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Sample records for cadmium zinc copper

  1. Interaction of zinc with cadmium and copper on ossification of embryonic chick bone in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Kaji, T; Takata, M; Miyahara, T; Kozuka, H; Koizumi, F

    1990-01-01

    Histological changes are shown of ossification induced by a simultaneous exposure to zinc and cadmium or to zinc and copper using embryonic chick femur in a culture system. Cadmium caused an atrophic change of the osseous tissue in the absence of zinc but caused an osteomalacic change with a partial degenerative change in the presence of zinc after a 6-day culture. Copper caused an atrophic change in the absence or presence of zinc. These observations were partly supported by the fact that the diaphysial calcium content was significantly decreased by zinc alone, and the decrease was unaffected by cadmium or copper. Zinc significantly decreased cadmium accumulation but not copper accumulation in the diaphysis. Thus, in spite of the inhibitory effect on calcification, zinc prevented a decrease in bone matrix formation caused by cadmium but not that by copper. Exposure of chick femur culture to zinc and cadmium induced changes consistent with osteomalacia, i.e., decreased mineralization of bone, with or without suppression of matrix formation. Exposure to zinc and copper, however, induced changes consistent with osteoporosis, i.e., decreased mineralization and matrix formation.

  2. Cadmium, zinc, and copper in horse liver and in horse liver metallothionein: comparisons with kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Elinder, C.G.; Nordberg, M.; Palm, B.; Piscator, M.

    1981-10-01

    Cadmium, zinc, and copper were determined in liver and in kidney cortex samples obtained from 33 normal Swedish horses. Cadmium concentrations in liver ranged from 0.002 to 0.165 mmole/kg and in kidney from 0.01 to 2.15 mmole/kg. There was a significant correlation between liver and kidney concentrations of cadmium. The average kidney concentration of cadmium was about 15 times that of liver. Zinc concentrations increased with increasing cadmium concentrations in both liver and kidney. The relative increase of zinc with cadmium was more pronounced in liver than in kidney. However, the absolute increase of zinc was larger in kidney due to the much higher concentration of cadmium in kidney compared to liver. Any significant correlation between copper and cadmium, or copper and zinc, could not be revealed. Sephadex gel filtration was performed on supernatants from homogenates of kidney and liver from 19 of the horses. In both organs the major part of cadmium was recovered in protein fractions corresponding to metallothionein (MT), in which the increase of zinc also took place. The molar ratio between zinc and cadmium was higher in MT fractions obtained from liver than in MT fractions obtained from kidney.

  3. Baseline toxicity data for freshwater bryozoa exposed to copper, cadmium, chromium, and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Pardue, W.J.; Wood, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    Four heavy metals - copper, cadmium, chromium, and zinc - were used to determine baseline toxicity data for three species of phylactolaemate bryozoa. Techniques used in germinating test organisms are described, and baseline toxicity data are presented. Minimal interspecific variation in toxicity was noted for each heavy metal. In general, copper was most toxic, followed by cadmium, chromium, and zinc. Available data indicate that bryozoans are more sensitive to these metals than many other invertebrates and fish.

  4. Cadmium, zinc, copper, and barium in foraminifera tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Edward A.

    1981-03-01

    The concentrations of cadmium, zinc, copper and barium have been determined on 2-mg samples of single-species foraminifera populations. Cleaning techniques were tested using North Atlantic core tops, and followed by a detailed downcore study for the last 30,000 years in South Atlantic core V22-174. Raw foram tests cleaned by crushing followed by ultrasonic removal of fine-grained material, and dissolved in a pH 5.5 acetate buffer, contain appreciable amounts of trace elements associated with ferromanganese and alumino-silicate contaminants. A reductive/complexing cleaning treatment reduces ferromanganese contamination by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Acetate buffers at pH 5.5 complex iron and raise the solubility of ferromanganese oxides; these buffers are unsuitable for separating carbonate lattice-bound trace elements from the fraction associated with ferromanganese phases. Improved mechanical and ultrasonic reductive cleaning combined with a mild dissolution in distilled water under 1 atm. P CO 2 reduces contaminant levels another order of magnitude. The Cd and Zn concentrations (order 10 -8 mole Cd/mole Ca and 10 -5 mole Zn/mole Ca) of species with low surface area show an increase with decreasing isotopic temperatures. This increase is consistent with the increasing concentrations of these metals from low values in surface waters to higher values at depth. The variance of Cd and Zn over the last 30,000 years in the central South Atlantic is consistent with the probable variability of the dissolved trace elements at the calcification levels of the species analyzed. Cu and Ba are irreproducible and probably sensitive to residual contaminant phases. The trace element content of the tests differs from levels observed in a recent coprecipitation study. Foraminifera may be a significant vector in zinc cycling in the ocean.

  5. Interrelationships among zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium in food, feces, and organs of humans.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, K; Iwao, S

    1978-08-01

    Concentrations of zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium were determined in 20 samples of food collected over a period of 20 days, 221 samples of feces collected over a period of 5 days from 19 males, 17 females, and 11 children and 85 samples each of renal cortex and liver from autopsied human cadavers in order to investigate the relationships among the four metals and among the various martices. In food the highest correlation was observed between copper and zinc (0.34). In feces the highest correlation was also between copper and zinc (0.45). In the highest correlation between cadmium and zinc (0.33), but that in the renal cortex was between copper and cadmium (0.52). These findings suggest that the relationships among the concentrations of the four metals in food and feces are almost equal to each other, but differ greatly from the concentrations in human organs due to the differing metabolic actions of the metals once they are absorbed into the body. In addition, it was observed that zinc and cadmium concentrations in the renal cortex increase with age, but copper and lead concentrations do not show much variation with age.

  6. Acute toxicity of aqueous copper, cadmium, and zinc to the mayfly Rhithrogena hageni.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Stephen F; Johnston, Walter D

    2008-04-01

    Heptageniid mayfly nymphs have been suggested as sensitive indicators of metal contamination in streams based on biomonitoring studies, experimentation in situ, and experimentation in microcosm. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of Rhithrogena hageni, a heptageniid mayfly, to waterborne copper, cadmium, and zinc. Tests were conducted with soft water (hardness = 40-50 mg/L) at about 12 degrees C. Toxicity endpoints were survival and moulting (%/day). Median 96 hr lethal concentrations were 0.137, 10.5, and 50.5 mg/L for copper, cadmium and zinc, respectively. The average daily moulting rate of survivors significantly decreased after exposure to these metals in solution.

  7. Interactions of cadmium with copper, zinc and iron in different organs and tissues of the rat.

    PubMed

    Julshamn, K; Utne, F; Braekkan, O R

    1977-11-01

    The effect of cadmium on tissue concentrations of iron, zinc and copper was studied in male rats. Two littermate groups were fed a stock diet with or without a supplement of 100 microgram cadmium per g. Every three weeks ten animals from each group were sampled and the liver, kidneys, heart, lungs, spleen, testes, muscle, fur, faeces and urine were individually analyzed. Except for the fur, all the other organs showed highly significantly increased levels of cadmium when compared with the control group. The iron levels were significantly depressed in all organs. As the content of the faeces remained unchanged and the urinary excretion showed an increase, it could be concluded that the cadmium supplementation resulted in a depletion of the body stores of iron. The zinc levels showed a significant increase in the liver and testes and a correspondingly significant decrease in the spleen. The levels of copper generally showed no significant changes.

  8. Cadmium zinc sulfide/copper indium diselenide module design and cost assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.

    1985-09-01

    The report presents the results of a cadmium zinc sulfide/copper indium diselenide. The primary objective of the research was to clarify several of the technical issues facing the technology development. The design work focused on a large four-foot-square module suited for utility or large scale commercial applications. Cost estimates were developed from detailed descriptions of each manufacturing process step.

  9. Chronic toxicity of mixtures of copper, cadmium and zinc to Daphnia pulex

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Daphnia pulex (de Greer) were exposed to single and bimetal mixtures of copper, cadmium and zinc in reconstituted waters of different hardness/alkalinity and humic acid concentrations. The effect of single and bimetal exposure to these metals was evaluated by survivorship and reproductive indices of brood size, percent aborted eggs/brood, age at reproductive maturity, age at first reproduction and the instantaneous rate of population growth. Accumulation by 7-day-old Daphnia magna of metals in these mixtures was also assessed in medium water containing 0.0 and 0.75 mg humic acid/L. The addition of 0.75 mg humic acid/L decreased the acute toxicity of copper and zinc but increased the acute toxicity of cadmium. Survival was the best index of a single or bimetal chronic stress since it was equally or more sensitive than any reproductive index. The interaction between copper and zinc was variable in soft water which contained 0.15 mg humic acid/L, but largely independent in medium water which contained 0.0 and 0.75 mg humic acid/L. Zinc and humic acid had no effect on the accumulation of copper in medium water. Copper and cadmium were synergistic in their interaction on daphniid survival in medium water which contained 0.0 and 0.75 mg humic acid/L.

  10. Copper changes the yield and cadmium/zinc accumulation and cellular distribution in the cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Wu, Longhua; Hu, Pengjie; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2013-10-15

    Non-accumulated metals in mixed metal contaminated soils may affect hyperaccumulator growth and metal accumulation and thus remediation efficiency. Two hydroponics experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of copper (Cu) on cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) accumulation by the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola, Cu toxicity and plant detoxification using chemical sequential extraction of metals, sub-cellular separation, micro synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. Compared with the control (0.31 μM Cu), 5-50 μM Cu had no significant effect on Cd/Zn accumulation, but Cu at 200 μM induced root cell plasmolysis and disordered chloroplast structure. The plants held Cu in the roots and cell walls and complexed Cu in insoluble forms as their main detoxification mechanisms. Exposure to 200 μM Cu for 4 days inhibited plant Cd uptake and translocation but did not affect Zn concentrations in roots and stems. Moreover, unloading of Cd and Zn from stem to leaf was restrained compared to control plants, perhaps due to Cu accumulation in leaf veins. Copper may thus interfere with root Cd uptake and restrain Cd/Zn unloading to the leaves. Further investigation of how Cu affects plant metal uptake may help elucidate the Cd/Zn hyper-accumulating mechanisms of S. plumbizincicola. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The toxicity of copper, cadmium and zinc to four different Hydra (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Karntanut, Wanchamai; Pascoe, David

    2002-06-01

    An acute toxicity study of three metals to Hydra species carried out using two different assessment methods, (i) determination of the LC50 and (ii) measurement of progressive morphological changes, demonstrated that relative toxicity decreased from copper to cadmium with zinc the least toxic for all species. The latter method revealed more details of the effect on Hydra in terms of physical damage to the polyp but both methods indicated that H. viridissima was more sensitive to copper and cadmium than H. vulgaris1 (Zurich strain, male clone), H. vulgaris2 (a dioecious strain reproducing sexually and asexually) and H. oligactis (dioecious, reproducing sexually and asexually). The responses to zinc were similar for all Hydra. The possible role of metabolic interactions between H. viridissima and its symbiotic green algae in contributing to the greater sensitivity of this polyp is discussed.

  12. Cadmium, copper, cobalt, nickel, lead, and zinc in the water column of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Westerlund, S.; Oehman, P. Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg )

    1991-08-01

    This paper presents results from the first complete investigation of the dissolved and suspended trace metals cadmium, copper, cobalt, nickel, lead, and zinc in the water column of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. A total of 35 stations was covered in the central Weddell Sea and the shelf areas around the Filchner Depression and Dronning Mauds Land. Snow samples were collected from the sea ice and from the Antarctic continent to evaluate the importance of the fresh water influence on the Weddell Sea. Oceanographic data, i.e., salinity, temperature, and nutrients, are used to link the trace metal results to the different water masses. The general range found is for cadmium, 0.5-0.8 nM; copper, 2.0-2.9 nM; cobalt, 20-40 nM; nickel, 6-7 nM; lead, 10 pM; zinc, 3-7 nM. The suspended trace metals are a small fraction, but considerably higher than in other oceans. The lowest concentrations of cadmium, copper, and zinc are found in the surface layer and in the whole water column at the Filchner Depression. Cobalt shows an increase in the surface water compared to the deep water. This is suggested to be generated by the terrogent material from the Antarctic continent from the melting of the ice. No evidence of anthropogenic lead can be seen in the lead profile. Nutrient trace metal relations found show poor statistical correlation in contrast to what is found in other oceans. This assumes that cadmium, copper, and zinc are not directly linked to the bioproduction cycle. However, the nutrient trace metal ratios found support the theory that the Weddell Sea is the ultimate source for generation of the nutrient trace metal ratios in the Pacific Ocean.

  13. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of zinc, cadmium, and copper metallothioneins: evidence for metal-binding cooperativity.

    PubMed Central

    Gehrig, P. M.; You, C.; Dallinger, R.; Gruber, C.; Brouwer, M.; Kägi, J. H.; Hunziker, P. E.

    2000-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectra of both well-characterized and novel metallothioneins (MTs) from various species were recorded to explore their metal-ion-binding modes and stoichiometries. The ESI mass spectra of the zinc- and cadmium-binding MTs showed a single main peak corresponding to metal-to-protein ratios of 4, 6, or 7. These findings combined with data obtained by other methods suggest that these MTs bind zinc or cadmium in a single predominant form and are consistent with the presence of three- and four-metal clusters. An unstable copper-specific MT isoform from Roman snails (Helix pomatia) could be isolated intact and was shown to preferentially bind 12 copper ions. To obtain additional information on the formation and relative stability of metal-thiolate clusters in MTs, a mass spectrometric titration study was conducted. One to seven molar equivalents of zinc or of cadmium were added to metal-free human MT-2 at neutral pH, and the resulting complexes were measured by ESI mass spectrometry. These experiments revealed that the formation of the four-metal cluster and of the thermodynamically less stable three-metal cluster is sequential and largely cooperative for both zinc and cadmium. Minor intermediate forms between metal-free MT, Me4MT, and fully reconstituted Me7MT were also observed. The addition of increasing amounts of cadmium to metal-free blue crab MT-I resulted in prominent peaks whose masses were consistent with apoMT, Cd3MT, and Cd6MT, reflecting the known structure of this MT with two Me3Cys9 centers. In a similar reconstitution experiment performed with Caenorhabditis elegans MT-II, a series of signals corresponding to apoMT and Cd3MT to Cd6MT species were observed. PMID:10716192

  14. Effects of zinc, iron and copper deficiencies on cadmium in tissues of Japanese quail. [Coturnix coturnix japonica

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.S.; Tao, S.H.; Stone, C.L.; Fry, B.E. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Experiments with young Japanese quail were conducted to determine whether combined moderate deficiencies of zinc, iron and copper would cause greater uptake and tissue retention of cadmium than the single deficiencies. Birds were fed the experimental diets containing 62 ppb cadmium from hatching to 16 days of age. On day 9 each bird received a dose of /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ in its diet. On day 10, the duodenal and jejunal-ileal tissues contained large amounts of cadmium, and there were many significant effects of treatment on cadmium-109 retention in the livers and kidneys. At day 16, zinc deficiency caused increased cadmium in the liver, whereas iron and copper deficiencies each caused increased cadmium in the kidneys. Combined deficiencies had little or no greater effect than single deficiencies and in some cases the combined effect was less than that of a single deficiency. 13 references, 11 tables.

  15. Cadmium, zinc, copper, sodium and potassium concentrations in rooster and turkey semen and their correlation.

    PubMed

    Massanyi, Peter; Weis, Jan; Lukac, Norbert; Trandzik, Jozef; Bystricka, Judita

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess concentration of selected elements (cadmium, zinc, copper, sodium and potassium) in rooster and turkey semen and to find possible correlations between these elements. Samples were analyzed on the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The analysis of cadmium showed that the concentration in rooster is 9.06 +/- 7.70 and in turkey 4.10 +/- 3.59 microg/mL. In zinc 5.25 +/- 1.96 microg/mL in rooster and 3.70 +/- 1.26 microg/mL in turkey were detected. Higher concentration of copper was found in rooster semen (6.79 +/- 6.42 microg/mL) in comparison with turkey semen (4.29 +/- 5.43 microg/mL). The level of sodium (3.96 +/- 1.02 microg/mL; 3.14 +/- 0.85 microg/mL) and potassium (2.88 +/- 0.65 microg/mL; 3.42 +/- 1.41 microg/mL) was very similar in both species. Correlation analysis detected high positive correlation between cadmium and zinc (r = 0.701) in rooster and between sodium and potassium (r = 0.899) in turkey semen.

  16. Assimilation of zinc, cadmium, lead, copper, and iron by the spider Dysdera crocata, a predator of woodlice

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkin, S.P.; Martin, M.H.

    1985-02-01

    In this paper, an experiment is described on the assimilation of zinc, cadmium, lead, copper and iron by Dysdera crocata collected from a site in central Bristol. The spiders were fed on woodlice from their own site, and on woodlice from a site contaminated by a smelting works which contained much higher levels of zinc, cadmium and lead than the spiders would have been used to in their normal diet.

  17. Arsenic, cadmium, lead, copper and zinc in cattle from Galicia, NW Spain.

    PubMed

    López Alonso, M; Benedito, J L; Miranda, M; Castillo, C; Hernández, J; Shore, R F

    2000-02-10

    Knowledge of trace and toxic metal concentrations in livestock is important for assessing the effects of pollutants on domestic animals and contaminant intakes by humans. Metal levels in cattle have been measured in various countries but not in Spain. In this study, the (wet wt.) concentrations of three toxic elements (arsenic, cadmium, lead) and two trace elements (copper, zinc) were quantified in the liver (Li), kidney (Ki), muscle (M) and blood (Bl) of calves (males and females between 6 and 10 months old) and cows (2-16 years old) from Galicia, NW Spain. For the toxic elements, geometric mean concentrations of arsenic in calves (sexes combined) and cows were 10.8 and 10.2 microg/kg (Li), 11.3 and 15.2 microg/kg (Ki), 3.75 and 4.25 microg/kg (M), 3.23 and 2.92 microg/l (Bl). The corresponding cadmium concentrations were 7.78 and 83.3 microg/kg (Li), 54.3 and 388 microg/kg (Ki), 0.839 and 0.944 microg/kg (M), 0.373 and 0.449 microg/l (Bl). Geometric mean concentrations of lead in calves and cows were similarly low and were 33.0 and 47.5 microg/kg (Li), 38.9 and 58.3 microg/kg (Ki), 6.37 and 12.5 microg/kg (M), 5.47 and 12.2 microg/l (Bl). Sex had almost no effect on the amount of toxic metal accumulated except that kidney cadmium concentrations were significantly higher in females than males. Age did influence accumulation; cadmium and lead (but not arsenic) concentrations in most tissues were significantly greater in cows than female calves. For the trace elements, geometric mean copper levels in calf and cow tissues were 49.9 and 36.6 mg/kg (Li), 4.27 and 3.63 mg/kg (Ki), 0.649 and 1.68 mg/kg (M) and 0.878 and 0.890 mg/l (Bl). The corresponding zinc concentrations were 46.3 and 52.5 mg/kg (Li), 14.2 and 20.7 mg/kg (Ki), 47.3 and 52.5 mg/kg (M) and 2.80 and 2.22 mg/l (Bl). Female calves had significantly higher levels than males of muscle zinc and blood copper and zinc. Female calves accumulated more copper but less zinc in the liver and kidneys compared with

  18. Effect of cadmium on prenatal development and on tissue cadmium, copper, and zinc concentrations in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Baranski, B.

    1987-02-01

    Administration of 60 and 180 ppm Cd in the drinking water of female rats from Day 1 to Day 20 of gestation resulted in a pronounced accumulation of Cd in all organs examined with the highest increase in the intestinal wall. The copper concentration was decreased in the liver and in the intestine of females from both groups in a dose-dependent manner and in the blood of females given Cd (180 ppm). The zinc concentration was decreased only in the kidney and the intestine of females from the higher level group. The serum glucose level, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were not affected in maternal blood, but the hematocrit was reduced in fetal blood in the 60-ppm Cd group. The fetal body weight and length were decreased in both groups though litter size was not affected. The fetal growth retardation was not concomitant with an increase of Cd concentration or with a decrease of copper and zinc concentration in fetal organs. Cd concentration was not changed in the fetal brain, liver, and kidney and increased only in the gastrointestinal tract of fetuses from the 180-ppm Cd group. The zinc concentration was decreased in fetal liver in the 180-ppm group and in brain of fetuses from the 60-ppm Cd group. The copper concentration was decreased in the gastrointestinal tract and increased in kidney of fetuses from the higher level group.

  19. The effect of copper, zinc, mercury and cadmium on some sperm enzyme activities in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Sarosiek, Beata; Pietrusewicz, Marta; Radziwoniuk, Julita; Glogowski, Jan

    2009-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of copper, zinc, cadmium and mercury ions (100, 10 and 1 mg/l) on the activity of some enzymes of carp spermatozoa. Acid phosphatase activity was proved to be relatively insensitive to zinc ions, while copper, mercury and cadmium ions effectively inhibited the activity of this enzyme. Beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity was sensitive only to mercury ions. Lactic dehydrogenase activity remained unaffected by heavy metals. Our results showed that, among the examined metals, mercury had the strongest inhibitory effect on enzymatic activities.

  20. [Content of lead, cadmium, mercury, zinc and copper in fruit from various regions of Poland].

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska-Mazurek, M; Zawadzka, T; Karłowski, K; Starska, K; Cwiek-Ludwicka, K; Brulińska-Ostrowska, E

    1995-01-01

    The content of lead, cadmium, mercury, zinc and copper was determined in various species of fruit gathered in Poland in the period 1989-1991. Samples for the determinations were taken from regions not directly exposed to air pollution from industrial plants and traffic. The content of Pb, Cd, Zn and Cu was determined after dry mineralization (at about 400 degrees C) by the flame ASA technique: Cu and Zn were determined directly in mineralizate solution, Pb and Cd after extraction of their complexes with APDC; Hg after wet mineralization by flameless ASA "cold vapour" method. About 10000 samples of fruit and about 300 samples of soil from the sites where the fruit was collected were investigated. The highest lead levels were found in strawberries, raspberries and currants (about 0.1 mg/kg on average), cadmium in raspberries and strawberries (mean 0.02 mg/kg). Mercury, zinc and copper levels were low. The levels of all these metals were lowest in apples and pears (Pb-mean 0.010-0.089 mg/kg, Cd mean 0.001-0.006 mg/kg, Cd mean 0.001-0.006 mg/kg). The content of metals in fruit, but ever more in soil, from highly industrialized areas was significantly higher. The authors suggest lowering in the Polish legislation of the maximal acceptable lead concentration in all types of fruit down to 0.20 mg/kg, and cadmium to 0.03 mg/kg for all types of berries and 0.02 mg/kg for the remaining fruit types.

  1. Simultaneous Measurement of Zinc, Copper, Lead and Cadmium in Baby Weaning Food and Powder Milk by DPASV.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Naficeh; Oveisi, Mohammad Reza; Jannat, Behrooz; Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Behfar, Abdolazim; Behzad, Masoomeh; Norouzi, Narges; Oveisi, Morvarid; Jannat, Behzad

    2014-01-01

    Apart from the breast milk, infant formula and baby weaning food have a special role in infant diet. Infants and young children are very susceptible to amount of trace elements. Copper and zinc are two elements that add in infant food. Lead and cadmium are heavy metals that enter to food chain unavoidably. DPASV is a benefit and applicable method for measurement of trace elements in food products. In this study, concentration of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium in four brands of baby food (rice and wheat based) and powder milk was analyzed with DPASV and polarograph set. Total Mean ± SE of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium in baby foods (n = 240) were 11.86 ± 1.474 mg/100g, 508.197 ± 83.154 μg/100g, 0.445 ± 0.006, 0.050 ± 0.005 mg/Kg respectively. Also these amount in powder milk (n = 240) were 3.621± 0.529 mg/100g, 403.822 ± 133.953 μg/100g, 0.007 ± 0.003, 0.060 ± 0.040 mg/Kg respectively. Zinc level in baby food type I was higher than lablled value (P = 0.030), but in other brands was not difference. Concentration of copper in all of samples was in labeled range (P > 0.05). In each four products, level of lead and cadmium were lower than the standard limit (P < 0.05). Amount of zinc and lead in baby food I, had difference versus other products. Concentration of zinc, camium in baby food type I, was higher than type II (P = 0.043, 0.001 respectively). Concentration of lead and cadmium in baby food type II, was higher than infant formulas, but are in standard limit.

  2. Lead, zinc, cadmium, mercury, selenium and copper in Greenland caribou and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus).

    PubMed

    Aastrup, P; Riget, F; Dietz, R; Asmund, G

    2000-01-17

    Samples of caribou and reindeer muscle (127 samples) and liver (126 samples) were collected from four locations during two seasons plus 3 years in Greenland. The levels of lead, zinc, cadmium, mercury, selenium, and copper were determined, and analyzed in relation to location, two seasons, age and year of sampling. The lead concentrations (geometric mean) ranged from below the detection limit to 0.007 microgram/g wet weight (wet wt.) in muscle and from 0.027 to 0.926 microgram/g wet wt. in liver. Zinc geometric mean concentrations ranged from 17.5 to 39.6 micrograms/g wet wt. in muscle and from 23.2 to 31.7 micrograms/g wet wt. in liver. For cadmium, the geometric mean concentrations were at, or below the detection limit in muscle, while concentrations in liver ranged from 0.121 to 0.695 microgram/g wet wt. Mercury levels ranged from 0.003 to 0.043 microgram/g wet wt. in muscle and from 0.040 to 0.618 microgram/g wet wt. in liver. Selenium concentration levels in muscle ranged from 0.030 to 0.252 microgram/g wet wt., and from 0.085 to 0.984 microgram/g wet wt. in liver. Copper levels in muscle ranged from 2.09 to 3.60 micrograms/g wet wt., and from 21.8 to 71.0 micrograms/g wet wt. in liver. Mercury concentrations were higher than those found at lower latitudes in Norway and Canada, especially in Isortoq in southern Greenland. Selenium levels were also high compared to other Arctic regions. Concentrations of lead, zinc, cadmium and copper are similar to those reported in caribou from Canada and Norway. Concentrations of elements generally decreased in the following order: Isortoq > Akia > Itinnera > Kangerlussuaq, and there was only found minor variation in the annual levels during 3 years in Itinnera. Late winter levels were generally significantly higher than early winter levels especially in the lichen-rich localities, and it is suggested that the availability of lichens as winter forage is the key determining the level of elements. Accordingly, when using

  3. Cadmium and zinc relationships.

    PubMed

    Elinder, C G; Piscator, M

    1978-08-01

    Cadmium and zinc concentrations in kidney and liver have been measured under different exposure situations in different species including man. The results show that zinc increases almost equimolarly with cadmium in kidney after long-term low-level exposure to cadmium, e.g., in man, horse, pig, and lamb. In contrast, the increase of zinc follows that of cadmium to only a limited extent, e.g., in guinea pig, rabbit, rat, mouse, and chicks. In liver, the cadmium--zinc relationship seems to be reversed in such a way that zinc increases with cadmium more markedly in laboratory animals than in higher mammals. These differences between cadmium and zinc relationships in humans and large farm animals and those in commonly used laboratory animals must be considered carefully before experimental data on cadmium and zinc relationships in laboratory animals can be extrapolated to humans.

  4. Sorption of cadmium, copper, and zinc onto soft coal and the fungus Rhizopus javanicus

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, H.D.; Chapman, S.K.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments involved testing the sorption properties of soft coal and the fungus Rhizopus javanicus to evaluate the feasibility of using these materials for acid mine reclamation. The metals cadmium, copper, and zinc were chosen since they are generally present in sulfide mine waste and are toxic. Their toxicity warrants their removal. To appropriate sulfide mine conditions, solutions of individual metals were prepared with concentrations between five and fifty milligrams/Liter and pH levels between three and seven. Results show forty to seventy percent metal removal for the fungus, and seventy-five to one-hundred percent removal by the coal. The pH of all the metal solutions equilibrated to between four and six when the fungus was used, and between five and seven for the coal. Sorption kinetics studies are currently underway and will be reported.

  5. Determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in geologic materials by atomic absorption spectrometry with tricaprylylmethylammonium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Interferences commonly encountered in the determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc at crustal abundance levels are effectively eliminated using a rapid, sensitive, organic extraction technique. A potassium chlorate-hydrochloric acid digestion solubilizes the metals not tightly bound in the silicate lattice of rocks, soils, and stream sediments. The six metals are selectively extracted into a 10% Aliquat 336-MIBK organic phase in the presence of ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. Metals in the organic extract are determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry to the 0.02-ppm level for silver, cadmium, copper, and zinc and to the 0.2-ppm level for bismuth and lead with a maximum relative standard deviation of 18.8% for known reference samples. An additional hydrofluoric acid digestion may be used to determine metals substituted in the silicate lattice.

  6. Effects of cadmium, copper and zinc on growth of four isolated algae from a highly polluted Argentina river.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Anahí; Vélez, Carlos Guillermo; Wenzel, María Teresa; Tell, Guillermo

    2014-02-01

    Toxicity of cadmium, copper and zinc was tested on four green algal species (Ankistrodesmus fusiformis, Chlorella ellipsoidea, Monoraphidium contortum and Scenedesmus acuminatus) isolated from a highly polluted river (Matanza-Riachuelo River, Buenos Aires, Argentina). The relative abundance of these species in river waters showed that C. ellipsoidea was the most abundant species (mean 4,540 ind mL(-1)), whereas the less abundant species was S. acuminatus (mean 220 ind mL(-1)). The most sensitive species was A. fusiformis, which EC50 were Cd = 141 μg L(-1), Cu = 72 μg L(-1), and Zn = 199 μg L(-1), whereas C. ellipsoidea was the most resistant species to copper (EC50 = 489 μg L(-1)) and cadmium (EC50 = 429 μg L(-1)), and M. contortum and S. acuminatus were the most resistant species to zinc (EC50 = 381 and 394 μg L(-1), respectively).

  7. Total body burdens and tissue concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and ash in 55 human cadavers

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, B.E.; Gross, S.B.; Yeager, D.W.; Meiners, B.G.; Gartside, P.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Trace metal contents of human tissues and total body burdens are useful for studies of nutrition and certain diseases. Data are summarized and analyzed for individuals exposed to the normal Cincinnati environment, for 29 tissues from 55 cadavers for lead and ash concentrations, and from 26 cadavers for cadmium, copper, and zinc concentrations. Total body burdens also were calculated and correlated against each other and age. The distributions for ash, copper, and zinc were close to normal, but those for lead and cadmium were closer to lognormal. Bone lead increased with age, whereas soft tissue lead did not. The calculated mean percentage of total body lead in the bones ranged from 78% at age 20 to 96% at age 80. Correlations of blood concentrations with total body burdens were negligible for cadmium and zinc. For copper the correlation coefficient was a poor 0.54. For lead in blood vs soft tissue burden it was a very poor 0.37, and vs total body lead it was negligible. Thus the use of blood samples as a convenient clinical measure of body burdens for these metals may be of limited value. These and other findings provide a useful bank of information for health studies.

  8. Application of anodic stripping voltammetry for zinc, copper, and cadmium quantification in the aqueous humor: implications of pseudoexfoliation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panteli, Vassiliki S; Kanellopoulou, Dimitra G; Gartaganis, Sotirios P; Koutsoukos, Petros G

    2009-12-01

    Anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) procedure, using mercury film electrode, was optimized and applied to determine the concentrations of zinc, cadmium, and copper in the aqueous humor. Concentration levels as low as 1 ppb of the test metals was possible to be detected using short electrolysis times (120 s) and microquantities of aqueous humor (up to 35 μL). As a first application of the voltammetric analysis of trace metals in the aqueous humor, the role of the three selected trace elements in the pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome was examined. Samples from aqueous humor were collected during cataract extraction from patients with and without PEX. The zinc and copper concentration levels in the aqueous humor did not show statistically significant difference in the study and control group. Cadmium was detected in a small number of samples, without however statistical differences between the two groups. ASV proved to be a highly precise and sensitive tool for the quantification of heavy metal ions in aqueous humor. Further studies may lead to useful conclusions for the role of zinc, copper, or cadmium in PEX syndrome.

  9. Copper, zinc and cadmium in benthic organisms from the Java Sea and estuarine and coastal areas around East Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everaarts, J. M.; Boon, J. P.; Kastoro, W.; Fischer, C. V.; Razak, H.; Sumanta, I.

    A study was made of the concentrations of copper, zinc and cadmium in benthic organisms, representing the phyla Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata and Pisces, from the riverine and estuarine areas of the rivers Brantas and Solo (East Java) and the adjacent coastal area. Moreover, an assessment was made of the contamination of the benthic biota with these elements in the Java Sea and Bali Sea. Benthic organisms show a species-specific uptake pattern for each element. Compared to the same type of animals from estuaries and coastal areas in temperate regions of western Europe, the concentrations of cadmium are considerably higher, while copper and zinc concentrations are somewhat lower. There is no general trend in concentration levels of the metals in specimens from rivers, estuaries, coastal zone and open sea. In some groups of organisms ( e.g. shrimp, starfish) the concentrations of copper and zinc are highest in specimens from rivers and estuaries. In contrast, cadmium concentration levels in e.g. crab, shrimp and squid are lowest in riverine and estuarine areas. Significant differences in metal concentrations in these organisms were found between the dry monsoon period (July, August) and the beginning of the wet monsoon (November, December). No relationship existed between the metal concentration of the organisms and the silt fraction of the sediment (grain size < 63 μm) or the bulk sediment.

  10. In vitro susceptibility of the oomycete Pythium insidiosum to metallic compounds containing cadmium, lead, copper, manganese or zinc.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tatiana Corrêa; Weiblen, Carla; Botton, Sônia de Avila; Pereira, Daniela Isabel Brayer; de Jesus, Francielli Pantella Kunz; Verdi, Camila Marina; Gressler, Leticia Trevisan; Sangioni, Luís Antonio; Santurio, Janio Morais

    2017-08-01

    Pythium insidiosum is an aquatic oomycete that causes pythiosis, an important and severe disease of difficult treatment that affects humans, domestic and wild animals. This infection is often described in horses in Brazil and humans in Thailand. In clinical practice, we have observed many cases that do not respond to available therapies, indicating the need to explore alternative therapeutic approaches. In this sense, studies using metal compounds in conjunction with available antimicrobial agents have been demonstrated greater antimicrobial activity. Thus, in this research, we tested in vitro activities of metallic compounds containing cadmium, lead, copper, manganese, or zinc against 23 isolates of P. insidiosum. The assays were performed by broth microdilution based on CLSI M38-A2 document. The minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations were established for all isolates. Copper acetate and cadmium acetate showed the highest inhibitory effects, with minimal inhibitory concentration ranging from 4-64 μg/ml and 16-256 μg/ml, respectively. The mean geometric for minimal fungicidal concentrations were, respectively, 26 μg/ml and 111.43 μg/ml for copper acetate and cadmium acetate. These results suggest that copper and cadmium can inhibit P. insidiosum growth, highlighting the greater inhibitory activity of copper acetate. In addition, our results propose that copper and/or cadmium compounds can be used in upcoming researches to formulate effective new complexed drugs against P. insidiosum in in vitro and in vivo experimental models. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Comparison of extractants for plant-available zinc, cadmium, nickel, and copper in contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Haq, A.U.; Bates, T.E.; Soon, Y.K.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this study was to find a suitable extractant(s) for plant-available metals in metal contaminated soils. Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L. Fordhook Giant) was grown in greenhouse pots on 46 Ontario soils varying in degree of contamination with metals. The soils had been contaminated with metals to varying degrees over a period of years. After 40 days, the plants were harvested and Zn, Cd, Ni, and Cu concentrations were measured. Each soil was extracted with nine different extractants: aqua regia, 0.01M EDTA, 0.005M DTPA, 0.02M NTA, 0.5N CH/sub 3/COOH, 1N CH/sub 3/COONH/sub 4/, 0.6N HCl + 0.05N AlCl/sub 3/, (COOH)/sub 2/ + (COONH/sub 4/)/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O. Zinc, cadmium, nickel, and copper concentrations in Swiss chard were correlated with the amounts of soil Zn, Cd, Ni, and Cu removed by each extractant. Of the nine soil extractants, CH/sub 3/COONH/sub 4/ was the best predictor of plant-available Zn if only extractable Zn and soil pH were included as independent variables in a regression equation. Acetic acid was the best extractant for prediction of both plant-available Cd and Ni when soil pH was included in the equation. Attempts to find a suitable soil extractant for plant-available Cu were unsuccessful.

  12. [Lead, cadmium, copper and zinc content in vegetables, gooseberry fruit and soil from gardening plots of Lublin].

    PubMed

    Kowalska-Pyłka, H; Kot, A; Wierciński, J; Kursa, K; Wałkuska, G; Cybulski, W

    1995-01-01

    Lead, cadmium, copper and zinc contents in vegetables, fruits of gooseberries and in soil of Lublin gardening plots "Pionier" and "Podzamcze" both situated along heavy traffic streets, and "Pionier" additional to the close vicinity of automobile factory were determined by atomic absorption spectrophofometry. Statistical analysis of the results respected the streets or factory distances from the gardening plots, and the species of the vegetables. Levels of the determined elements in the most of the samples were lower than permitted by the Ministry of Health Regulation established in 1993. According to that Regulation a slight exceeding of zinc content in the red beetroots and in the overground parts of the leak were found. Lead content in the parsley root and in the dill was close to the tolerance limit. Both lead and cadmium of the soil of "Podzamcze" gardening plot significantly exceeded the levels considered as tolerable for unpolluted grounds, whereas the soil of "Pionier" contained lead close to limit of tolerance level.

  13. Cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc concentrations in kidneys of grey wolves, Canis lupus, from Alaska, Idaho, Montana (USA) and the Northwest Territories (Canada).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S R; Blunck, S A; Petersen, K N; Jones, E M; Koval, J C; Misek, R; Frick, J A; Cluff, H D; Sime, C A; McNay, M; Beckman, K B; Atkinson, M W; Drew, M; Collinge, M D; Bangs, E E; Harper, R G

    2010-11-01

    Cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc levels were measured in the kidneys of 115 grey wolves (Canis lupus) from Idaho, Montana and Alaska (United States), and from the Northwest Territories (Canada). No significant differences in the levels of iron or copper were observed between locations, but wolf kidneys from more northern locations had significantly higher cadmium levels (Alaska > Northwest Territories > Montana ≈ Idaho), and wolves from Alaska showed significantly higher zinc than other locations. Additionally, female wolves in Alaska had higher iron levels than males, and adult wolves in Montana had higher copper levels than subadults.

  14. Lipid production combined with biosorption and bioaccumulation of cadmium, copper, manganese and zinc by oleaginous microalgae Chlorella minutissima UTEX2341.

    PubMed

    Yang, JinShui; Cao, Jing; Xing, GuanLan; Yuan, HongLi

    2015-01-01

    Algae lipid production combined with heavy metal removal is a cost-effective and environment-friendly method for algae biofuel production and hazardous waste treatment. Chlorella minutissima UTEX 2341 had strong resistance to cadmium, copper, manganese and zinc ions under heterotrophic culture condition and could efficiently remove them through intracellular accumulation and extracellular immobilization. Meanwhile, lipid accumulation was not inhibited by heavy metals. Instead, the algae lipid content significantly increased by 21.07% and 93.90%, respectively with the addition of cadmium and copper. Furthermore, the heavy metal residue in lipid was within μg range and satisfied the commercial standard. This artificial wastewater-algae biofuel-heavy-metal integrated utilization technology offered a new alternative solution to the problems of energy shortage and environmental pollution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The analysis of lead, cadmium, zinc, copper and nickel content in human bones from the upper Silesian industrial district.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, I; Czernicki, K; Aleksandrowicz, R

    1995-01-10

    The concentration of lead, cadmium, zinc, copper and nickel in autopsy samples of bones from adults living in the Upper Silesian industrial district (Poland)--an ecological disaster region--was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (flame and flameless GF AAS). Lead concentrations ranged from 20 micrograms/g to 200 micrograms/g bone wet weight, cadmium from 0.4 microgram/g to 1.5 micrograms/g bone wet weight. About one-fourth of the bones examined from Silesia, contained lead in the range from 100 micrograms/g to 200 micrograms/g. The were no significant differences in zinc, copper and nickel concentration between the control groups. The samples were mineralized in a microwave digestion system. To avoid anomalous results caused by the influence of the matrix Ca3 (PO4)2--the procedure of lead determination was carried out at a temperature of 2000 degrees C, the cadmium determination at a temperature of about 1200 degrees C.

  16. Baseline Blood Levels of Manganese, Lead, Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc in Residents of Beijing Suburb

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 μg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μ/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μ/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μ/L; for blood Pb, <100 μ/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μ/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. PMID:25836720

  17. Effects of glucose concentrations on cadmium, copper, mercury, and zinc toxicity to a Klebsiella sp

    SciTech Connect

    Brynhildsen, L.; Lundgren, B.V.; Allard, B.; Rosswall, T.

    1988-07-01

    The influence of glucose concentration on Cd, CU, Hg, and Zn toxicity to a Klebsiella sp. was studied by following the degradation of /sup 14/C-labeled glucose at pH 6.0. Uptake of /sup 14/C into the cells was also determined. The carbon concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 40 mg liter/sup -1/, which are equivalent to soluble C concentrations in natural environments. The toxicity of Cu, Cd, and Zn to a Klebsiella sp. was affected considerably by the C concentration. Copper at 10/sup -5/ M was toxic when the carbon concentration was 10 or 40 mg liter/sup -1/, while at 0.01 to 1.0 mg liter/sup -1/ no toxicity was observed. Cadmium and zinc were toxic at 10/sup -2/ M in media containing 0.01 to 1.0 mg of C liter/sup -1/. At C concentrations greater than 1.0 mg liter/sup -1/, the inhibition of glucose degradation and carbon assimilation was observed at 10/sup -3/ M Cd and Zn. The toxicity of mercury seemed to be independent of the C concentration. Results of this study showed that the nutritional state of an organism may have a profound effect on its sensitivity to metals. Metals taken up by energy-driven transport system may be less toxic under conditions of C starvation. The C concentration should be taken into account when evaluating results from toxicity studies, especially as most microorganisms in nature live under energy-limited conditions.

  18. Investigating the distribution of dissolved copper, zinc, silver and cadmium in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, D. J.; Cullen, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    A stated goal of the GEOTRACES program is to better understand the large-scale distribution of trace metals in the marine environment. A characteristic feature of the soft Lewis acid metals like copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), silver (Ag) and cadmium (Cd) is their correlation with the major algal nutrients. These correlations imply that the proximate control on the distribution of these metals is microbial uptake at the ocean surface, sinking associated with particulate organic matter and subsequent remineralization in the ocean interior. Combined with sedimentary records of past metal concentrations such correlations can provide much needed information on water mass circulation and nutrient cycling in the paleo-ocean. Today, as trace nutrients and/or toxins these metals help shape microbial community composition and influence productivity. Here we present depth profiles through the low dissolved oxygen waters of the north Pacific which show decoupling of trace metal-macronutrient relationships driven by depletion anomalies of trace metal concentrations in the broad, low oxygen layer. Similar anomalies have been previously reported in permanently anoxic layers (e.g. fjords) or in waters in contact with suboxic sediments and attributed to sulfidic removal of soft trace metals. The observed trace metal behavior and trace metal-macronutrient relationships in the oxygen minimum layer in the northeastern Pacific is consistent with the possibility of sulfidic scavenging of soft metals and the formation of insoluble metal sulfides in the water column. Implications of this influence on the basin scale distribution of soft metals like Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd through scavenging in the spreading low oxygen layer in the northeastern Pacific are discussed.

  19. Alteration of saliva and serum concentrations of manganese, copper, zinc, cadmium and lead among career welders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dixin; Du, Xuqin; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva offers a unique noninvasive approach for populational study. Purposes of this study were to investigate the feasibility of using saliva manganese (Mn) concentration as a biomarker of Mn exposure among career welders and to study the variations of Mn, copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in saliva as affected by the welding profession. Forty-nine male welders, of whom 28 were in the low exposed group and 21 in the high exposed group, were recruited. Control subjects were 33 military soldiers without metal exposure. Ambient Mn levels in breathing zones were 0.01, 0.24 and 2.21 mg/m3for control, low, and high exposed groups, respectively. Saliva samples were collected to quantify metals by inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Saliva concentrations of Mn and Cu were significantly higher in welders than in controls (p < 0.01); the variation in saliva levels appeared likely to be associated with airborne Mn levels among study populations. Saliva levels of Zn were significantly lower in welders than in controls (p < 0.05), while Cd and Pb levels in saliva were unchanged. Significant associations were observed between saliva and serum for Mn (r = 0.575, p < 0.05) and Cu (r = 0.50, p < 0.05). Moreover, saliva Mn concentrations were higher among welders with 5–10 years of employment than those with less than 5 years of employment. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between saliva Mn and Cu and between saliva Mn and Zn. Taken together, these data suggest that Mn concentrations in saliva appear reflective of welders’ exposure to airborne Mn and their years of welding experience. respectively. Elevated Mn levels among welders may alter the homeostasis of Cu and Zn. PMID:18054180

  20. Baseline blood levels of manganese, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in residents of Beijing suburb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12-60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 µg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17-30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46-60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80-25.2 μg/L; for blood Cu, 541-1475 μg/L; for blood Zn, 2349-9492 μg/L; for blood Pb, <100 μg/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μg/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs.

  1. Chronic sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc in laboratory water-only exposures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Dorman, Rebecca A; Brumbaugh, William G; Mebane, Christopher A; Kunz, James L; Hardesty, Doug K

    2014-10-01

    Chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc to white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was evaluated in water-only exposures started with newly hatched larvae or approximately 1-mo-old juveniles. The 20% effect concentration (EC20) for cadmium from the sturgeon tests was higher than the EC20 from the trout tests, whereas the EC20 for copper, lead, or zinc for the sturgeon were lower than those EC20s for the trout. When the EC20s from the present study were included in compiled toxicity databases for all freshwater species, species mean chronic value for white sturgeon was in a relatively low percentile of the species sensitivity distribution for copper (9th percentile) and in the middle percentile for cadmium (55th percentile), zinc (40th percentile), or lead (50th percentile). However, the species mean chronic value for rainbow trout was in a high percentile for copper, lead, and zinc (∼68th-82nd percentile), but in a low percentile for cadmium (23rd percentile). The trout EC20s for each of the 4 metals and the sturgeon EC20s for cadmium or lead were above US Environmental Protection Agency chronic ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) or Washington State chronic water quality standards (WQS), whereas the sturgeon EC20s for copper or zinc were approximately equal to or below the chronic AWQC and WQS. In addition, acute 50% effect concentrations (EC50s) for copper obtained in the first 4 d of the chronic sturgeon test were below the final acute value used to derive acute AWQC and below acute WQS for copper.

  2. Chronic sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc in laboratory water-only exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Dorman, Rebecca A.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Kunz, James L.; Hardesty, Douglas K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc to white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was evaluated in water-only exposures started with newly hatched larvae or approximately 1-mo-old juveniles. The 20% effect concentration (EC20) for cadmium from the sturgeon tests was higher than the EC20 from the trout tests, whereas the EC20 for copper, lead, or zinc for the sturgeon were lower than those EC20s for the trout. When the EC20s from the present study were included in compiled toxicity databases for all freshwater species, species mean chronic value for white sturgeon was in a relatively low percentile of the species sensitivity distribution for copper (9th percentile) and in the middle percentile for cadmium (55th percentile), zinc (40th percentile), or lead (50th percentile). However, the species mean chronic value for rainbow trout was in a high percentile for copper, lead, and zinc (∼68th–82nd percentile), but in a low percentile for cadmium (23rd percentile). The trout EC20s for each of the 4 metals and the sturgeon EC20s for cadmium or lead were above US Environmental Protection Agency chronic ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) or Washington State chronic water quality standards (WQS), whereas the sturgeon EC20s for copper or zinc were approximately equal to or below the chronic AWQC and WQS. In addition, acute 50% effect concentrations (EC50s) for copper obtained in the first 4 d of the chronic sturgeon test were below the final acute value used to derive acute AWQC and below acute WQS for copper.

  3. Cadmium, lead, calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc concentrations in human infant tissues: their relationship to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was any evidence of an excess of the toxic elements, cadmium and lead, or a deficiency of any of the essential elements, calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc, in the tissues of infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) as compared to those of infants who died of other causes. The literature was reviewed for SIDS, mineral metabolism, and mineral interactions. Lung, liver, kidney, and rib specimens were obtained at autopsy from 130 infants who died suddenly and unexpectedly. There were 85 SIDS cases ranging in age from 2 to 64 weeks and 45, aged 1 to 92 weeks, who died of other causes. Concentrations of cadmium, lead, calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc in each tissue were determined by electrothermal and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Statistical analysis of the data showed that liver and rib lead concentrations and liver magnesium concentrations were significantly higher in SIDS tissues in the 4 to 26 week age group than in non-SIDS tissues in the same age group. There was no evidence of a deficiency of the essential minerals measured.

  4. Reduced cadmium body burden in cadmium-exposed calves fed supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Lamphere, D.N.; Dorn, C.R.; Reddy, C.S.; Meyer, A.W.

    1984-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of practical supplemental dietary zinc to modify the cadmium content in edible bovine tissues and to identify copper interactions with cadmium and zinc. The effect of supplemental zinc (200 or 600 ..mu..g/g) on the concentrations of cadmium, zinc, and copper in liver, kidney cortex, muscle, and blood of calves fed 50 ..mu..g/g cadmium for 60 days was evaluated. Blood samples were collected before and eight times after starting to feed cadmium or cadmium plus zinc. Liver, kidney, and muscle samples were collected when calves were slaughtered (baseline, at beginning of experimental feeding; cadmium-fed, at end of 60 days feeding). The cadmium concentrations of all sample types collected were markedly increased by the feeding of cadmium. Feeding 600 ..mu..g/g supplemental zinc significantly increased the zinc concentrations of liver, kidney cortex, and blood and decreased the cadmium accumulation in these organs as well as muscle. The copper concentrations of muscle or blood were not altered by feeding cadmium with or without zinc but those of liver and kidney cortex were significantly increased by higher dietary levels of zinc and cadmium. The potential use of dietary zinc salts in reducing cadmium body burden in food animals suspected or known to have high cadmium intakes is suggested.

  5. Baseline blood levels of manganese, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in residents of Beijing suburb

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 µg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μg/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μg/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μg/L; for blood Pb, <100 μg/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μg/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. - Highlights: • Baseline blood levels of metals in residents of Beijing suburb are investigated. • BMn and BPb in this cohort are higher than those in other developed countries. • Remarkably lower blood levels of Cu and Zn in this Chinese cohort are noticed. • The reference values for blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd are established.

  6. Adsorption edge study about cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc adsorption by variable charge soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J. C.; Mouta, E. R.; Soares, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The improper discharge of industrial and urban residues and the inadvertent use of fertilizers and pesticides can result in soil and water pollution and improve the potential of trace metals to enter in the human food chain. Adsorption reactions occur at the solid/liquid interface and are the most important mechanisms for controlling the activity of metal ions in soil solution. In a complex system with amphoteric behavior, the comprehension of the mobility, availability and fate of pollutants in the soil system is crucial for the prediction of the environmental consequences and for development of prevention/remediation strategies. A comparative study of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) adsorption by highly weathered soils was carried out. Surface (0-0.2m) and subsoil (B horizon) samples were taken from a Rhodic Kandiudalf (RH), an Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox (XA) and an Anionic "Rhodic" Acrudox (RA), located in brazilian humid tropical area. As the pH and the ionic strength are important environmental factors influencing the solution chemistry of heavy metals in variable charge systems, adsorption envelopes, in a batch adsorption experiment, were elaborated by reacting, for 24 h, soil samples with individual 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 aqueous solutions containing nitrate salts of the adsorptive heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) at the initial concentration of 5 mg L-1, with an increasing pH value from 3.0 to 8.0. pH50-100%, the difference between the pH of 100 and 50 percent metal adsorption was determined. A sharp increase of adsorption density (adsorption edge) was observed within a very narrow pH range, usually less than two pH units. Commonly, the relative affinity of a soil for a metal cation increases with the tendency of the cation to form inner-sphere surface complexes. This may be caused by differences in extent of hydrolysis of Cu ions and in affinity of adsorption sites for Cu. In general, subsurface samples showed low pH50

  7. Potential Influence of Selenium, Copper, Zinc and Cadmium on L-Thyroxine Substitution in Patients with Hashimoto Thyroiditis and Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rasic-Milutinovic, Z; Jovanovic, D; Bogdanovic, G; Trifunovic, J; Mutic, J

    2017-02-01

    Background: Besides genetic factors, it is known that some trace elements, as Selenium, Copper, and Zinc are essential for thyroid gland fuction and thyroid hormone metabolism. Moreover, there were some metals effect that suggested patterns associated with overt thyroid disease. Aim of study: Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), chronic autoimune inflamation of thyroid gland with cosequtive hipothyroidism, is common disease in Serbia, and we thought it is worthwile to explore potential effects of essential and toxic metals and metalloides on thyroid function and ability to restore euthyroid status of them. Results: This cross-sectional, case-control, study investigated the status of essential elements (Selenium,Copper,and Zinc) and toxic metals and metalloides (Al, Cr, Mn, Co, As, Cd, Sb, Ba, Be, Pb and Ni) from the blood of 22 female, patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and overt hypothyroidism, and compared it with those of 55 female healthy persons. We tried to establish the presence of any correlation between previous mentioned elements and thyroid function in hypothyroid patients and healthy participants. Conclusions: The results of our study suggested that the blood concentration of essential trace elements, especially the ratio of Copper, and Selenium may influence directly thyroid function in patients with HT and overt hypothyroidism.Thus, our findings may have implication to life-long substitution therapy in terms of l-thyroxine dose reduction. Furthermore, for the first time, our study shown potential toxic effect of Cadmium on thyroid function in HT patients, which may implicate the dose of l-thyroxine substitution.

  8. Concentration of copper, iron, zinc, cadmium, lead, and nickel in boar semen and relation to the spermatozoa quality.

    PubMed

    Massányi, Peter; Trandzík, Jozef; Nad, Pavol; Koréneková, Beáta; Skalická, Magdaléna; Toman, Robert; Lukác, Norbert; Strapák, Peter; Halo, Marko; Turcan, Ján

    2003-01-01

    The concentration of copper, iron, zinc, cadmium, lead, and nickel as well as its relation to spermatozoa quality was investigated. The semen samples were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The concentration of copper in boar semen was 1.64 +/- 0.28 mg kg(-1) and of iron 16.14 +/- 10.35 mg kg(-1). The concentration of zinc in boar semen reached an average value of 171.74 +/- 64.72 mg kg(-1) and the level of cadmium reached 0.01-0.16 mg kg(-1) with the average value of 0.05 mg kg(-1). The analysis of lead showed that the concentration of this element in boar semen was 0.02 +/- 0.03 mg kg(-1) and the average level of nickel was 0.06 +/- 0.08 mg kg(-1). The total percentage of pathological spermatozoa was 9.82 +/- 1.47%. Detail analysis determined 3.18% of separated flagellum, 2.26% knob twisted flagellum, 0.88% flagellum torso, 0.85% flagellum ball, 0.42% broken flagellum, 0.23% retention of the cytoplasmic drop, 0.14% small heads, 0.03% large heads, and 1.83% forms other of pathological changes. Correlation analysis showed significant (p < 0.05) positive correlation between copper and lead (r = 0.52). High correlation between small head and knob twisted tail (r = 0.67), small head and broken flagellum (r = 0.88) as well as between small head and total number of pathological spermatozoa (r = 0.73) was determined.

  9. Blood concentration of copper, cadmium, zinc and lead in horses and its relation to hematological and biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Massanyi, Peter; Stawarz, Robert; Halo, Marko; Formicki, Grzegorz; Lukac, Norbert; Cupka, Peter; Schwarcz, Pavol; Kovacik, Anton; Tusimova, Eva; Kovacik, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollution results in serious health hazards to animals and blood analysis serves as a good alternative for health status assessment. The target of this study was to analyze the concentration of selected metals in equine blood, to analyze the blood parameters and to find possible correlations. Blood samples were collected from the vena jugularis of healthy adult horses. The highest concentration of all elements was found in whole blood (Cu 3.84 ± 0.90 mg L(-1); Cd = 0.81 ± 0.90 mg L(-1); Zn 26.67 ± 14.12 mg L(-1); Pb 9.33 ± 5.76 mg L(-1)). Higher concentrations of copper, cadmium, zinc and lead were detected in blood clots compared to blood sera (44.04%). A similar tendency was found for cadmium (50%), zinc (13.08%) and lead (46.02%), which showed generally higher concentrations in blood clots (cells). Correlation analysis proved some relations between analyzed elements. In blood clots there is a strong positive correlation between Cd - Pb (r = 0.93) and Zn - Pb (r = 0.71) was detected. For biochemical and hematological parameters mainly medium correlations were detected. Obtained results prove different correlations of analyzed elements in blood components as well as the effect on parameters of blood biochemical and hematological profiles.

  10. Determination of arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, molybdenum, silver and zinc in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Clark, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, molybdenum, silver and zinc are very useful elements in geochemical exploration. In the proposed method, geological samples are fused with potassium pyrosulphate and the fusate is dissolved in a solution of hydrochloric acid, ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. When this solution is shaken with a 10% V/V Aliquat 336 - isobutyl methyl ketone organic phase, the nine elements of interest are selectively partitioned in the organic phase. All nine elements can then be determined in the organic phase using flame atomic-absorption spectrometry. The method is rapid and allows the determination of Ag and Cd at levels down to 0.1 p.p.m., Cu, Mo, and Zn down to 0.5 p.p.m., Pb, Bi and Sb down to 1 p.p.m. and As down to 5 p.p.m. in geological materials.

  11. Survival and hepatic metallothionein in developing rainbow trout exposed to a mixture of zinc, copper, and cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, M.; McCarter, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in Buttle Lake on Vancouver Island, B.C. are exposed to metal contamination originating from a copper and zinc mining operation at Myra Falls near the head of the lake. In order to properly assess the risk to a population of rainbow trout in Buttle Lake, the authors initiated a long-term exposure of rainbow trout from hatch including the swim-up stage. Copper, zinc or cadmium are known to induce metallothionein in mammals and as a mixture of metals, induce hepatic metallothionein in rainbow trout. Investigation of hepatic metallothionein concentrations in wild rainbow trout from Buttle Lake and in lakes of the Campbell River downstream showed a correlation with metal concentrations in the water. Rainbow trout held in situ for 4 weeks showed the same correlation. In this report they determined whether or not the degree of contamination was correlated with concentrations of metallothionein in the livers of rainbow trout exposed to the mixture of metals during the early life stages.

  12. The Role of Blood Lead, Cadmium, Zinc and Copper in Development and Severity of Acne Vulgaris in a Nigerian Population.

    PubMed

    Ikaraoha, C I; Mbadiwe, N C; Anyanwu, C J; Odekhian, J; Nwadike, C N; Amah, H C

    2017-04-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common skin disorder affecting human beings. There is a paucity of report on the role of heavy metals-lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd)-globally, and trace metals-zinc (Zn) and copper (Cd)-particularly in Nigeria in the development/severity of acne vulgaris. This study is aimed to determine the blood levels of some heavy metals-cadmium and lead-and trace metals-zinc and copper-in acne vulgaris sufferers in a Nigerian population. Venous blood samples were collected from a total number of 90 non-obese female subjects consisting of 30 mild, 30 moderate and 30 severe acne vulgaris sufferers for blood Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn determination. They were age-matched with 60 females without acne vulgaris who served as the control subjects. Acne sufferers had significantly higher blood Cd and Pb (P = 0.0143 and P = 0.0001 respectively) and non-significantly different blood levels of Cu and Zn (P = 0.910 and P = 0.2140 respectively) compared to controls. There were significant progressive increases in blood levels of Cd and Pb (P = 0.0330 and P = 0.0001 respectively) and non-significant differences in the mean blood level of Cu and Zn (P = 0.1821 and P = 0.2728 respectively) from mild to moderate and severe acne vulgaris sufferers. Increases in blood Cd and Pb may play critical roles in the pathogenesis/severity of acne vulgaris, while Cu and Zn seem to play less significant roles in the development of this disorder in this environment.

  13. Effect of carbonate ion on precipitation treatment of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Waste water characteristics and their impact on the susceptibility of the waste to treatment are discussed. Many incidental or added constituents of a wastewater may affect the susceptibility of a metal in that wastewater to precipitation treatment. Among those constituents which may be widely variable with respect to both time and geographical location of an industrial facility, and which can influence precipitation efficiency, is the carbonate alkalinity initially present in the wastewater, or induced into the wastewater as a result of high wastewater treatment pH and consequent uptake of atmospheric CO/sub 2/. Higher carbonate levels may have either an adverse or beneficial effect upon precipitate solubility, depending upon the particular metal and associated pH of precipitation treatment. This effect can be predicted from theoretical calculations, although the actual solubility level may differ from that predicted. With regard to cadmium, both theory and experimental results indicate a reduction in cadmium solubility with increasing carbonate, at treatment pH values below ph 11. on the basis of thermodynamic calculations, added carbonate is predicted to increase copper solubility. Theory predicts a tremendous reduction in lead solubility at trace levels of carbonate at all ph values below pH 12. The effect of carbonate on lead solubility becomes more complex, however, as carbonate level increases. At a treatment pH near 9, increased carbonate is predicted to increase lead solubility, while the reverse patten is predicted at pH near 6. These trends were confirmed by the experimental results.

  14. Changes in selenium, zinc, copper and cadmium contents in human milk during the time when selenium has been supplemented to fertilizers in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kantol, M; Vartiainen, T

    2001-01-01

    Sodium selenate has been supplemented to all agricultural fertilizers used in Finland since 1984. We followed the changes in selenium, cadmium, zinc and copper content in Finnish human milk between the years 1987 and 1993-1995. A total of 257 milk samples was collected, four weeks after delivery, in two areas: In Helsinki, an urban area, and in Kuopio, a rural area, where elevated copper concentrations have been found in the bedrock. Direct atomic absorption spectrophotometric methods without digestion were used for the analyses. The dependence of trace element content on study time, living area, smoking habits, fish eating frequency, and parity of mothers was studied by analysis of covariance. Inter-element correlations and correlations with mothers' age and fat content in milk were studied by partial correlation. Significant increases were observed in mean selenium (16.4 microg/l and 18.9 microg/l, p < 0.001) and in fat contents (3.4% and 4.0%, p < 0.001), whereas significant decreases were seen in mean zinc (3.00 mg/l and 1.47 mg/l, p < 0.001), copper (0.52 mg/l and 0.43 mg/l, p < 0.001) and cadmium contents (0.095 microg/l and 0.062 microg/l, p < 0.01). In 1987, zinc had a positive correlation with copper and fat. Copper correlated inversely with the mothers' age. In 1993-1995, selenium correlated positively with copper, and zinc correlated inversely with mothers' age. Mothers living area had an effect on copper content in milk. Our results confirm that selenium supplementation to fertilizers in Finland has increased the selenium level in human maternal milk and most likely it also has an effect on the zinc and copper concentrations in maternal milk.

  15. Cadmium and copper metallothioneins in the American lobster, Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, D.W.; Brouwer, M.

    1986-03-01

    Lobsters were fed cadmium-rich oysters for 28 days, and the induction of cadmium metallothionein and its relation to concentrations of cadmium, copper, and zinc in the digestive gland and gills was determined. A portion of the tissues also was retained for determining the cytosolic distribution of these metals by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The digestive gland contained a majority of the cadmium, copper, and zinc, and both cadmium and zinc were actively accumulated from the oysters. Gel chromatography of the digestive gland cytosol showed that initially only copper was bound to a protein with a molecular weight in the range of metallothionein (i.e., 10,000-7000). However, after feeding on cadmium-laden oysters for 28 days, both cadmium and copper were bound to the metallothioneinlike protein. Further purification of the cadmium/copper protein by ion-exchange chromatography showed that a large portion of the copper and all of the cadmium did not bind to DEAE-Sephacel. The induction of cadmium metallothionein in the digestive gland is correlated with tissue cadmium concentration. Coincident with the induction of the cadmium metallothionein was a cytosolic redistribution of copper. The distribution of zinc was not affected.

  16. Influence of chronic cadmium exposure on the tissue distribution of copper and zinc and oxidative stress parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Onur; Yazihan, Nuray; Kocak, Mehtap Kacar; Sayal, Ahmet; Akcil, Ethem

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oral cadmium (Cd) intoxication on the antioxidant response and its relationship with essential bioelements like copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). The experimental group was chronically exposed to Cd daily for 8 weeks via consumption of water containing 15 ppm cadmium chloride. Cu, Zn, and Cd concentrations and oxidative stress parameters were analyzed in liver, kidney, and heart tissues. Exposure to Cd led to a significant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase in all considered samples while a significant increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase except for the kidney. We found a significant increase in malondialdehyde concentration in the tissues except for heart. Also oral administration of Cd caused a significant reduction of Zn and Cu in the tissues. Our results allow us to hypothesize that higher Cd concentration in the tissues causes oxidative stress by increasing malondialdehyde as a means of altering antioxidant defense system and deterioration of bioelements in rat liver, kidney, and heart. In addition, further studies are needed to explain the effect of long-term, low-dose exposure to Cd on distribution of bioelements and its relationship with oxidative stress. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Micro solid phase spectrophotometry in a sequential injection lab-on-valve platform for cadmium, zinc, and copper determination in freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Santos, Inês C; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Rangel, António O S S

    2015-09-03

    This work describes the development of a solid phase spectrophotometry method in a μSI-LOV system for cadmium, zinc, and copper determination in freshwaters. NTA (Nitrilotriacetic acid) beads with 60-160 μm diameter were packed in the flow cell of the LOV for a μSPE column of 1 cm length. The spectrophotometric determination is based on the colourimetric reaction between dithizone and the target metals, previously retained on NTA resin. The absorbance of the coloured product formed is measured, at 550 nm, on the surface of the NTA resin beads in a solid phase spectrophotometry approach. The developed method presented preconcentration factors in the range of 11-21 for the metal ions. A LOD of 0.23 μg L(-1) for cadmium, 2.39 μg L(-1) for zinc, and 0.11 μg L(-1) for copper and a sampling rate of 12, 13, and 15 h(-1) for cadmium, zinc, and copper were obtained, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to freshwater samples.

