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Sample records for cafe au lait

  1. Radiosensitivity of fibroblasts obtained from a cafe-au-lait spot and normal-appearing skin of a patient with neurofibromatosis (NF-6)

    SciT

    Hannan, M.A.; Smith, B.P.; Sigut, D.

    Fibroblast cells derived from a cafe-au-lait spot and normal-appearing skin of a neurofibromatosis (NF-6) patient were studied for radiosensitivity in comparison with two normal cell lines used as controls. No difference in radiosensitivity was observed between the patient's cell lines and the controls using acute gamma-irradiation. However, a markedly increased radiosensitivity of the fibroblasts obtained from the patient's skin of normal appearance was demonstrated after chronic gamma-irradiation. The cells from the cafe-au-lait spot showed intermediate sensitivity to chronic irradiation as compared with the control cell lines and the fibroblasts derived from the normal skin of the patient. These results showedmore » the usefulness of chronic irradiation in detecting increased cellular radiosensitivity which may result from a unique DNA repair defect in an NF patient. We suggest that enhanced genetic changes in radiosensitive NF patients may lead to formation of cafe-au-lait lesions and certain tumors. Such a transformation may be associated with production of radiotolerant cells.« less

  2. Divided café-au-lait macule of the mouth.

    PubMed

    Sergay, Amanda; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2007-05-01

    We describe a 4-year-old, otherwise healthy boy with a congenital history of a perioral and labial segmental café-au-lait macule, who was noted to have unilateral localized gingival hyperpigmentation that aligned with the café-au-lait macule. This case is highly illustrative of the embryologic timing of the genetic event locally, which leads to café-au-lait type hyperpigmentation. Because the facial features and the ectoderm overlying the facial muscles develop around the third to fourth week of gestation, the distribution of this café-au-lait macule suggests development at the same time.

  3. Café au lait macules and juvénile polyps.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Theresa R; Scatena, Lisa S; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Gralla, Jane; Lee, Lela A

    2007-01-01

    Several hereditary and nonhereditary gastrointestinal tract polyposis syndromes exhibit extra-intestinal manifestations, including cutaneous findings. However, a lack of information exists regarding cutaneous features of juvenile polyposis. Our objective was to document the prevalence of cutaneous hyperpigmented lesions in children with juvenile polyposis coli or juvenile polyposis coli and their first degree relatives.Children seen in the gastroenterology practice at The Children's Hospital in Denver, Colorado with polyps (juvenile polyposis coli, sporadic juvenile polyps, and familial adenomatous polyposis coli) and their first degree relatives were invited to participate in the study. A comprehensive skin examination was performed on those who consented to participate. We found that 8 of 14 patients (eight with juvenile polyposis coli, four with juvenile polyposis, and two with familial adenomatous polyposis coli) had at least one café-au-lait macule, compared with three of 27 relatives (p=0.003).The prevalence of at least one café-au-lait macule in our patients (8/14 or 57.1%, CI: 28.9–82.3%) was significantly higher than the general population prevalence of 28.5% (p=0.023). However, if the two patients with familial adenomatous polyposis coli were excluded, the comparison with the general population prevalence did not reach statistical significance (p=0.095). The prevalence of multiple cafe´-au-lait macules in our patients (4/14 or 28.6%; CI:8.4–58.1%) was significantly higher than the general population prevalence of 5.2% (p ¼ 0.005). A notable finding was the presence of multiple café -au-lait macules in 4 of 12 juvenile polyposis coli/juvenile polyposis patients.Two patients with juvenile polyposis coli also had lentigines. In this selected case series, we observed single or multiple café-au-lait macules in a high proportion of children with the three types of polyps. Further studies are needed to assess a possible common pathway for hamartomatous

  4. The diagnostic and clinical significance of café-au-lait macules.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kara N

    2010-10-01

    Café-au-lait, also referred to as café-au-lait spots or café-au-lait macules, present as well-circumscribed, evenly pigmented macules and patches that range in size from 1 to 2 mm to greater than 20 cm in greatest diameter. Café-au-lait are common in children. Although most café-au-lait present as 1 or 2 spots in an otherwise healthy child, the presence of multiple café-au-lait, large segmental café-au-lait, associated facial dysmorphism, other cutaneous anomalies, or unusual findings on physical examination should suggest the possibility of an associated syndrome. While neurofibromatosis type 1 is the most common syndrome seen in children with multiple café-au-lait, other syndromes associated with one or more café-au-lait include McCune-Albright syndrome, Legius syndrome, Noonan syndrome and other neuro-cardio-facialcutaneous syndromes, ring chromosome syndromes, and constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Halolike Phenomenon Around a Café au Lait Spot Superimposed on a Mongolian Spot.

    PubMed

    Neri, Iria; Lambertini, Martina; Tengattini, Vera; Rivalta, Beatrice; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2017-05-01

    An 8-month-old Caucasian infant with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with a congenital plexiform neurofibroma and multiple café au lait spots. A pale area surrounded one of the café au lait spots located on the left gluteus in the area of dermal melanocytosis. This halolike phenomenon results from the disappearance of the Mongolian spot around the café au lait spots, revealing normal pigmented skin. This sign has been described rarely in the literature and the pathogenic mechanism is unclear. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Lumbar lipomeningomyelocele associated with multiple café au lait spots: a case report.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Pradeep; Srinivas, C R; Arunachalam, Pavai; Thirumurthy, K S; Rajkumar, P R; Manuvidhya, H

    2015-01-01

    We report on a child with several café au lait spots in association with a lumbar lipomeningomyelocele as an apparently new association. Cutaneous markers, the identification of which plays a crucial role in the early diagnosis and management of spinal malformations, can accompany occult spinal dysraphism. Herein we report a case of lumbar lipomeningomyelocele associated with an overlying café au lait spot that served as a marker of occult spinal dysraphism. The patient also had segmental café au lait spots on the face, making the association unique. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Prevalence of Café-au-Lait Spots in children with solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Anna Claudia Evangelista; Heck, Benjamin; Camargo, Beatriz De; Vargas, Fernando Regla

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cafe-au-lait maculae (CALM) are frequently observed in humans, and usually are present as a solitary spot. Multiple CALMs are present in a smaller fraction of the population and are usually associated with other congenital anomalies as part of many syndromes. Most of these syndromes carry an increased risk of cancer development. Previous studies have indicated that minor congenital anomalies may be more prevalent in children with cancer. We investigated the prevalence of CALMs in two samples of Brazilian patients with childhood solid tumors, totaling 307 individuals. Additionally, 176 school children without diagnosis of cancer, or of a cancer predisposing syndrome, were investigated for the presence of CALMs. The prevalence of solitary CALM was similar in both study groups (18% and 19%) and also in the group of children without cancer. Multiple CALMs were more frequently observed in one of the study groups (Z = 2.1). However, when both groups were analyzed together, the significance disappeared (Z = 1.5). The additional morphological abnormalities in children with multiple CALMs were analyzed and compared to the findings observed in the literature. The nosologic entities associated with CALMs are reviewed. PMID:27223488

  8. Prevalence of Café-au-Lait Spots in children with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Santos, Anna Claudia Evangelista Dos; Heck, Benjamin; Camargo, Beatriz De; Vargas, Fernando Regla

    2016-05-24

    Cafe-au-lait maculae (CALM) are frequently observed in humans, and usually are present as a solitary spot. Multiple CALMs are present in a smaller fraction of the population and are usually associated with other congenital anomalies as part of many syndromes. Most of these syndromes carry an increased risk of cancer development. Previous studies have indicated that minor congenital anomalies may be more prevalent in children with cancer. We investigated the prevalence of CALMs in two samples of Brazilian patients with childhood solid tumors, totaling 307 individuals. Additionally, 176 school children without diagnosis of cancer, or of a cancer predisposing syndrome, were investigated for the presence of CALMs. The prevalence of solitary CALM was similar in both study groups (18% and 19%) and also in the group of children without cancer. Multiple CALMs were more frequently observed in one of the study groups (Z = 2.1). However, when both groups were analyzed together, the significance disappeared (Z = 1.5). The additional morphological abnormalities in children with multiple CALMs were analyzed and compared to the findings observed in the literature. The nosologic entities associated with CALMs are reviewed.

  9. Association of Piebaldism with Café-au-Lait Macules.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Naveen Kumar; Agarwal, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    A 45-day-old infant was brought by his parents to the dermatology outpatient department with chief complaints of asymptomatic, depigmented lesions that had been present on his skin since birth. On mucocutaneous examination, large rhomboid-shaped depigmented macules were noted on the abdomen and lower extremities bilaterally (Figure 1). A depigmented macule was present on the forehead, with white hair (leukotrichia; a "developing forelock") (Figure 2). Three hyperpigmented lesions (café-au-lait macules [CALMs]) were also noted on the chest (Figure 1a). There was no history of consanguinity, and the family history was negative. The infant was otherwise normal for his age. A diagnosis of "piebaldism with CALMs" was made, and his parents were counseled about the disease and its progression, and possible treatment options as the child grew. They were also informed about a currently unquantifiable risk of future development of Legius syndrome or neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), and were counseled for regular follow-up.

