS in iron-dominated systems, AVS concentrations were smaller in June than in March. However, this was likely due to a major storm event and associated sediment scouring before the June sampling, rather than to seasonal processes related to variations in temperature and dissolved oxygen. Based upon an indirect analysis of depth variations in AVS, there was some indication that zinc sulfide might be less prone to oxidation than iron sulfide. There was a strong correlation between toxicity of the sediment samples toH. azteca and interstitial water concentrations of zinc; however, the possible contribution of other contaminants to sediment toxicity cannot be dismissed.

  13. Stimulation of Cadmium Uptake in Relation to the Cadmium Content of Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Charles M.; Ringoet, Arthur; Myttenaere, Constant

    1978-01-01

    The time course of cadmium uptake by the roots of intact tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was measured in a nutrient solution with a micromolar cadmium concentration until all cadmium in the medium was exhausted. Exhaustion taking a few hours, cadmium was repeatedly added to the nutrient solution. The initial rate of cadmium uptake was computed for each cadmium addition. This rate sharply increased and ultimately leveled off, the maximum value being about three times higher than the value measured after the first cadmium addition. The stimulating effect of cadmium was associated with an inhibitory effect at higher levels of cadmium concentrations. An increase in the net cadmium influx with time could not be explained by the binding of heavy metal to a fixed number of organic compounds. Conceivably, the production of binding sites could be increased and cadmium might play a part in controlling the rate of sites production. PMID:16660557

  14. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  15. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  16. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide ; CASRN 123 - 09 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for N

  17. Dissolved sulfides in the oxic water column of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Luther, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Trace contaminants enter major estuaries such as San Francisco Bay from a variety of point and nonpoint sources and may then be repartitioned between solid and aqueous phases or altered in chemical speciation. Chemical speciation affects the bioavailability of metals as well as organic ligands to planktonic and benthic organisms, and the partitioning of these solutes between phases. Our previous, work in south San Francisco Bay indicated that sulfide complexation with metals may be of particular importance because of the thermodynamic stability of these complexes. Although the water column of the bay is consistently well-oxygenated and typically unstratified with respect to dissolved oxygen, the kinetics of sulfide oxidation could exert at least transient controls on metal speciation. Our initial data on dissolved sulfides in the main channel of both the northern and southern components of the bay consistently indicate submicromolar concenrations (from <1 nM to 162 nM), as one would expect in an oxidizing environment. However, chemical speciation calculations over the range of observed sulfide concentrations indicate that these trace concentrations in the bay water column can markedly affect chemical speciation of ecologically significant trace metals such as cadmium, copper, and zinc.

  18. Reaction between H2, CO, and H2S over Fe,Ni metal in the solar nebula: Experimental evidence for the formation of sulfur-bearing organic molecules and sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorca, Jordi; Casanova, Ignasi

    2000-07-01

    Detailed laboratory studies have been carried out in order to simulate the interaction between nanometer-sized kamacite metal particles and different gas mixtures consisting of H2:H2S (250:0.1), H2:CO (250:1) and H2:CO:H2S (250:1:0.1) under nebular-type conditions (5x10-4 atm and 473 K). Reaction of H2+H2S with kamacite particles for 1000 h leads to the formation of pyrrhotite. Incorporation of CO into the gaseous reactant mixture results in the formation of both sulfide and carbide phases. At the same time, amorphous carbon is deposited onto the metal particles and organic molecules are evolved, namely hydrocarbons and thiols in the C1-C5 and C1-C2 range, respectively. Carbon deposition and production of organics are enhanced with respect to experiments performed with H2+CO, where a carbide phase is formed. There is no evidence for the existence of sulfur poisoning effects on the metal-catalysed hydrogenation of CO through Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions in nebular environments. In fact, it is experimentally demonstrated that sulfur-containing organic species could be synthesized by such reactions from nebular gas.

  19. Electrodeposition of ZnO-doped films as window layer for Cd-free CIGS-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsin, Fabien; Vénérosy, Amélie; Hildebrandt, Thibaud; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Naghavi, Negar; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2016-02-01

    The Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cell technology has made a steady progress within the last decade reaching efficiency up to 22.3% on laboratory scale, thus overpassing the highest efficiency for polycrystalline silicon solar cells. High efficiency CIGS modules employ a so-called buffer layer of cadmium sulfide CdS deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD), which presence and Cd-containing waste present some environmental concerns. A second potential bottleneck for CIGS technology is its window layer made of i-ZnO/ZnO:Al, which is deposited by sputtering requiring expensive vacuum equipment. A non-vacuum deposition of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) relying on simpler equipment with lower investment costs will be more economically attractive, and could increase competitiveness of CIGS-based modules with the mainstream silicon-based technologies. In the frame of Novazolar project, we have developed a low-cost aqueous solution photo assisted electrodeposition process of the ZnO-based window layer for high efficiency CIGS-based solar cells. The window layer deposition have been first optimized on classical CdS buffer layer leading to cells with efficiencies similar to those measured with the sputtered references on the same absorber (15%). The the optimized ZnO doped layer has been adapted to cadmium free devices where the CdS is replaced by chemical bath deposited zinc oxysulfide Zn(S,O) buffer layer. The effect of different growth parameters has been studied on CBD-Zn(S,O)-plated co-evaporated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 substrates provided by the Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW). This optimization of the electrodeposition of ZnO:Cl on CIGS/Zn(S,O) stacks led to record efficiency of 14%, while the reference cell with a sputtered (Zn,Mg)O/ZnO:Al window layer has an efficiency of 15.2%.

  20. Cadmium accumulation and depuration in Anodonta anatina exposed to cadmium chloride or cadmium-EDTA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, D.A.; Hemelraad, J.; Veenhof, P.R.; Zandee, D.I.

    1988-03-01

    The authors have previously reported on the uptake and distribution of cadmium in unionids, experimentally exposed to cadmium chloride. The purpose of the present investigation was to study the effect of metal chelation on cadmium kinetics, including metal elimination in the post-exposure phase. Generally, chelation of ionic metal by natural substances like humic acids or by synthetic compounds like EDTA decreases its environmental toxicity through a diminished rate of uptake, as compared with the free ion. The influences of metal chelation on bioconcentration and on toxicity do not always run parallel. To their knowledge, there are no data on the effect of chelation on metal kinetics in freshwater clams. Data on rates of cadmium elimination from aquatic invertebrates are highly divergent, but Cd excretion is invariably found to be smaller than uptake.

  1. Biogeochemistry of dissolved hydrogen sulfide species and carbonyl sulfide in the western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford-Knȩry, Joël; Cutter, Gregory A.

    1994-12-01

    The biogeochemistry of total sulfide dissolved in the open ocean is a poorly understood component of the global sulfur cycle. Here, the cycling of total sulfide was examined in the western North Atlantic Ocean using specially developed sampling and analytical methods. Total sulfide (particulate + dissolved sulfide) concentrations ranged from <2-550 pmol/L; concentrations were highest in the mixed layer and decreased with depth. Significant levels (up to 19 pmol/L) of free sulfide (uncomplexed sulfide) were determined in the top 50 m of the water column. Sources of total sulfide were examined. In particular, the rate of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) hydrolysis was redetermined under oceanographic conditions, and the depth distribution of OCS was examined. The patterns of near-surface enrichment (up to 150 pmol/L) and depletion at depth observed in OCS depth profiles suggest in situ production of OCS. To quantify the sources and sinks of total sulfide in the mixed layer of the Sargasso Sea, a budget was constructed. The rate of total sulfide production was 5.5 pmol L-1 h-1 (OCS hydrolysis + atmospheric input), and total sulfide removal rate was 115 pmol L -1 h-1 (oxidation + particulate sinking). The significant difference between the known sources and sinks indicates that other processes are important for the cycling of sulfide. Similarities in the depth distribution of total sulfide and chlorophyll a, and results from recent laboratory experiments argue strongly in favor of biological involvement in the production of total sulfide in the open ocean.

  2. Cadmium-free copper indium gallium diselenide hybrid solar cells comprising a 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Manuel; Simon, Christoph; Kuhn, Johannes; Bürkert, Linda; Cemernjak, Marco; Dimmler, Bernhard; Lemmer, Uli; Colsmann, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells are the most efficient thin film photovoltaic devices today. In this work, we investigate CIGS/organic hybrid solar cells comprising a semi-transparent metal top electrode and a wide band gap organic semiconductor as buffer layer. Depositing the organic semiconductor from solution, we fabricate Cd-free solar cells exhibiting about the same efficiency as their counterparts comprising CdS and significantly higher open-circuit voltages as compared to buffer-free devices. Although the organic molecules do not cover the CIGS surface homogeneously, their use enables prolonged charge carrier lifetimes according to impedance spectroscopy measurements.

  3. Mis or sis solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rickus, E.; Jager, K.

    1985-01-22

    The function of the insulating film in MIS and SIS solar cells can also be fulfilled by a semiconductor with a sufficiently large energy gap. The doping of the quasi insulating layer guarantees good fill factors and short-circuit current densities also at a relatively high film thickness. For cadmium selenide solar cells with a quasi insulating film made of zinc selenide, copper is preferably used as a doping material.

  4. Sulfur transformations at the hydrogen sulfide/oxygen interface in stratified waters and in cyanobacterial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Stratified water bodies allow the development of several microbial plates along the water column. The microbial plates develop in relation to nutrient availability, light penetration, and the distribution of oxygen and sulfide. Sulfide is initially produced in the sediment by sulfate-reducing bacteria. It diffuses along the water column creating a zone of hydrogen sulfide/oxygen interface. In the chemocline of Solar Lake oxygen and sulfide coexist in a 0 to 10 cm layer that moves up and down during a diurnal cycle. The microbial plate at the chemocline is exposed to oxygen and hydrogen sulfide, alternating on a diurnal basis. The cyanobacteria occupying the interface switch from anoxygenic photosynthesis in the morning to oxygenic photosynthesis during the rest of the day which results in a temporal build up of elemental sulfur during the day and disappears at night due to both oxidation to thiosulfate and sulfate by thiobacilli, and reduction to hydrogen sulfide by Desulfuromonas sp. and anaerobically respiring cyanobacteria. Sulfate reduction was enhanced in the light at the surface of the cyanobacterial mats. Microsulfate reduction measurements showed enhanced activity of sulfate reduction even under high oxygen concentrations of 300 to 800 micrometer. Apparent aerobic SO sub 4 reduction activity is explained by the co-occurrence of H sub 2. The physiology of this apparent sulfate reduction activity is studied.

  5. Requirements specification for nickel cadmium battery expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The requirements for performance, design, test, and qualification of a computer program identified as NICBES, Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System, is established. The specific spacecraft power system configuration selected was the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Electrical Power System (EPS) Testbed. Power for the HST comes from a system of 13 Solar Panel Arrays (SPAs) linked to 6 Nickel Cadmium Batteries which are connected to 3 Busses. An expert system, NICBES, will be developed at Martin Marietta Aerospace to recognize a testbed anomaly, identify the malfunctioning component and recommend a course of action. Besides fault diagnosis, NICBES will be able to evaluate battery status, give advice on battery status and provide decision support for the operator. These requirements are detailed.

  6. Iron-Nickel Sulfide Compositional Ranges in CM Chondrites: No Simple Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Le, Loan

    2003-01-01

    Iron-nickel sulfides are found in most or all solar system environments, and are probably the only minerals found in all extraterrestrial materials on hand. Despite this ubiquity, they have only just begun the attention they deserve. The most common Fe-Ni sulfides in chondrites are troilite (FeS), pyrrhotite (Fe(1-x)S) and pentlandite (Fe,Ni)9S8. Troilite is believed to have resulted from sulfidation of metal (Fe-Ni) grains in an H2S-containing environment. Pyrrhotite is produced when friable troilite grains, which are exfoliated from the metal nucleus, are submitted to continued sulfidation. Some asteroids are known to have experienced aqueous alteration, forming products including new generations of sulfides (pyrrhotite and pentlandite). Pentlandite in particular is known to form during such alteration. However, experimental work by Lauretta has indicated that pentlandite may also have been formed during the initial sulfidation process, due to the faster diffusion rate of nickel into the forming sulfide, as compared to iron. Finally, there is considerable evidence for a family of phases intermediate between pyrrhotite and pentlandite, following the trend of the high temperature monosulfide solid solution, something not encountered in terrestrial rocks. Each sulfide has its own particular stability conditions, which have been determined for most phases. The long-term objective of our research is to characterize sulfides in chondritic materials in order to better establish the conditions under which they formed, and the subsequent processes they experienced. Ultimately, it will be possible to infer whether the sulfides in the chondrites were formed in the solar nebula or on asteroids, and if formed on the asteroids, deduce how much alteration has occurred there. Here we explore the relationships between the finest grain size portions of carbonaceous chondrites, these being matrix and chondrule rims; fine-grained materials are the most sensitive to their environment

  7. Cadmium-zinc interactions in plants and extractable cadmium and zinc fractions in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Sabour, M.F.; Mortvedt, J.J.; Kelsoe, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    This study related Cd-Zn concentrations in plants to levels of Cd and Zn in soil recovered by several extractants soon after application of Cd and Zn sources to soil. Cadmium nitrate and ZnSO/sub 4/ or Zn(C/sub 2/H/sub 3/O/sub 2/)/sub 2/ were mixed with a Zn-deficient Crowley silt loam soil, cropped with corn (Zea mays L.), and then cropped with Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris). Applied Cd significantly increased the Cd/Zn ratio in both crops, especially in Swiss chard, which accumulates heavy metals. A previously published sequential-extraction procedure was used to fractionate Cd and Zn in soil after the corn harvest. Results of statistical analyses showed the highest correlation between Cd uptake by each crop and the carbonate and sulfide fractions of Cd in soil. Including other Cd fractions resulted in only slightly higher R/sup 2/ values. Zinc uptake by each crop was best related to the organic fraction of Zn in soil, and including the other Zn fractions did not affect the relationship. These results show that Cd and Zn uptake by corn or Swiss chard was not related to similar chemical fractions of these elements in soil, and that the Cd/Zn ratio in plant tops was significantly affected by both Cd and Zn applications to soil.