  18. Complexation and Toxicity of Copper in Higher Plants. II. Different Mechanisms for Copper versus Cadmium Detoxification in the Copper-Sensitive Cadmium/Zinc Hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens (Ganges Ecotype)1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Mijovilovich, Ana; Leitenmaier, Barbara; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kroneck, Peter M.H.; Götz, Birgit; Küpper, Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    The cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens is sensitive toward copper (Cu) toxicity, which is a problem for phytoremediation of soils with mixed contamination. Cu levels in T. caerulescens grown with 10 μm Cu2+ remained in the nonaccumulator range (<50 ppm), and most individuals were as sensitive toward Cu as the related nonaccumulator Thlaspi fendleri. Obviously, hyperaccumulation and metal resistance are highly metal specific. Cu-induced inhibition of photosynthesis followed the “sun reaction” type of damage, with inhibition of the photosystem II reaction center charge separation and the water-splitting complex. A few individuals of T. caerulescens were more Cu resistant. Compared with Cu-sensitive individuals, they recovered faster from inhibition, at least partially by enhanced repair of chlorophyll-protein complexes but not by exclusion, since the content of Cu in their shoots was increased by about 25%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements on frozen-hydrated leaf samples revealed that a large proportion of Cu in T. caerulescens is bound by sulfur ligands. This is in contrast to the known binding environment of cadmium and zinc in the same species, which is dominated by oxygen ligands. Clearly, hyperaccumulators detoxify hyperaccumulated metals differently compared with nonaccumulated metals. Furthermore, strong features in the Cu-EXAFS spectra ascribed to metal-metal contributions were found, in particular in the Cu-resistant specimens. Some of these features may be due to Cu binding to metallothioneins, but a larger proportion seems to result from biomineralization, most likely Cu(II) oxalate and Cu(II) oxides. Additional contributions in the EXAFS spectra indicate complexation of Cu(II) by the nonproteogenic amino acid nicotianamine, which has a very high affinity for Cu(II) as further characterized here. PMID:19692532

  19. Complexation and toxicity of copper in higher plants. II. Different mechanisms for copper versus cadmium detoxification in the copper-sensitive cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens (Ganges Ecotype).

    PubMed

    Mijovilovich, Ana; Leitenmaier, Barbara; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kroneck, Peter M H; Götz, Birgit; Küpper, Hendrik

    2009-10-01

    The cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens is sensitive toward copper (Cu) toxicity, which is a problem for phytoremediation of soils with mixed contamination. Cu levels in T. caerulescens grown with 10 microm Cu(2+) remained in the nonaccumulator range (<50 ppm), and most individuals were as sensitive toward Cu as the related nonaccumulator Thlaspi fendleri. Obviously, hyperaccumulation and metal resistance are highly metal specific. Cu-induced inhibition of photosynthesis followed the "sun reaction" type of damage, with inhibition of the photosystem II reaction center charge separation and the water-splitting complex. A few individuals of T. caerulescens were more Cu resistant. Compared with Cu-sensitive individuals, they recovered faster from inhibition, at least partially by enhanced repair of chlorophyll-protein complexes but not by exclusion, since the content of Cu in their shoots was increased by about 25%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements on frozen-hydrated leaf samples revealed that a large proportion of Cu in T. caerulescens is bound by sulfur ligands. This is in contrast to the known binding environment of cadmium and zinc in the same species, which is dominated by oxygen ligands. Clearly, hyperaccumulators detoxify hyperaccumulated metals differently compared with nonaccumulated metals. Furthermore, strong features in the Cu-EXAFS spectra ascribed to metal-metal contributions were found, in particular in the Cu-resistant specimens. Some of these features may be due to Cu binding to metallothioneins, but a larger proportion seems to result from biomineralization, most likely Cu(II) oxalate and Cu(II) oxides. Additional contributions in the EXAFS spectra indicate complexation of Cu(II) by the nonproteogenic amino acid nicotianamine, which has a very high affinity for Cu(II) as further characterized here.

  20. Copper, cadmium, and zinc concentrations in aquatic food chains from the Upper Sacramento River (California) and selected tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, M.K.; Castleberry, D. T.; May, T. W.; Martin, B.A.; Bullard, F. N.

    1995-01-01

    Metals enter the Upper Sacramento River above Redding, California, primarily through Spring Creek, a tributary that receives acid-mine drainage from a US EPA Superfund site known locally as Iron Mountain Mine. Waterweed (Elodea canadensis) and aquatic insects (midge larvae, Chironomidae; and mayfly nymphs, Ephemeroptera) from the Sacramento River downstream from Spring Creek contained much higher concentrations of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn) than did similar taxa from nearby reference tributaries not exposed to acid-mine drainage. Aquatic insects from the Sacramento River contained especially high maximum concentrations of Cu (200 mg/kg dry weight in midge larvae), Cd (23 mg/kg dry weight in mayfly nymphs), and Zn (1,700 mg/kg dry weight in mayfly nymphs). Although not always statistically significant, whole-body concentrations of Cu, Cd, and Zn in fishes (threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus; Sacramento sucker, Catostomus occidentalis; Sacramento squawfish, Ptychocheilus grandis; and chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytasch) from the Sacramento River were generally higher than in fishes from the reference tributaries.

  1. Sensitivity of mottled sculpins (Cottus bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) to acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Besser, John M; Mebane, Christopher A; Mount, David R; Ivey, Chris D; Kunz, James L; Greer, I Eugene; May, Thomas W; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2007-08-01

    Studies of fish communities of streams draining mining areas suggest that sculpins (Cottus spp.) may be more sensitive than salmonids to adverse effects of metals. We compared the toxicity of zinc, copper, and cadmium to mottled sculpin (C. bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) in laboratory toxicity tests. Acute (96-h) and early life-stage chronic (21- or 28-d) toxicity tests were conducted with rainbow trout and with mottled sculpins from populations in Minnesota and Missouri, USA, in diluted well water (hardness = 100 mg/L as CaCO3). Acute and chronic toxicity of metals to newly hatched and swim-up stages of mottled sculpins differed between the two source populations. Differences between populations were greatest for copper, with chronic toxicity values (ChV = geometric mean of lowest-observed-effect concentration and no-observed-effect concentration) of 4.4 microg/L for Missouri sculpins and 37 microg/L for Minnesota sculpins. Cadmium toxicity followed a similar trend, but differences between sculpin populations were less marked, with ChVs of 1.1 microg/L (Missouri) and 1.9 microg/L (Minnesota). Conversely, zinc was more toxic to Minnesota sculpins (ChV = 75 microg/L) than Missouri sculpins (chronic ChV = 219 microg/L). Species-average acute and chronic toxicity values for mottled sculpins were similar to or lower than those for rainbow trout and indicated that mottled sculpins were among the most sensitive aquatic species to toxicity of all three metals. Our results indicate that current acute and chronic water quality criteria for cadmium, copper, and zinc adequately protect rainbow trout but may not adequately protect some populations of mottled sculpins. Proposed water quality criteria for copper based on the biotic ligand model would be protective of both sculpin populations tested.

  2. Concentration of copper, iron, zinc, cadmium, lead, and nickel in bull and ram semen and relation to the occurrence of pathological spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Massányi, P; Trandzik, J; Nad, P; Koreneková, B; Skalická, M; Toman, R; Lukac, N; Halo, M; Strapak, P

    2004-01-01

    In this study the concentration of copper, iron, zinc, cadmium, lead, and nickel in bull and ram semen and relation of these metals to spermatozoa morphology was investigated. Analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry showed that copper concentration was significantly higher (p<0.0001) in ram semen in comparison with bull semen. The zinc concentration was higher in bull semen in comparison with ram semen. The iron and cadmium concentrations in the semen were similar. Higher concentration of lead was found in ram semen. Higher levels of nickel were found in ram semen in comparison with bulls. In bull semen 11.79+/-4.88% of pathological spermatozoa was found. Higher occurrence of pathological spermatozoa was in ram semen (17.17+/-3.76) in comparison with the semen of bulls. Separated tail, tail torso, and knob twisted tail were the most frequent forms of pathological spermatozoa in both species. Correlation analysis in bulls showed high positive relation between iron and zinc (r = 0.72), nickel and separated tail (r = 0.76), separated tail and tail torso (r = 0.71), tail torso and total number of pathological spermatozoa (r=0.72), and between tail ball and total number of pathological spermatozoa (r = 0.78). In rams high positive correlation between cadmium and lead (r=0.98), nickel and separated tail (r=0.77), separated tail and total number of pathological spermatozoa (r=0.69), knob twisted tail and retention of cytoplasmic drop (r=0.78), and between knob twisted tail and other pathological spermatozoa (r = 0.71) was found. High negative correlation in ram semen was observed between copper and nickel (r=0.71), copper and separated tail (r=0.70), and between iron and tail torso (r=0.67). The results suggest that the studied metals have a direct effect on spermatozoa quality.

  3. Sensitivity of mottled sculpins (Cottus bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) to acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Mount, David R.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Greer, I. Eugene; May, Thomas W.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of fish communities of streams draining mining areas suggest that sculpins (Cottus spp.) may be more sensitive than salmonids to adverse effects of metals. We compared the toxicity of zinc, copper, and cadmium to mottled sculpin (C. bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) in laboratory toxicity tests. Acute (96-h) and early life-stage chronic (21- or 28-d) toxicity tests were conducted with rainbow trout and with mottled sculpins from populations in Minnesota and Missouri, USA, in diluted well water (hardness = 100 mg/L as CaCO3). Acute and chronic toxicity of metals to newly hatched and swim-up stages of mottled sculpins differed between the two source populations. Differences between populations were greatest for copper, with chronic toxicity values (ChV = geometric mean of lowest-observed-effect concentration and no-observed-effect concentration) of 4.4 μg/L for Missouri sculpins and 37 μg/L for Minnesota sculpins. Cadmium toxicity followed a similar trend, but differences between sculpin populations were less marked, with ChVs of 1.1 μg/L (Missouri) and 1.9 μg/L (Minnesota). Conversely, zinc was more toxic to Minnesota sculpins (ChV = 75 μg/L) than Missouri sculpins (chronic ChV = 219 μg/L). Species-average acute and chronic toxicity values for mottled sculpins were similar to or lower than those for rainbow trout and indicated that mottled sculpins were among the most sensitive aquatic species to toxicity of all three metals. Our results indicate that current acute and chronic water quality criteria for cadmium, copper, and zinc adequately protect rainbow trout but may not adequately protect some populations of mottled sculpins. Proposed water quality criteria for copper based on the biotic ligand model would be protective of both sculpin populations tested.

  4. Sensitivity of mottled sculpins (Cottus bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) to acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Mebane, C.A.; Mount, D.R.; Ivey, C.D.; Kunz, J.L.; Greer, I.E.; May, T.W.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of fish communities of streams draining mining areas suggest that sculpins (Cottus spp.) may be more sensitive than salmonids to adverse effects of metals. We compared the toxicity of zinc, copper, and cadmium to mottled sculpin (C. bairdi) and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) in laboratory toxicity tests. Acute (96-h) and early life-stage chronic (21- or 28-d) toxicity tests were conducted with rainbow trout and with mottled sculpins from populations in Minnesota and Missouri, USA, in diluted well water (hardness = 100 mg/L as CaCO3). Acute and chronic toxicity of metals to newly hatched and swim-up stages of mottled sculpins differed between the two source populations. Differences between populations were greatest for copper, with chronic toxicity values (ChV = geometric mean of lowest-observed-effect concentration and no-observed-effect concentration) of 4.4 ??g/L for Missouri sculpins and 37 ??g/L for Minnesota sculpins. Cadmium toxicity followed a similar trend, but differences between sculpin populations were less marked, with ChVs of 1.1 ??g/L (Missouri) and 1.9 ??g/L (Minnesota). Conversely, zinc was more toxic to Minnesota sculpins (ChV = 75 ??g/L) than Missouri sculpins (chronic ChV = 219 ??g/L). Species-average acute and chronic toxicity values for mottled sculpins were similar to or lower than those for rainbow trout and indicated that mottled sculpins were among the most sensitive aquatic species to toxicity of all three metals. Our results indicate that current acute and chronic water quality criteria for cadmium, copper, and zinc adequately protect rainbow trout but may not adequately protect some populations of mottled sculpins. Proposed water quality criteria for copper based on the biotic ligand model would be protective of both sculpin populations tested. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  5. Acute and chronic sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc in laboratory water-only exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Contributions by Wang, Ning; Calfee, Robin D.; Beahan, Erinn; Brumbaugh, William G.; Dorman, Rebecca A.; Hardesty, Doug K.; Kunz, James L.; Little, Edward E.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Puglis, Holly J.

    2014-01-01

    White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) are experiencing poor recruitment in the trans boundary reach of the upper Columbia River in eastern Washington State. Limited toxicity data indicated that early life stages of white sturgeon are sensitive to metals. In acute 4-day (d) exposures with larval white sturgeon, previous studies have reported that the 4-day median lethal concentrations (LC50) based on biotic ligand model (BLM) normalization for copper were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national recommended acute water-quality criterion. In previously published chronic 66-d exposures starting with newly fertilized eggs of white sturgeon, 20-percent lethal effect concentrations (LC20s) for copper, cadmium, or zinc generally were within a factor of two of the chronic values of the most sensitive fish species in the databases of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria (WQC) for the three metals. However, there were some uncertainties in the chronic exposures previously performed with white sturgeon, including (1) low control survival (37 percent), (2) more control fish tested in each replicate compared to other treatments, (3) limited replication of treatments (n=2), (4) lack of reported growth data (such as dry weight), and (5) wide dilution factors for exposure concentrations (6- to 8-fold dilutions). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that additional studies are needed to generate more toxicity data to better define lethal and sublethal toxicity thresholds for metals for white sturgeon. The objective of the study was to further evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc to early life stages of white sturgeon in water-only exposures. Toxicity tests also were performed with commonly tested rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under similar test conditions to determine the relative sensitivity between white sturgeon and rainbow trout to these metals. Toxicity data generated from

  6. The influence of diet on comparative trace metal cadmium, copper and zinc accumulation in Thais clavigera (Gastropoda: Muricidae) preying on intertidal barnacles or mussels.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Graham; Morton, Brian

    2002-09-01

    The influence of diet on comparative metal accumulation was investigated using a predatory muricid gastropod Thais clavigera. Individuals were fed for up to 56 days on either barnacles, i.e., Tetraclita squamosa, or mussels, i.e., Perna viridis, collected from metal-contaminated and clean sites. Barnacles and mussels have contrasting metal handling strategies and, therefore, different body concentrations, intracellular distributions and detoxification systems. Field collection of prey items that accumulated body metal concentrations over a lifetime of exposure allowed bioavailability to the predator, T. clavigera, to be assessed naturally, which may not be the case for prey exposed to metals for a short time in the laboratory. T. clavigera that was fed cadmium- and copper-contaminated barnacles or mussels ingested significantly greater amounts compared to those fed conspecifics collected from clean locations. T. clavigera body cadmium and copper concentrations were not, however, significantly different between individuals fed either contaminated or clean prey. Amount of zinc ingested was similar in mussels collected from clean and contaminated environments but much less when compared to the barnacle prey. The body concentrations of zinc in T. clavigera fed mussels collected from both sites fell. In contrast, the amount of zinc ingested from barnacle prey was significantly greater from those collected from the metal-contaminated site as compared to the clean one. This was reflected as significantly greater body zinc concentrations in T. clavigera fed contaminated barnacles compared to those fed clean individuals. Copper and zinc accumulation from prey was, therefore, complex. It varied between metal and between prey type, but appeared to be related to the amount ingested and the metal handling strategy of the prey.

  7. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of cephradine metal complexes : part II complexes with cobalt, copper, zinc and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Najma; Arayne, M Saeed; Afzal, M

    2005-01-01

    Cephradine, the first generation cephalosporin, is active against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria including penicillinase-producing Staphylococci. Since the presence of complexing ligand may affect the bioavailability of a metal in the blood or tissues, therefore, in order to study the probable interaction of cephradine with essential and trace elements present in human body, cephradine has been reacted with cobalt, copper, zinc and cadmium metal halides in L:M ratio of 2:1 in methanol and the products recrystallized from suitable solvents to pure crystals of consistent melting points. Infrared and ultraviolet studies of these complexes were carried out and compared with ligand. Magnetic susceptibility studies of these complexes were also carried out showing their paramagnetic behavior. From the infra red studies and elemental analysis of the complexes, it has been shown that the drug molecule serves as a bidentate ligand coordinating through both its carboxylate at C-3 and beta-lactam nitrogen and the metal having a square planar or octahedral geometry. To evaluate the changes in microbiological activity of cephradine after complexation, antibacterial studies were carried out by observing the changes in MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) of the complexes and compared with the parent drug by measuring the zone of inhibition of complexes and compared with the parent cephalosporin against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. For MIC observation, serial dilution method was employed and zone series were determined by disk diffusion method. Our investigations reveal that formation of complexes results in decrease in antibacterial activity of cephradine and MIC values are increased.

  8. Liver and kidney concentrations of strontium, barium, cadmium, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, antimony, selenium and lead in cats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to provide new knowledge on the storage of strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se) and lead (Pb) in the feline organism, we measured the concentrations of these elements in the liver, renal cortex and renal medulla, evaluating also the impact of age, sex or the occurrence of a chronic kidney disease (CKD). The element concentrations in the tissues of 47 cats (22 male; 25 female; aged between 2 months and 18 years) were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results Cu, Zn and Mn were the highest in the liver, followed by the renal cortex and the renal medulla. The Cd concentrations were lower in the renal medulla compared to the renal cortex and the liver, and Sr was higher in the renal medulla compared to the liver. The Se concentrations in the cortex of the kidneys were higher than in the medulla of the kidneys and in the liver. Higher Cd concentrations were measured in the renal cortex of female cats, while no further gender-related differences were observed. Except for Cr, Sb and Se, age-dependencies were detected for the storage of all elements. The occurrence of a CKD also affected the storage of the elements, with lower concentrations of Ba (renal medulla), Zn (renal cortex; renal medulla) and Mn (liver; renal medulla), but higher Cd concentrations (liver; renal cortex) in diseased cats. Conclusions In conclusion, the present results provide new information on the accumulation of specific elements in the feline liver and kidneys, demonstrating a dependency on age and an impaired kidney function, but not on the sex of the animals. PMID:25030305

  9. Concentrations of strontium, barium, cadmium, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, antimony, selenium and lead in the equine liver and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Mainzer, Barbara; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Schafft, Helmut; Palavinskas, Richard; Breithaupt, Angele; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of specific elements in the equine liver and kidneys are of practical relevance since horses are not only food-producing animals, but also partially serve as an indicator for the environmental pollution, as the basic feed includes plants like grass, grain and fruits. In this study, the concentrations of strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se) and lead (Pb) were measured in the liver, renal cortex and renal medulla of 21 horses (8 male; 13 female; aged between 5 months-28 years), using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Comparable Cu and Zn concentrations were detected in the liver and renal cortex, while approximately 50% lower concentrations were measured in the renal medulla. The lowest Sr, Cd and Se, but the highest Mn, Sb and Pb concentrations were measured in the liver. The Ba concentrations were comparable in the renal cortex and medulla, but lower in the liver of the horses. Gender-related differences were observed for Cd, Mn and Cr, with higher Cd concentrations in the liver, but lower Mn concentrations in the renal cortex and lower Cr concentrations in the renal medulla of female horses. Age-related differences were detected for most measured elements, however, the animal number per age-group was only low. In conclusion, the present study provides important reference data for the storage of Sr, Ba, Cd, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Sb, Se and Pb in the liver and kidneys of horses, which are of practical relevance for an evaluation of the exposure of horses to these elements, either via feed or the environment.

  10. [Intake of trace elements and heavy metals with the diet of 2-14 years old children. Zinc, manganese, copper, fluoride, iodine, selen; lead, cadmium, mercury (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stolley, H; Kersting, M; Droese, W

    1981-04-01

    For 2-14 year old children the intake of the trace elements zinc, manganese, copper, fluoride, iodine, selen, and of the heavy metals, lead, cadmium and mercury is calculated from their food intake. The results give a representative statement of the average supply of trace elements and of the average intake of heavy metals with the diet of children in the Federal Republic of Germany. It is shown that the choice of foodstuffs for the diet has an important influence on the supply of trace elements.

  11. Cadmium, copper, lead and zinc in cultured oysters under two contrasting climatic conditions in coastal lagoons from SE Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Osuna-Martínez, Carmen C; Páez-Osuna, Federico; Alonso-Rodríguez, Rosalba

    2011-09-01

    In order to determine the metal concentrations in cultured oysters from four coastal lagoons from SE Gulf of California, several individuals of Crassostrea gigas and C. corteziensis were collected and their cadmium, copper, lead and zinc levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry after acid digestion. The concentration of metals in oyster soft tissue was Zn > Cu > Cd > Pb. In two lagoons, Cd concentrations (10.1-13.5 μg g(-1) dw) exceeded the maximum level allowed according to the Official Mexican Standard (NOM-031-SSA1-1993), which is equivalent to the WHO recommended Cd levels in organisms used for human consumption.

  12. Semen quality and reproductive endocrine function in relation to biomarkers of lead, cadmium, zinc, and copper in men.

    PubMed Central

    Telisman, S; Cvitković, P; Jurasović, J; Pizent, A; Gavella, M; Rocić, B

    2000-01-01

    Blood lead (BPb), activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP), blood cadmium (BCd), serum zinc (SZn), seminal fluid zinc (SfZn), serum copper (SCu), and parameters of semen quality and of reproductive endocrine function were measured in 149 healthy male industrial workers 20-43 years of age. The group contained 98 subjects with slight to moderate occupational exposure to Pb and 51 reference subjects. All of the subjects lived in Zagreb, Croatia. Significant (p < 0.05) correlations of BPb, ALAD, and/or EP with reproductive parameters indicated a Pb-related decrease in sperm density, in counts of total, motile, and viable sperm, in the percentage and count of progressively motile sperm, in parameters of prostate secretory function (SfZn, acid phosphatase, and citric acid in seminal fluid), and an increase in abnormal sperm head morphology, serum testosterone, and estradiol. These associations were confirmed by results of multiple regression, which also showed significant (p < 0. 05) influence of BCd, SZn, SCu, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, or age on certain reproductive parameters. These effects were mainly of lower rank and intensity as compared to Pb-related reproductive effects, whereas BCd contributed to a decrease in sperm motility and an increase in abnormal sperm morphology and serum testosterone. No significant Pb- or Cd-related influence was found on levels of the lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme LDH-C(4) and fructose in seminal fluid or on follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and prolactin in serum. The seminal fluid concentrations of Pb (SfPb) and Cd (SfCd) were measured in 118 of the 149 subjects, and a highly significant (p < 0.0001) correlation was found between BPb and SfPb levels (r = 0.571) and between BCd and SfCd levels (r = 0.490). The overall study results indicate that even moderate exposures to Pb (BPb < 400 microg/L) and Cd (BCd < 10 microg/L) can significantly reduce human

  13. Partition and determination of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc in marine suspended particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Rantala, R T; Loring, D H

    1985-01-01

    A method for the determination of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the total and acetic acid (25%) soluble fraction of suspended particulate matter collected on Nuclepore membranes is described. The acetic acid leaching was carried out in a modified Millipore vacuum filtration apparatus. The total sample and the acetic insoluble fraction were decomposed in teflon bombs with HF/aqua regia. Flame or graphite furnace AAS was used for metal determinations. Sequential acetic acid extractions (3) show that on the average 76.4-92.0% of the metals are removed with the first extraction. Cadmium is potentially most easily available to biota with 90.4% of the total metal concentration located in the acetic acid soluble fraction.

  14. Inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of six elements in a variety of geological materials. Sixteen reference materials are analysed by this technique to demonstrate its use in geochemical exploration. Samples are decomposed with nitric, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and the residue dissolved in hydrochloric acid and diluted to volume. The elements are determined in two groups based on compatibility of instrument operating conditions and consideration of crustal abundance levels. Cadmium, Cu, Pb and Zn are determined as a group in the 50-ml sample solution under one set of instrument conditions with the use of scatter correction. Limitations of the scatter correction technique used with the fluorescence instrument are discussed. Iron and Mn are determined together using another set of instrumental conditions on a 1-50 dilution of the sample solution without the use of scatter correction. The ranges of concentration (??g g-1) of these elements in the sample that can be determined are: Cd, 0.3-500; Cu, 0.4-500; Fe, 85-250 000; Mn, 45-100 000; Pb, 5-10 000; and Zn, 0.4-300. The precision of the method is usually less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD) over a wide concentration range and acceptable accuracy is shown by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference materials.

  15. Determination of Zinc, Cadmium, Lead, Copper and Silver Using a Carbon Paste Electrode and a Screen Printed Electrode Modified with Chromium(III) Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Koudelkova, Zuzana; Syrovy, Tomas; Ambrozova, Pavlina; Moravec, Zdenek; Kubac, Lubomir; Hynek, David; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the preparation and electrochemical application of a chromium(III) oxide modified carbon paste electrode (Cr-CPE) and a screen printed electrode (SPE), made from the same material and optimized for the simple, cheap and sensitive simultaneous determination of zinc, cadmium, lead, copper and the detection of silver ions, is described. The limits of detection and quantification were 25 and 80 µg·L−1 for Zn(II), 3 and 10 µg·L−1 for Cd(II), 3 and 10 µg·L−1 for Pb(II), 3 and 10 µg·L−1 for Cu(II), and 3 and 10 µg·L−1 for Ag(I), respectively. Furthermore, this promising modification was transferred to the screen-printed electrode. The limits of detection for the simultaneous determination of zinc, cadmium, copper and lead on the screen printed electrodes were found to be 350 µg·L−1 for Zn(II), 25 µg·L−1 for Cd(II), 3 µg·L−1 for Pb(II) and 3 µg·L−1 for Cu(II). Practical usability for the simultaneous detection of these heavy metal ions by the Cr-CPE was also demonstrated in the analyses of wastewaters. PMID:28792450

  16. Concentrations of Arsenic, Cadmium, Copper, Lead, Selenium, and zinc in fish from the Mississippi River basin, 1995.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christopher J

    2004-01-01

    Fish were collected in late 1995 from 34 National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program (NCBP) stations and 12 National Water Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) stations in the Mississippi River basin (MRB), and in late 1996 from a reference site in West Virginia. The NCBP sites represented key points (dams, tributaries, etc.) in the largest rivers of the MRB. The NAWQA sites were typically on smaller rivers and were selected to represent dominant land uses in their watersheds. The West Virginia site, which is in an Eastern U.S. watershed adjacent to the MRB, was selected to document elemental concentrations in fish used for other aspects of a larger study and to provide additional contemporaneous data on background elemental concentrations. At each site four samples, each comprising (nominally) 10 adult common carp (Cyprinus carpio, 'carp') or black bass (Micropterus spp., 'bass') of the same sex, were collected. The whole fish were composited by station, species, and gender for analysis of arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and selenium (Se) by atomic absorption spectroscopy and for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Concentrations of most of the elements examined were lower in both carp and bass from the reference site, a small impoundment located in a rural area, than from the NCBP and NAWQA sites on rivers and larger impoundments. In contrast, there were few overall differences between NCBP sites NAWQA sites. The 1995 results generally confirmed the continued weathering and re-distribution of these elemental contaminants in the MRB; concentrations declined or were unchanged from 1984-1986 to 1995 at most NCBP sites, thus continuing two-decade trends. Exceptions were Se at Station 77 (Arkansas R. at John Martin Reservoir, CO), where concentrations have been elevated historically and increased slightly (to 3.8-4.7 microg g-(1) in bass and carp); and Pb, Cd, and Zn at Station 67 (Allegheny R. at Natrona, PA), where

  17. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, selenium, and zinc in fish from the Mississippi River Basin, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    Fish were collected in late 1995 from 34 National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program (NCBP) stations and 12 National Water Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) stations in the Mississippi River basin (MRB), and in late 1996 from a reference site in West Virginia. The NCBP sites represented key points (dams, tributaries, etc.) in the largest rivers of the MRB. The NAWQA sites were typically on smaller rivers and were selected to represent dominant land uses in their watersheds. The West Virginia site, which is in an Eastern U.S. watershed adjacent to the MRB, was selected to document elemental concentrations in fish used for other aspects of a larger study and to provide additional contemporaneous data on background elemental concentrations. At each site four samples, each comprising (nominally) 10 adult common carp (Cyprinus carpio, `carp') or black bass (Micropterus spp., `bass') of the same sex, were collected. The whole fish were composited by station, species, and gender for analysis of arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and selenium (Se) by atomic absorption spectroscopy and for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Concentrations of most of the elements examined were lower in both carpand bass from the reference site, a small impoundment located in a rural area, than from the NCBP and NAWQA sites on rivers and larger impoundments. In contrast, there were few overall differences between NCBP sites NAWQA sites. The 1995 results generally confirmed the continued weathering and re-distribution of these elemental contaminants in the MRB; concentrations declined or were unchanged from 1984–1986 to 1995 at most NCBP sites, thus continuing two-decade trends. Exceptions were Se at Station 77 (Arkansas R. at John Martin Reservoir, CO), where concentrations have been elevated historically and increased slightly (to 3.8–4.7 μg g-1 in bass and carp); and Pb, Cd, and Zn at Station 67 (Allegheny R. at Natrona, PA), where

  18. Maternal and neonatal scalp hair concentrations of zinc, copper, cadmium, and lead: relationship to some lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    Razagui, Ibrahim B-A; Ghribi, Ibrahim

    2005-07-01

    Postpartum scalp hair samples from 82 term-pregnancy mother/ neonate pairs were analyzed for their concentrations of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb), using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Maternal and neonatal Zn concentrations had geometric means (and 99% confidence intervals) of 122.5 microg/g (117.9--131.5 microg/g) and 146.9 microg (141.5--156.7 microg/g) respectively. Corresponding Cu values were 18.4 microg/g (17.6--23.8 microg/g) and 6.7 microg/g (6.3--7.6 microg/g). Those of Cd were 0.49 microg/g (0.47--0.69 microg/g) in the mothers and 0.57 microg/g (0.55--0.86 microg/g) in the neonates. For Pb, they were 7.95 microg/g (7.60--9.32 microg/g) and 4.56 microg/g (4.39--5.56 microg/g). Cigarette smoking, despite its relatively low prevalence (19.5%), was associated with lower Zn and higher Cd and Pb concentrations and in lower Zn/Cd and Zn/Pb molar concentration ratios. Smoking also altered interelemental relationships, particularly those of Zn with Cd and Pb and those between Cd and Pb. Smoking frequency appeared to show negative dose-response effects on maternal and neonatal Zn concentrations, Zn/Pb molar concentration ratios, and birth weight. Mothers with a history of oral contraceptive (OC) usage had significantly higher Cu concentrations and lower Zn/Cu molar concentration ratios than non users, with the highest Cu concentrations and lowest Zn/Cu values being associated with third-generation OCs. No similar effects were elicited in the respective neonatal Cu concentrations. Neither alcohol consumption nor prenatal supplementation with iron and/or folic acid had discernible effects on the maternal or neonatal elemental concentrations. The data from this study suggest that in a given population of term-pregnancy mothers and neonates, significant interindividual variations in hair trace element concentrations can occur, irrespective of commonality of general environment, and that lifestyle factors, including cigarette

  19. Effect of short term oral cadmium exposure in rats fed low zinc and low copper diets

    SciTech Connect

    Panemangalore, M.; Lee, C.J.; Wilson, K.

    1986-03-05

    The effects of 0, 0.15 and 5.0 ppm Cd in drinking water was determined in 10 week old F-344 rats fed either control - C (30 ppm Zn + 5 ppm Cu), low Zn - LZn (5 ppm Zn), low copper - LCu (0.5 ppm Cu) and low Zn + low Cu - LZn + LCu (5 ppm Zn + 0.5 ppm Cu) diets for 8 weeks. All groups gained about 9 g/wk and neither the decrease in dietary Zn and Cu levels or Cd exposure altered wt gain or food intake (14 g/day). Liver Zn levels averaged about 19 mg/g in all groups and were unaffected by either diet or Cd exposure; but metallothionein (MT) concentration increased from 19..mu..g/g to 40 ..mu..g/g in groups exposed to 5.0 ppm Cd and was lower in rats given LZn and LZn + LCu diet (pless than or equal to0.05). In contrast, kidney Zn levels declined in groups fed LZn + LCu diets, but exposure to Cd maintained Zn levels. Kidney MT concentration fell in response to LZn, LCu and LZn + LCu diets, while exposure to 5.0 ppm Cd elevated MT concentration almost 3 fold, however, LZn and LCu diets decreased the extent of MT induction (pless than or equal to0.05). Kidney Zn levels appear to be more susceptible to modulation by dietary Zn and Cu levels, and oral Cd exposure.

  20. Clean hydrometallurgical route to recover zinc, silver, lead, copper, cadmium and iron from hazardous jarosite residues produced during zinc hydrometallurgy.

    PubMed

    Ju, Shaohua; Zhang, Yifei; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Peiyi; Wang, Yihui

    2011-08-30

    A hydrometallurgical process for treating the hazardous jarosite residue from zinc hydrometallurgy was proposed, for not only detoxifying the residue, but also recovering the contained valuable metal components. The jarosite was initially activated and decomposed by sintering at 650°C for 1h. The sintered residue was leached in 6mol L(-1) aqueous NH(4)Cl solution at 105°C, followed by filtration. The leaching extraction of Zn, Pb, Cu, Cd and Ag are more than 95%. During reduction with Zn powder, more than 93% of Pb, Cu, Ag and Cd can be simultaneously recovered. Then the NH(4)Cl leaching residue were leached again in 30wt% aqueous NaOH solution for 1h at 160°C, and about 94% of As and 73% of Si were removed from the residue. The final residue was almost completely detoxified, and contains about 55wt% Fe, which can be used as an iron concentration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to copper, cadmium, or zinc in water-only laboratory exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, Robin D.; Little, Edward E.; Puglis, Holly J.; Scott, Erinn L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    The acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc to white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were determined for 7 developmental life stages in flow-through water-only exposures. Metal toxicity varied by species and by life stage. Rainbow trout were more sensitive to cadmium than white sturgeon across all life stages, with median effect concentrations (hardness-normalized EC50s) ranging from 1.47 µg Cd/L to 2.62 µg Cd/L with sensitivity remaining consistent during later stages of development. Rainbow trout at 46 d posthatch (dph) ranked at the 2nd percentile of a compiled database for Cd species sensitivity distribution with an EC50 of 1.46 µg Cd/L and 72 dph sturgeon ranked at the 19th percentile (EC50 of 3.02 µg Cd/L). White sturgeon were more sensitive to copper than rainbow trout in 5 of the 7 life stages tested with biotic ligand model (BLM)-normalized EC50s ranging from 1.51 µg Cu/L to 21.9 µg Cu/L. In turn, rainbow trout at 74 dph and 95 dph were more sensitive to copper than white sturgeon at 72 dph and 89 dph, indicating sturgeon become more tolerant in older life stages, whereas older trout become more sensitive to copper exposure. White sturgeon at 2 dph, 16 dph, and 30 dph ranked in the lower percentiles of a compiled database for copper species sensitivity distribution, ranking at the 3rd (2 dph), 5th (16 dph), and 10th (30 dph) percentiles. White sturgeon were more sensitive to zinc than rainbow trout for 1 out of 7 life stages tested (2 dph with an biotic ligand model–normalized EC50 of 209 µg Zn/L) and ranked in the 1st percentile of a compiled database for zinc species sensitivity distribution.

  2. Acute sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to copper, cadmium, or zinc in water-only laboratory exposures

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Robin D; Little, Edward E; Puglis, Holly J; Scott, Erinn; Brumbaugh, William G; Mebane, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    The acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc to white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were determined for 7 developmental life stages in flow-through water-only exposures. Metal toxicity varied by species and by life stage. Rainbow trout were more sensitive to cadmium than white sturgeon across all life stages, with median effect concentrations (hardness-normalized EC50s) ranging from 1.47 µg Cd/L to 2.62 µg Cd/L with sensitivity remaining consistent during later stages of development. Rainbow trout at 46 d posthatch (dph) ranked at the 2nd percentile of a compiled database for Cd species sensitivity distribution with an EC50 of 1.46 µg Cd/L and 72 dph sturgeon ranked at the 19th percentile (EC50 of 3.02 µg Cd/L). White sturgeon were more sensitive to copper than rainbow trout in 5 of the 7 life stages tested with biotic ligand model (BLM)-normalized EC50s ranging from 1.51 µg Cu/L to 21.9 µg Cu/L. In turn, rainbow trout at 74 dph and 95 dph were more sensitive to copper than white sturgeon at 72 dph and 89 dph, indicating sturgeon become more tolerant in older life stages, whereas older trout become more sensitive to copper exposure. White sturgeon at 2 dph, 16 dph, and 30 dph ranked in the lower percentiles of a compiled database for copper species sensitivity distribution, ranking at the 3rd (2 dph), 5th (16 dph), and 10th (30 dph) percentiles. White sturgeon were more sensitive to zinc than rainbow trout for 1 out of 7 life stages tested (2 dph with an biotic ligand model–normalized EC50 of 209 µg Zn/L) and ranked in the 1st percentile of a compiled database for zinc species sensitivity distribution. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;33:2259–2272. © 2014. The Authors. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published byWiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This is an open access article

  3. Acute sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to copper, cadmium, or zinc in water-only laboratory exposures.

    PubMed

    Calfee, Robin D; Little, Edward E; Puglis, Holly J; Scott, Erinn; Brumbaugh, William G; Mebane, Christopher A

    2014-10-01

    The acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, and zinc to white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were determined for 7 developmental life stages in flow-through water-only exposures. Metal toxicity varied by species and by life stage. Rainbow trout were more sensitive to cadmium than white sturgeon across all life stages, with median effect concentrations (hardness-normalized EC50s) ranging from 1.47 µg Cd/L to 2.62 µg Cd/L with sensitivity remaining consistent during later stages of development. Rainbow trout at 46 d posthatch (dph) ranked at the 2nd percentile of a compiled database for Cd species sensitivity distribution with an EC50 of 1.46 µg Cd/L and 72 dph sturgeon ranked at the 19th percentile (EC50 of 3.02 µg Cd/L). White sturgeon were more sensitive to copper than rainbow trout in 5 of the 7 life stages tested with biotic ligand model (BLM)-normalized EC50s ranging from 1.51 µg Cu/L to 21.9 µg Cu/L. In turn, rainbow trout at 74 dph and 95 dph were more sensitive to copper than white sturgeon at 72 dph and 89 dph, indicating sturgeon become more tolerant in older life stages, whereas older trout become more sensitive to copper exposure. White sturgeon at 2 dph, 16 dph, and 30 dph ranked in the lower percentiles of a compiled database for copper species sensitivity distribution, ranking at the 3rd (2 dph), 5th (16 dph), and 10th (30 dph) percentiles. White sturgeon were more sensitive to zinc than rainbow trout for 1 out of 7 life stages tested (2 dph with an biotic ligand model-normalized EC50 of 209 µg Zn/L) and ranked in the 1st percentile of a compiled database for zinc species sensitivity distribution. © 2014 The Authors. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  4. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Determination of cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc in thyroid glands of patients with diagnosed nodular goitre using ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Błazewicz, Anna; Dolliver, Wojciech; Sivsammye, Suceil; Deol, Apeksha; Randhawa, Rajinder; Orlicz-Szczesna, Grazyna; Błazewicz, Remigiusz

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate and compare the contents of selected metals in 65 pathological (diagnosed nodular goitre) and 50 healthy human thyroid tissues (taken during autopsies). Ion chromatography (IC) preceded by microwave mineralization was applied for the first time for determination of cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc in human thyroid samples. The study proved that the concentrations of Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), and Zn(2+) were significantly higher in the control group (healthy thyroids) in comparison with the studied group (nodular goitre) (p<0.05), whereas for Co(2+) the difference between two means of concentration (healthy vs pathological thyroids) was not significant statistically at 0.05 significance level. Measurement accuracy was verified by measurements of NIST standard reference material (1566a Oyster Tissue). Very good precision (RSD below 5%) and recoveries (above 90%) were evaluated.

  6. Heavy metal toxicity to fiddler crabs, Uca annulipes latreille and Uca triangularis (Milne Edwards): tolerance to copper, mercury, cadmium, and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, V.U.

    1987-12-01

    The heavy metal pollution in marine and coastal ecosystems have become the focus of attention in recent years. The presence of heavy metals in the harbor waters of Visakhapatnam on the east cost of India deserves a special mention as it almost forms a repository for the industrial effluents and city's sewage. In the present investigation, the fiddler crabs Uca annulipes and Uca triangularis inhabiting this area were selected as the bioassay organisms to study their tolerance to four heavy metals: copper, cadmium, zinc, and mercury. An attempt has also been made to compare the results of the crabs from Harbor area with that of their counterparts from Bhimilipatnam (35 km from Visakhapatnam) where the brackish water does not receive the effluent from any of the industries.

  7. Adsorption of copper, cadmium and zinc on suspended sediments in a stream contaminated by acid mine drainage: The effect of seasonal changes in dissolved organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Macalady, D.L.; Ranville, J.F.; Smith, K.S.; Daniel, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    The release of metal-rich, acidic waters from abandoned mining operations is a major problem in Colorado and throughout the Western United States. In Colorado, over 600 km of stream reach are estimated to be affected by such releases (Wentz, 1974). The metals released adversely affect stream biota, including fish. It is therefore important to understand the chemical processes which influence metal transport in these waters. The report details studies of the role of suspended sediments with respect to the transport of several important trace metals in a stream impacted by acid mine drainage. The role of streambed sediments was studied in the same system as part of an earlier project (Acid Mine Drainage: streambed sorption of copper, cadmium and zinc, PB--93-118263).

  8. Effect of magnesium supplementation on the distribution patterns of zinc, copper, and magnesium in rabbits exposed to prolonged cadmium intoxication.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Zorica; Dukić-Ćosić, Danijela; Antonijević, Biljana; Bulat, Petar; Vujanović, Dragana; Buha, Aleksandra; Matović, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    The present study is designed to investigate whether magnesium (Mg) supplementation may prevent Cd-induced alterations in zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and magnesium (Mg) status in rabbits. For this purpose, the concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Mg were estimated in blood, urine, and organs (brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas, skeletal muscle, and bone) of rabbits given Cd (10 mg/kg b.w.) and rabbits cotreated with Mg (40 mg/kg b.w.) orally, as aqueous solutions of Cd chloride and Mg acetate every day for 4 weeks. Samples were mineralized with conc. HNO₃ and HClO₄ (4:1) and metals concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Magnesium supplementation succeeded to overcome Cd-induced disbalance of investigated bioelements. Beneficial effects of Mg were observed on Zn levels in blood and urine, on Cu levels in urine, and on Mg levels in blood. Magnesium pretreatment also managed to counteract or reduce all Cd-induced changes in levels of Cu and Mg in organs, while it did not exert this effect on Zn levels. These findings suggest that enhanced dietary Mg intake during Cd exposure can have at least partly beneficial effect on Cd-induced alterations in homeostasis of zinc, copper, and magnesium.

  9. The Triboluminescence of Zinc Cadmium Sulfide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    W£rA0fe4 5^5 /KD-AtW Sis TECHNICAL REPORT ARBRL-TR-02124 THE TRIBOLUMINESCENCE OF ZINC CADMIUM SULFIDE Carmen M. Cialella TECHNICAL James...THE TRIBOLUMINESCENCE OF ZINC CADMIUM SULFIDE READ INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD...and tested. This report presents subsequent efforts to determine the light output of the TL phosphor. Zinc Cadmium Sulfide (ZnCdS] as a function of

  10. Simultaneous determination of zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium in fuel ethanol by anodic stripping voltammetry using a glassy carbon-mercury-film electrode.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Marcelo Firmino; Saczk, Adelir Aparecida; Okumura, Leonardo Luiz; Fernandes, Andréa Pires; De Moraes, Mercedes; Stradiotto, Nelson Ramos

    2004-09-01

    A new, versatile, and simple method for quantitative analysis of zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium in fuel ethanol by anodic stripping voltammetry is described. These metals can be quantified by direct dissolution of fuel ethanol in water and subsequent voltammetric measurement after the accumulation step. A maximum limit of 20% ( v/ v) ethanol in water solution was obtained for voltammetric measurements without loss of sensitivity for metal species. Chemical and operational optimum conditions were analyzed in this study; the values obtained were pH 2.9, a 4.7-microm thickness mercury film, a 1,000-rpm rotation frequency of the working electrode, and a 600-s pre-concentration time. Voltammetric measurements were obtained using linear scan (LSV), differential pulse (DPV), and square wave (SWV) modes and detection limits were in the range 10(-9)-10(-8) mol L(-1) for these metal species. The proposed method was compared with a traditional analytical technique, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), for quantification of these metal species in commercial fuel ethanol samples.

  11. Interactions of cadmium and zinc during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Sorell, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The interactions of cadmium exposure and zinc during pregnancy were investigated by studying rats exposed to 0, 5, 50, or 100 ppm cadmium (as CdCl{sub 2}) in the drinking water from day 6 to day 20 of pregnancy. On day 20 of pregnancy, fetuses of rats exposed to 50 and 100 ppm of cadmium were slightly but significantly smaller than those of control animals. Fetal weight was negatively correlated with fetal cadmium concentration and positively correlated with fetal cadmium concentration. Significant fetal cadmium accumulation occurred in both the 50 and 100 ppm cadmium exposure groups; fetal zinc concentrations were decreased. Maternal liver and kidney zinc concentrations were slightly elevated, and the possible role of maternal organ sequestration of available zinc is discussed. The activity of two zinc metalloenzymes, alkaline phosphatase and {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, was decreased in maternal and fetal tissues, providing evidence of an alteration in zinc metabolism. In addition, the placental transport of {sup 65}Zn was characterized in control animals and compared to exposed groups; placental zinc transport was significantly decreased in the 50 and 100 ppm exposure groups.

  12. Bioaccumulation and Tissue Distribution of Arsenic, Cadmium, Copper and Zinc in Crassostrea virginica Grown at Two Different Depths in Jamaica Bay, New York

    PubMed Central

    Rodney, Eric; Herrera, Pedro; Luxama, Juan; Boykin, Mark; Crawford, Alisa; Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, Jamaica Bay was a site of extensive oyster beds and shellfish culture leases that supported a significant oyster fishery in the New York area. The industrial and urban expansion of the early 1900’s led to over-harvesting and a deterioration in water and bay sediment quality that coincided with shellfish decline and the ultimate disappearance of oysters from the bay. Over the past 50 years, efforts to arrest and reverse the pollution problems of Jamaica Bay have been undertaken but the area still contains metals and other pollutants at levels higher than NYS Water Quality Standards. Previous we showed that Crassostrea virginica seed transplanted to the bay had excellent growth and survival despite the bay’s pollution problems. In this study we measured the one-year bioaccumulation and tissue distribution of four metals in C. virginica seed that were transplanted to the bay at two different depths: one foot from the surface and one foot above the sediment. Tissues of C. virginica were dissected, dried and digested in nitric acid. Arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc levels were measured using electrothermal vaporization with deuterium lamp background correction in an atomic absorption spectrophotometer fitted with a THGA graphite furnace. Metals were distributed in the various tissues in μg/g dry weight amounts, which correlate well with published values for whole oysters grown in other polluted areas. Metal distributions were not homogeneous throughout the animals and in most of the tissues tested, oysters grown near the surface accumulated more metal than those positioned near bay sediment. PMID:21841973

  13. Copper, cadmium, and zinc concentrations in juvenile Chinook salmon and selected fish-forage organisms (aquatic insects) in the upper Sacramento River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; Thompson, Larry D.; Walsh, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    This study assessed the downstream extent andseverity of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn)contamination from acid mine drainage on juvenile chinook salmon(Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and aquatic insects over aroughly 270-km reach of the Sacramento River below KeswickReservoir. During April–May 1998, salmon were collected fromfour sites in the river and from a fish hatchery that receiveswater from Battle Creek. Salmon from river sites were examinedfor gut contents to document their consumption of variousinvertebrate taxa, whereas salmon from river sites and thehatchery were used for metal determinations. Midge(Chironomidae) and caddisfly (Trichoptera) larvae and mayfly(Ephemeroptera) nymphs were collected for metal determinationsduring April–June from river sites and from Battle and Buttecreeks. The fish hatchery and Battle and Butte creeks served asreference sites because they had no history of receiving minedrainage. Salmon consumed mostly midge larvae and pupae (44.0%,damp-dry biomass), caddisfly larvae (18.9%), Cladocera (5.8%),and mayfly nymphs (5.7%). These results demonstrated thatinsects selected for metal determinations were important as fishforage. Dry-weight concentrations of Cu, Cd, and Zn weregenerally far higher in salmon and insects from the river thanfrom reference sites. Within the river, high metalconcentrations persisted as far downstream as South Meridian (thelowermost sampling site). Maximum concentrations of Cd (30.7 μg g-1) and Zn (1230 μg g-1),but not Cu (87.4 μg g-1), in insects exceeded amounts that other investigators reported as toxic when fed for prolonged periods to juvenile salmonids.

  14. Effect of age on acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, nickel, and zinc in individual-metal exposures to Daphnia magna neonates.

    PubMed

    Traudt, Elizabeth M; Ranville, James F; Meyer, Joseph S

    2017-01-01

    In previous studies, variability was high among replicate acute cadmium (Cd) Daphnia magna lethality tests (e.g., >10-fold range of median effect concentrations [EC50s]), less among zinc (Zn) tests, and relatively low for copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) tests. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) protocol includes starting toxicity tests with neonates less than 24 h old, the authors hypothesized that age-related differences in sensitivity to metals might occur even within that relatively narrow age range. Daphnia magna neonates were collected during 3 age windows (0-4 h, 10-14 h, and 20-24 h old) and immediately exposed to each of the 4 metals for 48 h using the standard USEPA protocol. In repeated sets of tests during different weeks, the Cd EC50 of the youngest neonates was approximately 10-fold greater than the EC50 of the oldest neonates (i.e., Cd was less toxic to the youngest neonates) and the EC50 of neonates aged 10 h to 14 h was intermediate. Age-related differences were negligible in Cu, Ni, and Zn tests. Therefore, variability in toxicity of Cd may partly be caused by temporal variability in neonate age at the start of toxicity tests. Decreasing the age range of D. magna used in toxicity tests could help to improve the accuracy and precision of toxicity models, particularly for metal mixtures. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:113-119. © 2016 SETAC.

  15. Ultramicro analysis for copper, cadmium, and zinc in human liver tissue by use of atomic absorption spectrophotometry and the heated graphite tube atomizer.

    PubMed

    Evenson, M A; Anderson, C T

    1975-04-01

    We describe a method of analysis for copper, cadmium, and zinc in a 15-mg (wet weight) sample of human liver by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The sample is digested with nitric acid (1.0 mol/liter), evaporated, and dilute HNO3 (10 mmol/liter) added. The reconstituted acid mixture is injected into the graphite tube atomizer for analysis of Cu and Cd and aspirated into the air--acetylene flame for measurement of Zn. The absorbance for each metal is suppressed with increasing pH. NaNO3, KNO3, KCl, and NaCl (e.g.) quench the Cd absorbance in acid solutions that contain no protein, but not in the presence of protein. Metal ions added to the predigestion human liver sample at 10 percent and 100 percent of the intrinsic metal concentrations were, respectively, 93 percent and 90 percent accounted for analytically in the case of Cu, 98 percent and 102 percent for Zn, and 101 percent and 93 percent for Cd. Analysis of a National Bureau of Standards' Bovine Liver Standard Reference Material yielded results corresponding to 99 percent (Cu), 112 percent (Zn), and 91 percent (Cd) of the mean expected concentrations of these metals. The between-run coefficient of variation for the bovine liver material was 6 percent for Cu, 9 percent for Zn, and 10 percent for Cd. For 16 histologically normal samples of human liver, the mean values were: Cu, 26; Zn, 293; and Cd, 6.0 nanograms of metal per milligram dry weight, in agreement with values published previously. The method can be easily and reliably applied to small samples of liver obtained by closed-needle biopsy.

  16. Uptake of Cadmium, Copper, Lead, and Zinc from Sediments by an Aquatic Macrophyte and by Terrestrial Arthropods in a Freshwater Wetland Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung-Tae; Kim, Jae Geun

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate trace-metal [cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn)] biotransference and biomagnification in terrestrial biota at different trophic levels (primary producer-top predator) of a wetland ecosystem. We investigated whether metal concentrations in the sediment are reflected in terrestrial arthropods and aquatic plants. We sampled the floating-leaved plant Trapa japonica; its species-specific primary consumer, the leaf beetle Galerucella nipponensis; and two predatory arthropods (the water strider Gerris sp. and the wolf spider Arctosa sp.) from three wetlands with different sedimentary metal concentrations. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N signatures in the trophic link between the plants and the leaf beetles supported the specificity of their feeding relationship. The stable isotope signatures indicate that the leaf beetle could be an important link in the trophic transfer of the metals. Transference factors (TFs) were <1 for Pb in all trophic links, and concentrations in the organisms were negatively correlated with the trophic levels. There was no evidence of Pb biomagnification in the food chain. Cu and Zn had TF >1 for all biota, and the concentrations were positively correlated with the trophic levels. Thus, there may be Cu and Zn biomagnification in the arthropods. We noted TF <1 for Cd between the plants and the leaf beetles, but TF was >1 among the arthropods. Therefore, Cd is probably not biomagnified between T. japonica and G. nipponensis, but it might be biomagnified in the arthropods. The metal burden in terrestrial arthropods may also be influenced by uptake from the sediment by aquatic plants.

  17. Functional characterization of a csoR-cueA divergon in Bradyrhizobium liaoningense CCNWSX0360, involved in copper, zinc and cadmium cotolerance

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Mingzhe; Lu, Mingmei; Li, Zhefei; Shen, Xihui; Chou, Minxia; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    Random mutagenesis in a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing Bradyrhizobium liaoningense CCNWSX0360 (Bln0360) using Tn5 identified five copper (Cu) resistance-related genes. They were functionally sorted into three groups: transmembrane transport (cueA and tolC); oxidation (copA); and protection of the membrane barrier (lptE and ctpA). The gene cueA, together with the upstream csoR (Cu-sensitive operon repressor), constituted a csoR-cueA divergon which plays a crucial role in Cu homeostasis. Deletion of cueA decreased the Cu tolerance of cells, and complementation of this mutant restored comparable Cu resistance to that of the wild-type. Transcriptional and fusion expression analysis demonstrated that csoR-cueA divergon was up-regulated by both the monovalent Cu+ and divalent Zn2+/Cd2+, and negatively regulated by transcriptional repressor CsoR, via a bidirectional promoter. Deletion of csoR renders the cell hyper-resistant to Cu, Zn and Cd. Although predicted to encode a Cu transporting P-type ATPase (CueA), cueA also conferred resistance to zinc and cadmium; two putative N-MBDs (N-terminal metal binding domains) of CueA were required for the Cu/Zn/Cd tolerance. Moreover, cueA is needed for nodulation competitiveness of B. liaoningense in Cu rich conditions. Together, the results demonstrated a crucial role for the csoR-cueA divergon as a component of the multiple-metal resistance machinery in B. liaoningense. PMID:27725778

  18. Acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, zinc, ammonia, 3,3 prime -dichlorobenzidine, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitroaniline, methylene chloride, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol to juvenile grass shrimp and killifish

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.T.; Fisher, D.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The acute toxicity of several compounds was investigated while performing a toxicity evaluation of a complex chemical effluent. The tests were conducted for one or more of the following reasons: (1) data were not available for the chemical; (2) data were not available for the species; or (3) data were not available for the juvenile life stage of the species. Forty-eight hour acute toxicity tests were run on juvenile grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) and juvenile killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to the following compounds: cadmium, copper, zinc, ammonia, 3,3{prime}-dichlorobenzidine, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitroaniline, methylene chloride (dichloromethane) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol.

  19. Leaching of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc from two slag dumps with different environmental exposure periods under dynamic acidic condition.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhisheng; Liu, Taoze; Yang, Yuangen; Jackson, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Over the past few decades, zinc smelting activities in Guizhou, China have produced numerous slag dumps, which are often dispersed on roadsides and hill slopes throughout the region. During periods of acid rain, these exposed slags release heavy metals into surface water bodies. A column leaching study was designed to test the potential release of the heavy metals cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) under simulated acid rain events. Two slags with varying environmental exposure periods were packed in columns and subjected to leaching solutions of pH 3.5, 5.5, or DI H2O at intervals of 1, 7, 14, 28, 56d. Pulse concentrations of Cd in leachate were found above 5μg/L, Cr, Pb, and Zn >10μg/L, whereas, Cu reached 10μg/L. After five leaching events, the leachability (percentage of cumulative heavy metal leached after five leaching events as in its respective total concentration in slags) of Cd was 0.05 percent and 0.035 percent from the old and young slag, respectively. Cr (0.035 percent and 0.05 percent) was greater than Cu (0.002 percent and 0.005 percent) and Zn (0.006 percent and 0.003 percent), while the lowest leachability was observed for Pb (0.0005 percent and 0.0002 percent) from the old and young slags, respectively. Reaction rates (release amount of heavy metals in certain period of leaching) of heavy metals in the leachates demonstrated the sequence of Zn>Cr>Cd, Cu>Pb. Leaching release of heavy metals was jointly affected by the pH of leaching solution and mineral composition of slags (including chemical forms of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn). Environmental exposure period of slags, resulting in the alteration of minerals, could affect the release process of heavy metals in leaching as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioavailability of cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc in subtropical coastal lagoons from the southeast Gulf of California using mangrove oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis and Crassostrea palmula).

    PubMed

    Páez-Osuna, Federico; Osuna-Martínez, Carmen C

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were assessed in the edible tissues of Crassrotrea corteziensis oysters collected during the rainy and dry seasons in 27 sites from 8 coastal lagoons of the southeast Gulf of California. In addition, C. palmula oysters were sampled at 9 sites from the same mangrove roots where C. corteziensis oysters were collected. Metal analyses were performed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Cd, Cu, and Zn), graphite furnace (Pb), and cold vapor detection (Hg). The obtained mean levels were (µg g(-1) dry weight) as follows: Cd 6.05 ± 2.77, Cu 60.0 ± 33.4, Hg 0.38 ± 0.17, Pb 1.11 ± 0.63, and Zn 777 ± 528 µg g(-1). For all metals except Hg, the concentrations were greater during dry season than during rainy seasons. The high levels, particularly that for Cd, were related to upwelling along the eastern Gulf of California. High Hg levels in the rainy season were associated with the transport of materials from the watershed to the lagoon. Shrimp farming, agriculture, and other sources were considered as potential sources to explain the differences in metal bioavailability in the 8 lagoons. The mean concentrations of Cd (Santa María-La Reforma lagoon), Cu [San Ignacio-Navachiste-El Macapule (SINM), Urías (URI), and Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón lagoons], and zinc (Zn) (URI, Santa María-Ohuira-Topolobampo, El Colorado, and SINM lagoons) during the dry season were greater than the maximum permissible limits. C. palmula collected in 8 sites where they were present simultaneously with C. corteziensis had consistently greater metal levels than C. corteziensis, but correlation analyses showed a high and significant (P < 0.05) correlation between metal concentrations in both species. The correlation equations obtained are useful where the same species is not distributed and is necessary to compare results from distinct regions.

  1. [Assessment of health risk for mined soils based on critical thresholds for lead, zinc, cadmium and copper].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Tian-ming; Zhou, Jie; Xie, Zheng-miao

    2008-08-01

    Contents of heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu) in soils in terms of point, line and area around a lead/zinc mine in Dongguan town, Zhejiang, China, were investigated to evaluate environmental quality based on index and health risk assessment model for safety of soils-human. The order for average contents of Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu in terms of point, line and area were Pb > Zn > Cu > Cd. The contents of Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu in terms of point and line were much higher than that in terms of area, especially Pb and Zn contents. The distribution of soil heavy metals was asymmetric. The calculated critical threshold in soil for adult was higher than that for children. The average order of individual risk index for children and adult health was Pb > Cd > Cu > Zn. Children were more easily affected by soil heavy metals, for that hazard indexes for children were 3 times of adult health. The environmental quality of Dongguan town was mainly safe correspondingly. The heavy metal environmental quality in terms of point and line near a lead/zinc mine had higher hazard risk and might bring potential hazard to local residents.

  2. Soil-applied zinc and copper suppress cadmium uptake and improve the performance of cereals and legumes.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Javed, Wasim; Hussain, Amir; Qadir, Manzoor; Aslam, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of soil-applied Zn and Cu on absorption and accumulation of Cd applied through irrigation water in legume (chickpea and mung bean) and cereal (wheat and maize) crops. The results revealed that Cd in irrigation water at higher levels (2 and 5 mg L(-1)) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the plant biomass while the soil application of Zn and Cu, singly or combined, favored the biomass production. Plant tissue Cd concentration increased linearly with the increasing application of Cd via irrigation water. While Cd application caused a redistribution of metals in grains, straw, and roots with the highest concentration of Cd, Zn, and Cu occurred in roots followed by straw and grains. Zinc addition to soil alleviated Cd toxicity by decreasing Cd concentration in plant tissues due to a possible antagonistic effect. The addition of Cu to the soil had no consistent effects on Zn and Cd contents across all crops. Inhibitory effects of Cd on the uptake and accumulation of Zn and Cu have also been observed at higher Cd load. Thus, soil-applied Zn and Cu antagonized Cd helping the plant to cope with its toxicity and suppressed the toxic effects of Cd in plant tissues, thus favoring plant growth.

  3. Zinc, cadmium, and copper mobility and accumulation in reeds (Phragmites australis) in urban sediments from two stormwater infiltration basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedell, J.-P.; Saulais, S.; Delolme, C.

    2012-04-01

    organic matter and metals than "Minerve". For example, Zn contents are equal to 400 mg/kgDW in "Grézieu" whereas it is equal to 80 mg/kgDW in "Minerve". In the most contaminated basin "Grézieu", metals mobility is mainly controlled by their association with carbonates and organic matter. Thus, copper associated with organic matter may represent almost 70% of the total copper content. In the "Minerve" sediment, the metals are distributed on the different sediment components, with very stable associations on the different mineral phases. The reed accumulates more metal in the context of the most contaminated basin (Grézieu), but without any differences in bioconcentration factors. The high metal contents in "Grézieu" sediments limited also the growth of reed. Moreover, for "Grézieu" sediment, characteristics evolve with the seasons. Thus, texture decreases from June to December in parallel with an increase in organic matter and metals in the sediment deposit.

  4. Dinuclear cadmium(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II), trinuclear nickel(II), and pentanuclear copper(II) complexes with novel macrocyclic and acyclic Schiff-base ligands having enantiopure or racemic camphoric diamine components.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jue-Chao; Chu, Zhao-Lian; Huang, Wei; Wang, Gang; You, Xiao-Zeng

    2010-07-05

    Four novel [3 + 3] Schiff-base macrocyclic ligands I-IV condensed from 2,6-diformyl-4-substituted phenols (R = CH(3) or Cl) and enantiopure or racemic camphoric diamines have been synthesized and characterized. Metal-ion complexations of these enantiopure and racemic [3 + 3] macrocyclic ligands with different cadmium(II), zinc(II), manganese(II), nickel(II), and copper(II) salts lead to the cleavage of Schiff-base C horizontal lineN double bonds and subsequent ring contraction of the macrocyclic ligands due to the size effects and the spatial restrictions of the coordination geometry of the central metals, the steric hindrance of ligands, and the counterions used. As a result, five [2 + 2] and one [1 + 2] dinuclear cadmium(II) complexes (1-6), two [2 + 2] dinuclear zinc(II) (7 and 8), and two [2 + 2] dinuclear manganese(II) (9 and 10) complexes together with one [1 + 1] trinuclear nickel(II) complex (11) and one [1 + 2] pentanuclear copper(II) complex (12), bearing enantiopure or racemic ligands, different substituent groups in the phenyl rings, and different anionic ligands (Cl(-), Br(-), OAc(-), and SCN(-)), have been obtained in which the chiral carbon atoms in the camphoric backbones are arranged in different ways (RRSS for the enantiopure ligands in 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7-10 and RSRS for the racemic ligands in 3, 6, 11, and 12). The steric hindrance effects of the methyl group bonded to one of the chiral carbon atoms of camphoric diamine units are believed to play important roles in the formation of the acyclic [1 + 1] trinuclear complex 11 and [1 + 2] dinuclear and pentanuclear complexes 6 and 12. In dinuclear cadmium(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II) complexes 1-10, the sequence of separations between the metal centers is consistent with that of the ionic radii shortened from cadmium(II) to manganese(II) to zinc(II) ions. Furthermore, UV-vis, circular dichroism, (1)H NMR, and fluorescence spectra have been used to characterize and compare the structural

  5. Environmental zinc and cadmium pollution associated with generalized osteochondrosis, osteoporosis, and nephrocalcinosis in horses.

    PubMed

    Gunson, D E; Kowalczyk, D F; Shoop, C R; Ramberg, C F

    1982-02-01

    Several suspect causes of chronic zinc/cadmium toxicosis in horses near a zinc smelter were investigated following observations of lameness, swollen joints, and unthriftiness, particularly in foals. Two foals born and raised near the smelter were lame and had joint swellings that were attributable to severe generalized osteochondrosis. Zinc and cadmium concentrations were markedly increased in the pancreas, liver, and kidney. The serum of 1 foal, zinc and potassium concentrations were high, whereas calcium and magnesium concentrations were low. Marked nephrocalcinosis and osteoporosis were observed in this foal. Nephrocalcinosis also was observed in his dam, who died of a punctured lung following rib fractures, though there was no history of trauma. The joint cartilage lesions were similar to those induced experimentally in animals fed high-zinc diets and may have been the result of zin-induced abnormality of copper metabolism. The osteoporosis and nephrocalcinosis were consistent with chronic cadmium toxicosis.