  10. Café-au-lait Macules and Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Anne; Larbrisseau, Albert; Perreault, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    The first sign of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in a child is often the presence of multiple café-au-lait macules. Although previous studies reported that almost individuals with multiple café-au-lait macules will eventually develop NF1 based on clinical criteria, recent studies and clinical observations suggest that a significant percentage of them do not have NF1. We conducted the first systematic review of the literature on the prevalence of definitive NF1 among patients referred for isolated café-au-lait macules, searching more precisely for the proportion of those patients who do not have NF1. Because we now know that the presence of café-au-lait macules and freckling might not distinguish between NF1 and other conditions such as Legius syndrome, definitive NF1 was defined as the presence of café-au-lait macules with or without freckling plus one of the following: Lisch nodules, neurofibroma, plexiform neurofibroma, bone dysplasia, optic pathway glioma, or familial history of NF1. Six articles reported sufficient data to meet our inclusion criteria. Grouping all studies together, we found that 19.5% to 57.1% of all patients with isolated café-au-lait macules did not have a diagnosis of NF1 after follow-up or genetic testing. A significant portion of the patients presenting with isolated café-au-lait macules at initial consultation might not have NF1. Genetic testing could help guide the follow-up of those patients, but further evidence is required to make recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenotypic Variability Among Café-au-lait Macules in NF1

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kevin P.; Gao, Liyan; Feng, Rui; Beasley, Mark; Messiaen, Ludwine; Korf, Bruce R.; Theos, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Background Cafe-au-lait macules (CALMs) in NF1 are an early and accessible phenotype in NF1, but have not been extensively studied. Objective To more fully characterize the phenotype of CALMs in patients with NF1. Methods Twenty-four patients with a diagnosis of NF1 confirmed through clinical diagnosis or molecular genetic testing were recruited from patients seen in the Genetics Department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. CALM locations were mapped using standard digital photography. Pigment intensity was measured with a narrowband spectrophotometer, which estimates the relative amount of melanin (M) based on its absorption of visible light. The major response was defined as the difference between the mean M from the CALM and the mean M from the surrounding skin. The major response for each spot was compared to spots within an individual and across individuals in the study population. Results There was significant variability of the major response, primarily attributable to intrapersonal variability (48.4%, <0.0001) and secondly to interpersonal variability (33.0%, <0.0094). Subsequent analysis based on genetic mutation type showed significantly darker spots in individuals with germline mutations leading to haploinsufficiency. Limitations The study was performed on a small population of patients and the method utilized has not yet been used extensively for this purpose. Conclusions CALMs vary in pigment intensity not only across individuals, but also within individuals and this variability was unrelated to sun exposure. Further studies may help elucidate the molecular basis of this finding, leading to an increased understanding of the pathogenesis of CALMs in NF1. PMID:20605257

  12. Eczematous Dermatitis Occurring on a Café-au-Lait Spot Long after Laser Radiation.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Motoyuki

    2013-05-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented with an itchy erythematosquamous change of a café-au-lait spot in her face. The onset of this change occurred just after her relocation. The café-au-lait spot had been irradiated by laser approximately 20 years ago. Clinically, there was a coin-sized erythema with a slight scale on the pigmented lesion in the left lateral orbital region. Histopathologically, the lesion demonstrated both spongiotic dermatitis and interface dermatitis together with lymphohistiocytic cell infiltration, in addition to moderate acanthosis and elongation of rete ridges with slight basal hyperpigmentation. From these clinical and histopathological findings, the lesion was diagnosed as eczematous dermatitis occurring on the café-au-lait spot after laser radiation. Another interesting histopathological finding was that some parts of a lobule of the sebaceous gland were occupied exclusively by degenerative atrophic sebocytes. From the viewpoint of pathogenesis, the eczematous dermatitis of this patient could have been an accompanying feature of a neurogenic inflammation occurring on the café-au-lait spot after laser radiation, and the atrophic change of a part of the sebaceous lobule might have been induced by a morphogenetic alteration of certain germinative cells of the sebaceous lobule due to laser radiation.

  13. Diagnostic value of multiple café-au-lait macules for neurofibromatosis 1 in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ruen; Wang, Lili; Yu, Yongguo; Wang, Jian; Shen, Yiping

    2016-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. The appearance of multiple café-au-lait macules is an early sign of the condition, which often alert physicians to follow up and further examine the patient for the possibility of NF1. In order to determine the predictive value of multiple café-au-lait macules at early age for NF1 in Chinese patients, we recruited 19 children who shared the common sign of multiple café-au-lait macules from a general pediatric clinic in Shanghai. All the patients were clinically evaluated following the National Institutes of Health criteria for NF1 and molecular tested for sequence variants and copy number changes. Nine children met the clinical diagnostic criteria of NF1, and molecular tests confirmed all nine patients with pathogenic variants including two genomic deletions, two novel frame-shift variants, four novel nonsense and a splicing variants. In addition, four children who did not meet the diagnostic criteria were also found to carry pathogenic NF1 variants. Overall, 68.4% (13/19) of children with café-au-lait macules and various other clinical presentations were molecularly confirmed with NF1. This study demonstrated that the majority of Chinese children with multiple café-au-lait macules who came to seek for medical attention had NF1. Molecular testing is necessary to be used as an adjunct and sometimes as the main tool for confirming and diagnosing children of NF1 at early age. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  14. Multiple café au lait spots in familial patients with MAP2K2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Takahashi, Takao; Saya, Hideyuki; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in genetic diagnostic technologies have made the classic disease nosology highly complicated. This situation is exemplified by rasopathies, among which neurofibromatosis type 1 and Noonan syndrome represent prototypic entities. The former condition is characterized by multiple café au lait spots and neurofibromas, while the latter is characterized by distinct facial features, webbed neck, congenital heart disease, and a short stature. On rare occasions, the features of both neurofibromatosis and Noonan syndrome co-exist within an individual; such patients are diagnosed as having neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Here, we report familial patients with multiple café au lait spots and Noonan syndrome-like facial features. A mutation analysis unexpectedly revealed a mutation in MAP2K2 in both the propositus and his mother. The propositus fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for neurofibromatosis type 1, but his mother did not. Their phenotype was not consistent with that of cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, which is classically known to be associated with MAP2K2 mutations. The mother of the propositus had cervical cancer at the age of 23 years, consistent with the oncogenic tendency associated with rasopathies. The phenotypic combination of multiple café au lait spots and Noonan syndrome-like facial features suggested a diagnosis of neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Whether this condition represents a discrete disease entity or a variable expression of neurofibromatosis type 1 has long been debated. The present observation suggests that some perturbation in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade results in multiple café au lait spots, a key diagnostic phenotype of rasopathies, although the exact mechanism remains to be elucidated. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Neonatal blue light phototherapy increases café-au-lait macules in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Wintermeier, Kathrin; von Poblotzki, Martina; Genzel-Boroviczény, Orsolya; Vogel, Sandra; Schotten, Klaus; Berking, Carola; Giehl, Kathrin A

    2014-11-01

    Neonatal blue light phototherapy (NBLP) is an effective treatment for hyperbilirubinaemia. Concerning the influence on melanocytic nevi, conflicting studies have been published. To assess the role of NBLP according to the incidence of melanocytic nevi in preschool children, a cohort of 104 5- to 6-year-old children were included. The case group consisted of 52 NBLP-exposed children, while the control group (n = 52) never had NBLP and was matched regarding age, gender, gestational age and skin phototype. Six dizygotic twins were included with one twin having received NBLP, respectively. The following parameters were recorded: nevi count, presence of freckles, café-au-lait macules, skin phototype and previous history of sun exposure. There was no significant association between nevi count and exposure to NBLP (median nevi count 17.0 compared to 18.5 in controls). No significant difference was also found in the dizygotic twin pairs with a median nevi count of 10.0 (with NBLP) compared to 14.5 (without NBLP). However, a significantly higher prevalence of café-au-lait macules was found in children with NBLP (mean count 0.5) than in children without NBLP (mean count 0.2; p = 0.001). Significant predictors for the number of melanocytic nevi included skin phototype, sun exposure and vacations in the South. In this study, NBLP had no significant influence on the development of melanocytic nevi, but on café-au-lait macules which was a new finding. Differences with comparable studies regarding age, differentiation between nevi and other pigmented lesions as well as dose and type of NBLP need to be taken into account for further investigations.

  16. Giant café-au-lait macule in neurofibromatosis 1: a type 2 segmental manifestation of neurofibromatosis 1?

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Chun; Happle, Rudolf; Chao, Sheau-Chiou; Yu-Yun Lee, Julia; Chen, WenChieh

    2008-03-01

    Type 2 segmental manifestation of autosomal dominant dermatoses refers to pronounced segmental lesions superimposed on the ordinary nonsegmental phenotype, indicating loss of heterozygosity occurring at an early stage of embryogenesis. We describe a 20-year-old Taiwanese woman with typical lesions of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in the form of characteristic café-au-lait spots, neurofibromas, axillary freckling and Lisch nodules. In addition, a giant garment-like or "bathing-trunk" café-au-lait macule involved the lower half of the trunk, the buttocks, and parts of the thighs, being superimposed on the ordinary smaller spots of NF1. This large café-au-lait macule may be best explained as an example of type 2 segmental NF1. A novel mutation (3009delG) in exon 23 was also identified in this patient, which has not yet been described in sporadic and familial NF1.

  17. The first case of Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome in Kazakhstan associated with café au lait spots.

    PubMed

    Al Mosawi, A J; Fewin, L

    2009-10-01

    Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome (Kabuki syndrome) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome of unknown etiology with a very wide spectrum of abnormalities and severity. The aim of this paper was to report the first case of the syndrome in Kazakhstan associated café au lait. Five year and half old boy from Kazakhstan (Uzbek-of Turk ethnicity) presented with dysmorphic facial features (long palpebral fissures, a broad and depressed nasal tip, large prominent earlobes, small head, epicanthic folds short stature, delayed language development, hypotonia, bilateral developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), large ears and triangular chin, café au lait spots. The clinical diagnosis was based on the triad of characteristic facial abnormalities (long palpebral fissures, a broad and depressed nasal tip, large prominent earlobes, small head), growth retardation, (DDH). In this paper the authors report the first case of Kabuki syndrome associated with café au lait spots.