  8. Metallothionein and bioaccumulation of cadmium in juvenile bluegills exposed to aqueous and sediment-associated cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    The author evaluated metallothionein (MT), free (unbound) hepatic cadmium and whole body cadmium as indicators of cadmium exposure in juvenile bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in laboratory tests. Two types of cadmium exposure were tested; aqueous and sediment-associated. In the aqueous tests, fish were exposed to cadmium (0.0 to 32.3 [mu]g/L) in an intermittent-flow diluter. In the sediment-associated cadmium test, fish were exposed to resuspended river sidment containing 1.3 to 21.4 [mu]g Cd/g (dry weight) at a nominal total suspended solids concentration of 1,000 mg/L in revolving, circular glass exposure chambers. Total cadmium concentrations were measured in various bluegill liver fractions, whole bluegill, water, and resuspended sediment to assess the partitioning and bioaccumulation of cadmium after the tests. Mean concentrations of MT and free cadmium in bluegill livers and concentrations of cadmium in whole bluegills were positively correlated with aqueous cadmium concentration and were equally suitable as indicators of aqueous cadmium exposure. Sediment-associated cadmium was biologically available, but to a lesser extent than aqueous cadmium. Cadmium concentrations in whole bluegills exposed to resuspended river sediment were 1.5- to 3.5-fold the concentrations in bluegills in sediment-free controls. Free cadmium and MT concentrations in bluegill liver and whole-body cadmium concentrations in bluegills were positively correlated with the cadmium concentrations in filtered water, resuspended sediment, and bulk river sediment; however, whole-body cadmim concentrations were a more sensitive indicator of exposure to sediment-associated cadmium than either free cadmium or MT concentratons in liver.

  9. Case study for correction of a widespread cadmium soil contamination problem using local funds

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, T.J.; Cassler, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A Pennsylvania Community had been land spreading liquid sewage sludge since 1964. The Community had also been giving away sludge dried on sand beds to all comers during the same period. The Community economy includes a large light bulb manufacturing facility. Recurring digester problems and yellow coloration of the sewage prompted an investigation and it was determined that the problem was mainly cadmium sulfide being discharged by the light bulb manufacturing facility. In 1976, USDA officials were invited in to assess the problem. The Community was advised to discontinue sludge applications on certain farms and to lime the land used. The light bulb manufacturer was instructed to abate the discharge of cadmium. The Community advised the farmers where heavy sludge application was made to lime their lands and discontinued using those sites. The land application program continued, with the feeling that the problem had been corrected.

  10. Marine diagenesis of hydrothermal sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Moammar, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss the artificial and natural oxidation and hydrolysis of hydrothermal sulfide upon interaction with normal seawater. Synthetic and natural ferrosphalerite particles used in kinetic oxidation and hydrolysis studies in seawater develop dense, crystalline coatings consisting of ordered and ferrimagnetic delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH. Due to the formation of this reactive diffusion barrier, the release of Zn into solution decreases rapidly, and sulfide oxidation is reduced to a low rate determined by the diffusion of oxygen through the oxyhydroxide film. This also acts as an efficient solvent for ions such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and possibly Cd/sup 2 +/, which contribute to the stabilization of the delta-FeOOH structure. The oxidation of sulfide occurs in many seafloor spreading areas, such as 21/sup 0/N on the East Pacific Ridge. In these areas the old surface of the sulfide chimneys are found to be covered by an orange stain, and sediment near the base of nonactive vents is also found to consist of what has been referred to as amorphous iron oxide and hydroxide. This thesis also discusses the exceedingly low solubility of zinc in seawater, from delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH and the analogous phase (zinc-ferrihydroxide) and the zinc exchange minerals, 10-A manganate and montmorillonite. The concentrations of all four are of the same magnitude (16, 36.4, and 12 nM, respectively) as the zinc concentration in deep ocean water (approx. 10 nM), which suggests that manganates and montmorillonite with iron oxyhydroxides control zinc concentration in the deep ocean.

  11. Improved Routes Towards Solution Deposition of Indium Sulfide Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications:

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    deposited films were found to crystallise as tetragonal P- In2S3 , no evidence for incorporation of hydroxy-indium species was found by XPS measurements...INTRODUCTION The III-VI semiconductor indium sulfide ( In2S3 ) has been the focus of much attention during the past two decades, primarily due to its...sensitized solar cells [2]. Indium sulfide is an n-type semiconductor that exists in three forms, viz. a defect cubic structure (x- In2S3 under ambient

  12. Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Pius

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a heavy metal of considerable occupational and environmental concern, has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The carcinogenic potential of Cd as well as the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis following exposure to Cd has been studied using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal models. Exposure of cells to Cd results in their transformation. Administration of Cd in animals results in tumors of multiple organs/tissues. Also, a causal relationship has been noticed between exposure to Cd and the incidence of lung cancer in human. It has been demonstrated that Cd induces cancer by multiple mechanisms and the most important among them are aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, induction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of apoptosis. The available evidence indicates that, perhaps, oxidative stress plays a central role in Cd carcinogenesis because of its involvement in Cd-induced aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and apoptosis.

  13. Sulfidation mechanism for zinc oxide nanoparticles and the effect of sulfidation on their solubility.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Michel, F Marc; Brown, Gordon E; Lowry, Gregory V

    2013-03-19

    Environmental transformations of nanoparticles (NPs) affect their properties and toxicity potential. Sulfidation is an important transformation process affecting the fate of NPs containing metal cations with an affinity for sulfide. Here, the extent and mechanism of sulfidation of ZnO NPs were investigated, and the properties of resulting products were carefully characterized. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that transformation of ZnO to ZnS occurs readily at ambient temperature in the presence of inorganic sulfide. The extent of sulfidation depends on sulfide concentration, and close to 100% conversion can be obtained in 5 days given sufficient addition of sulfide. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed formation of primarily ZnS NPs smaller than 5 nm, indicating that sulfidation of ZnO NPs occurs by a dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism. The solubility of partially sulfidized ZnO NPs is controlled by the remaining ZnO core and not quenched by a ZnS shell formed as was observed for partially sulfidized Ag NPs. Sulfidation also led to NP aggregation and a decrease of surface charge. These changes suggest that sulfidation of ZnO NPs alters the behavior, fate, and toxicity of ZnO NPs in the environment. The reactivity and fate of the resulting <5 nm ZnS particles remains to be determined.

  14. Synergistic Effect of a Molecular Cocatalyst and a Heterojunction in a 1 D Semiconductor Photocatalyst for Robust and Highly Efficient Solar Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Daochuan; Irfan, Rana Muhammad; Sun, Zijun; Lu, Dapeng; Du, Pingwu

    2016-11-09

    Photocatalytic production of hydrogen by water splitting is a promising pathway for the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. However, the photocatalytic conversion efficiency is often limited by the sluggish transfer of the photogenerated charge carriers, charge recombination, and subsequent slow catalytic reactions. Herein, we report a highly active noble-metal-free photocatalytic system for hydrogen production in water. The system contains a water-soluble nickel complex as a molecular cocatalyst and zinc sulfide on 1D cadmium sulfide as the heterojunction photocatalyst. The complex can efficiently transport photogenerated electrons and holes over a heterojunction photocatalyst to hamper charge recombination, leading to highly improved catalytic efficiency and durability of a heterojunction photocatalyst- molecular cocatalyst system. The results show that under optimal conditions, the average apparent quantum yield was approximately 58.3 % after 7 h of irradiation with monochromatic 420 nm light. In contrast, the value is only 16.8 % if the molecular cocatalyst is absent. Such a remarkable performance in a molecular cocatalyst-based photocatalytic system without any noble metal loading has, to the best of our knowledge, not been reported to date.

  15. Determination of the nonstoichiometry of cadmium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Brezhnev, V.Yu.; Kharif, Ya.L.; Kovtunenko, P.V.

    1986-11-01

    In the annealing of cadmium selenide crystals, cadmium dissolves in the crystals. As a result, their composition deviates from stoichiometry, which affects their electrical conductivity and photosensitivity. In order to obtain crystals with the required properties, it is necessary to determine the amount of dissolved cadmium, i.e., the nonstoichiometry of the crystals. In this paper, the authors experimented with and report on the two methods of extracting dissolved cadmium: recrystallization of the sample by evaporation and condensation; and by creating the conditions for the occurrence of a diffusion stream of cadmium from the bulk to the surface of the crystals.

  16. Nickel cadmium battery expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-11-01

    The applicability of artificial intelligence methodologies for the automation of energy storage management, in this case, nickel cadmium batteries, is demonstrated. With the Hubble Space Telescope Electrical Power System (HST/EPS) testbed as the application domain, an expert system was developed which incorporates the physical characterization of the EPS, in particular, the nickel cadmium batteries, as well as the human's operational knowledge. The expert system returns not only fault diagnostics but also status and advice along with justifications and explanations in the form of decision support.

  17. Nickel cadmium battery expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The applicability of artificial intelligence methodologies for the automation of energy storage management, in this case, nickel cadmium batteries, is demonstrated. With the Hubble Space Telescope Electrical Power System (HST/EPS) testbed as the application domain, an expert system was developed which incorporates the physical characterization of the EPS, in particular, the nickel cadmium batteries, as well as the human's operational knowledge. The expert system returns not only fault diagnostics but also status and advice along with justifications and explanations in the form of decision support.

  18. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 mediates cadmium resistance in budding yeast through ubiquitination of the transcription factor Met4

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Gi-Wook; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Naganuma, Akira

    2007-11-23

    Overexpression of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 conferred strong cadmium resistance on budding yeast. Proteasome activity, which is involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins, was not essential for the acquisition of resistance to cadmium. The overexpression of Cdc34 accelerated the ubiquitination of the transcription factor Met4 and reduced expression of MET25 gene, which is a target of Met4. A MET25-disrupted strain of yeast was more resistant to cadmium than was the wild-type strain, but overexpression of Cdc34 in the MET25-disrupted cells did not affect sensitivity to cadmium. Met25 is an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of homocysteine from sulfide (S{sup 2-}) and O-acetylhomocysteine and we detected the increased production of S{sup 2-} upon overexpression of Cdc34. Our results suggest that overexpression of Cdc34 inactivates Met4 and interferes with expression of the MET25, with subsequent production of CdS, which has low toxicity, and, thus, a decrease in the cadmium toxicity.

  19. Reduced cadmium body burden in cadmium-exposed calves fed supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Lamphere, D.N.; Dorn, C.R.; Reddy, C.S.; Meyer, A.W.

    1984-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of practical supplemental dietary zinc to modify the cadmium content in edible bovine tissues and to identify copper interactions with cadmium and zinc. The effect of supplemental zinc (200 or 600 ..mu..g/g) on the concentrations of cadmium, zinc, and copper in liver, kidney cortex, muscle, and blood of calves fed 50 ..mu..g/g cadmium for 60 days was evaluated. Blood samples were collected before and eight times after starting to feed cadmium or cadmium plus zinc. Liver, kidney, and muscle samples were collected when calves were slaughtered (baseline, at beginning of experimental feeding; cadmium-fed, at end of 60 days feeding). The cadmium concentrations of all sample types collected were markedly increased by the feeding of cadmium. Feeding 600 ..mu..g/g supplemental zinc significantly increased the zinc concentrations of liver, kidney cortex, and blood and decreased the cadmium accumulation in these organs as well as muscle. The copper concentrations of muscle or blood were not altered by feeding cadmium with or without zinc but those of liver and kidney cortex were significantly increased by higher dietary levels of zinc and cadmium. The potential use of dietary zinc salts in reducing cadmium body burden in food animals suspected or known to have high cadmium intakes is suggested.