  6. Environmental zinc and cadmium pollution associated with generalized osteochondrosis, osteoporosis, and nephrocalcinosis in horses

    SciTech Connect

    Gunson, D.E.; Kowalczyk, D.F.; Shoop, C.R.; Ramberg, C.F. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    Several suspect causes of chronic zinc/cadmium toxicosis in horses near a zinc smelter were investigated following observations of lameness, swollen joints, and unthriftiness, particularly in foals. Two foals born and raised near the smelter were lame and had joint swellings that were attributable to severe generalized osteochondrosis. Zinc and cadmium concentrations were markedly increased in the pancreas, liver, and kidney. The serum of 1 foal, zinc and potassium concentrations were high, whereas calcium and magnesium concentrations were low. Marked nephrocalcinosis and osteoporosis were observed in this foal. Nephrocalcinosis also was observed in his dam, who died of a punctured lung following rib fractures, though there was no history of trauma. The joint cartilage lesions were similar to those induced experimentally in animals fed high-zinc diets and may have been the result of zin-induced abnormality of copper metabolism. The osteoporosis and nephrocalcinosis were consistent with chronic cadmium toxicosis.

  7. Acute toxicity of copper, lead, cadmium, and zinc to early life stages of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) in laboratory and Columbia River water.

    PubMed

    Vardy, David W; Santore, Robert; Ryan, Adam; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Populations of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) are in decline in North America. This is attributed, primarily, to poor recruitment, and white sturgeon are listed as threatened or endangered in several parts of British Columbia, Canada, and the United States. In the Columbia River, effects of metals have been hypothesized as possible contributing factors. Previous work has demonstrated that early life stage white sturgeon are particularly sensitive to certain metals, and concerns over the level of protectiveness of water quality standards are justified. Here we report results from acute (96-h) toxicity tests for copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), and lead (Pb) from parallel studies that were conducted in laboratory water and in the field with Columbia River water. Water effect ratios (WERs) and sensitivity parameters (i.e., median lethal accumulations, or LA50s) were calculated to assess relative bioavailability of these metals in Columbia River water compared to laboratory water, and to elucidate possible differences in sensitivity of early life stage white sturgeon to the same concentrations of metals when tested in the different water sources. For Cu and Pb, white sturgeon toxicity tests were initiated at two life stages, 8 and 40 days post-hatch (dph), and median lethal concentrations (LC50s) ranged between 9-25 μg Cu/L and 177-1,556 μg Pb/L. LC50s for 8 dph white sturgeon exposed to Cd in laboratory water and river water were 14.5 and 72 μg/L, respectively. Exposure of 8 dph white sturgeon to Zn in laboratory and river water resulted in LC50s of 150 and 625 μg/L, respectively. Threshold concentrations were consistently less in laboratory water compared with river water, and as a result, WERs were greater than 1 in all cases. In addition, LA50s were consistently greater in river water exposures compared with laboratory exposures in all paired tests. These results, in combination with results from the biotic ligand model, suggest that the observed

  8. Uptake of cadmium, zinc, lead, and copper by earthworms near a zinc-smelting complex: influence of soil pH and organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, W.; Edelman, T.; van Beersum, I.; Jans, T.

    1983-04-01

    Soil samples were taken from 31 sites near Eindhoven, The Netherlands, mainly along transects of 1 to 15 km from the nearest zinc smelter. Earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus) were taken from the upper 20 cm soil layer and analyzed from accumulation of Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cd, Zn, and Pb appeared to be more strongly accumulated by L. rubellus when present in soil with a low pH value. Cu was the only exception in this regard; its uptake by L. rubellus was not significantly influenced by soil pH. The organic matter content of the soil played a significant role only in the worm uptake of Pb. Soil Pb content, soil pH, and soil organic matter content together accounted for almost 70% of the variance in worm Pb content. The results indicate that L. rubellus accumulates Pb more strongly in soil with a low pH and low organic matter content than in soil with higher values of these parameters. The demonstrated influence of pH and organic matter content on element concentration in earthworms emphasizes the importance of soil factors in governing the entrance of toxic metal elements into the food web. (JMT)

  9. SUBSTITUTION OF CADMIUM CYANIDE ELECTROPLATING WITH ZINC CHLORIDE ELECTROPLATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the zinc chloride electroplating process as a substitute for cadmium cyanide electroplating in the manufacture of industrial connectors and fittings at Aeroquip Corporation. The process substitution eliminates certain wastes, specifically cadmium and cyanide, ...

  10. SUBSTITUTION OF CADMIUM CYANIDE ELECTROPLATING WITH ZINC CHLORIDE ELECTROPLATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the zinc chloride electroplating process as a substitute for cadmium cyanide electroplating in the manufacture of industrial connectors and fittings at Aeroquip Corporation. The process substitution eliminates certain wastes, specifically cadmium and cyanide, ...

  11. Copper and zinc in selected foods.

    PubMed

    Lawler, M R; Klevay, L M

    1984-09-01

    Few data on the copper and zinc contents of convenience items and frozen foods have been reported in the literature. In this study, selected meats, frozen vegetables, and convenience items were analyzed for copper and zinc content by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Foods found to have the highest copper content tended to be highest in zinc as well. Beef liver was an outstanding source of both minerals. Protein foods were generally good sources of zinc, supplying more than 2 mg/100-gm serving. Foods containing more than 0.2 mg copper per 100 gm were considered to be good sources. Examples included chicken livers, garbanzo beans, frozen Mexican-style dinner, and frozen brownies. Most of the other foods analyzed contained relatively small amounts of copper and zinc. Nevertheless, the contribution of such foods to the total daily copper and zinc intake illustrates the desirability of including a wide variety of foods in the diet.

  12. Cadmium zinc telluride charged particle nuclear detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, J.E. |; James, R.B.; Antolak, A.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the improvements in understanding of transport phenomena in cadmium zinc telluride radiation sensors achieved through studies of alpha particle response and spatially resolved photoconductivity mapping. Alpha particle response waveforms and photocurrent profiles both indicate non-uniformities in the electric field which may have detrimental effects on detector performance. Identifying and eliminating the sources of these nonuniformities will ultimately lead to improved detector performance.

  13. Talitrid amphipods (Crustacea) as biomonitors for copper and zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainbow, P. S.; Moore, P. G.; Watson, D.

    1989-06-01

    Data are presented on the copper and zinc concentrations of four talitrid amphipod species (standard dry weight 10 mg), i.e. Orchestia gammarellus (Pallas), O. mediterranea Costa, Talitrus saltator Montagu and Talorchestia deshayesii (Audouin), from 31 sites in S.W. Scotland, N. Wales and S.W. England. More limited data are also presented for cadmium in O. gammarellus (three sites) and T. deshayesii (one site). In S.W. Scotland, copper concentrations were raised significantly in O. gammarellus from Whithorn and Auchencairn (Solway) and Loch Long and Holy Loch (Clyde). In S.W. England, copper concentrations were highest at Restronguet Creek, Torpoint and Gannel (Cornwall). Samples of O. gammarellus from Islay (inner Hebrides) taken adjacent to the effluent outfalls of local whisky distilleries fell into two groups based on copper concentrations (presumably derived from copper stills), the higher copper levels deriving from the more productive distilleries. High copper levels were found in T. saltator and Tal. deshayesii from Dulas Bay (Wales). Zinc levels in O. gammarellus were high in Holy Loch and Auchencairn (Scotland), Gannel and Torpoint (England) but extremely elevated (as was Zn in O. mediterranea) at Restronguet Creek. Zinc was also high in T. saltator from Dulas Bay (Wales), but not in Tal. deshayesii. Cadmium levels in O. gammarellus from Kilve (Bristol Channel) were much raised. These differences (a) conform with expectations of elevated bioavailability of these metals from well researched areas (S.W. England & N. Wales), and (b) identify hitherto unappreciated areas of enrichment in S.W. Scotland. Orchestia gammarellus is put forward as a suitable biomonitor for copper and zinc in British coastal waters.

  14. Copper hepatotoxicity attenuated by zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Schilsky, M.; Blank, R.; Stockert, R.; Sternlieb, I.; Scheinberg, I.H.

    1987-05-01

    The manifestations of hepatocellular copper toxicity and the role of zinc in its prevention have been investigated. When incubated for 48 hrs in media to which increasing concentrations of Cu acetate are added, HepG2 cells exhibit reduced viability with an LD/sub 50/ of 750 uM. Morphology, cell membranes and mitochondria appeared to be normal after 1 hr exposure to 1000 uM Cu acetate, but progressive abnormalities were noted between 3 and 12 hrs. In the first hour of exposure to this concentration of copper, protein synthesis (/sup 35/S-methionine uptake into TCA precipitates) was reduced to 20% of control while transcription (/sup 3/H-uridine incorporation) increased to 139% of controls. Preincubation with 200 uM Zn acetate for 2 hr increased cellular survival and allowed protein synthesis to proceed at 80% of control levels during exposure to 1000 uM Cu acetate. /sup 67/Cu uptake was unaltered by incubation with up to 500 uM Zn acetate. SDS-PAGE of cellular proteins after treatment with 200 uM Zn produced a different banding pattern suggesting induction of specific proteins. Since the addition of 1000 uM Cu acetate to a wheat-germ-translation-system using B-globin mRNA reduced translation by 95%, they conclude from this and the foregoing data that copper inhibits protein synthesis at the level of translation and that zinc mitigates this inhibition in hepatocytes.

  15. Cadmium and Cadmium/Zinc Ratios and Tobacco-Related Morbidities.

    PubMed

    Richter, Patricia; Faroon, Obaid; Pappas, R Steven

    2017-09-29

    Metals are one of five major categories of carcinogenic or toxic constituents in tobacco and tobacco smoke. Cadmium is highly volatile and a higher percentage of the total tobacco cadmium content is efficiently transferred to mainstream tobacco smoke than many other toxic metals in tobacco. Inhaled cadmium bioaccumulates in the lungs and is distributed beyond the lungs to other tissues, with a total body biological half-life of one to two decades. Chronic cadmium exposure through tobacco use elevates blood and urine cadmium concentrations. Cadmium is a carcinogen, and an inducer of proinflammatory immune responses. Elevated exposure to cadmium is associated with reduced pulmonary function, obstructive lung disease, bronchogenic carcinoma, cardiovascular diseases including myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, prostate cancer, cervical cancer, pancreatic cancer, and various oral pathologies. Cadmium and zinc have a toxicologically inverse relationship. Zinc is an essential element and is reportedly antagonistic to some manifestations of cadmium toxicity. This review summarizes associations between blood, urine, and tissue cadmium concentrations with emphasis on cadmium exposure due to tobacco use and several disease states. Available data about zinc and cadmium/zinc ratios and tobacco-related diseases is summarized from studies reporting smoking status. Collectively, data suggest that blood, urine, and tissue cadmium and cadmium/zinc ratios are often significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers and they are also different in smokers for several diseases and cancers. Additional biomonitoring data such as blood or serum and urine zinc and cadmium levels and cadmium/zinc ratios in smokers may provide further insight into the development and progression of diseases of the lung, cardiovascular system, and possibly other organs.

  16. Lead, cadmium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, calcium and magnesium in SPF male rats exposed to a dilution of automotive exhaust gas throughout their lives.

    PubMed

    Stupfel, M; Valleron, A J; Radford, E

    1983-12-15

    Male pathogen free CFE albino Sprague Dawley rats were exposed 8 h per day, 5 days per week, for three years to a 1/1000 dilution of automotive exhaust gas, containing 58 ppm carbon monoxide, 0.37% carbon dioxide, 23 ppm nitrogen oxides, 2 ppm aldehydes, less than 5 mg/l hydrocarbons and 8.5 micrograms/m3 lead. Lead, cadmium, iron, zinc, calcium and magnesium were measured by atomic absorption in the femurs and tibias of the rats which died during the experiment. A comparison with two control groups revealed that the only significant difference in the elements measured in the bones was a 500% increase in lead concentration. The calculations of the correlations between the percentages of the elements in bones, the ages and the body weights of the rats, as well as cluster analysis, did not show consistent variations of the water, calcium, magnesium concentrations nor of the other studied metals related to this increase in lead concentration. Moreover, longevity was the same in the 3 groups of rats, but the body weight was statistically smaller (4%) in the group exposed to the auto exhaust dilution.

  17. Cationic Zinc-Cadmium Alloy Clusters in Zeolite A

    SciTech Connect

    Readman,J.; Gameson, I.; Hriljac, J.; Anderson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Rietveld analysis of synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data obtained from the product of the reaction of cadmium vapor with dehydrated zinc-exchanged zeolite A (LTA structure type) indicates the formation of cationic zinc-cadmium alloy clusters. The clusters are located in approximately 40% of the sodalite cages; the remaining 60% of the cages contain divalent zinc ions coordinated both to the oxygen atoms of the zeolite framework and to residual extra framework oxygen.

  18. Effect of metallothionein core promoter region polymorphism on cadmium, zinc and copper levels in autopsy kidney tissues from a Turkish population

    SciTech Connect

    Kayaalti, Zeliha; Mergen, Goerkem; Soeylemezoglu, Tuelin

    2010-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-binding, low molecular weight proteins and are involved in pathophysiological processes like metabolism of essential metals, metal ion homeostasis and detoxification of heavy metals. Metallothionein expression is induced by various heavy metals especially cadmium, mercury and zinc; MTs suppress toxicity of heavy metals by binding themselves to these metals. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the - 5 A/G metallothionein 2A (MT2A) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in the renal cortex from autopsy cases. MT2A core promoter region - 5 A/G SNP was analyzed by PCR-RFLP method using 114 autopsy kidney tissues and the genotype frequencies of this polymorphism were found as 87.7% homozygote typical (AA), 11.4% heterozygote (AG) and 0.9% homozygote atypical (GG). In order to assess the Cd, Zn and Cu levels in the same autopsy kidney tissues, a dual atomic absorption spectrophotometer system was used and the average levels of Cd, Zn and Cu were measured as 95.54 {+-} 65.58 {mu}g/g, 181.20 {+-} 87.72 {mu}g/g and 17.14 {+-} 16.28 {mu}g/g, respectively. As a result, no statistical association was found between the - 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene and the Zn and Cu levels in the renal cortex (p > 0.05), but considerably high accumulation of Cd was monitored for individuals having AG (151.24 {+-} 60.21 {mu}g/g) and GG genotypes (153.09 {mu}g/g) compared with individuals having AA genotype (87.72 {+-} 62.98 {mu}g/g) (p < 0.05). These results show that the core promoter region polymorphism of metallothionein 2A increases the accumulation of Cd in human renal cortex.

  19. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, calcium, iron, manganese and chromium (VI) levels in Nigeria and United States of America cement dust.

    PubMed

    Ogunbileje, J O; Sadagoparamanujam, V-M; Anetor, J I; Farombi, E O; Akinosun, O M; Okorodudu, A O

    2013-03-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relative abundance of heavy metals in cement dust from different cement dust factories in order to predict their possible roles in the severity of cement dust toxicity. The concentrations of total mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), iron (Fe) and chromium (VI) (Cr (VI)) levels in cement dust and clinker samples from Nigeria and cement dust sample from the United States of America (USA) were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAAS), while Zn and Ca were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS), and Cr (VI) by colorimetric method. Total Cu, Ni and Mn were significantly higher in cement dust sample from USA (p<0.05), also, both total Cr and Cr (VI) were 5.4-26 folds higher in USA cement dust compared with Nigeria cement dust or clinker (p<0.001). Total Cd was higher in both Nigeria cement dust and clinker (p<0.05 and p<0.001), respectively. Mercury was more in both Nigeria cement dust and clinker (p<0.05), while Pb was only significantly higher in clinker from Nigeria (p<0.001). These results show that cement dust contain mixture of metals that are known human carcinogens and also have been implicated in other debilitating health conditions. Additionally, it revealed that metal content concentrations are factory dependent. This study appears to indicate the need for additional human studies relating the toxicity of these metals and their health impacts on cement factory workers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidation of polycrystalline materials based on zinc and cadmium chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Gunchenko, N.N.; Dronova, G.N.; Maksimova, I.A.; Mironov, I.A.; Pavlova, V.N.; Pevtsova, N.I.

    1988-06-01

    The resistance of polycrystalline zinc sulfide and selenide and cadmium telluride to atmospheric exposure in heating to 300-700/degrees/C was investigated. Polycrystalline zinc sulfide (KO-2 optical ceramic) was prepared by hot powder molding and zinc selenide and cadmium telluride were prepared by evaporation with filtrations of vapors through porous materials and subsequent condensation on a heated support. Zinc sulfide was most sensitive to oxidation. The rate of oxidation of polycrystals was slightly higher than for single crystals. The possibility of using oxidation for creating protective and antireflective coatings on zinc sulfide and selenide should be noted.

  1. Seasonal variability in cadmium, lead, copper, zinc and iron concentrations in the three major fish species, Oreochromis niloticus, Lates niloticus and Rastrineobola argentea in Winam Gulf, Lake Victoria: impact of wash-off into the lake.

    PubMed

    Ongeri, David M K; Lalah, Joseph O; Wandiga, Shem O; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Michalke, Bernard

    2012-02-01

    Trace metals Cadmium (Cd), Lead (Pb), Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) and Iron (Fe) were analyzed in edible portions of three main finfish species namely Lates niloticus, Oreochromis niloticus and Rastrineobola argentea sampled from various beaches of Winam Gulf, Lake Victoria, Kenya, in order to determine any seasonal and site variations and the results showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher mean concentrations of Cd, Cu, Zn and Fe during the wet season compared to the dry season for all the three species indicating the impact of wash-off into the lake during the rainy periods. The overall mean concentrations of the heavy metals (in μg/g dry weight) in all combined samples ranged from 0.17-0.40 (Cd), 0.47-2.53 (Pb), 2.13-8.74 (Cu), 28.9-409.3 (Zn) and 31.4-208.1 (Fe), respectively. It was found that consumption of Rastrineobola argentea can be a significant source of heavy metals especially Zn, to humans, compared with Lates niloticus and Oreochromis niloticus, if only the muscle parts of the latter two are consumed.

  2. Concentrations of strontium, barium, cadmium, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, antimony, selenium, and lead in the liver and kidneys of dogs according to age, gender, and the occurrence of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Passlack, Nadine; Mainzer, Barbara; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Schafft, Helmut; Palavinskas, Richard; Breithaupt, Angele; Zentek, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to measure the concentrations of strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se), and lead (Pb) in canine liver, renal cortex, and renal medulla, and the association of these concentrations with age, gender, and occurrence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Tissues from 50 dogs were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Cu, Zn, and Mn levels were highest in the liver followed by the renal cortex and renal medulla. The highest Sr, Cd, and Se concentrations were measured in the renal cortex while lower levels were found in the renal medulla and liver. Female dogs had higher tissue concentrations of Sr (liver and renal medulla), Cd (liver), Zn (liver and renal cortex), Cr (liver, renal cortex, and renal medulla), and Pb (liver) than male animals. Except for Mn and Sb, age-dependent variations were observed for all element concentrations in the canine tissues. Hepatic Cd and Cr concentrations were higher in dogs with CKD. In conclusion, the present results provide new knowledge about the storage of specific elements in canine liver and kidneys, and can be considered important reference data for diagnostic methods and further investigations.

  3. Adsorption of Cadmium, Nickel and Zinc in a Brazilian Oxisoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, José Carlos; Martins, Susian Christian; Soares, Marcio Roberto

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption reactions mechanisms provide the understanding of the pollutant fate metals and often control the bioavailability and transport of heavy metals ions in soil, indicating the preventive environmental control. The cadmium, nickel and zinc behavior in the soils are explained by the reactions of adsorption, influenced by pH and ionic strength. The objective of this work was to study the influence of those factors on cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption in an oxisol. It was studied the Cd, Ni and Zn adsorption in soil samples of the State of São Paulo (Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox), collected in surface and in depth and submitted to solutions of Ca(NO3)2 1,0; 0,1 and 0,01 mol L-1. The pH of the samples from 3,0 to 10,0 was varied adding NaOH or HCl 4 mol L-1 not surpassing 2% of the electrolyte volume. The soil samples received 5,0 mg dm-3 of cadmium, nickel and zinc, ratio 1:10 (2,0 g of soil: 20 solution ml) and were shacked for 24 hours. The cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption increased with pH, reaching it picks at pH 7,0 for cadmium and approximately at pH 6,0 for nickel and zinc. This indicates that zinc and nickel have higher affinity than cadmium with the soil colloids, because it reached the maximum adsorption in a small pH value. In other words, the amount of negative charges necessary to promote the maximum adsorption was small for zinc. The influence of ionic strengths was small for cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption, being similar from pH 3,0 to 10,0, in surface soil layer and in depth, demonstrating that competition with Ca2+ for the retention colloid sites of the soils didn't interfere in the adsorption. In that way, it is supposed that cadmium, nickel and zinc binding energy is high in a soil rich in Fe and Al oxides. Adsorption of cadmium, nickel and zinc was similar for the ionic strengths, not depending on PZSE. The cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption increased with pH elevation, with small ionic strength influence. Nickel and zinc have

  4. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.

    1992-05-12

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  5. Copper-cadmium interaction in mice: effects of copper status on retention and distribution of cadmium after cadmium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    The role of increased dietary copper in altering the accumulation of cadmium and other metals in tissues, was investigated. Female Swiss-Webster mice were pretreated with cadmium or copper in drinking water for three weeks prior to cadmium exposure for an additional nine weeks, with sub groups from each dose level receiving Cu additions to the Cd supplemented water. In Cd pretreated animals, a significant decrease was observed in Cd concentrations in liver and kidney when Cu was added to Cd in drinking water. Cadmium levels in soluble protein fractions of liver of animals administered 5 ppm Cd were approximately three fold greater than that for the same Cd dose when Cu was added. The same was the case for the metallothionein-like protein fraction (MTP) of the liver cytosol. In copper pretreated animals similar trends were noted in that brain, spleen, liver (but not kidney) Cd levels were decreased in animals receiving Cu additions to the Cd dose. Increased binding of Cd to the MTP fraction was observed after both in vivo and in vitro exposure of intestinal mucosal cells to cadmium.

  6. Serum copper and zinc levels and copper/zinc ratio in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yücel, I; Arpaci, F; Ozet, A; Döner, B; Karayilanoğlu, T; Sayar, A; Berk, O

    1994-01-01

    Serum copper, zinc levels, and the Cu/Zn ratio were evaluated in 31 patients with breast cancer and 35 healthy controls. Copper and zinc were determined by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry. The mean serum copper level and the mean Cu/Zn ratio in patients with breast cancer were significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). In addition, the mean serum zinc level in patients with breast cancer was significantly lower than the control group (p < 0.001). Neither serum copper and zinc levels nor the Cu/Zn ratio were of value in discriminating of the disease activity and severity. Interestingly, the Cu/Zn ratio in premenopausal patients was higher than postmenopausal patients (p < 0.05) and this was not related to age. The further combined biological and epidemiological studies are necessary to investigate the roles of copper and zinc in breast cancer.

  7. Distribution of blood lead, blood cadmium, urinary cadmium, and urinary arsenic levels in employees of a copper smelter

    SciTech Connect

    Lilis, R.; Valciukas, J.A.; Weber, J.P.; Fischbein, A.; Nicholson, W.J.; Campbell, C.; Malkin, J.; Selikoff, I.J.

    1984-02-01

    A cross-sectional medical examination of a copper smelter work force included determination of blood lead (Pb-B), zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), blood cadmium (Cd-B), urinary cadmium (Cd-U), and urinary arsenic (As-U), since it was known that such metal impurities were present in the copper concentrate. A total of 776 copper smelter employees (680 active and 96 retirees and ex-employees) were examined. Another 144 men, never employed in the smelter, but who had worked in copper mines (and sometimes in gold mines) were also examined. Mean Pb-B, ZPP, Cd-B, and As-U were significantly higher in active copper smelter employees than in retirees or miners, indicating exposure and absorption in the copper smelter. Significant correlations between Pb-B and Cd-B, and Cd-U and As-U were present, confirming the common source of absorption. Although there was evidence for an increased lead absorption, this was very moderate, with practically no Pb-B levels in excess of 60 ..mu..g/dl. A marked effect of smoking on blood cadmium levels was present; nevertheless, for all smoking categories Cd-B levels were significantly higher in active employees, indicating the independent contribution of exposure to cadmium in the smelter. Cd-U did not exceed 10 ..mu..g/g creatinine, the generally accepted critical level for the kidney, but was higher than 2 ..mu..g/g cretinine, a level very rarely exceeded in the general population, in a sizable proportion of those examined. The highest Cd-U levels were found in retired copper smelter employees; age might have been a contributing factor, besides a longer duration of exposure in the smelter.

  8. Preventive effects of zinc on cadmium-induced inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization activity in osteoblast-like cells, MC3T3-E1.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Morita, I; Yamane, Y; Murota, S

    1989-02-01

    In order to determine the specific action of cadmium on bone metabolism, the effect of cadmium on alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker enzyme of osteoblasts, was compared with that of other divalent heavy metal ions, i.e., zinc, manganese, lead, copper, nickel and mercury (10 microM each), using cloned osteoblast-like cells, MC3T3-E1. Cadmium had the strongest inhibitory effect on alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells among the metals tested. At the same dose, however, cadmium failed to inhibit cellular glucose-6-phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of cadmium on alkaline phosphatase was specific and was not dependent on cell injury. Cadmium treatment caused a significant decrease in cellular zinc level, but mercury treatment had no such effect at the dose inhibiting alkaline phosphatase activity. There was a good correlation between decrease of cellular zinc level and inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity in cadmium-treated cells. Concomitant treatment of the cells with zinc prevented the cadmium-induced inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity. However, this was not the case in the mercury-induced inhibition. Cadmium also inhibited the mineralization of osteoblasts. When 10 or 20 microM zinc was concomitantly added to the cultures, the inhibition of mineralization was prevented. These data suggest that the inhibitory effect of cadmium in osteoblasts may be closely related to its influence on the cellular zinc metabolism.

  9. Cadmium and zinc reversibly arrest development of Artemia larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Bagshaw, J.C.; Rafiee, P.; Matthews, C.O.; MacRae, T.H.

    1986-08-01

    Despite the widespread distribution of heavy metals such as cadmium and zinc in the environment and their well-known cytotoxicity and embryotoxicity in mammals, comparatively little is known about their effect on aquatic organisms, particularly invertebrates. Post-gastrula and early larval development of the brine shrimp, Artemia, present some useful advantages for studies of developmental aspects of environmental toxicology. Dormant encysted gastrulae, erroneously called brine shrimp eggs, can be obtained commercially and raised in the laboratory under completely defined conditions. Following a period of post-gastrula development within the cyst, pre-nauplius larvae emerge through a crack in the cyst shell. A few hours later, free-swimming nauplius larvae hatch. Cadmium is acutely toxic to both adults and nauplius larvae of Artemia, but the reported LC50s are as high as 10 mM, depending on larval age. In this paper the authors show that pre-nauplius larvae prior to hatching are much more sensitive to cadmium than are hatched nauplius larvae. At 0.1 ..mu..m, cadmium retards development and hatching of larvae; higher concentrations block hatching almost completely and thus are lethal. However, the larvae arrested at the emergence stage survive for 24 hours or more before succumbing to the effects of cadmium, and during this period the potentially lethal effect is reversible if the larvae are placed in cadmium-free medium. The effects of zinc parallel those of cadmium, although zinc is somewhat less toxic than cadmium at equal concentrations.

  10. Zinc, copper and selenium in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Bedwal, R S; Bahuguna, A

    1994-07-15

    Of the nine biological trace elements, zinc, copper and selenium are important in reproduction in males and females. Zinc content is high in the adult testis, and the prostate has a higher concentration of zinc than any other organ of the body. Zinc deficiency first impairs angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, and this in turn leads to depletion of testosterone and inhibition of spermatogenesis. Defects in spermatozoa are frequently observed in the zinc-deficient rat. Zinc is thought to help to extend the functional life span of the ejaculated spermatozoa. Zinc deficiency in the female can lead to such problems as impaired synthesis/secretion of (FSH) and (LH), abnormal ovarian development, disruption of the estrous cycle, frequent abortion, a prolonged gestation period, teratogenicity, stillbirths, difficulty in parturition, pre-eclampsia, toxemia and low birth weights of infants. The level of testosterone in the male has been suggested to play a role in the severity of copper deficiency. Copper-deficient female rats are protected against mortality due to copper deficiency, and the protection has been suggested to be provided by estrogens, since estrogens alter the subcellular distribution of copper in the liver and increase plasma copper levels by inducing ceruloplasmin synthesis. The selenium content of male gonads increases during pubertal maturation. Selenium is localized in the mitochondrial capsule protein (MCP) of the midpiece. Maximal incorporation in MCP occurs at steps 7 and 12 of spermatogenesis and uptake decreases by step 15. Selenium deficiency in females results in infertility, abortions and retention of the placenta. The newborns from a selenium-deficient mother suffer from muscular weakness, but the concentration of selenium during pregnancy does not have any effect on the weight of the baby or length of pregnancy. The selenium requirements of a pregnant and lactating mother are increased as a result of selenium transport to the fetus via

  11. Formation of copper-zinc chromites

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, O.V.; Yur`eva, T.M.; Plyasova, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    The compounds of a hydrotalcite structure formed from copper-zinc-chromium hydroxycarbonate at an increasing temperature of calcination are studied. At temperatures ranging from 300 to 350{degrees}C, the decomposition of hydroxycarbonate occurs to yield anion-modified oxides in which chromium cations are partially present in the decree of oxidation +6. The structure of the anion-modified oxide is governed by the nature of a bivalent cation and differs from that of spinel. The formation of the spinel structure in the copper-chromium system is observed at temperatures above 450{degrees}C. The distribution of cations over their crystallographic positions in the copper-zinc-chromium spinels depends on the Cu:Zn ratio and calcination temperature.

  12. Simultaneous automatic electrochemical detection of zinc, cadmium, copper and lead ions in environmental samples using a thin-film mercury electrode and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Kudr, Jiri; Nguyen, Hoai Viet; Gumulec, Jaromir; Nejdl, Lukas; Blazkova, Iva; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Hynek, David; Kynicky, Jindrich; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-30

    In this study a device for automatic electrochemical analysis was designed. A three electrodes detection system was attached to a positioning device, which enabled us to move the electrode system from one well to another of a microtitre plate. Disposable carbon tip electrodes were used for Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) ion quantification, while Zn(II) did not give signal in this electrode configuration. In order to detect all mentioned heavy metals simultaneously, thin-film mercury electrodes (TFME) were fabricated by electrodeposition of mercury on the surface of carbon tips. In comparison with bare electrodes the TMFEs had lower detection limits and better sensitivity. In addition to pure aqueous heavy metal solutions, the assay was also performed on mineralized rock samples, artificial blood plasma samples and samples of chicken embryo organs treated with cadmium. An artificial neural network was created to evaluate the concentrations of the mentioned heavy metals correctly in mixture samples and an excellent fit was observed (R2 = 0.9933).

  13. Simultaneous Automatic Electrochemical Detection of Zinc, Cadmium, Copper and Lead Ions in Environmental Samples Using a Thin-Film Mercury Electrode and an Artificial Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Kudr, Jiri; Nguyen, Hoai Viet; Gumulec, Jaromir; Nejdl, Lukas; Blazkova, Iva; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Hynek, David; Kynicky, Jindrich; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    In this study a device for automatic electrochemical analysis was designed. A three electrodes detection system was attached to a positioning device, which enabled us to move the electrode system from one well to another of a microtitre plate. Disposable carbon tip electrodes were used for Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) ion quantification, while Zn(II) did not give signal in this electrode configuration. In order to detect all mentioned heavy metals simultaneously, thin-film mercury electrodes (TFME) were fabricated by electrodeposition of mercury on the surface of carbon tips. In comparison with bare electrodes the TMFEs had lower detection limits and better sensitivity. In addition to pure aqueous heavy metal solutions, the assay was also performed on mineralized rock samples, artificial blood plasma samples and samples of chicken embryo organs treated with cadmium. An artificial neural network was created to evaluate the concentrations of the mentioned heavy metals correctly in mixture samples and an excellent fit was observed (R2 = 0.9933). PMID:25558996

  14. Preconcentration of cadmium and zinc with 1-phenyl-2, 3-dimethlypyrazolone-5-thione

    SciTech Connect

    Bikkulova, A.T.

    1985-08-20

    This paper attempts to ascertain the possibility of use of 1-phenyl-2,3-dimethyl-pyrazolone-5-thione (thiopyrine) for cadmium and zinc concentration in waste waters of oil refineries for their subsequent determination. Cadmium and zinc complexing with thiopyrine in aqueous solutions was studied by the distribution method. Cadmium and zinc in waste waters were determined by a neutron activation technique. The elemental composition and certain properties of halide complexes of cadmium and zinc with thiopyrine are shown. The constants of chloroform extraction of iodide complexes of cadmium and zinc with thiopyrine are shown.

  15. The possible role of gradual accumulation of copper, cadmium, lead and iron and gradual depletion of zinc, magnesium, selenium, vitamins B2, B6, D, and E and essential fatty acids in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2000-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has a much higher incidence among caucasians that in any other race. Furthermore: females are much more susceptible than males and white females living in colder, wetter areas are much more susceptible than those living in warmer areas. On the other hand, menstruating women have increased copper (Cu) absorption and half-life, so they tend to accumulate more Cu than males. Moreover, rapidly growing girls have an increased demand for zinc (Zn), but their rapidly decreasing production of melatonin results in impaired Zn absorption, which is exacerbated by the high Cu levels. The low Zn levels result in deficient CuZnSuperoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), which in turn leads to increased levels of superoxide. Menstruating females also often present with low magnesium (Mg) and vitamin B6 levels. Vitamin B6 moderates intracellular nitric oxide (NO) production and extracellular Mg is required for NO release from the cell, so that a deficiency of these nutrients results in increased NO production in the cell and reduced release from the cell. The trapped NO combines with superoxide to form peroxinitrite, an extremely powerful free radical that leads to the myelin damage of MS. Iron (Fe), molybdenum (Mo) and cadmium (Cd) accumulation also increase superoxide production. Which explains MS in males, who tend to accumulate Fe much faster and Cu much less rapidly than females. Since vitamin D is paramount for Mg absorption, the much reduced exposure to sunlight in the higher latitudes may account for the higher incidence in these areas. Moreover, vitamin B2 is a cofactor for xanthine oxidase, and its deficiency exacerbates the low levels of uric acid caused by high Cu levels, resulting in myelin degeneration. Finally Selenium (Se) and vitamin E prevent lipid peroxidation and EPA and DHA upregulate CuZnSOD. Therefore, supplementation with 100 mg MG, 25 mg vit B6, 10 mg vit B2, 15 mg Zn and 400 IU vit D and E, 100 microg Se, 180 mg EPA and 120 mg DHA per day

  16. Cadmium and Zinc in Soils, Plants and Animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cadmium (Cd) is well known for causing adverse health effects in subsistence rice farmers in Asia, and as a subject of food-chain concern, but is seldom important as a cause of phytotoxicity in the field. On the other hand, zinc (Zn) is commonly both a deficient and phytotoxic element in soils, the...

  17. Effect of cigarette smoking on copper, lead, and cadmium accumulation in human lens

    PubMed Central

    Cekic, O.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To identify cigarette smoking as a risk factor for development of cataract, to determine the importance of copper, lead, and cadmium in cataractogenesis, and to learn about any relation between those elements.
METHODS—Copper, lead, and cadmium concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 37 cataractous and nine normal human lenses.
RESULTS—All three element accumulations in lenses with cataract were statistically meaningful. Lenticular copper, lead, and cadmium were increased significantly with cigarette smoking. Cadmium had a positive correlation both with lead and copper in cataractous lenses.
CONCLUSION—The accumulation of copper, lead, and cadmium occurs in cataract. The probable source of cadmium in humans is cigarettes. Lenticular cadmium accumulation also increases copper and lead precipitation in the lens. Cigarette smoking might be cataractogenic.

 Keywords: cigarettes; cataract; copper; lead; cadmium PMID:9613387

  18. Copper toxicity and copper-zinc interactions in amphibian embryos.

    PubMed

    Herkovits, J; Helguero, L A

    1998-09-29

    The copper hazard was evaluated by means of a 7-day toxicity test with Bufo arenarum embryos. The LC50 and LC10 values from 24 to 168 h of exposure were approx. 0.085 and 0.05 mg Cu2+/1, respectively, while the LC90 resulted in 0.155 mg Cu2+/1 but in this case from 96 h onwards the LC90 diminished up to approx. 0.105 mg Cu2+/1. These data plotted as Toxicity Profiles (TOP) provide a better understanding of concentration and time-dependent thresholds. For instance, exposure threshold occurs within the first 24 h of treatment while for concentration thresholds LC10 and LC90 seem to be more meaningful than LC50 because the S.D. of this last value is overlapping those of LC10 and LC90 for most of the exposure period evaluated. Toxicity data corresponds to a pH of 6.8 which is normal for the maintaining media. Combined treatments of copper and zinc point out a beneficial effect of zinc proportional to the zinc concentration in the maintaining media, e.g. 100% of protection was achieved with 30 mg Zn2+/1 for a copper concentration exerting 90% of mortality. The presence of Cu2+ did not enhance Zn2+ toxicity. The results are discussed in terms of water quality criteria for wildlife and human health protection purposes.

  19. Cadmium in zinc deposits: Economic geology of a polluting element

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.O.

    2000-05-01

    The chief host of cadmium in zinc deposits is sphalerite, the cadmium content of which depends on the type of deposit. Sphalerite from Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits has high cadmium concentrations whereas sphalerite from exhalative deposits has low cadmium concentrations. The Cd content of sphalerite depends on the Cd/Zn ratio, ligand activities, and temperature of the ore-forming fluids. The combined effect of variation of temperature, pH, total activity of reduced sulfur, and activity of Cl{sup {minus}} cannot by itself account for either Cd depletion (exhalative deposits) or Cd enrichment (MVT deposits). Variations in the Cd/Zn ratio of the fluid have a significant effect in determining that of sphalerite. Basinal brines, which can be considered to be the recent equivalents of MVT fluids, have high Cd/Zn ratios, and active exhalative systems are characterized by low Cd/Zn ratios. Probably the differences in sphalerite composition between the different deposit types are less a function of temperature and ligand activities than Cd/Zn ratio of the ore-forming fluids. In the hydrothermal environment, the Cd/Zn ratio is generally not high enough to allow crystallization of cadmium sulfides (greenockite or hawleyite). The abundance of greenockite in the supergene alteration zone of hydrothermal zinc deposits can be explained on the basis of Zn scavenging by crystallizing smithsonite.

  20. Extraction of copper and zinc from rubber and silicone stoppers.

    PubMed

    Bogden, J D; Zadzielski, E; Aviv, A

    1983-01-01

    Drugs and other chemicals are often administered in the drinking water of laboratory animals, and bottles for this purpose usually have rubber stoppers. We studied the ability of solutions of several drugs to extract copper and zinc from rubber and silicone stoppers. Water and isoniazid extracted little copper or zinc from rubber stoppers, whereas EDTA, ethambutol, tetracycline, and chlorpromazine generally extracted considerable quantities of copper and zinc from these stoppers. Neither water nor solutions of the above drugs extracted copper or zinc from silicone stoppers. We routinely use silicone stoppers on water bottles when conducting laboratory studies requiring administration of drugs, toxins, or nutrients in the drinking water.

  1. Abnormalities of zinc and copper during total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, S F; Goodgame, J T; Smith, J C; Maher, M M; Makuch, R W; Henkin, R I; Brennan, M F

    1979-01-01

    Changes in serum zinc and copper levels were studied in 19 tumor bearing patients undergoing parenteral nutrition (TPN) for five to 42 days. Before initiation of intravenous feeding mean serum zinc and copper concentrations were within normal limits but during TPN levels decreased significantly below those measured prior to parenteral nutrition. During TPN nitrogen, zinc, and copper intake, urinary output and serum levels were studied prospectively in nine of these patients. These nine patients exhibited positive nitrogen retention based upon urinary nitrogen excretion, but elevated urinary zinc and copper excretion and lowered serum zinc and copper concentrations. Neither blood administration nor limited oral intake was consistently able to maintain normal serum levels of zinc or copper. Zinc and copper supplementation of hyperalimentation fluids in four patients studied for five to 16 days was successful in increasing serum zinc and copper levels in only two. The data obtained suggest that patients undergoing parenteral nutrition may require supplementation of zinc and copper to prevent deficiencies of these elements. PMID:103506

  2. Cadmium-zinc interactions in plants and extractable cadmium and zinc fractions in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Sabour, M.F.; Mortvedt, J.J.; Kelsoe, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    This study related Cd-Zn concentrations in plants to levels of Cd and Zn in soil recovered by several extractants soon after application of Cd and Zn sources to soil. Cadmium nitrate and ZnSO/sub 4/ or Zn(C/sub 2/H/sub 3/O/sub 2/)/sub 2/ were mixed with a Zn-deficient Crowley silt loam soil, cropped with corn (Zea mays L.), and then cropped with Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris). Applied Cd significantly increased the Cd/Zn ratio in both crops, especially in Swiss chard, which accumulates heavy metals. A previously published sequential-extraction procedure was used to fractionate Cd and Zn in soil after the corn harvest. Results of statistical analyses showed the highest correlation between Cd uptake by each crop and the carbonate and sulfide fractions of Cd in soil. Including other Cd fractions resulted in only slightly higher R/sup 2/ values. Zinc uptake by each crop was best related to the organic fraction of Zn in soil, and including the other Zn fractions did not affect the relationship. These results show that Cd and Zn uptake by corn or Swiss chard was not related to similar chemical fractions of these elements in soil, and that the Cd/Zn ratio in plant tops was significantly affected by both Cd and Zn applications to soil.

  3. Distribution of Cadmium, Iron, and Zinc in Millstreams of Hard Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Guttieri, Mary J; Seabourn, Bradford W; Liu, Caixia; Baenziger, P Stephen; Waters, Brian M

    2015-12-16

    Hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a major crop in the Great Plains of the United States, and our previous work demonstrated that wheat genotypes vary for grain cadmium accumulation with some exceeding the CODEX standard (0.2 mg kg(-1)). Previous reports of cadmium distribution in flour milling fractions have not included high cadmium grain. This study measured the distribution of cadmium, zinc, and iron in flour and bran streams from high cadmium (0.352 mg kg(-1)) grain on a pilot mill that produced 12 flour and four bran streams. Recovery in flour was substantially greater for cadmium (50%) than for zinc (31%) or iron (22%). Cadmium, zinc, and iron in the lowest mineral concentration flour stream, representing the purest endosperm fraction, were 52, 22, and 11%, respectively, of initial grain concentration. Our results indicate that, relative to zinc and iron, a greater proportion of cadmium is stored in the endosperm, the source of white flour.

  4. A theoretical and experimental study of calcium, iron, zinc, cadmium, and sodium ions absorption by aspartame.

    PubMed

    Mahnam, Karim; Raisi, Fatame

    2017-03-01

    Aspartame (L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is a sweet dipeptide used in some foods and beverages. Experimental studies show that aspartame causes osteoporosis and some illnesses, which are similar to those of copper and calcium deficiency. This raises the issue that aspartame in food may interact with cations and excrete them from the body. This study aimed to study aspartame interaction with calcium, zinc, iron, sodium, and cadmium ions via molecular dynamics simulation (MD) and spectroscopy. Following a 480-ns molecular dynamics simulation, it became clear that the aspartame is able to sequester Fe(2+), Ca(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) ions for a long time. Complexation led to increasing UV-Vis absorption spectra and emission spectra of the complexes. This study suggests a potential risk of cationic absorption of aspartame. This study suggests that purification of cadmium-polluted water by aspartame needs a more general risk assessment.

  5. Assessment of zinc and copper status in weaned piglets in relation to dietary zinc and copper supply.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D; Beattie, J H; Poulsen, H D

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of weaning and the effect of increasing dietary zinc concentrations on the zinc and copper status of weaned piglets (study 1) and to study the effect of high concentrations of dietary zinc and/or copper on zinc and copper status of weaned piglets (study 2). Study 1 included 54 piglets (six litters of nine piglets). One piglet from every litter was killed 1 day before weaning. The remaining 48 piglets were allocated at weaning (28 days) to four dietary zinc treatments (100, 250, 1000 or 2500 ppm) and subsequently killed 1-2, 5-6 or 14-15 days after weaning. Study 2 included 48 piglets (six litters of eight piglets) allocated to four dietary treatments, consisting of low or high dietary zinc (100 or 2500 ppm) in combination with low or high dietary copper (20 or 175 ppm). All piglets in study 2 were killed 5-7 days after weaning. In both studies, the trace mineral status was assessed by zinc and copper concentrations and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity in plasma and mucosal tissue. In study 2, lymphocyte metallothionein (MT) mRNA and intestinal mucosa MT mRNA concentrations were included as zinc status markers. The results showed that the zinc status, measured as zinc in plasma and mucosa, was not affected by weaning of the piglets. Plasma copper concentrations decreased during the first 2 weeks after weaning. High dietary copper concentrations did not affect the concentration of copper in plasma, but increased the concentration of copper in mucosa and the concentration of zinc in plasma. The dietary zinc treatments increased the zinc concentration in plasma as well as the zinc and MT mRNA concentration in mucosa. Lymphocyte MT mRNA concentrations did not reflect the differences in dietary zinc supplementation.

  6. Identification of three relationships linking cadmium accumulation to cadmium tolerance and zinc and citrate accumulation in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Zorrig, Walid; Rouached, Aïda; Shahzad, Zaigham; Abdelly, Chedly; Davidian, Jean-Claude; Berthomieu, Pierre

    2010-10-15

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is a plant species that shows high accumulation of cadmium, a toxic heavy metal. Lettuce is therefore a good model both for identifying determinants controlling cadmium accumulation in plant tissues and for developing breeding strategies aimed at limiting cadmium accumulation in edible tissues. In this work, 14-day-old plants from three lettuce varieties were grown for 8 days on media supplemented with cadmium concentrations ranging from 0 to 50 microM. Growth, as well as Cd(2+), Zn(2+), K(+), Ca(2+), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), Cl(-), phosphate, malate and citrate root an shoot contents were analyzed. The three lettuce varieties Paris Island Cos, Red Salad Bowl and Kordaat displayed differential abilities to accumulate cadmium in roots and shoots, Paris Island Cos displaying the lowest cadmium content and Kordaat the highest. From the global analysis of the three varieties, three main trends were identified. First, a common negative correlation linked cadmium tissue content and relative dry weight reduction in response to cadmium treatments in the three varieties. Second, increasing cadmium concentration in the culture medium resulted in a parallel increase in zinc tissue content in all lettuce varieties. A common strong positive correlation between cadmium and zinc contents was observed for all varieties. This suggested that systems enabling zinc and cadmium transport were induced by cadmium. Finally, the cadmium treatments had a contrasting effect on anion contents in tissues. Interestingly, citrate content in shoots was correlated with cadmium translocation from roots to shoots, suggesting that citrate might play a role in cadmium transport in the xylem vessels. Altogether, these results shed light on three main strategies developed by lettuce to cope with cadmium, which could help to develop breeding strategies aimed at limiting cadmium accumulation in lettuce. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, V.; Bhattacharya, D.; Vibhute, A.; Pawar, P.; Rao, A. R.; Hingar, M. K.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Patil, M. H.; Arora, Y. K.; Sinha, S.; Priya, P.; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S.; Vinod, P.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N.; Navalgund, K. H.; Sarma, K. S.; Pandiyan, R.; Seetha, S.; Subbarao, K.

    2017-06-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZTI's namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to >200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17^' over a 4.6° × 4.6° (FWHM) field-of-view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarization above ˜ 100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarization studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  8. Cadmium and copper inhibit both DNA repair activities of polynucleotide kinase.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, James R; Box, Clare L; McMillan, Trevor J; Allinson, Sarah L

    2010-01-02

    Human exposure to heavy metals is of increasing concern due to their well-documented toxicological and carcinogenic effects and rising environmental levels through industrial processes and pollution. It has been widely reported that such metals can be genotoxic by several modes of action including generation of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of DNA repair. However, although it has been observed that certain heavy metals can inhibit single strand break (SSB) rejoining, the effects of these metals on SSB end-processing enzymes has not previously been investigated. Accordingly, we have investigated the potential inhibition of polynucleotide kinase (PNK)-dependent single strand break repair by six metals: cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead and zinc. It was found that micromolar concentrations of cadmium and copper are able to inhibit the phosphatase and kinase activities of PNK in both human cell extracts and purified recombinant protein, while the other metals had no effect at the concentrations tested. The inhibition of PNK by environmentally and physiologically relevant concentrations of cadmium and copper suggests a novel means by which these toxic heavy metals may exert their carcinogenic and neurotoxic effects. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Metal cotolerance to copper, lead, and zinc in Festuca rubra

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.H.

    1982-10-01

    Tillers of red fescue (Festuca rubra) were collected from three copper-contaminated sites: Prescot (Lancashire, near the copper refinery factory), Great Orme (Clwyd, copper mine), and Ecton (Staffordshire, copper mine), as well as from an uncontaminated area (Festuca rubra S59). By comparing their indexes of tolerance, it was discovered that tillers from Ecton which contained a rather high level of copper, lead, and zinc were tolerant to all three metals. This variety of F. rubra would be useful for reclaiming nonferrous mine spoils which contain a high level of the three commonly occurring heavy metals, i.e., copper, lead and zinc.

  10. Simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in fertilizers by microwave acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry detection: single-laboratory validation of a modification and extension of AOAC 2006.03.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sharon; Bartos, James; Boles, Rhonda; Hasty, Elaine; Thuotte, Ethel; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was conducted for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in all major types of commercial fertilizer products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy analysis. This validation study proposes an extension and modification of AOAC 2006.03. The extension is the inclusion of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc, and the modification is incorporation of hydrochloric acid in the digestion system. This dual acid digestion utilizes both hydrochloric and nitric acids in a 3 to 9 mL volume ratio/100 mL. In addition to 15 of the 30 original validation materials used in the 2006.03 collaborative study, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 695 and Magruder 2009-06 were incorporated as accuracy materials. The main benefits of this proposed method are a significant increase in laboratory efficiency when compared to the use of both AOAC Methods 965.09 and 2006.03 to achieve the same objective and an enhanced recovery of several metals.

  11. Biosorption of cadmium and copper contaminated water by Scenedesmus abundans.

    PubMed

    Terry, Patricia A; Stone, Wendy

    2002-04-01

    Experiments were conducted comparing the individual removals of cadmium and copper from water via biosorption using Scenedesmus abundans, a common green algae, to removal in a multi-component system to determine competitive effects, if any, between the metals. The goal was to characterize the biological treatment of water contaminated with heavy metals using live aquatic species. In addition, experiments were performed to measure cell viability as a function of metal concentration and also to compare metal removal using living species to that using nonliving ones. It was shown that, while both living and nonliving S. abundans removed cadmium and copper from water, living algae significantly outperformed nonliving algae. Further, in characterizing biosorption by three concentrations of live S. abundans, capacity curves were created comparing the metal biosorbed per mass algae to the initial metal concentration in solution. The algae concentration was not a factor in the biosorption of either metal individually, such that the capacity of the algae for the metal increased with decreasing algae concentration. At the lowest algae concentration considered, competitive effects were observed at copper and cadmium concentrations above 4 mg/l each. At the highest algae concentration considered, no competitive effects were observed in the range of cadmium and copper concentrations studied (1-7 mg/l). It was concluded that biological treatment of heavy metal contaminated water is possible and that at adequately high algae concentrations, multi-component metal systems can be remediated to the same level as individual metals.

  12. Influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in Bangladeshi women

    SciTech Connect

    Kippler, Maria; Ekstroem, Eva-Charlotte; Loennerdal, Bo; Goessler, Walter; Akesson, Agneta; El Arifeen, Shams; Persson, Lars-Ake; Vahter, Marie . E-mail: Marie.Vahter@ki.se

    2007-07-15

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental contaminant present in food. The absorption in the intestine increases in individuals with low iron stores, but the effect of zinc deficiency is not clear. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in pregnant Bangladeshi women. We measured cadmium in urine from 890 women using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Further, we also measured ferritin and zinc in plasma. The median cadmium concentration in urine was 0.59 {mu}g/L (adjusted to mean specific gravity of 1.012 g/mL). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that urinary cadmium was associated with plasma ferritin and plasma zinc via a significant interaction between dichotomized plasma ferritin and plasma zinc. The analysis was adjusted for age and socioeconomic status. Women with low iron stores and adequate zinc status had significantly higher urinary cadmium compared to women with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. There was no difference in urinary cadmium between women with both low iron stores and zinc status compared to those with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. In conclusion, low iron stores were associated with increased cadmium accumulation, but only at adequate zinc status.

  13. Serum concentration of copper, zinc, iron, and cobalt and the copper/zinc ratio in horses with equine herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    Yörük, Ibrahim; Deger, Yeter; Mert, Handan; Mert, Nihat; Ataseven, Veysel

    2007-07-01

    The serum concentrations of copper, zinc, iron, and cobalt and copper/zinc ratio were investigated in horses infected with equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1). Nine horses were naturally infected with the virus and nine healthy horses served as controls. The concentrations of copper, zinc, iron, and cobalt were determined spectrophotometrically in the blood serum of all horses. The results were (expressed in micrograms per deciliters) copper 2.80 +/- 0.34 vs 1.12 +/- 0.44, zinc 3.05 +/- 0.18 vs 0.83 +/- 0.06, iron 2.76 +/- 0.17 vs 3.71 +/- 0.69, cobalt 0.19 +/- 0.37 vs 0.22 +/- 0.45, and copper/zinc ratio 0.72 +/- 0.38 vs 1.41 +/- 0.36 for control vs infected group, respectively. In conclusion, copper and zinc concentrations of the infected group were lower than the control group (p < 0.001), whereas iron concentration and the copper/zinc ratio of the infected group were higher than the control group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). The cobalt concentration was not found to be statistically different between two groups. It might be emphasized that copper/zinc ratio was significantly affected by the EHV-1 infection, so it could be taken into consideration during the course of infection.

  14. Zinc and cadmium concentrations in soft tissues of the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852) after exposure to zinc and cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Maranhao, P.; Marques, J.C.; Madeira, V.M.C.

    1999-08-01

    Zinc and cadmium concentrations in crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) soft tissues (as edible portion) were measured after exposure to zinc and cadmium at 0, 25, 50, or 100 {micro}g/L for 96 h at 10 or 20 C, and compared to environmental standards for human consumption. Results demonstrated that no significant change occurred in the concentrations of zinc in soft tissues of crayfish under the given conditions. Net accumulation of cadmium was observed at all experimental exposures, and exceeded the maximum allowed for human consumption only for those crayfish exposed to 100 {micro}g/L at 20 C.

  15. Desorption of copper and cadmium from soils enhanced by organic acids.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Songhu; Xi, Zhimin; Jiang, Yi; Wan, Jinzhong; Wu, Chan; Zheng, Zhonghua; Lu, Xiaohua

    2007-07-01

    The adsorption/desorption behavior of copper and cadmium on soils was investigated in this study. The adsorption isotherm of copper and cadmium conformed to Langmuir equation better than Freundlich equation. The effect of ionic strength, pH, and organic acid, including ethylenediamine tetraacetic disodium acid salt (EDTA), citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid, on the desorption of copper and cadmium was studied. The desorption of copper and cadmium increased with the increase of ionic strength, while the desorption decreased with the rise of pH. The desorption of copper and cadmium enhanced by organic acids was influenced by pH. EDTA showed excellent enhancement on the desorption of both copper and cadmium; citric acid demonstrated great enhancement on the desorption of copper but negligible enhancement on the desorption of cadmium; oxalic acid enhanced the desorption of copper only at pH around 6.4 and enhanced the desorption of cadmium in the pH range from 6.4 to 10.7; tartaric acid slightly enhanced the desorption of copper but negligibly enhanced the desorption of cadmium. The desorption mechanism in the presence of organic acids were explained as the competition of complexation, adsorption and precipitation. The net effect determined the desorption efficiency. This study provided guidance for the selection of organic acids to enhance the electrokinetic (EK) remediation of copper and cadmium from contaminated soils.

  16. Copper and Zinc Metallation Status of Copper Zinc Superoxide Dismutase form Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Transgenic Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lelie, H.L.; Miller, L.; Liba, A.; Bourassa, M.W.; Chattopadhyay, M.; Chan, P.K.; Gralla, E.B.; Borchelt, D.R.; et al

    2010-09-24

    Mutations in the metalloenzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause one form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and metals are suspected to play a pivotal role in ALS pathology. To learn more about metals in ALS, we determined the metallation states of human wild-type or mutant (G37R, G93A, and H46R/H48Q) SOD1 proteins from SOD1-ALS transgenic mice spinal cords. SOD1 was gently extracted from spinal cord and separated into insoluble (aggregated) and soluble (supernatant) fractions, and then metallation states were determined by HPLC inductively coupled plasma MS. Insoluble SOD1-rich fractions were not enriched in copper and zinc. However, the soluble mutant and WT SOD1s were highly metallated except for the metal-binding-region mutant H46R/H48Q, which did not bind any copper. Due to the stability conferred by high metallation of G37R and G93A, it is unlikely that these soluble SOD1s are prone to aggregation in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that immature nascent SOD1 is the substrate for aggregation. We also investigated the effect of SOD1 overexpression and disease on metal homeostasis in spinal cord cross-sections of SOD1-ALS mice using synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy. In each mouse genotype, except for the H46R/H48Q mouse, we found a redistribution of copper between gray and white matters correlated to areas of high SOD1. Interestingly, a disease-specific increase of zinc was observed in the white matter for all mutant SOD1 mice. Together these data provide a picture of copper and zinc in the cell as well as highlight the importance of these metals in understanding SOD1-ALS pathology.

  17. Insights into zinc and cadmium biology in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Nicholas; Tan, Chieh-Hsiang; Cubillas, Ciro; Earley, Brian James; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-12-01

    Zinc is an essential metal that is involved in a wide range of biological processes, and aberrant zinc homeostasis is implicated in multiple human diseases. Cadmium is chemically similar to zinc, but it is a nonessential environmental pollutant. Because zinc deficiency and excess are deleterious, animals require homeostatic mechanisms to maintain zinc levels in response to dietary fluctuations. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is emerging as a powerful model system to investigate zinc trafficking and homeostasis as well as cadmium toxicity. Here we review genetic and molecular studies that have combined to generate a picture of zinc homeostasis based on the transcriptional control of zinc transporters in intestinal cells. Furthermore, we summarize studies of cadmium toxicity that reveal intriguing parallels with zinc biology. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Roles of zinc and copper in modulating the oxidative refolding of bovine copper, zinc superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Tao; Jiao, Ming; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2010-03-15

    The structural integrity of the ubiquitous enzyme copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) depends critically on the correct coordination of zinc and copper. We investigate here the roles of the stoichiometric zinc and copper ions in modulating the oxidative refolding of reduced, denatured bovine erythrocyte SOD1 at physiological pH and room temperature. Fluorescence experiment results showed that the oxidative refolding of the demetalated SOD1 (apo-SOD1) is biphasic, and the addition of stoichiometric Zn(2+) into the refolding buffer remarkably accelerates both the fast phase and the slow phase of the oxidative refolding, compared with without Zn(2+). Aggregation of apo-SOD1 in the presence of stoichiometric Zn(2+) is remarkably slower than that in the absence of Zn(2+). In contrast, the effects of stoichiometric Cu(2+) on both the rates of the oxidative refolding and the aggregation of apo-SOD1 are not remarkable. Experiments of resistance to proteinase K showed that apo-SOD1 forms a conformation with low-level proteinase K resistance during refolding and stoichiometric Cu(2+) has no obvious effect on the resistance to proteinase K. In contrast, when the refolding buffer contains stoichiometric zinc, SOD1 forms a compact conformation with high-level proteinase K resistance during refolding. Our data here demonstrated that stoichiometric zinc plays an important role in the oxidative refolding of low micromolar bovine SOD1 by accelerating the oxidative refolding, suppressing the aggregation during refolding, and helping the protein to form a compact conformation with high protease resistance activity.

  19. Treatment of Wilson's disease with zinc. II. Validation of oral /sup 64/copper with copper balance

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, G.M.; Brewer, G.J.; Juni, J.E.; Prasad, A.S.; Dick, R.D.

    1986-12-01

    The efficacy of zinc as a therapeutic agent to control copper balance in Wilson's disease patients has been previously documented with balance studies. In an attempt to develop a simpler and faster tool for evaluating the adequacy of zinc therapy, a technique that measures the uptake into blood of a small oral dose of /sup 64/copper was studied in conjunction with copper balance. The mean peak /sup 64/copper uptake into blood of nine Wilson's disease patients on D-penicillamine, trien, or no medication was 6.04 +/- 2.74%, comparable with normal controls. Seven patients on zinc therapy had a markedly and significantly reduced mean uptake of 0.79 +/- 1.05% after treatment. The data demonstrate that the prevention of copper uptake into blood in Wilson's disease patients by zinc therapy can be evaluated by /sup 64/copper uptake and that peak uptakes of less than 1% occur in patients with neutral or negative copper balance.

  20. Are serum zinc and copper levels related to semen quality?

    PubMed

    Yuyan, Li; Junqing, Wu; Wei, Yuan; Weijin, Zhou; Ersheng, Gao

    2008-04-01

    Low serum zinc levels are harmful to semen quality in Chinese men. In this study, eligible men aged 20-59 years old-excluding those who had ever had urinary or genital disease, tuberculosis, or occupational heavy metal contact-were examined for semen quality and serum zinc and copper concentrations. Progressive motility showed differences among the five copper groups, but multiple logistic analyses did not show that higher or lower serum copper levels had a significant effect on sperm quality. When serum zinc concentration was low, the risk of asthenozoospermia was higher. The ratio of Cu/Zn was higher in the progressive motility abnormal group than in the normal group.

  1. Ternary cadmium zinc sulphide films with high charge mobilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampong, Francis K.; Awudza, Johannes A. M.; Nkum, R. K.; Boakye, F.; Thomas, P. John; O'Brien, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium zinc sulphide thin films with high charge mobilities are obtained from acidic chemical baths employing the corresponding metal chlorides, urea and thioacetamide. The films are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, absorption spectroscopy and charge transport measurements. The compositional control afforded by the technique and the resultant changes in the structural, optical and electronic properties of the films are critically examined. We find good correlation between structure and properties at extremes of the composition range.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of luminescent cadmium selenide/zinc selenide/zinc sulfide cholinomimetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Gégout, Claire; McAtee, Maria L; Bennett, Nichole M; Viranga Tillekeratne, L M; Kirchhoff, Jon R

    2012-08-07

    Luminescent quantum dots conjugated with highly selective molecular recognition ligands are widely used for targeting and imaging biological structures. In this paper, water soluble cholinomimetic cadmium selenide (core), zinc selenide/zinc sulfide (shell) quantum dots were synthesized for targeting cholinergic sites. Cholinomimetic specificity was incorporated by conjugation of the quantum dots to an aminated analogue of hemicholinium-15, a well known competitive inhibitor of the high affinity choline uptake transporter. Detailed evaluation of the nanocrystal synthesis and characterization of the final product was conducted by (1)H and (31)P NMR, absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Venoms, copper, and zinc in the treatment of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, J R

    1999-11-01

    This article discusses the use of venoms, copper, and zinc in the treatment of arthritis. The author examines the history and effectiveness of viper, bee, and ant venoms in order to determine whether these natural ingredients in anti-inflammatory medications help relieve a patient's symptoms. Copper and zinc studies may offer therapeutic benefits, but there is still no solid consensus on the potential role of these elements in treating arthritis.

  4. Inclusion free cadmium zinc tellurium and cadmium tellurium crystals and associated growth method

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleskey E [South Setauket, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2010-07-20

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for crystal growth of cadmium zinc tellurium (CZT) and cadmium tellurium (CdTe) crystals with an inverted growth reactor chamber. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables growth of single, large, high purity CZT and CdTe crystals that can be used, for example, in X-ray and gamma detection, substrates for infrared detectors, or the like. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables reductions in the presence of Te inclusions, which are recognized as an important limiting factor in using CZT or CdTe as radiation detectors. The inverted growth reactor chamber can be utilized with existing crystal growth techniques such as the Bridgman crystal growth mechanism and the like. In an exemplary embodiment, the inverted growth reactor chamber is a U-shaped ampoule.

  5. Accumulation, elimination, and speciation of cadmium and zinc in mussels, Mytilus edulis, in the natural environment

    SciTech Connect

    Luten, J.B.; Bouquet, W.; Burggraaf, M.M.; Rus, J.

    1986-10-01

    Accumulation of trace metals like cadmium and zinc by the common mussel (Mytilus edulis) has been often studied. Most of these studies have been carried out under laboratory conditions. It has been shown that the accumulation of cadmium by the common mussel is affected by abiotic factors like salinity, temperature and the presence of complexing agents and biotic factors like animal size, sex and maturity. Elimination studies of cadmium from the common mussel are scarce. Detoxification of cadmium by the common mussel takes place by binding to low (metallothionein) and high molecular weight proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate accumulation and elimination of cadmium and zinc by the common mussel in the natural environment in combination with a study about the speciation of cadmium and zinc in the common mussel.

  6. A zinc-resistant human epithelial cell line is impaired in cadmium and manganese import

    SciTech Connect

    Rousselet, Estelle |; Richaud, Pierre ||; Douki, Thierry; Chantegrel, Jocelyne Garcia; Favier, Alain |||; Moulis, Jean-Marc ||

    2008-08-01

    A human epithelial cell line (HZR) growing with high zinc concentrations has been analyzed for its ability to sustain high cadmium concentrations. Exposure to up to 200 {mu}M of cadmium acetate for 24 h hardly impacted viability, whereas most of parental HeLa cells were killed by less than 10 {mu}M of cadmium. Upon challenge by 35 fold higher cadmium concentrations than HeLa cells, HZR cells did not display increased DNA damage, increased protein oxidation, or changed intracellular cadmium localization. Rather, the main cause of resistance against cadmium was by avoiding cadmium entry into cells, which differs from that against zinc as the latter accumulates inside cells. The zinc-resistant phenotype of these cells was shown to also impair extracellular manganese uptake. Manganese and cadmium competed for entry into HeLa cells. Probing formerly identified cadmium or manganese transport systems in different animal cells did not evidence any significant change between HeLa and HZR cells. These results reveal zinc adaptation influences manganese and cadmium cellular traffic and they highlight previously unknown connections among homeostasis of divalent metals.