  18. Predicting neurofibromatosis type 1 risk among children with isolated café-au-lait macules.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shachar, Shay; Dubov, Tom; Toledano-Alhadef, Hagit; Mashiah, Jacob; Sprecher, Eli; Constantini, Shlomi; Leshno, Moshe; Messiaen, Ludwine M

    2017-06-01

    Although isolated cafe-au-lait macules (CALMs) are a common skin finding, they are an early feature of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). We sought to develop an algorithm determining the risk of children with CALMs to have constitutional NF1. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with isolated CALMs. Diagnosis of NF1 was based on detecting NF1 mutation in blood or fulfilling clinical criteria. In all, 170 of 419 (41%) and 21 of 86 (24%) children with isolated CALMs who underwent molecular testing and clinical follow-up, respectively, were given a diagnosis of NF1. Presence of fewer than 6 CALMs at presentation or atypical CALMs was associated with not having NF1 (P < .001). An algorithm based on age, CALMs number, and presence of atypical macules predicted NF1 in both cohorts. According to the algorithm, children older than 29 months with at least 1 atypical CALM or less than 6 CALMs have a 0.9% (95% confidence interval 0%-2.6%) risk for constitutional NF1 whereas children younger than 29 months with 6 or more CALMs have a high risk (80.4%, 95% confidence interval 74.6%-86.2%). The study was designed to detect constitutional NF1 and not NF1 in mosaic form. A simple algorithm enables categorization of children with isolated CALMs as being at low or high risk for having NF1. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Choroidal abnormalities in café-au-lait syndromes: a new differential diagnostic tool?

    PubMed

    Cassiman, C; Casteels, I; Jacob, J; Plasschaert, E; Brems, H; Dubron, K; Keer, K V; Legius, E

    2017-04-01

    The best known café-au-lait syndrome is neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Legius syndrome (LS) is another, rarer syndrome with café-au-lait macules (CALMs). In young patients their clinical picture is often indistinguishable. We investigated the presence of choroidal abnormalities in syndromes with CALMs as a candidate tool for a more efficient diagnosis. Thirty-four patients with NF1 (14 with a truncating mutation, 14 with a non-truncating mutation and 6 with unknown mutation) and 11 patients with LS. All patients underwent an ophthalmological examination. Infrared images were performed. Choroidal nodules were diagnosed in 65% of the NF1 group. About 71% of NF1 patients with a truncating mutation and 50% of patients with a non-truncating mutation were found to have nodules. Choroidal nodules were seen in 18% of the LS patients, never more than one nodule/eye was detected in this group. Choroidal nodules are more abundantly present in NF1 genotypes with truncating mutations. In contrast, the number of choroidal nodules in LS is comparable with their presence in healthy individuals. Especially at an early age, when the clinical picture is incomplete, the detection of choroidal nodules is of diagnostic value, and helps in an appropriate genetic counselling and follow-up. These results support the suggestion to include choroidal nodules to the diagnostic criteria for NF1. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Successful surgical management of bilateral epiretinal membrane in a child with only café-au-lait spots.

    PubMed

    Philip, Swetha Sara; Kuriakose, Thomas; Chacko, Geeta

    2017-06-01

    A 6-year-old boy diagnosed as anisometropic amblyopia, with only café-au-lait spots and a family history of neurofibromatosis, presented with decrease in vision in the both eyes. Dilated fundus examination showed epiretinal membrane in both eyes over the macula. He underwent successful surgical management of the epiretinal membrane.

  1. Molecular screening strategies for NF1-like syndromes with café-au-lait macules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Ming; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) are usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), one of the most common hereditary disorders. However, a group of genetic disorders presenting with CALM have mutations that are involved in human skin pigmentation regulation signaling pathways, including KIT ligand/KIT proto-oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase and Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase. These disorders, which include Legius syndrome, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines or LEOPARD syndrome, and familial progressive hyperpigmentation) are difficult to distinguish from NF1 at early stages, using skin appearance alone. Furthermore, certain syndromes are clinically overlapping and molecular testing is a vital diagnostic method. The present review aims to provide an overview of these ‘NF1-like’ inherited diseases and recommend a cost-effective strategy for making a clear diagnosis among these diseases with an ambiguous borderline. PMID:27666661

  2. Molecular screening strategies for NF1-like syndromes with café-au-lait macules (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Ming; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-11-01

    Multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) are usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), one of the most common hereditary disorders. However, a group of genetic disorders presenting with CALM have mutations that are involved in human skin pigmentation regulation signaling pathways, including KIT ligand/KIT proto‑oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase and Ras/mitogen‑activated protein kinase. These disorders, which include Legius syndrome, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines or LEOPARD syndrome, and familial progressive hyperpigmentation) are difficult to distinguish from NF1 at early stages, using skin appearance alone. Furthermore, certain syndromes are clinically overlapping and molecular testing is a vital diagnostic method. The present review aims to provide an overview of these 'NF1‑like' inherited diseases and recommend a cost‑effective strategy for making a clear diagnosis among these diseases with an ambiguous borderline.

  3. Halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient on immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lolatgis, Helena; Varigos, George; Braue, Anna; Scardamaglia, Laura; Boyapati, Ann; Winship, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    A case of halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy is described. We propose the direct transfer of an auto-reactive antibody, CD8 T-cells or tumour necrosis factor α from the transplant donor to the recipient as a possible cause. We have also considered insufficient immunosuppressive therapy as a possible mechanism. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  4. McCune Albright syndrome - association of fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and hyperthyroidism - case report.

    PubMed

    Raus, Iulian; Coroiu, Roxana Elena

    2016-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare sporadic disease characterized by bone fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and a variable association of hyperfunctional endocrine disorders. Fibrous dysplasia (FD), which can involve the craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeleton, may range from an isolated, asymptomatic monostotic lesion to a severe disabling polyostotic disease involving the entire skeleton. A twenty-five-year old male patient presented to our clinic with recently developed heart palpitations. He had also been feeling pain in the right femur since he was younger, without any trauma history, leading to difficulties of ambulation and limping occasionally. His physical examination revealed café-au-lait spots with irregular borders and right testicular agenesis. Laboratory findings identified hyperthyroidism with hyperparathyroidism. Radiographs of the pelvis revealed multiple lytic lesions of the right femur and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characterized these lesions as specific to fibrous dysplasia of the bone, without any insufficiency fracture at this level. The association of café-au-lait skin spots with bone fibrous dysplasia, and hyperthyroidism in this patient suggested the diagnosis of McCune - Albright syndrome.

  5. [Congenital "kissing" lesions: Nevus or "café au lait" spot?

    PubMed

    Durazzo, A; Boccara, O; Fraitag, S; Fusade, T; Picard, A; Kadlub, N

    2016-12-01

    "Café au lait" spots (CLS) are pigmented skin lesions principally located at the trunk and the limbs. Histologically, CLSs consist in an excessive pigmentation of the epidermis, with no risk of malignant transformation. The "kissing" nevus is a rare pigmented congenital nevus affecting both lower and upper eyelids in a mirror layout. As other nevi, it presents a theoretical risk of malignant transformation. These two pigmented lesions are responsible for aesthetic discomfort when affecting the face. Three patients presenting with a congenital pigmented lesion affecting the two eyelids in a mirror layout are presented. In two cases, the lesions, initially considered as "kissing" nevi, were classified as CLSs. The diagnosis of CLS was made on a biopsy in one patient and after surgery in the other one. Pigmented mirror layout lesions, called "kissing" lesions, are exclusively described for the nevi. We describe two cases of CLSs affecting the eyelids in a mirror layout. Difficulties in diagnostic are exposed and the possible treatments are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Phenotypic variability among café-au-lait macules in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Kevin P; Gao, Liyan; Feng, Rui; Beasley, Mark; Messiaen, Ludwine; Korf, Bruce R; Theos, Amy

    2010-09-01

    Café-au-lait macules (CALMs) in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are an early and accessible phenotype in NF1, but have not been extensively studied. We sought to more fully characterize the phenotype of CALMs in patients with NF1. In all, 24 patients with a diagnosis of NF1 confirmed through clinical diagnosis or molecular genetic testing were recruited from patients seen in the genetics department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. CALM locations were mapped using standard digital photography. Pigment intensity was measured with a narrowband spectrophotometer, which estimates the relative amount of melanin based on its absorption of visible light. The major response was defined as the difference between the mean melanin from the CALM and the mean melanin from the surrounding skin. The major response for each spot was compared with spots within an individual and across individuals in the study population. There was significant variability of the major response, primarily attributable to intrapersonal variability (48.4%, P < .0001) and secondly to interpersonal variability (33.0%, P < .0094). Subsequent analysis based on genetic mutation type showed significantly darker spots in individuals with germline mutations leading to haploinsufficiency. The study was performed on a small population of patients and the method has not yet been used extensively for this purpose. CALMs vary in pigment intensity not only across individuals, but also within individuals and this variability was unrelated to sun exposure. Further studies may help elucidate the molecular basis of this finding, leading to an increased understanding of the pathogenesis of CALMs in NF1. Copyright 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [McCune-Albright syndrome revealed by Blaschko-linear café-au-lait spots on the back].