  20. Photoluminescent Response of Palladium-Cadmium Sulfide and Palladium-Graded Cadmium Sulfoselenide Schottky Diodes to Molecular Hydrogen.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    assistance - and helpful discussions. 8 Re ferences 1. Hollingsworth, R. E.; Sites, J. R. 3. Appi . Phys. 1982, 53, 5357 and references therein. 2. Hobson...W. S.; Ellis, A. B. J. Ap. Phys. 1983, 54, 5956 and references therein. 3. Mettler, K. Appi . Phys. 1977, 12, 75. 4. Stephens, R. B. Phys. Rev.. B...1984, 29, 3283. 5. Steele, M. C.; Maclver, B. A. Appi . Phys. Lett. 1976, 28, 687. 6. Yamamoto, N.; Tonomura, S.; Matsuoka-, T.; Tsubomura, H. Surf. Sci

  1. Effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on the photocatalytic activities and flat-band potentials of cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Uchihara, Toshio ); Matsumura, Michio; Ono, Junichi; Tsubomura, Hiroshi )

    1990-01-11

    Photocatalyzed hydrogen evolution on Pt-loaded CdS powder from aqueous solutions of sodium sulfite is enhanced by addition of a small amount of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to the solution. EDTA is hardly consumed by the reaction. It has been concluded from the measurements of the flat-band potential of CdS electrodes that EDTA and other chelating agents, such as 1,2-cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid, are adsorbed strongly on the surface of CdS and shift the conduction band energy toward the negative. The enhancement of the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution by the addition of EDTA is explained as being caused by the upward shift of the conduction band energy of CdS due to the negative charge of the chelating agents. The change of the conduction band energy by the adsorption of EDTA is observed also for CdSe electrodes. Although Pt-loaded CdSe powder is inactive for the hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of sodium sulfite, it generates hydrogen when EDTA is added to the solution.

  2. Semiconductor-olefin adducts. Photoluminescent properties of cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide in the presence of butenes

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.J.; Leung, L.K.; Ellis, A.B. ); Yu, J.C. ); Lisensky, G.C. )

    1989-07-05

    Direct evidence for adduct formation between butenes and etched, single-crystal n-CdS and n-CdSe (CdS(e)) surfaces has been obtained from photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Exposure of CdS(e) to butenes causes enhancement of the solids' band edge PL relative to a N{sub 2} ambient. For 30% mixtures of the olefins in N{sub 2}, the magnitude of the enhancement follows the order 1,3-butadiene > cis-2-butene {approximately} trans-2-butene > isobutylene {approximately} 1-butene and correlates with the olefin basicities, on the basis of photoionization potentials. Enhancements in PL intensity can be fit to a dead-layer model, allowing the determination of the reduction in depletion width in the semiconductor resulting from olefin exposure; depletion width reductions reach a few hundred angstroms for adducts of 1,3-butadiene with CdS(e). The PL changes were used in conjunction with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model to yield equilibrium constants for adduct formation of 1,3-butadiene with CdS(e) of 9 {plus minus} 4 atm{sup {minus}1} at 293 K. Surface interactions that may contribute to the observed PL changes are discussed.

  3. Band offset in zinc oxy-sulfide/cubic-tin sulfide interface from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K. C., Sanal; Nair, P. K.; Nair, M. T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxy-sulfide, ZnOxS1-x, has been found to provide better band alignment in thin film solar cells of tin sulfide of orthorhombic crystalline structure. Here we examine ZnOxS1-x/SnS-CUB interface, in which the ZnOxS1-x thin film was deposited by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering on SnS thin film of cubic (CUB) crystalline structure with a band gap (Eg) of 1.72 eV, obtained via chemical deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provides the valence band maxima of the materials and hence places the conduction band offset of 0.41 eV for SnS-CUB/ZnO0.27S0.73 and -0.28 eV for SnS-CUB/ZnO0.88S0.12 interfaces. Thin films of ZnOxS1-x with 175-240 nm in thickness were deposited from targets prepared with different ZnO to ZnS molar ratios. With the target of molar ratio of 1:13.4, the thin films are of composition ZnO0.27S0.73 with hexagonal crystalline structure and with that of 1:1.7 ratio, it is ZnO0.88S0.12. The optical band gap of the ZnOxS1-x thin films varies from 2.90 eV to 3.21 eV as the sulfur to zinc ratio in the film increases from 0.12:1 to 0.73:1 as determined from X-ray diffraction patterns. Thus, band offsets sought for absorber materials and zinc oxy-sulfide in solar cells may be achieved through a choice of ZnO:ZnS ratio in the sputtering target.

  4. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  5. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Provisions § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration... the potassium ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters...

  6. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  7. Medical Functions of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gasomediator synthesized from L- and D-cysteine in various tissues. It is involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes. H(2)S exhibits antiatherosclerotic, vasodilator, and proangiogenic properties, and protects the kidney and heart from damage following ischemia/reperfusion injury. H(2)S donors may be natural or synthetic, and may be used for the safe treatment of a wide range of diseases. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the therapeutic function of H(2)S.

  8. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  9. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  10. Lithium-cupric sulfide cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, A.J.; Bump, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Lithium cells have become the primary power source for cardiac pacemakers due to their reliability and longevity at low current drain rates. A lithium-cupric sulfide cell was developed which makes maximum use of the shape of a pacemaker's battery compartment. The cell has a stable voltage throughout 90% of its lifetime. It then drops to a second stable voltage before depletion. The voltage drop creates a small decrease in pacemaker rate, which alerts the physician to replace the pacemaker. No loss of capacity due to self-discharge as been seen to date, and cells have proven to be safe under extreme conditions. 2 refs.

  11. Variation in sulfide tolerance of photosystem II in phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II.

  12. The role of hydrogen sulfide in burns.

    PubMed

    Akter, Farhana

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a novel gasotransmitter that has been shown to play a major role in regulating vascular tone. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide in inflammation, sepsis and burns has only recently been studied. In animal studies, hydrogen sulfide has been shown to play a role in both promoting and inhibiting inflammation. Understanding the role of H2S in sepsis and shock is particularly important due to the high mortality associated with both conditions. In animal sepsis models, hydrogen sulfide appears to increase survival. Severe burns are associated with an inflammatory response that causes increased permeability and edema. Currently, there are few studies that have examined the exact role of hydrogen sulfide in burns. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide in inflammation enables us to hypothesize its role in burns. This review highlights the role of hydrogen sulfide in the mechanisms of action underlying inflammation, wound healing and sepsis as well as examining the potential role of hydrogen sulfide in burns. The authors of this article hope that this review will stimulate research to discover the exact role of this fascinating molecule in burns.

  13. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Ward, J.W.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  14. Ferrous and Sulfide Treatment of Electroplating Wastewater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    chromium contaminants and the precipitation of heavy metal contaminants from contaminated electroplating wastewater. The wastewater is first adjusted...to a pH of from about 8 to 10 and then treated with sodium sulfide to provide sulfide ions to effect precipitation of heavy metal contaminants followed

  15. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  16. Chelation of cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, O

    1984-01-01

    The toxicity of cadmium is determined by chelation reactions: in vivo, Cd2+ exists exclusively in coordination complexes with biological ligands, or with administered chelating agents. The Cd2+ ion has some soft character, but it is not a typical soft ion. It has a high degree of polarizability, and its complexes with soft ligands have predominantly covalent bond characteristics. Cd2+ forms the most stable complexes with soft donor atoms (S much greater than N greater than 0). The coordination stereochemistry of Cd2+ is unusually varied, including coordination numbers from 2 to 8. Even though the Cd2+ ion is a d10 ion, disturbed coordination geometries are often seen. Generally, the stability of complexes increases with the number of coordination groups contributed by the ligand; consequently, complexes of Cd2+ with polydentate ligands containing SH groups are very stable. Cd2+ in metallothionein (MT) is coordinated with 4 thiolate groups, and the log stability constant is estimated to 25.5. Complexes between Cd2+ and low molecular weight monodentate or bidentate ligands, e.g., free amino acids (LMW-Cd), seem to exist very briefly, and Cd2+ is rapidly bound to high molecular weight proteins, mainly serum albumin. These complexes (HMW-Cd) are rapidly scavenged from blood, mainly by the liver, and Cd2+ is redistributed to MT. After about 1 day the Cd-MT complex (MT-Cd) almost exclusively accounts for the total retained dose of Cd2+, independent of the route of exposure. MT-Cd is slowly transferred to and accumulated in kidney cortex. The acute toxicity and interorgan distribution of parenterally administered Cd2+ are strongly influenced by preceding MT induction, or decreased capacity for MT synthesis; however, the gastrointestinal (GI) uptake of Cd2+ seems unaffected by preceding MT induction resulting in considerable capacity for Cd2+ chelation in intestinal mucosa, and this finding indicates that endogenous MT is not involved in Cd2+ absorption. The toxicity of

  17. Distribution of cadmium in the pearl oyster following exposure to cadmium in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Francesconi, K.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Laboratory studies on the uptake of cadmium from seawater have shown that bivalve molluscs readily accumulated cadmium from this medium and that the relative concentrations of cadmium between viscera and muscle were always the same as those found in natural populations. These results suggested that in the natural environment seawater was a major source of cadmium for bivalve molluscs. Results of a recent study have indicated that seawater is not always the major contributor of cadmium to bivalve molluscs. These authors reported high levels of cadmium in the pearl oyster Pinctada albina albina, collected from Shark Bay in Western Australia, and noted that there was no correlation between cadmium concentrations in the oysters and cadmium concentrations in the surrounding seawater. Australia is one of several countries which have a maximum permissible level of cadmium in molluscs. The possibility that the pearl oyster, and perhaps other molluscs as well, may accumulate cadmium preferentially in different tissues depending upon the source of cadmium has important implications in the area of contaminants in marine foodstuffs. The present study reports the uptake and distribution of cadmium within P. albina albina when subjected to cadmium in seawater alone.

  18. Modulation of cadmium bioaccumulation and enhancing cadmium tolerance in Pichia kudriavzevii by sodium chloride preincubation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Li, Chunsheng; Zhang, Dandan; Yu, Jinzhi; Xu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Application of growing microorganisms for cadmium removal is limited by the sensitivity of living cells to cadmium. The effects of sodium chloride (NaCl) preincubation on the cadmium bioaccumulation and tolerance of Pichia kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated in this study. NaCl preincubation significantly reduced the intracellular and cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of P. kudriavzevii at both 6 and 20 mg L(-1) cadmium, while no obvious effect was observed in S. cerevisiae except that the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation at 20 mg L(-1) cadmium was reduced obviously by 20-60 g L(-1)  NaCl. For both yeasts, the improved contents of protein and proline after NaCl preincubation contributed to the cadmium tolerance. The thiol contents in P. kudriavzevii under cadmium stress were alleviated by NaCl preincubation, which might be due to the decrease of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. NaCl preincubation enhanced the contents of glycerol and trehalose in P. kudriavzevii under cadmium stress, while no acceleration was observed in S. cerevisiae. The results suggested that NaCl preincubation could be applied in cadmium removal by growing P. kudriavzevii to increase the cadmium tolerance of the yeast.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide pollution in wastewater treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    AlDhowalia, K.H. )

    1987-01-01

    The hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) found in wastewater collection systems and wastewater treatment facilities results from the bacterial reduction of the sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}). Hydrogen sulfide is a gas that occurs both in the sewer atmosphere and as a dissolved gas in the wastewater. When raw wastewater first enters the wastewater treatment facility by gravity most of the hydrogen sulfide is in the gaseous phase and will escape into the atmosphere at the inlet structures. Also some of the dissolved hydrogen sulfide will be released at points of turbulance such as at drops in flow, flumes, or aeration chambers. Several factors can cause excessive hydrogen sulfide concentrations in a sewerage system. These include septic sewage, long flow times in the sewerage system, high temperatures, flat sewer grades, and poor ventilation. These factors are discussed in this paper.

  20. Rapid Deposition Technology Holds the Key for the World's Largest Manufacturer of Thin-Film Solar Modules (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    First Solar, Inc. has been collaborating with NREL since 1991, advancing its thin-film cadmium telluride solar technology to grow from a startup company to become one of the world's largest manufacturers of solar modules, and the world's largest manufacturer of thin-film solar modules.

  1. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Filipič, Metka

    2012-05-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  2. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  3. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future.

  4. Evaluation of metal/acid-volatile sulfide relationships in the prediction of metal bioaccumulation by benthic macroinvertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.