  7. Toxicological studies of cadmium and zinc on the crayfish Orconectes virilis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirenda, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The acute toxicities of cadmium and of zinc to the crayfish Oronectes virilis were determined. Adult, intermolt crayfish were exposed to a series of concentrations of either cadmium or zinc for a two week period. Cadmium was found to be a cumulative poison to the crayfish; LC50 values decreased from 6.1 mg Cd/I for 96 hours to 0.7 mg Cd/I for two weeks. An incipient LC50 was also estimated to be 0.0604 mg Cd/I. Zinc was found to have a relatively low toxicity to O. virilis under the present exposure conditions. Whole animal and tissue analyses for cadmium or zinc were performed on the crayfish used in the acute toxicity tests. Whole animals concentrations both for cadmium and for zinc exhibited a linear relationship to exposure concentrations (r = 0.85 and 0.87, respectively). The gills had the highest concentrations (r = 0.85 and 0.87, respectively). The gills had the highest concentrations of cadmium and zinc, and displayed a linear relationship to exposure concentrations (r = 0.82 and 0.87 respectively). The hepatopancreas displayed a plateau in metal concentrations and is probably the main storage site for both metals in the crayfish. The relationship of cadmium concentration to exposure concentration in the antennal glands also showed linearity (r = 0.65), while zinc levels reached a steady state level. All the remaining tissues analyzed exhibited a plateau in metal concentration.

  8. Analysis of serum zinc and copper concentrations in hair loss.

    PubMed

    Kil, Min Seong; Kim, Chul Woo; Kim, Sang Seok

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that some trace elements such as zinc and copper play a significant role in many forms of hair loss. However, the effect of zinc and copper in the pathogenesis of hair loss is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the zinc and copper status in each of four types of hair loss. A study was carried out with 30 health controls and 312 patients who were diagnosed with alopecia areata (AA), male pattern hair loss, female pattern hair loss and telogen effluvium (TE) (2008 to 2011; Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital). Zinc and copper serum concentrations were evaluated between controls and each of four types of hair loss patients. In all of the hair loss patients, the mean serum zinc was 84.33±22.88, significantly lower than the control group (97.94±21.05 µg/dl) (p=0.002), whereas the serum copper was 96.44±22.62, which was not significantly different (p=0.975). The analysis of each group showed that all groups of hair loss had statistically lower zinc concentration, but not copper concentrations. However, the ratio of the patients with serum zinc concentration lower than 70 µg/dl was significantly high in only the AA group (odds ratio, OR 4.02; confidence interval, CI 1.13 to 14.31) and the TE group (OR 1.12; CI 1.12 to 17.68). The data led to the hypothesis of zinc metabolism disturbances playing a key role in hair loss, especially AA and TE, whereas the effect of copper on hair growth and shedding cycles still needs more study.

  9. Effect of zinc on copper and iron bioavailability as influenced by dietary copper and fat source

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.C.; Jones, B.P.; Lin, F.; Sinthusek, G.; Frimpong, N.A.; Wu, S.

    1986-03-05

    In a number of experiments, they have observed that liver copper levels of young male rats fed low zinc diets were essentially the same as liver copper levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Liver iron levels of rats fed low zinc diets, however, tended to be markedly higher than liver iron levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Increases in dietary zinc (up to 200 ppm) were generally associated with decreases in liver iron deposition, but had little effect on liver copper deposition. Iron bioavailability appeared to be enhanced when fat sources high in saturated fatty acids were used, and there was evidence that the type of dietary fat influenced the effect of zinc on iron bioavailability. Liver copper deposition, however, did not appear to be markedly affected by the type of dietary fat suggesting that copper bioavailability is less affected by fat source. Increases in dietary copper were associated with increases in liver copper levels and decreases in liver iron levels of rats fed increasing levels of zinc. These data suggest that potential interrelationships between dietary factors not being considered as experimental variables could have significant effects on results and on the interrelationships between dietary variables which are being studied.

  10. Effects of Nano-zinc on Biochemical Parameters in Cadmium-Exposed Rats.

    PubMed

    Hejazy, Marzie; Koohi, Mohammad Kazem

    2017-04-17

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic environmental and occupational pollutant with reported toxic effects on the kidneys, liver, lungs, bones, and the immunity system. Based on its physicochemical similarity to cadmium, zinc (Zn) shows protective effects against cadmium toxicity and cadmium accumulation in the body. Nano-zinc and nano-zinc oxide (ZnO), recently used in foods and pharmaceutical products, can release a great amount of Zn(2+) in their environment. This research was carried out to investigate the more potent properties of the metal zinc among sub-acute cadmium intoxicated rats. Seventy-five male Wistar rats were caged in 15 groups. Cadmium chloride (CdCl2) was used in drinking water to induce cadmium toxicity. Different sizes (15, 20, and 30 nm) and doses of nano-zinc particles (3, 10, 100 mg/kg body weight [bw]) were administered solely and simultaneously with CdCl2 (2-5 mg/kg bw) for 28 days. The experimental animals were decapitated, and the biochemical biomarkers (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) were determined in their serum after oral exposure to nano-zinc and cadmium. Statistical analysis was carried out with a one-way ANOVA and t test. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The haematocrit (HCT) significantly increased and blood coagulation time significantly reduced in the nano-zinc-treated rats. AST, ALT, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, and free fatty acids increased significantly in the cadmium- and nano-zinc-treated rats compared with the controls. However, albumin, total protein, and HDLc significantly decreased in the cadmium- and nano-zinc-treated rats compared with the controls (P < 0.05). It seems that in the oral administration of nano-zinc, the smaller sizes with low doses and the larger sizes with high doses are more toxic than metallic zinc. In a few cases, an inverse dose-dependent relationship was seen as well. This research showed that in spite of larger sizes of zinc, smaller sizes of nano-zinc particles are not

  11. Fate and behaviour of copper and zinc in secondary biological wastewater treatment processes: I. Evaluation of biomass adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Crane, R S; Barton, P; Cartmell, E; Coulon, F; Hillis, P; Judd, S J; Santos, A; Stephenson, T; Lester, J N

    2010-06-01

    The current sources of copper and zinc in municipal wastewaters have been considered, and the changes in the concentrations and quantities of these two elements entering sewage treatment works over the last three decades have been calculated. The concentrations and quantities of the heavy metals cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead and zinc, entering UK sewage treatment works, have been reduced by between 50% and 90% during this period. However, the reductions in copper and zinc appear to be at the lower end of these ranges and thus remain a cause for concern, particularly their concentrations in sewage effluents and their potential environmental impacts on receiving waters. Bench studies have been undertaken to predict removals by three types of biological wastewater treatment plants: trickling filters, conventional activated sludge and membrane bioreactors, to determine if any of these processes are more efficacious for the removal of these metals. These results suggest that, despite membrane bioreactor biomass achieving the lowest effluent suspended solids concentration and having the lowest effluent chemical oxygen demand, which is accepted as a surrogate measure of organic chemical chelating ability of the aqueous phase, they produce the highest effluent values for the two metals in this study (copper and zinc). Removals of zinc and copper in biological wastewater treatment processes are probably primarily determined by those factors influencing metal solubility in the biomass matrix.

  12. Influence of cadmium and zinc sulphates on the function of human T lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petanová, J; Fucíková, T; Bencko, V

    2000-08-01

    Substances present in our environment influence the whole organism, including the immune system. Metals are one of the principal parts of these substances. It is generally supposed that they may have stimulating effect on immunity system in low concentrations in comparison with high concentrations in which they are toxic, with variations of each metal. There are differences between for example cadmium and zinc, and cadmium is toxic in low concentrations either. The effect of cadmium on the immune system has not been studied so deeply as the influence of zinc. In our work, we are interested in the study of immunomodulation caused by cadmium in comparison with the influence of zinc. We tested the effect of cadmium and zinc sulphates on human T lymphocytes in vitro. Molar concentrations of salts used in our work were from 10(-2) M to 10(-10) M. The influence of metals on lymphocytes in cell culture was studied by the expression of surface antigen CD69, blast transformation and IL-2 and IL-4 intracellular production after 2, 24 and 72 h cultivation. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies. The results show more expressive differences in blast transformation. There are stimulating effects of cadmium in concentrations 10(-3) M, 10(-4) M and 10(-8) M, and zinc 10(-3) M. The most suppressive effect is in concentrations 10(-10) M of cadmium and 10(-8) M of zinc. The highest CD69 expression is in concentrations 10(-4) M to 10(-6) M of cadmium, and 10(-3) M of zinc. There are minimal differences in intracellular cytokine production in CD4+ lymphocytes effected by various metal concentrations used and between cadmium and zinc salts after 2 hours cultivation. There is the elevation of cytokines negative cells after the cultivation lasting 24 hours. Our investigation of metals' influence by different methods shows possibilities for further research.

  13. Effectiveness of copper and bronze for zinc capture

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P. S.

    2012-10-15

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the efficacy of using copper and bronze sheet and screen under high vacuum conditions to capture zinc vapor. The experiments were conducted in a parametric manner using a fixed zinc vaporization temperature (350°C) but varying the filter temperature from ambient to 550°C. Consistent with previous work, metallic zinc was deposited at low temperatures, but the deposit was non-adherent. At an intermediate temperature range (350-450°C), the deposit formed an alloy with both copper and bronze materials. At higher temperatures (> 500°C) the zinc did not deposit on the surfaces likely due to its high vapor pressure. Additional testing to optimize the zinc 'getter' chemistry and surface condition is warranted.

  14. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Zinc protects testicular injury induced by concurrent exposure to cadmium and lead in rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D K; Murthy, R C; Singh, C; Chandra, S V

    1989-05-01

    The effect of coexposure to lead and cadmium (each 50 ppm alone and 25 ppm in combination) on the testes of rats and the preventive role of zinc (50 ppm) was investigated by administering these metals through drinking water. Male weaned albino rats were exposed to these metals for 120 days. Testicular histology, sperm counts and sperm motility were studied in these rats. The animals coexposed to lead and cadmium exhibited much more pronounced pathological changes and reduced sperm counts compared to the animals exposed to either of the metals alone. Zinc supplementation to the lead + cadmium exposed rats revealed the protective effect of zinc on these parameters. The observed higher magnitude of changes in the testes of lead + cadmium exposed group seems to be due to the excessive cadmium accumulation.

  16. Maternal Cadmium, Iron and Zinc Levels, DNA Methylation and Birth Weight

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Cadmium (Cd) is a ubiquitous and environmentally persistent toxic metal that has been implicated in neurotoxicity, carcinogenesis and obesity and essential metals including zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) may alter these outcomes. However mechanisms underlying these relationsh...

  17. Maternal Cadmium, Iron and Zinc Levels, DNA Methylation and Birth Weight

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Cadmium (Cd) is a ubiquitous and environmentally persistent toxic metal that has been implicated in neurotoxicity, carcinogenesis and obesity and essential metals including zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) may alter these outcomes. However mechanisms underlying these relationsh...

  18. Zinc protection against cadmium effect on estrual cycle of Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Rivera, O E; Belmonte, N; Herkovits, J

    1990-04-01

    A single dose of cadmium chloride (2.2 mg/kg of body wt) increased the estrual cycle period about two times. This effect could be prevented by means of simultaneous administration of zinc at the same dose.

  19. Zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Central East Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.; Born, E.W.; Agger, C.T.; Nielsen, C.O.

    1995-02-01

    Muscle, liver, and kidney tissues from 38 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) caught in the Scoresby Sound area, Central East Greenland, were analysed for zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium. In general, cadmium concentrations were low in muscle, liver and kidney tissue. This finding can be explained by low cadmium levels in the blubber of ringed seals. The concentration of mercury in muscle tissue was low, whereas concentrations in liver and kidney tissue were relatively high. Mercury and cadmium were positively correlated with age in liver and kidney. Zinc was positively correlated with in kidney, and selenium was correlated with age in liver. Contrary to other marine mammals, polar bears had higher mercury levels in the kidneys than in the liver. In all three tissues polar bears had significantly lower cadmium levels than ringed seals from the same area. Mercury levels were significantly lower in the muscle tissue of polar bears than in ringed seals, where-as levels in the liver and kidney were significantly higher. The previous geographic trend for cadmium and mercury found in Canadian polar bears could be extended to cover East Greenland as well. Hence cadmium levels were higher in Greenland than in Canada, while the opposite was the case for mercury. Greenland polar bears had higher mercury and cadmium contents in livers and kidneys than polar bears from Svalbard. The mercury levels in muscle and liver tissue from polar bears from East Greenland were twice as high as found in bears from western Alaska, but half the levels found in northern Alaska. Cadmium and zinc were partially correlated in kidney tissue, and this was found for mercury and selenium as well. Cadmium and zinc showed molar ratios close to unity with the highest concentrations occurring in kidney tissue, while the levels of zinc exceeded cadmium in muscle and liver tissue by up to several decades. Mercury and selenium showed molar ratios close to unity in liver and kidneys. 56 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Levels of dissolved zinc and cadmium in some surface waters of western Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Fatoki, O.S.

    1993-12-31

    Dissolved zinc and cadmium in some surface waters of Western Nigeria were separated and quantified using anion exchange of their chloro-complexes and detected by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Concentrations of zinc and cadmium found in tested water samples ranged from 0.99 to 2.97 mg L{sup {minus}1} and 0.13 to 0.17 mg L{sup {minus}1}, respectively. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Deposition of zinc and cadmium by marine bacteria in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLerran, C.J.; Holmes, Charles W.

    1974-01-01

    Mixed cultures of marine bacteria isolated from the sediments of Corpus Christi Harbor were examined for their ability to assimilate or precipitate radioactive zinc and cadmium from solution. Test data indicate that during summer, when bacterial activity is at a maximum, the bacteria and their metabolic byproducts play a significant role in the removal of zinc and cadmium from seawater and their subsequent deposition in marine sediments.

  2. Induced Positron Annihiliation Investigation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Crystal Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Akers

    2005-06-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crystals are used in semiconductor radiation detectors for the detection of x-ray and gamma radiation. However, production of detector grade crystals is difficult as small variations in compositional uniformity and primarily the zinc content can significantly affect the ability of the CZT crystal to function as a radiation detector. Currently there are no known nondestructive methods that can be used to identify detector grade crystals. The current test method is to fabricate and test the detector to determine if the crystal is sufficiently uniform and of the correct composition to be considered a detector grade crystal. Consequently, nondestructive detection methods are needed to identify detector grade crystals prior to the fabrication process. The purpose of this feasibility study was to perform a preliminary assessment of the ability of several new, nondestructive technologies based on Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA) to determine if detector grade CZT crystals can be identified. Results of measurements performed on specimens from Fisk University and EV Products, Inc. indicate that both the near surface Distributed Source Positron Annihilation (up to 3 mm penetration) and the volumetric Photon Induced Positron Annihilation methods may be suitable for determining CZT crystal quality. Further work on CZT crystals with a broader range of compositions and detector characteristics is needed to provide a well defined, calibrated, method for assessing CZT crystal quality.

  3. Synthesis and interface structures of zinc sulfide sheathed zinc-cadmium nanowire heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guozhen; Bando, Yoshio; Gao, Yihua; Golberg, Dmitri

    2006-07-27

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) sheathed zinc (Zn)-cadmium (Cd) nanowire heterojunctions have been prepared by thermal evaporating of ZnS and CdS powders in a vertical induction furnace at 1200 degrees C. Studies found that both the Zn and Cd subnanowires, within a single nanoheterojunction, are single-crystallines with the growth directions perpendicular to the [210] plane, whereas the sheathed ZnS is polycrystalline with a thickness of ca. 5 nm. The Zn/Cd interface structure in the ZnS sheathed Zn-Cd nanowire heterojunctions was thoroughly experimentally studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and theoretically studied using a near-coincidence site lattice (NCSL) concept. The results show that the Cd and Zn have a crystalline orientation relationship as [0001]Zn//[0001]Cd, (10(-)10)Zn//(10(-)10)Cd, (01(-)10)Zn//(01(-)10)Cd, and ((-)1100)Zn//((-)1100)Cd.

  4. Chronic cadmium toxicity to sperm of heavy cigarette smokers: immunomodulation by zinc.

    PubMed

    Al-Bader, A; Omu, A E; Dashti, H

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of zinc therapy in 125 male cigarette smokers with infertility. The mechanism involved in the zinc/cadmium relationship was evaluated through the effect of a zinc-deficient diet and supplementation on testes of male adult Sprague-Drew rats. Heavy smoking was associated with low sperm count, motility, and morphology and increased seminal cadmium levels. Zinc therapy improved sperm quality and increased seminal IL-4, but reduced TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. A zinc-deficient diet led to high cadmium testicular accumulation comparable with those supplemented with cadmium. Cadmium had a linear correlation with TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, but not with IL-4. Cytology of testicular aspirate and histopathology were normal in supplemented groups as in controls. These results indicate that zinc modulates the putative effect of cadmium through its enhancement of T-helper 2 cytokines expression and down-regulation of T-helper 1 cytokines.

  5. Low serum zinc is associated with elevated risk of cadmium nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu-Sheng; Ho, Wen-Chao; Caffrey, James L.; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2014-10-15

    Background: Despite animal evidence suggests that zinc modulates cadmium nephrotoxicity, limited human data are available. Objective: To test the hypothesis that low serum zinc concentrations may increase the risk of cadmium-mediated renal dysfunction in humans. Methods: Data from 1545 subjects aged 20 or older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2011–2012 were analyzed. Renal function was defined as impaired when estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) fell below 60 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and/or the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio surpassed 2.5 in men and 3.5 mg/mmol in women. Results: Within the study cohort, 117 subjects had reduced eGFR and 214 had elevated urinary albumin. After adjusting for potential confounders, subjects with elevated blood cadmium (>0.53 μg/L) were more likely to have a reduced eGFR (odds ratio [OR]=2.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09–4.50) and a higher urinary albumin (OR=2.04, 95% CI: 1.13–3.69) than their low cadmium (<0.18 μg/L) peers. In addition, for any given cadmium exposure, low serum zinc is associated with elevated risk of reduced eGFR (OR=3.38, 95% CI: 1.39–8.28). A similar increase in the odds ratio was observed between declining serum zinc and albuminuria but failed to reach statistical significance. Those with lower serum zinc/blood cadmium ratios were likewise at a greater risk of renal dysfunction (p<0.01). Conclusions: This study results suggest that low serum zinc concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cadmium nephrotoxicity. Elevated cadmium exposure is global public health issue and the assessment of zinc nutritional status may be an important covariate in determining its effective renal toxicity. - Highlights: • Blood cadmium was associated with increased risk of nephrotoxicity. • Low serum zinc may exacerbate risk of cadmium-mediated renal dysfunction. • Both zinc deficiency and elevated cadmium exposure are global public health issues.

  6. An aqueous zinc-ion battery based on copper hexacyanoferrate.

    PubMed

    Trócoli, Rafael; La Mantia, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    A new zinc-ion battery based on copper hexacyanoferrate and zinc foil in a 20 mM solution of zinc sulfate, which is a nontoxic and noncorrosive electrolyte, at pH 6 is reported. The voltage of this novel battery system is as high as 1.73 V. The system shows cyclability, rate capability, and specific energy values near to those of lithium-ion organic batteries based on Li4 Ti5 O12 and LiFePO4 at 10 C. The effects of Zn(2+) intercalation and H2 evolution on the performance of the battery are discussed in detail. In particular, it has been observed that hydrogen evolution can cause a shift in pH near the surface of the zinc electrode, and favor the stabilization of zinc oxide, which decreases the performance of the battery. This mechanism is hindered when the surface of zinc becomes rougher.

  7. A study of the stability of cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide and cadmium sulfide copper-indium-diselenide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, G.; Richard, N.; Gaines, G.

    1984-08-01

    Groups of high efficiency cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide solar cells were exposed to combinations of stresses designed to isolate and accelerate intrinsic degradation mechanisms. Stresses included elevated temperature, illumination intensity, and cell loading conditions. All stress exposures and tests were conducted in a benign (high purity argon) atmosphere. Two primary intrinsic modes of degradation were identified: degradation of the open circuit voltage under continuous illumination and nonzero loading was found to be self recovering upon interruption of illumination or upon shorting or reverse biasing the cells. It was attributed to traps in the depletion region. Recovery from decay of light generated current was not spontaneous but could be partially accomplished by annealing in a reducing (hydrogen) environment. It was attributed to changes in the stoichiometry of the copper sulfide under the influence of electric fields and currents.

  8. Copper and zinc in CCl/sub 4/ treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Loyke, H.F.

    1984-04-01

    The role of two trace metals, copper and zinc, are important in maintaining blood pressure and the effect of carbon tetrachloride (CCl/sub 4/) has been found to be a depressor. Experimental renal hypertension has been reduced to normotension after multiple subcutaneous injections of CCl/sub 4/. By dose adjustment, the degree of liver damage has been reduced to a level of mild to moderate degree of fatty metamorphosis of the liver. It is possible that the depressor effect could be mediated by imbalance of copper and/or zinc. In the present study, copper and zinc levels were determined following CCl/sub 4/ treatment. The present work used normotensive rats treated for periods, which, in hypertensive animals, caused the blood pressure to fall.

  9. Low serum zinc is associated with elevated risk of cadmium nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Sheng; Ho, Wen-Chao; Caffrey, James L; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2014-10-01

    Despite animal evidence suggests that zinc modulates cadmium nephrotoxicity, limited human data are available. To test the hypothesis that low serum zinc concentrations may increase the risk of cadmium-mediated renal dysfunction in humans. Data from 1545 subjects aged 20 or older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2011-2012 were analyzed. Renal function was defined as impaired when estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) fell below 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and/or the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio surpassed 2.5 in men and 3.5mg/mmol in women. Within the study cohort, 117 subjects had reduced eGFR and 214 had elevated urinary albumin. After adjusting for potential confounders, subjects with elevated blood cadmium (>0.53 μg/L) were more likely to have a reduced eGFR (odds ratio [OR]=2.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09-4.50) and a higher urinary albumin (OR=2.04, 95% CI: 1.13-3.69) than their low cadmium (<0.18 μg/L) peers. In addition, for any given cadmium exposure, low serum zinc is associated with elevated risk of reduced eGFR (OR=3.38, 95% CI: 1.39-8.28). A similar increase in the odds ratio was observed between declining serum zinc and albuminuria but failed to reach statistical significance. Those with lower serum zinc/blood cadmium ratios were likewise at a greater risk of renal dysfunction (p<0.01). This study results suggest that low serum zinc concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cadmium nephrotoxicity. Elevated cadmium exposure is global public health issue and the assessment of zinc nutritional status may be an important covariate in determining its effective renal toxicity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. [Relationship between the amount of copper and zinc given to critically ill patients on total parenteral nutrition and plasma and erythrocyte copper and zinc levels].

    PubMed

    Menéndez, A M; Weisstaub, A; Montemerlo, H; Alloatti, S; Guidoni, M E; Rusi, F; Portela, M L de

    2008-01-01

    Complications resulting from zinc and copper deficiency, or adverse effects from excessive zinc and copper intake should be avoided during total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This study was conducted on critically ill patients requiring TPN to determine the relationship between the zinc and copper levels of the TPN mixtures, patients' clinical progression, and changes in plasma levels of zinc, serum levels of copper, and erythrocyte levels of zinc and copper. 29 adult critically ill patients following pancreatitis or after a major abdominal surgery were studied. Zinc and copper levels in TPN, plasmatic zinc levels, copper serum levels and erythrocyte levels of zinc and copper were determined at the onset and at the end of the treatment (5-21 days) (using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry). The mean+/-standard deviation (and ranges in parenthesis) of zinc and copper levels in TPN were (microg/mL): zinc: 4.2+/-1.7 (1.8 a 9.3); copper: 0.94+/-0.66 (0.1 a 3.1). Biochemical parameters at the onset and at the end of the treatment were, respectively: (microg/mL): plasmatic zinc: 80+/-45 (29-205) and 122+/-56 (37-229); erythrocyte zinc: 2,300+/-1,070 (790-5,280) and 2,160+/-920 (790-4,440); serum copper (microg/dL): 124+/-35 (62-211) and 128+/-41 (60- 238); erythrocyte copper (microg/dl): 72+/-39 (4-183) and 70+/-41 (9-156). Plasmatic and erythrocyte zinc levels did not correlated neither at the onset nor at the end of the treatment. Changes in erythrocyte zinc levels correlated with daily administered zinc (mg/d) in the parenteral nutrition (r=0.38). Serum copper and erythrocyte copper showed significant correlation at the onset (p=0.0005) and at the end of treatment (p=0.008). Changes of serum or erythrocyte copper levels showed a significant correlation with daily administered copper (r=0.31 and 0.26, respectively). These results show that: 1) determination of erythrocyte zinc and copper levels in these critically ill patients would help to control zinc and copper

  11. Serum copper and zinc levels in melanoma patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.L.; Spitler, L.E.; McNeill, K.L.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1981-04-01

    Serum copper levels (SCL) and serum zinc levels (SZL) were evaluated in malignant melanoma patients at various clinical stages. Copper levels were generally found to be elevated, reflecting the degree and extent of tumor activity. Zinc levels and, hence, SCL:SZL ratios did not reflect tumor activity. SCL appeared to prognosticate disease progression in that all patients whose values never declined below 150 ..mu..g/100 ml died during the course of the study. However, not all patients who died from tumor metastases displayed persistent elevations of SCL. Patients receiving BCG immunotherapy appeared to have higher SCL than untreated patients.

  12. Purification of human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase by copper chelate affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Weslake, R.J.; Chesney, S.L.; Petkau, A.; Friesen, A.D.

    1986-05-15

    Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase was isolated from human red blood cell hemolysate by DEAE-Sepharose and copper chelate affinity chromatography. Enzyme preparations had specific activities ranging from 3400 to 3800 U/mg and recoveries were approximately 60% of the enzyme activity in the lysate. Copper chelate affinity chromatography resulted in a purification factor of about 60-fold. The homogeneity of the superoxide dismutase preparation was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis, analytical gel filtration chromatography, and isoelectric focusing.

  13. Acute toxicity and synergism of cadmium and zinc in white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus, Juveniles

    SciTech Connect

    Vanegas, C.; Espina, S.; Botello, A.V.; Villanueva, S.

    1997-01-01

    Toxic effects of individual heavy metals on decapod crustaceans have been reported frequently, but little information exists concerning interactions. Among the non-essential heavy metals, cadmium is one of the most hazardous elements in the aquatic environment; on the other hand, zinc is an essential element, but toxic when present in greater than trace amounts. Biological effects of cadmium in aquatic organisms are complex due to the interactions with both environmental variables and other toxic agents. In decapod crustaceans, the toxicity of cadmium and zinc is modified by salinity, temperature, hypoxia, calcium ion concentrations and life-cycle stage. Heavy metal pollution has increased in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico, particularly in shrimp habitat. This study examined the toxicity of cadmium and zinc to white shrimp juveniles and looked at the interaction of the metals. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Response of zinc, iron and copper status parameters to supplementation with zinc or zinc and iron in women

    SciTech Connect

    Yadrick, K.; Kenney, M.A.; Winterfeldt, E.

    1986-03-05

    Supplementation with zinc at levels available over-the-counter may compromise iron or copper status. This study examined the effects of zinc(50mg/day) or zinc and iron(50 mg each/day) on 18 women aged 25-40. Subjects were matched on initial levels of serum ferritin(SF) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase(ESOD) and randomly assigned to Group Z (zinc) or F-Z (iron and zinc). The following were measured pretreatment and after 6 and 10 weeks treatment: serum zinc (BZ), salivary sediment zinc (SSZ), hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), SF, serum ceruloplasmin (Cp) and ESOD. Effects of treatment and weeks of treatment on changes from initial blood and saliva levels were analyzed using AOV. BZ increased (P=0.0144) and ESOD decreased (P=0.0001) with weeks of treatment. Differences due to treatment are presented. No effects were noted on Hgb, Hct or Cp. Intakes of zinc supplements at about 4X RDA appear to decrease copper(ESOD) and iron(SF) status. Use of iron w/zinc may be protective for FE but not Cu, and may compromise zinc (SSZ) status.

  15. Comparison of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hee, Ay Ching; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mehrali, Mohammad; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-12-01

    Ferrite is an important ceramic material with magnetic properties that are useful in many types of electronic devices. In this study, structure and magnetic properties of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion were compared. Both ferrites samples demonstrated similar weight loss characteristics in TGA. The magnesium copper zinc ferrite showed a crystalline structure with an average crystallite size of 13.5 nm. However, nickel zinc ferrite showed an amorphous phase. Transmission electron micrographs showed agglomerated nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 26.6 nm for magnesium copper zinc ferrite and 22.7 nm for nickel zinc ferrite. Magnesium copper zinc ferrite exhibited soft ferromagnetic bahaviour whereas nickel zinc ferrite showed superparamagnetic nature.

  16. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the accumulation of cadmium and metallothionein in selected tissues of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of continuous dietary zinc deficiency on the metabolism of the toxic heavy metal cadmium has not been widely studied. This investigation was designed to assess the effects of subadequate dietary zinc intake on the accumulation of dietary cadmium and on metallothionein (MT) and zinc concentrations in target organs of cadmium toxicity. Adult male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were allowed, ad libitum, diets either adequate (60 ppm) or deficient (7 ppm) in zinc for a total of 9 wk. The zinc-deficient diet resulted in an approximately 40% reduction in plasma zinc (assessed at 3, 6, and 9 wk) in the absence of overt signs of zinc deficiency (i.e., reduced weight gain, alopecia, etc.). Separate groups of rats were also maintained on zinc-defined diets for a total of 9 wk, but cadmium was added to the diet (0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 ppm) a the end of wk 3 and maintained at that level throughout the remaining 6 wk of the study, when the rats were killed. The feeding of the zinc-deficient diet markedly enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the liver, kidney, and testes. Hepatic, renal, and testicular zinc concentrations were not affected by suboptimal zinc intake alone. However, marked reductions in renal and testicular zinc concentrations were caused by zinc deficiency in concert with cadmium exposure. MT levels, when related to tissue cadmium concentrations, were elevated to a significantly lesser extent in the kidneys of zinc-deficient animals. These results indicate that marginal zinc deficiency markedly increases cadmium accumulation in various organs and reduces zinc content and MT induction in some organs.

  17. Determination of Copper and Zinc in Brass: Two Basic Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabre, Paul-Louis; Reynes, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In this experiment, the concentrations of copper and zinc in brass are obtained by two methods. This experiment does not require advanced instrumentation, uses inexpensive chemicals, and can be easily carried out during a 3-h upper-level undergraduate laboratory. Pedagogically, the basic concepts of analytical chemistry in solutions, such as pH,…

  18. Antimicrobial electrospun silver-, copper- and zinc-doped polyvinylpyrrolidone nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Jennifer; Borges, João P; Boltes, Karina; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Rosal, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    The use of electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc nanoparticles was studied to prepare antimicrobial mats using silver and copper nitrates and zinc acetate as precursors. Silver became reduced during electrospinning and formed nanoparticles of several tens of nanometers. Silver nanoparticles and the insoluble forms of copper and zinc were dispersed using low molecular weight PVP as capping agent. High molecular weight PVP formed uniform fibers with a narrow distribution of diameters around 500 nm. The fibers were converted into an insoluble network using ultraviolet irradiation crosslinking. The efficiency of metal-loaded mats against the bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was tested for different metal loadings by measuring the inhibition of colony forming units and the staining with fluorescent probes for metabolic viability and compromised membranes. The assays included the culture in contact with mats and the direct staining of surface attached microorganisms. The results indicated a strong inhibition for silver-loaded fibers and the absence of significant amounts of viable but non-culturable microorganisms. Copper and zinc-loaded mats also decreased the metabolic activity and cell viability, although in a lesser extent. Metal-loaded fibers allowed the slow release of the soluble forms of the three metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of Copper and Zinc in Brass: Two Basic Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabre, Paul-Louis; Reynes, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In this experiment, the concentrations of copper and zinc in brass are obtained by two methods. This experiment does not require advanced instrumentation, uses inexpensive chemicals, and can be easily carried out during a 3-h upper-level undergraduate laboratory. Pedagogically, the basic concepts of analytical chemistry in solutions, such as pH,…

  20. LEAD AND COPPER CONTROL WITH NON-ZINC ORTHOPHOSPHATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful application of orthophosphate formulations not containing zinc for achieving control of copper and lead corrosion requires careful consideration of the background water chemistry, particularly pH and DIC. Inhibitor performance is extremely dependent upon dosage and pH,...

  1. A cadmium-zinc-telluride crystal array spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. McHugh; W. Quam; T. DeVore; R. Vogle; J. Weslowski

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes a gamma detector employing an array of eight cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) crystals configured as a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. This detector is part of a more complex instrument that identifies the isotope,displays this information, and records the gamma spectrum. Various alarms and other operator features are incorporated in this battery operated rugged instrument. The CZT detector is the key component of this instrument and will be described in detail in this paper. We have made extensive spectral measurements of the usual laboratory gamma sources, common medical isotopes, and various Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) with this detector. Some of these data will be presented as spectra. We will also present energy resolution and detection efficiency for the basic 8-crystal array. Additional data will also be presented for a 32-crystal array. The basic 8-crystal array development was completed two years ago, and the system electronic design has been imp roved recently. This has resulted in significantly improved noise performance. We expect to have a much smaller detector package, using 8 crystals, in a few months. This package will use flip-chip packaging to reduce the electronics physical size by a factor of 5.

  2. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, James H.; Lavietes, Anthony D.

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  3. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  4. Preliminary uranium enrichment analysis results using cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; McQuaid, James H.; Paulus, T. J.

    1996-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and EG and G ORTEC have jointly developed a portable ambient-temperature detection system that can be used in a number of application scenarios. The detection system uses a planar cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector with custom-designed detector support electronics developed at LLNL and is based on the recently released MicroNOMAD multichannel analyzer (MCA) produced by ORTEC. Spectral analysis is performed using software developed at LLNL that was originally designed for use with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems. In one application, the CZT detection system determines uranium enrichments ranging from less than 3% to over 75% to within accuracies of 20%. The analysis was performed using sample sizes of 200 g or larger and acquisition times of 30 min. We have demonstrated the capabilities of this system by analyzing the spectra gathered by the CZT detection system from uranium sources of several enrichments. These experiments demonstrate that current CZT detectors can, in some cases, approach performance criteria that were previously the exclusive domain of larger HPGe detector systems.

  5. Accumulation of cadmium and zinc in Evodiopanax innovans.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Chisato; Kobayashi, Motoharu; Kanaya, Shotaro

    2009-12-01

    The use of tree species for phytoremediation of contaminated soil offers the advantage of a large biomass in which to store contaminants. We investigated the cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) accumulation ability of Evodiopanax innovans, a common deciduous tree species belonging to the Araliaceae family and widely found in secondary forests in Japan. Sampling was conducted at an old silver mine. Leaf samples were collected from nine tree species, including E. innovans. The seasonal variation of metal concentrations in the leaves and the detailed distribution of metals in the leaves and twigs of E. innovans were measured. We also analyzed the contents of organic acids in the leaves. The highest concentration of Cd in the leaves of E. innovans was 118 μg/g, which exceeds the threshold level for being considered a Cd hyperaccumulator (100 μg/g). For Zn, the highest value was 1040 μg/g in leaves, which is less than required to qualify as a Zn hyperaccumulator. Both Cd and Zn were found to accumulate in the petioles and veins of leaves and the bark of twigs. Since the oxalic acid content of leaves showed a weak correlation with Cd concentration, oxalic acid may play an important role in the accumulation of Cd. Taking both the Cd concentration level and the biomass of this woody plant into consideration, it may be possible to use E. innovans for the phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soils.

  6. Comparative studies on the toxicity of mercury, cadmium, and copper toward the isolated perfused rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Strubelt, O.; Kremer, J.; Tilse, A.; Keogh, J.; Pentz, K.R.; Younes, M.

    1996-02-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium, mercury, and copper were compared over the range 0.01, 0.03, and 0.1 mM using the isolated perfused rat liver preparation. All metals caused similar changes in various parameters used to describe general toxicity. Reductions in oxygen consumption, perfusion flow, and biliary secretion were found, while lactate dehydrogenase release , as well as liver weight, increased in a dose-dependent fashion. Each metal caused similar magnitudes of changes and exerted similar potency. Measurement of other parameters revealed a number of differences. Although all metals reduced hepatic ATP concentration, mercury and cadmium were more potent than copper. Cadmium was the most potent at decreasing reduced glutathione levels. Mercury was most effective at increasing tissue calcium content, while copper was less so, and cadmium ineffective. Only copper significantly increased tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) content, while all metals increased its release into perfusate, cadmium seemed the most potent metal in increasing MDA release, but it was least efficacious, while copper was the most. Antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and Trolox C only reduced cadmium`s influence on MDA in perfusate; but did not affect cadmium`s ability to alter most other parameters of vitality. Albumin reversed the toxic effects of copper and mercury, but not cadmium. While metal-induced reductions in perfusion flow accounted for some of the toxic effects of the metals, the results as a whole supported the suggestion that all metals exerted toxicity at the mitochondria, since ATP levels were reduced in a manner that could not be reproduced by perfusion flow reduction alone. Lipid peroxidation appears to play little role in determining toxicity induced by any of these metals. Furthermore, albumin may play an important physiological role in preventing hepatic injury that might otherwise be induced through acute metal intoxication. 40 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Biosorption of cadmium (II) and copper (II) by pretreated biomass of marine alga Gracilaria fisheri.

    PubMed

    Chaisuksant, Y

    2003-12-01

    The cadmium (II) and copper (II) adsorption properties of chemically pretreated biomass of red marine alga Gracilaria fisheri were investigated. Batch equilibrium experiments showed that the maximum adsorption capacity values of the pretreated biomass for cadmium and copper were 0.63 and 0.72 mmol g(-1), respectively. The equilibrium data fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption capacity increased as pH increased and reached a plateau at pH 4.0. The cadmium and copper uptake rates were rapid with 90% of the biosorption completed within 30 minutes. The presence of light metal ions (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) in solution had an insignificant effect on cadmium and copper sorption capacity. These findings indicate a positive potential for the biosorbent development with effective heavy metal removal capacity in the presence of light metal ions in waste streams by using the biomass of plentifully available red marine algae.

  8. Combined copper/zinc attachment to prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    Misfolding of prion protein (PrP) is responsible for diseases such as ``mad-cow disease'' in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jacob in humans. Extensive experimental investigation has established that this protein strongly interacts with copper ions, and this ability has been linked to its still unknown function. Attachment of other metal ions (zinc, iron, manganese) have been demonstrated as well, but none of them could outcompete copper. Recent finding, however, indicates that at intermediate concentrations both copper and zinc ions can attach to the PrP at the octarepeat region, which contains high affinity metal binding sites. Based on this evidence, we have performed density functional theory simulations to investigate the combined Cu/Zn attachment. We consider all previously reported binding modes of copper at the octarepeat region and examine a possibility simultaneous Cu/Zn attachment. We find that this can indeed occur for only one of the known binding sites, when copper changes its coordination mode to allow for attachment of zinc ion. The implications of the simultaneous attachment on neural function remain to be explored.

  9. Life-cycle changes and zinc shortage in cadmium-tolerant midges, Chironomus riparius (Diptera), reared in the absence of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, J.F.; Mol, S.; Larsen, H.; Admiraal, W. . Section of Aquatic Ecotoxicology)

    1995-01-01

    Adaptation to selected metals is known to modify life-cycle characteristics of some invertebrates and can modify the response to other metals. The reverse process, i.e., adaptation to nonpolluted conditions in a metal-tolerant strain, was studied here for a cadmium-tolerant population of the midge Chironomus riparius to detect whether this backward adaptation followed the same lines. It appeared that cadmium-tolerant populations, reared in the absence of cadmium, continued to suffer from high mortality rates and lowered larval growth rates and reproductive success. Also, some cadmium-tolerant populations accumulated more zinc than did nontolerant populations. Successive experiments in which both cadmium-tolerant and nontolerant populations were exposed to zinc indicated that the reduced growth rate and reproduction were a direct consequence of zinc shortage in tolerant midges reared in the absence of cadmium. Mortality among cadmium-tolerant midges was, however, not lowered by zinc exposure and, judged by their high mortality rates, these midges were even more sensitive to zinc than were nontolerant chironomids. It was concluded that cadmium-tolerant chironomid populations recovering from prolonged exposure are affected by an increased need for zinc as well as by an increased mortality rate as a direct consequence of their earlier adaptation process.

  10. Solvent extraction of cadmium and zinc from sulphate solutions: Comparison of mechanical agitation and ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Daryabor, Mahboubeh; Ahmadi, Ali; Zilouei, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the potential of ultrasonic irradiation during the solvent extraction of metals, and comparing its efficiency with a mechanically stirred system (MSSX). The simultaneous extraction of zinc and cadmium from sulphate solutions was investigated by di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an organic extractant which was diluted (20%) in kerosene at the organic: aqueous phase ratio of 1:1 and the temperature of 25°C. The influence of some critical parameters, including contact time, solution pH, ultrasonic power, and zinc/cadmium ratio were investigated on the extraction of the metals. Results show that D2EHPA selectively extract zinc rather than cadmium in both mechanically and ultrasonically mixed systems. It was also found that increase of ultrasonic power from 10 to 120W cause a small decrease in zinc extraction; while, at low and high levels of the induced power, cadmium extraction was significantly decreased. Results also show that maximum extraction amounts of zinc (88.7%) and cadmium (68.2%) by the MSSX system occurred at the pH of 3 and the contact times of 3 and 20min, respectively. Although capability of extraction in the ultrasonically assisted solvent extraction (USAX) system for both metals was higher, the selectivity was lower than that of MSSX system under different conditions especially in high zinc/cadmium ratios. It can be concluded that physical effects (i.e. mixing) inducing at low ultrasonic powers (below 60W) mainly results in increasing solvent extraction rate, while the chemical actions applied at the higher powers have a negative outcome on the extraction rate particularly for cadmium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium and zinc to two hydra species.

    PubMed

    Holdway, D A; Lok, K; Semaan, M

    2001-01-01

    The potential of two hydra species, Hydra vulgaris (pink) and Hydra viridissima (green), for use as invertebrate models for toxicity testing of waterborne metals was investigated. The acute and subchronic toxicities of cadmium (a nonessential metal) and zinc (an essential metal) were determined. Results showed that both the hydra species were more sensitive to cadmium than to zinc, and that green hydra were more sensitive than pink hydra. The mean (SE) 96 h LC50 values of cadmium and zinc for pink hydra were 83 (8.5) and 2300 (150) micrograms/L, respectively. For green hydra, the respective 96 h LC50 values for cadmium and zinc were 3.0 (0.0) and 935 (46.5) micrograms/L. The respective 7-day no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC) and lowest-observed-effect-concentrations (LOEC) for pink hydra were < 13 and 13 micrograms/L for cadmium, and < 250 and 250 micrograms/L for zinc. The respective 7-day NOEC and LOEC values for green hydra were 0.4 and 0.8, microgram/L for cadmium, and 38 and 75 micrograms/L for zinc. Neither 1, 2, or 3 x 90-min pulse-exposures to 0.4, 0.8, or 1.5 micrograms/L of cadmium had any significant deleterious effect on total green hydra numbers after seven days in clean water. Green hydra appeared to be excellent freshwater invertebrate models for testing dissolved metals based on their sensitivity and the ability to rapidly assess population reproduction in the laboratory.

  12. Comparative analysis of the biosorption of cadmium, lead, nickel, and zinc by algae.

    PubMed

    Klimmek, S; Stan, H J; Wilke, A; Bunke, G; Buchholz, R

    2001-11-01

    Thirty strains of algae were examined for their biosorption abilities in the uptake of cadmium, lead, nickel, and zinc from aqueous solution. A wide range of adsorption capacities between the different strains of algae and between the four metals can be observed. The cyanophyceae Lyngbya taylorii exhibited high uptake capacities for the four metals. The algae showed maximum capacities according to the Langmuir Adsorption Model of 1.47 mmol lead, 0.37 mmol cadmium, 0.65 mmol nickel, and 0.49 mmol zinc per gram of dry biomass. The optimum pH for L. taylorii was between pH 3 and 7 for lead, cadmium, and zinc and between pH 4 and 7 for nickel. Studies with the algae indicated a preference for the uptake of lead over cadmium, nickel, and zinc in a four metal solution. The metal binding abilities of L. taylorii could be improved by phosphorylation of the biomass. The modified biosorbent demonstrated maximum capacities of 2.52 mmol cadmium, 3.08 mmol lead, 2.79 mmol nickel, and 2.60 mmol zinc per gram of dry biomass. Investigations with phosphated L. taylorii indicated high capacities for the four metals also at low pH. The selectivity remained quite similar to the unmodified algae.

  13. Selective leaching process for the recovery of copper and zinc oxide from copper-containing dust.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-Yi; Chang, Fang-Chih; Wang, H Paul; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Ko, Chun-Han; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a resource recovery procedure for recovering copper and zinc from dust produced by copper smelting furnaces during the manufacturing of copper-alloy wires. The concentrations of copper in copper-containing dust do not meet the regulation standards defined by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration; therefore, such waste is classified as hazardous. In this study, the percentages of zinc and copper in the dust samples were approximately 38.4% and 2.6%, respectively. To reduce environmental damage and recover metal resources for industrial reuse, acid leaching was used to recover metals from these inorganic wastes. In the first stage, 2 N of sulphuric acid was used to leach the dust, with pH values controlled at 2.0-3.0, and a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:10. The results indicated that zinc extraction efficiency was higher than 95%. A selective acid leaching process was then used to recover the copper content of the residue after filtration. In the second stage, an additional 1 N of sulphuric acid was added to the suspension in the selective leaching process, and the pH value was controlled at 1.5-2.0. The reagent sodium hydroxide (2 N) was used as leachate at a pH greater than 7. A zinc hydroxide compound formed during the process and was recovered after drying. The yields for zinc and copper were 86.9-93.5% and 97.0-98.9%, respectively.

  14. An assessment of zinc oxide nanosheets as a selective adsorbent for cadmium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanosheet is assessed as a selective adsorbent for the detection and adsorption of cadmium using simple eco-friendly extraction method. Pure zinc oxide nanosheet powders were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The zinc oxide nanosheets were applied to different metal ions, including Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), La(III), Mn(II), Pb(II), Pd(II), and Y(III). Zinc oxide nanosheets were found to be selective for cadmium among these metal ions when determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Moreover, adsorption isotherm data provided that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer on zinc oxide nanosheets. PMID:24011201

  15. Indicators of lead, zinc and cadmium exposure in cattle. I. Results in a polluted area

    SciTech Connect

    Milhaud, G.E.; Mehennaoui, S.

    1988-12-01

    Dairy cattle on a farm located in the vicinity of a lead and zinc-ore processing factory were studied over 21 mo and compared with cattle on a control farm. Mean daily intakes of lead from the diet were 4.3 mg/kg body weight, with great variations; mean daily zinc intakes were 5.6 mg/kg body weight; and mean daily cadmium intakes were 0.064 mg/kg body weight. The 3 major indicators of contamination were blood lead concentrations, with mean values of 50 micrograms/100 ml of blood, zinc protoporphyrin with mean values of 165 micrograms/100 ml blood, and lead concentrations in hair which averaged 10 micrograms/g. Blood zinc concentrations and zinc concentrations were not significantly increased. One cow developed fatal post-partum paralysis. Liver, kidney and bone lead concentrations and kidney cadmium concentrations were good ''post-mortem'' indicators of exposure.

  16. Indicators of lead, zinc and cadmium exposure in cattle. I. Results in a polluted area.

    PubMed

    Milhaud, G E; Mehennaoui, S

    1988-12-01

    Dairy cattle on a farm located in the vicinity of a lead and zinc-ore processing factory were studied over 21 mo and compared with cattle on a control farm. Mean daily intakes of lead from the diet were 4.3 mg/kg body weight, with great variations; mean daily zinc intakes were 5.6 mg/kg body weight; and mean daily cadmium intakes were 0.064 mg/kg body weight. The 3 major indicators of contamination were blood lead concentrations, with mean values of 50 micrograms/100 ml of blood, zinc protoporphyrin with mean values of 165 micrograms/100 ml blood, and lead concentrations in hair which averaged 10 micrograms/g. Blood zinc concentrations and zinc concentrations were not significantly increased. One cow developed fatal post-partum paralysis. Liver, kidney and bone lead concentrations and kidney cadmium concentrations were good "post-mortem" indicators of exposure.

  17. A combined marginal deficiency of copper and zinc does not exacerbate oxidant stress asssociated with copper or zinc deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both copper deficiency (Cu-def) and zinc deficiency (Zn-def) result in oxidative stress. Thus, an experiment was conducted to determine whether a marginal Zn-def amplified oxidative stress responses to a marginal Cu-def, or vice versa. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to groups of 10 ...

  18. Removal of copper and cadmium from aqueous solution using switchgrass biochar produced via hydrothermal carbonization process.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Garcia Moscoso, Jose Luis; Kumar, Sandeep; Cao, Xiaoyan; Mao, Jingdong; Schafran, Gary

    2012-10-30

    Biochar produced from switchgrass via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) was used as a sorbent for the removal of copper and cadmium from aqueous solution. The cold activation process using KOH at room temperature was developed to enhance the porous structure and sorption properties of the HTC biochar. The sorption efficiency of HTC biochar and alkali activated HTC biochar (HTCB) for removing copper and cadmium from aqueous solution were compared with commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The present batch adsorption study describes the effects of solution pH, biochar dose, and contact time on copper and cadmium removal efficiency from single metal ion aqueous solutions. The activated HTCB exhibited a higher adsorption potential for copper and cadmium than HTC biochar and PAC. Experiments conducted with an initial metal concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 5.0 and contact time of 24 h resulted in close to 100% copper and cadmium removal by activated HTCB at 2 g/L, far greater than what was observed for HTC biochar (16% and 5.6%) and PAC (4% and 7.7%). The adsorption capacities of activated HTCB for cadmium removal were 34 mg/g (0.313 mmol/g) and copper removal was 31 mg/g (0.503 mmol/g).

  19. Cadmium and copper toxicity in three marine macroalgae: evaluation of the biochemical responses and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Babu, M Yokesh; Palanikumar, L; Nagarani, N; Devi, V Janaki; Kumar, S Ramesh; Ramakritinan, C M; Kumaraguru, A K

    2014-01-01

    Marine macroalgae have evolved a different mechanism to maintain physiological concentrations of essential metal ions and non-essential metals. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the antioxidant response and DNA damage of copper and cadmium ions in three halophytes, namely, Acanthophora spicifera, Chaetomorpha antennina, and Ulva reticulata. Accumulation of copper was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of cadmium. Biochemical responses showed that copper was considerably more toxic than cadmium (P < 0.05). Decreases in glutathione content and fluctuations of super oxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were observed corresponding to time and concentration of exposure. Interestingly, it was also observed that antioxidant levels decreased as a result of metal accumulation, which may be due to free radicals generated by copper and cadmium in seaweeds. The present study also showed that copper and cadmium increased oxidative stress and induced antioxidant defense systems against reactive oxygen species. The order of toxicity for metals in the studied seaweeds was U. reticulata > A. spicifera > C. antennina. DNA damage index analysis supported that copper was significantly (P < 0.05) more toxic than cadmium. Bioaccumulation, biochemical responses, and DNA damage observed in the here analyzed marine macroalgae after exposure to selected metals indicate that these marine organisms represent useful bioindicators of marine pollution.

  20. Interaction of copper and europium in zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhangel'skii, G.E.; Bukke, E.E.; Grigor'ev, N.N.; Lavrov, A.V.; Fok, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    Different ZnS-Eu, Cu crystals with a constant optimal Eu concentration equal to 6 x 10/sup -5/ g-atoms/g-mole and copper concentrations were studied to determine why ZnS-Eu and ZnS-Cu activators interfere with one another when introduced together. The luminescence spectra of the crystals is shown and the results of the interaction of impurities for powdered ZnS-Eu, Cu luminophores were checked. The copper impurity in the luminophore lowered the EPR intensity of europium but the concentration dependence was shifted toward higher copper concentration. The formation of copper-europium complexes was responsible for a drop in the efficiency of photoluminescence of Eu bands and the vanishing of the EPR signal of the EU/sup 2 +/ ion in the zinc sulfide lattice.

  1. Human TRPV5 and TRPV6: key players in cadmium and zinc toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gergely; Montalbetti, Nicolas; Franz, Marie-Christine; Graeter, Stefanie; Simonin, Alexandre; Hediger, Matthias A

    2013-10-01

    TRPV5 and TRPV6 are two major calcium transport pathways in the human body maintaining calcium homeostasis. TRPV5 is mainly expressed in the distal convoluted and connecting tubule where it is the major, regulated pathway for calcium reabsorption. TRPV6 serves as an important calcium entry pathway in the duodenum and the placenta. Previously, we showed that human TRPV6 (hTRPV6) transports several heavy metals. In this study we tested whether human TRPV5 (hTRPV5) also transports cadmium and zinc, and whether hTRPV5 together with hTRPV6 are involved in cadmium and zinc toxicity. The hTRPV5 mRNA and protein were expressed in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with pTagRFP-C1-hTRPV5. The overexpression of the hTRPV5 protein at the plasma membrane was revealed by cell surface biotinylation and immunofluorescence techniques. We observed that both cadmium and zinc permeate hTRPV5 in ion imaging experiments using Fura-2 or Newport Green DCF. Our results were further confirmed using whole-cell patch clamp technique. Transient overexpression of hTRPV5 or hTRPV6 sensitized cells to cadmium and zinc. Toxicity curves of cadmium and zinc were also shifted in hTRPV6 expressing HEK293 cells clones. Our results suggest that TRPV5 and TRPV6 are crucial gates controlling cadmium and zinc levels in the human body especially under low calcium dietary conditions, when these channels are maximally upregulated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Early growth and environmental implications of dietary zinc and copper concentrations and sources of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Dozier, W A; Davis, A J; Freeman, M E; Ward, T L

    2003-12-01

    1. Environmental accumulation of zinc and copper is becoming a concern in areas having intensive animal production. This study examined performance and excretion of broiler chicks given diets supplemented with graded concentrations of zinc and copper from three different sources. 2. Two experiments were conducted, each utilising 570 1-d-old chicks. In Experiment 1, chicks were given diets containing supplemental zinc concentrations from 40 to 120 mg/kg supplied as zinc sulphate, a zinc amino acid complex (Availa Zn), or a combination of zinc sulphate and Availa Zn with each contributing one-half of the total supplemental zinc. In Experiment 2, broiler chicks were given diets with graded concentrations of supplemental copper ranging from 4 to 12 mg/kg from copper sulphate, a copper amino acid complex (Availa Cu), or a combination of copper sulphate and Availa Cu with each contributing one-half of the total supplemental copper. 3. During the 17-d experimental period, mineral concentration or source did not influence body weight, feed conversion, or the incidence of mortality from 1 to 17 d. 4. Decreasing dietary zinc concentration from 120 to 40 mg/kg reduced zinc excretion by 50%. 5. Copper excretion was decreased by 35% as supplemental copper was reduced from 12 to 4 mg/kg. 6. Reducing dietary zinc and copper concentrations can potentially decrease the accumulation of heavy metals in the environment without compromising bird performance.

  3. Distribution of lead, cadmium, and zinc in tissues of hens and chickens from Slovenia

    SciTech Connect

    Doganoc, D.Z.

    1996-12-01

    Lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are environmental contaminants which are present in almost all living organisms and are non-essential for plants, animals and human beings. Zinc (Zn) is an essential element which occurs together with Cd and is linked with it. Little information exists about the contamination of tissues of hens and chickens with these elements. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of lead, cadmium, and zinc in different tissues of poultry and eggs in Slovenia. 10 refs., 7 tabs.

  4. Correlation of tellurium inclusions and carrier lifetime in detector grade cadmium zinc telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Elshazly, Ezzat S.; Tepper, Gary

    2008-07-28

    Carrier lifetimes and tellurium inclusion densities in detector grade cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by the high pressure Bridgman method were optically measured using pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation and infrared microscopy. Excess carriers were produced in the material using a pulsed laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and pulse width of 7 ns, and the electronic decay was measured at room temperature. Spatial mapping of lifetimes and defect densities in cadmium zinc telluride was performed to determine the relationship between tellurium defect density and trapping. A strong correlation was found between the volume fraction of tellurium inclusions and the carrier trapping time.

  5. Ecological risk assessment of copper and cadmium in surface waters of Chesapeake Bay watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Scott, M.C.; Killen, W.D.

    1998-06-01

    This ecological risk assessment was designed to characterize risk of copper and cadmium exposure in the Chesapeake Bay watershed by comparing the probability distributions of environmental exposure concentrations with the probability distributions of species response data determined from laboratory studies. The overlap of these distributions was a measure of risk to aquatic life. Dissolved copper and cadmium exposure data were available from six primary data sources covering 102 stations in 18 basins in the Chesapeake Bay watershed from 1985 through 1996. Highest environmental concentrations of copper (based on 90th percentiles) were reported in the Chesapeake and Delaware (C and D) Canal, Choptank River, Middle River, and Potomac River; the lowest concentrations of copper were reported in the lower and middle mainstem Chesapeake Bay and Nanticoke River. Based on the calculation of 90th percentiles, cadmium concentrations were highest in the C and D Canal, Potomac River, Upper Chesapeake Bay, and West Chesapeake watershed. Lowest environmental concentrations of cadmium were reported in the lower and middle mainstem Chesapeake Bay and Susquehanna River. The ecological effects data used for this risk assessment were derived primarily from acute copper and cadmium laboratory toxicity tests conducted in both fresh water and salt water; chronic data were much more limited. The 10th percentile (concentration protecting 90% of the species) for all species derived from the freshwater acute copper toxicity database was 8.3 {micro}g/L. For acute saltwater copper data, the 10th percentile for all species was 6.3 {micro}g/L copper. The acute 10th percentile for all saltwater species was 31.7 {micro}g/L cadmium. Highest potential ecological risk from copper exposures was reported in the C and D Canal area of the northern Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  6. Comparative studies on the toxicity of mercury, cadmium, and copper toward the isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Kremer, J; Tilse, A; Keogh, J; Pentz, R; Younes, M

    1996-02-23

    The toxic effects of cadmium, mercury, and copper were compared over the over range 0.01, 0.03, and 0.1 mM using the isolated perfused rat liver preparation. All metals caused similar changes in various parameters used to describe general toxicity. Thus reductions in oxygen consumption, perfusion flow, and biliary secretion were found, while lactate dehydrogenase release into the perfusate, as well as liver weight, increased also in a dose-dependent fashion. Each metal caused similar magnitudes of changes and exerted similar potency. Measurement of other parameters indicating more specific injury revealed a number of differences. Although all metals reduced hepatic ATP concentration, mercury and cadmium were more potent than copper in this respect. Cadmium was the most potent at decreasing reduced glutathione levels. Mercury was most effective at increasing tissue calcium content, while copper was less so, and cadmium ineffective. Only copper significantly increased tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) content, while all metals increased its release into perfusate. Furthermore, whereas cadmium seemed the most potent metal in increasing MDA release, it was least efficacious, while copper was the most. Antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and Trolox C only reduced cadmium's influence on MDA in perfusate; however, they did not affect cadmium's ability to alter most other parameters of vitality. Albumin reversed the toxic effects of copper and mercury, but not cadmium. While metal-induced reductions in perfusion flow accounted for some of the toxic effects of the metals investigated, the results as a whole supported the suggestion that all metals exerted toxicity at the mitochondria, since ATP levels were reduced in a manner that could not be reproduced by perfusion flow reduction alone. Lipid peroxidation appears to play little role in determining toxicity induced by any of these metals. Furthermore, albumin may play an important physiological role in

  7. Evidence for iron, copper and zinc complexation as multinuclear sulphide clusters in oxic rivers

    PubMed

    Rozan; Lassman; Ridge; Luther

    2000-08-24

    The availability and toxicity of trace metals in fresh water are known to be regulated by the complexation of free metal ions with dissolved organic matter. The potential role of inorganic sulphides in binding trace metals has been largely ignored because of the reduced persistence of sulphides in these oxic waters. However, nanomolar concentrations of copper and zinc sulphides have been observed in four rivers in Connecticut and Maryland. Here we report dissolved (< 0.2 microm particle diameter) sulphide concentrations ranging up to 600 nM, with more than 90% being complexed by copper, iron and zinc. These complexes account for up to 20% of the total dissolved Fe and Zn and 45% of the total dissolved Cu. Fourier transform mass spectrometry reveals that these complexes are not simple M(HS)+ protonated species but are higher-order unprotonated clusters (M3S3, M4S6, M2S4), similar to those found in laboratory solutions and bio-inorganic molecules. These extended structures have high stability constants and are resistant to oxidation and dissociation, which may help control the toxicity of these and other less abundant, but more toxic, trace metals, such as silver, cadmium and mercury.

  8. Influence of clay on the adsorption of heavy metals like copper and cadmium on chitosan.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Nagan; Latha, Srinivasan; Sudha, Persu N; Renganathan, N Gopalan

    2013-02-01

    The influence of clay on the adsorption of heavy metals like copper and cadmium on chitosan from simulated industrial wastewater is evaluated. Chitosan-clay blend with ratio of (1:1), (1:2), and (2:1) have been prepared, and these were used as membranes to remove copper and cadmium ions from synthetic industrial wastewater. The chemical parameters for quantities of adsorption of heavy metal contamination have been done, and the kinetics of adsorption has also been carried out. Clay provides enough absorbable sites to overcome mass transfer limitations. The number of absorbable sites for cadmium is more compared to copper, and thus the rate of recovery of cadmium is faster than copper, and the percentage removal of cadmium is more than copper at all times on clay over nylon 6. This difference indicates the influence of clay in the adsorption of heavy metals in comparison to synthetic polymer nylon 6. Rate constant for first-order kinetics of adsorption, k (1), for copper and cadmium is less than that of clay, which clearly indicates that clay, which is a natural polymer, is more kinetically favored compared to synthetic polymer. The difference in the intraparticle diffusion in both the natural and synthetic polymer is not much, and it suggests that the particle diffusion mechanism is the same in both cases. Copper and cadmium recovery is parallel at all times. The percentage of removal of copper increased with an increase in pH from 3 to 5. In the case of cadmium containing wastewater, the maximum removal of metal occurred at pH 5. The uptake amount of Cu(2+) ions on chitosan increased rapidly with increasing the contact time from 0 to 360 min and then reaches equilibrium after 360 min, and the equilibrium constant for copper and cadmium ions are more or less the same for the adsorption reaction. There are more adsorption sites for cadmium in the presence of clay and mass transfer limitation is avoided without resorting to rotation, which is the highlight of the

  9. Interaction between cadmium and zinc in the production and sulfation of glycosaminoglycans in cultured bovine vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, S; Kaji, T; Yamamoto, C; Fujiwara, Y; Sakamoto, M; Kozuka, H

    1996-02-09

    Previously, we showed that cadmium stimulates the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) but inhibits their sulfation in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. The effect of zinc on such alterations of GAGs induced by cadmium was investigated in the present study. The incorporation of [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulfate into GAGs was determined by the cetylpyridinium chloride precipitation method as a marker of GAG production and GAG sulfation, respectively. The incorporation of both [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulfate was not changed in GAGs accumulated in the endothelial cell layer and the conditioned medium after exposure to zinc at 20 micrometers or less alone. A simultaneous exposure of the endothelial cell layer to zinc at 20 micrometers or less and cadmium at 2 micrometers resulted in prevention of the cadmium-induced decrease in [35S]sulfate incorporation; however, the cadmium-induced increase in [3H]glucosamine incorporation was not affected by zinc. Characterization of GAGs in the cell layer revealed that such an interaction between zinc and cadmium occurred in both heparan sulfate and the other GAGs. Zinc significantly prevented the inhibition of either [3H]thymidine or [3H]leucine incorporation caused by cadmium with less accumulation of intracellular cadmium suggesting that zinc decreased intracellular cadmium and protected endothelial cells from cadmium-induced inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis. The present data showed that a simultaneous exposure to cadmium and zinc resulted in an increase in heparan sulfate without a reduction of sulfation in the endothelial cell layer. The alteration may potentiate the antihrombogenic property of vascular endothelium.

  10. Effect of zinc, copper, and iron on ochratoxin A production.

    PubMed

    Steele, J A; Davis, N D; Diener, U L

    1973-05-01

    The effect of zinc, copper, and iron levels on production of ochratoxin A by Aspergillus ochraceus Wilhelm in a synthetic medium in a shake culture was investigated. Optimal concentrations of ZnSO(4), CuSO(4), and FeCl(3) for ochratoxin A production were 0.055 to 2.2 mg/liter, 0.004 to 0.04 mg/liter, and 1.2 to 24 mg/liter, respectively. Zinc and copper levels greater than optimum reduced the rate of ochratoxin accumulation without altering either glutamate or sucrose utilization. Ochratoxin A production was correlated with rapid utilization of sucrose by the fungus and decreasing pH of the medium. Most of the glutamic acid was removed from the medium prior to ochratoxin production. There was no correlation between mycelial dry weight and ochratoxin A production.