    PubMed

    Jung, A-J; Soskin, S; Paris, F; Lipsker, D

    2016-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare sporadic disease defined by the triad of café-au-lait spots, fibrous dysplasia of bone and endocrine disorder. Diagnosis is classically confirmed by the presence of bone lesions or precocious puberty. We report a case of McCune-Albright syndrome diagnosed solely on the basis of the cutaneous signs. A four-year-old girl was seen in our clinic due to the presence of congenital café-au-lait spots on her back. These macules were irregular, with jagged borders, and were disposed in a broad band on the left shoulder and in the lumbar region, in a Blaschko-linear pattern. McCune-Albright syndrome was immediately suspected, despite the absence of other signs of the disease. Genetic assessment carried out a year and a half later confirmed the diagnosis, with arginine substitution at position 201 of Gs alpha protein. The child was still asymptomatic. Regular radiographic and endocrine assessments remained normal for three years until the sudden appearance at the age of seven years of precocious puberty and radiographic evidence of fibrous dysplasia of the right hand. Café-au-lait spots are very common in the general population. An underlying genetic disorder should only be sought when such spots are multiple. However, in the case of McCune-Albright syndrome, it is the irregular borders and the Blaschko-linear arrangement of the spots in broad irregular bands that are pathognomonic, reflecting as they do the genetic mosaicism characteristic of this disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Café-au-lait macules and pediatric malignancy caused by biallelic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene PMS2.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carl-Christian; Holter, Spring; Pollett, Aaron; Clendenning, Mark; Chou, Shirley; Senter, Leigha; Ramphal, Raveena; Gallinger, Steven; Boycott, Kym

    2008-06-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with a T4 sigmoid adenocarcinoma, <10 colonic adenomas and multiple café-au-lait macules. Family history was not suggestive of a dominant hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Evaluation of the tumor revealed abnormal immunohistochemical staining of the PMS2 protein and high frequency microsatellite instability. Germline analysis identified biallelic PMS2 missense mutations. A new cancer syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in the mismatch repair genes, including PMS2, is now emerging and is characterized by café-au-lait macules, colonic polyps and a distinctive tumor spectrum. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Response to Laser Treatment of Café au Lait Macules Based on Morphologic Features.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Daniel A; Neckman, Julia P; Jeon, Hana; Friedman, Paul; Geronemus, Roy G

    2017-11-01

    Response to laser treatment for café au lait macules (CALMs) is inconsistent and difficult to predict. To test the hypothesis that irregularly bordered CALMs of the "coast of Maine" subtype respond better to treatment than those of the smooth-bordered "coast of California" subtype. This retrospective case series included patients from 2 multiple-clinician US practices treated from 2005 through 2016. All patients had a clinical diagnosis of CALM and were treated with a Q-switched or picosecond laser. A total of 51 consecutive patients were eligible, 6 of whom were excluded owing to ambiguous lesion subtype. Observers were blinded to final patient groupings. Treatment with 755-nm alexandrite picosecond laser, Q-switched ruby laser, Q-switched alexandrite laser, or Q-switched 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. Main outcome was grade in a visual analog scale (VAS) consisting of 4 levels of treatment response: poor (grade 1, 0%-25% improvement), fair (grade 2, 26%-50% improvement), good (grade 3, 51%-75% improvement), and excellent (grade 4, 76%-100% improvement). Forty-five patients were included in the series, 19 with smooth-bordered lesions and 26 with irregularly bordered lesions. Thirty-four (76%) of the participants were female; 33 (73%) were white; and the mean age at the time of laser treatment was 14.5 years (range, 0-44 years). Smooth-bordered lesions received a mean VAS score of 1.76, corresponding to a fair response on average (26%-50% pigmentary clearance). Irregularly bordered lesions received a mean VAS score of 3.67, corresponding to an excellent response on average (76%-100% clearance) (P < .001). CALMs with jagged or ill-defined borders of the coast of Maine subtype tend to respond well to laser treatment, whereas those with smooth and well-defined borders of the coast of California subtype tend to have poor response. Clinicians using Q-switched or picosecond lasers to treat CALMs can use morphologic characteristics to help predict response and more

  10. Multiple or familial café-au-lait spots is neurofibromatosis type 6: clarification of a diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Madson, Justin G

    2012-05-15

    A café-au-lait macule (CALM) is an evenly pigmented macule or patch of variable size. Solitary CALMs are common birthmarks in up to 2.5 percent of normal neonates and their incidence rises to up to 25 percent in preschool-aged children. Two or more CALMs occur much less frequently. Multiple lesions may warrant investigation to identify an underlying disease including neurofibromatosis types 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2, McCune-Albright syndrome, and neurofibromatosis type 1-like syndrome. Considered a hallmark and diagnostic criteria for NF1 is the presence of 6 or more CALMs greater than 0.5 cm in prepubertal individuals. Rare reports describe families which demonstrate the phenomenon of multiple CALMs without other stigmata of NF1 or evidence of other systemic disease. Herein is a description of the condition and justification for this entity to be named Neurofibromatosis type 6.

  11. Novel use of non-ablative fractional photothermolysis for café-au-lait macules in darker skin types.

    PubMed

    Balaraman, Brundha; Ravanfar-Jordan, Parisa; Friedman, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    The removal of café-au-lait macules (CALMs) in patients with darker skin phototypes poses a significant challenge due to limited available therapeutic options and increased risk of adverse effects, including permanent scarring and further dyspigmentation. Herein, we demonstrate the novel use of non-ablative fractional photothermolysis for the safe removal of CALMs in individuals with Fitzpatrick skin type (FST) IV-V. Retrospective analysis of four patients (FST IV-V) with CALMs revealed that three of these patients had greater than 50% clearance after multiple treatment sessions with the non-ablative fractional 1,550-nm erbium-doped fiber laser. This report demonstrates the utility and safety of non-ablative fractional resurfacing in the treatment of CALMs in darker skin phototypes. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:84-87, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Spinal Neurofibromatosis without Café-au-Lait Macules in Two Families with Null Mutations of the NF1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Dieter; Müller, Ralf; Bartelt, Britta; Wolf, Michael; Kunzi-Rapp, Karin; Hanemann, Clemens Oliver; Fahsold, Raimund; Hein, Christian; Vogel, Walther; Assum, Günter

    2001-01-01

    Spinal neurofibromatosis (SNF) is considered to be an alternative form of neurofibromatosis, showing multiple spinal tumors and café-au-lait macules. Involvement of the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) locus has been demonstrated, by linkage analysis, for three families with SNF. In one of them, a cosegregating frameshift mutation in exon 46 of the NF1 gene was identified. In the present study, we report four individuals from two families who carry NF1 null mutations that would be expected to cause NF1. Three patients have multiple spinal tumors and no café-au-lait macules, and the fourth has no clinical signs of NF1. In the first family, a missense mutation (Leu2067Pro) in NF1 exon 33 was found, and, in the second, a splice-site mutation (IVS31-5A→G) enlarging exon 32 by 4 bp at the 5′ end was found. The latter mutation has also been observed in an unrelated patient with classical NF1. Both NF1 mutations cause a reduction in neurofibromin of ∼50%, with no truncated protein present in the cells. This demonstrates that typical NF1 null mutations can result in a phenotype that is distinct from classical NF1, showing only a small spectrum of the NF1 symptoms, such as multiple spinal tumors, but not completely fitting the current clinical criteria for SNF. We speculate that this phenotype is caused by an unknown modifying gene that compensates for some, but not all, of the effects caused by neurofibromin deficiency. PMID:11704931

  13. McCune Albright syndrome - association of fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and hyperthyroidism – case report

    PubMed Central

    RAUS, IULIAN; COROIU, ROXANA ELENA

    2016-01-01

    McCune–Albright syndrome is a rare sporadic disease characterized by bone fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and a variable association of hyperfunctional endocrine disorders. Fibrous dysplasia (FD), which can involve the craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeleton, may range from an isolated, asymptomatic monostotic lesion to a severe disabling polyostotic disease involving the entire skeleton. A twenty-five-year old male patient presented to our clinic with recently developed heart palpitations. He had also been feeling pain in the right femur since he was younger, without any trauma history, leading to difficulties of ambulation and limping occasionally. His physical examination revealed café-au-lait spots with irregular borders and right testicular agenesis. Laboratory findings identified hyperthyroidism with hyperparathyroidism. Radiographs of the pelvis revealed multiple lytic lesions of the right femur and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characterized these lesions as specific to fibrous dysplasia of the bone, without any insufficiency fracture at this level. The association of café-au-lait skin spots with bone fibrous dysplasia, and hyperthyroidism in this patient suggested the diagnosis of McCune – Albright syndrome. PMID:27857528

  14. Congenital grouped albinotic spots of the retinal pigment epithelium in a patient with hemihypertrophy and café au lait spots.

    PubMed

    White, Eugenia C; Sengillo, Jesse D; Cho, Galaxy Y; Bakhoum, Mathieu F; Tsang, Stephen H

    2018-05-16

    To describe the finding of circularly grouped hypomelanotic spots in the central macula of a patient with syndromic characteristics. Case report of a patient with albinotic spots grouped within the macula, café au lait spots, and left-sided hemihypertrophy. A 15-year-old boy presented with hypomelanotic spots which were hyperautofluorescent on fundus autofluorescence imaging with no disruption of the retinal laminae or photoreceptor inner and outer segment (IS/OS) junction on spectral domain optical coherence tomography. His developmental history included hemihypertrophy, café au lait spots over his axilla and extremities, and surgically corrected left-sided cryptorchidism. Other ocular history included resolved convergence insufficiency and red-green color blindness. It is essential to recognize that circularly grouped hypomelanotic spots are a benign condition. The location and arrangement of the hypomelanotic spots were atypical for congenital grouped albinotic spots of the retinal pigment epithelium (CGAS) as they were grouped within the macula in addition to a more characteristic linear "bear track" formation in the periphery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of CGAS present in a patient with hemihypertrophy, café au lait spots, and cryptorchidism and may represent a novel syndromic association.