    1996-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the toxicity of divalent cationic metals (cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc) in sediments can be controlled through binding to acid-volatile sulfide (AVS). When the molar concentration of AVS exceeds that of the metals (i.e., the metal/AVS ratio is less than unity), they exist predominantly as insoluble metal sulfides, which presumably are not biologically available. Thus, at metal/AVS ratios less than 1, toxicity of sediment-associated metals to benthic macro-invertebrates has not been observed. However, bioaccumulation may provide a more direct assessment of contaminant bioavailability than the presence or absence of toxicity. The purpose of this report is to comprehensively review available literature on metal bioaccumulation versus sediment metal/AVS relationships to further examine the tenet that AVS controls metal bioavailability. In all, 12 studies were evaluated; these ranged from short-term (10-d) laboratory experiments with metal-spiked or field-collected sediments containing cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and/or zinc to long-term (> 1-year) field studies with sediments spiked with cadmium or zinc. Test organisms included mollusks, oligochaetes, polychaetes, amphipods, and midges. The preponderance of studies indicated reduced accumulation of metals at sediment metal/AVS ratios of less than 1. However, there were exceptions to this general observation, two of which occurred in short-term laboratory experiments with cadmium- or nickel-spiked sediments. In these studies there appeared to be a linear accumulation of metals with increasing sediment metal concentrations irrespective of the metal/AVS ratio. Although there is experimental evidence suggesting that significant bioaccumulation of metals does not occur when there is sufficient AVS available to bind them, the existence of data to the contrary indicates the need for further research into factors controlling the bioaccumulation of metals from sediments.

  5. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Lehoczky, E.; Szabados, I.; Marth, P.

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation.

  7. Sulfide oxidation as a process for the formation of copper-rich magmatic sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, Cora C.; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Ballhaus, Chris; Berndt, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Typical magmatic sulfides are dominated by pyrrhotite and pentlandite with minor chalcopyrite, and the bulk atomic Cu/Fe ratio of these sulfides is typically less than unity. However, there are rare magmatic sulfide occurrences that are dominated by Cu-rich sulfides (e.g., bornite, digenite, and chalcopyrite, sometimes coexisting with metallic Cu) with atomic Cu/Fe as high as 5. Typically, these types of sulfide assemblages occur in the upper parts of moderately to highly fractionated layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, a well-known example being the Pd/Au reef in the Upper Middle Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion. Processes proposed to explain why these sulfides are so unusually rich in Cu include fractional crystallization of Fe/(Ni) monosulfide and infiltration of postmagmatic Cu-rich fluids. In this contribution, we explore and experimentally evaluate a third possibility: that Cu-rich magmatic sulfides may be the result of magmatic oxidation. FeS-dominated Ni/Cu-bearing sulfides were equilibrated at variable oxygen fugacities in both open and closed system. Our results show that the Cu/Fe ratio of the sulfide melt increases as a function of oxygen fugacity due to the preferential conversion of FeS into FeO and FeO1.5, and the resistance of Cu2S to being converted into an oxide component even at oxygen fugacities characteristic of the sulfide/sulfate transition (above FMQ + 1). This phenomenon will lead to an increase in the metal/S ratio of a sulfide liquid and will also depress its liquidus temperature. As such, any modeling of the sulfide liquid line of descent in magmatic sulfide complexes needs to address this issue.

  8. Cadmium resistance in Drosophila: a small cadmium binding substance

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Williams, M.W.; Richter, L.J.; Holt, S.E.; Hook, G.J.; Knoop, S.M.; Sloop, F.V.; Faust, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    A small cadmium-binding substance (CdBS) has been observed in adult Drosophila melanogaster that were raised for their entire growth cycle on a diet that contained 0.15 mM CdCl/sub 2/. Induction of CdBS was observed in strains that differed widely in their sensitivity of CdCl/sub 2/. This report describes the induction of CdBS and some of its characteristics. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Update on Alternatives for Cadmium Coatings on Military Electrical Connectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    established torque/tension requirements) • Shock resistance • Solderability • Temperature resistance • Vibration resistance CCCs are applied over cadmium...Likewise, titanium alloys and Inconel® have been found to be adequate as substrate substitutes for cadmium plated fas- teners5, but these may also...Cadmium LHE Cadmium Titanium Cadmium Titanium Cadmium IVD Aluminum IVD Aluminum Acid Zinc Nickel Acid Zinc Nickel Alkaline Zinc Nickel Alkaline Zinc

  10. Cadmium telluride in tellurium—cadmium films consisting of ultradispersed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Migunova, A. A.; Lisitsyn, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    Solid solutions of tellurium in cadmium, cadmium in tellurium, and cadmium in cadmium telluride synthesized during sputtering are formed for the first time by ion-plasma sputtering and the codeposition of ultradispersed Te and Cd particle fluxes onto substrates moving with respect to the fluxes. This fact supports thermofluctuation melting and coalescence of small particles. The lattice parameter of cadmium telluride, which coexists with an amorphous solid solution of tellurium in cadmium in a coating, is smaller than the tabulated value and reaches it when the cadmium concentration in a coating increases to 70 at %. The lattice parameter of the fcc lattice of cadmium telluride increases with the cadmium concentration in a coating according to the linear relation a = 0.0002CCd + 0.6346 nm (where CCd is the cadmium concentration in the coating, at %), which is likely to indicate a certain broadening of the homogeneity area. The estimation of the particle size shows that the cadmium telluride grain size is 10-15 nm, which implies that the coatings are nanocrystalline. The absorption and transmission spectra of the tellurium—cadmium films at the fundamental absorption edge demonstrate that their energy gaps are larger than that of stoichiometric CdTe, which can be explained by the experimental conditions of crystal structure formation.

  11. Cadmium in smoke particulates of regular and filter cigarettes containing low and high cadmium concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, C.A.; Reid, C.M.; Hoffman, D.; Adams, J.D.; Lisk, D.J.

    1986-03-01

    In the work reported, filter and nonfilter cigarettes were prepared from high-cadmium tobacco grown on a municipal sludge-amended soil or a low-cadmium tobacco grown on untreated soil alone. These were smoked by machine to determine the effectiveness of the cigarette filters in possibly reducing the quantities of cadmium in the mainstream smoke particulates.

  12. Tolerance to cadmium and cadmium-binding ligands in Great Salt Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

    SciTech Connect

    Jayasekara, S.; Drown, D.B.; Sharma, R.P.

    1986-02-01

    Information on the accumulation of cadmium in cytosolic proteins of Great Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was obtained from animals collected directly from the lake and also from animal hatched and maintained in three sublethal concentrations of cadmium (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 ppm) in saltwater aquaria. Brine shrimp growth under these conditions was monitored by measuring body lengths during a 7-day exposure period. Heat-stable, cadmium-binding ligands were isolated and identified by Sephadex G-75 chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cadmium was found to be equally distributed between high and low molecular weight proteins in animals collected from the lake and the 0.5 ppm cadmium group. There was also a slight growth stimulation noted in the 0.5-pm group. Higher cadmium incorporation was noted in low molecular weight fractions with increasing cadmium concentration in the exposure media. Low molecular weight fractions were also found to have high uv absorption characteristics at 250 nm and low absorption at 280 nm. Molecular weight of the cadmium-binding ligands was found to be 11,000 as estimated by the gel filtration method. De novo synthesis of this protein was increased as a function of cadmium concentration in the media. However, slow accumulation of cadmium in other protein fractions was also noticed in higher cadmium exposure groups, suggesting the existence of possible tolerance mechanisms in brine shrimp exposed to suspected acute cadmium concentrations.

  13. Cadmium content of umbilical cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M.; Finch, H.

    1984-06-01

    Cadmium was measured in the umbilical cord blood at birth from 94 healthy babies. Samples were dried and ashed at low temperatures with an oxygen plasma prior to atomic absorption spectrometry. The concentration of cadmium ranged from 0.003 to 0.210 ..mu..g/dl, with a mean of 0.045 +/- 0.063 (SD). Blood lead, maternal smoking, and proximity of residence to automobile traffic were not statistically related to cadmium levels.

  14. Cadmium, A Health Hazard Surface Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    of this EEC Directive under German law resulted in the Chemicals Prohibitory Regulation (Chemikalien-Verbotsverordnung). Thus, for example, cadmium...and its alloys must not be marketed pursuant to this EEC Directive and the Chemicals Prohibitory Regulation. However, the present legal situation does...this question and then explain those characteristics of cadmium which are injurious to health in greater detail: Cadmium is a chemical element and is a

  15. Dislocation Etching Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Dislocation Etching Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide by Kevin Doyle and Sudhir Trivedi ARL-CR-0744 September 2014...Etching Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide Kevin Doyle and Sudhir Trivedi Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL prepared by...Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W811NF-12-2-0019 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kevin Doyle and

  16. Mercury Cadmium Selenide for Infrared Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    REPORT Mercury cadmium selenide for infrared detection 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Samples of HgCdSe alloys were grown via molecular...NUMBER John Dinan 512-245-6711 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - Mercury cadmium selenide for...PAGE (SF298) (Continuation Sheet) Continuation for Block 13 ARO Report Number Mercury cadmium selenide for infrared detection Block 13

  17. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  18. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  19. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  20. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  1. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  3. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  4. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  5. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  6. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  7. Effects of dietary cadmium on mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, B.W.; Sileo, L.; Franson, J.C.; Moore, J.

    1983-01-01

    Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings were fed cadmium in the diet at 0, 5, 10, or 20 ppm from 1 day of age until 12 weeks of age. At 4-week intervals six males and six females from each dietary group were randomly selected, bled by jugular venipuncture, and necropsied. Significant decreases in packed cell volume (PCV) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and a significant increase in serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) were found at 8 weeks of age in ducklings fed 20 ppm cadmium. Mild to severe kidney lesions were evident in ducklings fed 20 ppm cadmium for 12 weeks. No other blood chemistry measurement, hematological parameter, or tissue histopathological measurement indicated a reaction to cadmium ingestion. Body weight, liver weight, and the ratio of the femur weight to length were not affected by dietary cadmium. Femur cadmium concentration In all ducklings 12 weeks of age declined from the values detected at 4 and 8 weeks of age. Liver cadmium concentrations were significantly higher in relation to the increased dietary levels and in relation to the length of time the ducklings were fed the cadmium diets. At 12 weeks of age the cadmium concentration in liver tissue was twice that in the diet.

  8. Metal hydrogen sulfide superconducting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    Éliashberg theory is generalized to the electronphonon (EP) systems with the not constant density of electronic states. The phonon contribution to the anomalous electron Green's function (GF) is considered. The generalized Éliashberg equations with the variable density of electronic states are resolved for the hydrogen sulphide SH3 phase under pressure. The dependence of both the real and the imaginary part of the order parameter on the frequency in the SH3 phase is obtained. The Tc = 177 K value in the hydrogen sulfide SH3 phase at the pressure P = 225 GPa has been defined. The results of the solution of the Eliashberg equations for the Im-3m (170 GPa), Im-3m (200 GPa) and R3m (120 GPa) phases are presented. A peak value Tc = 241 K of the superconducting transition temperature has been predicted.

  9. Redox biochemistry of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-07-16

    H(2)S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of gamma-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H(2)S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in gamma-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxidative phosphorylation while also exposing cytochrome c oxidase to this metabolic poison. This report focuses on the biochemistry of H(2)S biogenesis and clearance, on the molecular mechanisms of its action, and on its varied biological effects.

  10. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.; Fox, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semiconductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  11. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.; Fox, R.J.

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semi-conductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  12. Silicate sulfidation and chemical differences between enstatite chondrites and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, S. W.; Petaev, M. I.; Buseck, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic similarity between the Earth-Moon system and enstatite chondrites (ECs) led to the idea that ECs were Earth's building blocks [1-3]. However, compared to Earth's mantle, ECs have low Fe0/Fe ratios, are enriched in volatile elements, and depleted in refractory lithophile elements and Mg [4]. Therefore, deriving Earth composition from ECs requires a loss of volatiles during or prior to accretion and sequestering a large fraction of Si in the deep Earth. Alternatively, the isotopic similarity between the Earth and ECs is explained by their formation from a common precursor that experienced different evolutionary paths resulting in the chemical difference [4]. The vestiges of such a precursor are still present in the unequilibrated ECs as FeO-rich silicates with O isotopic compositions identical to bulk ECs and Earth [5]. Conversion of such a precursor into the characteristic EC mineral assemblage requires high-temperature processing in an H-poor environment with high fS2 and fO2 close to that of the classic solar nebula [6], consistent with redox conditions inferred from Ti4+/Ti3+ ratios in EC pyroxene [7]. Under such conditions reaction of FeO-rich silicates with S-rich gas results in their replacement by the assemblage of FeO-poor silicates; Fe, Mg, Ca sulfides; free silica; and Si-bearing Fe,Ni metal alloy. The progressive sulfidation of ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules results in loss of Mg and addition of Fe, Mn, S, Na, K and, perhaps, other volatiles [6]. At the advanced stages of silicate sulfidation recorded in the metal-sulfide nodules [8], a portion of Si is reduced and dissolved in the Fe,Ni metal. This process is known to fractionate Si isotopes [9,10] and would explain the differences between the ECs and Earth's mantle [11]. The sulfidation of silicates also produces porous S-rich silica, a peculiar phase observed so far only in the ECs. It consists of a sinewy SiO2-rich framework enclosing numerous vesicles filled with beam

  13. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenouil, Laurent A.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900°C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO3 to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO3 calcination point (899°C at 1.03 bar CO2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900°C if CO2 is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO3 grains that greatly hinders more H2S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H2S through the CaS layer, possibly by S2- ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  14. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric oxidation of sulfides.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Graham E; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Anita R

    2012-04-06

    Copper-catalyzed asymmetric sulfoxidation of aryl benzyl and aryl alkyl sulfides, using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant, has been investigated. A relationship between the steric effects of the sulfide substituents and the enantioselectivity of the oxidation has been observed, with up to 93% ee for 2-naphthylmethyl phenyl sulfoxide, in modest yield in this instance (up to 30%). The influence of variation of solvent and ligand structure was examined, and the optimized conditions were then used to oxidize a number of aryl alkyl and aryl benzyl sulfides, producing sulfoxides in excellent yields in most cases (up to 92%), and good enantiopurities in certain cases (up to 84% ee).