  11. Effect of Zinc, Copper, and Iron on Ochratoxin A Production

    PubMed Central

    Steele, J. A.; Davis, N. D.; Diener, U. L.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of zinc, copper, and iron levels on production of ochratoxin A by Aspergillus ochraceus Wilhelm in a synthetic medium in a shake culture was investigated. Optimal concentrations of ZnSO4, CuSO4, and FeCl3 for ochratoxin A production were 0.055 to 2.2 mg/liter, 0.004 to 0.04 mg/liter, and 1.2 to 24 mg/liter, respectively. Zinc and copper levels greater than optimum reduced the rate of ochratoxin accumulation without altering either glutamate or sucrose utilization. Ochratoxin A production was correlated with rapid utilization of sucrose by the fungus and decreasing pH of the medium. Most of the glutamic acid was removed from the medium prior to ochratoxin production. There was no correlation between mycelial dry weight and ochratoxin A production. PMID:4715563

  12. The roles of zinc and copper sensing in fungal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ballou, Elizabeth R; Wilson, Duncan

    2016-08-01

    All organisms must secure essential trace nutrients, including iron, zinc, manganese and copper for survival and proliferation. However, these very nutrients are also highly toxic if present at elevated levels. Mammalian immunity has harnessed both the essentiality and toxicity of micronutrients to defend against microbial invasion-processes known collectively as 'nutritional immunity'. Therefore, pathogenic microbes must possess highly effective micronutrient assimilation and detoxification mechanisms to survive and proliferate within the infected host. In this review we compare and contrast the micronutrient homeostatic mechanisms of Cryptococcus and Candida-yeasts which, despite ancient evolutionary divergence, account for over a million life-threatening infections per year. We focus on two emerging arenas within the host-pathogen battle for essential trace metals: adaptive responses to zinc limitation and copper availability.

  13. Effects of diallyl sulfide and zinc on testicular steroidogenesis in cadmium-treated male rats.

    PubMed

    Sadik, Nermin A H

    2008-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the environmental pollutants that affect various tissues and organs including testis. Harmful effect of cadmium on testis is known to be germ cell degeneration and impairment of testicular steroidogenesis. In the present study, the effect of diallyl sulfide (DAS), a sulfur-containing volatile compound present in garlic, and zinc (Zn) was investigated on cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in rats. Male adult Wistar rats treated with cadmium (2.5 mg/kg body wt, five times a week for 4 weeks) showed decreased body weight, paired testicular weight, relative testicular weight, serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and testicular total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and protein levels. Testicular steroidogenic enzymes, such as 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD), and marker enzymes, such as sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), showed a significant decrease in activities whereas that of gamma-glutamyl transferase was significantly increased after cadmium exposure. The results have revealed that concurrent treatment with DAS or zinc restored key steroidogenic enzymes, SDH, LDH, and G6PD and increased testicular weight significantly. DAS restored the TAC level and increased testosterone level and relative testicular weight significantly. Zinc restored testicular protein level and body weight. It can be concluded that cadmium causes testicular toxicity and inhibits androgen production in adult male rats probably by affecting pituitary gonadotrophins and that concurrent administration of DAS or zinc provides protection against cadmium-induced testicular toxicity.

  14. Copper Zinc Thiolate Complexes as Potential Molecular Precursors for Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide (CZTS).

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Daniel; Dietrich, Stefan; Krautscheid, Harald

    2017-03-08

    Five copper zinc thiolate complexes [(iPr3 PCu)2 (ZnEt2 )(edt)]2 (1-Et), [(iPr3 PCu)2 (Zn(iPr)2 )(edt)]2 (1-iPr), [(iPr3 PCu)4 (edt)2 (ZnMe2 )]2 (2), [(iPr3 PCu)3 (ZnPh2 )(ZnPh)(edt)2 ]2 (3), and [(iPr3 PCu)2 Zn2 (edt)3 ]6 (4) were prepared by the reaction of [(iPr3 PCu)2 (edt)]2 with ZnR2 (R=Me, Et, Ph, iPr) with or without addition of ethanedithiol (edt(2-) =ethane-1,2-dithiolate). The molecular structures of these complexes were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The ethanedithiolate ligands coordinate in μ3 -η(1) :η(2) :η(1) (2, 4), μ4 -η(1) :η(1) :η(2) :η(1) (1-R, 3), and μ5 -η(1) :η(1) :η(2) :η(1) :η(1) (2) bridging modes, each sulfur atom binds to two or three metal atoms. Evidence for the presence of the weak Zn-S bonds in solution was provided by NMR spectroscopy. Mixtures of 1-Et, 1-iPr, or 3 with Sn(edt)2 were examined by thermogravimetry up to 600 °C, whereupon volatile thermolysis products were identified by mass spectrometry. In all thermolysis experiments, the formation of Cu2 ZnSnS4 as main product, besides small amounts of binary metal sulfides, was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD) and EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) analysis.

  15. Zinc, iron, manganese, and magnesium accumulation in crayfish populations near copper-nickel smelters at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bagatto, G.; Alikhan, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    The Sudbury basin has been subjected to extreme ecological disturbances from logging, mining and smelting activities. Elevated concentrations of copper, cadmium, and nickel have been reported in crayfish populations close to the Sudbury smelting works. The present study compares concentrations of zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and magnesium (Mg) in freshwater crayfish at selected distances of the habitat from the emission source. These metals were selected since they are known to be emitted in moderately high quantities into the Sudbury environment as byproduct of the smelting process. Various tissue concentrations in crayfish were also examined to determined specific tissue sites for these accumulations.

  16. Water quality improvement through bioretention: lead, copper, and zinc removal.

    PubMed

    Davis, Allen P; Shokouhian, Mohammad; Sharma, Himanshu; Minami, Christie; Winogradoff, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Intensive automobile use, weathering of building materials, and atmospheric deposition contribute lead, copper, zinc, and other heavy metals to urban and roadway runoff. Bioretention is a low-impact-development best management practice that has the potential to improve stormwater quality from developed areas. The practice represents a soil, sand, organic matter, and vegetation-based storage and infiltration facility used in parking lots and on individual lots to treat runoff. Investigations using pilot-plant laboratory bioretention systems and two existing bioretention facilities documented their effectiveness at removing low levels of lead, copper, and zinc from synthetic stormwater runoff. Removal rates of these metals (based on concentration and total mass) were excellent, reaching close to 100% for all metals under most conditions, with effluent copper and lead levels mostly less than 5 microg/L and zinc less than 25 microg/L. Somewhat less removal was noted for shallow bioretention depths. Runoff pH, duration, intensity, and pollutant concentrations were varied, and all had minimal effect on removal. The two field investigations generally supported the laboratory studies. Overall, excellent removal of dissolved heavy metals can be expected through bioretention infiltration. Although the accumulation of metals is a concern, buildup problems are not anticipated for more than 15 years because of the low metal concentrations expected in runoff.

  17. Effectiveness of copper and zinc ions in preventing scaling of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Hui, Franck; Ledion, Jean; Li, Fengting

    2011-04-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of copper and zinc ions an economical and environmentally friendly method for inhibiting the scaling of drinking water, using the method of rapid controlled precipitation (RCP). The results indicated that zinc ions and copper ions, at low concentrations, were highly efficient inhibitors in a 300 mL solution (calcium ion concentration of 126.5 mg/L). To produce an inhibition efficiency of 100% (in 70 min), the concentration of the copper ion was 0.9 mg/L and that of the zinc ion was 0.4 mg/L. The analysis by SEM and infrared absorption spectrometry showed that copper and zinc ions could affect the calcium carbonate germination and change the crystal morphology, which indicated that copper and zinc ions had participated in the composition of the crystal; however, the quantity of copper or zinc ion in the precipitate was so small that it was difficult to observe them.

  18. Detoxication of zinc and cadmium by the freshwater protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis. II. Growth experiments and ultrastructural studies on sequestration of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, S.; Chapman, G.

    1981-04-01

    Sublethal concentrations of zinc and cadmium limited the growth of batch cultures of the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Electron microscopy of cultured populations revealed many electron-dense cytoplasmic granules in cells exposed to zinc (60 ppM), but fewer in cells grown with less zinc (6 ppM) or cadmium (2 ppM). Ultrasturctural abnormalities were observed only in cells grown with cadmium. These contained autophagic vacuoles and had damaged nuclei. Zinc was shown to exert a protective effect against cadmium toxicity both in terms of growth and ulstructural appearance. Electron probe x-ray microanalysis revealed both zinc and cadmium within the cytoplasmic granules of cells exposed to these metals. Since the granules are normally composed predominantly of calcium and magnesium, these ions are implicated in the intracellular detoxication of zinc and cadmium. Zinc was detected only in the granules, while cadmium was also found in autophagic vacuoles and damaged nuclei.

  19. Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with cadmium, copper and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Wu, Longhua; Li, Zhu; Han, Cunliang; Liu, Ling; Teng, Ying; Sun, Xianghui; Pan, Cheng; Huang, Yujuan; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2012-07-01

    A pot experiment and afield trial were conducted to study the remediation of an aged field soil contaminated with cadmium, copper and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (7.67 +/- 0.51 mg kg(-1) Cd, 369 +/- 1 mg kg(-1) Cu in pot experiment; 8.46 +/- 0.31 mg kg(-1) Cd, 468 +/- 7 mg kg(-1) Cu, 323 +/- 12 microg kg(-1) PCBs for field experiment) under different cropping patterns. In the pot experiment Sedum plumbizincicola showed pronounced Cd phytoextraction. After two periods (14 months) of cropping the Cd removal rates in these two treatments were 52.2 +/- 12.0 and 56.1 +/- 9.1%, respectively. Total soil PCBs in unplanted control pots decreased from 323 +/- 11 to 49.3 +/- 6.6 microg kg(-1), but with no significant difference between treatments. The field microcosm experiment intercropping of three plant species reduced the yield of S. plumbizincicola, with a consequent decrease in soil Cd removal. S. plumbizincicola intercropped with E. splendens had the highest shoot Cd uptake (18.5 +/- 1.8 mg pot(-1)) after 6 months planting followed by intercropping with M. sativa (15.9 +/- 1.9 mg pot(-1)). Liming with S. plumbizincicola intercropped with M. sativa significantly promoted soil PCB degradation by 25.2%. Thus, adjustment of soil pH to 5.56 combined with intercropping with S. plumbizincicola and M. sativagave high removal rates of Cd, Cu, and PCBs.

  20. [Bioaccumulation of cadmium and zinc in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.)].

    PubMed

    Sbartai, Hana; Djebar, Med Reda; Sbartai, Ibtissem; Berrabbah, Houria

    2012-09-01

    This work aims at evaluating the accumulation of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) (trace elements) in the organs of young tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum L. var. Rio Grande) and their effects on the rate of chlorophyll and enzyme activities involved in the antioxidant system: catalase (CAT), glutathion-S-transferase (GST) and peroxysase ascorbate (APX). Plants previously grown on a basic nutrient solution were undergoing treatment for 7 days, either by increasing concentrations of CdCl(2) or ZnSO(4) (0, 50, 100, 250, 500 μM) or by the combined concentrations of Cd and Zn (100/50, 100/100, 100/250, 100/500 μM). The results concerning the determination of metals in the various compartments of tomato plants as a function of increasing concentrations of Cd or Zn, suggest a greater accumulation of Cd and Zn in the roots compared to leaves. The combined treatment (Cd/Zn) interferes with the absorption of the two elements according to their concentrations in the culture medium. The presence of Zn at low concentrations (50 μM of Zn/100 μM Cd) has little influence on the accumulation of Cd in the roots and leaves, while the absorption of these two elements in the leaves increases and decreases in roots when their concentrations are equivalent (100/100 μM) compared to treatment alone. When the concentration of Zn is higher than that of Cd (500 μM of Zn/100 μM Cd) absorption of the latter is inhibited in the roots while increasing their translocation to the leaves. Meanwhile, the dosage of chlorophylls shows that they tend to decrease in a dose-dependent for both treatments (Cd or Cd/Zn), however, treatment with low concentrations of Zn (50 and 100 μM) stimulates chlorophyll synthesis. However, treatment with different concentrations of Cd seems to induce the activity of the enzymes studied (CAT, APX, GST). It is the same for treatment with different concentrations of Zn and this particularly for the highest concentrations. Finally, the combined treatment (Zn

  1. Plasma copper, zinc and iron in burn patients

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, A.K.; Tamura, T.; Sauberlich, H.E.; Dimick, A.R. )

    1989-02-09

    Plasma copper, zinc and iron levels were measured using atomic absorption spectrometry in 25 patients admitted to the Burn Care Center from December 1986 to May 1988. The plasma samples were obtained within 48 hours of admission while the patients were beginning aggressive oral nutrition support therapy. The percentage of total body-surface area (TBSA) burn ranged from 11 to 65 (mean 29.2%) and involved 2nd and 3rd degree burns. The mean plasma zinc and iron levels were 0.77 ({plus minus} 0.23; SD) and 0.58 ({plus minus} 0.22) {mu}g/ml, respectively, in 11 patients with < 25% TBSA burns. These levels were higher than the means of 14 patients with {ge} 25% TBSA burns (0.67 {plus minus} 0.23 and 0.50 {plus minus} 0.13 {mu}g/ml, respectively). Plasma copper levels were significantly decreased in patients with {ge} 25% TBSA burns (0.56 {plus minus} 0.27 {mu}l/ml) compared to patients with < 25% TBSA burns. A significant correlation between TBSA burn and plasma copper levels was also found among all patients. The data indicate that the plasma copper levels are lower as the percentage of body surface area burn increases. Although the mechanisms of this rapid decline of plasma levels are not known, careful attention should be given to monitor the nutrient status of these minerals during the treatment and recovery of burn patients.

  2. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L. )

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  3. Effect of extracts from Spirulina platensis bioaccumulating cadmium and zinc on L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Pane, Luigi; Solisio, Carlo; Lodi, Alessandra; Luigi Mariottini, Gian; Converti, Attilio

    2008-05-01

    The uptake of cadmium and zinc by Spirulina platensis was investigated using a laboratory culture of this cyanobacterium. The cells were treated with metal concentrations increasing from 0.5 to 2.0 mg L(-1), in order to evaluate their adsorption capacity and survival potential. Afterwards, the cytotoxicity of cell extracts bioaccumulating heavy metals was evaluated on cultured L929 mouse fibroblasts. Cadmium was removed with higher yield (84.0-88.7%) than zinc (54.5-68.0%) and the maximum specific removal of these metals was 1.82 and 2.60 mg g(-1), respectively. Cadmium bioaccumulating algal extracts caused higher cell mortality of L929 cells than zinc accumulating ones, with a clear dose-response trend. EC(50) estimated by Trimmed Spearman-Karber (TSK) method were 7.21 and 9.59cells mL(-1) for cadmium and zinc, respectively. The capability to accumulate heavy metals could have a remarkable importance for the utilization of algal species in human or animal feeding.

  4. Acclimation-induced changes in the toxicity of zinc and cadmium to rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, W.A.; Steadman, B.L.; La Point, T.W.; Bergman, H.L.

    1999-12-01

    Adults and juvenile rainbow trout exposed for 21 d to sublethal levels of zinc or cadmium exhibited significant changes in their respective incipient lethal levels (ILL). Acclimation resulted in exposure-dependent changes in both tolerance (ILL concentration) and resistance (time to ILL) in both size classes of fish for each metal. The ILLs for adult rainbow trout exposed to zinc increased from 695 {micro}g/L at 131 h for nonacclimated fish to 2,025 {micro}/L at 168 h for fish previously exposed to 0.5 ILL (324 {micro}g/L zinc). The ILLs for cadmium-exposed fish increased from 6 {micro}g/L at 187 h for nonacclimated fish to 122 {micro}g/L at 266 h for fish acclimated to 0.5 ILL (10.2 {micro}g/L cadmium). Similar, although somewhat less dramatic, acclimation responses were observed for juveniles with both zinc and cadmium. Juveniles were found to be approximately three times less sensitive to the toxic effects of the metals than were adult fish.

  5. Growth of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals by Controlled Seeding Contactless Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Grasza, K.; Gillies, D.; Jerman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk crystals of cadmium-zinc telluride, 23 mm in diameter and up to 45 grams in weight were grown. Controlled seed formation procedure was used to limit the number of grains in the crystal. Most uniform distribution of ZnTe in the crystals was obtained using excess (Cd + Zn) pressure in the ampoule.

  6. Photocatalytic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide on cadmium and zinc sulfides immobilized on a cation exchange film

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmadmurodov, A.; Gruzdkov, Y.A.; Parmon, V.N.; Savinov, E.N.

    1986-08-01

    The photocatalytic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide on cadmium, zinc, and tin sulfides, immobilized on a polymer, was studied. Activation of the photocatalyst by finely divided particles of Pd and Pt was used. A quantum yield of 9.5% was achieved.

  7. Liquid Crystals in Binary Systems of Lead Decanoate with Zinc or Cadmium Decanoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T. A., Mirnaya; Sudovtsova, L. S.; Yaremchuk, G. G.

    2000-12-01

    The phase transition temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis and hot stage polarization microscopy between room temperature and the isotropic liquid region for the binary systems of lead (II) decanoate with zinc (II) or cadmium (II) decanoate. The boundaries of the liquid crystal formation in these systems were found.

  8. [Investigation of health status of workers exposed to low concentration cadmium in a zinc powder factory].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-lian; Pi, Song-lian; Chen, Fa-ming; Li, Ji-meng

    2011-12-01

    To explore the health status of workers exposed to Cd at low concentration. One hundred eighteen workers of zinc powder finishing and 34 staffs were served as the exposure group and control group, respectively. The physical examination, blood cadmium, urinary cadmium, blood lead, urinary 32-microglobin, urine creatine, chest film, pulmonary function , pure tone teat and were detected for all subjects. Twelve air samples from 6 monitoring points in workshop were detected, the air Cd concentrations were 0.002-0.015 mg/m³, which were under the national limit of occupational exposure. In exposure group, the rates of exceeding standards of blood Cd and urinary Cd were 65.25% and 38.16%, respectively, the rate of exceeding standards of urinary Cd for two times was 27.12%, the rate of exceeding standard of urine Cd for two times plus the positive urinary 32-microglobin was 2.54 %. In control group, the rates of exceeding national standard of blood Cd was 26.47 %, but the values of urinary Cd were normal. In exposure group, the rate of exceeding standards of urinary Cd increased with the service length. Smoking could enhance the rates of exceeding standards of blood Cd and urinary Cd. In zinc powder finishing, the low-concentration cadmium exposure could cause the occupational cadmium poisoning, the comprehensive protection measures can reduce the occupational cadmium poisoning. It is suggested that the limits of occupational exposure to cadmium should be declined.

  9. Effects of in vivo and in vitro zinc and cadmium treatment on sperm steroidogenesis of the African catfish Clarias gairepinus.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, M

    2007-09-01

    The aim of present research to study the effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure of catfish to heavy metals to determine whether the steroidogenic activity in sperm would be affected by two heavy metals contaminants, zinc and cadmium. Three groups of six male African catfish were fed from the sexually immature juvenile stage, with diet containing 1000 ppm zinc, cadmium or zinc + cadmium for 110 days and 20alphaHSD activity in milt of these fish were compared with six other control fish fed with normal diet. The 20alphaHSD enzyme activity was also measured in in vitro incubation of milt from six control fish with different concentrations (0, 0.1, 1,3, 10, 30, 100, 1000 and 3000 ppm) of zinc, cadmium or zinc + cadmium. A very high 20alphahydroxy steroid dehydrogenase enzyme activity was found in all sperm incubations of African catfish. This enzyme converts 17-hydroxy progesterone (17P) substrate to 17,20alpha-dihydroxy progesterone (17, 20alphaP) product and the rate of enzyme activity is related to substrate (17P) concentrations. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in enzyme activity in converting 17P to 17,20alphaP were found between in vitro incubations of sperm with different concentrations of zinc, cadmium or zinc + cadmium and control group (0 ppm). Significant differences (p < 0.05) in enzyme activity and 17,20alphaP production were found between fish fed with diet containing 1000 ppm zinc or cadmium and the group fed with diet containing 1000 ppm zinc + cadmium and control groups. The results showed that 20alphaHSD enzyme activities in fish sperm may be used as indicator of water contamination with heavy metals and their bioaccumulations in testis of aquatic animals.

  10. Presence of acute phase changes in zinc, iron, and copper metabolism in turkey embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Klasing, K.C.; Richards, M.P.; Darcey, S.E.; Laurin, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Acute phase changes in trace mineral metabolism were examined in turkey embryos. An endotoxin injection resulted in increased concentrations of serum copper and liver zinc and decreased concentrations of serum zinc in embryos incubated either in ovo or ex ovo. Changes in zinc and copper metabolism occurred when endotoxin either was injected intramuscularly, into the amnionic fluid, or administered onto the chorioallantoic membrane. Unlike poults, embryos did not respond to an inflammatory challenge with decreased serum iron concentrations. Acute phase changes in embryo serum zinc and copper as well as liver zinc concentrations were similar to those in poults. Increased liver zinc concentrations were associated with increased zinc in metallothionein (MT). An injection of a crude interleukin 1 preparation into embryos resulted in similar increases in hepatic zinc and MT concentrations as an endotoxin injection, suggesting a role for this cytokine in mediating the acute phase changes in embryonic zinc metabolism.

  11. The Functions of Metamorphic Metallothioneins in Zinc and Copper Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krężel, Artur; Maret, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Recent discoveries in zinc biology provide a new platform for discussing the primary physiological functions of mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) and their exquisite zinc-dependent regulation. It is now understood that the control of cellular zinc homeostasis includes buffering of Zn2+ ions at picomolar concentrations, extensive subcellular re-distribution of Zn2+, the loading of exocytotic vesicles with zinc species, and the control of Zn2+ ion signalling. In parallel, characteristic features of human MTs became known: their graded affinities for Zn2+ and the redox activity of their thiolate coordination environments. Unlike the single species that structural models of mammalian MTs describe with a set of seven divalent or eight to twelve monovalent metal ions, MTs are metamorphic. In vivo, they exist as many species differing in redox state and load with different metal ions. The functions of mammalian MTs should no longer be considered elusive or enigmatic because it is now evident that the reactivity and coordination dynamics of MTs with Zn2+ and Cu+ match the biological requirements for controlling—binding and delivering—these cellular metal ions, thus completing a 60-year search for their functions. MT represents a unique biological principle for buffering the most competitive essential metal ions Zn2+ and Cu+. How this knowledge translates to the function of other families of MTs awaits further insights into the specifics of how their properties relate to zinc and copper metabolism in other organisms. PMID:28598392

  12. Lead, cadmium and zinc in hair samples: relationship with dietary habits and urban environment.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Reimers, E; Martín-González, C; Galindo-Martín, L; Aleman-Valls, M R; Velasco-Vázquez, J; Arnay-de-la-Rosa, M; Pérez-Hernández, O; Luis, R Hernández

    2014-03-01

    This study was performed in order to analyze the relationships between hair zinc, lead, and cadmium with the kind of diet consumed (by recall of the diet consumed the previous 14 days), living area (urban or rural), tobacco smoking, and body mass index (BMI) among 419 individuals of the Canary Archipelago. Median values and interquartile range were 43 μg/g (18.50-132.50) for zinc, 4.09 μg/g (2.19-8.38) for lead, and 0.128 μg/g (0.05-0.30) for cadmium. We observed that hair zinc was markedly elevated among those consuming fish more frequently and, to a lesser amount, among those who consumed meat frequently, among those living in urban areas, and among those with BMI over 25 kg/m(2), keeping a significant relationship with BMI. Hair lead was also higher among fish consumers, showed a trend to higher values among inhabitants of urban areas, and was lower among obese individuals. Hair cadmium was higher among those who consumed less vegetables and fruits. By multivariate analysis, introducing the variables meat, fish, and vegetable consumption, urban/rural; sex; age; and BMI values, we observed that fish consumption (beta = 0.15) was the only variable independently associated to higher zinc levels; fish consumption (beta = 0.15) and meat consumption (beta = 0.17) were related to high cadmium levels, whereas meat consumption was significantly associated to higher hair lead levels (beta = 0.15). Therefore, we conclude that hair zinc, cadmium, and lead seem to depend more heavily on dietary habits than on tobacco consumption or living in rural or urban areas.

  13. Supplemental phytic acid and microbial phytase change zinc bioavailability and cadmium accumulation in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Rimbach, G; Brandt, K; Most, E; Pallauf, J

    1995-07-01

    Three groups of individually housed albino rats (n = 6 each, initial average weight = 47 g) were fed diets based on egg white and corn starch over a 4-week period. All diets were supplemented with 15 mg/kg of Zn and 5 mg/kg of Cd. Group I (Control) was fed the basal diet free of phytic acid (PA) and phytase. By replacing corn starch by 0.5% PA (as NaPA) in groups II and III, a molar PA/Zn ratio of 33 was obtained. In group III, 2000 U of microbial phytase per kg diet were added. Addition of PA to diet (group II) resulted in a significant decrease in growth and zinc status. The negative effect of dietary PA on growth and zinc status was considerably counteracted by the supplementation of 2000 U microbial phytase (group III). In group I the highest apparent zinc absorption (58.2%) was measured. The addition of 0.5% PA (group II) significantly decreased apparent zinc absorption to 23.4%. In rats receiving the phytase-enriched diet (group III) 46.5% of ingested zinc was apparently absorbed. Liver cadmium concentration in rats fed the diet containing PA was significantly higher than that in the control group, whereas phytase supplementation lowered liver cadmium accumulation. In tendency similar effects were obtained for kidney cadmium accumulation.

  14. Zinc and cadmium interference with four commonly performed diagnostic tests for lead intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alleinne, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    Increases in erythrocytic delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase(delta-ALAD) activity, erythrocytic zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentration, urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid (delta-ALA-U) concentration, and blood lead (Pb-B) concentration are indicative of lead intoxication and are the basis for determining exposure to lead. The influence of oral or parenteral zinc and cadmium on the toxicity of oral lead was investigated in Hartley guinea pigs. Compared to the administration of lead alone, the concomitant oral administration of lead and zinc resulted in reduced Pb-B and delta-ALA-U concentrations. Similarly, the concomitant administration of lead and cadmium resulted in decreased packed cell volume (PCV) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, and increased ZPP concentration in blood. Delta-ALAD activity was maximally inhibited in all groups which received lead. Consequently, no significant data concerning the effects of cadmium or zinc on delta-ALAD activity was obtained. This data indicates that delta-ALA-U analysis is an inappropriate test to determine intoxication which may have been caused by simultaneous oral exposure to lead and zinc, and that simultaneous exposure apparently decreases the absorption of lead. These observations seriously question the validity of using only delta-ALA-U or Pb-B as a screening test for lead intoxication.

  15. Toxicodynamics of copper and cadmium in Folsomia candida exposed to simulated soil solutions.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Masoud M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2013-12-01

    To improve our understanding of metal bioavailability to soil-living invertebrates, the effect of porewater composition on the toxicodynamics of copper and cadmium in Folsomia candida (Collembola) was investigated. Assuming that porewater is the main exposure route, F. candida was exposed to simulated soil solutions of different composition. Toxicity of copper was slightly lower in a calcium-only solution than in a multication solution. With increasing copper concentrations from 0.005 mM to 1.37 mM, internal copper concentrations similarly increased in both exposure solutions, suggesting that a single cation nutrient solution is suitable for testing F. candida. In the second experiment, animals were exposed for 7 d to copper and cadmium in simplified soil solutions with different calcium (0.2 mM, 0.8 mM, 3.2 mM, 12.8 mM) and pH (5.0, 6.0, 7.0) levels. The median lethal concentration (LC50) values decreased with time in both the calcium and pH series. A hormetic-type effect was observed for copper in the second test, as well as in the calcium-only solution in the first experiment. Because of stronger hormesis, LC50s for copper were higher at lower calcium concentrations. For cadmium, LC50 values were higher at higher calcium concentrations, suggesting competition of calcium with the free cadmium ion. Toxicity of cadmium increased with decreasing pH, while copper was more toxic at intermediate pH. The results show that a toxicodynamics approach can help to improve the interpretation of metal toxicity to soil invertebrates, taking into account soil solution properties.

  16. Indium and Zinc Alloys as Cadmium Brush Plating Replacements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    Aged In- Sn Aged Cd In- Sn before Aging Cd before Aging Sn -Zn (12V) before Aging ...to assess state-of-the-art technology – Selected and tested initial coating candidates (2009-2010) • Indium-tin (In- Sn ), tin-zinc ( Sn -Zn), and zinc...nickel (Zn-Ni) • In and Sn foils – Selected and currently testing follow-on candidates (2010 – present) • Indium-zinc (In-Zn) and different

  17. The role of microRNAs in copper and cadmium homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yan-Fei; Zhu, Cheng

    2009-08-14

    Essential heavy metals (e.g., copper) and non-essential metals (e.g., cadmium) are both toxic to plants at high concentrations. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important modulators of plants adaptive response to heavy metal stress. Plant miRNAs negatively regulate target mRNAs by post-transcriptional cleavage. miR398 regulates copper homeostasis via down-regulating the expression of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (CSD), a scavenger of superoxide radicals. miR393 and miR171 play an important role in cadmium stress mediation. This review focuses on the recent advance in the involvement of miRNAs in copper and cadmium stress regulatory networks in plants.

  18. Effect of age on sensitivity of daphnia magna to cadmium, copper and cyanazine

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeker, A.V.; Cairns, M.A.; Onjukka, S.T.; Titus, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Daphnia magna were exposed to cadmium, copper, and cyanazine to determine the relative sensitivities of several age groups: less than 4 h, less than 24 h, 1 d, 2 d, 3 d, 4 d, 5 d, and 6 d old. Mean cadmium 48-h EC50 values for each age group ranged from 23 to 164 micrograms/L. Mean copper EC50 values ranged from 6 to 18 micrograms/L. Cyanazine EC50 values ranged from 53 to 106 micrograms/L. The 1-d-old Daphnia mean EC50s were 48 and 49 micrograms/L for cadmium, 10 and 10 micrograms/L for copper and 84 and 86 microgram/L for cyanazine, respectively. These similar sensitivities indicate that older animals can be used in tests equally as well as younger animals, thus simplifying the recovery of daphnids in acute sediment toxicity tests.

  19. Interaction between cadmium and zinc in the production and sulfation of glycosaminoglycans in cultured bovine vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawara, Susumu; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Chika

    1996-02-09

    Previously, we showed that cadmium stimulates the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) but inhibits their sulfation in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. The effect of zinc on such alterations of GAGs induced by cadmium was investigated in the present study. The incorporation of [{sup 3}H]glucosamine and [{sup 35}S]sulfate into GAGs was determined by the cetylpyridinium chloride precipitation method as a marker of GAG production and GAG sulfation, respectively. The incorporation of both [{sup 3}H]glucosamine and [{sup 35}S]sulfate was not changed in GAGs accumulated in the endothelial cell layer and the conditioned medium after exposure to zinc at 20 {mu}M or less alone. A simultaneous exposure of the endothelial cell layer to zinc at 20 {mu}M or less and cadmium at 2{mu}M resulted in prevention of the cadmium-induced decrease in [{sup 35}S]sulfate incorporation; however, the cadmium-induced increase in [{sup 3}H]glucosamine incorporation was not affected by zinc. Characterization of GAGs in the cell layer revealed that such an interaction between zinc and cadmium occurred in both heparan sulfate and the other GAGs. Zinc significantly prevented the inhibition of either [{sup 3}H]thymidine or [{sup 3}H]leucine incorporation caused by cadmium with cadmium and protected endothelial cells from cadmium-induced inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis. The present data showed that a simultaneous exposure to cadmium and zinc resulted in an increase in heparan sulfate without a reduction of sulfation in the endothelial cell layer. The alteration may potentiate the antithrombogenic property of vascular endothelium. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Zinc and copper status of women by physical activity and menstrual status

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Deuster, P.A.; Kyle, S.B.; Moser, P.B.

    1986-03-01

    The zinc and copper status of 33 eumenorrheic (EU) and 12 amenorrheic (AM) female marathon runners and 19 EU and 8 AM nonrunners were determined from 3-day diet records and plasma and erythrocyte (RBC) levels. The study was conducted as a completely randomized 2 x 2 factorial. Mean daily zinc intakes of all groups fell below the recommended dietary allowances. Copper intakes of runners (EU = 1.3 mg; AM = 1.3 mg) were not significantly different. Menstrual status did not affect plasma zinc, RBC zinc or plasma copper levels. Physical activity however, affected RBC zinc and plasma copper levels. Both these parameters were significantly higher in runners. These findings suggest that exercise influences blood zinc and copper levels.

  1. Zinc Deficiency Impacts CO2 Assimilation and Disrupts Copper Homeostasis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Malasarn, Davin; Kropat, Janette; Hsieh, Scott I.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Casero, David; Loo, Joseph A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wollman, Francis-André; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because of its role in catalysis and in protein stabilization, but excess zinc is deleterious. We distinguished four nutritional zinc states in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: toxic, replete, deficient, and limited. Growth is inhibited in zinc-limited and zinc-toxic cells relative to zinc-replete cells, whereas zinc deficiency is visually asymptomatic but distinguished by the accumulation of transcripts encoding ZIP family transporters. To identify targets of zinc deficiency and mechanisms of zinc acclimation, we used RNA-seq to probe zinc nutrition-responsive changes in gene expression. We identified genes encoding zinc-handling components, including ZIP family transporters and candidate chaperones. Additionally, we noted an impact on two other regulatory pathways, the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and the nutritional copper regulon. Targets of transcription factor Ccm1 and various CAH genes are up-regulated in zinc deficiency, probably due to reduced carbonic anhydrase activity, validated by quantitative proteomics and immunoblot analysis of Cah1, Cah3, and Cah4. Chlamydomonas is therefore not able to grow photoautotrophically in zinc-limiting conditions, but supplementation with 1% CO2 restores growth to wild-type rates, suggesting that the inability to maintain CCM is a major consequence of zinc limitation. The Crr1 regulon responds to copper limitation and is turned on in zinc deficiency, and Crr1 is required for growth in zinc-limiting conditions. Zinc-deficient cells are functionally copper-deficient, although they hyperaccumulate copper up to 50-fold over normal levels. We suggest that zinc-deficient cells sequester copper in a biounavailable form, perhaps to prevent mismetallation of critical zinc sites. PMID:23439652

  2. Seasonal and spatial patterns of metals at a restored copper mine site. I. Stream copper and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bambic, D.G.; Alpers, C.N.; Green, P.G.; Fanelli, E.; Silk, W.K.

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in metal concentrations and pH were found in a stream at a restored copper mine site located near a massive sulfide deposit in the Foothill copper-zinc belt of the Sierra Nevada, California. At the mouth of the stream, copper concentrations increased and pH decreased with increased streamflow after the onset of winter rain and, unexpectedly, reached extreme values 1 or 2 months after peaks in the seasonal hydrographs. In contrast, aqueous zinc and sulfate concentrations were highest during low-flow periods. Spatial variation was assessed in 400 m of reach encompassing an acidic, metal-laden seep. At this seep, pH remained low (2-3) throughout the year, and copper concentrations were highest. In contrast, the zinc concentrations increased with downstream distance. These spatial patterns were caused by immobilization of copper by hydrous ferric oxides in benthic sediments, coupled with increasing downstream supply of zinc from groundwater seepage.

  3. Seasonal and spatial patterns of metals at a restored copper mine site. I. Stream copper and zinc.

    PubMed

    Bambic, Dustin G; Alpers, Charles N; Green, Peter G; Fanelli, Eileen; Silk, Wendy K

    2006-12-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in metal concentrations and pH were found in a stream at a restored copper mine site located near a massive sulfide deposit in the Foothill copper-zinc belt of the Sierra Nevada, California. At the mouth of the stream, copper concentrations increased and pH decreased with increased streamflow after the onset of winter rain and, unexpectedly, reached extreme values 1 or 2 months after peaks in the seasonal hydrographs. In contrast, aqueous zinc and sulfate concentrations were highest during low-flow periods. Spatial variation was assessed in 400 m of reach encompassing an acidic, metal-laden seep. At this seep, pH remained low (2-3) throughout the year, and copper concentrations were highest. In contrast, the zinc concentrations increased with downstream distance. These spatial patterns were caused by immobilization of copper by hydrous ferric oxides in benthic sediments, coupled with increasing downstream supply of zinc from groundwater seepage.

  4. Impact of Cadmium on Intracellular Zinc Levels in HepG2 Cells: Quantitative Evaluations and Molecular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Urani, Chiara; Melchioretto, Pasquale; Bruschi, Maurizio; Fabbri, Marco; Sacco, Maria Grazia; Gribaldo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is classified as a human carcinogen, and its disturbance in zinc homeostasis has been well established. However, its extent as well as molecular mechanisms involved in cadmium carcinogenesis has yet to be fully clarified. To this end, we used the zinc specific probe Zinquin to visualize and to quantitatively evaluate changes in the concentration of labile zinc, in an in vitro model of human hepatic cells (HepG2) exposed to cadmium. A very large increase (+93%) of intracellular labile zinc, displaced by cadmium from the zinc proteome, was measured when HepG2 were exposed to 10 µM cadmium for 24 hrs. Microarray expression profiling showed that in cells, featuring an increase of labile zinc after cadmium exposure, one of the top regulated genes is Snail1 (+3.6), which is included in the adherens junction pathway and linked to cancer. In the same pathway MET, TGF-βR, and two members of the Rho-family GTPase, Rac, and cdc42 all implicated in the loss of adherence features and acquisition of migratory and cancer properties were regulated, as well. The microRNAs analysis showed a downregulation of miR-34a and miR-200a, both implicated in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These microRNAs results support the role played by zinc in affecting gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. PMID:26339654

  5. Availability of cadmium and zinc from sewage sludge to the flounder, Platichthys flesus, via a marine food chain.

    PubMed

    Burgos, M G; Rainbow, P S

    2001-06-01

    This paper examines the potential availability to a demersal fish of cadmium and zinc associated with digested sewage sludge, via a food chain as well as directly from the sludge, and the tissue distribution and possible excretion of any accumulated cadmium and zinc. Radioactive tracer techniques were used in order to follow the food chain transfer of the metals. Flounder (Platichthys flesus) accumulated cadmium both directly from sludge (delivered in newly ingested unassimilated gutfuls in the amphipods) and in assimilated form from the tissues of the amphipod crustacean Corophium volutator that had been feeding on a sludge-sediment mixture. Cadmium from both sources could be excreted by the fish. The concentration of cadmium within the whole fish increased as the input of cadmium in the diet increased. Zinc, similarly, is available to the flounder both directly from sludge and from zinc accumulated in C. volutator. Only a limited increase in net accumulation of zinc by the flounder was observed upon increased inputs of zinc through the diet, perhaps indicating some regulation of body zinc concentration by the flounder.

  6. Toxicity of binary mixtures of cadmium-copper and carbendazim-copper to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Martijs J; Piskiewicz, Anna M; Ivorra i Castellà, Núria; Kammenga, Jan E

    2004-06-01

    For ecological risk assessment, the additive model may be used to empirically predict toxic mixture effects. Detailed toxicity tests were performed to determine whether effects of mixtures of copper-cadmium and copper-carbendazim on Caenorhabditis elegans were similar to the effects of the individual compounds. Effects on the course of reproduction, the length of the juvenile period, the length of the reproductive period, and body length were analyzed. Dose-response data were compared to the additive model and tested for four deviation patterns from additivity: No deviation, synergistic/antagonistic deviation, dose ratio-dependent deviation, dose level-dependent deviation. During the exposure, the cadmium-copper effect on reproduction changed from a synergistic, to a dose ratio-dependent deviation from additivity. More cadmium in the mixture decreased the toxicity and more copper increased the toxicity. The effect of copper-carbendazim on reproduction was synergistic at low dose levels and antagonistic at high dose levels and independent of time. Mixture effects on the juvenile and reproductive period were similar to single component effects. It was concluded that the observed time-dependence of toxic interactions was small and that interactions on the timing of reproduction were not found. The additive model underestimated mixture effects on reproduction and body length.

  7. Sorption of cadmium and copper ions on natural and synthetic hydroxylapatite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fernane, F.; Mecherri, M.O.; Sharrock, P. Hadioui, M.; Lounici, H.; Fedoroff, M.

    2008-05-15

    The sorption of divalent cadmium and copper ions from aqueous solutions on natural and synthetic hydroxyapatite was investigated by the batch method and under dynamic conditions in columns at 22 deg. C and pH 5. The effect of cadmium and copper concentration on sorption was studied. Both types of apatites are efficient, despite their different composition and morphology. The sorption mechanism involves an ion exchange for Cd(II), while Cu(II) leads to precipitation of a newly formed solid. Thus, the sorption efficiency depends on the experimental conditions and the specific physicochemical properties of the apatites used. The sorption isotherms were fitted to the Langmuir equation.

  8. Mechanical Activation-Assisted Reductive Leaching of Cadmium from Zinc Neutral Leaching Residue Using Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Mi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, zinc neutral leaching residue was mechanically activated by ball-milling. The subsequent leaching behavior and kinetics of cadmium extraction in a mixed SO2-H2SO4 system were studied. Changes in the crystalline phase, lattice distortion, particle size and morphology, which were induced by mechanical activation, were also investigated. The activated samples showed different physicochemical characteristics, and cadmium extraction was found to be easier than for the un-activated samples. Under the same conditions, mechanical activation contributed to higher cadmium leaching. The cadmium extraction kinetics at 75-95°C was found to fit the shrinking core model. The raw neutral leaching residue, and the samples activated for 60 min and 120 min had a calculated activation energy of 65.02 kJ/mol, 59.45 kJ/mol and 53.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The leaching residue was characterized by ICP, XRD and SEM analysis. According to XRD analysis, the main phases in the residue were lead sulfate (PbSO4), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS).

  9. Iron supplementation does not affect copper and zinc absorption in breastfed infants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Iron supplements are commonly recommended for infants but were suggested to inhibit zinc and copper absorption. The objective of this study was to investigate potential effects of iron supplementation, infant age, and mineral status on zinc and copper absorption in infants at 6 and 9 mo of age. Twen...

  10. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum...

  13. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum...

  14. Potentiometric stripping analysis of zinc and copper in human teeth and dental materials.

    PubMed

    Kalicanin, Biljana M; Nikolić, Ruzica S

    2008-01-01

    Potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) with oxygen as the oxidant has been used to determine soluble zinc and copper levels in exfoliated human teeth (all of which required extraction for orthodontic reasons) and commercial dental materials. The soluble zinc and copper contents of teeth were slightly below the zinc and copper contents in whole teeth reported by other researchers, except in the case of tooth with removed amalgam filling. Soluble zinc and copper concentrations of the dental materials and metal ceramic crowns were 0.50-6.30, and of 2.00-4.30 microg/g, respectively. The results of this work suggest that PSA may be a good method for zinc and copper leaching studies during the investigation of dental prosthetic materials' biocompatibility. Corrosive action of acidic media as evidenced by SEM micrographs caused the leaching of metal ions from teeth.

  15. CadA of Mesorhizobium metallidurans isolated from a zinc-rich mining soil is a P(IB-2)-type ATPase involved in cadmium and zinc resistance.

    PubMed

    Maynaud, Geraldine; Brunel, Brigitte; Yashiro, Erika; Mergeay, Max; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude; Le Quéré, Antoine

    2014-04-01

    Mesorhizobium metallidurans STM 2683(T) is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium that nodulates Anthyllis vulneraria in mine tailings highly contaminated in zinc, lead and cadmium. To study the mechanisms whereby this bacterium copes with metals, we functionally screened a cosmid genomic library of M. metallidurans for zinc or cadmium tolerance. A cosmid clone harbored a gene encoding P(IB)-type ATPase homologous to CadA that leads to cadmium and zinc resistance in Escherichia coli. The CadA protein structure presents one duplication of the two N-terminal metal binding domains (i.e. a heavy metal-associated domain followed by a histidine-rich domain) which allows specific binding to zinc and cadmium cations. A cadA-deleted strain of M. metallidurans failed to grow at high zinc concentrations (2 mM) and its growth was delayed at lower zinc concentrations. Expression studies using a transcriptional fusion of cadA promoter to gfp showed that cadA is specifically induced in a dose-dependent manner by zinc and cadmium in M. metallidurans in vitro conditions and into A. vulneraria nodules after Zn stress. Metal induction sensitivity was increased in the strain where cadA gene was deleted. This study identified cadA as a first mesorhizobial resistance determinant involved in detoxification of cadmium and zinc and which confers upon M. metallidurans greater capacity for coping with high zinc concentrations. This improves the knowledge of this bacterium for potential use as a symbiotic inoculant of Anthyllis in phytostabilization strategies of metal-rich sites. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. YCF1-Mediated Cadmium Resistance in Yeast Is Dependent on Copper Metabolism and Antioxidant Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wenzhong; Smith, Nathan; Wu, Xiaobin; Kim, Heejeong; Seravalli, Javier; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Acquisition and detoxification of metal ions are vital biological processes. Given the requirement of metallochaperones in cellular copper distribution and metallation of cuproproteins, this study investigates whether the metallochaperones also deliver metal ions for transporters functioning in metal detoxification. Results: Resistance to excess cadmium and copper of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is conferred by PCA1 and CaCRP1 metal efflux P-type ATPases, respectively, does not rely on known metallochaperones, Atx1p, Ccs1p, and Cox17p. Copper deficiency induced by the expression of CaCRP1 encoding a copper exporter occurs in the absence of Atx1p. Intriguingly, CCS1 encoding the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1p) is necessary for cadmium resistance that is mediated by Ycf1p, a vacuolar cadmium sequestration transporter. This is attributed to Ccs1p's role in the maturation of Sod1p rather than its direct interaction with Ycf1p for cadmium transfer. Functional defect in Ycf1p associated with the absence of Sod1p as well as another antioxidant enzyme Glr1p is rescued by anaerobic growth or substitutions of specific cysteine residues of Ycf1p to alanine or serine. This further supports oxidative inactivation of Ycf1p in the absence of Ccs1p, Sod1p, or Glr1p. Innovation: These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of metal metabolism, interaction among metal ions, and the roles for antioxidant systems in metal detoxification. Conclusion: Copper metabolism and antioxidant enzymes maintain the function of Ycf1p for cadmium defense. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1475–1489. PMID:24444374

  17. YCF1-mediated cadmium resistance in yeast is dependent on copper metabolism and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenzhong; Smith, Nathan; Wu, Xiaobin; Kim, Heejeong; Seravalli, Javier; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Lee, Jaekwon

    2014-10-01

    Acquisition and detoxification of metal ions are vital biological processes. Given the requirement of metallochaperones in cellular copper distribution and metallation of cuproproteins, this study investigates whether the metallochaperones also deliver metal ions for transporters functioning in metal detoxification. Resistance to excess cadmium and copper of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is conferred by PCA1 and CaCRP1 metal efflux P-type ATPases, respectively, does not rely on known metallochaperones, Atx1p, Ccs1p, and Cox17p. Copper deficiency induced by the expression of CaCRP1 encoding a copper exporter occurs in the absence of Atx1p. Intriguingly, CCS1 encoding the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1p) is necessary for cadmium resistance that is mediated by Ycf1p, a vacuolar cadmium sequestration transporter. This is attributed to Ccs1p's role in the maturation of Sod1p rather than its direct interaction with Ycf1p for cadmium transfer. Functional defect in Ycf1p associated with the absence of Sod1p as well as another antioxidant enzyme Glr1p is rescued by anaerobic growth or substitutions of specific cysteine residues of Ycf1p to alanine or serine. This further supports oxidative inactivation of Ycf1p in the absence of Ccs1p, Sod1p, or Glr1p. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of metal metabolism, interaction among metal ions, and the roles for antioxidant systems in metal detoxification. Copper metabolism and antioxidant enzymes maintain the function of Ycf1p for cadmium defense.

  18. Toxicological, cellular and gene expression responses in earthworms exposed to copper and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, David J; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Svendsen, Claus; Hankard, Peter K; Morgan, A John; Weeks, Jason M; Kille, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This study correlates sub-organismal changes with toxicological effects in earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus) exposed to copper and cadmium. Both metals reduced survival and reproduction at the highest concentration (LC50 5.11 microM Cu g(-1) and 4.04 microM Cd g(-1); cocoon production EC50s 5.17 microM Cu g(-1) and 1.86 microM Cd g(-1), all values as dry mass soil). Cadmium significantly reduced lysosomal membrane stability (at 1.86 microM Cd g(-1) and higher), upregulated metallothionein gene expression (at least sevenfold in all treatments) and reduced lysosome-associated-glycoprotein gene expression. Copper did not lower lysosomal membrane stability, but did upregulate metallothionein gene expression (at 2.5 microM Cu g(-1)), reduce lysosome-associated-glycoprotein gene expression and gave a nonlinear pattern for mitochondrial ribosomal subunit transcript expression (reduced at 0.35 and 0.811 microM Cu g(-1); higher at 2.5 microM Cu g(-1)). Correlation of metal body residue concentrations and cellular and molecular genetic responses with juvenile production rate confirmed a relationship for metallothionein expression, lysosomal membrane stability and cadmium tissue concentration in cadmium-exposed worms. Relationships between responses were also found for both metals. These suggested mechanisms for the interaction of cadmium and copper with specific gene products and with organelle (mitochondrial, lysosomal) functioning.

  19. Effect of copper and cadmium on three Malaysian tropical estuarine invertebrate larvae.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Patel, T R; Colbo, M H

    1997-03-01

    Three species of tropical estuarine invertebrates were exposed to copper sulfate and cadmium chloride to investigate their potential as test specimens for sediment toxicity assays in the South-east Asian regions. The larvae of the reef sea urchin (Diadema setosum), the oyster (Crassostrea iradalei), and the mud crab (Scylla seratta Forskall) were used in the 48-hr assays with copper and cadmium as reference toxicants. In addition the sea urchin were tested for end point measurements at different stages of the larval development and a 60-min sperm bioassay. The study revealed that the sea urchin first cleavage, which is an assay end point and which takes place about 1 hr after fertilization, was the most sensitive stage for both toxicants, with copper being more toxic than cadmium. Sensitivity comparisons between the three invertebrate larvae revealed the mud crab zoea larvae to be most sensitive for cadmium with an LC50 value of 0.078 microgram/ml, while the sea urchin was more sensitive for copper, with EC50 values of 0.01 microgram/ml at the first cleavage stage and 0.04 microgram/ml at the pluteus larva stage. All the invertebrates tested gave responses that made them suitable test organisms for metal bioassays in the tropical estuarine environment.

  20. Effects of Copper, Cadmium, Lead, and Arsenic in a Live Diet on Juvenile Fish Growth

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of dietborne copper, cadmium, lead, and arsenic on juvenile fish were evaluated using a live diet consisting of the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. In 30-d exposures, no effects on growth and survival of rainbow trout, fathead minnow, and channel catfish were obs...

  1. Cadmium, copper and nickel levels in vegetables from industrial and residential areas of Lagos City, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, A A; Arowolo, T A; Bamgbose, O

    2003-03-01

    The levels of cadmium, copper and nickel in five different edible vegetables, Talinum triangulare, Celosia trigyna, Corchorus olitorus, Venomia amygydalina and Telfaria accidentalis, and the soils in which they were grown, from three industrial and three residential areas of Lagos City, Nigeria, were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results obtained for these three heavy metals from the industrial areas were higher than those of the residential areas as a result of pollution. Industrial area results for vegetables ranged between 1.13 and 1.67 microg/g for cadmium; 25.08 and 56.84 microg/g for copper and 1.33 and 2.06 microg/g for nickel. There were statistically significant differences (P<0.05) between the levels of copper and nickel in all the vegetables studied from industrial and residential areas, while there was no statistically significant difference for cadmium. The results also show that Corchorus olitorus (bush okra) has the ability to accumulate more copper and nickel than the other vegetable studied but has the least ability to accumulate cadmium.

  2. Effects of Copper, Cadmium, Lead, and Arsenic in a Live Diet on Juvenile Fish Growth

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of dietborne copper, cadmium, lead, and arsenic on juvenile fish were evaluated using a live diet consisting of the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. In 30-d exposures, no effects on growth and survival of rainbow trout, fathead minnow, and channel catfish were obs...

  3. In vitro effect of cadmium and copper on separated blood leukocytes of Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, Mirella; Celi, Monica; Tramati, Cecilia; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Arizza, Vincenzo; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2014-04-01

    The immunotoxic effects of heavy metals on blood leukocytes of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were examined. The cells, separated by a discontinuous Percoll-gradients, were exposed in vitro to various sublethal concentrations of cadmium and copper (10(-7)M, 10(-5)M, and 10(-3)M) and their immunotoxic effect was then evaluated by measuring neutral red uptake, MTT assay, DNA fragmentation and Hsp70 gene expression. First of all, we demonstrated that the cells treated in vitro could incorporate Cd and Cu. A relationship between heavy metal exposure and dose-time-dependent alterations in responses of leukocytes from blood was found for both metals, but copper was more immunotoxic than cadmium in all assays performed. A significant reduction in the cells׳ ability to uptake neutral red and viability by MTT assay was recorded, indicating that both cadmium and copper could change the membrane permeability, inducing cellular apoptosis when the concentration of metals reached 10(-3)M. The apoptotic effect may also explain the high level of cytotoxicity found when the leukocytes were exposed to higher concentration of metals. These results demonstrated that toxic effect of copper and cadmium affect on the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity reducing the immune defences of the organism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anomalous segregation during electrodynamic gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yeckel, Andrew; Burger, Arnold; Cui, Yunlong; Lynn, Kelvin G.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2011-06-01

    A transient, coupled model has been developed to analyze the segregation of zinc in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) grown in an electrodynamic gradient freeze (EDG) furnace. The coupled model consists of a local model that solves for time-dependent melt flow, heat transfer, melt-crystal interface position, and zinc distribution in both melt and solid phases and a quasi-steady-state global model that features realistic furnace heat transfer. After verification and validation tests, the model is applied to predict composition patterns in a large-scale CZT EDG growth system previously analyzed by Gasperino et al. [On crucible effects during the growth of cadmium zinc telluride in an electrodynamic gradient freeze furnace, J. Crys. Growth 311 (2009) 2327-2335]. Surprisingly, anomalous zinc segregation is predicted, featuring a non-monotonic axial concentration profile and several local minima and maxima across the boule. A mechanistic explanation is put forth based on the cumulative effect of changes in multi-cellular melt flow structures, a particularly susceptible occurrence for CZT systems. Additional effects of furnace translation rate and solid state diffusion are probed.

  5. Removal of cadmium, zinc, manganese and chromium cations from aqueous solution by a clay mineral.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Maria G; de Oliveira, Michelle M; Arakaki, Luiza N H

    2006-09-01

    Vermiculite, a 2:1 clay mineral, was applied as adsorbent for removal of cadmium, zinc, manganese, and chromium from aqueous solutions. Parameters such as time of reaction, effect of pH and cation concentration were investigated. All isotherms were L type of the Gilles classification, except zinc (type S). The adsorbent showed good sorption potential for these cations. The experimental data was analyzed by Langmuir isotherm model showing reasonable adjustment. The quantity of adsorbed cations was 0.50, 0.52, 0.60, and 0.48 mmol g(-1) of Cd(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Cr(3+), respectively.

  6. Electrodeposited Zinc-Nickel as an Alternative to Cadmium Plating for Aerospace Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, V. C.

    1991-01-01

    Corrosion evaluation studies were conducted on 4130 alloy steel samples coated with electrodeposited zinc-nickel and samples coated with electrodeposited cadmium. The zinc nickel was deposited by the selection electrochemical metallizing process. These coated samples were exposed to a 5-percent salt fog environment at 35 plus or minus 2 C for a period ranging from 96 to 240 hours. An evaluation of the effect of dichromate coatings on the performance of each plating was conducted. The protection afforded by platings with a dichromate seal was compared to platings without the seal. During the later stages of testing, deposit adhesion and the potential for hydrogen entrapment were also evaluated.

  7. Interactive studies of potassium and copper with cadmium on seed germination and early seedling growth in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Shikha; Sharma, Yogesh Kumar

    2009-05-01

    In the present study a novel approach has been made to evaluate the toxicity of cadmium in maize (Zea mays L. cv KJ9451) in terms of germination, seedling growth, pigment development and relevant enzyme activity and the possible remedial approach using potassium and copper to reduce cadmium toxicity. For the present investigations maize seeds were sown in petridishes on filter paper in triplicate containing different doses of cadmium viz. 0.05, 0. 10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0 mM and for interactive studies maize seeds sown in 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 mM Cd concentration were subjected to 0.50 and 1.00 mM concentration of potassium and copper respectively. At the high cadmium concentrations, germination percentage was decreased. I also showed considerable reduction in plumule length, radicle length and number of lateral roots while the potassium and copper combination with cadmium increased the seedling growth. The calculated values of SVI were found to be decreased with increase in the concentration of cadmium. Decreased GRI values were observed in maize treated with three higher concentrations of cadmium but the combination of potassium and copper showed recovery in GRI values. The fresh weight, dry weight and moisture contents were also found reduced with higher cadmium concentrations but the potassium and copper combination showed recovery when used with higher concentration of cadmium. Declined chlorophyll contents were noticed under the influence of higher cadmium concentrations. Both the combination of potassium and copper used with 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 mM cadmium concentrations resulted in increased chlorophyll and pheophytin contents and decreased in Cu combination respectively. The potassium and copper (both 0.50 and 1.00 mM) with 0.75 and 1.00 mM cadmium increased the carotenoid contents although lone cadmium decreased it. Amylase activity was found to be gradually reduced at all concentrations of cadmium. The 0.50 mM and 1.00mM potassium combination improved

  8. Detoxication of zinc and cadmium by the freshwater protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis: the effect of water hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.; Dunlop, S.

    1981-10-01

    Estimated 8-hr LC/sub 50/ values of zinc and cadmium were less than 1 ppm in the absence of soluble calcium and magnesium, but were raised, for example, to 24 ppm of zinc and 19 ppm of cadmium by the addition of calcium plus magnesium at a concentration (500 ppm) equivalent to that of very hard water. Experiments with /sup 65/Zn showed that uptake of this element from sublethal concentrations over 8 hr was reduced from approximately 50 X 10/sup -2/ ..mu..g liter/sup -1/ to 10 X 10/sup -2/ ..mu..g liter/sup -1/ per 10/sup 6/ cells by the addition of 500 ppm of calcium and magnesium. Diminished uptake may partly explain the antagonism observed in the toxicity tests.

  9. Determination of Cadmium, Lead and Zinc in Vegetables in Jaipur (India).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Verma, P S

    2014-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectroscopic method was used for the determination of Lead, Cadmium and Zinc in vegetables grown in and around Jaipur food stuffs irrigated with industrial waste water. Vegetable samples were collected after maturity, and analyzed, such as spinach (Spinacia oleracea), ladyfinger (Abelmoschus esulentus), pepper mint (Menthe pipereta), brinjal (Solanum melongena), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), cauliflower (Brassica oleracea), onion (Allium cepa), radish (Raphanus sativus), pointedgourd (Trichosanthes dioica), bottlegourd (Lagenaria siceraria), chilies (Capsicum annum), ribbedgourd (Luffa acutangula) and pumpkin (Curcurbites pepo). The concentration of Lead ranged between 1.40-71.06 ppm, Cadmium 0.61-34.48 ppm and Zinc 0.39-187.26 ppm in vegetable samples. The results reveal that urban consumers are at greater risk of purchasing fresh vegetables with high levels of heavy metal, beyond the permissible limits, as defined by the Indian Prevention of Food Adulteration Act, 1954 and WHO.

  10. Evaluation of the Randox colorimetric serum copper and zinc assays against atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Jeffrey M; Hartley, Thomas F; Ball, Madeleine J

    2009-07-01

    Analysis of copper and zinc in serum is commonly performed using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS); however, these methods are often not readily available in smaller laboratories. Randox colorimetric assays for copper and zinc in serum were evaluated on the Thermo Electron Data Pro analyser against flame AAS methods. Copper and zinc were measured in 48 serum samples using the Randox colorimetric copper (CU2340) and zinc (ZN2341) assays on the Data Pro analyser and the results compared with those from a Varian Spectra 880 atomic absorption spectrometer. A smaller set of samples (n = 15) were also analysed colorimetrically for zinc on the Roche Cobas Mira. Linear regression analyses of Bland and Altman plots from the Data Pro - AAS comparison gave the following results for copper: correlation r = 0.6669 (P < 0.01), slope = -0.2499 (P < 0.01), intercept = 3.219 (P < 0.01). For zinc, results were as follows: correlation r = 0.1976, slope = 0.1807, intercept = -1.922. For the smaller set of samples, the Cobas Mira - AAS comparison for zinc gave correlation r = 0.4379, slope = 0.5294, intercept = -4.074. The results indicated significant systematic and fixed bias between the colorimetric copper and the AAS method. Performances in comparison to AAS methods indicated the colorimetric methods, as used, are unsuitable for the accurate determination of copper and zinc in human serum.

  11. Skeletal concentrations of lead, cadmium, zinc, and silver in ancient North American Pecos Indians.

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, J E; Smith, D R; Flegal, A R

    1991-01-01

    Bone samples of 14 prehistoric North American Pecos Indians from circa 1400 A.D. were analyzed for lead, cadmium, zinc, and silver by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry to establish the baseline levels of these elements in an ancient North American population. Measurements of outer and inner bone fractions indicate the former were contaminated postmortem for lead, zinc, and cadmium. The contamination-adjusted average (mean +/- SD) level of lead (expressed as the ratio of atomic lead to atomic calcium) in bones of the Indians was 8.4 +/- 4.4 x 10(-7)), which was similar to ratios in bones of ancient Peruvians (0.9 to 7.7 x 10(-7)) and significantly lower than ratios in bones of modern adults in England and the United States (210 to 350 x 10(-7]. The adjusted average concentrations (microgram per gram dry weight) of biologic cadmium, silver, and zinc in the Pecos Indian bones were 0.032 +/- 0.013, 0.094 +/- 0.044, and 130 +/- 66, as compared to concentrations of 1.8, 0.01 to 0.44, and 75 to 170 in the bones of modern people, respectively. Therefore, cadmium concentrations in Pecos Indian bones are also approximately 50-fold lower than those of contemporary humans. These data support earlier findings that most previously reported natural concentrations of lead in human tissues are erroneously high and indicate that natural concentrations of cadmium are also between one and two orders of magnitude lower than contemporary concentrations. PMID:1773793

  12. Integrated micro-biochemical approach for phytoremediation of cadmium and zinc contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Mani, Dinesh; Kumar, Chitranjan; Patel, Niraj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The integrated potential of oilcake manure (OM), elemental sulphur (S(0)), Glomus fasciculatum and Pseudomonas putida by growing Helianthus annuus L for phytoremediation of cadmium and zinc contaminated soils was investigated under pot experiment. The integrated treatment (2.5 g kg(-1) OM, 0.8 g kg(-1) S(0) and co-inoculation with G. fasciculatum and P. putida promoted the dry biomass of the plant. The treatment was feasible for enhanced cadmium accumulation up to 6.56 and 5.25 mg kg(-1) and zinc accumulation up to 45.46 and 32.56 mg kg(-1) in root and shoot, respectively, which caused maximum remediation efficiency (0.73 percent and 0.25 percent) and bioaccumulation factor (2.39 and 0.83) for Cd and Zn, respectively showing feasible uptake (in mg kg(-1) dry biomass) of Cd (5.55) and Zn (35.51) at the contaminated site. Thus, authors conclude to integrate oilcake manure, S(0) and microbial co-inoculation for enhanced clean-up of cadmium and zinc-contaminated soils.

  13. [Effect of cadmium on apoptosis of spermatogenic cells of rat testis and the protection effect of zinc against it].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Yi, J; Wang, C; Xu, P

    2000-05-30

    To study the effect of cadmium on the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells of rat testis and the protective effect of zinc against it. 24 Wistar male rats were divided into 3 groups (cadmium, cadmium and zinc, and control rats). Rats were injected with low-dose CdCl2 (2 mg/kgBW), zinc acetate(ZnAc, 15 mg/kgBW) before and after injected with low-dose CdCl2 and ZnAc(50 mg/kgBW). The control rats were injected with same-dose of 0.9% NaCl. After 7 days, the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells was studied with in situ nick translation(ISNT) technique. Compared with control group, the number of apoptosis spermategenic cells was obviously increased in cadmium group(P < 0.01, t = 3.87), but it was not significantly different in cadmium and zinc rats. Cadmium treatment could accelerate testis apoptosis. Zinc could proven it.

  14. Copper and zinc in the serum, urine, and hair of patients with Wilson's disease treated with penicillamine and zinc.

    PubMed

    Dastych, Milan; Procházková, Dagmar; Pokorný, Antonin; Zdrazil, Libor

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the different levels of copper and zinc in the serum, urine, and scalp hair of patients with Wilson's disease receiving different, currently accepted methods of treatment to reduce the copper load (penicillamine-group 1, n = 8; zinc-group 2, n = 8; penicillamine+zinc-group 3, n = 8). Blood, urine, and hair samples were collected from the patients. All three treatments resulted in a significant decrease of the serum copper levels. Significantly increased levels of zinc in the serum were detected in the patients in groups 2 and 3 (19.1 and 18.8 micromol/l, respectively; p < 0.05). Copper excretion in the urine significantly increased during its administration to groups 1 and 3 (11.5 and 7.94 micromol/24 h respectively; p < 0.001) due to the effect of penicillamine. The administration of zinc as monotherapy (group 2) or in combination with penicillamine (group 3) led to an increase of its excretion (25.3 and 22.4 micromol/24 h, respectively; p < 0.01). Only an insignificant rise of the copper content in the hair was found in all three groups of patients. The content of zinc in the hair did not differ significantly in any of the groups in comparison with the control group.

  15. Heavy metal pollution among autoworkers. II. Cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, and nickel.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Rastogi, S C

    1977-01-01

    Garages and auto-repair workshops may be polluted with other heavy metals besides lead. Blood of autoworkers with high lead content was analysed for cadmium, chromium, copper manganese, nickel, ALAD activity and carboxyhaemoglobin level. Cadmium and copper levels in blood of autoworkers were comparable with those of the control subjects while chroimium and nickel levels were significantly higher (P less than 0-01 for both metals), and scattered raised values of manganese were found. There was no significant mutual correlation between levels of various heavy metals determined in whole blood. High copper levels were slightly related to decreasing ALAD activity (P less than 0-1). Nineteen per cent of autoworkers were found to have an abnormally blood level of carboxyhaemoglobin. The amount of particulate heavy metal in autoworkshop air was not related to biochemical abnormalities found in the autoworkers. Various sources of pollution of these heavy metals in autoworkshops are discussed. PMID:71915

  16. Combined effects of cadmium and zinc on a Lake Michigan zooplankton community

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.S.; Mellinger, D.L.; Parker, J.I.