  15. Diagnostic and pathogenetic role of café-au-lait macules in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Café au lait spots (CALS) are common dermatologic findings that can at the same time arise in a variety of pathologic conditions such as Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), together with numerous hereditary syndromes for which they represent either diagnostic criteria or associated elements (McCune Albright, Silver-Russell, LEOPARD, Ataxia-Telangiectasia). A review of the literature also revealed two cases of association with NBCCS. We report here the case of a female proband with CALS associated to Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) with known PTCH1 germline mutation (C.1348-2A>G) who had been misdiagnosed with NF1 in her childhood because of 5 CALS and cutaneous nodules. The patient presented a giant cell tumor of the skin, palmar and calcaneal epidermoidal cystic nodules, odontogenic keratocystic tumors and deformity of the jaw profile. Her family history brought both her brother and father to our attention because of the presence of KCOTs diagnosed at early age: after genetic testing, the same PTCH1 germline mutation was identified in the three family members. Clinical criteria are used for discerning NF1 diagnosis (size, number and onset age), while there are no definite guidelines concerning CALS except for their presence. In our experience, we have noted an association of CALS with NBCCS; this seems interesting because we already know clinical criteria are a dynamic entity and can be modified by epidemiologic evidences. PMID:23107377

  16. Genetic Modifiers of Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Associated Café-au-Lait Macule Count Identified Using Multi-platform Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pemov, Alexander; Sung, Heejong; Hyland, Paula L.; Sloan, Jennifer L.; Ruppert, Sarah L.; Baldwin, Andrea M.; Boland, Joseph F.; Bass, Sara E.; Lee, Hyo Jung; Jones, Kristine M.; Zhang, Xijun; Mullikin, James C.; Widemann, Brigitte C.; Wilson, Alexander F.; Stewart, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant, monogenic disorder of dysregulated neurocutaneous tissue growth. Pleiotropy, variable expressivity and few NF1 genotype-phenotype correlates limit clinical prognostication in NF1. Phenotype complexity in NF1 is hypothesized to derive in part from genetic modifiers unlinked to the NF1 locus. In this study, we hypothesized that normal variation in germline gene expression confers risk for certain phenotypes in NF1. In a set of 79 individuals with NF1, we examined the association between gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines with NF1-associated phenotypes and sequenced select genes with significant phenotype/expression correlations. In a discovery cohort of 89 self-reported European-Americans with NF1 we examined the association between germline sequence variants of these genes with café-au-lait macule (CALM) count, a tractable, tumor-like phenotype in NF1. Two correlated, common SNPs (rs4660761 and rs7161) between DPH2 and ATP6V0B were significantly associated with the CALM count. Analysis with tiled regression also identified SNP rs4660761 as significantly associated with CALM count. SNP rs1800934 and 12 rare variants in the mismatch repair gene MSH6 were also associated with CALM count. Both SNPs rs7161 and rs4660761 (DPH2 and ATP6V0B) were highly significant in a mega-analysis in a combined cohort of 180 self-reported European-Americans; SNP rs1800934 (MSH6) was near-significant in a meta-analysis assuming dominant effect of the minor allele. SNP rs4660761 is predicted to regulate ATP6V0B, a gene associated with melanosome biology. Individuals with homozygous mutations in MSH6 can develop an NF1-like phenotype, including multiple CALMs. Through a multi-platform approach, we identified variants that influence NF1 CALM count. PMID:25329635

  17. Microtia Combined With Split Sole of Feet, Deformed Middle Fingers and Café -au-lait Spots on the Trunk: A New Association.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Hu, Jintian; Liu, Tun; Cao, Yilin; Zhang, Qingguo

    2015-11-01

    Microtia is a spectrum of congenital deformities. Approximately, half of the patients are associated with hemifacial microtia. The birth rate of microtia ranges from 2 per 10,000 to 17.4 per 10,000. Microtia and limb deformities sometimes occurred simultaneously as described in the literature. In this report, the patient was found to be with unilateral microtia combined with bilateral split sole of feet, deformed middle fingers on both hands, and café-au-lait spots on the trunk. Despite a thorough literature search, the authors could not achieve a satisfactory diagnosis for the current case with respect to the type of anomalies seen in the case.

  18. Association of Piebaldism, multiple café-au-lait macules, and intertriginous freckling: clinical evidence of a common pathway between KIT and sprouty-related, ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yvonne E; Dugan, Stefanie; Basel, Donald; Siegel, Dawn H

    2013-01-01

    Piebaldism is a rare genodermatosis caused by KIT mutations. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy who had the white forelock and leukoderma of piebaldism, but the presence of many café-au-lait macules and axillary and inguinal freckling complicated the diagnosis. Patients with similar cutaneous findings have been previously reported, and their disorder has been attributed to an overlap of piebaldism and neurofibromatosis type 1. Legius syndrome is a recently described syndrome caused by Sprouty-related, Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1) mutations that also has multiple café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling. Based on our current understanding of KIT and SPRED1 protein interactions, we propose that café-au-lait macules and freckling may be seen in some patients with piebaldism and does not necessarily represent coexistence of neurofibromatosis type 1. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. An Update on Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Not Just Café-au-Lait Spots, Freckling, and Neurofibromas. An Update. Part I. Dermatological Clinical Criteria Diagnostic of the Disease.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martín, A; Duat-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common neurocutaneous syndrome and probably the one best known to dermatologists, who are generally the first physicians to suspect its diagnosis. Although the genetic locus of NF1 was identified on chromosome 17 in 1987, diagnosis of the disease is still mainly based on clinical observations and the diagnostic criteria of the National Institute of Health, dating from 1988. Cutaneous manifestations are particularly important because café-au-lait spots, freckling on flexural areas, and cutaneous neurofibromas comprise 3 of the 7 clinical diagnostic criteria. However, café-au-lait spots and freckling can also be present in other diseases. These manifestations are therefore not pathognomonic and are insufficient for definitive diagnosis in the early years of life. NF1 is a multisystemic disease associated with a predisposition to cancer. A multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary and dermatologists play an important role. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel NF1 mutation in a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait macule in neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

    PubMed

    Tong, H-X; Li, M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, J; Lu, W-Q

    2012-08-29

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; OMIM#162200) is a common neurocutaneous disorder that is characterized by multiple café-au-lait, skinfold freckling, Lisch nodules, and neurofibromas. Mutations in the NF1 gene, which encodes the neurofibromin protein, have been identified as the pathogenic gene of NF1. In this study, we present a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait in NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body, axillary freckling, and multiple subcutaneous neurofibromas. He also had a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormalities. The germline mutational analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel missense mutation in exon 13. It is a novel heterozygous nucleotide G>A transition at position 2241 of the NF1 gene. We found no mutation in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor DNA from this patient. This expands the database for NF1 gene mutations in NF1. Its absence in the normal chromosomes suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first case of giant café-au-lait macule in NF1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

  1. Fractional 532-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser: One of the safest novel treatment modality to treat café-au-lait macules.

    PubMed

    Won, Kwang Hee; Lee, Ye Jin; Rhee, Do Young; Chang, Sung Eun

    2016-10-01

    Café-au-lait macules (CALMs) are benign epidermal basilar hyperpigmentations that can be found in an isolated form or in association with neurocutaneous syndromes. Frequency-doubled Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (532-nm QSNYL) does not penetrate deeply into the skin and is therefore suitable for epidermal pigmented lesion. Fractional photothermolysis (FP) targets only very small areas of the skin, without injuring adjacent areas of healthy, normal skin. Herein, we report a case of CALMs successfully treated with fractional 532-nm QSNYL. By applying FP to 532-nm QSNYL, we could treat CALMs safely with less downtime as compared to conventional laser treatments and expect more energy delivery for each microscopic hole, thereby allowing higher response rate.

  2. Deletion 21pterq22.11: Report of a Patient with Dysmorphic Features, Hypertonia, and Café-au-Lait Macules and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Malinverni, Andréa C M; Yamashiro Coelho, Érika M; Chen, Kelin; Colovati, Mileny E; Soares Pinho Cernach, Mirlene C; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Partial monosomy 21 results in a great variability of clinical features that may be associated with the size and location of the deletion. In this study, we report a 22-month-old girl who showed a 45,XX,add(12)(p13)dn,-21 karyotype. The final cytogenomic result was 45,XX,der(12)t(12;21)(p13;q22.11) dn,-21.arr[hg19] 21q11.2q22.11(14824453_33868129)×1 revealing a deletion from 21pter to 21q22.11. Clinical manifestation of the patient included hypertonia, a long philtrum, epicanthic folds, low-set ears, and café-au-lait macules - a phenotype considered as mild despite the relatively large size of the deletion compared to patients from the literature. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. An Update on Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Not Just Café-au-Lait Spots and Freckling. Part II. Other Skin Manifestations Characteristic of NF1. NF1 and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martín, A; Duat-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common neurocutaneous syndrome and probably the one best known to dermatologists. Although the genetic locus of NF1 was identified on chromosome 17 in 1987, diagnosis of the disease is still based primarily on clinical observations. The 7 diagnostic criteria of the National Institutes of Health, which were established in 1988, include 3 skin manifestations (café-au-lait spots, freckling on flexural areas, and cutaneous neurofibromas). The age at which these diagnostic lesions appear is variable: onset can be late in some patients while others never develop certain symptoms. Definitive diagnosis may therefore be delayed by years. Although the appearance of the characteristic café-au-lait spots and freckling in the early years of childhood are very suggestive of the disease, these signs are not pathognomonic and, in isolation, do not constitute sufficient evidence to establish a definitive diagnosis. Thus, other diagnoses should be considered in patients whose only symptoms are café-au-lait spots and freckling. By contrast, the presence of multiple cutaneous neurofibromas or at least 1 plexiform neurofibroma is a very specific indication of NF1. Identification of the different types of neurofibroma allows us to confirm the diagnosis and initiate appropriate management. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of café-au-lait macules with a high-fluenced 1064-nm Q-switched neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiehoon; Hur, Hoon; Kim, Yu Ri; Cho, Sung Bin

    2018-02-01

    Café-au-lait macules (CALMs) are light to dark brown macules or patches of increased melanin concentration found along the dermoepidermal junction. Although many attempts to treat CALMs using various kinds of laser/light-based devices have been reported, CALMs remain refractory thereto with high recurrence rates. In this case series, we describe four patients with idiopathic CALMs that were effectively and safely treated with a non-ablative, high-fluenced, Q-switched (QS), 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. The typical laser parameters for treating CALMs, including a spot size of 7-7.5 mm, a fluence of 2.4-2.5 J/cm 2 , and one to two passes until the appearance of mild erythema, but not petechiae, were utilized in this study over 12-24 treatment sessions at 2-week intervals. We suggest that high-fluenced QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser treatment can be used as an effective and alternative treatment modality for CALMs with minimal risk of side effects.