  15. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  16. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  17. Historical perspectives on cadmium toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Nordberg, Gunnar F.

    2009-08-01

    The first health effects of cadmium (Cd) were reported already in 1858. Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred among persons using Cd-containing polishing agent. The first experimental toxicological studies are from 1919. Bone effects and proteinuria in humans were reported in the 1940's. After World War II, a bone disease with fractures and severe pain, the itai-itai disease, a form of Cd-induced renal osteomalacia, was identified in Japan. Subsequently, the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of Cd were described including its binding to the protein metallothionein. International warnings of health risks from Cd-pollution were issued in the 1970's. Reproductive and carcinogenic effects were studied at an early stage, but a quantitative assessment of these effects in humans is still subject to considerable uncertainty. The World Health Organization in its International Program on Chemical Safety, WHO/IPCS (1992) (Cadmium. Environmental Health Criteria Document 134, IPCS. WHO, Geneva, 1-280.) identified renal dysfunction as the critical effect and a crude quantitative evaluation was presented. In the 1990's and 2000 several epidemiological studies have reported adverse health effects, sometimes at low environmental exposures to Cd, in population groups in Japan, China, Europe and USA (reviewed in other contributions to the present volume). The early identification of an important role of metallothionein in cadmium toxicology formed the basis for recent studies using biomarkers of susceptibility to development of Cd-related renal dysfunction such as gene expression of metallothionein in peripheral lymphocytes and autoantibodies against metallothionein in blood plasma. Findings in these studies indicate that very low exposure levels to cadmium may give rise to renal dysfunction among sensitive subgroups of human populations such as persons with diabetes.

  18. Interpreting NHANES biomonitoring data, cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Patricia; Mumtaz, Moiz; Osterloh, John; Fisher, Jeffrey; Fowler, Bruce A

    2010-09-15

    Cadmium (Cd) occurs naturally in the environment and the general population's exposure to it is predominantly through diet. Chronic Cd exposure is a public health concern because Cd is a known carcinogen; it accumulates in the body and causes kidney damage. The National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) has measured urinary Cd; the 2003-2004 NHANES survey cycle reported estimates for 2257 persons aged 6 years and older in the Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals. As part of translational research to make computerized models accessible to health risk assessors we re-coded a cadmium model in Berkeley Madonna simulation language. This model was used in our computational toxicology laboratory to predict the urinary excretion of cadmium. The model simulated the NHANES-measured data very well from ages 6 to 60+ years. An unusual increase in Cd urinary excretion was observed among 6-11-year-olds, followed by a continuous monotonic rise into the seventh decade of life. This observation was also made in earlier studies that could be life stage-related and a function of anatomical and phsysiological changes occurring during this period of life. Urinary excretion of Cd was approximately twofold higher among females than males in all age groups. The model describes Cd's cumulative nature in humans and accommodates the observed variation in exposure/uptake over the course of a lifetime. Such models may be useful for interpreting biomonitoring data and risk assessment.

  19. Removal of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, T.; Mikami, E.

    1989-03-01

    Methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide were efficiently removed from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m and oxidized to sulfate stoichiometrically. More than 99.99% of dimethyl sulfide was removed when the load was less than 4.0 g of dimethyl sulfide per g (dry cell weight) per day.

  20. Sulfide in the core and the composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition of the Earth is traditionally explained in terms of evolution from a solar-like composition, similar to that found in primitive 'chondritic' meteorites. It now appears, however, that the silicate Earth is not 'chondritic', but depleted in incompatible elements, including refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements. Either Earth lost material during planet-building due to collisional erosion or else internal differentiation processes produced a hidden reservoir deep in the early Earth. Sulfide in the core may provide a reservoir capable of balancing the composition of the silicate Earth. Recent experimental work suggests that the core contains a significant proportion of sulfide, added during the final stages of accretion and new data suggests that at high pressures sulfide can incorporate a substantial amount of refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements [1]. Pioneering work using the short-lived 146Sm-142Nd system strongly suggests that Earth's silicate mantle is non-chondritic [e.g. 2]. The drawback of such radiogenic isotope systems is that it is not possible to distinguish the fractionation of Sm/Nd that occurs during silicate melting from that occurring during the segregation of a sulfide-melt to form the core. Neodymium stable isotopes have the potential to provide just such a tracer of sulfide segregation, because there is a significant contrast in bonding environment between sulfide and silicate, where heavy isotopes should be preferentially incorporated into high force-constant bonds involving REE3+ (i.e. the silicate mantle). Preliminary data indicate that mantle rocks do indeed possess heavier 146Nd/144Nd values than chondritic meteorites, consistent with the removal of light Nd into sulfide in the core, driving the residual mantle to heavy values. Overall, our isotope and elemental data indicate that the rare earths and other incompatible elements are substantially incorporated into sulfide. While Nd Stable isotope

  1. Investigation on laboratory and pilot-scale airlift sulfide oxidation reactor under varying sulfide loading rate.

    PubMed

    Pokasoowan, Chanya; Kanitchaidecha, Wilawan; K C, Bal Krishna; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2009-01-01

    Airlift bioreactor was established for recovering sulfur from synthetic sulfide wastewater under controlled dissolved oxygen condition. The maximum recovered sulfur was 14.49 g/day when sulfide loading rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH values were 2.97 kgHS(-)/m(3)-day, 0.2-1.0 mg/L and 7.2-7.8, respectively. On the other hand, the increase in recovered sulfur reduced the contact surface of sulfide oxidizing bacteria which affects the recovery process. This effect caused to reduce the conversion of sulfide to sulfur. More recovered sulfur was produced at high sulfide loading rate due to the change of metabolic pathway of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria which prevented the toxicity of sulfide in the culture. The maximum activity in this system was recorded to be about 3.28 kgS/kgVSS-day. The recovered sulfur contained organic compounds which were confirmed by the results from XRD and CHN analyzer. Afterwards, by annealing the recovered sulfur at 120 degrees C for 24 hrs under ambient Argon, the percentage of carbon reduced from 4.44% to 0.30%. Furthermore, the percentage of nitrogen and hydrogen decreased from 0.79% and 0.48% to 0.00% and 0.14%, respectively. This result showed the success in increasing the purity of recovered sulfur by using the annealing technique. The pilot-scale biological sulfide oxidation process was carried out using real wastewater from Thai Rayon Industry in Thailand. The airlift reactor successfully removed sulfide more than 90% of the influent sulfide at DO concentration of less than 0.1 mg/L, whereas the elementary sulfur production was 2.37 kgS/m(3)-day at sulfide loading rate of 2.14 kgHS(-)/m(3)-day. The sulfur production was still increasing as the reactor had not yet reached its maximum sulfide loading rate.

  2. Rapid Deposition Technology Holds the Key for the World's Largest Solar Manufacturer (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    Thanks in part to years of collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a manufacturer of thin-film solar modules has grown from a small garage-type operation to become the world's largest manufacturer of solar modules. First Solar, Inc. now manufactures cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar modules throughout the world, but it began in Ohio as a small company called Solar Cells, Inc.

  3. Determination of cadmium vapor pressure over dichromium cadmium tetraselenide by the atomic absorption method

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'skii, N.K.; Ochertyanova L.I.; Zhegalinka, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    By the atomic absorption method one measures the light absorption by the vapor of the investigated element as a function of the temperature of the evaporating surface. To measure vapor pressure the authors use cadmium selenide of the purity grade, which was recrystallized by sublimitation. The optical density of the vapor over cadmium selenide was determined in the temperature range 820-890 K. Using atomic spectroscopy the vapor pressure of cadmium over cadmium selenide was determined in dichromium cadmium tetraselenide with different amounts of deviation from stoichiometry at 790-880 deg. The results are compared with the literature data.

  4. Influence of the phenols on the biogeochemical behavior of cadmium in the mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Jia, Hui; Yu, Junyi; Hong, Hualong; Yan, Chongling

    2016-02-01

    Phenols exert a great influence on the dynamic process of Cd in the soil-plant interface. We investigated the influence of phenols on the biogeochemical behavior of cadmium in the rhizosphere of Avicennia marina (Forsk) Vierh. All combinations of four levels of cadmium (0, 1, 2 and 4 mg/kg DW) and two levels of phenol (0 and 15 mg/kg DW) were included in the experimental design. We found that phenols facilitated increasing concentrations of exchangeable cadmium (Ex-Cd), acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and reactive solid-phase Fe (II) in sediments, and iron in plants, but inhibited Cd accumulation in iron plaque and roots. The concentrations of AVS and reactive solid-phase Fe (II) were significantly positively correlated with Cd treatment. As for the biogeochemical behavior of Cd in mangrove sediments, this research revealed that phenols facilitated activation and mobility of Cd. They disturbed the "source-sink" balance of Cd and turned it into a "source", whilst decreasing Cd absorption in A. marina. Additionally, phenols facilitated iron absorption in the plant and alleviated the Fe limit for mangrove plant growth.

  5. Nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria as microbial oxidants for rapid biological sulfide removal.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; De Schryver, Peter; De Cooman, Michaël; Verbeken, Kim; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The emission of hydrogen sulfide into the atmosphere of sewer systems induces the biological production of sulfuric acid, causing severe concrete corrosion. As a possible preventive solution, a microbial consortium of nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) was enriched in a continuously stirred tank reactor in order to develop a biological technique for the removal of dissolved sulfide. The consortium, dominated by Arcobacter sp., was capable of removing 99% of sulfide. Stable isotope fractioning of the sulfide indicated that the oxidation was a biological process. The capacity of the NR-SOB consortium for rapid removal of sulfide was demonstrated by using it as an inoculum in synthetic and real sewage. Removal rates up to 52 mg sulfide-S g VSS(-1) h(-1) were achieved, to our knowledge the highest removal rate reported so far for freshwater species in the absence of molecular oxygen. Further long-term incubation experiments revealed the capacity of the bacteria to oxidize sulfide without the presence of nitrate, suggesting that an oxidized redox reserve is present in the culture.

  6. A Photoelectrochemical Solar Cell: An Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sharon M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Preparation and testing of a cadmium selenide photoelectrical solar cell was introduced into an environmental chemistry course to illustrate solid state semiconductor and electrochemical principles. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment which can be accomplished in a three- to four-hour laboratory session…

  7. Ridding Groundwater of Hydrogen Sulfide. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochrane, Thomas G.

    1979-01-01

    This article is the first in a series reviewing the problems associated with hydrogen sulfide in drinking water sources. Discussion centers on identification of a cost-effective balance between aeration and chlorination treatment operations. (AS)

  8. Hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata

    2014-06-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well known toxic gas that is synthesized from the amino acids: cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) by three enzymes: cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Hydrogen sulfide, like carbon monoxide (CO) or nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule in different biological systems, including the cardiovascular system. Moreover, hydrogen sulfide plays a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. It modulates different elements of hemostasis (activation of blood platelet, and coagulation process) as well as proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the biological role and the therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. This review summarizes the different functions of hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis.

  9. [Fatal outcome of an hydrogen sulfide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Querellou, E; Jaffrelot, M; Savary, D; Savry, C; Perfus, J-P

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of fatal outcome poisoning by massive exposure to hydrogen sulfide of a sewer worker. This rare event was associated with a moderate intoxication of two members of the rescue team. The death was due to asystole and massive lung oedema. Autopsy analysis showed diffuse necrotic lesions in lungs. Hydrogen sulfide is a direct and systemic poison, produced by organic matter decomposition. The direct toxicity mechanism is still unclear. The systemic toxicity is due to an acute toxicity by oxygen depletion at cellular level. It is highly diffusable and potentially very dangerous. At low concentration, rotten egg smell must trigger hydrogen sulfide suspicion since at higher concentration it is undetectable, making intoxication possible. In case of acute intoxication, there is an almost instantaneous cardiovascular failure and a rapid death. Hydrogen sulfide exposure requires prevention measures and more specifically the use of respiratory equipment for members of the rescue team.