    1981-11-01

    Two 3-week experiments with small enclosures were conducted in situ in northeastern Green Bay, Lake Michigan, to compare the effects of separate and combined additions of cadmium and zinc on the zooplankton community. The radioisotopes /sup 109/Cd and /sup 65/Zn were used as tracers to determine the sorption of cadmium and zinc by different particle size fractions. Separate additions of 2 ..mu..g Cd/L or 100 ..mu..g Zn/L, as well as combined additions of 2 ..mu..g Cd/L + 100 ..mu.. Zn/L or 1 ..mu..g Cd/L + 50 ..mu..g Zn/L, caused significant reductions of total crustacean density, species diversity, two community similarity indices, and final dissolved oxygen concentration. The effects of separate additions of 100 ..mu..g Zn/L were generally more pronounced than those of 2 ..mu..g Cd/L, but were similar to those of approx. =5 ..mu..g Cd/L. The effects of combined additions of 2 ..mu..g Cd/L + 100 ..mu..g Zn/L were not significantly different from those of 100 ..mu..g Zn/L alone and were primarily due to zinc because it reduced cadmium uptake by the plankton (10-85 ..mu..m and >85 ..mu.. fractions). The effects of combined additions of 1 ..mu..g Cd/L + 50 ..mu..g Zn/L probably were also mainly due to zinc. The overall results of this study suggest that less than a ten-fold increase in the concentration of zinc in Lake Michigan.

  17. Combined effects of cadmium and zinc on a Lake Michigan zooplankton community

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.S.; Mellinger, D.L.; Parker, J.I.

    1981-01-01

    Two 3-week experiments with small enclosures were conducted in situ in northeastern Green Bay, Lake Michigan, to compare the effects of separate and combined additions of cadmium and zinc on the zooplankton community. The radioisotopes /sup 109/Cd and /sup 65/Zn were used as tracers to determine the sorption of cadmium and zinc by different particle size fractions. Separate additions of 2 ..mu..g Cd/L or 100 ..mu..g Zn/L, as well as combined additions of 2 ..mu..g Cd/L + 100 ..mu..g Zn/L or 1 ..mu..g Cd/L + 50 ..mu..g Zn/L, caused significant reductions of total crustacean density, species diversity, two community similarity indices, and final dissolved oxygen concentration. The effects of separate additions of 100 ..mu..g Zn/L were generally more pronounced than those of 2 ..mu..g Cd/L, but were similar to those of approx.5..mu..g Cd/L. The effects of combined additions of 2 ..mu..g Cd/L + 100 ..mu..g Zn/L were not significantly different from those of 100 ..mu..g Zn/L alone and were primarily due to zinc because it reduced cadmium uptake by the plankton (10-85 ..mu..m and >85 ..mu..m fractions). The effects of combined additions of 1 ..mu..g Cd/L + 50 ..mu..g Zn/L probably were also mainly due to zinc. The overall results of this study suggest that less than a ten-fold increase in the concentration of zinc in Lake Michigan (presently approx.5 ..mu..g/L) could have pronounced effects on the plankton community.

  18. A comparative study of cadmium and copper in ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) in regions with and without historic mining.

    PubMed

    Snively, Marian; Flaspohler, David J

    2006-10-01

    Mining activities can increase the bioavailability of metals in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Following over 100 years of copper mining in portions of Michigan's Upper Peninsula (UP) terrestrial ecosystems retain vast quantities of waste rock with traces of cadmium and large concentrations of copper. We compared liver cadmium and copper concentrations in ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), a popular game bird from landscapes with and without historic mining. We also used chickens (Gallus domesticus) to determine whether mine waste was a direct source of liver cadmium. Cadmium and copper levels did not differ between mining areas in Michigan and non-mining areas in Wisconsin. We found nearly significant difference between sexes in cadmium levels. Cadmium levels for all chickens were below the method detection limit of the lab (0.03 mg/kg) and copper levels did not differ in the experimental chickens. These results suggest that the historic mining in the western UP is not leading to higher cadmium or copper uptake in grouse.

  19. Copper, cadmium, and nickel accumulation in crayfish populations near copper-nickel smelters at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bagatto, G.; Aikhan, M.A.

    1987-03-01

    The Sudbury basin, an elliptical 646 square mile depression containing a number of freshwater reservoirs, has been subjected to extreme ecological disturbances from logging, mining and smelting activities. The purpose of the present study was to compare tissue concentration of copper, cadmium and nickel in freshwater crayfish at selected distances of the habitat from the emission source. Various tissue concentrations in crayfish from the sites were also examined to determine if particular body tissues were specific sites for metal accumulation.

  20. Zinc and copper in Asian pregnancies--is there evidence for a nutritional deficiency?

    PubMed

    Campbell-Brown, M; Ward, R J; Haines, A P; North, W R; Abraham, R; McFadyen, I R; Turnlund, J R; King, J C

    1985-09-01

    In 92 Hindu Asians, 59% of them vegetarian, and 51 Europeans longitudinal measurements were made during pregnancy of the zinc and copper concentrations in plasma and hair together with urinary zinc excretion, as indices of their zinc and copper status. Maternal diets were assessed once at booking. Zinc intakes ranged from 3.1 to 16.9 mg/day, with average intakes least in vegetarian Hindus and most in Europeans. Average copper intakes ranged between 1.48 and 1.80 mg/day and were similar in the three patient groups. Both ethnic groups showed the pregnancy-associated fall in the plasma concentration of zinc and rise in that of copper but throughout the study Hindus had statistically significant lower levels of zinc and higher levels of copper than Europeans. Urinary zinc excretion was not only significantly lower throughout the study in Hindus than in Europeans but the increase in excretion which occurred after 20 weeks gestation was smaller. There were no ethnic differences in the zinc content of hair. Urinary zinc excretion correlated with both plasma zinc levels and dietary zinc. Mean birthweight in the Hindus was 2912 g and 34% of infants were below the 10th centile, using the Aberdeen standards, compared with 6% of the European babies (mean birthweight 3349 g). No association was found between crude or adjusted birthweight and any of the measures of zinc or copper status in either ethnic group. The Hindus had an apparently lower average zinc status than the Europeans, but there was no evidence that this had acted as a nutritional constraint and was the cause of their slower rate of intrauterine growth.

  1. Copper, lead and zinc concentrations of human breast milk as affected by maternal dietary practices

    SciTech Connect

    Umoren, J.; Kies, C.

    1986-03-01

    Maternal dietary practices have been found to affect the concentrations of some nutrients in human breast milk. Lead toxicity is a concern in young children. Lead, copper and zinc are thought to compete for intestinal absorption sites. The objective of the current project was to compare copper, lead and zinc contents of breast milk from practicing lacto-vegetarian and omnivore, lactating women at approximately four months post-partum. Analyses were done by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a carbon rod attachment. Copper concentrations were higher in milk samples from lacto-ovo-vegetarians. Milk samples from the omnivores had the highest lead and zinc concentrations. Lead and copper concentrations in milk were negatively correlated. The higher zinc concentrations in the milk of the omnivore women may have been related to better utilization of zinc from meat than from plant food sources.

  2. Galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibit melanogenesis via multiple pigmentary pathways.

    PubMed

    Won, Yen-Kim; Lin, Connie B; Seiberg, Miri; Chen, Nannan; Hu, Yaping; Rossetti, Dianne; Saliou, Claude; Loy, Chong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous electrical field of human skin plays an important role in many skin functions. However, the biological effects and mechanism of action of externally applied electrical stimulation on skin remain unclear. Recent study showed that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles produce electrical stimulation and reduce inflammatory and immune responses in intact skin, suggesting the important role of electrical stimulation in non-wounded skin. The objective of this study is to investigate the biological effect of galvanic zinc-copper microparticles on skin pigmentation. Our findings showed that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibited melanogenesis in a human melanoma cell line (MNT-1), human keratinocytes and melanoma cells co-cultures, and in pigmented epidermal equivalents. Treatment of galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibited melanogenesis by reducing the promoter transactivation of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1 in human melanoma cells. In a co-culture Transwell system of keratinocytes and melanoma cells, galvanic zinc-copper microparticles reduced melanin production via downregulation of endothelin-1 secretion from keratinocytes and reduced tyrosinase gene expression in melanoma cells. In addition, exposure of pigmented epidermal equivalents to galvanic zinc-copper microparticles resulted in reduced melanin deposition. In conclusion, our data demonstrated for the first time that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles reduced melanogenesis in melanoma cells and melanin deposition in pigmented epidermal equivalents by affecting multiple pigmentary pathways.

  3. Effect of infant cereals on zinc and copper absorption during weaning

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.G.; Keen, C.L.; Loennerdal, B.

    1987-10-01

    Zinc and copper absorption from five infant cereal products mixed with water, human milk, or cow's milk was measured using an in vivo absorption model (rat pup) involving gastric intubation of extrinsically radiolabeled diets. Whole-body copper 64 uptake, nine hours after intubation, ranged from 14% to 31% of the dose given for the different cereal combinations. The resultant bioavailability of copper from human milk-cereal combinations (23% to 26%) was significantly lower than that from human milk alone (38%). Whole-body zinc 65 uptake, nine hours after intubation, ranged from 13% to 54% of the dose given for the different cereal combinations. These values were significantly lower than the whole-body zinc 65 uptake from milk alone (61%). Zinc availability was lower (13% to 25%) from dry cereal combinations that contained phytic acid (oatmeal and high-protein varieties) compared with the ready-to-serve cereal-fruit combinations (24% to 54%). The highest zinc uptake (37% to 54%) was from rice-fruit combinations that do not contain phytic acid. We estimated the amounts of zinc and copper that would be absorbed from these cereal products and speculated on the potential impact of these foods on the weaning infant's zinc and copper nutriture. Depending on the feeding practices employed during the weaning period, it is apparent that infant cereals may compromise utilization of zinc and copper from milk diets during weaning.

  4. Lipid peroxidation in the gill and hepatopancreas of Oziotelphusa senex senex fabricius during cadmium and copper exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P.S. ); Bhagyalakshmi, A. )

    1994-11-01

    Environmental contamination by metals has increased in recent years due to the excessive use of metals in agriculture and industry. Due to their bioconcentration, immutable and non-degradable properties, these metals constitute a major source of pollutants. Among these metals cadmium, lead and mercury are non-essential, where as copper, iron, manganese, and zinc are essential elements. They are required in trace amounts by all forms of life but are toxic when present in excess. Considerable information is available on the toxic effects of cadmium on biological mechanisms at all integration levels, such as molecular, biochemical, physiological and behavioural, in animals. It is also well known that heavy metal contamination alters cellular physiology, particularly by affecting aspects such as transport across plasma membranes, mitochondrial functions, lysosomal stability etc. Even though it has been demonstrated that the in vitro addition of heavy metals stimulates membrane lipid peroxidation, the in vivo effects exerted by different cations on this process are still not clear. The present work reports the effect of exposure to sublethal concentrations of heavy metals such as Cu and Cd on lipid peroxidation in the tissues of the edible freshwater crab, Oziotelphusa senex senex. 16 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Effect of zinc supplementation on the antioxidant, copper, and iron status of physically active adolescents.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Karla de Jesus Fernandes; Donangelo, Carmen Marino; de Oliveira, Astrogildo Vianna; da Silveira, Carmen Lucia Porto; Koury, Josely Correa

    2009-04-01

    Puberty associated with intense physical activity results in oxidation stress. Zinc supplementation may benefit antioxidant capacity although it may also affect iron and copper status. This study evaluated the effect of zinc supplementation on antioxidant, zinc and copper status of physically active male football players (13 years +/- 0.4 years), divided in two groups and studied during 12 weeks: Zn-supplemented (Zn-SUP, 22 mg Zn d(-1) as zinc gluconate, n = 21) and placebo (PLA, n = 26). At baseline, there was no significant difference in biochemical indices between the two groups. After treatment, plasma zinc and erythrocyte iron increased in both groups (p < 0.001); urinary zinc increased (p < 0.001) only in Zn-SUP, and erythrocyte zinc decreased (p = 0.002) only in PLA. Plasma iron and copper decreased (p = 0.01 and p = 0.015, respectively) only in Zn-SUP. Plasma ferric-reducing ability and plasma conjugated dienes increased, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility decrease in both groups, although the latter two were significantly lower in Zn-SUP compared to PLA (p < 0.01). In conclusion, our study indicates that the use of 22 mg d(-1) of supplemental zinc during 12 week in adolescent athletes did not affect growth, improved markers of antioxidant status but reduced plasma iron and copper. Therefore, it appears that the use of zinc supplementation by healthy adolescent athletes benefits their antioxidant capacity but impairs copper and iron nutritional status. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Chronic but not acute antidepresant treatment alters serum zinc/copper ratio under pathological/zinc-deficient conditions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mlyniec, K; Ostachowicz, B; Krakowska, A; Reczynski, W; Opoka, W; Nowak, G

    2014-10-01

    Depression is the leading psychiatric disorder with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Clinical studies report lower serum zinc in depressed patients, suggesting a strong link between zinc and mood disorders. Also copper as an antagonistic element to zinc seems to play a role in depression, where elevated concentration is observed. In the present study we investigated serum copper and zinc concentration after acute or chronic antidepressant (AD) treatment under pathological/zinc-deficient conditions. Zinc deficiency in mice was induced by a special diet administered for 6 weeks (zinc adequate diet - ZnA, contains 33.5 mgZn/kg; zinc deficient diet - ZnD, contains 0.2 mgZn/kg). Animals received acute or chronically saline (control), imipramine, escitalopram, reboxetine or bupropion. To evaluate changes in serum copper and zinc concentrations the total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was performed. In ZnD animals serum zinc level was reduced after acute ADs treatment (similarly to vehicle treatment), however, as demonstrated in the previous study after chronic ADs administration no differences between both ZnA and ZnD groups were observed. Acute ADs in ZnD animals caused different changes in serum copper concentration with no changes after chronic ADs treatment. The calculated serum Zn/Cu ratio is reduced in ZnD animals (compared to ZnA subjects) treated with saline (acutely or chronically) and in animals treated acutely with ADs. However, chronic treatment with ADs normalized (by escitalopram, reboxetine or bupropion) or increased (by imipramine) this Zn/Cu ratio. Observed in this study normalization of serum Zn/Cu ratio in depression-like conditions by chronic (but not acute) antidepressants suggest that this ratio may be consider as a marker of depression or treatment efficacy.

  7. Method for the simultaneous determination of cadmium and zinc in whole blood by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and measurement in normotensive and hypertensive humans.

    PubMed

    Tulley, R T; Lehmann, H P

    1982-07-01

    A method is described for the analysis of whole blood cadmium and zinc by extraction and atomic absorption spectrophotometry, in which cadmium is analyzed using a graphite furnace, and zinc using an air-acetylene flame with a single slot burner, after dilution of the extract. Recoveries for cadmium and zinc were 100% and 106%, respectively. For cadmium the day-to-day and within-run coefficients of variation were all less than 13% at low concentrations (approximately 27 nmol/1) and 6% or less at high concentrations (approximately 89 nmol/1). For zinc the coefficients of variation for day-to-day and within-run analyses were less than 6% at low (approximately 76 mumol/1) and high concentrations (approximately 138 mumol/1). The sensitivity of the procedure is 0.5 nmol/1 for cadmium and 1.2 mu mol/1 for zinc. Whole blood from 72 normotensive volunteers, 56 treated hypertensives, and 15 untreated hypertensives were analyzed using this method. Cadmium levels were elevated in smokers but not significantly affected by age or sex. Zinc levels were higher in males than in females, but not significantly affected by smoking. Levels of cadmium and zinc were increased in treated hypertensives and greater still in untreated hypertensives. Significant elevations were found for cadmium in treated hypertensive females who smoked, treated and untreated hypertensive male non-smokers, and for the cadmium to zinc ratio in these later two groups.

  8. Magnesium, zinc, and copper status of US Navy SEAL trainees.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Day, B A; DeBolt, J E; Trostmann, U H; Bernier, L L; Deuster, P A

    1989-04-01

    Magnesium, zinc, and copper status of 270 US Navy Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) trainees was determined from dietary intakes and biochemical profiles. Although mean intakes exceeded the Recommended Dietary Allowances or the Estimated Safe and Adequate Intake range, intakes of 34%, 44%, and 37% of the trainees were below the recommendations for Mg, Zn, and Cu, respectively. Mean plasma concentrations were 0.85 +/- 0.004 mmol/L, 13.4 +/- 0.2 mumol/L, and 16.5 +/- 0.2 mumol/L for Mg, Zn, and Cu respectively. Mean 24-h urinary excretions were 5.7 +/- 0.2 mmol, 11.1 +/- 0.3 mumol, and 0.05 +/- 0.003 mumol, for Mg, Zn, and Cu, respectively. The data provided by the present study should be useful for comparing other physically active male populations.

  9. Copper, lead, zinc, antimony, and arsenic in Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Max Gregg

    1975-01-01

    Copper localities that merit geological investigation are found in the western Chasai District, in North Waziristan Agency, and in the Salt Range in Mianwali and Sargodha Districts. No high-grade deposits have been .reported from these ,areas and if deposits are developed they will likely be low-grade, high-tonnage, disseminated deposits. Those localities reported from Chitral State are too remote and inaccessible to be of interest now. All lead localities found to date are of minor importance; there has been small production at one .locality in Chasai District and in the southern part of the Hazara District. Zinc, antimony, and arsenic are sparse in Pakistan and no important localities of these metals are reported.

  10. Serum copper and zinc concentrations in patients with brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Cesur, Salih; Kocaturk, Pelin Aribal; Kavas, Guzin Ozelci; Aksaray, Sebahat; Tezeren, Deniz; Ciftci, Ugur

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the alterations in serum trace element concentrations, including zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) in patients with brucellosis and to compare them with the results of healthy individuals. Seventy-five subjects, 60 patients with brucellosis and 15 healthy individuals were included in this study. The serum Zn and Cu concentrations were measured by using atomic absorbtion spectrophotometer in sera of patients with brucellosis and statistically compared with those of healthy individuals. Serum Cu concentration was found to be significantly higher in patients with brucellosis than that of healthy individual (130.5+/-24.7, 96+/-8.65 microg/dl, respectively) (p < 0.01). Serum Zn concentration was lower in patients with brucellosis than those of healthy subjects (79.5 +/-13.5 and 83+/-5.59 microg/dl, respectively) (p < 0.01). Serum trace element concentrations showed significant alterations in patients with brucellosis compared with healthy subjects.

  11. Serum Copper and Zinc Levels Among Iranian Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Khoshdel, Zahra; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin; Abdollahi, Kourosh; Shojaei, Shahla; Moradi, Mostafa; Malekzadeh, Mahyar

    2016-04-01

    Alterations of trace element concentrations adversely affect biological processes and could promote carcinogenesis. Only a few studies have investigated the degree of changes in copper and zinc levels in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to compare the serum copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) concentrations in patients with CRC from Iran with those of healthy subjects. Cu and Zn concentrations in the serum of 119 cancer patients and 128 healthy individuals were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. We found a significant decrease in the total mean serum Cu and Zn concentrations in CRC patients as compared with the control group (137.5 ± 122.38 vs. 160.68 ± 45.12 μg/dl and 81.04 ± 52.05 vs. 141.64 ± 51.75, respectively). However, the serum Cu/Zn ratio in the patient group was significantly higher than that measured in the control group (p = 0.00). There was no significant difference in the mean values of serum Cu and Zn concentrations between young (<60 years) and elderly (≥60 years) patients. However, the Cu/Zn ratio in <60-year cases was significantly higher than that in ≥60-year age group (p < 0.05). In addition, mean serum Cu level in normal weight patients was significantly higher than that in overweight/obese cases (132.31 ± 87.43 vs. 103.81 ± 53.72 μg/dl, respectively) (p < 0.05). There was no difference in mean serum Cu and Zn concentrations in patients stratified by the site, stage, or differentiation grade of tumors. Our findings suggest that imbalance in Cu and Zn trace element level is associated with CRC and might play an important role in cancer development among Iranian patients.

  12. Avoidance of copper and zinc by rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss pre-exposed to copper.

    PubMed

    Svecevičius, Gintaras

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on 1-year-old rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in a counter-current flow, steep-gradient chamber to evaluate their ability to detect and avoid copper and zinc at concentrations of 0.1 mg Cu/L and 1 mg Zn/L, respectively, after 10-day pre-exposure to five copper sublethal concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 mg Cu/L and after 10-day re-acclimation period in clean water. Avoidance response intensity in affected fish significantly decreased with increase in pre-exposure Cu concentration. The strength of avoidance response to Cu and Zn test solutions in pre-exposed fish after re-acclimation gradually increased in a concentration-dependent order.

  13. Urinary excretion of copper, zinc and iron with and without D-penicillamine administration in relation to hepatic copper concentration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fieten, H; Hugen, S; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Hendriks, W H; Vernooij, J C M; Bode, P; Watson, A L; Leegwater, P A J; Rothuizen, J

    2013-08-01

    Hereditary copper-associated hepatitis in dogs resembles Wilson's disease, a copper storage disease in humans. Values for urinary copper excretion are well established in the diagnostic protocol of Wilson's disease, whereas in dogs these have not been evaluated. The objectives of this study were to characterize both basal and D-penicillamine induced urinary copper, zinc and iron excretion in dogs in relation to hepatic copper concentration. Beagles, Beagle-Bedlington terrier cross-breeds homozygous for the COMMD1 gene mutation that causes copper toxicosis, and Labrador retrievers with normal or increased hepatic copper concentrations were investigated. The hepatic copper phenotype was determined by histological evaluation of liver biopsies and measurement of the hepatic copper concentration by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Urinary excretion of copper, iron and zinc was measured via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry under basal conditions and after oral administration of a single dose (20mg/kg bodyweight) of the chelator D-penicillamine. There was a rapid increase in urinary excretion of copper and zinc, but not iron after D-penicillamine administration. This increase was not different between dogs with high or normal hepatic copper concentrations. D-penicillamine-induced urinary copper excretion and the copper/creatinine ratio did not correlate with hepatic copper concentrations in the dogs studied, although basal urinary copper/zinc ratios did correlate with hepatic copper concentrations in Labrador retrievers. The latter parameter may be useful in diagnostic and follow-up protocols for copper-associated hepatitis in Labrador retrievers.

  14. Balanus eburneus: a sensitive indicator of copper and zinc pollution in the coastal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, S.; Trefry, J.H.

    1981-12-01

    Barnacles were collected in the Eau Gallie Harbor waters, Florida, and were examined for copper and zinc by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results suggest that a 1 ppb increase in dissolved copper brings about a 36 ppm increase in tissue copper levels and that B. eburneus a sensitive indicator of copper and zinc pollution. However, this pollution is non-detectable 1 km away in the barnacles of Indian River Lagoon. This suggests minimal input or rapid dilution of the metals in the Indian River waters and raises concern for pollutant enrichment in restricted coastal embayments. (JMT)

  15. Alzheimer’s disease causation by copper toxicity and treatment with zinc

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence will be presented that the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) epidemic is new, the disease being very rare in the 1900s. The incidence is increasing rapidly, but only in developed countries. We postulate that the new emerging environmental factor partially causal of the AD epidemic is ingestion of inorganic copper from drinking water and taking supplement pills, along with a high fat diet. Inorganic copper can be partially directly absorbed and elevate the serum free copper pool. The Squitti group has shown that serum free copper is elevated in AD, correlates with cognition, and predicts cognition loss. Thus, our inorganic copper hypothesis fits well with the Squitti group data. We have also shown that AD patients are zinc deficient compared to age-matched controls. Because zinc is a neuronal protective factor, we postulate that zinc deficiency may also be partially causative of AD. We carried out a small 6 month double blind study of a new zinc formulation and found that in patients age 70 and over, it protected against cognition loss. Zinc therapy also significantly reduced serum free copper in AD patients, so efficacy may come from restoring normal zinc levels, or from lowering serum free copper, or from both. PMID:24860501

  16. Geographical differences of zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Greenland.

    PubMed

    Dietz, R; Riget, F; Born, E W

    2000-01-17

    Muscle, liver, and kidney tissues from 100 polar bears (Ursus maritimus), caught in the Avanersuaq area, north-west Greenland, and Ittoqqortoormiit area, central-east Greenland, were analysed for zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium. The zinc concentrations in muscle and liver were higher than in kidney. Mean zinc concentrations ranged from 19.7 to 76.0 micrograms/g (all data are presented as geometric means on a wet wt. basis). The presented cadmium concentrations by area and age groups were all low in muscle and in many cases below the detection limit (range: < 0.015-0.048 microgram/g). Cadmium concentrations were intermediate in liver (range: 0.120-1.98 micrograms/g) and highest in kidney tissue (range: 2.16-28.9 micrograms/g). Mercury was likewise lowest in muscle tissue (range: 0.034-0.191 microgram/g). Mercury concentration ranged quite similarly in liver and kidney tissue (liver range: 2.13-22.0 micrograms/g; kidney range: 2.87-32.0 micrograms/g). The selenium concentration increased from muscle (range: < 0.2-0.452 microgram/g) over liver (range: 1.20-9.80 micrograms/g) to kidney (range: 2.34-13.9 micrograms/g). No age accumulation was found for zinc. A weak increase was found for selenium, whereas cadmium and mercury clearly accumulated with age. An exception was mercury concentrations in muscle tissue, where no clear pattern was observed. Polar bears had significantly lower cadmium concentrations than ringed seals from the same area in all three tissues. Likewise mercury was significantly lower in the muscle tissue of polar bears than in ringed seals, whereas liver and kidney concentrations were higher. Biomagnification factors are provided for different tissues and age groups. Tissue ratios are given for different age groups and metals to enable a rough extrapolation from one tissue to another. Tissue ratios for cadmium, selenium and for mercury vary up to a factor of 6 with age. No significant differences could be detected between the elements analysed in

  17. Zinc and copper balances in healthy adult males during and after 17 wk of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Schneider, V. S.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Kuo, M. C.; Spector, E.; Lane, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of long-term bed rest on zinc and copper balances were measured in seven healthy men. Volunteers aged 22-54 y (mean +/- SD, 34 +/- 12 y), 168-185 cm in height (173 +/- 5 cm), and 64-86 kg in weight (74 +/- 9 kg) remained on a metabolic ward for 29 wk. Subjects were ambulatory during weeks 1-5, remained in continuous bed rest for weeks 6-22, and were reambulated during weeks 23-29. Copper and zinc were measured in weekly urine and fecal composites. Dietary intakes provided (mean +/- SD) 19.2 +/- 1.2 mumol Cu (1.22 +/- 0.08 mg), 211 +/- 11 mumol Zn (13.81 +/- 0.72 mg), 25.2 +/- 1.2 mmol Ca (1011 +/- 46 mg), 1086 +/- 46 mmol N (15.21 +/- 0.65 g), and 48.1 +/- 1.4 mmol K (1489 +/- 44 mg)/d. Bed rest increased fecal zinc excretion and decreased zinc balance, whereas copper balance was unchanged. Reambulation decreased fecal zinc excretion and increased both zinc and copper balances. These results suggest that during long-term bed rest or space flight, individuals will lose total body zinc and will retain more zinc and copper when they reambulate.

  18. Zinc and copper balances in healthy adult males during and after 17 wk of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Schneider, V. S.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Kuo, M. C.; Spector, E.; Lane, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of long-term bed rest on zinc and copper balances were measured in seven healthy men. Volunteers aged 22-54 y (mean +/- SD, 34 +/- 12 y), 168-185 cm in height (173 +/- 5 cm), and 64-86 kg in weight (74 +/- 9 kg) remained on a metabolic ward for 29 wk. Subjects were ambulatory during weeks 1-5, remained in continuous bed rest for weeks 6-22, and were reambulated during weeks 23-29. Copper and zinc were measured in weekly urine and fecal composites. Dietary intakes provided (mean +/- SD) 19.2 +/- 1.2 mumol Cu (1.22 +/- 0.08 mg), 211 +/- 11 mumol Zn (13.81 +/- 0.72 mg), 25.2 +/- 1.2 mmol Ca (1011 +/- 46 mg), 1086 +/- 46 mmol N (15.21 +/- 0.65 g), and 48.1 +/- 1.4 mmol K (1489 +/- 44 mg)/d. Bed rest increased fecal zinc excretion and decreased zinc balance, whereas copper balance was unchanged. Reambulation decreased fecal zinc excretion and increased both zinc and copper balances. These results suggest that during long-term bed rest or space flight, individuals will lose total body zinc and will retain more zinc and copper when they reambulate.

  19. [Zinc and copper content in individual components used to prepare pediatric total nutrition mixtures].

    PubMed

    Menéndez, A M; Weisstaub, A R; Montemerlo, H; Rusi, F; Guidoni, Ma E; Piñeiro, A; Pita Martín de Portela, Ma L

    2007-01-01

    1) to determine zinc and copper levels of contamination in the individual component solutions used to prepare the pediatric total parenteral nutrition mixtures in Argentina; 2) to compare zinc and copper amounts prescribed by the physician with the true amount given to a neonate weighing 1.2 kg and to a child weighing 10 kg, who would receive total parenteral nutrition formulas prepared with those component solutions. Zn and Cu were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 59 individual solutions belonging to 14 components chosen between the commercial products available in Argentina. zinc and copper, as contaminants, were found neither in the sterile water, nor in the potassium chloride or in the vitamin solutions. Zinc, but no copper, was detected in sodium chloride, manganese sulfate, chromium chloride and seleniose acid solutions. Zinc and copper were detected in dextrose, amino acids, calcium gluconate and lipid solutions at variable levels. Zinc sulfate solutions contained between 90.4% and 140% of the declared content and a variable contamination with copper. Copper sulfate solutions presented between 4% and 18% less the declared copper concentration and a variable contamination with zinc. Dextrose and lipid solutions presented the highest amount of zinc and copper. Therefore, the total parenteral mixtures prepared with the analyzed solutions must have had an excess of zinc and copper in relation to the prescription: ranging between 103% and 161% and between 7%-426% higher than the Zn and Cu amounts prescribed for neonates, respectively; the excess in the total parenteral nutrition for a child weighing 10 kg would ranged between 105% and 189% and between 7%-365% higher than the prescribed for Zn and Cu, respectively. 1) Nine components presented Zn and five Cu, both of them not declared in the label; 2) the usually prescribed total parenteral nutrition mixtures must have had a zinc and copper amount higher than the prescribed one according to

  20. Effect of copper and cadmium ions on heart function and calpain activity in blue mussel Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Bakhmet, Igor N; Kantserova, Nadezhda P; Lysenko, Liudmila A; Nemova, Nina N

    2012-01-01

    The heart rate and calpain activity of blue mussels Mytilus edulis from the sublittoral zone, exposed to different levels of water-borne copper and cadmium, was investigated in a long-term experiment. The content of cadmium and copper in the blue mussel was determined using flame and graphite Atomic absorption spectroscopy. The observed concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 89.1 μg/g dry weight for cadmium and from 6.1 to 51.0 μg/g dry weight for copper in the control and highest concentration, respectively. Initially, increase in cardiac activity in response to copper and Cadmium exposure was observed under all pollutant concentrations (5-250 and 10-500 μg/L, respectively). The calpain-like activity in gills and hepatopancreas of the mussels treated with metals changed in dose- and time-dependent manner: from a sharp rise at the 250 μg/L concentration of copper on the first day to a significant decrease under the effect of Cadmium in the concentration of 500 μg/L on the third day of the experiment. These results suggest that: (i) heart rate oscillation may reflect active adaptation of blue mussels to contamination and (ii) animals have different sensitivity to copper and Cadmium according to the role of the metals in the mussels' life activity.

  1. Kinetics of sulfuric acid leaching of cadmium from Cd-Ni zinc plant residues.

    PubMed

    Safarzadeh, Mohammad Sadegh; Moradkhani, Davood; Ojaghi-Ilkhchi, Mehdi

    2009-04-30

    Cd-Ni filtercakes are produced continuously at the third purification step in the electrolytic production of zinc in the National Iranian Lead and Zinc Company (NILZ) in northwestern Iran. In this research, the dissolution kinetics of cadmium from Cd-Ni residues produced in NILZ plant has been investigated. Hence, the effects of temperature, sulfuric acid concentration, particle size and stirring speed on the kinetics of cadmium dissolution in sulfuric acid were studied. The dissolution kinetics at 25-55 degrees C and tcadmium and sulfate ions through the porous region of alloying layer (Cd(5)Ni, Cd(2)Ni(1.9) and Cd(10)Cu(3)) as the rate determining step. This finding is in accordance with the apparent activation energy (E(a)) of 13.363 kJ/mol and a linear relationship between the rate constant and the reciprocal of squared particle size. Arrhenius constant was calculated as 6.3942 min(-1). The order of reaction with respect to sulfuric acid concentration, solid/liquid ratio and particle size were also achieved. The rate of reaction at first 5 min based on diffusion-controlled process can be expressed by a semi-empirical equation as:It was determined that the dissolution rate increased with increasing sulfuric acid concentration and decreasing particle size.

  2. Zinc, cadmium and lead accumulation and characteristics of rhizosphere microbial population associated with hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Long, Xin-Xian; Zhang, Yu-Gang; Jun, Dai; Zhou, Qixing

    2009-04-01

    A field survey was conducted to study the characteristics of zinc, cadmium, and lead accumulation and rhizosphere microbial population associated with hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance growing natively on an old lead/zinc mining site. We found significant hyperaccumulation of zinc and cadmium in field samples of S. alfredii, with maximal shoot concentrations of 9.10-19.61 g kg(-1) zinc and 0.12-1.23 g kg(-1) cadmium, shoot/root ratios ranging from 1.75 to 3.19 (average 2.54) for zinc, 3.36 to 4.43 (average 3.85) for cadmium, shoot bioaccumulation factors of zinc and cadmium being 1.46-4.84 and 7.35-17.41, respectively. While most of lead was retained in roots, thus indicating exclusion as a tolerance strategy for lead. Compared to the non-rhizosphere soil, organic matter and total nitrogen and phosphorus content, CEC and water extractable zinc, cadmium, and lead concentration were significantly higher, but pH was smaller in rhizosphere soil. The rhizosphere soil of S. alfredii harbored a wide variety of microorganism. In general, significantly higher numbers of culturable bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi were found in the rhizosphere compared to bulk soil, confirming the stimulatory effect of the S. alfredii rhizosphere on microbial growth and proliferation. Analyses of BIOLOG data also showed that the growth of S. alfredii resulted in observable changes in BIOLOG metabolic profiles, utilization ability of different carbon substrates of microbial communities in the rhizosphere soil were also higher than the non-rhizosphere, confirming a functional effect of the rhizosphere of S. alfredii on bacterial population.

  3. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of copper zinc aluminum nanoferrite particles.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Ravindra Reddy, T; Roy, Nivya; Philip, Reji; Montero, Ovidio Almanza; Endo, Tamio; Frost, Ray L

    2014-06-05

    Copper doped zinc aluminum ferrites CuxZn1-x.(AlxFe2-x)O4 are synthesized by the solid-state reaction route and characterized by XRD, TEM, EPR and non linear optical spectroscopy techniques. The average particle size is found to be from 35 to 90nm and the unit cell parameter "a" is calculated as from 8.39 to 8.89Å. The cation distributions are estimated from X-ray diffraction intensities of various planes. The XRD studies have verified the quality of the synthesis of compounds and have shown the differences in the positions of the diffraction peaks due to the change in concentration of copper ions. TEM pictures clearly indicating that fundamental unit is composed of octahedral and tetrahedral blocks and joined strongly. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) of the ferrite system shows best crystallinity is obtained when Cu content is very. Some of the d-plane spacings are exactly coinciding with XRD values. EPR spectra is compositional dependent at lower Al/Cu concentration EPR spectra is due to Fe(3+) and at a higher content of Al/Cu the EPR spectra is due to Cu(2+). Absence of EPR spectra at room temperature indicates that the sample is perfectly ferromagnetic. EPR results at low temperature indicate that the sample is paramagnetic, and that copper is placed in the tetragonal elongation (B) site with magnetically non-equivalent ions in the unit cell having strong exchange coupling between them. This property is useful in industrial applications. Nonlinear optical properties of the samples studied using 5ns laser pulses at 532nm employing the open aperture z-scan technique indicate that these ferrites are potential candidates for optical limiting applications.

  4. Cadmium regulates copper homoeostasis by inhibiting the activity of Mac1, a transcriptional activator of the copper regulon, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong-Hyuk; Baek, In-Joon; Kang, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chang, Miwha; Jeong, Mi-Young; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Choi, Il-Dong; Yun, Cheol-Won

    2010-10-15

    Cadmium is a toxic metal and the mechanism of its toxicity has been studied in various model systems from bacteria to mammals. We employed Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to study cadmium toxicity at the molecular level because it has been used to identify the molecular mechanisms of toxicity found in higher organisms. cDNA microarray and Northern blot analyses revealed that cadmium salts inhibited the expression of genes related to copper metabolism. Western blotting, Northern blotting and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that CTR1 expression was inhibited at the transcriptional level through direct inhibition of the Mac1 transcriptional activator. The decreased expression of CTR1 results in cellular copper deficiency and inhibition of Fet3 activity, which eventually impairs iron uptake. In this way, cadmium exhibits a negative effect on both iron and copper homoeostasis.

  5. Cadmium purification with a vibrating reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, N.; Esna-Ashari, M.; Biallas, H.; Kangas, K.

    1986-08-01

    While electrolytically producing zinc from sulfide concentrates, purification is the most significant step. Impurities such as Co, Sn, Ge, Ni and Sb can cause extensive redissolution of the electrodeposited zinc, thus diminishing current efficiency. Other metals, particularly cadmium, lead and copper, can negatively affect zinc properties by deposition on the cathode. It is standard practice to use atomized zinc dust as a reducing agent in the purification process, either alone or combined with additives. In conventional operations, special facilities are necessary to produce zinc dust in an amount close to 8wt% of cathode production. This paper examines a technique which makes use of zinc granules instead of dust.

  6. Metal ions in macrophage antimicrobial pathways: emerging roles for zinc and copper

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Sian L.; Bokil, Nilesh J.; Achard, Maud E. S.; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Schembri, Mark A.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Sweet, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    The immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties of zinc and copper have long been appreciated. In addition, these metal ions are also essential for microbial growth and survival. This presents opportunities for the host to either harness their antimicrobial properties or limit their availability as defence strategies. Recent studies have shed some light on mechanisms by which copper and zinc regulation contribute to host defence, but there remain many unanswered questions at the cellular and molecular levels. Here we review the roles of these two metal ions in providing protection against infectious diseases in vivo, and in regulating innate immune responses. In particular, we focus on studies implicating zinc and copper in macrophage antimicrobial pathways, as well as the specific host genes encoding zinc transporters (SLC30A, SLC39A family members) and CTRs (copper transporters, ATP7 family members) that may contribute to pathogen control by these cells. PMID:23738776

  7. Zinc, cadmium and manganese uptake by soybean from two zinc- and cadmium-amended Coastal Plain soils

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.C.; Chaney, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    Two Coastal Plain soils were used to evaluate the effects of organic matter and Fe and Mn hydrous oxides on Zn phytotoxicity, and on Zn, Cd, and Mn uptake by soybean seedlings. Fertilized Pocomoke sl and Sassafras sl were limed to pH 5.5 and 6.3 with CaCO/sub 3/ when adding Zn (six levens between 1.3 and 196 mg/kg at pH 5.5; seven levels between 1.3 and 524 mg/kg at pH 6.3). Cadmium was added at 1% of the added Zn. Beeson soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) was grown 4 weeks, and the trifoliolate leaves evaluated for dry weight yield and for their Zn, Cd, and Mn concentrations. The higher organic matter Pocomoke soil was more effective than the Sassafras soil in reducing metal uptake, and Zn phytoxicity. Foliar Zn levels associated with yield reduction of soybean grown on Pocomoke differed with soil pH. Cadmium uptake was significantly lower on the Pocomoke soil. Foliar Mn increased to reported phytotoxic levels (> 500 mg/kg) with increased added Zn only on the Sassafras soil at pH 6.3. DTPA-extractable Zn and Cd were linear functions of added Zn and Cd for both soils; 0.01M CaCl/sub 2/-extractable Zn and Cd were curvilinear (increasing slope) functions for the Sassafras and linear for the Pocomoke soil. Thus, soil type can strongly influence Zn, Cd, and Mn uptake as well as Zn phytotoxicity to soybean. Soil organic matter appears to be more important than hydrous oxides of Fe and Mn in moderating the effects of excessive soil Zn and limiting Zn and Cd uptake. Induced metal toxicities (Mn) may depend on many factors, and should be considered an integral part of any characterization of specific metal phytotoxicities (e.g. Zn).

  8. Biosorption of cadmium, lead and copper with calcium alginate xerogels and immobilized Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Mata, Y N; Blázquez, M L; Ballester, A; González, F; Muñoz, J A

    2009-04-30

    This paper determines the effect of immobilized brown alga Fucus vesiculosus in the biosorption of heavy metals with alginate xerogels. Immobilization increased the kinetic uptakes and intraparticle diffusion rates of the three metals. The Langmuir maximum biosorption capacity increased twofold for cadmium, 10 times for lead, and decreased by half for copper. According to this model, the affinity of the metals for the biomass was as follows: Cu>Pb>Cd without alga and Pb>Cu>Cd with alga. FITR confirmed that carboxyl groups were the main groups involved in the metal uptake. Calcium in the gels was displaced by heavy metals from solution according to the "egg-box" model. The restructured gel matrix became more uniform and organized as shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization. F. vesiculosus immobilized in alginate xerogels constitutes an excellent biosorbent for cadmium, lead and copper, sometimes surpassing the biosorption performance of alginate alone and even the free alga.

  9. Lead, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, and copper in chicken feathers from Tuskegee, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.T.; Love, M.J.; Booker, T.; Mielke, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    The feather has been widely used as a indicator tissue of metal exposure in birds. The feathers were collected from Tuskegee University poultry farm (TUPF) and Harrison Poultry farm (HPF) chicken and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy for lead, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, and copper contaminations. The mean levels of lead, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, and copper in TUPF chicken were 3.67, 0.13, 12.23, 0.22, and 7.71 ppm, respectively, and in HPF chicken were 5.32, 0.096, 11.03, 0.15, and 8.06 ppm, respectively. The mean levels of these metals did not show any significant difference between TUPF and HPF chicken.

  10. Spectrophotometric determination of serum nitrite and nitrate by copper-cadmium alloy.

    PubMed

    Sastry, K V H; Moudgal, R P; Mohan, J; Tyagi, J S; Rao, G S

    2002-07-01

    A macro and micro assay for the spectrophotometric determination of serum nitrite and nitrate was developed. Nitrite/nitrate in biological samples can be estimated in a single step by this method. The principle of the assay is the reduction of nitrate by copper-cadmium alloy, followed by color development with Griess reagent (sulfanilamide and N-naphthylethylenediamine) in acidic medium. This assay is sensitive to 1 microM nitrate and is suitable for different biological fluids, including sera with a high lipid concentration. The copper-cadmium alloy used in the present method is easy to prepare and can completely reduce nitrate to nitrite in an hour. The present method provides a simple, cost-effective assay for the estimation of stable oxidation products of nitric oxide in biological samples.

  11. Analysis of cadmium and copper in cyanide plating solutions by the inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, G.R.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop spectrometric methods for the analysis of copper and cadmium in cyanide plating solutions. If the methods were faster and/or more accurate than the classical volumetric methods being used, spectrometric methods could replace volumetric methods for routine production support. Spectrometric methods were developed on an inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometer. The spectrometric method developed for copper analysis proved as accurate as the classical chemical method, and faster, 20 minutes compared to two or three hours. Because of this significant savings, along with the reliability, the new method has replaced the classical method for routine production support. In contrast, the spectrometric method for cadmium proved to be slower, 30 minutes compared to 10 minutes, than the classical method. The spectrometric method is, however, accurate and reliable and will be retained as an alternate back-up method. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Supplementation with zinc in rats enhances memory and reverses an age-dependent increase in plasma copper.

    PubMed

    Sandusky-Beltran, Leslie A; Manchester, Bryce L; McNay, Ewan C

    2017-08-30

    Zinc and copper are essential trace elements. Dyshomeostasis in these two metals has been observed in Alzheimer's disease, which causes profound cognitive impairment. Insulin therapy has been shown to enhance cognitive performance; however, recent data suggest that this effect may be at least in part due to the inclusion of zinc in the insulin formulation used. Zinc plays a key role in regulation of neuronal glutamate signaling, suggesting a possible link between zinc and memory processes. Consistent with this, zinc deficiency causes cognitive impairments in children. The effect of zinc supplementation on short- and long-term recognition memory, and on spatial working memory, was explored in young and adult male Sprague Dawley rats. After behavioral testing, hippocampal and plasma zinc and copper were measured. Age increased hippocampal zinc and copper, as well as plasma copper, and decreased plasma zinc. An interaction between age and treatment affecting plasma copper was also found, with zinc supplementation reversing elevated plasma copper concentration in adult rats. Zinc supplementation enhanced cognitive performance across tasks. These data support zinc as a plausible therapeutic intervention to ameliorate cognitive impairment in disorders characterized by alterations in zinc and copper, such as Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Uptake of zinc, cadmium and phosphorus by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) from a low available phosphorus calcareous soil spiked with zinc and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Christie, Peter; Li, Xiaolin

    2006-01-01

    In a multifactorial pot experiment, maize (Zea mays L.) with or without inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae BEG167 was grown in a sterilized soil spiked with three levels of zinc (0, 300 and 900 mg Zn kg(-1) soil) and three levels of cadmium (0, 25 and 100 mg Cd kg(-1) soil). At harvest after 8 weeks of growth, the proportion of root length of inoculated plants colonized decreased with increasing Zn or Cd addition, and was 56% in the absence of both metals and was reduced significantly to 27% in the presence of the higher levels of both metals. Mycorrhizal plants had higher biomass than non-mycorrhizal controls except at the highest soil level of Cd. Cadmium had more pronounced effects on plant biomass than did Zn at the levels studied and the two metals showed a significant interaction. The data suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation increased plant growth with enhancement of P nutrition, perhaps increasing plant tolerance to Zn and Cd by a dilution effect. AM inoculation also led to higher soil solution pH after harvest, possibly reducing the availability of the metals for plant uptake, and lowered the concentrations of soluble Zn and Cd in the soil solution, perhaps by adsorption onto the extrametrical mycelium.

  14. Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc in the Danville and Springfield coal members (Pennsylvanian) from Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Drobniak, A.

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc contents and distributions are discussed in two major Pennsylvanian coal beds in Indiana: the Danville Coal Member and the Springfield Coal Member. Arsenic contents of the Danville and Springfield coals show similar ranges from 0.5 to 43??ppm for the Danville Coal and 1 to 50??ppm for the Springfield Coal, with an average of 12.7??ppm for the Danville and 9.4??ppm for the Springfield Coal. Cadmium concentrations do not exceed 9??ppm, with an average of 0.4 for Danville and 0.7??ppm for the Springfield. Average Pb contents are 21.3 and 6.3??ppm, whereas Zn contents are 101 and 54??ppm for the Danville and the Springfield, respectively. The distribution of these elements varies both laterally and vertically within the coals, as functions of their mineral associations and the time of their emplacement. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sorption of cadmium and zinc from aqueous solutions by zeolite 4A, zeolite 13X and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Purna Chandra Rao, G; Satyaveni, S; Ramesh, A; Seshaiah, K; Murthy, K S N; Choudary, N V

    2006-11-01

    The sorption and desorption of cadmium and zinc on zeolite 4A, zeolite 13X and bentonite has been studied using batch sorption studies. Parameters such as equilibrium time, effect of pH and sorbent dose were studied. The sorbents exhibited good sorption potential for cadmium and zinc with a peak value at pH 6.0 and 6.5, respectively. The sorption followed the Freundlich sorption model. More than 70% sorption occurred within 20 min and equilibrium was attained at around 90 min for the three sorbents. The metals sorption by zeolite 4A was higher than that by zeolite 13X and bentonite. The desorption studies were carried out using NaCl solution and the effect of NaCl concentration on desorption was also studied. Maximum desorption of 76% for cadmium and 80% for zinc occurred with 10% NaCl.

  16. Zinc and Copper Homeostasis in Head and Neck Cancer: Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ressnerova, Alzbeta; Raudenska, Martina; Holubova, Monika; Svobodova, Marketa; Polanska, Hana; Babula, Petr; Masarik, Michal; Gumulec, Jaromir

    2016-01-01

    Metals are known for playing essential roles in human physiology. Copper and zinc are trace elements closely dependent on one another and are involved in cell proliferation, growth, gene expression, apoptosis and other processes. Their homeostasis is crucial and tightly controlled by a resourceful system of transporters and transport proteins which deliver copper and zinc ions to their target sites. Abnormal zinc and copper homeostasis can be seen in a number of malignancies and also in head and neck cancer. Imbalance in this homeostasis is observed as an elevation or decrease of copper and zinc ions in serum or tissue levels in patients with cancer. In head and neck cancer these altered levels stand out from those of other malignancies which makes them an object of interest and therefore zinc and copper ions might be a good target for further research of head and neck cancer development and progression. This review aims to summarize the physiological roles of copper and zinc, its binding and transport mechanisms, and based on those, its role in head and neck cancer. To provide stronger evidence, dysregulation of levels is analysed by a meta-analytical approach.

  17. Coronary heart disease and the zinc-to-copper ratio in human aorta and drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Kinard, J.T.; Moses, H.A.; Stackhouse, C.; Fludd, R.; Thompson, R.

    1986-01-01

    Trace levels of zinc and copper have been determined in the aorta from individuals with known histories of coronary heart disease (experimental group) and from individuals without a history of heart disease (control group) or any condition with an alleged or known association with trace zinc and copper. Subjects for the experimental and control groups were matched in terms of age, sex, and race. The zinc-to-copper ratio in the aorta for the experimental group was found to be significantly higher than the zinc-to-copper ratio in the control group at the 90% level of confidence. The results suggest that an imbalance in the zinc-to-copper ratio is a risk factor in coronary artery disease. Data for trace elements in major water sources for different geographical areas of the US from 1962-1967 were compiled and correlations with mortality rates for heart diseases from 1969-1971 were made. The results revealed that there was an extremely high correlation between the zinc-to-copper ratio in water and mortality rates of non-white females with coronary heart disease.

  18. Bulk growth and surface characterization of epitaxy ready cadmium zinc telluride substrates for use in IR imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, J. P.; Martinez, B.; Betz, T. E. M.; Mackenzie, J.; Kumar, F. J.; Burgess, L.

    2017-02-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (Cd1-xZnxTe or CZT) is a compound semiconductor substrate material that has been used for infrared detector (IR) applications for many years. CZT is a perfect substrate for the epitaxial growth of Mercury Cadmium Telluride (Hg1-xCdxTe or MCT) epitaxial layers and remains the material of choice for many high performance IR detectors and focal plane arrays that are used to detect across wide IR spectral bands. Critical to the fabrication of high performance MCT IR detectors is a high quality starting CZT substrate, this being a key determinant of epitaxial layer crystallinity, defectivity and ultimately device electro-optical performance. In this work we report on a new source of substrates suitable for IR detector applications, grown using the Travelling Heater Method (THM). This proven method of crystal growth has been used to manufacture high quality IR specification CZT substrates where industry requirements for IR transmission, dislocations, tellurium precipitates and copper impurity levels have been met. Results will be presented for the chemo-mechanical (CMP) polishing of CZT substrates using production tool sets that are identical to those that are used to produce epitaxy-ready surface finishes on related IR compound semiconductor materials such as GaSb and InSb. We will also discuss the requirements to scale CZT substrate manufacture and how with a new III-V like approach to both CZT crystal growth and substrate polishing, we can move towards a more standardized product and one that can ultimately deliver a standard round CZT substrate, as is the case for competing IR materials such as GaSb, InSb and InP.

  19. Plasma cadmium and zinc and their interrelationship in adult Nigerians: potential health implications

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonnaya, Lawrence Ulu; Uro-Chukwu, Henry; Obuna, Johnson Akuma; Ogiji, Emeka; Ezenkwa, Simon Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (an essential trace element) and cadmium (a ubiquitous environmental pollutant with acclaimed toxicity) have been found to occur together in nature, with reported antagonism between the two elements. The present study aimed at determination of plasma levels of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) and their interrelationship in adult Nigerians. The series comprised adults (n=443) aged ≥18 yrs (mean ± SD 38.4±13.7 yrs), consisting of 117 males, 184 non-pregnant and 140 pregnant females. Sociodemographic data were collected by questionnaire while anthropometrics were determined using standard methods. Plasma Cd and Zn were determined by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The mean plasma zinc and cadmium were 94.7±18.1 μg/dl and 0.150±0.548 μg/dl, respectively. Age, sex, pregnancy, and parity had no effect on either plasma Zn or Cd. Although educational level had no effect on plasma Zn, it had a significant effect on Cd; subjects possessing either secondary or tertiary education had significantly lower plasma Cd than subjects without formal education. Moreover, there seemed to be an inverse relationship between Cd and Zn, but this was not statistically significant (r=–0.089; p=0.061). Although plasma Zn was not related to BMI (r=0.037; p=0.432), Cd was significantly negatively correlated with BMI (r=–0.124; p=0.009). It may be concluded that adult Nigerians in Ebonyi State have elevated plasma levels of Cd, with apparent impact on the levels of plasma Zn. This has important public health implications considering the essential roles of Zn in the protection of Cd mediated adverse health effects. While food diversification is recommended to improve plasma Zn, efforts should be made to reduce exposure to Cd to mitigate partially its possible adverse effects. PMID:27486364

  20. Follow up of Treatment of Cadmium and Copper Toxicity in Clarias Gariepinus Using Laser Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Khalid H.; Ali, Maha F.; El-Bary, Manal G. Abd; Abd El-Harith, Mohamed

    2010-04-01

    Two purified diets were formulated and fed to seven groups of the Nile catfish; Clarias gariepinus for 12 weeks. The formulated diets contained 50 or 500 mg/kg diet of an ascorbic acid equivalent, supplied by L-ascorbyl-2-monophosphate (Mg salt). Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIDS) technique has been used to characterize the bioaccumulation of cadmium, copper and iron in some selected organs (Gills, liver, kidney and muscles) and disturbance in the distribution of sodium, calcium and magnesium in gills and muscles of fish fed the minimum requirement of vitamin C (50 mg/kg diet) and exposed to cadmium (0.165 mg/l) and copper (0.35 mg/l) individually or in combination. Heavy metals bioaccumulation affect histological structure of gills, liver and kidney and consequently, fish exhibited the lowest growth rate and meat quality with a progressive fall in RBCs count, Hb content and haematocrite value. These effects were concomitant with significant increase in the WBCs count, serum glucose, total protein, AST, ALT, creatinine and uric acid. On the contrary, serum total lipids and liver glycogen revealed a significant decrease. However, fish fed 500 mg vitamin C/kg diet and exposed to the same concentrations of cadmium and copper either individually or in mixture showed an improvement in the growth rate and meat quality and a tendency to exhibit close to the control values for most of the other studied physiological, biochemical and histopathological investigations.

  1. Effects of copper on bone component in the femoral tissues of rats: anabolic effect of zinc is weakened by copper.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying Ling; Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2005-12-01

    The effects of copper on biochemical components in the femoral-diaphyseal (cortical bone) and -metaphyseal (trabecullar bone) tissues of rats in vivo and in vitro were investigated. Rats were orally administered copper sulfate (50, 100, or 200 microg Cu/100 g body weight) once daily for 7 d. Calcium content in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues was significantly decreased with the administration of copper (200 microg/100 g), while alkaline phosphatase activity in these tissues was not significantly changed by copper administration. The diaphyseal DNA content was significantly decreased with the administration of copper (50, 100, or 200 microg/100 g). Moreover, the femoral-diaphyseal and -metaphyseal tissues were cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium containing either vehicle or copper (10(-7) - 10(-4) M). Culture with copper (10(-7) - 10(-4) M) caused a significant decrease in alkaline phosphatase activity in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues, while calcium and DNA contents in these tissues were not significantly changed. Culture with parathyroid hormone [PTH (1-34); 10(-7) M], a bone-resorbing factor, caused a significant decrease in calcium content in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues. This decrease was completely inhibited in the presence of copper (10(-6) or 10(-5) M). Culture with zinc sulfate (10(-4) M) caused a significant increase in calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues. The effects of zinc (10(-4) M) in increasing femoral calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity were not seen in the presence of cycloheximide (10(-6) M), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, suggesting that the effects of zinc are involved in newly synthesized protein components. The effects of zinc in increasing calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues were significantly weakened in the presence of copper (10(-4) M). The inhibitory effects of copper were further

  2. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  3. Increasing cadmium and zinc levels in wild common eiders breeding along Canada's remote northern coastline.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Mark L; Braune, Birgit M; Robertson, Gregory J; Gilchrist, H Grant; Mallory, Conor D; Forbes, Mark R; Wells, Regina

    2014-04-01

    The common eider (Somateria mollissima) is an abundant sea duck breeding around the circumpolar Arctic, and is an important component of subsistence and sport harvest in some regions. We determined hepatic cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentrations in the livers of breeding females sampled during three time periods including 1992/3, 2001/2 and 2008 at three sites spanning 53.7°N-75.8°N in the eastern Canadian Arctic. At all sites, concentrations of both Cd and Zn increased ~300% over this time period. The reasons for this rapid increase in concentrations are unclear.

  4. Operational Studies of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Microstrip Detectors using SVX ASIC Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizmanic, John; Barbier, L. M.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, L.; Birsa, F.; Gehrels, N.; Hanchak, C.; Kurczynski, P.; Odom, J.; Parsons, A.; Palmer, D.; Sheppard, D.; Snodgrass, S.; Stahle, C. M.; Teegarden, B.; Tueller, J.

    1997-04-01

    We have been investigating the operational properties of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) microstrip detectors by using SVX ASIC readout electronics. This research is in conjunction with the development of a CZT-based, next generation gamma-ray telescope for use in the gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) experiment. CZT microstrip detectors with 128 channels and 100 micron strip pitch have been fabricated and were interfaced to SVX electronics at Goddard Space Flight Center. Experimental results involving position sensing, spectroscopy, and CZT operational properties will be presented.

  5. Cadmium and zinc activate adaptive mechanisms in Nicotiana tabacum similar to those observed in metal tolerant plants.

    PubMed

    Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Gómez-Méndez, María F; Amezcua-Romero, Julio C; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Rosas-Santiago, Paul; Pantoja, Omar

    2017-04-28

    Tobacco germinated and grew in the presence of high concentrations of cadmium and zinc without toxic symptoms. Evidence suggests that these ions are sequestered into the vacuole by heavy metal/H (+) exchanger mechanisms. Heavy metal hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance are traits shared by a small set of plants which show specialized physiological and molecular adaptations allowing them to accumulate and sequester toxic metal ions. Nicotiana tabacum was used to test its potential as a metal-accumulator in a glass house experiment. Seed germination was not affected in the presence of increasing concentrations of zinc and cadmium. Juvenile and adult plants could concentrate CdCl2 and ZnSO4 to levels exceeding those in the hydroponic growth medium and maintained or increased their leaf dry weight when treated with 0.5- or 1-mM CdCl2 or 1-mM ZnSO4 for 5 days. Accumulation of heavy metals did not affect the chlorophyll and carotenoid levels, while variable effects were observed in cell sap osmolarity. Heavy metal-dependent H(+) transport across the vacuole membrane was monitored using quinacrine fluorescence quenching. Cadmium- or zinc-dependent fluorescence recovery revealed that increasing concentrations of heavy metals stimulated the activities of the tonoplast Cd(2+) or Zn(2+)/H(+) exchangers. Immunodetection of the V-ATPase subunits showed that the increased proton transport by zinc was not due to changes in protein amount. MTP1 and MTP4 immunodetection and semiquantitative RT-PCR of NtMTP1, NtNRAMP1, and NtZIP1 helped to identify the genes that are likely involved in sequestration of cadmium and zinc in the leaf and root tissue. Finally, we demonstrated that cadmium and zinc treatments induced an accumulation of zinc in leaf tissues. This study shows that N. tabacum possesses a hyperaccumulation response, and thus could be used for phytoremediation purposes.

  6. Serum zinc and copper status in hospitalized vs. healthy elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Belbraouet, Slimane; Biaudet, Hughes; Tébi, Ambroise; Chau, Nearkasen; Gray-Donald, Katherine; Debry, Gérard

    2007-12-01

    To assess serum zinc and copper concentrations of elderly hospitalized patients with a broad range of diseases and compare their levels to those of healthy community dwelling controls of similar age. This case-control study compared serum zinc and copper levels of 668 hospitalized subjects, aged 70 or over, with 104 healthy controls of the same age and from the same geographical area. The study protocol, conducted by one physician on the day after the admission to the hospital, included a questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics, a medical examination, and serum zinc and copper measured with flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Data were analysed using analysis of covariance, controlling for age and sex. The diseased subjects had markedly lower zinc concentrations than the control group. The frequency of low values (<0.70 mg/L) was high (20.2% vs. zero in controls, p < 0.001), and it differed among various disease categories: 35.7% for respiratory disease, 20%- 27% for cancer, infectious disease, trauma, blood diseases, and genitourinary diseases, and less than 20% for the other diseases. Low values for serum copper concentration (<0.80 mg/L) were rare in hospitalized subjects (1.4% vs. zero in controls). Whatever the disease category and number of diagnoses considered, the serum copper/zinc ratio was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in diseased than in healthy people. Elderly hospitalized patients are at elevated risk of low zinc but not copper values. The significantly lower values of serum zinc found in the hospitalized elderly compared to healthy elderly are likely to be related to disease rather than to aging per se. In addition to other classic anthropometric (BMI) and biological (serum proteins) nutritional parameters, copper/zinc ratio may be a useful marker of malnutrition.

  7. Effect of time exposure to high altitude on zinc and copper concentrations in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Rawal, S B; Singh, M V; Tyagi, A K; Roy, J; Dimri, G P; Selvamurthy, W

    1999-12-01

    Research has focused mainly on the relationship of zinc and copper contents and physical stresses like running, cycling, etc. It has also been reported that other forms of stresses change the concentration of these trace elements in humans. However,there are no reports on the effects of high altitude induced hypoxic stress on the plasma levels of these metals. Since hypoxia is one of the important stresses, we considered it appropriate to observe the changes in the levels of zinc and copper concentrations and in certain related zinc and copper enzymes and hormones in the plasma of human volunteers on acute induction to high altitude. From these findings, we intended to ascertain whether supplementation of these trace elements would be required for optimal health under such conditions. On acute induction to hypoxia, contents of these trace elements may change as the requirements of stressed organs and tissue may increase. Hence, further supplementation may be beneficial under hypoxic stress for better adaptability. Volunteers were divided into two groups: with and without zinc and copper salt supplementation. Blood samples were collected at sea level and on induction to acute hypoxia on days 3 and 10. Trace mineral contents and their related enzyme (alkaline phosphatase) and hormone (ceruloplasmin) levels were determined in plasma samples. Plasma zinc contents were significantly reduced upon induction to high altitude in the non-supplemented group, but not in the zinc-supplemented group. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased significantly upon induction to the high altitude stress. The enzyme activity remained elevated up to day 10 of the stress. Plasma copper contents and ceruloplasmin activity did not change upon induction to high altitude. Under hypoxic stress, circulating levels of zinc and alkaline phosphatase in plasma changed appreciably as plasma zinc was transported into the organs and tissues. However, circulating levels of copper and ceruloplasmin in

  8. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z; Ortiz, Eydith J Comenencia; Moss, Stephen J; Jensen, Anders A; Davies, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na(+) and K(+) relative to Cs(+) are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na(+) and K(+) with the divalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) results in complete elimination of Zn(2+)-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Sarah M.; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z.; Comenencia Ortiz, Eydith J.; Moss, Stephen J.; Jensen, Anders A.; Davies, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn2+) but also copper (Cu2+) and protons (H+) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ and H+ > Zn2+ > Cu2+, respectively. The responses elicited by Zn2+, Cu2+ and H+ through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H+ than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na+ and K+ relative to Cs+ are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na+ and K+ with the divalent cations Ca2+ or Mg2+ results in complete elimination of Zn2+-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca2+ and Mg2+ inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn2+, Cu2+ and H+. ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn2+, Cu2+ and H+. PMID:26872532

  10. Serum copper, zinc and lipid peroxidation in pregnant women with preeclampsia in gorgan.

    PubMed

    Rafeeinia, Arash; Tabandeh, Afsaneh; Khajeniazi, Safoura; Marjani, Abdol J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of study was to assay serum copper, zinc and lipid peroxidation levels in pregnant women with and without preeclampsia. There were significant differences between systolic, diastolic blood pressures and copper, Cu/Zn ratio and malondialdehyde among two groups. There were significant differences in weight, pre-pregnancy body mass index, systolic, diastolic blood pressures and copper, Cu/Zn ratio and malondialdehyde levels when compared to healthy pregnant women with mild and severe preeclampsia patients. A positive correlation was observed between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and copper, malondialdehyde and Cu/Zn ratio. Copper and malondialdehyde may play a role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  11. Changes in copper and zinc serum levels in women wearing a copper TCu-380A intrauterine device.

    PubMed

    Imani, Somaieh; Moghaddam-Banaem, Lida; Roudbar-Mohammadi, Shahla; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of the copper intrauterine device (IUD) TCu-380A, on copper and zinc serum levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS This longitudinal study enrolled 121 women attending Health Centres in Tehran between November 2011 and August 2012. A blood sample was obtained before use and three months after insertion of a TCu-380A IUD. Serum levels of copper and zinc were measured for the 101 women who had completed three months with the device in situ. Analyses of change included paired t-tests, McNemar tests and linear regression. RESULTS Significant elevations in mean serum levels were found for both copper (170.22 μg/dl at three months vs.160.40 μg/dl at baseline, p = 0.034) and zinc (107.67 μg/dl at three months vs. 94.61 μg/dl at baseline, p < 0.001) three months after IUD insertion. CONCLUSIONS A slight, but significant increase in copper serum levels, not reaching toxic levels, was observed three months after TCu-380A IUD insertion. Zinc levels too had risen significantly, which was quite unexpected, and warrants further investigation.