  5. A low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser for the treatment of café-au-lait macules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong-Rae; Ha, Jeong-Min; Park, Min-Soo; Lee, Young; Seo, Young-Joon; Kim, Chang-Deok; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Im, Myung

    2015-09-01

    Café-au-lait macules (CALMs) are a common pigmentary disorder. Although a variety of laser modalities have been used to treat CALMs, their efficacies vary and dyspigmentation may develop. We evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of a low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for the treatment of CALMs. In a preliminary investigation, 6 patients underwent a split-lesion comparative study with 532- and 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser treatment. In total, 32 patients with 39 CALMs were enrolled in a subsequent prospective trial to evaluate the treatment with a low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. In the preliminary study, the 1064-nm treatment group had a more favorable response and a shorter recovery time. In a subsequent prospective trial of a 1064-nm laser, 74.4% of the lesions showed a clinical response with clearance of ≥50.0%. The treatment regimen was well tolerated; 15.4% of patients experienced adverse events. The study participants were followed for 6 months, and there were no relevant treatment controls in the prospective trial group. Low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser therapy afforded good clinical improvement for treating CALMs. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Coffin-Siris syndrome with café-au-lait spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Uctepe, Eyyup; Gunduz, Mehmet; Gormez, Zeliha; Erpolat, Seval; Oznur, Murat; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Demirci, Huseyin; Gunduz, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Summary Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) (MIM 135900) is characterized by developmental delay, severe speech impairment, distinctive facial features, hypertrichosis, aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth digit and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Recently, it was shown that mutations in the ARID1B gene are the main cause of CSS, accounting for 76% of identified mutations. Here, we report a 15 year-old female patient who was admitted to our clinic with seizures, speech problems, dysmorphic features, bilaterally big, large thumb, café-au-lait (CAL) spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism. First, the patient was thought to have an association of neurofibromatosis and Rubinstein Taybi syndrome. Because of the large size of the NF1 gene for neurofibromatosis and CREBBP gene for Rubinstein Taybi syndrome, whole exome sequence analysis (WES) was conducted and a novel ARID1B mutation was identified. The proband WES test identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.3394_3395insTA in exon 13 of ARID1B (NM_017519.2) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Tyr1132Leufs*67). Sanger sequencing confirmed the heterozygous c.3394_3395insTA mutation in the proband and that it was not present in her parents indicating de novo mutation. Further investigation and new cases will help to understand this phenomenon better. PMID:27672547

  7. Coffin-Siris syndrome with café-au-lait spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Uctepe, Eyyup; Gunduz, Mehmet; Gormez, Zeliha; Erpolat, Seval; Oznur, Murat; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Demirci, Huseyin; Gunduz, Esra

    2016-08-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) (MIM 135900) is characterized by developmental delay, severe speech impairment, distinctive facial features, hypertrichosis, aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth digit and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Recently, it was shown that mutations in the ARID1B gene are the main cause of CSS, accounting for 76% of identified mutations. Here, we report a 15 year-old female patient who was admitted to our clinic with seizures, speech problems, dysmorphic features, bilaterally big, large thumb, café-au-lait (CAL) spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism. First, the patient was thought to have an association of neurofibromatosis and Rubinstein Taybi syndrome. Because of the large size of the NF1 gene for neurofibromatosis and CREBBP gene for Rubinstein Taybi syndrome, whole exome sequence analysis (WES) was conducted and a novel ARID1B mutation was identified. The proband WES test identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.3394_3395insTA in exon 13 of ARID1B (NM_017519.2) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Tyr1132Leufs*67). Sanger sequencing confirmed the heterozygous c.3394_3395insTA mutation in the proband and that it was not present in her parents indicating de novo mutation. Further investigation and new cases will help to understand this phenomenon better.

  8. Picosecond 532-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser-a novel and promising modality for the treatment of café-au-lait macules.

    PubMed

    Artzi, Ofir; Mehrabi, Joseph N; Koren, Amir; Niv, Roni; Lapidoth, Moshe; Levi, Assi

    2018-05-01

    Café-au-lait macules (CALMs) present as benign hyperpigmented, well-circumscribed spots on the skin for which many patients seek treatment for aesthetic reasons. The objective of this study is to report our experience in treating CALMs using a picosecond 532-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (PS 532 nm) laser. This is a retrospective case series of 16 patients with CALMs who were treated by a PS 532-nm laser (1-4 treatments, 4-8 weeks apart). Response as seen on clinical photographs was assessed by two independent dermatologists and graded on a scale of 0 (exacerbation) to 5 (95-100% improvement). Patient satisfaction and tolerance were documented at final visit. The results of 15 patients demonstrated significant improvement (average 3.43), and their satisfaction and tolerance levels were high. One patient had no response whatsoever to treatment. The PS 532-nm laser is a promising novel modality for the treatment of CALMs.

  9. Multiple Café au Lait Spots in a Group of Fair-Skinned Children without Signs or Symptoms of Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    St John, Jessica; Summe, Heather; Csikesz, Courtney; Wiss, Karen; Hay, Beverly; Belazarian, Leah

    2016-09-01

    The presence of six or more café au lait (CAL) spots is a criterion for the diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). Children with multiple CAL spots are often referred to dermatologists for NF-1 screening. The objective of this case series is to characterize a subset of fair-complected children with red or blond hair and multiple feathery CAL spots who did not meet the criteria for NF-1 at the time of their last evaluation. We conducted a chart review of eight patients seen in our pediatric dermatology clinic who were previously identified as having multiple CAL spots and no other signs or symptoms of NF-1. We describe eight patients ages 2 to 9 years old with multiple, irregular CAL spots with feathery borders and no other signs or symptoms of NF-1. Most of these patients had red or blond hair and were fair complected. All patients were evaluated in our pediatric dermatology clinic, some with a geneticist. The number of CAL spots per patient ranged from 5 to 15 (mean 9.4, median 9). A subset of children, many with fair complexions and red or blond hair, has an increased number of feathery CAL spots and appears unlikely to develop NF-1, although genetic testing was not conducted. It is important to recognize the benign nature of CAL spots in these patients so that appropriate screening and follow-up recommendations may be made. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. High-fluence 1064-nm Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser: Safe and effective treatment of café-au-lait macules in Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin Ok; Park, Il-Joong; Lee, Kyung Real; Ryu, Ha Ryeong; Kim, Jeongsoo; Lee, Seulki; Kim, Yu Ri; Hur, Hoon

    2018-06-01

    Café-au-lait macules (CALMs) are benign cutaneous hyperpigmentary disorders. Usually, laser therapies for cosmetic concerns result in more severe side effects in the people of Asian descent than that of Caucasians. Unfortunately, there is no gold standard for the laser treatment of CALMs in skin of people of Asian descent. To investigate the efficacy and safety of a high-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser treatment of CALMs in Asian patients. The medical records of 35 Korean patients (age range: 1 to 40 years old, mean age: 18.5 years) diagnosed with isolated CALMs were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were treated with a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The parameters were a spot size of 7 mm, a fluence of 2.2-2.4 J/cm 2 with a slow single sliding-stacking pass, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz with a 1-week interval for 20-50 sessions. At the week of the final treatment, all treated CALMs showed considerable pigmentation removal without any permanent side effects, such as scaring, mottled hypopigmentation and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). All treated CALMs showed more than 50% clinical improvement. No recurrence was observed in any of the patients after 12 months of follow-up. A high-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser treatment of CALMs in Asian patients is a safe and effective method without side effects and recurrence. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors, lentigines, and café-au-lait macules associated with germline c-kit mutation treated with imatinib.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Divya; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Larizza, Lidia; Colombo, Elisa A; Fontana, Laura; Gervasini, Cristina; Thappa, Devinder M; Rajappa, Medha; Rajendiran, Kalai Selvi; Sreenath, Gubbi Shamanna; Kate, Vikram

    2017-02-01

    Familial lentiginosis syndromes are characterized by a wide array of manifestations resulting from activation of molecular pathways which control growth, proliferation, and differentiation of a broad range of tissues. Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are often accompanied by additional features like hyperpigmentation, mastocytosis, and dysphagia. They have been described with mutations in c-kit (most commonly), platelet-derived growth factor receptor A, neurofibromatosis-1, and succinate dehydrogenase genes. We report on molecular characterization and tumor histopathology of two siblings in whom lentigines and café-au-lait macules were present along with multifocal GIST. Immuhistochemical analysis of CD34 and CD117 was performed on GIST biopsy samples from both siblings, while c-kit mutational analysis was done by PCR and direct sequencing on DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of all family members and from paraffin-embedded gastric biopsy specimens of affected siblings. Histopathology revealed positive expression of CD117 and CD34. Mutational analysis showed the germline c.1676T>C mutation in c-kit exon 11, (p.(Val559Ala)), in the peripheral blood of both siblings and a second exon 11 mutation, c.1669T>A (p.(Trp557Arg)) in the tumor biopsy of one of them. Initiation of imatinib treatment resulted in striking resolution of their hyperpigmentation and a stable gastrointestinal disease in one of them. A c-kit mutational test in familial GISTs is indicated before initiation of imatinib therapy, as it can help predict tumor response to treatment. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Death Cafe.

    PubMed

    Miles, Lizzy; Corr, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    This article explains the meaning of the phrase Death Cafe and describes what typically occurs at a Death Cafe gathering. The article traces the history of the Death Cafe movement, explores some reasons why people take part in a Death Cafe gathering, and gives examples of what individuals think they might derive from their participation. In addition, this article notes similarities between the Death Cafe movement and three other developments in the field of death, dying, and bereavement. Finally, this article identifies two provisional lessons that can be drawn from Death Cafe gatherings and the Death Cafe movement itself.

  13. DOT's CAFE rulemaking analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-02-13

    Presentation discusses what DOT needs to consider in setting CAFE standards. How DOT's use of the CAFE Compliance and Effects Modeling System helps to analyze potential CAFE Standards. How DOT might approach the next round of CAFE standards for model...

  14. Cafe Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaolo, Concetta A.; Robinson, David F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present time series data collected from a cafe run by business students at a Midwestern public university. The data were collected over a ten-week period during the spring semester of 2010. These data can be used in introductory courses to illustrate basic concepts of time series and forecasting, including trend, seasonality, and…

  15. McCune-Albright syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones in the face Gigantism Irregular, large patchy cafe-au-lait spots , especially on the back ... skull Abnormal heart rhythms ( arrhythmias ) Acromegaly Gigantism Large cafe-au-lait spots on the skin Liver disease, ...