  10. Oxygen in activator centers of zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Golobeva, N.P.; Fok, M.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors observed the sensitized luminescence of Tm and Dy without addition of Cu and Ag in samples which had been obtained by the sulfonation of zinc sulfide in hydrogen sulfide; the zinc sulfide has a copper concentration below 5.10/sup -6/ mass %. In this case the excitation can be transmitted from the ZnS lattice to the rare-earth activators mainly through defects including oxygen. The following conclusions were made. In the case of activated ZnS, oxygen is present in formations accounting for the excitation and luminescence of a number of luminophors. When an activator is introduced in the region of ZnS layer faults, where also the oxygen must be located, the positioning of the faults in close vicinity is facilitated even when the oxygen concentration of the ZnS is low. All this must be considered when models of luminescence centers of zinc sulfide are developed.

  11. Upper critical field of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical field of sintered and sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide Cu(x)Mo6S8 was measured and found to exceed the Werthamer, Helfand, and Hohenberg (1966) value for a type II superconductor characterized by dirty limit, weak isotropic electron phonon coupling, and no paramagnetic limiting. It is suggested that the enhancement results from anisotropy or clean limit or both. Other ternary molybdenum sulfides appear to show similar anomalies.

  12. The subchronic oral toxicity of polyphenylene sulfide.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W C; Kirwin, C J; Wazeter, F X; Jessup, D C

    1984-02-01

    Polyphenylene sulfide was offered to Charles River CD rats for 6 months in the diet at concentrations of 0.00, 0.50, 2.75 and 5.00% (w/w). In this study, animals of both sexes consumed polyphenylene sulfide for 6 months without exhibiting compound-related effects. Parameters studied were: body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, gross pathology and histopathology.

  13. Development of Zinc Sulfide Seeker Window Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 15 JAN 2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of...contrasting to the currently used THAAD sapphire window and validate the predictions for an alternate seeker window material, multispectral zinc...and validate the capability of multispectral zinc sulfide seeker window material. The use of zinc sulfide as a replacement window for the current

  14. Effect of Nitrate on Biogenic Sulfide Production

    PubMed Central

    Jenneman, Gary E.; McInerney, M. J.; Knapp, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of 59 mM nitrate inhibited biogenic sulfide production in dilute sewage sludge (10% [vol/vol]) amended with 20 mM sulfate and either acetate, glucose, or hydrogen as electron donors. Similar results were found when pond sediment or oil field brines served as the inoculum. Sulfide production was inhibited for periods of at least 6 months and was accompanied by the oxidation of resazurin from its colorless reduced state to its pink oxidized state. Lower amounts of nitrate (6 or 20 mM) and increased amounts of sewage sludge resulted in only transient inhibition of sulfide production. The addition of 156 mM sulfate to bottles with 59 mM nitrate and 10% (vol/vol) sewage sludge or pond sediment resulted in sulfide production. Nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were detected during periods where sulfide production was inhibited, whereas nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were below detectable levels at the time sulfide production began. The oxidation of resazurin was attributed to an increase in nitrous oxide which persisted in concentration of about 1.0 mM for up to 5 months. The numbers of sulfate-reducing organisms decreased from 106 CFU ml−1 sludge to less than detectable levels after prolonged incubation of oxidized bottles. The addition of 10 mM glucose to oxidized bottles after 14.5 weeks of incubation resulted in rereduction of the resazurin and subsequent sulfide production. The prolonged inhibition of sulfide production was attributed to an increase in oxidation-reduction potential due to biogenic production of nitrous oxide, which appeared to have a cytotoxic effect on sulfate-reducing populations. PMID:16347078

  15. Photooxidation of methyl sulfide, ethyl sulfide, and methanethiol

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.

    1984-06-01

    Products of sunlight-irradiated mixtures of oxides of nitrogen and alkyl sulfides (RSR, R = CH/sub 3/, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/) and methanethiol (CH/sub 3/SH) in air include formaldehyde (R = CH/sub 3/), acetaldehyde and PAN (R = C/sub 2/H/sub 5/), sulfur dioxide, and alkyl nitrates (RONO/sub 2/) as well as particulate alkanesulfonic acids (RSO/sub 2/OH) and inorganic sulfate. The nature and yields of gaseous and particulate products are discussed in terms of OH-initiated reaction pathways, including C-S bond scission, and subsequent reactions of alkythiyl radicals (RS), including those leading to photolabile RSNO and stable RSNO/sub 2/ products for which indirect evidence is presented. SO/sub 2/ yields are found to vary according to the relative importance of the competing pathways RS + O/sub 2/ (a) and RS + NO/sub 2/ (b), for which a ratio k/sub b/ / k/sub a/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 6/ is derived from data for irradiated RSR-NO/sub x/, RSH-Cl/sub 2/, and RSH-Cl/sub 2/-NO/sub 2/ mixtures.

  16. Solvothermal synthesis of copper sulfide semiconductor micro/nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Xue, Dongfeng

    2010-03-15

    Covellite copper sulfide (CuS) micro/nanometer crystals in the shape of hierarchical doughnut-shaped, superstructured spheric-shaped and flowerlike architectures congregated from those nanoplates with the thickness of 20-100 nm have been prepared by a solvothermal method. The as-obtained CuS products were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A systematic investigation has been carried out to understand the factors influencing the evolution of CuS particle morphology which found to be predominant by solvent, surfactant, sulfur resource and copper salt. The possible formation mechanism for the nanostructure formation was also discussed. These CuS products show potential applications in solar cell, photothermal conversion and chemical sensor.

  17. Effect of rainfall on terrestrial fluxes of global cooling gases: carbonyl sulfide (COS) and its precursor dimethyl sulfide (DMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, M.; Rhew, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric sulfur compounds regulate climate by affecting cloud dynamics and reducing the amount of direct solar radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, and are notable for sometimes resulting in a global cooling effect. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur-containing gas in the atmosphere. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS), known to be produced by phytoplankton and bacteria, is oxidized in the atmosphere by hydroxl radicals, forming a considerable portion of the total atmospheric COS. Changes in soil moisture are expected to influence the direction of net gas fluxes of both COS and DMS. With the goal of refining existing models of sulfur gas fluxes, this study observes dramatic changes in the rates of production and consumption of COS and DMS when in situ grass-covered soils are initially wetted. Here we report the effect of simulated rainfall on uncultivated marine terrace field sites near Santa Cruz, CA (37.0 °N, 122°W) in the dry season using static flux chambers. Dry plots exhibited fluxes of DMS and COS below method detection limits. Immediately after a simulated rainfall event, DMS fluxes increased, then declined from their post-rainfall maxima by 90 minutes after wetting. Fluxes of COS from wetted plots showed occasional uptake, but were not consistent between sites. These results agree with observations from our lab-based soil incubation experiments.

  18. Immunochromatographic assay of cadmium levels in oysters.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Kosuke; Kim, In-Hae; Itai, Takaaki; Sugahara, Takuya; Takeyama, Haruko; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2012-08-15

    Oysters are one of foodstuffs containing a relatively high amount of cadmium. Here we report on establishment of an immunochromatographic assay (ICA) method of cadmium levels in oysters. Cadmium was extracted with 0.l mol L(-1) HCl from oysters and cleaned up from other metals by the use of an anion-exchange column. The behavior of five metals Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd was monitored at each step of extraction and clean-up procedure for the ICA method in an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. The results revealed that a simple extraction method with the HCl solution was efficient enough to extract almost all of cadmium from oysters. Clean-up with an anion-exchange column presented almost no loss of cadmium adsorbed on the column and an efficient removal of metals other than cadmium. When a spiked recovery test was performed in the ICA method, the recovery ranged from 98% to 112% with relative standard deviations between 5.9% and 9.2%. The measured values of cadmium in various oyster samples in the ICA method were favorably correlated with those in ICP-MS analysis (r(2)=0.97). Overall results indicate that the ICA method established in the present study is an adequate and reliable detection method for cadmium levels in oysters.

  19. Electroneutral intrinsic point defects in cadmium chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Kharif, Ya.L.; Kudryashov, N.I.; Strunilina, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    Low-mobility electrically neutral intrinsic point defects were observed in cadmium chalcogenides. It was shown that the concentration of these defects is proportional to the cadmium vapor pressure to the 1/3 power at a constant temperature, and a mechanism for the formation of these defects were proposed.

  20. Cadmium concentrations in tobacco and tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.; Barkemeyer, H.

    1983-02-01

    The amount of cadmium in tobacco depends on the variety and origin of the plant as well as on the analytical method used to determine cadmium. In the literature, cadmium concentrations in tobacco of between 0.5 and 5 ppm are reported. Modern German cigarette tobacco contains about 0.5-1.5 micrograms cadmium/cigarette. Of importance for the smoker is the amount of the metal in the mainstream smoke. The cadmium level in the mainstream smoke of modern cigarettes is reduced by means of filters and other construction features. The average Cd value of German filter cigarettes is less than 0.1 microgram/cigarette in mainstream smoke. An average daily intake of about 1 microgram cadmium by smoking 20 cigarettes can be calculated on the basis of an experimentally proved pulmonary retention rate of 50%. Pulmonary resorption rates relevant to uptake rates of cadmium by smoking are discussed. It can be assumed that cadmium uptake by smoking modern cigarettes has been reduced because of modifications in tobacco processing and cigarette construction in the last few decades.

  1. Association of urinary cadmium and myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Charles J. Frithsen, Ivar L.

    2008-02-15

    We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individuals 45-79 years old in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994) (NHANES III). Myocardial infarction was determined by electrocardiogram (ECG). Our sample included 4912 participants, which when weighted represented 52,234,055 Americans. We performed adjusted logistic regressions with the Framingham risk score, pack-years of smoking, race-ethnicity, and family history of heart attack, and diabetes as covariates. Urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.86 (95% CI 1.26-2.75) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine. This result supports the hypothesis that cadmium is associated with coronary heart disease. When logistic regressions were done by gender, women, but not men, showed a significant association of urinary cadmium with myocardial infarction. Women with urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.80 (95% CI 1.06-3.04) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine. When the analysis was restricted to never smokers (N=2187) urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.85 (95% CI 1.10-3.14) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine.

  2. Transparent and Conductive Cadmium-Tin Oxide Films Deposited by Atom Beam Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Tatsuo; Ito, Kentaro

    1988-09-01

    Transparent and conductive cadmium-tin oxide films with resistivities of 9× 10-4 Ω cm and transmittance higher than 80% over the visible range were prepared by atom beam sputtering. The structure of the deposited film was amorphous and its composition was highly deficient in CdO compared with Cd2SnO4. This CTO film was used as the window layer of a heterojunction solar cell.

  3. Solar Mesosphere Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Five experiments and the instruments packages designed for use in studying reactions between sunlight, ozone, and other chemicals in the atmosphere as well as for determining how ozone concentrations are transported in the mesosphere are described. The spin-stabilized satellite carrying the experiments consists of an observatory module and a spacecraft bus. Powered by a solar array which charges the nickel-cadmium batteries, the satellite is to be inserted into a sun synchronous orbit by a two stage Delta 2310 launch vehicle. The mission objectives, spacecraft configurations, and various subsystems are described as well as the ground support and prelaunch operations.

  4. Novel Cadmium Resistance Determinant in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Cameron; Lee, Sangmi; Jayeola, Victor; Kathariou, Sophia

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause severe disease (listeriosis) in susceptible individuals. It is ubiquitous in the environment and often exhibits resistance to heavy metals. One of the determinants that enables Listeria to tolerate exposure to cadmium is the cadAC efflux system, with CadA being a P-type ATPase. Three different cadA genes (designated cadA1 to cadA3) were previously characterized in L. monocytogenes A novel putative cadmium resistance gene (cadA4) was recently identified through whole-genome sequencing, but experimental confirmation for its involvement in cadmium resistance is lacking. In this study, we characterized cadA4 in L. monocytogenes strain F8027, a cadmium-resistant strain of serotype 4b. By screening a mariner-based transposon library of this strain, we identified a mutant with reduced tolerance to cadmium and that harbored a single transposon insertion in cadA4 The tolerance to cadmium was restored by genetic complementation with the cadmium resistance cassette (cadA4C), and enhanced cadmium tolerance was conferred to two unrelated cadmium-sensitive strains via heterologous complementation with cadA4C Cadmium exposure induced cadA4 expression, even at noninhibitory levels. Virulence assessments in the Galleria mellonella model suggested that a functional cadA4 suppressed virulence, potentially promoting commensal colonization of the insect larvae. Biofilm assays suggested that cadA4 inactivation reduced biofilm formation. These data not only confirm cadA4 as a novel cadmium resistance determinant in L. monocytogenes but also provide evidence for roles in virulence and biofilm formation.IMPORTANCEListeria monocytogenes is an intracellular foodborne pathogen causing the disease listeriosis, which is responsible for numerous hospitalizations and deaths every year. Among the adaptations that enable the survival of Listeria in the environment are the abilities to persist in biofilms, grow in the cold, and tolerate

  5. Evaluation of radiation interference in the Voyager Sun Sensor's cadmium sulfide detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, T. C.; Divita, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The simulation of radiation interference effects and the results of a radiation interference test on two Voyager Sun Sensor prototype detector assemblies are reported. The derivation of test levels and requirements are discussed and show that cobalt 60 gamma radiation is an effective and practical simulator of the ionization dose rate effects induced by high-energy electron flux incident on the spacecraft at a rate of 3.7 x 10 to the 8th e/sq cm-sec (10 rad(Si)/s) during closest approach to Jupiter. The test results provide information that is used to confirm an analytic correlation, and to predict satisfactory performance of a spacecraft sun sensing device having stringent angular resolution requirements. The measured detector response shows that at dose rates incident on the detector elements of 2 rad(Si)/sec, which is four times that expected during Jupiter encounter, the radiation-induced angle error is almost an order of magnitude less than that allowed by the acceptance criteria.