  12. Effect of soil and foliar application of zinc on grain zinc and cadmium concentration of wheat genotypes differing in Zn-efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A two-year field experiment was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of soil and foliar applications of zinc sulfate and soil application of waste rubber ash to increase Zn and decrease cadmium (Cd) concentration in grain of 10 wheat genotypes with different Zn-efficiency. Foliar spray of zi...

  13. Zinc supplementation does not alter sensitive biomarkers of copper status in healthy boys.

    PubMed

    Bertinato, Jesse; Simpson, Janis Randall; Sherrard, Lindsey; Taylor, Jessica; Plouffe, Louise J; Van Dyke, Deborah; Geleynse, Melissa; Dam, Yian Yian; Murphy, Paddy; Knee, Christopher; Vresk, Laura; Holland, Nicole; Quach, Hanson; Mack, David R; Cooper, Marcia; L'abbé, Mary R; Hayward, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    The tolerable upper intake levels (UL) for zinc for children were based on limited data and there is concern that the UL may be set too low. The first effect of excessive zinc intake is a reduction in copper status. The primary objective of this study was to examine the effect of zinc supplementation on copper status in children. Healthy, 6- to 8-y-old boys from Ontario, Canada were assigned to take a placebo (n = 10) or 5 mg (n = 10), 10 mg (n = 9), or 15 mg (n = 8) of zinc supplement daily for 4 mo in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Biochemical measures were evaluated at baseline and after 2 and 4 mo of supplementation. Food records were completed near the baseline and 4-mo visits. Age and anthropometric measurements did not differ (P > 0.05) between treatment groups at baseline. Mean zinc intakes from food alone (10.9-14.8 mg zinc/d) approached or exceeded the UL of 12 mg/d. Compared with the placebo group, the zinc groups had a greater change in the urine zinc:creatinine ratio at 4 mo (P = 0.02). Traditional (plasma copper and ceruloplasmin activity) and more sensitive biomarkers of copper status, including erythrocyte SOD1 activity and the erythrocyte CCS:SOD1 protein ratio, were unchanged in zinc-supplemented boys, demonstrating that copper status was not depressed. Serum lipid measures and hemoglobin concentrations were also unaffected and gastrointestinal symptoms were not reported. These data provide evidence in support of the need for reexamining the current UL for zinc for children.

  14. Symptomatic copper deficiency in three Wilson's disease patients treated with zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Dzieżyc, Karolina; Litwin, Tomasz; Sobańska, Anna; Członkowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is caused by excess of copper that leads to accumulation of copper mainly in the liver, brain and needs life-long decoppering therapy. However, overtreatment with anti-copper agents may lead to copper deficiency which may cause neurological and hematological symptoms. Copper is an important cofactor for many enzymes. This report describes three WD patients with diagnosed copper deficiency during zinc sulphate (ZS) treatment. After 5-16 years of therapy all patients developed leucopenia. Spinal cord injury was manifested in two of the patients. One of them also presented myopathy. In conclusion, copper deficiency may occur in different time after treatment onset, therefore regular copper metabolism and hematological monitoring is necessary. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. [A dynamic study of HGH, zinc and copper in diabetic girls. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    González Espinosa, C; García Báez, M; Rodríguez, I; González, C; Lopes, S; Duque, R

    1982-11-01

    A dynamic study study on secretion of HGH in diabetic girls under the combined stimulus of L-dopa and L-arginina is performed. Serum levels for Zinc and copper are measured. Results show that as HGH increase, copper levels decrease. Correlation (r = 0.81, p = 0.05) points to an inverse dependence of both parameters. Concomitantly, the values obtained for zinc and copper are correlated (r = 0.82, p = 0.03). During stimulation, all patients showed an increase in glycemia and a significant correlation between both parameters was found (r = 0.76, p = 0.05).

  16. Defect characterization in cadmium telluride and cadmium-zinc-tellurium crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, Salah Abdo

    Intrinsic defects and impurities in undoped CdTe and Cd1-x ZnxTe semiconductor compounds have been investigated using thermally stimulated spectroscopy with the general aim of identifying and then understanding the effects of the defects on the electrical and optical properties of these compounds. In order to identify and understand the effects of these defects (trapping levels), the samples were subjected to room temperature deformation, high temperature annealing, and dopants diffusion. The samples were always analyzed before and after any process. It is found that the trapping levels observed at ˜61 K and ˜114 K with thermal ionization energies of 0.12 +/- 0.01 eV and 0.23 +/- 0.01 eV and trapping cross-sections of 4.7 x 10-16 and 7.8 x 10-17 cm2 are associated with the isolated first and second ionized state of the cadmium vacancy, while trapping levels observed at ˜51 K and ˜94 K with thermal ionization energies of 0.09 +/- 0.01 eV and 0.18 +/- 0.01 eV and trapping cross-sections of 9.3 x 10 -17 and 6.8 x 10-17 cm2 are associated with first and second states of the isoelectronic oxygen-cadmium vacancy complex (VCd-OTe) respectively. In addition, we found that deep level trapping states located near the middle of the band gap (in the region between 230 K and 267 K) in undoped as grown CdTe are related to the tellurium antisite-cadmium vacancy complex (TeCd-V Cd) where the lowest thermal ionization state is 0.78 +/- 0.01 eV. The thermal ionization energies (transition energies) were extracted using variable heating rate and/or initial rise methods. Our results have been reinforced with theoretical calculations using linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) within the local density approximation (LDA). Also, from our room temperature deformation, we have found evidence of three levels of dislocation defects in CdTe crystals. The first two energy levels, with ionization energies of E1 = 0.06 +/- 0.01 eV and E2 = 0.38 +/- 0.01 eV are due to Cd dislocations. The

  17. Copper and Zinc Chelation as a Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting millions of people in the U.S. The cause of the disease remains unknown, but amyloid- β (A β), a short peptide, is considered causal its pathogenesis. At cellular level, AD is characterized by deposits mainly composed of A β that also contain elevated levels of transition metals ions. Targeting metals is a promising new strategy for AD treatment, which uses moderately strong metal chelators to sequester them from A β or the environment. PBT2 is a chelating compound that has been the most promising in clinical trials. In our work, we use computer simulations to investigate complexes of a close analog of PBT2 with Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions. The calculations employ KS/FD DFT method, which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with the frozen-density DFT to achieve efficient description of explicit solvent beyond the first solvation shell. Our work is based on recent experiments and examines both 1:1 and 2:1 chelator-metal stochiometries detected experimentally. The results show that copper attaches more strongly than zinc, find that 1:1 complexes involve water in the first coordination shell and determine which one of several possible 2:1 geometries is the most preferable.

  18. Copper and zinc metabolism in aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Torres-Rodríguez, G A; Cruz, C; Mainero, A; Tapia, E; Ibarra-Rubio, M E; Silencio, J L

    1994-01-01

    Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) were measured in urine, serum and tissues from rats with nephrotic syndrome (NS) induced with a single subcutaneous dose of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN; 15 mg/100 g BW). Control animals were pair-fed. Urine was collected daily, and the rats were sacrificed on day 10. PAN-nephrotic rats had proteinuria (days 3-10), high urinary Cu (days 1, 2, 4-10) and Zn (days 3-10) excretion. On day 10, nephrotic rats had: (a) albuminuria, hypoalbuminemia, hypoproteinemia, high urine and low serum levels of ceruloplasmin; (b) low Cu and Zn serum levels; (c) high clearance and fractional excretion of Cu and Zn, and (d) low kidney and liver Cu content and essentially normal tissue Zn levels. The alterations in Cu metabolism were more intense than those in Zn metabolism. Urine Cu and Zn showed a positive correlation with urine total protein on days 3-10 which suggests that high urinary excretion of Cu and Zn may be due to the excretion of its carrier proteins. In conclusion, these rats did not show a typical Zn deficiency but a clear decrease in Cu in the liver and kidney.

  19. Metabolic alterations in yeast lacking copper-zinc superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Sehati, Sadaf; Clement, Matthew H S; Martins, Jake; Xu, Lei; Longo, Valter D; Valentine, Joan S; Gralla, Edith B

    2011-06-01

    Yeast lacking copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (sod1∆) have a number of oxygen-dependent defects, including auxotrophies for lysine and methionine and sensitivity to oxygen. Here we report additional defects in metabolic regulation. Under standard growth conditions with glucose as the carbon source, yeast undergo glucose repression in which mitochondrial respiration is deemphasized, energy is mainly derived from glycolysis, and ethanol is produced. When glucose is depleted, the diauxic shift is activated, in which mitochondrial respiration is reemphasized and stress resistance increases. We find that both of these programs are adversely affected by the lack of Sod1p. Key events in the diauxic shift do not occur and sod1∆ cells do not utilize ethanol and stop growing. The ability to shift to growth on ethanol is gradually lost as time in culture increases. In early stages of culture, sod1∆ cells consume more oxygen and have more mitochondrial mass than wild-type cells, indicating that glucose repression is not fully activated. These changes are at least partially dependent on the activity of the Hap2,3,4,5 complex, as indicated by CYC1-lacZ reporter assays. These changes may indicate a role for superoxide in metabolic signaling and regulation and/or a role for glucose derepression in defense against oxidative stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Single and Combined Exposure to Zinc- and Copper-Containing Welding Fumes Lead to Asymptomatic Systemic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Markert, Agnieszka; Baumann, Ralf; Gerhards, Benjamin; Gube, Monika; Kossack, Veronika; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Recently, it has been shown that exposure to welding fumes containing both zinc and copper leads to asymptomatic systemic inflammation in humans as shown by an increase of blood C-reactive protein. In the present study, it was investigated which metal is responsible for this effect. Fifteen healthy male subjects were exposed under controlled conditions to welding fumes containing either zinc, or copper, or copper and zinc. For each exposure blood C-reactive protein increased. Copper- and zinc-containing welding fumes are able to induce systemic inflammation.

  1. Content of Zinc and Copper in Selected Plants Growing Along a Motorway.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Elżbieta; Jankowski, Kazimierz; Wiśniewska-Kadżajan, Beata; Sosnowski, Jacek; Kolczarek, Roman; Jankowska, Jolanta; Ciepiela, Grażyna A

    2015-11-01

    In 2011 a study was carried out analyzing the effects of road traffic on bioaccumulation of zinc and copper in selected species of dicotyledonous plants growing on adjacent grasslands. To do the research the plants were sampled from the 9-km-long Siedlce bypass, a part of the international route E-30. They were collected during the flowering stage, at following distances from the road: 1, 5, 10, 15 m. The content of zinc and copper was determined with the AAS method, with dry mineralisation done before. The highest concentration of the elements, regardless of the distance from the road, was found in Taraxacum spec. Among the tested plants, the lowest zinc content was in Vicia cracca, and the lowest copper content in Rumex acetosa. The limit for copper content was exceeded in Taraxacum spec. and, slightly, in Achillea millefolium growing at the roadside, closest to the roadway.

  2. Reported zinc, but not copper, intakes influence whole body bone density, mineral content and T score responses to zinc and copper supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A supplementation trial starting with 224 postmenopausal women provided with adequate vitamin D and calcium was conducted to determine whether increased copper and zinc intakes would reduce the risk for bone loss. Healthy women aged 51-80 years were recruited for a double-blind, placebo-controlled s...

  3. Interaction between selected bacterial strains and Arabidopsis halleri modulates shoot proteome and cadmium and zinc accumulation.

    PubMed

    Farinati, Silvia; DalCrso, Giovanni; Panigati, Monica; Furini, Antonella

    2011-06-01

    The effects of plant-microbe interactions between the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and eight bacterial strains, isolated from the rhizosphere of A. halleri plants grown in a cadmium- and zinc-contaminated site, were analysed for shoot metal accumulation, shoot proteome, and the transcription of genes involved in plant metal homeostasis and hyperaccumulation. Cadmium and zinc concentrations were lower in the shoots of plants cultivated in the presence of these metals plus the selected bacterial strains compared with plants grown solely with these metals or, as previously reported, with plants grown with these metals plus the autochthonous rhizosphere-derived microorganisms. The shoot proteome of plants cultivated in the presence of these selected bacterial strains plus metals, showed an increased abundance of photosynthesis- and abiotic stress-related proteins (e.g. subunits of the photosynthetic complexes, Rubisco, superoxide dismutase, and malate dehydrogenase) counteracted by a decreased amount of plant defence-related proteins (e.g. endochitinases, vegetative storage proteins, and β-glucosidase). The transcription of several homeostasis genes was modulated by the microbial communities and by Cd and Zn content in the shoot. Altogether these results highlight the importance of plant-microbe interactions in plant protein expression and metal accumulation and emphasize the possibility of exploiting microbial consortia for increasing or decreasing shoot metal content.

  4. Interaction between selected bacterial strains and Arabidopsis halleri modulates shoot proteome and cadmium and zinc accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Panigati, Monica; Furini, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    The effects of plant–microbe interactions between the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and eight bacterial strains, isolated from the rhizosphere of A. halleri plants grown in a cadmium- and zinc-contaminated site, were analysed for shoot metal accumulation, shoot proteome, and the transcription of genes involved in plant metal homeostasis and hyperaccumulation. Cadmium and zinc concentrations were lower in the shoots of plants cultivated in the presence of these metals plus the selected bacterial strains compared with plants grown solely with these metals or, as previously reported, with plants grown with these metals plus the autochthonous rhizosphere-derived microorganisms. The shoot proteome of plants cultivated in the presence of these selected bacterial strains plus metals, showed an increased abundance of photosynthesis- and abiotic stress-related proteins (e.g. subunits of the photosynthetic complexes, Rubisco, superoxide dismutase, and malate dehydrogenase) counteracted by a decreased amount of plant defence-related proteins (e.g. endochitinases, vegetative storage proteins, and β-glucosidase). The transcription of several homeostasis genes was modulated by the microbial communities and by Cd and Zn content in the shoot. Altogether these results highlight the importance of plant-microbe interactions in plant protein expression and metal accumulation and emphasize the possibility of exploiting microbial consortia for increasing or decreasing shoot metal content. PMID:21357773

  5. Zinc and cadmium biosorption by untreated and calcium-treated Macrocystis pyrifera in a batch system.

    PubMed

    Plaza Cazón, J; Bernardelli, C; Viera, M; Donati, E; Guibal, E

    2012-07-01

    Zinc and cadmium can be efficiently removed from solutions using the brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera. Treatment with CaCl(2) allowed stabilization of the biosorbent. The maximum biosorption capacities in mono-component systems were 0.91 mmol g(-1) and 0.89 mmol g(-1) and the Langmuir affinity coefficients were 1.76 L mmol(-1) and 1.25 L mmol(-1) for Zn(II) and Cd(II), respectively. In two-component systems, Zn(II) and Cd(II) adsorption capacities were reduced by 50% and 40%, respectively and the biosorbent showed a preference for Cd(II) over Zn(II). HNO(3) (0.1M) and EDTA (0.1M) achieved 90-100% desorption of both ions from the loaded biomass. While HNO(3) preserved the biomass structure, EDTA destroyed it completely. Fourier transform infrared spectra identified the contribution of carboxylic, amine and sulfonate groups on Zn(II) and Cd(II) biosorption. These results showed that biosorption using M. pyrifera-treated biomass could be an affordable and simple process for cadmium and zinc removal from wastewaters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of cadmium on metallothionein levels in human peripheral blood leukocytes: a comparison with zinc.

    PubMed

    Yurkow, E J; DeCoste, C J

    1999-11-12

    Metallothioneins (MT) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins that are induced in response to a variety of chemical stresses and therefore can be used to assess human exposure to environmental agents. In the current study, flow cytometry was used to characterize the basal and cadmium-induced expression of MT in the three major leukocyte populations of human peripheral blood. In the analysis, monocytes were the most sensitive leukocytes to this toxic metal, with significant increases in cellular MT levels being detected at concentrations of cadmium as low as 0.1 microM (24 h). The lymphocyte population also exhibited pronounced treatment-associated elevations in cellular MT, while the granulocyte population was found to be nonresponsive. Although both CdCl2 (3 microM) and ZnCl2 (50 microM) induced MT expression in monocytes to a similar degree and did not affect the expression of this protein in granulocytes, cadmium but not zinc treatment induced dramatic increases in MT levels of lymphocytes. Our results indicate that cellular MT protein levels, as determined by this flow cytometric method, may be used to characterize the differential responsiveness of the major human leukocyte subpopulations to transitional metals. It is evident from the current work that the responsiveness of all peripheral blood leukocyte populations should be analyzed in exposure assessment studies.

  7. Study of structural and optical properties of chemically synthesized nanostructured cadmium zinc sulphide films for band gap tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochahari, P. K.; Sarma, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured cadmium zinc sulphide films have been deposited onto cleaned glass substrates by chemical bath deposition method at room temperature using polyvinyl alcohol as capping agent. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the formation of cubic-phase cadmium zinc sulphide films. Crystallite size obtained from the calculation of Scherrer's formula and Williamson-Hall plot as well as size-strain plot is found to decrease with the increase in zinc concentration. The films have very high dislocation density of the order of 1016 m-2, whereas the strain is of the order of 10-3. Scanning electron microscopic image reveals that the particles are agglomerated to form nanoclusters and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis confirms that films are composed of cadmium, zinc and sulphur. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic image reveals that the shape of the particles is nearly spherical, uniformly distributed. Selected-area electron diffraction pattern supports the formation of cubic phase of the film. Optical absorption peaks of the films shift towards lower wavelength side and their optical band gap increases with the increase in zinc concentration. The increase in zinc concentration enhances the photoluminescence emission intensity, whose emission is in the green region of visible spectrum.

  8. [Environmental concerns on geochemical mobility of lead, zinc and cadmium from zinc smelting areas: western Guizhou, China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Tang-Fu; Zhou, Wan-Chun; Ao, Zi-Qiang; Zhang, Jun-Fang

    2009-07-15

    Indigenous zinc smelting activity, widely spread in western Guizhou, China, had caused serious pollution of heavy metals of lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) in soil and water and posed risk to the local ecosystem. Geochemical distribution and mobility of Pb, Zn and Cd in soil, waste residue and waters were investigated in a small watershed in order to provide scientific base for the approach to pollution control and remediation. Concentrations of Pb, Zn and Cd in smelting residues averaged at 4 632 mg/kg, 8 968 mg/kg, and 58 mg/kg, respectively; whereas Pb 234 mg/kg, Zn 400 mg/kg and Cd 9.6 mg/kg in average in the soils around the smelting areas were measured. The sequential geochemical extraction test showed that Pb, Zn and Cd in the contaminated soils had high mobility and bioavailability for the metals, whereas smelting waste residues had lower mobility and bioavailability because their concentrations presented small percentages (all less than 0.2%) in the exchangeable fraction. Concentrations of Pb, Zn and Cd were high in the local stream water but low in groundwater. In the surface water, Pb, Zn and Cd were significantly concentrated in the suspended sediment. The results indicated that metal-rich erosion process of smelting residue and contaminated soil contributed to mobility of the metals into stream water.

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of copper(I) binding to apo and metal-reconstituted zinc finger peptides.

    PubMed

    Doku, Reginald T; Park, Grace; Wheeler, Korin E; Splan, Kathryn E

    2013-08-01

    Cu(I) exhibits high affinity for thiolate ligands, suggesting that thiol-rich zinc or iron binding sites may be subject to disruption during copper stress conditions. Zinc fingers constitute a large class of metalloproteins that use a combination of cysteine and histidine residues that bind Zn(II) as a structural element. Despite the shared preference of both copper and zinc for thiolate and amine coordination, the susceptibility of zinc finger domains toward copper substitution is not well studied. We report spectroscopic studies that characterize the Cu(I) binding properties of the zinc finger consensus peptides CP-CCHH, CP-CCHC, and CP-CCCC and the C-terminal zinc finger domain of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein p7 (NCp7_C). Cu(I) binds to both the apopeptides and the Co(II)-substituted peptides, and the stoichiometry of Cu(I) binding is dependent on the number of cysteine thiols at the metal binding site. Fluorescence studies of the Zn(II)-NCp7_C complex indicate that Cu(I) also effectively competes with Zn(II) at the metal binding site, despite the high affinity of Zn(II) for the CCHC binding motif. Circular dichroism studies on both CP-CCHC and NCp7_C show that the conformations of the Cu(I)-bound complexes differ substantially from those of the Zn(II) species, implying that Cu(I) substitution is likely to impact zinc finger function. These results show that for the peptides studied here, Cu(I) is the thermodynamically favored metal despite the known high Zn(II) affinity of zinc finger domains, suggesting that Cu(I)-substituted zinc finger domains might be relevant in the context of both copper toxicity mechanisms and copper-responsive transcription factors.

  10. Zinc and copper metabolism in pregnancy and lactation of adolescent women.

    PubMed

    Maia, Patricia Afonso; Figueiredo, Renata C B; Anastácio, Alexandra Silva; Porto da Silveira, Carmem Lucia; Donangelo, Carmen Marino

    2007-03-01

    Pregnant and lactating adolescent women are at risk of zinc and copper deficiency but their capacity for metabolic adaptation is poorly known. This study investigated the effect of pregnancy and lactation on zinc and copper metabolism in adolescent women by comparing biochemical indices between groups in different reproductive states. Habitual dietary intake and biochemical indices (zinc, copper, alkaline phosphatase, and ceruloplasmin in plasma; zinc [E-Zn], metallothionein [E-MT], and superoxide dismutase [E-SOD] in erythrocytes) and their relation were compared among non-pregnant non-lactating adolescents (NPNLs; n = 26), third-trimester pregnant adolescents (PAs; n = 26), and lactating adolescents up to 3 mo postpartum (LAs; n = 21). Zinc and copper intakes were not different across groups (on average, 8.7 and 1.0 mg/d, respectively). PAs had lower plasma zinc but higher plasma copper, alkaline phosphatase, and ceruloplasmin levels than did LAs and NPNLs (P < 0.05). E-SOD and E-Zn were similar in all groups but E-MT was higher in the PA and LA groups than in the NPNL group (P < 0.05). Correlations between plasma copper and ceruloplasmin and between E-MT and E-Zn were observed in the LA and NPNL groups (r > or = 0.64, P < 0.01) but not in the PA group. In contrast, correlations between plasma alkaline phosphatase and plasma zinc, between E-MT and plasma zinc, and between E-SOD and E-Zn were observed only in the PA group (r > or = 0.46, P < 0.05). Zinc and copper biochemical responses to pregnancy and lactation in the adolescent women studied appeared qualitatively similar to those described in previous studies in adult women. However, the significant correlations observed between the activity of zinc-dependent enzymes and plasma (or erythrocyte) zinc suggest that a poor maternal zinc status may limit the metabolic adaptation capacity of these adolescent women especially during pregnancy.

  11. Influence of cadmium, lead, and zinc on the ability of guinea pig macrophages to interact with macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kiremidjian-Schumacher, L.; Stotzky, G.; Dickstein, R.A.; Schwartz, J.

    1981-02-01

    The effects of cadmium, lead, and zinc on the ability of guinea pig macrophages to migrate and to interact with migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were studied by cell electrophoresis and the indirect migration inhibition assay. The metals significantly inhibited the motility of the cells and decreased or abolished the effect of MIF on their migration.

  12. Plasmid-determined inducible efflux is responsible for resistance to cadmium, zinc, and cobalt in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Nies, D H; Silver, S

    1989-01-01

    In Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, resistance to chromate is plasmid determined, inducible, and based on decreased net accumulation of the metal anion. Plasmid-encoded resistances to zinc, cadmium, cobalt, and nickel are resulting from inducible, energy-dependent cation efflux systems. PMID:2914875

  13. Toxic effects of cadmium and copper on the isolated heart of dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Wang, X T; Wu, L; Mateescu, M A

    1999-08-13

    The adverse effects of heavy metal ions on the heart functions of lower vertebrates are largely unknown. In the present study, the effects of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Cu+ on the cardiac functions of the heart isolated from dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, including the epicardial electrocardiogram, ventricular developed pressure (VDP), and heart beating rate, were studied. Cadmium (10 to 100 microM) significantly decreased VDP of the isolated shark hearts in a reversible manner. However, heart beating rate was not affected by cadmium. Cadmium also induced a transient modification of the amplitude and the form of the QRS complex. Cupric ion transiently increased VDP in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas cuprous ion (1 to 100 microM) did not markedly alter the cardiac functions of shark. Cupric or cuprous ions did not change heart beating rate and electrocardiogram at concentrations of 10 to 100 microM. Our results, for the first time, demonstrated the effects of cadmium on shark heart and indicated that the cardiac effects of copper are valence dependent. An elucidation of heavy metal effects on fish cardiac functions will help to understand the complex toxicological properties of heavy metals in different species and tissues, and will provide information for management of pollution control and marine resource protection.

  14. [Zinc and copper blood plasma and erythrocyte value in adolescent with the different types of pathology].

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, E M; Bakanov, M I; Spichak, T V; Simonova, O I; Poliakova, S I; Surganova, A A; Kupriianova, O O; Gorelova, Zh Iu; Plats-Koldobenko, A N; Baranovskaia, Iu V; Gorinova, Iu V

    2009-01-01

    Comparative analysis the value of the cation of zinc and copper in the blood plasma and erythrocytes were performed in the different diseases in children and adolescent. The patients with bronchopulmonary diseases, liver diseases, low cardiovascular malformation and growth inhibition were examined. Increase the value of the intracellular zinc and copper was detected in patients with the definite bronchopulmonary diseases, which can on the one hand, reflected the activation of the antioxidant protection system and by another hand, reflected destructive metalloproteinase. Decrease the value of the intracellular copper in bronchopulmonary patients with the lung emphysema and Kartagnera syndrome indicate about the falure of the compensatory reactions and needs the additional investigation. It was detected that copper content in the blood plasma and the copper accumulation in erythrocyte were decrease in patients with liver diseases in comparison with the health children. The increase of copper value in erythrocyte in children with low cardiovascular malformation was detected and need the additional investigation. In children with the growth inhibition was detected appreciable decrease the value of the free zinc and copper ions in erythrocytes and copper in the blood plasma, which can explained the physical developmental lagging.

  15. LEACHING OF CADMIUM, TELLURIUM AND COPPER FROM CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES.

    SciTech Connect

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2004-02-03

    Separating the metals from the glass is the first step in recycling end-of-life cadmium telluride photovoltaic modules and manufacturing scrap. We accomplished this by leaching the metals in solutions of various concentrations of acids and hydrogen peroxide. A relatively dilute solution of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide was found to be most effective for leaching cadmium and tellurium from broken pieces of CdTe PV modules. A solution comprising 5 mL of hydrogen peroxide per kg of PV scrap in 1 M sulfuric acid, gave better results than the 12 mL H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/kg, 3.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution currently used in the industry. Our study also showed that this dilute solution is more effective than hydrochloric-acid solutions and it can be reused after adding a small amount of hydrogen peroxide. These findings, when implemented in large-scale operation, would result in significant savings due to reductions in volume of the concentrated leaching agents (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and of the alkaline reagents required to neutralize the residuals of leaching.

  16. Can zinc(II) ions be doped into the crystal structure of L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate?

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R

    2013-12-01

    The bivalent metals Cd(II) and Zn(II) exhibit different stereochemical requirements for the set of chloride and L-proline ligands, which precludes the doping of Zn(II) ions into the crystal structure of dichloro(l-proline)cadmium(II) hydrate also referred to as L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate (L-PCCM). Hence, the reported claim of growth of zinc doped L-PCCM crystals namely Zn(0.4 mol):LPCCM and Zn(0.2 mol):LPCCM by Vetrivel et al. (S. Vetrivel, P. Anandan, K. Kanagasabapathy, S. Bhattacharya, S. Gopinath, R. Rajasekaran, Effect of zinc chloride on the growth and characterization of l-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate semiorganic NLO single crystals, Spectrochim. Acta 110A (2013) 317-323), is untenable.

  17. Plasma leptin, plasma zinc, and plasma copper are associated in elite female and male judo athletes.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Lopes, Gustavo; de Oliveira-Junior, Astrogildo Vianna; Portella, Emilson Souza; Lisboa, Patrícia Cristina; Donangelo, Carmen Marino; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Koury, Josely Correa

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare plasma leptin, plasma zinc, and plasma copper levels and their relationship in trained female and male judo athletes (n = 10 women; n = 8 men). Blood samples were obtained 24 h after training to measure plasma zinc, copper, and leptin levels. Subjects presented similar values to age (22 +/- 2 years old), body mass index (24 +/- 1 kg/m(2)), plasma zinc (17.2 +/- 2 micromol/L), copper (12.5 +/- 2 micromol/L), and leptin (5.6 +/- 1.3 microg/L). However, height, total body mass, lean mass, fat mass, and sum of ten-skinfold thickness were higher in male than female. Plasma leptin was associated with sum of ten skinfolds in male (r = 0.91; p < 0.001) and female athletes (r = 0.84; p < 0.003). Plasma zinc was associated with leptin in males (r = 0.82; p < 0.05) while copper was associated with plasma leptin in females (r = 0.66; p < 0.05). Our results suggest that young judo athletes lost sex-related differences in leptin levels. Plasma zinc, plasma copper, and energy homeostasis may be involved in regulation of plasma leptin.

  18. Serum levels of zinc and copper in epileptic children during long-term therapy with anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Talat, Mohamed A; Ahmed, Anwar; Mohammed, Lamia

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the serum levels of zinc and copper in epileptic children during the long-term treatment of anticonvulsant drugs and correlate this with healthy subjects. A hospital-based group matched case-control study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt between November 2013 and October 2014. Ninety patients aged 7.1 ± 3.6 years were diagnosed with epilepsy by a neurologist. The control group was selected from healthy individuals and matched to the case group. Serum zinc and copper were measured by the calorimetric method using a colorimetric method kit. The mean zinc level was 60.1 ± 22.6 ug/dl in the cases, and 102.1 ± 18 ug/dl in the controls (p<0.001). The mean copper level was 180.1 ± 32.4 ug/dl in cases compared with 114.5 ± 18.5 ug/dl in controls (p<0.001). Serum zinc levels in epileptic children under drug treatment are lower compared with healthy children. Also, serum copper levels in these patients are significantly higher than in healthy people. No significant difference in the levels of serum copper and zinc was observed in using one drug or multiple drugs in the treatment of epileptic patients.

  19. Plasma zinc, copper, leptin, and body composition are associated in elite female judo athletes.

    PubMed

    Koury, Josely Correa; de Oliveira, Karla de Jesus Fernandes; Lopes, Gustavo Casimiro; de Oliveira, Astrogildo Vianna; Portella, Emilson Souza; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Donangelo, Carmen Marino

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated levels of plasma zinc, copper, and leptin, body composition, and their relationship in nine elite female judo athletes under two different training conditions. Body composition and biochemical measurements (hematological indexes, plasma zinc, plasma copper, and plasma leptin) were analyzed 24 h after intense training and following a 5-d period without training (no-training). Plasma leptin and plasma zinc increased with no-training. Plasma zinc correlated negatively with percent fat mass (r= -0.62; r=0.05) and positively with plasma leptin (r=0.83; p=0.002) in the no-training condition. Plasma copper did not change during the study and correlated positively with plasma leptin (r=0.66; p=0.05) and with percent fat mass (r=0.80; p=0.007) after training. Percent fat mass was associated negatively with plasma zinc (r=-0.62; p=0.05) in the no-training condition. Moreover, percent fat mass was negatively associated with the Zn/Cu plasma ratio under both training conditions (r< -0.78, p< 0.001). These results are consistent with the possible function of zinc as a lipid-mobilizing factor and of copper as a limiting factor in energy metabolism.

  20. Carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin mitigates toxicity of cadmium, cobalt, and copper during naphthalene biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Douglas R; Anderson, Phillip P; Schubert, Carissa M; Gault, Melissa B; Blanford, William J; Sandrin, Todd R

    2010-04-01

    Hazardous waste sites are commonly contaminated with both organic and metal pollutants. Many metal pollutants have been shown to inhibit organic pollutant biodegradation. We investigated the ability of a modified, polydentate cyclodextrin (carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin, CMCD) to reduce the toxicity of 33.4 microM cadmium, cobalt or copper during naphthalene degradation by a Burkholderia sp. in 120 h aerobic, batch studies. The highest investigated concentration of CMCD, 3340 microM, reduced cadmium, cobalt, and copper toxicity. With each metal, the length of the lag phase was reduced (by as much as 108 h with cobalt or copper), the cell yield was increased (by as much as a factor of 16 with cobalt), and the growth rate was increased (by as much as a factor of 31 with cobalt). The degrader was unable to use CMCD as the sole source of carbon and energy. Our data suggest that the ability of CMCD to complex metals plays an important role in its ability to mitigate metal toxicity and that CMCD has the potential to enhance biodegradation in organic and metal co-contaminated environments.

  1. Determination of selenium, zinc and cadmium in antidandruff shampoos by atomic spectrometry after microwave assisted sample digestion.

    PubMed

    Salvador, A; Pascual-Martí, M C; Aragó, E; Chisvert, A; March, J G

    2000-05-05

    Microwave assisted pre-treatments for atomic spectrometric determination (inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, ICP-OES or flame atomic absorption spectrometry, FAAS) of metallic elements, usually present in antidandruff shampoos, are proposed. They are based on the digestion of the sample with HNO(3) into a closed reactor, which is irradiated at 800 W for a few minutes. Selenium was determined by ICP-OES. The limit of detection was 0.11 mg l(-1); the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for the selenium content in the samples was in the 0.6-3.6% range. The results obtained were in agreement with the label contents and the recovery of the proposed method was in the 100-106% range. Zinc and cadmium were determined by FAAS. The limit of detection for zinc determination was 0.078 mg l(-1); the R.S.D. for zinc contents was in the 0.8-8.6% range. A limit of detection of 0.09 mg l(-1) was obtained for cadmium determination; the R.S.D. for cadmium contents was in the 0.7-2.7% range. The determinations were performed after two different sample mineralization pre-treatments - dry ashing (in an electric furnace) and wet mineralization (in a microwave oven). Both methodologies provided comparable results for zinc and cadmium determination in shampoos. The proposed microwave assisted digestion procedures allow a precise and accurate determination of selenium, zinc and cadmium in commercial antidandruff shampoos, and the sample pre-treatment is less time-consuming than the classic methods.

  2. Solid-state phase diagram of the zinc sulfide-cadmium sulfide system

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, V.A.; Ganshin, V.A.; Korkishko, Y.N. )

    1993-01-01

    The II-VI wide-band compounds zinc sulfide, cadmium sulfide and Cd[sub x]ZN[sub 1[minus]x]S ternary alloys has been of considerable technological interest due to their semiconducting, optical and mechanical properties and are of considerable importance as photoconductors, phosphors, infrared and solar-cell window materials and materials for short-wavelength optoelectronic applications. Structures and phase relation in the ZnS-CdS system were investigated in the temperature range 150-700 C and the boundaries describing the equilibria between the zinc-blend and wurtzite Cd[sub x]An[sub 1[minus]x]S solid solutions were determined by examining the ion exchange processes Cd[sup 2+] [r arrow] Zn[sup 2+] in the ZnS powder. The complete thermodynamical description of the ZnS-CdS system is proposed. It was found, that Cd[sub x]Z[sub n[minus]1]S solid solutions of both modifications obey a regular solution model. Enthalpies of the zinc-blend-to-wurtzite structural phase transition in CdS (550[plus minus]50 J/mol) and in ZnS (1700[plus minus]100 J/mol) were defined. The solid state phase diagram calculated from defined thermodynamical parameters agrees well with the experimental data.

  3. Diffusive gradient in thin films technique for assessment of cadmium and copper bioaccessibility to radish (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Dočekalová, Hana; Škarpa, Petr; Dočekal, Bohumil

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess cadmium and copper uptake by radish (Raphanus sativus) and to test the capability of the diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique to predict bioaccessibility of the metals for this plant. Radish plants were grown in pots filled with uncontaminated control and artificially contaminated soils differing in cadmium and copper contents. Metal concentrations in plants were compared with free ion metal concentrations in soil solution, and concentrations measured by DGT. Significant correlation was found between metal fluxes to plant and metal fluxes into DGT. Pearson correlation coefficient for cadmium was 0.994 and for copper 0.998. The obtained results showed that DGT offers the possibility of simple test procedure for soils and can be used as a physical surrogate for plant uptake.

  4. Iron, copper and zinc isotopic fractionation up mammal trophic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Pons, Marie-Laure; Balter, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that some non-traditional elements exhibit stable isotope compositions that are distinct in botanical and animal products, providing potential new tracers for diet reconstructions. Here, we present data for iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) stable isotope compositions in plants and bones of herbivores and carnivores. The samples come from trophic chains located in the Western Cape area and in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Fe, Cu and Zn isotope systematics are similar in both parks. However, local Cu, and possibly Zn, isotopic values of soils influence that of plants and of higher trophic levels. Between plants and bones of herbivores, the Zn isotope compositions are 66Zn-enriched by about 0.8‰ whereas no significant trophic enrichment is observed for Fe and Cu. Between bones of herbivores and bones of carnivores, the Fe isotope compositions are 56Fe-depleted by about 0.6‰, the Cu isotope compositions are 65Cu-enriched by about 1.0‰, and the Zn isotope compositions are slightly 66Zn-depleted by about 0.2‰. The isotopic distributions of the metals in the body partly explain the observed trophic isotopic systematics. However, it is also necessary to invoke differential intestinal metal absorption between herbivores and carnivores to account for the observed results. Further studies are necessary to fully understand how the Fe, Cu and Zn isotope values are regulated within the ecosystem's trophic levels, but the data already suggests significant potential as new paleodietary and paleoecological proxies.

  5. Sensitivity of Mediterranean woody seedlings to copper, nickel and zinc.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, David; Disante, Karen B; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Cortina, Jordi; Vallejo, V Ramón

    2007-01-01

    The restoration of heavy metal contaminated areas requires information on the response of native plant species to these contaminants. The sensitivity of most Mediterranean woody species to heavy metals has not been established, and little is known about phytotoxic thresholds and environmental risks. We have evaluated the response of four plant species commonly used in ecological restoration, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia lentiscus, Juniperus oxycedrus, and Rhamnus alaternus, grown in nutrient solutions containing a range of copper, nickel and zinc concentrations. Seedlings of these species were exposed to 0.048, 1 and 4 microM of Cu; 0, 25 and 50 microM of Ni; and 0.073, 25 and 100 microM of Zn in a hydroponic silica sand culture for 12 weeks. For all four species, the heavy metal concentration increased in plants as the solution concentration increased and was always higher in roots than in shoots. Pinus halepensis and P. lentiscus showed a higher capacity to accumulate metals in roots than J. oxycedrus and R. alaternus, while the allocation to shoots was considerably higher in the latter two. Intermediate heavy-metal doses enhanced biomass accumulation, whereas the highest doses resulted in reductions in biomass. Decreases in shoot biomass occurred at internal concentrations ranging from 25 to 128 microg g-1 of Zn, and 1.7 to 4.1 microg g( -1) of Cu. Nickel phytoxicity could not be established within the range of doses used. Rhamnus alaternus and J. oxycedrus showed higher sensitivity to Cu and Zn than P. halepensis and, especially, P. lentiscus. Contrasted responses to heavy metals must be taken into account when using Mediterranean woody species for the restoration of heavy metal contaminated sites.

  6. Interrelationships between cadmium, zinc and antioxidants in the liver of the rat exposed orally to relatively high doses of cadmium and zinc.

    PubMed

    Jihen, El Heni; Sonia, Sfar; Fatima, Hammouda; Mohamed Tahar, Sfar; Abdelhamid, Kerkeni

    2011-10-01

    Zinc (Zn) reduces cadmium (Cd)-induced toxicity in the liver although it increases Cd tissue burden in some conditions; hence, the present study is designed to study the relationships between Cd, Zn and antioxidants in the liver of rats exposed to Cd. Livers of male rats which received orally relatively high doses of Cd (200 mg Cd/L as Cd chloride or Cd (200 mg/L)+Zn (500 mg Zn as Zn chloride) during five weeks, were investigated. Cd induced an accumulation of Cd and Zn in parallel to depletion in important variables (GSH, GSH/GSSG, CuZn-SOD and GPx activities) and to elevation in others (Cd/Zn and GSSG). Cd, did not affect CuZn SOD/GPx, nor Mn-SOD in the liver. Cd accumulation, Cd/Zn, CuZn SOD activity and CuZn SOD/GPx, was increased remarkably under Zn action. Zn supply ameliorated GSH level and partially reversed the decrease in GSH/GSSG, but it did not ameliorate GPx activity. Analysis showed high correlations between Cd and the majority of the variables, while Zn was positively correlated with only GSSG. We suggest from our results that Zn has indirect ameliorative effects on Cd-induced toxicity in the liver and that the increase in Cd retention is probably the key mechanism modulating, in the case of relatively high doses of Cd, the antioxidant response during exposure to Cd and Zn. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Zinc to cadmium replacement in the A. thaliana SUPERMAN Cys₂ His₂ zinc finger induces structural rearrangements of typical DNA base determinant positions.

    PubMed

    Malgieri, Gaetano; Zaccaro, Laura; Leone, Marilisa; Bucci, Enrico; Esposito, Sabrina; Baglivo, Ilaria; Del Gatto, Annarita; Russo, Luigi; Scandurra, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V; Fattorusso, Roberto; Isernia, Carla

    2011-11-01

    Among heavy metals, whose toxicity cause a steadily increasing of environmental pollution, cadmium is of special concern due to its relatively high mobility in soils and potential toxicity at low concentrations. Given their ubiquitous role, zinc fingers domains have been proposed as mediators for the toxic and carcinogenic effects exerted by xenobiotic metals. To verify the structural effects of zinc replacement by cadmium in zinc fingers, we have determined the high resolution structure of the single Cys₂ His₂ zinc finger of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN protein (SUP37) complexed to the cadmium ion by means of UV-vis and NMR techniques. SUP37 is able to bind Cd(II), though with a dissociation constant higher than that measured for Zn(II). Cd-SUP37 retains the ββα fold but experiences a global structural rearrangement affecting both the relative orientation of the secondary structure elements and the position of side chains involved in DNA recognition: among them Ser17 side chain, which we show to be essential for DNA binding, experiences the largest displacement. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effects of piezoelectricity on cadmium sulphide-copper sulphide solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the effects of applied uniform and non-uniform stresses on copper sulphide-cadmium sulphide solar cells predict that uniform stress will not affect their performance, while non-uniform stress will. Changes in open-circuit voltage and capacitance resulting from piezoelectric effects are predicted to be proportional to the divergence of the piezoelectric polarization. Experiments performed on single crystal cells verified these calculations for uniform stresses, and for a particular non-uniform stress (uniaxial bending). The changes in the latter case were less than 1%. These experiments were extended to determine the growth face of crystallites in polycrystalline cells.

  9. Effects of zinc, copper, and lead toxicity on. cap alpha. -aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shafiq-ur-Rehman

    1984-07-01

    The distribution of lead, zinc and copper in the human environment has been recognized as a major toxicological factor. Lead ions have been shown to inhibit the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD), which is involved in the biosynthesis of heme. Copper also has its inhibitory effect on delta-ALAD activity. A study has shown that the delta-ALAD was activated by zinc ions at physiological concentrations. In view of these reports, it was considered worthwhile to study the poisoning effects of lead, zinc and copper on delta-ALAD activity along with the concentrations of these metal ions in the blood. A possible role of Zn/sup + +/, Cu/sup + +/, and Pb/sup + +/ interaction and their influence on delta-ALAD has been explored in the present paper.

  10. Magnesium, zinc, and copper status in women involved in different sports.

    PubMed

    Nuviala, R J; Lapieza, M G; Bernal, E

    1999-09-01

    The dietary intake, serum levels, and urinary excretion of magnesium, zinc, and copper were studied in 78 women involved in different sports (karate, handball, basketball, and running) and in 65 sedentary women. Seven-day, weighed-food dietary reports revealed that no group of female athletes reached the minimal intake recommended for magnesium (280 mg/day) and zinc (12 mg/day), although their values were superior to those of the control group. The estimated safe and adequate minimal intake of copper (1.5 mg/day) was amply surpassed by the basketball players and runners but was not reached by the handball players. Serum levels and urinary excretion of magnesium, zinc and copper di not seem related either to their intake or to the type of physical activity performed. The influence of other factors such as nutritional status, bioavailability, intestinal absorption mechanisms, and muscle-level modifications might explain the differences between the different groups of female athletes.

  11. Are copper, zinc and selenium in erythrocytes valuable biological indexes of nutrition and pathology?

    PubMed

    Vitoux, D; Arnaud, J; Chappuis, P

    1999-11-01

    The real significance of the level of trace elements copper, zinc and selenium in erythrocytes is still a matter of debate. This review is an evaluation of the potential value of copper, zinc and selenium in red blood cells in physiology, nutrition and pathology, taking into account the other commonly used indices and the analytical difficulty encountered for erythrocyte determinations. The main analytical methods and reference values in erythrocytes are also presented. The literature of the last 3 decades was analyzed. On the basis of these papers, the role of erythrocyte copper in various pathologies should be re-investigated, especially when they include inflammatory processes or hormonal changes. The main interest of zinc determination in red blood cells concerns thyroid pathology. In general, the value of selenium in erythrocytes agrees with selenium in serum and its determination is often unnecessary.

  12. Serum iron, zinc and copper levels and lipid peroxidation in children with chronic giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Mustafa; Delibas, Namik; Altuntas, Irfan; Oktem, Faruk; Yönden, Zafer

    2003-03-01

    This study investigated the levels of iron, zinc, and copper and their demolishing effects against lipid peroxidation in chronic giardiasis. Serum iron, zinc and copper levels, erythrocyte cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, and malondialdehyde levels were measured in 34 children with chronic giardiasis and were compared with controls. The serum iron and zinc levels and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity were significantly lower, and malondialdehyde levels were significantly higher among the children with chronic giardiasis compared to the control group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in copper levels between the two groups (p > 0.05). Consequently, the oxidant-antioxidant balance may tilt towards the oxidative side due to weakness of the antioxidant system in giardiasis. If early and proper treatment is not performed, free radical-mediated damage might occur in children with chronic giardiasis.

  13. Zinc, copper, iron, and chromium concentrations in young patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Basaki, M; Saeb, M; Nazifi, S; Shamsaei, H A

    2012-08-01

    Homeostasis of trace elements can be disrupted by diabetes mellitus. On the other hand, disturbance in trace element status in diabetes mellitus may contribute to the insulin resistance and development of diabetic complications. The aim of present study was to compare the concentration of essential trace elements, zinc, copper, iron, and chromium in serum of patients who have type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 20) with those of nondiabetic control subjects (n = 20). The serum concentrations of zinc, copper, iron, and chromium were measured by means of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Shimadzu AA 670, Kyoto, Japan) after acid digestion. The results of this study showed that the mean values of zinc, copper, and chromium were significantly lower in the serum of patients with diabetes as compared to the control subjects (P < 0.05). Our results show that deficiency of some essential trace elements may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus.

  14. Characterization studies on the cadmium-binding proteins from two species of New Zealand oysters

    SciTech Connect

    Nordberg, M.; Nuottaniemi, I.; Cherian, M.G.; Nordberg, G.F.; Kjellstroem, T.; Garvey, J.S.

    1986-03-01

    Two different types of New Zealand oysters - Ostrea lutaria (OL) and Crassostrea glomerata (CG) - contained different concentrations of zinc, copper, and cadmium. Both kinds of oysters were shown by gel filtration (G-75) to contain cadmium and zinc in fractions corresponding to a high molecular weight protein which was heat labile. OL oysters contained cadmium in fractions corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 6500. The cadmium-binding protein in these fractions was heat-stable. This protein contained no detectable amounts of zinc and was not present in the CG oysters. CG oysters contained cadmium and zinc in a polypeptide with low molecular weight (MW 1000). The cadmium-binding oyster proteins are minimally reactive in a competitive binding radioimmunoassay in comparison to the reactivity of a typical vertebrate metallothionein; the proteins may be metallothioneins, but, if so, they do not exhibit the principal determinants characteristic of vertebrate metallothioneins.

  15. Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is activated through a sulfenic acid intermediate at a copper ion entry site.

    PubMed

    Fetherolf, Morgan M; Boyd, Stefanie D; Taylor, Alexander B; Kim, Hee Jong; Wohlschlegel, James A; Blackburn, Ninian J; Hart, P John; Winge, Dennis R; Winkler, Duane D

    2017-07-21

    Metallochaperones are a diverse family of trafficking molecules that provide metal ions to protein targets for use as cofactors. The copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase (Ccs1) activates immature copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Sod1) by delivering copper and facilitating the oxidation of the Sod1 intramolecular disulfide bond. Here, we present structural, spectroscopic, and cell-based data supporting a novel copper-induced mechanism for Sod1 activation. Ccs1 binding exposes an electropositive cavity and proposed "entry site" for copper ion delivery on immature Sod1. Copper-mediated sulfenylation leads to a sulfenic acid intermediate that eventually resolves to form the Sod1 disulfide bond with concomitant release of copper into the Sod1 active site. Sod1 is the predominant disulfide bond-requiring enzyme in the cytoplasm, and this copper-induced mechanism of disulfide bond formation obviates the need for a thiol/disulfide oxidoreductase in that compartment. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Mineral commodity profiles: Cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Plachy, Jozef

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Cadmium is a soft, low-melting-point metal that has many uses. It is similar in abundance to antimony and bismuth and is the 63d element in order of crustal abundance. Cadmium is associated in nature with zinc (and, less closely, with lead and copper) and is extracted mainly as a byproduct of the mining and processing of zinc. In 2000, it was refined in 27 countries, of which the 8 largest accounted for two-thirds of world production. The United States was the third largest refiner after Japan and China. World production in 2000 was 19,700 metric tons (t) and U.S. production was 1,890 t. In the United States, one company in Illinois and another in Tennessee refined primary cadmium. A Pennsylvania company recovered cadmium from scrap, mainly spent nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries. The supply of cadmium in the world and in the United States appears to be adequate to meet future industrial needs; the United States has about 23 percent of the world reserve base.

  17. Zinc improves the immune function and the proliferation of lymphocytes in Cadmium-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Iftekhar; Bashandy, Samir; Taha, Nael Abu; Mahmood, Amer; Alomar, Suliman; Alhazza, Iibrahim; Mashaly, Ashraf; Rady, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Cadmium (Cd) exposure and the treatment with Zinc (Zn) on immune functions of splenocytes and cultured lymphocytes of rats were studied. The exposure of rats to Cd was at a dose of 2.2 mg/kg CdCl2, injected subcutaneously four times weekly for 2 months. Rats were supplemented with Zn (2.2 mg/kg ZnCl2, injected subcutaneously four times weekly for 2 months) one hour prior to Cd exposure. Spleens were removed and splenocytes were isolated and cultured. The proliferation capacity of lymphocytes and their homing to the spleen were studied. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) was extracted from stimulated lymphocytes in order to analyse gene expressions using RT-PCR. Accordingly, proliferation of lymphocytes was found to be suppressed in Cd-treated rats, both in vivo and in vitro. Zinc served to activate the proliferation of B and T lymphocytes in Cd-treated rats both in vivo and in vitro. Antigen-activated lymphocytes showed that Cd impaired the mRNA expression of CD68, Ccl22 and CXCL10. Zinc was not found to restore mRNA expression of these genes to the normal levels. Zinc was found to decrease the MDA level with replenishment of activity of key antioxidant enzymes and proteins in Cd-pre-treated animals significantly. Moreover, the histopathological examination of spleen samples also agreed with the molecular, immunological and redox findings. Hence, Zn is able to restore the normal structure, redox status and immunity in Cd-induced damage in the rat model system. PMID:26155160

  18. Behavioral and dermatologic changes and low serum zinc and copper concentrations in two premature infants after parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, K N; Henkin, R I

    1978-11-01

    Two premature infants were observed to develop behavioral and dermatologic changes and low serum zinc and copper concentrations following cessation of prolonged parenteral alimentation, while being fed exclusively with human milk. Following treatment with exogenous oral zinc supplementation, prompt relief of symptoms and increases of serum zinc and copper concentrations were observed in both infants. These patients comprise about 5% of our premature infants who are treated with parenteral alimentation for more than two weeks. We recommend that premature infants on prolonged parenteral alimentation should be monitored for changes in serum zinc and copper concentrations and, if a marked fall is observed, supplementation should be considered.

  19. Charge Sharing and Charge Loss in a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Fine-Pixel Detector Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, J. A.; Sharma, D. P.; Ramsey, B. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard x-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750micron pitch), lmm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300micron pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values.

  20. Towards Optimization of ACRT Schedules Applied to the Gradient Freeze Growth of Cadmium Zinc Telluride

    DOE PAGES

    Divecha, Mia S.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2017-10-03

    Historically, the melt growth of II-VI crystals has benefitted by the application of the accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT). Here, we employ a comprehensive numerical model to assess the impact of two ACRT schedules designed for a cadmium zinc telluride growth system per the classical recommendations of Capper and co-workers. The “flow maximizing” ACRT schedule, with higher rotation, effectively mixes the solutal field in the melt but does not reduce supercooling adjacent to the growth interface. The ACRT schedule derived for stable Ekman flow, with lower rotation, proves more effective in reducing supercooling and promoting stable growth. Furthermore, these counterintuitivemore » results highlight the need for more comprehensive studies on the optimization of ACRT schedules for specific growth systems and for desired growth outcomes.« less

  1. Pyrolysis of Plants After Phytoremediation of Contaminated Soil with Lead, Cadmium and Zinc.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Aysun; Günkaya, Zerrin; Banar, Müfide

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to remediate lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) from contaminated soil and stabilize to pyrolysis solid product. To accomplish this, phytoremediation of soil contaminated with Pb, Cd and Zn by different plants (sunflower, corn and rape) was performed with and without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). According to phytoremediation results, rape was the most effective plant with 72 %, 76 % and 77 % removal efficiency for Pb, Cd and Zn, respectively. Also, EDTA addition had no significant effect on translocation of the metals from roots to stems. According to pyrolysis results, Pb, Cd and Zn in the contaminated plants were stabilized in the ash/char fraction. In addition, the solid product can be safely landfilled as inert waste since its toxicity leaching value is lower than the limit values given in the Turkish Regulation on Landfilling of Wastes.

  2. Characterization of a 2-mm thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Richardson, Georgia; Mitchell, Shannon; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul; Sharma, Dharma

    2003-01-01

    The detector under study is a 2-mm-thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and inter-pixel gap of 50 microns. This detector is a precursor to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation. In addition, we discuss electric field modeling for this specific detector geometry and the role this mapping will play in terms of charge sharing and charge loss in the detector.

  3. Internal Electric Field Behavior of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Radiation Detectors Under High Carrier Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.H.; Gul, R.; and James, R.B.

    2010-10-26

    The behavior of the internal electric-field of nuclear-radiation detectors substantially affects the detector's performance. We investigated the distribution of the internal field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors under high carrier injection. We noted the build-up of a space charge region near the cathode that produces a built-in field opposing the applied field. Its presence entails the collapse of the electric field in the rest of detector, other than the portion near the cathode. Such a space-charge region originates from serious hole-trapping in CZT. The device's operating temperature greatly affects the width of the space-charge region. With increasing temperature from 5 C to 35 C, its width expanded from about 1/6 to 1/2 of the total depth of the detector.

  4. Characterization of a 2-mm thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Richardson, Georgia; Mitchell, Shannon; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul; Sharma, Dharma

    2003-01-01

    The detector under study is a 2-mm-thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and inter-pixel gap of 50 microns. This detector is a precursor to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation. In addition, we discuss electric field modeling for this specific detector geometry and the role this mapping will play in terms of charge sharing and charge loss in the detector.

  5. Stepwise a.c. amperometric titration of cadmium and zinc with EGTA.

    PubMed

    Asplund, J

    1974-03-01

    The theory of d.c. and a.c. amperometric titrations based on complexometric reactions is presented. It is shown that when E(1 2 )(M(I)) > E(1 2 )(M(II)) and log K(M(I)L) < log K(M(II)L), M(I) and M(II) can be sequentially determined by d.c. as well as a.c. amperometric titration. If, on the other hand E(1 2 )(M(I)) > E(1 2 )(M(II)) and log K(M(II)L), a stepwise titration can be performed only by a.c. amperometry. The effect of oxygen on an a.c. amperometric titration is also discussed. The stepwise a.c. amperometric titration of cadmium and zinc with EGTA at pH 6 in the presence of oxygen and an excess of 0.05 M acetate illustrates the theory.

  6. Reproduction and biochemical responses in Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta) to zinc or cadmium exposures.

    PubMed

    Novais, Sara C; Gomes, Susana I L; Gravato, Carlos; Guilhermino, Lúcia; De Coen, Wim; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2011-07-01

    To better understand chemical modes of action, emphasis has been given to stress responses at lower levels of biological organization. Cholinesterases and antioxidant defenses are among the most used biomarkers due to their crucial role in the neurocholinergic transmission and in cell homeostasis preventing DNA damage, enzymatic inactivation and lipid peroxidation. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effects of zinc and cadmium on survival and reproduction of E. albidus and to assess metals oxidative stress potential and neurotoxic effects at concentrations that affected reproduction. Both metals affected the enchytraeids' survival and reproduction and induced significant changes in the antioxidant defenses as well as increased lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative damage. This study demonstrates that determining effects at different levels of biological organization can give better information on the physiological responses of enchytraeids in metal contamination events and further unravel the mechanistic processes dealing with metal stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation Between Bulk Material Defects and Spectroscopic Response in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Parsons, A. M.; Tueller, J.; VanSant, J. T.; Munoz, B. F.; Snodgrass, S. J.; Mullinix, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the critical challenges for large area cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detector arrays is obtaining material capable of uniform imaging and spectroscopic response. Two complementary nondestructive techniques for characterizing bulk CdZnTe have been developed to identify material with a uniform response. The first technique, infrared transmission imaging, allows for rapid visualization of bulk defects. The second technique, x-ray spectral mapping, provides a map of the material spectroscopic response when it is configured as a planar detector. The two techniques have been used to develop a correlation between bulk defect type and detector performance. The correlation allows for the use of infrared imaging to rapidly develop wafer mining maps. The mining of material free of detrimental defects has the potential to dramatically increase the yield and quality of large area CdZnTe detector arrays.

  8. The Place of Zinc, Cadmium, and Mercury in the Periodic Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, William B.

    2003-08-01

    Following an earlier article on the positions of lanthanium and lutetium in the periodic table (J. Chem. Educ. 1982, 59, 634-636), the author notes that introductory textbooks, inorganic textbooks, and advanced monographs on coordination and organometallic chemistry are increasingly treating zinc, cadmium, and mercury as transition or d-block elements, rather than as main-block elements. The author reviews the historical evolution of the concepts of transition elements and d-block elements, evaluates the chemical and spectrosopic evidence for each placement, and concludes that these elements are unambiguously main-block elements and that there is a fundamental bifurcation of group 2 at magnesium into a Ca Ra branch and a Zn Hg branch. The author also reviews various ways of representing this bifurcation using spatial position in the periodic table and various labeling schemes.

  9. Imaging characteristics of zinc sulfide shell, cadmium telluride core quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Hamid; Nelms, Jennifer; Muhammad, Osman; Jackson, Heather; Tkach, Jean; Davros, William; Peterson, Todd; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Bruchez, Marcel P; Toms, Steven A

    2008-02-01

    Quantum dots are optical nanocrystals whose in vitro and in vivo use in molecular imaging is expanding rapidly. In comparison with organic fluorophores, quantum dots exhibit desirable properties, such as multiwavelength fluorescence emission, excellent brightness and resistance to photobleaching. Their electron-dense, metallic cores suggest utility in other clinical imaging modalities. Core-shell zinc sulfide-cadmium telluride quantum dots were studied by magnetic resonance and computed tomography phantoms. Quantum dots were also injected into rat brain, as well as intravenously, using convection-enhanced delivery, prior to animal imaging. Computed tomography studies suggest that current formulations of quantum dots might be imaged in vivo in animals. Used in conjunction with optical imaging techniques, quantum dots have the potential to function as multimodal imaging platforms in vivo. The ability to detect an optical nanoparticle preoperatively with clinical imaging modality offers a distinct advantage to clinicians engaged in image-guided surgical applications.

  10. Migration and redistribution of zinc and cadmium in marine estuarine system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Charles W.; Slade, Elizabeth A.; McLerran, C.J.

    1974-01-01

    A survey of trace-element levels in the estuarine sediments of Texas shows that Corpus Christi Bay has anomalously high concentrations of zinc and cadmium. Maps of elemental abundance within the bay indicate large concentration gradients, the highest values being near the harbor entrance. Seasonal determinations of metal levels in the harbor and bay waters also revealed variations with time. During summer, stagnation of the harbor water increases the concentration of metals so that significant quantities precipitate in the reducing environment of the bottom water. In winter, the exchange of water between the bay and the harbor increases, and metals are redissolved from harbor deposits, washed into the bay, and adsorbed by particles settling to the bottom.

  11. Efficiency of repeated phytoextraction of cadmium and zinc from an agricultural soil contaminated with sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kai; Ma, Tingting; Liu, Hongyan; Wu, Longhua; Ren, Jing; Nai, Fengjiao; Li, Rui; Chen, Like; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Long-term application of sewage sludge resulted in soil cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) contamination in a pot experiment conducted to phytoextract Cd/Zn repeatedly using Sedum plumbizincicola and Apium graceolens in monoculture or intercropping mode eight times. Shoot yields and soil physicochemical properties changed markedly with increasing number of remediation crops when the two plant species were intercropped compared with the unplanted control soil and the two monoculture treatments. Changes in soil microbial indices such as average well colour development, soil enzyme activity and soil microbial counts were also significantly affected by the growth of the remediation plants, especially intercropping with S. plumbizincicola and A. graveolens. The higher yields and amounts of Cd taken up indicated that intercropping of the hyperaccumulator and the vegetable species may be suitable for simultaneous agricultural production and soil remediation, with larger crop yields and higher phytoremediation efficiencies than under monoculture conditions.

  12. The response of Hyalella azteca to artificial sediments spiked with cadmium, zinc, and anthracene

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, L.N.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Two artificial sediment recipes with differing organic content have been found that give > 80%. control survival with Hyalella azteca in standard toxicity assays. To further explore the usefulness of these sediments, both were spiked with cadmium, zinc, and anthracene. Toxicity assays (96 hr.) were run at intervals up to 4 weeks post-spike. Consistent LC50 results were obtained for both sediments and both metals. Responses with the PAH were similar to the metals, but each test was placed under UV light to assess photo-induced toxicity. GC analysis on porewater indicates that anthracene either binds tightly to the sediment or is absorbed directly by Hyalella azteca. Toxicity decreased over time, perhaps due to this binding. Both sediments appear to be adequate as routine control sediments.

  13. Experiments and Monte Carlo modeling of a higher resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride detector for safeguards applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre is engaged in R&D activity in the field of Non Destructive Analysis on nuclear materials, with focus on spent fuel characterization. A 500 mm3 Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) with enhanced resolution was recently purchased. With a full width at half maximum of 1.3% at 662 keV, the detector is very promising in view of its use for applications such as determination of uranium enrichment and plutonium isotopic composition, as well as measurement on spent fuel. In this paper, I report about the work done with such a detector in terms of its characterization. The detector energy calibration, peak shape and efficiency were determined from experimental data. The data included measurements with calibrated sources, both in a bare and in a shielded environment. In addition, Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNPX code were carried out and benchmarked with experiments.

  14. Facile Route to Rare Heterobimetallic Aluminum-Copper and Aluminum-Zinc Selenide Clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Li, Jiancheng; Liu, Rui; Zhu, Hongping; Roesky, Herbert W

    2017-03-20

    Heterobimetallic aluminum-copper and aluminum-zinc clusters were prepared from the reaction of LAl(SeH)2 [1; L = HC(CMeNAr)2 and Ar = 2,6-iPr2C6H3] with (MesCu)4 and ZnEt2, respectively. The resulting clusters with the core structures of Al2Se4Cu4 and Al2Se4Zn3 exhibit unique metal-organic frameworks. This is a novel pathway for the synthesis of aluminum-copper and aluminum-zinc selenides. The products have been characterized by spectroscopic methods and single-crystal X-ray structural characterization.

  15. Use of natural clinoptilolite for the removal of lead, copper and zinc in fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Marinos A; Hadjiconstantinou, Michalis P; Inglezakis, Vasilis J; Moustakas, Konstantinos G; Loizidou, Maria D

    2007-05-08

    This work deals with the removal of lead, copper and zinc from aqueous solutions by using natural zeolite (clinoptilolite). Fixed bed experiments were performed, using three different volumetric flow rates of 5, 7 and 10bed volume/h, under a total normality of 0.01N, at initial pH of 4 and ambient temperature (25 degrees C). The removal efficiency increased when decreasing the flow rate and the following selectivity series was found: Pb(2+)>Zn(2+)> or =Cu(2+). Conductivity measurements showed that lead removal follows mainly ion exchange mechanism, while copper and zinc removal follows ion exchange and sorption mechanism as well.