  16. Lait humain provenant d’une banque de dons ou acheté en ligne?

    PubMed Central

    St-Onge, Maude; Chaudhry, Shahnaz; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Question Une de mes patientes m’a demandé si elle pourrait se procurer du lait humain par Internet pour allaiter son nourrisson s’il le fallait. L’usage de lait humain provenant d’une banque de dons est-il plus sécuritaire que son achat en ligne? Réponse L’Organisation mondiale de la Santé et l’American Academy of Pediatrics recommandent d’utiliser des dons de lait humain comme choix à privilégier lorsque le lait maternel n’est pas disponible. Cependant, la Société canadienne de pédiatrie n’approuve pas le partage de lait humain non traité. Le lait humain entreposé dans les banques de lait diffère de celui qu’on peut se procurer par Internet en raison du processus rigoureux de sélection des donneuses, des fréquentes inspections de la qualité, des procédés de transport règlementés et du processus de pasteurisation conforme aux directives établies par l’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments. La plupart des échantillons achetés en ligne contiennent des bactéries à gram négatif ou comptent au total plus de 104 unités formant colonies de bactéries aérobiques par millilitre; ils renferment aussi en moyenne au décompte total plus de bactéries aérobiques, de bactéries à gram négatif, de coliformes et de Staphylococcus spp que les échantillons des banques de lait. La croissance de la plupart des espèces de bactéries est associée au nombre de jours en transit, ce qui porte à croire que les conditions de collecte, d’entreposage et de transport sont médiocres pour le lait acheté en ligne.

  17. Why CAFE Worked

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-11-01

    The 1975 Energy Policy and Conservation Act established mandatory fuel economy standards for passenger cars and light trucks sold in the U.S. Since that time the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards have often been criticized as costly, in...

  18. Crossroads Cafe Implementation Florida Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Teri

    The evaluation reviews the implementation of the "Crossroads Cafe" English language instruction program in Florida, focusing on the program's management, training, and overall effectiveness as measured by its impact on adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teachers and learners. "Crossroads Cafe" is a series of videotape…

  19. Birthmarks - pigmented

    MedlinePlus

    Hairy nevus; Nevi; Mole; Cafe-au-lait spots; Congenital nevus ... Different types of birthmarks have different causes. Cafe-au-lait spots are common at or after birth. Someone who has many of these spots may have a genetic disorder called neurofibromatosis . ...

  20. Literacy Cafe: Making Writing Authentic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Erika

    2007-01-01

    The "Literacy Cafe," a celebration of genre study and student writing, offers students (and visitors!) a positive environment in which to engage in reading and discussion of writing without self-consciousness or fear of criticism. It works because students learn to recognize writing as a learning tool and a relevant, authentic skill in the real…

  1. A Cafe Scientifique for Teens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M.; Mayhew, M.

    2008-12-01

    It is well-known to those pursuing the quest to connect scientists to the public that an exceedingly hard-to- reach demographic is people of high school age. Typically, kids may tag along with their parents to museums until they reach adolescence, and then don't again appear in museums until they themselves have children. We have addressed this demographic challenge for free-choice-learning by developing a Cafe Scientifique program specifically for high school students. The Cafe Scientifique model for adults was developed in England and France, and has now spread like wildfire across the U.S. Typically, people come to a informal setting like a cafe, socialize and have food and drink, and then hear a short presentation by a scientist on a hot science topic in the news. This is followed by a period of lively discussion. We have followed this model for high school age students in four towns in northern New Mexico--Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Espanola, and Albuquerque--which represent a highly diverse demographic. We started this novel project with some trepidation, i.e. what if we build it and they don't come. But the program has proven popular beyond our expectations in all four towns. A part of the secret of success is the social setting, and-especially for this age group-the food provided. But we have also found that the kids are genuinely interested in the science topics, directing their own program, and interacting with scientists. We have often heard statements like, "I think it is important to be well-informed citizens". One of the most important aspects of the Cafes for the kids is to be able to discuss and argue about issues related to the science topic with the presenter and each other. It is an important part of the popularity that the Cafes do not involve school or parents, but also that we have strived to give the kids ownership of the program. Each town has a Youth Leadership Team-open to any teen-that discusses and prioritizes potential topics, conducts

  2. SPS Fabric of the Cosmos Cafe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Anish

    2012-02-01

    Hosted by Brian Greene and based on his best-selling book of the same title, The Fabric of the Cosmos is a new four- part NOVA series that explores the deepest mysteries of space and time. The program was kicked-off by 30 ``Cosmic Cafes'' being held around the country funded by an NSF grant which allows SPS-NOVA to fund SPS chapters for these events. During the summer I assisted in planning this kick-off, reviewing and suggesting revisions of resources related to the NOVA series to make them relevant to an SPS audience. I also got to organize and moderate the first ``Cosmic Cafe.'' The Cosmic cafe that I organized was discussion based, with our speaker Dr. James Gates starting with a short talk and then opening the floor up for questions. By organizing a ``Cosmic cafe,'' I got real hand experience about the challenges an SPS chapter would face while organizing a cafe themselves. Based on my experience I shall also discuss the effectiveness of the first ever themed science cafe blitz. A science caf'e is an informal discussion with an expert in a very casual location, usually a restaurant, coffee shop, or a bar. A science cafe is mostly discussion based, but has a lot of freedom for the format. A ``Cosmic'' cafe is a science cafe which is based around the topics discussed in the documentary ``The Fabric of the Cosmos.''

  3. Border Pedagogy Cafes: Grassroots Conversations that Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Necochea, Juan; Cline, Zulmara

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study uses qualitative methods to analyze the impact of conversations in the Border Pedagogy "Cafes" on more than 500 binational educators from the Tijuana/San Diego area on the U.S.-Mexico border. Four important themes emerged from the analysis that describe the impact of the cafes and offer a strong foundation on which…

  4. CaFe interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Kozak, M.; Gnaciński, P.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Beletsky, Y.; Krełowski, J.

    2007-07-01

    A new kind of interstellar cloud is proposed. These are rare (just a few examples among ~300 lines of sight) objects with the CaI 4227-Å, FeI 3720-Å and 3860-Å lines stronger than those of KI (near 7699 Å) and NaI (near 3302 Å). We propose the name `CaFe' for these clouds. Apparently they occupy different volumes from the well-known interstellar HI clouds where the KI and ultraviolet NaI lines are dominant features. In the CaFe clouds we have not found either detectable molecular features (CH, CN) or diffuse interstellar bands which, as commonly believed, are carried by some complex, organic molecules. We have found the CaFe clouds only along sightlines toward hot, luminous (and thus distant) objects with high rates of mass loss. In principle, the observed gas-phase interstellar abundances reflect the combined effects of the nucleosynthetic history of the material, the depletion of heavy elements into dust grains and the ionization state of these elements which may depend on irradiation by neighbouring stars. Based on data collected using the Maestro spectrograph at the Terskol 2-m telescope, Russia; and on data collected using the ESO Feros spectrograph; and on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility acquired with the UVES spectrograph, Chile. E-mail: `arctur'@rambler.ru (AB); marizak@astri.uni.torun.pl (MK); pg@iftia.univ.gda.pl (PG); gala@boao.re.kr (GAG); ybialets@eso.org (YB); jacek@astri.uni.torun.pl (JK)

  5. CAFE: Computer aided fabric evaluation

    SciT

    Sims, J.E.

    1994-05-06

    With the intent of automating the inspection of color printed fabrics for defects, the Engineering Research Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in addition with several other national labs, in conjunction with the textile industry has initiated the CAFE project. The projects objective is predicated on the development, implementation and testing of an algorithm for the inspection of color printed fabrics. We attempt to take advantage of the wide ranging applications possible with Computer Vision in order to achieve this. The first job of the algorithm is to teach the computer the {open_quote}correct{close_quote} repeat as the reference, tests themore » remaining repeats in the pattern. There are two different ways to go about doing the first job and with this paper we will describe both methods.« less

  6. Developing a Science Cafe Program for Your University Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaramozzino, Jeanine Marie; Trujillo, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Science Cafe is a national movement that attempts to foster community dialog and inquiry on scientific topics in informal venues such as coffee houses, bookstores, restaurants and bars. The California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Robert E. Kennedy Library staff have taken the Science Cafe model out of bars and cafes and into…

  7. Big Ideas behind Daily 5 and CAFE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boushey, Gail; Moser, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The Daily 5 and CAFE were born out of The Sister's research and observations of instructional mentors, their intense desire to be able to deliver highly intentional, focused instruction to small groups and individuals while the rest of the class was engaged in truly authentic reading and writing, and their understanding that a one size fits all…

  8. The Business Cafe Project: Viewing to Browsing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Gilly

    2001-01-01

    Describes and discusses critically a unique experiment called The Business Cafe that used a combination of broadcast television and an interactive Web site to reach people interested in business and management. Outlines the nine broadcasts, which were collaborations between the Open University (United Kingdom) and the BBC (British Broadcasting…

  9. Physical conditions in CaFe interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnaciński, P.; Krogulec, M.

    2008-01-01

    Interstellar clouds that exhibit strong Ca I and Fe I lines are called CaFe clouds. Ionisation equilibrium equations were used to model the column densities of Ca II, Ca I, K I, Na I, Fe I and Ti II in CaFe clouds. We find that the chemical composition of CaFe clouds is solar and that there is no depletion into dust grains. CaFe clouds have high electron densities, n_e≈1 cm-3, that lead to high column densities of neutral Ca and Fe.