  6. Plasma-enhanced microwave solid-state synthesis of cadmium sulfide: reaction mechanism and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Du, Ke-zhao; Chaturvedi, Apoorva; Wang, Xing-zhi; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Ke-ke; Iqbal Bakti Utama, M; Hu, Peng; Jiang, Hui; Xiong, Qi-hua; Kloc, Christian

    2015-08-14

    CdS synthesis by plasma-enhanced microwave physical vapor transport (PMPVT) has been developed in this work. The photoluminescence (PL), absorbance, Raman spectra and the mechanism of CdS crystal growth have been investigated. Furthermore, plasma-enhanced microwave chemical vapour transport (PMCVT) synthesis of CdS with additional chemical transport agents has been explored. In addition, other II-VI chalcogenides were also synthesized by PMPVT.

  7. Growth analysis of cadmium sulfide thin films by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Ramanathan, K.

    1996-05-01

    CdS films have been deposited by solution growth on SnO{sub 2} and glass substrates. Nucleation on SnO{sub 2} occurs at early deposition times, and complete conformal coverage is observed at low thickness values. The average grain size of the CdS films is established at these early times. In films deposited on glass substrates, nucleation is slower and occurs through 3-dimensional islands that increase in size and number as deposition proceeds. Optical measurements show that the bandgap values of CdS films deposited on SnO{sub 2} depend mainly on substrate structure. Hydrogen heat treatment does not affect the surface morphology of the samples, but decreases bandgap values.

  8. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-09-04

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation.

  9. Surface chemistry of cadmium sulfide magic-sized clusters: a window into ligand-nanoparticle interactions.

    PubMed

    Nevers, Douglas R; Williamson, Curtis B; Hanrath, Tobias; Robinson, Richard D

    2017-03-02

    Optoelectronic properties of nanoparticles are intimately coupled to the complex physiochemical interplay between the inorganic core and the organic ligand shell. Magic-sized clusters, which are predominately surface atoms, provide a promising avenue to clarify these critical surface interactions. Whereas these interactions impact the surface of both nanoparticles and magic-sized clusters, we show here that only clusters manifest a shift in the excitonic peak by up to 0.4 eV upon solvent or ligand treatment. These results highlight the utility of the clusters as a probe of ligand-surface interactions.

  10. Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering on cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in silicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Yu. V.; Rempel, A. A.; Meyer, M.; Pipich, V.; Gerth, S.; Magerl, A.

    2016-08-01

    Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering on Cd and S doped glass annealed at 600 °C shows after the first 12 h nucleation and growth of spherical CdS nanoparticles with a radius of up to 34±4 Å. After the nucleation is completed after 24 h, further growth in this amorphous environment is governed by oriented particle attachment mechanism as found for a liquid medium. Towards 48 h the particle shape has changed into spheroidal with short and long axis of 40±2 Å and 120±2 Å, respectively.

  11. Fluorescent cadmium sulfide nanoparticles for selective and sensitive detection of toxic pesticides in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walia, Shanka; Acharya, Amitabha

    2014-12-01

    The detection of pesticide residues in ground water, food, or soil samples is extremely important. The currently available laboratory techniques have several drawbacks and needs to be replaced. Fluorescent chemosensors for pesticide detection were reported in the literature, with few reports published on quantum dot-based pesticide sensors, but none of these were focused toward differentiating organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides specifically. In this respect, glutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. The TEM studies of the nanoparticles suggested mostly monodispersed spherical particles, with size in the range of 11.5±1 nm. The prepared fluorescent nanoparticles were found to selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles 2.5 times. Similar studies carried out with organophosphorous pesticide dimethoate did not result any change in the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. Further studies carried out with commercially available pesticide solutions, also confirmed similar results. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol. Control experiments suggested possible role of both amine and carboxylic acid functional groups of glutathione in the recognition of dicofol. The limit of detection of dicofol was found to be 55±11 ppb.

  12. Review of methods for preparatin of zinc and cadmium sulfide, selenide and telluride single cyrstals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucharczyk, M.; Zabludowska, K.

    1986-01-01

    The growth method of (Zn,Cd)S, (Zn,Cd)Se, (Zn,Cd)Te single crystals is reviewed. It is suggested that the method of sublimation-condensation is the most suitable to the conditions and facilities available, and should be employed in the Department of Physics of Bislystok Polytechnic.

  13. Nucleo-mitochondrial interaction of yeast in response to cadmium sulfide quantum dot exposure.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Francesco; Agrimonti, Caterina; Pagano, Luca; Zappettini, Andrea; Villani, Marco; Marmiroli, Marta; White, Jason C; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2017-02-15

    Cell sensitivity to quantum dots (QDs) has been attributed to a cascade triggered by oxidative stress leading to apoptosis. The role and function of mitochondria in animal cells are well understood but little information is available on the complex genetic networks that regulate nucleo-mitochondrial interaction. The effect of CdS QD exposure in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was assessed under conditions of limited lethality (<10%), using cell physiological and morphological endpoints. Whole-genomic array analysis and the screening of a deletion mutant library were also carried out. The results showed that QDs: increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased the level of reduced vs oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG); reduced oxygen consumption and the abundance of respiratory cytochromes; disrupted mitochondrial membrane potentials and affected mitochondrial morphology. Exposure affected the capacity of cells to grow on galactose, which requires nucleo-mitochondrial involvement. However, QDs exposure did not materially induce respiratory deficient (RD) mutants but only RD phenocopies. All of these cellular changes were correlated with several key nuclear genes, including TOM5 and FKS1, involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial organization and function. The consequences of these cellular effects are discussed in terms of dysregulation of cell function in response to these "pathological mitochondria".

  14. Carbon nanoparticle-enhanced immunoelectrochemical detection for protein tumor marker with cadmium sulfide biotracers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ja-an Annie; Lin, Yeh-Chun; Wang, Li-Sheng; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2009-02-15

    We have developed a sensitive electrochemical immunoassay system for the detection of a protein tumor marker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that is based on a carbon nanoparticle (CNP)/poly(ethylene imine) (PEI)-modified screen-printed graphite electrode (CNP-PEI/SPGE) covered with anti-CEA antibodies. The signal amplification strategy--using CdS nanocrystals as biotracers and CNPs to enhance electron transfer--improves the sensitivity and detection limit for CEA, suggesting that this system holds promise for development into a point-of-care or disposable home-care self-diagnostic tool. This biosensor is based on a sandwich complex immunoassay, which we assembled from sequential layers of the anti-CEA antibody (alphaCEA) on CNP-PEI/SPGE, the CEA sample, and the CdS nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) sensitized with alphaCEA (alphaCEA-CdS QD). We used square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) to amplify the signal current response obtained from the dissolved alphaCEA-CdS QDs. The calibration curve for CEA concentration was linear in the range of 0.032-10 ng/mL; the detection limit (estimated as the mean of the blank sample plus three times the standard deviation obtained on the blank sample) was 32 pg/mL (equivalent to 160 fg in a 5 microL sample). This method is suitably precise and sensitive to function as a means of determining urinary CEA, which is a better marker than serum CEA for the early detection of urothelial carcinoma.

  15. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-09-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of charge transport in cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummon, Marissa Rachel

    2009-12-01

    This thesis examines charge transport in individual colloidal nanocrystals (quantum dots) using a scanning tunneling microscope. We observe coulomb blockade (CB) at room temperature and extract the charging energy of the quantum dot (QD). We analyze time-dependent CB measurements to determine the lifetime and energy of the trapped charge on the QD. A model of the lifetime is presented, furthering our analysis of the charge detrapping mechanism. We observe a hysteresis in the current-voltage (IV) tunneling spectra as the substrate bias is swept from empty to filled states and then back to empty states. This hysteresis is consistent with trapped charge(s) presenting an additional potential barrier to tunneling, a measure of CB. Traditional CB experiments measure a coulomb repulsion due to charge build-up on the island between two electrodes. We observe CB, hysteresis in successive IV sweeps, due to charge trapping/detrapping in a state other than the transport level. This trap state may be related to the dark state in blinking experiments. Optical and electrical measurements of QD trap states are often related to a puzzling physical phenomena observed universally in QDs: blinking. Blinking is the stochastic photoluminescence behavior of quantum dots, where, under constant excitation by a laser, a QD does not emit a continuous stream of photons. In fact, the QD will blink "on" and "off" for completely unpredictable durations that are thought to be related to the QD being in either a neutral or charged state. We measure a lifetime for the charged state of 15 +/- 7 s when Vsub ≤ 1.5 V and 170 +/- 140 ms when Vsub ≥ 1.6 V. The abrupt transition in lifetime between 1.5 and 1.6 V implies that this is the voltage necessary to lower the Au Fermi level equal to the trap state energy, thus allowing the trapped charge to tunnel out of the trap state. The voltage drop between the QD and substrate, determined from a self-consistent calculation of the relative capacitance between the tip, QD, and substrate, at Vsub = 1.6 V is 420 meV. The trap state is located, ˜780 meV below E C,QD. The energy of the trap state is comparable to a deep surface state, that may be responsible for the long (milliseconds to seconds) "off" durations in blinking experiments.

  17. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2013-09-15

    The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC₅₀ value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells.

  18. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation. PMID:26337119

  19. Optical properties of cadmium sulfide nanocrystals obtained by the sol-gel method in gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobeeva, V. M.; Smyntyna, V. A.; Sviridova, O. I.; Struts, D. A.; Tyurin, A. V.

    2008-07-01

    Based on analysis of optical absorption data for CdS nanocrystals obtained by sol-gel technology in gelatin, we have studied the effect of technological factors (reagent concentrations, gelatin concentration) on the growth process and size distribution of the synthesized nanocrystals. Depending on the reagent concentration, we synthesized CdS nanocrystals with mean radii in the range bar r = 1.9 - 2.4 nm . We have shown that for a low gelatin content (1%), nanocrystals of different sizes are formed (1.7 nm and 2.6 nm). With an increase in the gelatin concentration, the size dispersion decreases and nanocrystals of a single mean radius (2.3 nm) are formed. We have established a correlation between the size dispersion and the shape of the photoluminescence spectrum of the CdS nanocrystals.

  20. Infrared cadmium selenide photoconductor and process of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, S.

    1987-02-17

    The process is described of making an infrared responsive cadmium selenide photoconductor comprising the steps of preparing a blend of cadmium selenide, copper-containing cadmium selenide mix and cadmium chloride, and firing the blend at a temperature of about 425/sup 0/C.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S is a signaling molecule without definite effect. The use of existing H2S donors is limited because of the instant release and short lifetime of H2S. Thus, translational medicine involving the sustained and controlled release of H2S is of great value for both scientific and clinical uses. H2S donation can be manipulated by different ways, including where H2S is given, how H2S is donated, or the specific structures of H2S-releasing drugs and H2S donor molecules. This review briefly summarizes recent progress in research on the physiological and pathological functions of H2S and H2S-releasing drugs, and suggests hope for future investigations. PMID:24096643

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Gasotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are well established as messenger molecules throughout the body, gasotransmitters, based on striking alterations in mice lacking the appropriate biosynthetic enzymes. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is even more chemically reactive, but till recently there was little definitive evidence for its physiologic formation. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22), and Cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE; EC 4.4.1.1), also known as cytathionase, can generate H2S from cyst(e)ine. Very recent studies with mice lacking these enzymes have established that CSE is responsible for H2S formation in the periphery, while in the brain CBS is the biosynthetic enzyme. Endothelial-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) activity is reduced 80% in the mesenteric artery of mice with deletion of CSE, establishing H2S as a major physiologic EDRF. H2S appears to signal predominantly by S-sulfhydrating cysteines in its target proteins, analogous to S-nitrosylation by NO. Whereas S-nitrosylation typically inhibits enzymes, S-sulfhydration activates them. S-nitrosylation basally affects 1–2% of its target proteins, while 10–25% of H2S target proteins are S-sulfhydrated. In summary, H2S appears to be a physiologic gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO. PMID:20067586

  3. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  4. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  5. Solar collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. I.