  16. Cadmium and zinc in soil solution extracts following the application of phosphate fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Raphaël; Grant, Cynthia; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the solubility of cadmium and zinc in soils after the application of phosphate fertilizers containing those two metals. The solubility of cadmium and zinc was assessed by measuring their concentration in soil water extracts. Three monoammonium phosphate fertilizers containing various amounts of metals were applied on cultivated fields for 3 years at three different rates. In order to investigate the effects of long-term applications of fertilizers on the solubility of Cd and Zn, a similar design was used to apply contaminated fertilizers to soils in a laboratory experiment using a single fertilizer addition equivalent to 15 years of application. Phosphate fertilizers increased the concentration of Cd in soil extracts compared to control in 87% and 80% of the treatments in field and laboratory experiments respectively. Both increasing the rate of application and using fertilizer containing more Cd lead to higher Cd concentrations in extracts for the field and the laboratory experiments. The addition of the equivalent of 15 years of fertilizer application in the laboratory results in higher Cd concentration in extracts compared to the field experiment. For Zn, the fertilizer treatments enhanced the metal solution concentration in 83% of field treatments, but no significant correlations could be found between Zn inputs and its concentration in solution. In the laboratory, fertilizer additions increase the Zn concentrations in 53% of the treatments and decrease it in most of the other treatments. The decrease in Zn concentrations in the laboratory trial is attributed to the higher phosphate concentrations in the soil solution; which is presumed to have contributed to the precipitation of Zn-phosphates. For both trials, the metal concentrations in soil extracts cannot be related to the Zn concentration in the fertilizer or the rate of application. The high Zn to Cd ratio is presumably responsible for the Cd increase in the soil extracts due to

  17. Resistance of Xanthomonas euvesicatoria strains from Brazilian pepper to copper and zinc sulfates.

    PubMed

    Areas, Maysa S; Gonçalves, Ricardo M; Soman, José M; Souza, Ronaldo C; Gioria, Ricardo; Silva, Tadeu A F DA; Maringoni, Antonio C

    2017-07-24

    Bacterial spot, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is one of the major bacterial diseases in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The infection results in reduced crop yield, particularly during periods of high rainfall and temperature, due to the low efficiency of chemical control with copper bactericides. This study evaluated the copper and zinc sulfate sensitivity of 59 pathogenic strains of Xanthomonas euvesicatoria isolated from pepper plants produced in various regions throughout Brazil. Both the respective sulfates and a mixture thereof was evaluated at 50, 100, 200 and 400 μg.mL-1. All the evaluated strains were found to be resistant to zinc sulfate (100 μg.mL-1) and 86.4% were resistant to copper sulfate (200 μg.mL-1). The mixture of copper (200 μg.mL-1) and zinc (200 μg.mL-1) sulfates inhibited the growth of all strains of X. euvesicatoria. To our knowledge this is the first study to report the resistance of X. euvesicatoria strains from pepper plants to copper and zinc sulfates in Brazil.

  18. Electrothermal atomic-absorption determination of silver in zinc and cadmium selenides

    SciTech Connect

    Khozhainov, Yu.M.; Dolova, N.K.

    1987-10-01

    An atomic-absorption signal is dependent on the chemical forms of the test element and matrix in the solution as well as on the processes during electrothermal atomization. The authors have examined the absorption due to silver with a Saturn-2 spectrophotometer with such atomization; the authors used the 328.1 nm line (i = 10 mA, slit width 0.15, time-constant 0.6 sec). The presence of cadmium and zinc was monitored from the 326.1 and 213.8 nm lines respectively. The measurements were made in argon. The internal gas flow was turned off during the atomization. The graphite was used until there were sharp changes in the silver absorption due to change in the structure of the graphite and occurrence of the memory effect. The results from over 100 specimens of cadmium selenide films analyzed for silver showed that the results were in full agreement with the conditions for silver activation (time, temperature, and activator mass).

  19. Highly-thermostable metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of zinc and cadmium 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalates with a unique fluorite topology.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ru-Qiang; Zhong, Rui-Qin; Du, Miao; Kiyobayashi, Tetsu; Xu, Qiang

    2007-06-28

    Two novel zinc and cadmium 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalate metal-organic frameworks have been synthesized and characterized using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and exhibit a unique fluorite topology and high thermal stabilities.

  20. Zinc in denture adhesive: a rare cause of copper deficiency in a patient on home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rakesh; Hawthorne, Barney; Durai, Dharmaraj; McDowell, Ian

    2015-10-09

    A 65-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, who had been on home parenteral nutrition for many years, presented with perioral paraesthesia and a burning sensation in the mouth. Initial blood tests including serum ferritin, vitamin B12 and folate, were normal apart from mild pancytopaenia. Serum copper was low, in spite of receiving regular copper in her parenteral feeds. The copper in her parenteral feeds was increased initially, but when it did not improve, she was started on weekly intravenous copper infusions. She was using dental adhesive, which had zinc in it, and a possibility that this was causing her copper deficiency was raised. Serum zinc levels were normal, but urinary zinc was very high. The patient was advised to use zinc-free dental adhesive and her copper level returned to normal within a few months with normalisation of her pancytopaenia, and partial resolution of her oral paraesthesia. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Evidence that diabetes mellitus favors impaired metabolism of zinc, copper, and selenium in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Quilliot, D; Dousset, B; Guerci, B; Dubois, F; Drouin, P; Ziegler, O

    2001-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a common complication of chronic pancreatitis, can disturb the metabolism of zinc, copper, and selenium. We analyzed the effects of hyperglycemia, malabsorption, and dietary intake on these factors in 35 men with alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis complicated by insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (CP-D), 12 men with chronic pancreatitis but no diabetes (nondiabetic CP), 25 men with type 1 diabetes mellitus (type 1 DM), and 20 control subjects. Diabetes due to chronic pancreatitis was associated with decreased plasma zinc and selenium concentrations and with increased urinary copper excretion. Of the chronic pancreatitis patients, 17% had low plasma zinc, and 41% of them had low plasma selenium. None of the type 1 diabetic patients had low plasma concentrations of zinc, but 12% of them had a low selenium concentration. Hyperglycemia, as assessed by fasting plasma glucose and by plasma HbAlc, was responsible for the increased zinc excretion and the decreased superoxide dismutase activity. The perturbations of the copper, selenium, and zinc metabolism were particularly pronounced in subjects with chronic pancreatitis plus diabetes mellitus. We have yet to determine whether the differences in trace-element status contribute to the clinical expression of the disease.

  2. Zinc and copper biochemical indices of antioxidant status in elite athletes of different modalities.

    PubMed

    Koury, Josely C; de Olilveria, Astrogildo V; Portella, Emílson S; de Olilveria, Cyntia F; Lopes, Gustavo C; Donangelo, Carmen M

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare zinc and copper biochemical indices of antioxidant status and their relationship in elite athletes of different modalities: aerobic with high-impact (triathletes, n = 10 and long-distance runners, n = 12), anaerobic with high-impact (short-distance runners, n = 9), and anaerobic with low-impact (short-distance swimmers, n = 13). The influence of recent dietary intake and body composition was also evaluated. A venous blood sample was drawn 16-20 hr after competition for the following measurements: packed-cell volume and hemoglobin in blood; copper and zinc in plasma and erythrocytes; ceruloplasmin in plasma; superoxide dismutase activity and metal-lothionein in erythrocytes; and erythrocyte osmotic fragility. Zinc and copper intakes were not different in the athlete groups and did not affect the biochemical indices measured. Athletes of the long-distance high-impact aerobic modalities had higher indices of antioxidant protection (erythrocyte zinc, superoxide dismutase activity, and metallothionein) than those of the short-distance low-impact modalities, suggesting that there is adaptation of the antioxidant capacity to the specific training. Significant correlations were observed in all athletes between erythrocyte zinc, superoxide dismutase activity, and metallothionein consistent with the importance of an adequate zinc status in the response of antioxidant mechanisms to intense exercise.

  3. Specific features of photoluminescence properties of copper-doped cadmium selenide quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikov, G. I.; Dorofeev, S. G.; Tananaev, P. N.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2011-09-15

    The effect of doping with copper on the photoluminescence properties of cadmium selenide quantum dots 4 nm in dimension is studied. The quenching of the excitonic photoluminescence band related to the quantum dots and the appearance of an impurity photoluminescence band in the near-infrared region are observed after doping of the quantum dots with copper. It is established that, on doping of the quantum dots, the photoluminescence kinetics undergoes substantial changes. The photoluminescence kinetics of the undoped quantum dots is adequately described by a sum of exponential relaxation relations, whereas the photoluminescence kinetics experimentally observed in the region of the impurity band of the copper-doped samples follows stretched exponential decay, with the average lifetimes 0.3-0.6 {mu}s at the photon energies in the range of 1.47-1.82 eV. The experimentally observed changes in the photoluminescence properties are attributed to transformation of radiative centers in the quantum dots when doped with copper atoms.

  4. Production of phytochelatins in Polygonum cuspidatum on exposure to copper but not to zinc.

    PubMed

    Imahara, H; Hatayama, T; Kuroda, S; Horie, Y; Inoue, E; Wakatsuki, T; Kitamura, T; Fujimoto, S; Ohara, A; Hashimoto, K

    1992-12-01

    We studied cellular resistance to copper of plant cells Polygonum cuspidatum. When callus of P. cuspidatum was incubated on medium containing 100 microM cupric sulfate, the callus grew as well as the control callus did. The copper content of the callus, however, was elevated to a similar level of the medium. When cell extracts of callus exposed to 100 microM cupric sulfate were fractionated by gel filtration chromatography, a specific copper peak was eluted at the region of molecular weights between 4000 and 1000. Since an appearance of the copper-containing materials was inhibited by buthionine sulfoximine and the partially purified copper-containing materials contained only three amino acids: glutamic acid, glycine and cystine, the materials were supposed to be gamma-glutamyl peptides phytochelatins. Callus of P. cuspidatum synthesized phytochelatins from 50 microM cupric sulfate and maximally at 100-150 microM cupric sulfate. When induction of phytochelatins by another heavy metal, zinc, was analyzed, the callus, however, did not synthesize phytochelatins on exposure to zinc sulfate up to 1 mM. These findings suggested that phytochelatins were required for resistance to copper but probably not to zinc in the plant cells.

  5. Yeast and Mammalian Metallothioneins Functionally Substitute for Yeast Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, Katherine T.; Gralla, Edith B.; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Valentine, Joan S.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    1993-09-01

    Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen and is thought to play an important role in protecting cells from oxygen toxicity. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains lacking copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, which is encoded by the SOD1 gene, are sensitive to oxidative stress and exhibit a variety of growth defects including hypersensitivity to dioxygen and to superoxide-generating drugs such as paraquat. We have found that in addition to these known phenotypes, SOD1-deletion strains fail to grow on agar containing the respiratory carbon source lactate. We demonstrate here that expression of the yeast or monkey metallothionein proteins in the presence of copper suppresses the lactate growth defect and some other phenotypes associated with SOD1-deletion strains, indicating that copper metallothioneins substitute for copper-zinc superoxide dismutase in vivo to protect cells from oxygen toxicity. Consistent with these results, we show that yeast metallothionein mRNA levels are dramatically elevated under conditions of oxidative stress. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrate that yeast metallothionein, purified or from whole-cell extracts, exhibits copper-dependent antioxidant activity. Taken together, these data suggest that both yeast and mammalian metallothioneins may play a direct role in the cellular defense against oxidative stress by functioning as antioxidants.

  6. Copper, zinc and calcium: imaging and quantification in anterior pituitary secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Bonnemaison, Mathilde L; Duffy, Megan E; Mains, Richard E; Vogt, Stefan; Eipper, Betty A; Ralle, Martina

    2016-09-01

    The anterior pituitary is specialized for the synthesis, storage and release of peptide hormones. The activation of inactive peptide hormone precursors requires a specific set of proteases and other post-translational processing enzymes. High levels of peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), an essential peptide processing enzyme, occur in the anterior pituitary. PAM, which converts glycine-extended peptides into amidated products, requires copper and zinc to support its two catalytic activities and calcium for structure. We used X-ray fluorescence microscopy on rat pituitary sections and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry on subcellular fractions prepared from rat anterior pituitary to localize and quantify copper, zinc and calcium. X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicated that the calcium concentration in pituitary tissue was about 2.5 mM, 10-times more than zinc and 50-times more than copper. Although no higher than cytosolic levels, secretory granule levels of copper exceeded PAM levels by a factor of 10. Atp7a, which transports copper into the lumen of the secretory pathway, was enriched in endosomes and Golgi, not in secretory granules. If Atp7a transfers copper directly to PAM, this pH-dependent process is likely to occur in Golgi and endosomes.

  7. LOWER SERUM LEVELS OF SELENIUM, COPPER, AND ZINC ARE RELATED TO NEUROMOTOR IMPAIRMENTS IN CHILDREN WITH KONZO

    PubMed Central

    Bumoko, GM-M; Sadiki, NH; Rwatambuga, A; Kayembe, K.P.; Okitundu, DL; Ngoyi, Mumba; Muyembe, J-JT; Banea, J-P; Boivin, MJ; Tshala-Katumbay, D

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between key trace elements and neurocognitive and motor impairments observed in konzo, a motor neuron disease associated with cassava cyanogenic exposure in nutritionally challenged African children. Serum concentrations of iron, copper, zinc, selenium, and neurotoxic lead, mercury, manganese, cadmium, and cobalt were measured in 123 konzo children (mean age 8.53 years) and 87 non-konzo children (mean age 9.07 years) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Concentrations of trace elements were compared and related to performance scores on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, 2nd edition (KABC-II) for cognition and Bruininks-Oseretsky Test, 2nd edition (BOT-2) for motor proficiency. Children with konzo had low levels of selenium, copper, and zinc relative to controls. Selenium concentration significantly correlated with serum 8,12-iso-iPF2α-VI isoprostane (spearman r = 0.75, p < 0.01) and BOT-2 scores (r = 0.31, p = 0.00) in children with konzo. Elemental deficiency was not associated with poor cognition. Mean (SD) urinary levels of thiocyanate were 388.03 (221.75) μmol/l in non-konzo compared to 518.59 (354.19) μmol/l in konzo children (p < 0.01). Motor deficits associated with konzo may possibly be driven by the combined effects of cyanide toxicity and Se deficiency on prooxidant mechanisms. Strategies to prevent konzo may include dietary supplementation with trace elements, preferentially, those with antioxidant and cyanide-scavenging properties. PMID:25592410

  8. Supercritical Antisolvent Precipitation of Amorphous Copper-Zinc Georgeite and Acetate Precursors for the Preparation of Ambient-Pressure Water-Gas-Shift Copper/Zinc Oxide Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul J; Kondrat, Simon A; Carter, James H; Chater, Philip A; Bartley, Jonathan K; Taylor, Stuart H; Spencer, Michael S; Hutchings, Graham J

    2017-05-10

    A series of copper-zinc acetate and zincian georgeite precursors have been produced by supercritical CO2 antisolvent (SAS) precipitation as precursors to Cu/ZnO catalysts for the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. The amorphous materials were prepared by varying the water/ethanol volumetric ratio in the initial metal acetate solutions. Water addition promoted georgeite formation at the expense of mixed metal acetates, which are formed in the absence of the water co-solvent. Optimum SAS precipitation occurs without water to give high surface areas, whereas high water content gives inferior surface areas and copper-zinc segregation. Calcination of the acetates is exothermic, producing a mixture of metal oxides with high crystallinity. However, thermal decomposition of zincian georgeite resulted in highly dispersed CuO and ZnO crystallites with poor structural order. The georgeite-derived catalysts give superior WGS performance to the acetate-derived catalysts, which is attributed to enhanced copper-zinc interactions that originate from the precursor.

  9. Properties of Nitrogen-Doped Zinc Telluride Films for Back Contact to Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimpi, Tushar M.; Drayton, Jennifer; Swanson, Drew E.; Sampath, Walajabad S.

    2017-08-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) films have been deposited onto uncoated glass superstrates by reactive radiofrequency (RF) sputtering with different amounts of nitrogen introduced into the process gas, and the structural and electronic transport properties of the resulting nitrogen-doped ZnTe (ZnTe:N) films characterized. Based on transmission and x-ray diffraction measurements, it was observed that the crystalline quality of the ZnTe:N films decreased with increasing nitrogen in the deposition process. The bulk carrier concentration of the ZnTe:N films determined from Hall-effect measurements showed a slight decrease at 4% nitrogen flow rate. The effect of ZnTe:N films as back contact to cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells was also investigated. ZnTe:N films were deposited before or after CdCl2 passivation on CdTe/CdS samples. Small-area devices were characterized for their electronic properties. Glancing-angle x-ray diffraction measurements and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis confirmed substantial loss of zinc from the samples where CdCl2 passivation was carried out after ZnTe:N film deposition.

  10. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of two metal-tolerant symbiotic Mesorhizobium isolates to Zinc and Cadmium exposure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesorhizobium metallidurans STM 2683T and Mesorhizobium sp. strain STM 4661 were isolated from nodules of the metallicolous legume Anthyllis vulneraria from distant mining spoils. They tolerate unusually high Zinc and Cadmium concentrations as compared to other mesorhizobia. This work aims to study the gene expression profiles associated with Zinc or Cadmium exposure and to identify genes involved in metal tolerance in these two metallicolous Mesorhizobium strains of interest for mine phytostabilization purposes. Results The draft genomes of the two Mezorhizobium strains were sequenced and used to map RNAseq data obtained after Zinc or Cadmium stresses. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics allowed the rapid discovery of metal-specific or/and strain-specific genes. Respectively 1.05% (72/6,844) and 0.97% (68/6,994) predicted Coding DNA Sequences (CDS) for STM 2683 and STM 4661 were significantly differentially expressed upon metal exposure. Among these, a significant number of CDS involved in transport (13/72 and 13/68 for STM 2683 and STM 4661, respectively) and sequestration (15/72 and 16/68 for STM 2683 and STM 4661, respectively) were identified. Thirteen CDS presented homologs in both strains and were differentially regulated by Zinc and/or Cadmium. For instance, several PIB-type ATPases and genes likely to participate in metal sequestration were identified. Among the conserved CDS that showed differential regulation in the two isolates, we also found znuABC homologs encoding for a high affinity ABC-type Zinc import system probably involved in Zinc homeostasis. Additionally, global analyses suggested that both metals also repressed significantly the translational machinery. Conclusions The comparative RNAseq-based approach revealed a relatively low number of genes significantly regulated in the two Mesorhizobium strains. Very few of them were involved in the non-specific metal response, indicating that the approach was well suited for identifying

  11. Binary adsorption of copper(II) and cadmium(II) from aqueous solutions by biomass of marine alga Durvillaea potatorum

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Q.; Kaewsarn, P.

    1999-06-01

    Much work on the biosorption of heavy metals by low-cost, natural biomass has been on the uptake of single metals. In practice, wastewaters often contain multiple heavy metal ions. In this paper the binary adsorption of copper(II) and cadmium(II) by a pretreated biomass of the marine alga Durvillaea potatorum from aqueous solutions was studied. The results showed that the uptake capacities for each heavy metal of the binary system were lower when compared with the single metal biosorption for copper and cadmium, respectively, but the total capacities for the binary system were similar to those obtained for single metal biosorption. The uptake capacities for copper and cadmium increased as the equilibrium pH increased and reached a plateau at a pH around 5.0. The uptake process was relatively fast, with 90% of the adsorption completed within 10 minutes for copper and 30 minutes for cadmium, and equilibrium reached after about 60 minutes of stirring. The biosorption isotherms of binary systems were not significantly affected by equilibrium temperature. The presence of light metal ions in solution also did not affect adsorption significantly. The binary adsorption was successfully predicted by the extended Langmuir model, using parameters and capacities obtained from single component systems.

  12. Determining the arsenic, cadmium, lead, copper and chromium contents by atomic absorption spectrometry in Pangasius fillets from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Molognoni, Luciano; Vitali, Luciano; Ploêncio, Leandro As; Santos, Jacson N; Daguer, Heitor

    2016-07-01

    Pangasius is a fish produced on a large scale in Vietnam and exported to many countries. Since river contamination from human activities can affect the safety of this food, fish consumption can cause exposure to potentially toxic elements for humans. The aim of this study, therefore, was to assess arsenic, cadmium, lead, copper and chromium contents by atomic absorption spectrometry in Pangasius fillet produced in the provinces of Dong Thap and Can Tho (Vietnam) and exported to Brazil. The limits of detection were: arsenic 0.5443 µg kg(-1) , cadmium 0.0040 mg kg(-1) , chromium 0.0004 mg kg(-1) , copper 0.0037 mg kg(-1) and lead 0.0284 mg kg(-1) . Analysis of 20 samples showed results below the limit of detection for arsenic, chromium and lead, while copper average concentration was 0.0234 mg kg(-1) . Cadmium average concentration was 0.0547 mg kg(-1) , with no significant difference between the two regions studied. The samples of Pangasius had no detectable concentrations of arsenic, chromium, copper and lead, and do not represent a hazard to public health. However, cadmium analysis revealed non-compliant samples, demonstrating the importance of monitoring the quality of imported Pangasius fish. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  14. Decline of phosphorus, copper, and zinc in anaerobic lagoon columns receiving pretreated influent

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a 15-month meso-scale column study, we evaluated the effect of manure pretreatment on reduction of total suspended solids (TSS), total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) in swine lagoons using (i) enhanced solid–liquid separation with polymer (SS) and (i...

  15. Update of mercury emissions from China's primary zinc, lead and copper smelters, 2000-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. R.; Wang, S. X.; Zhang, L.; Song, J. X.; Yang, H.; Meng, Y.

    2012-07-01

    China is the largest anthropogenic mercury emitter in the world, where primary nonferrous metal smelting process is regarded as one of the most significant emission sources. In this study, atmospheric mercury emissions from primary zinc, lead and copper smelters in China during 2000-2010 were estimated using a technology-based methodology with comprehensive consideration of mercury concentration in concentrates, smelting process, mercury removal efficiencies of air pollution control devices (APCDs) and installation rate of a certain type of APCD combination. Our study indicated that atmospheric mercury emission from nonferrous metal smelters in 2000, 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2010 was 67.6, 100.1 86.7 80.6 and 72.5 t, respectively. In 2010, the mercury in metal concentrates consumed by primary zinc, lead and copper smelters were 543 t. The mercury emitted into atmosphere, fly ash, other solids, waste water and acid was 72.5, 61.5, 2.0, 3774 and 27.2 t, respectively. Mercury retrieved directly from flue gas as byproduct of nonferrous metal smelting was about 2.4 t. The amounts of mercury emitted into atmosphere were 39.4, 30.6 and 2.5 t from primary zinc, lead and copper smelters, respectively. The largest amount of mercury was emitted from Gansu province, followed by Henan, Yunnan, Hunan, Inner Mongolia and Shaanxi provinces. The average mercury removal efficiency was 90.5%, 71.2% and 91.8% in zinc, lead, and copper smelters, respectively.

  16. Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase: A Unique Biological "Ligand" for Bioinorganic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Joan Selverstone; de Freitas, Duarte Mota

    1985-01-01

    Discusses superoxide dismutase (SOD) research and the properties of copper, zinc (Cu, Zn)-SOD. Emphasizes the controversy concerning the role of Cu,Zn-SOD and other SOD enzymes as protective agents in reactions involving dioxygen metabolism, and the properties of Cu, Zn-SOD that make it an interesting biological ligand for physical studies of…

  17. Investigation of the effects of dietary protein source on copper and zinc bioavailability in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited research has examined the effects that dietary protein sources have on copper (Cu) and Zinc (Zn) absorption, interactions and utilization in rainbow trout. Therefore, the objective of the first trial was to determine what effect protein source (plant vs. animal based), Cu source (complex vs....

  18. Neutron activation analysis of fluid inclusions for copper, manganese, and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Roedder, E.; Burns, F.C.

    1963-01-01

    Microgram quantities of copper, manganese, and zinc, corresponding to concentrations greater than 100 parts per million, were found in milligram quantities of primary inclusion fluid extracted from samples of quartz and fluorite from two types of ore deposits. The results indicate that neutron activation is a useful analytical method for studying the content of heavy metal in fluid inclusions.

  19. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF COPPER AND ZINC ACCUMULATED BY EASTERN OYSTER AMEBOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. Submitted. Antimicrobial Activity of Copper and Zinc Accumulated by Eastern Oyster Amebocytes. J. Shellfish Res. 54 p. (ERL,GB 1196).

    The distribution of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica near terrestrial watersheds has led to a general impression t...

  20. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF COPPER AND ZINC ACCUMULATED BY EASTERN OYSTER AMEBOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. Submitted. Antimicrobial Activity of Copper and Zinc Accumulated by Eastern Oyster Amebocytes. J. Shellfish Res. 54 p. (ERL,GB 1196).

    The distribution of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica near terrestrial watersheds has led to a general impression t...

  1. [Iron, zinc and copper content of foods commonly consumed in Mexico].

    PubMed

    López, P; Castañeda, M; López, G; Muñoz, E; Rosado, J L

    1999-09-01

    Nutrient composition in foods is necessary for the determination of nutrient intake. Food composition tables used for dietary studies in Mexico do not have information of zinc, iron and copper; when present the values have been extrapolated from laboratory analysis carried out with foods in other countries and regions of the world. In this study zinc, iron, and copper content of 104 plant foods and 32 animal foods was determined. The procedure used was atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the minerals. Foods were grouped into cereals, vegetables, fruits, legumes and animal foods. Zinc content ranged from 0.018 mg/100 g for strawberry to 9.193 mg/100 g for beef. Iron content ranged from 0.113 mg/100 g for yogurt to 19.82 mg/100 g for a commercial cereal which had minerals added during processing. In some foods copper was not found and the highest content was 3.371 mg/100 g in beef liver. This study has provided information on zinc, iron and copper content of the most commonly consumed foods in Mexico.

  2. Laser forming of structures of zinc oxide on a surface of products from copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, D. V.; Gorudko, T. N.; Koblov, A. N.; Nogtev, D. S.; Novikova, O. A.

    Laser formation of a protective zinc oxide layer on a surface of products from copper alloys is present. This layer is formed with using of carbon nanotubes. Destructions of the basic material are avoided or minimized at laser nanostructuring of product surfaces. Such laser processing can be made repeatedly. Offered covering have self-clearing and water-repellent properties.

  3. Serum Level of Zinc and Copper in Sudanese Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Manal E; Adam, Isahg; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Rayis, Duria A; Hamdan, Hamdan Z

    2017-03-18

    The study aimed to evaluate the serum level of zinc and copper in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). A case-control study was conducted at Saad Abualila infertility center (Khartoum, Sudan). The cases were women who had a PCOS based on Rotterdam criteria. The controls were infertile women with no evidence of PCOS. The socio-demographic characteristics and medical history data were gathered using questionnaires. Zinc and copper levels were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. While there was no difference in zinc and copper levels between the two groups (50 women in each arm), mean (SD) of body mass index (BMI) was significantly higher in women with PCOS compared to the controls [28.4 (4.2) vs. 25.6 (5.7) kg/m(2); P = 0.006], respectively. There were no significant differences in the level of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), LH/FSH, prolactin, testosterone, cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) between the cases and the controls. In linear regression analyses, none of the investigated factors were associated with PCOS. Zinc and copper were not associated with PCOS in this setting.

  4. Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase: A Unique Biological "Ligand" for Bioinorganic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Joan Selverstone; de Freitas, Duarte Mota

    1985-01-01

    Discusses superoxide dismutase (SOD) research and the properties of copper, zinc (Cu, Zn)-SOD. Emphasizes the controversy concerning the role of Cu,Zn-SOD and other SOD enzymes as protective agents in reactions involving dioxygen metabolism, and the properties of Cu, Zn-SOD that make it an interesting biological ligand for physical studies of…

  5. EXAMINATION OF THE OXIDATION PROTECTION OF ZINC COATINGS FORMED ON COPPER ALLOYS AND STEEL SUBSTRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.

    2010-01-21

    The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

  6. Modeling batch kinetics and thermodynamics of zinc and cadmium ions removal from waste solutions using synthetic zeolite A.

    PubMed

    El-Kamash, A M; Zaki, A A; El Geleel, M Abed

    2005-12-09

    The sorptive removal of zinc and cadmium ions from aqueous solutions using synthetic zeolite A was investigated. Experiments were carried out as a function of solute concentration and temperature (298-333 K). Several kinetic models were used to test the experimental rate data and to examine the controlling mechanism of the sorption process. Various parameters such as effective diffusion coefficient, activation energy and entropy of activation were evaluated. Equilibrium sorption data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Of the model tested, both Freundlich and D-R isotherm expressions were found to give better fit to the experimental equilibrium data compared to Langmuir model. The mean free energy is in all cases in the range corresponding to the ion exchange type of sorption. The results indicated that synthetic zeolite A can be used as an efficient ion exchange material for the removal of zinc and cadmium ions from industrial and radioactive wastewaters.

  7. Influence of cadmium, zinc, and lead on growth, trap formation, and collagenase activity of nematode-trapping fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, W.D.; Pramer, D.

    1980-10-01

    Growth and morphogenesis of seven species of nematode-trapping fungi and the activity of a collagenase produced by Arthrobotrys amerospora were measured in the presence of various concentrations of divalent cadmium, zinc, or lead. In general, growth varied with species and was dependent on the metal present and the concentration at which it was tested. Cadmium was found to exhibit the greatest toxicity followed by zinc and lead, respectively. In most cases, inhibition of growth was directly correlated with a decreased capacity to form traps. However, in a few cases, trap formation was inhibited either more or less than was growth. The activity of the collagenase was less sensitive than was growth or trap formation to heavy-metal inhibition.

  8. Biosorption of zinc and copper from aqueous solutions by two freshwater green microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Jie; Peng, Fu-Qiang; Zhang, Li-Juan; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the removal of zinc and copper by two freshwater green microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus obliquus and to investigate changes of algal ultrastructure and photosynthetic pigment. Algal cells were exposed for 8 days to different initial zinc or copper concentrations. Heavy metal concentrations were detected by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Algal growth, ultrastructure, and photosynthetic pigment were analyzed by a microplate reader, transmission electron microscope, and spectrophotometer, respectively. Low zinc and copper concentrations induced increase in algal growth, whereas application of high zinc and copper concentrations suppressed the growth of both algae. High metal concentrations also decreased the photosynthetic pigments and destroyed algal cell ultrastructure. The zinc removal efficiency by both algae increased rapidly during the first day and thereafter remained nearly constant throughout the experiment. The copper removal efficiency by both algae increased slowly during the whole experimental periods. In all cultures, the quantity of both metals removed intracellularly was much lower than the adsorbed quantity on the cell surface. Both strains of the microalgae had proven effective in removing zinc and copper from aqueous solutions, with the highest removal efficiency being near 100%. In addition, C. pyrenoidosa appeared to be more efficient than S. obliquus for removing copper ions. On the contrary, S. obliquus appeared to be more efficient than C. pyrenoidosa for removing zinc ions.

  9. Copper, iron and zinc absorption, retention and status of young women fed vitamin B-6 deficient diets

    SciTech Connect

    Turnlund, J.R.; Keyes, W.R.; Hudson, C.A.; Betschart, A.A.; Kretsch, M.J.; Sauberlich, H.E. Western Regional Research Center, Albany, CA )

    1991-03-11

    A study was conducted in young women to determine the effect of vitamin B-6 deficient diets on copper, iron and zinc metabolism. Young women were confined to a metabolic research unit for 84 and 98 days. They were fed a vitamin B-6 deficient formula diet initially, followed by food diet containing four increasing levels of vitamin B-6. Copper, iron and zinc absorption, retention and status were determined at intervals throughout the study. Absorption was determined using the stable isotopes {sup 65}Cu, {sup 54}Fe, and {sup 67}Zn. Status was based on serum copper and zinc, hemoglobin, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume. Copper absorption averaged 18 {plus minus} 1% during vitamin B-6 depletion, significantly lower than 24 {plus minus} 1% during repletion, but serum copper was not affected and balance was positive. Iron absorption was not impaired significantly by vitamin B-6 deficient diets, but status declined during the depletion period. Zinc absorption averaged 40 {plus minus} 2% during depletion and 27 {plus minus} 2% during repletion. Zinc absorption and retention were significantly greater during vitamin B-6 depletion, but serum zinc declined suggesting the absorbed zinc was not available for utilization. The results suggest that vitamin B-6 depletion of young women may inhibit copper absorption, affect iron status and alter zinc metabolism. The effects of vitamin B-6 depletion differ markedly among these elements.

  10. Cycle life test. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells. [performance tests on silver zinc batteries, silver cadmium batteries, and nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Considerable research is being done to find more efficient and reliable means of starting electrical energy for orbiting satellites. Rechargeable cells offer one such means. A test program is described which has been established in order to further the evaluation of certain types of cells and to obtain performance and failure data as an aid to their continued improvement. The purpose of the program is to determine the cycling performance capabilities of packs of cells under different load and temperature conditions. The various kinds of cells tested were nickel-cadmium, silver-cadmium, and silver-zinc sealed cells. A summary of the results of the life cycling program is given in this report.

  11. Iron supplementation in pregnancy and breastfeeding and iron, copper and zinc status of lactating women from a human milk bank.

    PubMed

    Mello-Neto, Julio; Rondó, Patricia Helen Carvalho; Oshiiwa, Marie; Morgano, Marcelo Antonio; Zacari, Cristiane Zago; dos Santos, Mariana Lima

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of iron supplementation in pregnancy and breastfeeding on iron status of lactating women from a Brazilian Human Milk Bank. Blood and mature breast milk samples were collected from 145 women for assessment of iron status, as well as copper and zinc status. Haemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin were determined, respectively, by electronic counting, colorimetry and chemiluminescence. Transferrin and ceruloplasmin were analysed by nephelometry. Serum copper and zinc were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and serum alkaline phosphatase was measured by a colorimetric method. Iron, zinc and copper in breast milk were determined by spectrometry. Mean values of iron, copper and zinc (blood and breast milk) were compared by ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Iron supplementation was beneficial to prevent anaemia in pregnancy but not effective to treat anaemia. During breastfeeding, iron supplementation had a negative effect on maternal copper status, confirming an interaction between these micronutrients.

  12. [Lead and cadmium content in daily food rations of children and adolescents from copper basin of the Legnica region].

    PubMed

    Krejpcio, Z; Olejnik, D; Wójciak, R W; Gawecki, J

    1999-01-01

    Environmental pollution still remains a serious problem in some heavily industrialized regions of Poland. Among various xenobiotics prevalent in human environment heavy metals such as lead and cadmium are considered as most harmful to living systems. The main source of these metals for humans is food and water, therefore increased dietary lead and cadmium intake may cause functional disturbances of various body systems, especially in young developing organisms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the lead and cadmium content in daily food rations served at two selected Children Guardian Centres (CGC) located in the region of Copper Basin Legnica (Głogów and Polkowice), during winter and spring seasons in 1996. The lead and cadmium content was determined after dry mineralization of samples by the FAAS method with deuterium BC. It was found that the lead and cadmium content in daily food rations exceeded the PTWI limits for children and adolescents in both CGC. Moreover, seasonal and regional variations of the lead and cadmium content in daily meals were observed. Generally, higher levels of lead in food rations were determined in the winter season whereas the cadmium content was higher in the CGC in Głogów in comparison to Polkowice.

  13. Isotopic composition of zinc, copper, and iron in lunar samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, F.; Albarède, F.; Herzog, G. F.

    2006-12-01

    We determined by ICP-MS the concentrations and isotopic ratios of Fe, Cu, and Zn in the Ti-rich lunar basalt 74275, in the lunar orange glass 74220, and in up to 10 lunar soils, namely, 14163, 15231, 64501, 66041, 68841, 69941, 70011, 72501, 75081, and 76501. Two analyses of zinc in lunar basalt 74275 give δ 66Zn = 0.17‰ and 0.75‰, values within the range of those measured in terrestrial basalts; copper in lunar basalt 74275 has δ 65Cu ˜ +1.4‰, which is isotopically heavier than values observed in terrestrial basalts. In the orange glass, we measured δ 56Fe = -0.24‰, δ 65Cu = -0.42‰, and δ 66Zn ˜ -3.6‰. These values of δ are more negative than those obtained for 74275 and for typical lunar basalts, but for Cu, comparable to those observed in terrestrial sulfides and meteorites. In lunar soils we found 0.11‰ ⩽ δ 56Fe ⩽ 0.51‰, 2.6‰ ⩽ δ 65Cu ⩽ 4.5‰, and 2.2‰ ⩽ δ 66Zn ⩽ 6.4‰. Insofar as we can generalize from a small sample set, S, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd show similar trends in isotopic fractionation on the Moon. Lunar basalts have nearly terrestrial isotopic ratios. Relative to the lunar basalt 74275, the pyroclastic glass 74220 is enriched in the lighter isotopes of Fe, Cu, and Zn, and the soils are enriched in the heavier isotopes of Fe, Cu, and Zn. The patterns in the basalts are likely inherited from the source material; the light-isotope enrichments seen in the orange glass originated during lava fountaining or, less probably, during partial condensation of vapor; and the heavy-isotope enrichments in the lunar soils were likely created by a combination of processes that included micrometeorite vaporization and sputtering. In the orange glass, the light-isotope enrichments (relative to lunar basalts) of Zn are larger than those of Cu. If these enrichments reflect accurately the isotopic composition of the gas, they suggest that Cu is more volatile than Zn in the liquid from which the gas derived. A simple model built on

  14. Is there a link between premature ovarian failure and serum concentrations of vitamin D, zinc, and copper?

    PubMed

    Kebapcilar, Ayse Gul; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Kebapcilar, Levent; Gonen, Mustafa Sait; Unlü, Ali; Topcu, Ali; Demirci, Fatih; Taner, Cüneyt Eftal

    2013-01-01

    The risk of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) increases in association with autoimmune conditions. Adequate intake of vitamin D (vit D) and trace elements is required for the immune system to function efficiently. The aim of this study was to evaluate vit D, zinc, and copper blood levels in women with POI who had given birth to at least one child and in women with normal menstrual cycles. This was a cross-sectional, case-control study involving 63 participants divided into two groups: the study group, which is composed of 35 women with POI, and the control group, which is composed of 28 women with normal menstrual cycles. Serum concentrations of zinc, vit D, and copper were determined for each participant. Women with POI had significantly higher serum copper levels and copper-to-zinc ratio but significantly lower serum vit D and zinc levels when compared with the healthy control group. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels were inversely correlated with zinc and vit D levels and positively correlated with the copper-to-zinc ratio and copper levels. Vit D levels were inversely correlated with follicle-stimulating hormone levels, copper-to-zinc ratio, and copper levels and positively correlated with zinc levels. Most women with POI are deficient in vit D. Zinc, copper, and vit D seem to correlate with hormonal status in the participants. The present study may generate hypotheses for future studies that will investigate the possible mechanisms behind alterations in trace elements and vit D deficiency in women with POI and whether these changes could be used to screen for the risk of developing POI.

  15. Effects of feeding elevated concentrations of copper and zinc on the antimicrobial susceptibilities of fecal bacteria in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Megan E; Fox, J Trent; Nagaraja, T G; Drouillard, James S; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Narayanan, Sanjeev K

    2010-06-01

    Cattle are fed elevated concentrations of copper and zinc for growth promotion. The potential mechanisms of growth promotional effects of these elements are attributed to their antimicrobial activities, similar to that of antibiotics, in that gut microbial flora are altered to reduce fermentation loss of nutrients and to suppress gut pathogens. Copper and zinc fed at elevated concentrations may select for bacteria that are resistant not only to heavy metals but also to antibiotics. Our objectives were to determine the effects of feeding elevated copper and zinc on the antimicrobial susceptibilities of fecal bacteria in feedlot cattle. Twenty heifers, fed corn-based high-grain diets, were randomly assigned to treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement with 1X or 10X National Research Council recommended copper and/or zinc. Feces, collected on days 0, 14, and 32, were cultured for commensal bacteria (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) to determine their susceptibilities to copper, zinc, and antibiotics. Fecal DNA was extracted to detect tcrB gene and quantify erm(B) and tet(M) genes. In E. coli and Enterococcus sp., minimal differences in minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of copper, zinc, and antibiotics were noticed. The mean copper MIC for E. coli increased (p < 0.05) between days 0 and 32 and days 14 and 32. The only treatment effect detected was increased zinc MIC of E. coli isolates (p < 0.01). The tcrB gene was not detected in feces or in enterococcal isolates. Proportions of erm(B) and tet(M) were unaffected by copper or zinc supplementation. However, the proportion of tet(M) increased (p < 0.05) between days 0 and 14. Feeding elevated copper and/or zinc to feedlot cattle had marginal effects on antimicrobial susceptibilities of fecal E. coli and enterococci.

  16. Copper and zinc content in wild game shot with lead or non-lead ammunition - implications for consumer health protection.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Daniela; Sommerfeld, Christine; Müller-Graf, Christine; Selhorst, Thomas; Greiner, Matthias; Gerofke, Antje; Ulbig, Ellen; Gremse, Carl; Spolders, Markus; Schafft, Helmut; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contamination of game meat with copper and zinc and establish whether the use of alternative (non-lead) ammunition can lead to higher or unsafe levels of copper and zinc in the meat of roe deer, wild boar and red deer. The research project "Safety of game meat obtained through hunting" (LEMISI) was conducted in Germany with the purpose of examining the entry of lead as well as copper and zinc into the meat of hunted game when using either lead or non-lead ammunition. The outcome of this study shows that the usage of both lead-based ammunition and alternative non-lead ammunition results in the entry of copper and zinc into the edible parts of the game. Using non-lead ammunition does not entail dangerously elevated levels of copper and zinc, so replacing lead ammunition with alternative ammunition does not introduce a further health problem with regard to these metals. The levels of copper and zinc in game meat found in this study are in the range found in previous studies of game. The content of copper and zinc in game meat is also comparable to those regularly detected in meat and its products from livestock (pig, cattle, sheep) for which the mean human consumption rate is much higher. From the viewpoint of consumer health protection, the use of non-lead ammunition does not pose an additional hazard through copper and zinc contamination. A health risk due to the presence of copper and zinc in game meat at typical levels of consumer exposure is unlikely for both types of ammunition.

  17. Autonomous, In-situ Instrumentation for Continuous Measurement of Dissolved Copper and Zinc in Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Z.; Holm, C. E.; Groshong, H.; Yannasch, H.; Johnson, K.

    2008-12-01

    Quantifying trace metal concentrations in aquatic systems is complicated, costly, and prone to contamination artifacts. Consequently, very little is known about high-frequency temporal variability (hours-to-days) in metal concentrations. Such data can be used to assess the origin, fate and impact of toxic trace metals such as copper and zinc. We have developed autonomous, in-situ instrumentation to measure dissolved copper and zinc concentrations, suitable for deployment on time scales from weeks to a month. Both instruments use the commercially available in-situ nitrate analyzer (YSI 9600) as the base platform. Micro solenoid pumps take in sample and dispense reagent, standard, and blank solutions. Filtration (0.45 μm) and acidification (pH ~1.7) permit a measurement of total dissolved metal. The copper instrument features a custom-made photomultiplier (PMT) based detector and flow-cell. Copper is detected through chemiluminescence of 1-10- phenanthroline. The zinc instrument features a custom-made PMT and LED-based fluorometric detector and flow-cell. Zinc is detected using the fluorescent probe Fluo-Zin3. Averaged over all in-situ estuarine deployments, the copper instrument has a detection limit of 0.8 nM ±0.3 nM, a sample precision of 11% (n=612), and an accuracy of 17% (compared to discrete samples n=27). The instrument is capable of functioning autonomously for 25 days when sampling every hour and calibrating every six hours. Based on bench tests, the zinc instrument has a detection limit of ~2 nM and a sample precision better than 2%. The hardware and analytical approach can be easily modified to detect additional metals by chemiluminescence (e.g. Co, Fe, Mn) and fluorescence (e.g. Al, Cd).

  18. Effect of post-treatment processing on copper migration from Douglas-fir lumber treated with ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min; Morrell, Jeffrey J

    2015-04-01

    Migration of heavy metals into aquatic environments has become a concern in some regions of the world. Many wood preservatives are copper based systems that have the potential to migrate from the wood and into the surrounding environment. Some wood treaters have developed "best management practices" (BMPs) that are designed to reduce the risk of migration, but there are few comparative studies assessing the efficacy of these processes. The potential for using various heating combinations to limit copper migration was assessed using ammoniacal coper zinc arsenate treated Douglas-fir lumber. Kiln drying and air drying both proved to be the most effective methods for limiting copper migration, while post-treatment steaming or hot water immersion produced more variable results. The results should provide guidance for improving the BMP processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective recovery of copper and zinc from mine dump waters of mining enterprises in precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orekhova, N. N.; Tarybaeva, G. A.; Muravev, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    The acid mine dump waters at mining companies that mining the copper and copperzinc sulphide ore have the high concentrates of metals and classified in our view as the raw materials for selective recovery of metals in precipitates comparable in quality with concentrates of ores enrichment and suitable for further metallurgical processing. Authors have implemented three two-stage schemes for sequential extraction of copper and zinc: cementation-sulphide precipitation, galvanocoagulation-sulphide precipitation, precipitation-precipitation. Moreover, parameters of processes and quality of the obtained precipitates have described. The achieved copper recovery is 89% and 94% respectively with the application of cementation and galvanocoagulation, in sulphide precipitate exceeded 75%. Furthermore, the copper recovery from decoppering in precipitates amounted to more than 65%. Zinc-containing precipitates because of coprecipitation of iron, magnesium and calcium contain zinc from 14% to 28%, in two to three times less than the quality of conditioned zinc concentrates. The content of precipitates allows to apply them for additional charging to concentrates of enrichment or for the production of metals in metallurgical treatment. As a result of the studying the effect of reduced total salinity (S) on mass fraction of zinc in precipitate (β) with the constant concentration of zinc (SZn), the changes in concentration with constant salinity and reduction in total salinity (S) with constant ratio S/CZn, the following dependencies have obtained: ≤ft( {{S}} \\right):{≤ft( {{{\\partial β } \\over {\\partial {cZn}}}} \\right)_S} > 0,{≤ft( {{{\\partial β } \\over {\\partial S}}} \\right){C_{Zn}}} < 0, in the range of an index S from 4.5 to 90.0 g/L {≤ft( {{{\\partial β } \\over {\\partial S}}} \\right){{{C_{Zn}} \\over S}}} < 0, where {≤ft( {{{\\partial x} \\over {\\partial y}}} \\right)_Z} is a partial derivative of x to y, whereas the value z is fixed.

  20. Optimization of the electrocoagulation process for the removal of copper, lead and cadmium in natural waters and simulated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Claudio; Soto-Salazar, César; Toral, M Inés

    2006-12-01

    Chemical, electrochemical and flow variables were optimized to examine the effectiveness of the electrocoagulation process for the removal of copper, lead and cadmium. The electrochemical process, which uses electrodes of commercial laminate steel, was applied to simulated wastewater containing 12 mg dm(-3) of copper, 4 mg dm(-3) of lead and 4 mg dm(-3) of cadmium. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as pH=7, flow rate=6.3 cm(3) min(-1) and a current density between 31 and 54 A m(-2). When the electrode geometric area and time of electrolysis reached critical values, the copper removal reached a maximum value of 80%. A linear relationship was identified between the current density and the mass of generated sludge. In addition, a linear relationship was found between specific energy consumption and current density. The results of this investigation provide important data for the development of an industrial-scale electrolytic reactor.

  1. Reference Data for the Density and Viscosity of Liquid Cadmium, Cobalt, Gallium, Indium, Mercury, Silicon, Thallium, and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assael, Marc J.; Armyra, Ivi J.; Brillo, Juergen; Stankus, Sergei V.; Wu, Jiangtao; Wakeham, William A.

    2012-09-01

    The available experimental data for the density and viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc have been critically examined with the intention of establishing both a density and a viscosity standard. All experimental data have been categorized into primary and secondary data according to the quality of measurement, the technique employed and the presentation of the data, as specified by a series of criteria. The proposed standard reference correlations for the density of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 0.6, 2.1, 0.4, 0.5, 2.2, 0.9, and 0.7, respectively. In the case of mercury, since density reference values already exist, no further work was carried out. The standard reference correlations for the viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 9.4, 14.0, 13.5, 2.1, 7.3, 15.7, 5.1, and 9.3, respectively.

  2. Reference Data for the Density and Viscosity of Liquid Cadmium, Cobalt, Gallium, Indium, Mercury, Silicon, Thallium, and Zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Assael, Marc J.; Armyra, Ivi J.; Brillo, Juergen; Stankus, Sergei V.; Wu Jiangtao; Wakeham, William A.

    2012-09-15

    The available experimental data for the density and viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc have been critically examined with the intention of establishing both a density and a viscosity standard. All experimental data have been categorized into primary and secondary data according to the quality of measurement, the technique employed and the presentation of the data, as specified by a series of criteria. The proposed standard reference correlations for the density of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 0.6, 2.1, 0.4, 0.5, 2.2, 0.9, and 0.7, respectively. In the case of mercury, since density reference values already exist, no further work was carried out. The standard reference correlations for the viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 9.4, 14.0, 13.5, 2.1, 7.3, 15.7, 5.1, and 9.3, respectively.

  3. Iron, zinc, and copper nutritional status in children infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Janjetic, Mariana A; Goldman, Cinthia G; Balcarce, Norma E; Rua, Eduardo Cueto; González, Andrea Beltrán; Fuda, Julián A; Meseri, Emiliano I; Torti, Horacio E; Barrado, Julieta; Zubillaga, Marcela B; López, Laura B; Boccio, José R

    2010-07-01

    : Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of about half of the world's population and it has been related to extragastrointestinal diseases. The present study sought to evaluate the association between H pylori infection and iron, zinc, and copper nutritional status in symptomatic children. : A cross-sectional study was carried out in 395 children (4-16 years) with upper gastrointestinal symptoms, who were tested for H pylori infection by the C-urea breath test. Iron status was determined by hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and serum transferrin receptors. Copper and zinc serum concentrations were also evaluated. Epidemiological data, dietary assessment, and anthropometric indicators were analyzed as potential confounding factors. : Prevalence of H pylori infection was 24.3%. Anemia and iron deficiency (ID) were found in 12.0% and 14.3% of the H pylori-positive and 8.9% and 11.0% of the H pylori-negative children, respectively. There was no association between H pylori infection and anemia (odds ratio = 1.54 [95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73%-3.24%]) or ID (odds ratio = 1.35 [95% CI 0.67-2.70]). Crude beta coefficients showed that H pylori has no significant effect on hemoglobin, serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptors, copper, and zinc concentrations. However, adjusted results suggested that H pylori-infected children had an increase of 9.74 microg/dL (95% CI 2.12-17.37 microg/dL) in copper concentrations. : This study revealed that H pylori infection was not associated with iron deficiency, anemia, or zinc concentrations; however, a positive relation with copper status was found after adjusting for confounding factors. The contribution of H pylori infection to higher copper concentrations needs to be confirmed by additional studies.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of copper zinc oxide nanoparticles obtained via metathesis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoohinkong, Weerachon; Foophow, Tita; Pecharapa, Wisanu

    2017-09-01

    Copper-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by grinding copper acetate and zinc acetate powder with different starting molar ratios in combined with sodium hydroxide. The effect of initial copper and zinc molar ratios on the product samples was investigated and discussed. Relevant ligand coordination type of reactant acetate salt precursors and product samples were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The particle shapes and surface morphologies were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Phase structures of prepared samples were studied by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was applied to investigate the local structure of Cu and Zn environment atoms. The results demonstrate that the, particle size of as-synthesized products affected by copper concentration in the precursor trend to gradually decreases from nanorod shape with diameter around 50-100 nm to irregular particle structure around 5 nm associated with an increase in the concentration of copper in precursor. Moreover, it is noticed that shape and morphology of the products are strongly dependent on Cu:Zn ratios during the synthesis. Nanocrystallines Cu-doped ZnO by the substitution in Zn site with a high crystallization degree of hexagonal wurtzite structure were obtained. This synthesis technique is suggested as a potential effective technique for preparing copper zinc oxide nanoparticles with various atomic ratio in wide range of applications. Contribution at the 4th Southeast Asia Conference on Thermoelectrics 2016 (SACT 2016), 15-18 December 2016, Da Nang City, Vietnam.

  5. Zinc and multi-mineral supplementation should mitigate the pathogenic impact of cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2012-11-01

    High-level cadmium (Cd) exposure has long been known to induce nephropathy, severe osteoporosis, and fractures in humans. More recent epidemiology, however, reveals that, in populations not known to have important industrial exposure to this heavy metal, high-normal blood or urine Cd levels correlate with increased risk for vascular disorders, cancers, diabetes, and total mortality, as well as osteoporosis and nephropathy. Since these disorders appear unlikely to expedite Cd absorption, and since Cd has promoted these pathologies in rodent studies, it seems reasonable to conclude that Cd is an important mediating risk factor for these disorders in humans. Avoiding tobacco smoke or frequent ingestion of shellfish or organ meats can lessen humans exposure to Cd, but the chief dietary sources of Cd are plant-derived foods - green leafy vegetables, whole grains, tubers, and root vegetables - typically recommended for their health-supportive properties; indeed, among non-smokers, vegans tend to have the highest Cd body burden. Fortunately, iron sufficiency and ample dietary intakes of calcium, magnesium, and zinc can impede absorption of dietary Cd, both by down-regulating intestinal expression of mineral transporters, and by directly competing with Cd for access to these transporters. Correction of iron deficiency appears to be of particular importance for controlling Cd absorption. Moreover, zinc supplementation can counteract the toxicity of Cd already in the body via induction of metallothionein, which binds Cd avidly via its sulfhydryl groups; so long as it remains sequestered in this form, Cd is innocuous. Zinc supplementation may in any case be recommendable, as optimal zinc status exerts protective anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunosupportive effects. Inasmuch as the toxicity of Cd appears to be mediated in large part by oxidative stress, ingestion of spirulina, lipoic acid, melatonin, and N-acetylcysteine may also have potential for mitigating the risk

  6. Identification of a Salmonella ancillary copper detoxification mechanism by a comparative analysis of the genome-wide transcriptional response to copper and zinc excess.

    PubMed

    Pontel, Lucas B; Scampoli, Nadia L; Porwollik, Steffen; Checa, Susana K; McClelland, Michael; Soncini, Fernando C

    2014-08-01

    Copper and zinc are essential metal ions, but toxic in excess. Bacteria have evolved different strategies to control their intracellular concentrations, ensuring proper supply while avoiding toxicity, including the induction of metal-specific as well as non-specific mechanisms. We compared the transcriptional profiles of Salmonella Typhimurium after exposure to either copper or zinc ions in both rich and minimal media. Besides metal-specific regulatory networks many global stress-response pathways react to an excess of either of these metal ions. Copper excess affects both zinc and iron homeostasis by inducing transcription of these metal-specific regulons. In addition to the control of zinc-specific regulons, zinc excess affects the Cpx regulon and the σ(E) envelope-stress responses. Finally, novel metal-specific upregulated genes were detected including a new copper-detoxification pathway that involves the siderophore enterobactin and the outer-membrane protein TolC. This work sheds light onto the transcriptional landscape of Salmonella after copper or zinc overload, and discloses a new mechanism of copper detoxification.

  7. Effects of cadmium and copper on chemotaxis of marine and freshwater ciliates

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, S.G.; Gunderson, J.H.; Derk, L.A.

    1985-06-01

    Recommendations of a workshop on biological screening requested the inclusion of behavior studies to reveal subtle, dysfunctional effects of pollutants on organisms and suggestions for additional research in development of behavioral tests incorporated into testing protocols were made at the ASTM Symposium on Aquatic Toxicology. The present study addresses these research needs by examining a rapid behavioral bioassay using protozoa, microfauna with important roles in microbial-based food chains, regeneration of nutrients, and regulation of bacterial populations in aquatic environments. In this study, ciliated protozoa from both marine and freshwater environments were examined with respect to their response to an attractant in the presence of a variety of concentrations of cadmium and copper.

  8. Characterization of the biosorption of cadmium, lead and copper with the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Mata, Y N; Blázquez, M L; Ballester, A; González, F; Muñoz, J A

    2008-10-30

    The recovery of cadmium, lead and copper with the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus was characterized and quantified. The biosorption data fitted the pseudo-second order and Langmuir isotherm models, but did not adjust to the intraparticle diffusion model. The metal uptakes deduced from the pseudo-second order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model followed a similar sequence: Cu>Cd approximately Pb. The Langmuir maximum metal uptakes were: 0.9626 mmol/g, Pb 1.02 mmol/g, and Cu 1.66 mmol/g. According to the equilibrium constants of this isotherm model, the affinity of metals for the biomass followed this order: Pb>Cu>Cd. Biosorption was accomplished by ion exchange between metals in solution and algal protons, calcium and other light metals, and by complexation of the adsorbed metals with algal carboxyl groups. FTIR spectra showed a shift in the bands of carboxyl, hydroxyl and sulfonate groups.

  9. In situ phytoextraction of copper and cadmium and its biological impacts in acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongbiao; Fan, Yuchao; Yang, John; Xu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Zhu, Zhenqiu

    2016-10-01

    Phytoremediation is a potential cost-effective technology for remediating heavy metal-contaminated soils. In this study, we evaluated the biomass and accumulation of copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) of plant species grown in a contaminated acidic soil treated with limestone. Five species produced biomass in the order: Pennisetum sinese > Elsholtzia splendens > Vetiveria zizanioides > Setaria pumila > Sedum plumbizincicola. Over one growing season, the best accumulators for Cu and Cd were Pennisetum sinese and Sedum plumbizincicola, respectively. Overall, Pennisetum sinese was the best species for Cu and Cd removal when biomass was considered. However, Elsholtzia splendens soil had the highest enzyme activities and microbial populations, while the biological properties in Pennisetum sinese soil were moderately enhanced. Results would provide valuable insights for phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Toxicity and accumulation of copper and cadmium in the alga Scenedesmus obliquus LH

    SciTech Connect

    Drbal, K.; Veber, K.; Zahradnik, J.

    1985-06-01

    The techniques of determination of toxic and inhibitory effects, and of measuring the kinetics of metal sorption, used by individual authors differ widely in basic parameters, especially in the experimental concentrations of algal suspensions and in methods of separation of algae. Some authors assume that the drop in the concentration of the metal in the solution, or its concentration in the biomass, are a measure of sorption of the metals by the algae. This is not entirely correct; our study led to this conclusion on the basis of measurement of inhibition of growth and sorption of copper and cadmium ions in dense algal suspensions in a photoautotrophic regime of an intensive culture, and comparison of disappearance of these ions from the solution in the absence of the algae.

  11. Effect of zinc chloride on the growth and characterization of L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate semiorganic NLO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrivel, S.; Anandan, P.; Kanagasabapathy, K.; Bhattacharya, Suman; Gopinath, S.; Rajasekaran, R.

    2013-06-01

    Single crystals of zinc doped L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate were successfully grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation method at room temperature for different molar concentration of zinc chloride. The structural properties of grown crystals have been studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction studies and Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The incorporation of the dopant (zinc chloride) into L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate crystal lattice has been confirmed by EDAX analysis. UV-Vis spectral analyses showed that the doped crystals have lower UV cut-off wavelength at 200 nm combined with very good transparency about 85% in a very wide range. The second harmonic generation efficiency test has been carried out and results are discussed. The 0.2 and 0.4 mol Zinc chloride doped crystals were thermally stable up to 208.9 °C and 211.9 °C respectively. The electrical properties have been studied by dielectric constant studies. All results are compared with the results of pure L-PCCM crystals.

  12. Effect of zinc chloride on the growth and characterization of L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate semiorganic NLO single crystals.

    PubMed

    Vetrivel, S; Anandan, P; Kanagasabapathy, K; Bhattacharya, Suman; Gopinath, S; Rajasekaran, R

    2013-06-01

    Single crystals of zinc doped L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate were successfully grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation method at room temperature for different molar concentration of zinc chloride. The structural properties of grown crystals have been studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction studies and Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The incorporation of the dopant (zinc chloride) into L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate crystal lattice has been confirmed by EDAX analysis. UV-Vis spectral analyses showed that the doped crystals have lower UV cut-off wavelength at 200 nm combined with very good transparency about 85% in a very wide range. The second harmonic generation efficiency test has been carried out and results are discussed. The 0.2 and 0.4 mol Zinc chloride doped crystals were thermally stable up to 208.9 °C and 211.9 °C respectively. The electrical properties have been studied by dielectric constant studies. All results are compared with the results of pure L-PCCM crystals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of enhanced zinc and copper in drinking water on spatial memory and fear conditioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chrosniak, L.D.; Smith, L.N.; McDonald, C.G.; Jones, B.F.; Flinn, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Ingestion of enhanced zinc can cause memory impairments and copper deficiencies. This study examined the effect of zinc supplementation, with and without copper, on two types of memory. Rats raised pre- and post-natally on 10 mg/kg ZnCO3 or ZnSO4 in the drinking water were tested in a fear-conditioning experiment at 11 months of age. Both zinc groups showed a maladaptive retention of fearful memories compared to controls raised on tap water. Rats raised on 10 mg/kg ZnCO3, 10 mg/kg ZnCO3 + 0.25 mg/kg CuCl2, or tap water, were tested for spatial memory ability at 3 months of age. Significant improvements in performance were found in the ZnCO3 + CuCl2 group compared to the ZnCO3 group, suggesting that some of the cognitive deficits associated with zinc supplementation may be remediated by addition of copper. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Serum levels of selenium, calcium, copper magnesium, manganese and zinc in various human diseases.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J F; Blotcky, A J; Jetton, M M; Hahn, H K; Burch, R E

    1979-08-01

    Serum selenium as well as serum zinc, copper, magnesium, calcium and manganese were investigated in a control group of adult males and in 11 groups of patients in various disease states. Not only the change of each trace element but also the possible association between elements was studied in the various groups. All patients were fasting when sampled and studied only after the acute phase of the disease was corrected. Trace metal determinations were performed by atomic absorption spectrophometry (Mg, Ca, Cu, Zn) and by neutron activation analysis (Se, Mn). All patients showed low serum zinc when compared to controls. Cirrhotic patients had a low serum selenium level as well as low calcium, magnesium and zinc. Emphysemia and cancer patients had an elevated serum copper concentration while copper and manganese levels were elevated in congestive heart failure, infection and pschoses. To our knowledge this is the first time low serum selenium values have been demonstrated to be associated with the low serum zinc, calcium and magnesium levels found in cirrhotic patients.

  15. Organic complexation and its control of the dissolved concentrations of copper and zinc in the Scheldt estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Constant M. G.; Merks, Adri G. A.; Duursma, Egbert K.

    1987-06-01

    Cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) is used to determine total (after UV-irradiation) and labile dissolved metal concentrations as well as complexing ligand concentrations in samples from the river Scheldt estuary. It was found that even at high added concentrations of catechol (1 m M for copper and 0·4 m M for iron) and of APDC (1 m M for zinc) only part of the dissolved metal was labile (5-58% for copper, 34-69% for zinc, 10-38% for iron); this discrepancy could be explained by the low solubility of iron which is largely present as colloidal material, and by competition for dissolved copper and zinc by organic complexing ligands. Ligand concentrations varied between 28 and 206 n M for copper and between 22 and 220 n M for zinc; part of the copper complexing ligands could be sub-divided into strong complexing sites with concentrations between 23 and 121 n M and weaker sites with concentrations between 44 and 131 n M. Values for conditional stability constants varied between (log K' values) 13·0 and 14·8 for strong and between 11·5 and 12·1 for weaker copper complexing ligands, whereas for zinc the values were between 8·6 and 10·6. The average products of ligand concentrations and conditional stability constants ( a-coefficients) were 6 × 10 2 for zinc and 6 × 10 6 for copper. The dissolved zinc concentration was found to co-vary with the zinc complexing ligand concentration throughout the estuary. It is argued that the zinc concentration is regulated, in this estuary at least, by interactions with dissolved organic complexing ligands. A similar relationship was apparent between the dissolved copper and the strong copper complexing ligand concentration. The total copper complexing ligand concentrations were much greater than the dissolved copper concentrations, suggesting that only strongly complexed copper is kept in solution. These results provide evidence for the first time that interactions of copper and zinc with dissolved organic complexing ligands

  16. Zinc pyrithione inhibits yeast growth through copper influx and inactivation of iron-sulfur proteins.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Nancy L; Kaplan, Jerry; Xu, Jun; Youngquist, R Scott; Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ping; Juhlin, Kenton D; Schwartz, James R; Grant, Raymond A; Fieno, Angela; Nemeth, Suzanne; Reichling, Tim; Tiesman, Jay P; Mills, Tim; Steinke, Mark; Wang, Shuo L; Saunders, Charles W

    2011-12-01

    Zinc pyrithione (ZPT) is an antimicrobial material with widespread use in antidandruff shampoos and antifouling paints. Despite decades of commercial use, there is little understanding of its antimicrobial mechanism of action. We used a combination of genome-wide approaches (yeast deletion mutants and microarrays) and traditional methods (gene constructs and atomic emission) to characterize the activity of ZPT against a model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ZPT acts through an increase in cellular copper levels that leads to loss of activity of iron-sulfur cluster-containing proteins. ZPT was also found to mediate growth inhibition through an increase in copper in the scalp fungus Malassezia globosa. A model is presented in which pyrithione acts as a copper ionophore, enabling copper to enter cells and distribute across intracellular membranes. This is the first report of a metal-ligand complex that inhibits fungal growth by increasing the cellular level of a different metal.

  17. Selenium, copper and zinc in seminal plasma of men with varicocele, relationship with seminal parameters.

    PubMed

    Camejo, María Isabel; Abdala, Lyzeth; Vivas-Acevedo, Giovanny; Lozano-Hernández, Ricardo; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Greaves, Eduardo D

    2011-12-01

    Varicocele has been associated with decrease in seminal parameters. Selenium (Se), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) are trace elements essential for normal spermatogenesis of mammals and play a critical role as antioxidant defense system enzymes. Se, Cu, and Zn are associated with sperm quality in fertile and infertile men. However, there is little information about Se, Cu, and Zn concentrations in semen in patients with varicocele and its association with seminal parameters. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of Se, Cu, and Zn in semen of patients with varicocele and the relationship with seminal parameters. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence was used for the fist time in the seminal fluid analysis. The concentration of selenium in men with varicocele was smaller than the normozoospermic group, while no differences were observed for both concentrations of zinc and copper. A significant positive correlation between zinc and selenium concentration was observed. Selenium in seminal plasma correlates with a good spermatozoa concentrations, motility, and morphology. Additionally, a significant positive correlation was observed between zinc levels and sperm count. In conclusion, a decrease in selenium concentration was associated with detriment of seminal parameters. A study should be conducted to evaluate the benefits of both zinc and selenium supplementation to improve seminal parameters in patients with varicocele.

  18. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  19. A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing for cadmium zinc telluride wafers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Ping; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi; Guo, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is developed for cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) wafers. The approach uses environment-friendly slurry that consists of mainly silica, hydrogen peroxide, and citric acid. This is different from the previously reported slurries that are usually composed of strong acid, alkali, and bromine methanol, and are detrimental to the environment and operators. Surface roughness 0.5 nm and 4.7 nm are achieved for Ra and peak-to-valley (PV) values respectively in a measurement area of 70 × 50 μm2, using the developed novel approach. Fundam