    1984-08-01

    Solar dishes, photovoltaics, passive solar building and solar hot water systems, Trombe walls, hot air panels, hybrid solar heating systems, solar grain dryers, solar greenhouses, solar hot water worhshops, and solar workshops are discussed. These solar technologies are applied to residential situations.

  6. Comparative proteome analysis of high and low cadmium accumulating soybeans under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Zahed; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-12-01

    A comparative proteomic study was performed to unravel the protein networks involved in cadmium stress response in soybean. Ten-day-old seedlings of contrasting cadmium accumulating soybean cultivars-Harosoy (high cadmium accumulator), Fukuyutaka (low cadmium accumulator), and their recombinant inbred line CDH-80 (high cadmium accumulator) were exposed to 100 μM CdCl(2) treatment for 3 days. Root growth was found to be affected under cadmium stress in all. Varietal differences at root protein level were evaluated. NADP-dependent alkenal double bond reductase P1 was found to be more abundant in low cadmium accumulating Fukuyutaka. Leaf proteome analysis revealed that differentially expressed proteins were primarily involved in metabolism and energy production. The results indicate that both high and low cadmium accumulating cultivars and CDH-80 share some common defense strategies to cope with the cadmium stress. High abundance of enzymes involved in glycolysis and TCA cycle might help cadmium challenged cells to produce more energy necessary to meet the high energy demand. Moreover, enhanced expressions of photosynthesis related proteins indicate quick utilization of photoassimilates in energy generation. Increased abundance of glutamine synthetase in all might be involved in phytochelatin mediated detoxification of cadmium ions. In addition, increased abundance of antioxidant enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, ensures cellular protection from reactive oxygen species mediated damages under cadmium stress. Enhanced expression of molecular chaperones in high cadmium accumulating cultivar might be another additional defense mechanism for refolding of misfolded proteins and to stabilize protein structure and function, thus maintain cellular homeostasis.

  7. FIB-TEM Investigations of Fe-NI-Sulfides in the CI Chondrites Alais and Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Lauretta, D. S.; Zega, T. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    The CI chondrites are primitive meteorites with bulk compositions matching the solar photosphere for all but the lightest elements. They have been extensively aqueously altered, and are composed primarily of fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix material which is host to carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and minor amounts of olivine and pyroxene. The alteration, while extensive, is heterogeneous. For example, CI-chondrite cubanite and carbonate grains differ on mm to sub-mm scales, demonstrating multiple aqueous episodes. CI-chondrite variability is also evidenced by degree of brecciation, abundance and size of coarse-grained phyllosilicates, olivine and pyroxene abundance, as well as Ni-content and size of sulfide grains. Our previous work revealed Orgueil sulfide grains with variable Ni-contents, metal:S ratios, crystal structures and textures. We continue to explore the variability of CI-chondrite pyrrhotite (Po, (FeNi)1-xS) and pentlandite (Pn, (Fe,Ni)9S8) grains. We investigate the microstructure of sulfides within and among CI-chondrite meteorites in order to place constraints on the conditions under which they formed.

  8. Altered avoidance behavior of young black ducks fed cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Haseltine, S.D.; Sileo, L.

    1983-01-01

    Pairs of adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were fed a diet containing 0, 4 or 40 ppm cadmium as cadmium chloride. One-week-old ducklings that had been fed thc same dietary concentrations of cadmium as had their parents were tested for avoidance of a fright stimulus. Ducklings fed 4 ppm cadmium ran significantly farther from the stimulus than did controls or ducklings fed 40 ppm cadmium. Such an alteration in behavior could have harmful effects on wild birds.

  9. Sources of cadmium in the environment.

    PubMed

    Hutton, M

    1983-02-01

    This paper is concerned with quantifying the major sources of cadmium in the European Community and assessing the relative significance of such inputs to the environmental compartments, air, land, and water. The methodology involved identification of potential sources of cadmium, including natural processes, as well as those associated with human activities. This was followed by a review of any emission studies of these processes and subsequent estimation of an emission factor for each source. The emission factor was applied to the most recent production or consumption data for the process in question to obtain an estimate of the annual discharge. The steel industry and waste incineration, followed by volcanic action and zinc production, are estimated to account for the largest emissions of atmospheric cadmium in the region. Waste disposal results in the single largest input of cadmium to land; the quantity of cadmium associated with this source is greater than the total from the four other major sources--coal combustion, iron and steel production, phosphate fertilizer manufacture and use, and zinc production. The characterization of cadmium inputs to aquatic systems is incomplete but of the sources considered, the manufacture of cadmium-containing articles accounts for the largest discharge, followed by phosphate fertilizer manufacture and zinc production.

  10. Main sources of lead and cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Lead-acid batteries used in cars accounted for 65% of the lead in MSW in 1986, and rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries contributed 52% of the cadmium discarded in the U.S. since 1980. According to an EPA draft report, other major sources of lead are consumer electronics 27%; glass and ceramics, 4%; and such plastic items as PVC resins. Other less significant sources of lead are soldered cans, pigments, brass and bronze products, light bulbs, rubber products, used oil, and lead foil wine bottle wrappers. Cadmium comes from other sources in addition to nickel-cadmium batteries. Plastics using cadmium as stabilizer (mainly PVC) or in pigments contribute 28% of the total amount entering the waste stream. Consumer electronics account for 9% (including cadmium-plated steel chassis on old TV sets and radios); appliances which used to be built with cadmium-plated parts to resist corrosion, 5% pigments, particularly those used in non-newspaper printing inks, textile dyes and paints, 4%; and glass and ceramics, 1.6% of the total.

  11. Cadmium determination in Mexican-produced tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Saldivar De R., L.; Soto, R.; Fortoul, T.I. ); Luna, M.; Reyes, E. )

    1991-06-01

    Exposure to cadmium by inhalation or ingestion is dangerous for human health. This metal induces damage to the kidneys, the bones, the prostate, and the lungs. In the lungs, cadmium can produce cancer, emphysema, and fibrosis. It is well known that tobacco leaves are contaminated with cadmium, a metal that has been related to pulmonary damage. In this paper the authors report the concentration of cadmium in tobacco leaves and in cigarettes produced for domestic consumption. Fifty-five cigarettes of different brands, prices, and stocks were analyzed as well as 48 samples from four different types of tobacco. The average concentration of cadmium in cigarettes was 4.41 {plus minus} 0.67 {mu}g/g, and 2.65 {plus minus} 0.99 {mu}g/g for tobacco leaves; the content of cadmium, was 2.8 {plus minus} 0.4 {mu}g/cigarette. It was estimated that a person that smokes 20 Mexican cigarettes per day can increase his(her) cadmium burden by 1.4 to 2.8 {mu}g per day.

  12. Cadmium inhalation and male reproductive toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, H.A.; Mast, T.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Cadmium is a highly toxic element that is cumulative and has a long biological half-life in mammals. The severe toxicity of cadmium in man has been known for more than 100 years. Despite the knowledge that cadmium is toxic, only 20 human cases of poisoning via ingestion were recorded prior to 1941, whereas in the ensuing five-year period more than 680 cases of cadmium poisonings from accidental oral ingestion of this metal were documented. Some of the recorded effects of exposure to cadmium in laboratory animals include renal tubular damage, placental and testicular necrosis, structural and functional liver damage, osteomalacia, testicular tumors, teratogenic malformations, anemia, hypertension, pulmonary edema, chronic pulmonary emphysema, and induced deficiencies of iron, copper, and zinc. Some of these effects have also been observed in human after accidental exposures to cadmium oxide fumes and are characteristic of the syndrome described in Japan as Itai Itai disease in which ingestion of cadmium is the inciting chemical.134 references.

  13. Interaction of cadmium with phosphate on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, P.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1997-08-01

    Interactions between different ions are of importance in understanding chemical processes in natural systems. In this study simultaneous adsorption of phosphate and cadmium on goethite is studied in detail. The charge distribution (CD)-multisite complexation (MUSIC) model has been successful in describing extended data sets of cadmium adsorption and phosphate adsorption on goethite. In this study, the parameters of this model for these two data sets were combined to describe a new data set of simultaneous adsorption of cadmium and phosphate on goethite. Attention is focused on the surface speciation of cadmium. With the extra information that can be obtained from the interaction experiments, the cadmium adsorption model is refined. For a perfect description of the data, the singly coordinated surface groups at the 110 face of goethite were assumed to form both monodentate and bidentate surface species with cadmium. The CD-MUSIC model is able to describe data sets of both simultaneous and single adsorption of cadmium and phosphate with the same parameters. The model calculations confirmed the idea that only singly coordinated surface groups are reactive for specific ion binding.

  14. Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride

    DOEpatents

    Hasoon, F.S.; Nelson, A.J.

    1996-01-16

    A process is described for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10{sup {minus}6} torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m.

  15. Effects of cadmium on heart mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Kisling, G.M.; Kopp, S.J.; Paulson, D.J.; Tow, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effect of cadmium on isolated heart mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were rapidly prepared by polytroning hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats in a 0.25 M Sucrose, 4 mM Tris, 1 mM EGTA, 0.2% BSA buffer (pH 7.4), followed by a two-part differential centrifugation. Mitochondria were resuspended in this same Tris-sucrose-BSA buffer minus EGTA and mitochondrial respiration was assayed using a Clark oxygen electrode system at a concentration of 0.5 mg total mitochondrial protein/ml assay buffer. At 5 x 10/sup -6/ M cadmium, mitochondrial state 3 respiration (pyruvate plus malate) was reduced to a level 74.8% of the control value. A 50% reduction in state 3 respiratory rate was achieved at a cadmium concentration of 8.75 x 10/sup -6/ M. The respiratory control ratio did not change significantly but at higher cadmium concentrations (< greater than or equal to 1.25 x 10/sup -5/ M) the ADP/O ratio was increased. None of the cadmium concentrations tested, from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ M, demonstrated an uncoupling response. These data suggest that cadmium acts strictly as an inhibitor of heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These results contrast those of earlier work involving liver mitochondria in which cadmium was reported to uncouple mitochondrial respiration.

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  17. [Sulfide removal from wastewater by nanoscale iron].

    PubMed

    Xi, Hong-bo; Yang, Qi; Shang, Hai-tao; Hao, Chun-bo; Li, Zhi-ling

    2008-09-01

    Influencing factors, adsorption isotherm, adsorption kinetics and preliminary discussion on the mechanism of sulfide adsorption by nanoscale iron prepared in laboratory were studied using manual simulation sulfide wastewater. Experimental results indicate that the removal efficiency of S2- increases with increasing iron dosage and decreases with increasing initial S2- concentration and pH values. The removal efficiency of S2- is 100% when initial concentration is less than 100 mg x L(-1) and are 87.34%, 65.80% and 44.61% at pH 2, 7 and 13. The temperature at 25 degrees C favors the maximum adsorption of S2- with 19.17 mg x g(-1) of equilibrium adsorption quantity and the adsorption capacity decreas at higher or lower temperature. The adsorption data fit well to the Langmuir equation and the Freundlich equation. The sulfide adsorption follows the pseudo second order equation with the maximum initial sorption rate(h) is 1.575 3 mg x (g x mg)(-1) at 25 degrees C and the adsorption rate constant increases with the increasing of temperature. The activation energy(Ea) is 8.22 kJ x mol(-1). The mechanism of sulfide removal is being sorbed onto the iron nanoparticles via formation of surface compleses, FeOSH and iron sulfides (FeS, FeS2, FeSn).

  18. Spectral properties of powder preparations of cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide with controlled nonstoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomyakov, A. V.; Mozhevitina, E. N.; Kuz'min, V. V.; Kon'kova, N. A.; Avetissov, I. Ch.

    2015-03-01

    The reflection spectra of powder preparations of cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide with different contents of overstoichiometric components have been investigated in the range of 800-1700 nm. The reflectance is found to be maximum for samples with compositions close to stoichiometric. An increase in the concentration of overstoichiometric cadmium more radically reduces the reflectance in comparison with preparations containing excess chalcogen. It is shown that halftone images in the near-IR range can be formed by using of these materials.

  19. Longitudinal studies of exposure to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, R; Chettle, D R; Scott, M C; Blindt, M; Mason, H J

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of urinary proteins, blood and urinary cadmium, and in vivo kidney and liver cadmium have been made for a group of workers at several times between 1981 and 1990. The possibility of the introduction of measurement artifacts due to the use of different in vivo measurement systems has been assessed and is considered to be small. Changes in cadmium body burden with time have been studied in relation to kidney function. The results suggest several interesting patterns, although more data are needed to elucidate these further. They do, however, show the effectiveness of good hygiene in the workplace. PMID:1515347

  20. Preparation of silver-activated zinc sulfide thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, C.; Swindells, F. E.

    1968-01-01

    Silver improves luminescence and reduces contamination of zinc sulfide phosphors. The silver is added after the zinc sulfide phosphors are deposited in thin films by vapor evaporation, but before calcining, by immersion in a solution of silver salt.