  10. Prandiology of Drosophila and the CAFE assay

    PubMed Central

    Ja, William W.; Carvalho, Gil B.; Mak, Elizabeth M.; de la Rosa, Noelle N.; Fang, Annie Y.; Liong, Jonathan C.; Brummel, Ted; Benzer, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Studies of feeding behavior in genetically tractable invertebrate model systems have been limited by the lack of proper methodology. We introduce the Capillary Feeder (CAFE), a method allowing precise, real-time measurement of ingestion by individual or grouped fruit flies on the scale of minutes to days. Using this technique, we conducted the first quantitative analysis of prandial behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results allow the dissection of feeding into discrete bouts of ingestion, defining two separate parameters, meal volume and frequency, that can be uncoupled and thus are likely to be independently regulated. In addition, our long-term measurements show that flies can ingest as much as 1.7× their body mass over 24 h. Besides the study of appetite, the CAFE can be used to monitor oral drug delivery. As an illustration, we used the CAFE to test the effects of dietary supplementation with two compounds, paraquat and ethanol, on food ingestion and preference. Paraquat, a prooxidant widely used in stress tests, had a strong anorexigenic effect. In contrast, in a feeding preference assay, ethanol-laced food, but not ethanol by itself, acted as an attractant. PMID:17494737

  11. Working in the Cafe: Lessons in Group Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Vana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to report on findings related to the use of a large group intervention method known as The World Cafe. Design/methodology/approach: The intervention method and its philosophical genesis are described along with lessons learned from observation, personal use, and interviews with cafe participants. Findings: While…

  12. Working in the Cafe: Lessons in Group Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Vana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on findings related to the use of a large group intervention method known as The World Cafe. Design/methodology/approach: The intervention method and its philosophical genesis are described, along with lessons learned from observation, personal use, and interviews with cafe participants. Findings:…

  13. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene: Beyond café au lait spots and dermal neurofibromas.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Sirkku; Kallionpää, Roope A; Peltonen, Juha

    2017-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) occurs in 1:2000 births. The main diagnostic signs are visible on the skin, and this opens several interesting aspects for dermatological point of view. The NF1 syndrome is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene which encodes the tumor suppressor protein neurofibromin. Neurofibromin functions as a Ras-GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), and NF1 mutations lead to overactivation of the Ras signalling pathway. The NF1 gene and neurofibromin have intriguing functions in keratinocytes and melanocytes. Neurofibromin regulates melanin synthesis and keratinocyte differentiation in a currently unknown manner. The NF1 gene has also an important but poorly understood role in tumorigenesis and cancer. Compared to the general population, NF1 patients have a fivefold risk for cancer and a more than 2000-fold risk for neurogenic malignancies. Mutations of the NF1 gene are common in numerous cancer types in patients without NF1, and this suggests a more general role for the NF1 gene in oncogenesis. In melanoma, NF1 mutations seem to drive tumorigenesis and contribute to drug resistance. In this article, we review the literature on neurofibromin with special attention to keratinocytes, melanocytes, NF1-related tumors and melanoma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Fuel Economy Label and CAFE Data Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Fuel Economy Label and CAFE Data asset contains measured summary fuel economy estimates and test data for light-duty vehicle manufacturers by model for certification as required under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA) and The Energy Independent Security Act of 2007 (EISA) to collect vehicle fuel economy estimates for the creation of Economy Labels and for the calculation of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE). Manufacturers submit data on an annual basis, or as needed to document vehicle model changes.The EPA performs targeted fuel economy confirmatory tests on approximately 15% of vehicles submitted for validation. Confirmatory data on vehicles is associated with its corresponding submission data to verify the accuracy of manufacturer submissions beyond standard business rules. Submitted data comes in XML format or as documents, with the majority of submissions being sent in XML, and includes descriptive information on the vehicle itself, fuel economy information, and the manufacturer's testing approach. This data may contain proprietary information (CBI) such as information on estimated sales or other data elements indicated by the submitter as confidential. CBI data is not publically available; however, within the EPA data can accessed under the restrictions of the Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) CBI policy [RCS Link]. Datasets are segmented by vehicle model/manufacturer and/or year with corresponding fuel economy, te

  15. Science Cafes: Engaging graduate students one drink at a time!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, H.; Chen, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    Science Cafes are events that take place in casual settings (pubs, coffeehouses) that are typically open to a broad audience and feature engaging conversations with scientists about particular topics. Science Cafes are a grassroots movement and exist on an international scale with a common goal of engaging broad audiences in informal scientific discussions. Graduate Students for Ocean Education (GrOE), funded by COSEE OCEAN (Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence—Ocean Communities in Science Education And social Networks), has taken this model and honed in on a specific audience: graduate students. Through monthly Science Cafes with varying themes (ocean acidification to remote sensing), GrOE has engaged over two hundred graduate students throughout New England. While attendance at the Science Cafes is consistent, the presence and engagement of graduate students on the GrOE Facebook page is now growing, a trend attributed to having face-to-face contact with scientists and other graduate students.

  16. 75 FR 21044 - Notice of Centennial Challenges 2011 CAFE Green Flight Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... is a prize competition designed to bring about the development of new aviation technologies that can... Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation. NASA is providing the prize purse. DATES: 2011 CAFE...

  17. CAFE: A New Relativistic MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Cruz-Osorio, A.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce CAFE, a new independent code designed to solve the equations of relativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) in three dimensions. We present the standard tests for an RMHD code and for the relativistic hydrodynamics regime because we have not reported them before. The tests include the one-dimensional Riemann problems related to blast waves, head-on collisions of streams, and states with transverse velocities, with and without magnetic field, which is aligned or transverse, constant or discontinuous across the initial discontinuity. Among the two-dimensional (2D) and 3D tests without magnetic field, we include the 2D Riemann problem, a one-dimensional shock tube along a diagonal, the high-speed Emery wind tunnel, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, a set of jets, and a 3D spherical blast wave, whereas in the presence of a magnetic field we show the magnetic rotor, the cylindrical explosion, a case of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and a 3D magnetic field advection loop. The code uses high-resolution shock-capturing methods, and we present the error analysis for a combination that uses the Harten, Lax, van Leer, and Einfeldt (HLLE) flux formula combined with a linear, piecewise parabolic method and fifth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory reconstructors. We use the flux-constrained transport and the divergence cleaning methods to control the divergence-free magnetic field constraint.

  18. CAFE: aCcelerated Alignment-FrEe sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang Young; Tang, Kujin; Ren, Jie; Fuhrman, Jed A; Waterman, Michael S; Sun, Fengzhu

    2017-07-03

    Alignment-free genome and metagenome comparisons are increasingly important with the development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Recently developed state-of-the-art k-mer based alignment-free dissimilarity measures including CVTree, $d_2^*$ and $d_2^S$ are more computationally expensive than measures based solely on the k-mer frequencies. Here, we report a standalone software, aCcelerated Alignment-FrEe sequence analysis (CAFE), for efficient calculation of 28 alignment-free dissimilarity measures. CAFE allows for both assembled genome sequences and unassembled NGS shotgun reads as input, and wraps the output in a standard PHYLIP format. In downstream analyses, CAFE can also be used to visualize the pairwise dissimilarity measures, including dendrograms, heatmap, principal coordinate analysis and network display. CAFE serves as a general k-mer based alignment-free analysis platform for studying the relationships among genomes and metagenomes, and is freely available at https://github.com/younglululu/CAFE. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. CAFE: aCcelerated Alignment-FrEe sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang Young; Tang, Kujin; Ren, Jie; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Waterman, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Alignment-free genome and metagenome comparisons are increasingly important with the development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Recently developed state-of-the-art k-mer based alignment-free dissimilarity measures including CVTree, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$d_2^*$\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$d_2^S$\\end{document} are more computationally expensive than measures based solely on the k-mer frequencies. Here, we report a standalone software, aCcelerated Alignment-FrEe sequence analysis (CAFE), for efficient calculation of 28 alignment-free dissimilarity measures. CAFE allows for both assembled genome sequences and unassembled NGS shotgun reads as input, and wraps the output in a standard PHYLIP format. In downstream analyses, CAFE can also be used to visualize the pairwise dissimilarity measures, including dendrograms, heatmap, principal coordinate analysis and network display. CAFE serves as a general k-mer based alignment-free analysis platform for studying the relationships among genomes and metagenomes, and is freely available at https://github.com/younglululu/CAFE. PMID:28472388

  20. The Consequences of Internet Cafe use on Turkish College Students' Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Mustafa; Ferneding, Karen Ann

    2007-01-01

    This paper draws on a part of the doctoral research study that investigates the potential impacts of Internet cafe use on Turkish college students' social capital. In this study, Internet cafe usage was portrayed by the amount of time spent and the frequency of online activities engaged at the cafes. Social capital, on the other hand, was…

  1. Making Time for Spacetime: The Story of a National Science Cafe Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, Kendra; Chakrabarti, Anish

    2012-03-01

    Science Cafes are live and lively events that take place in casual settings such as coffeehouses or bars, are open to everyone, and feature an engaging conversation with a scientist about a compelling scientific topic. The Science Cafe movement in the United States is a grassroots effort to really engage the public in discussions about science and its relevance to society, inspired by the United Kingdom Cafe Scientifique organization. With support from NOVA and the related website sciencecafes.org, a number of Society of Physics Students chapters hosted local Cosmic Cafes (cosmic themed science cafes) in late 2011 and early 2012. This presentation will discuss the goals and models of the Science Cafe movement, the Cosmic Cafe effort, lessons learned, and how you can get involved.

  2. Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants. Industry Training Monograph No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumbrell, Tom

    Australia's accommodation, cafes, and restaurants industry represents more than half of the nation's total tourism and hospitality employment. It accounts for roughly 4.5% of all jobs in Australia (400,000 workers). Since 1987, the number of jobs in the sector has risen from about 257,000 to about 372,000. Approximately 57% of employees are…

  3. What Can We Learn from the Word Writing CAFE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Karen; Vandenberg, Amy; White, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Building on the work of an earlier article ["The Word Writing CAFE: Assessing Student Writing for Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency," Dorothy J. Leal, "Reading Teacher," 59 (4) Dec 2005 (EJ738016)], these authors investigated the use of a simple assessment tool with a different audience to yield similar useful results. (Contains 3 figures and 4…

  4. Learning Science at Internet Cafes: Reflections on a Bulgarian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Mick; Smith, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    In-service education using information and communication technology (ICT) to teach science is particularly demanding when working in under-resourced locations or where resources are in heavy demand. This article is based on Inset carried out by the authors working with teachers and a university lecturer in a Bulgarian Internet cafe. The use of…

  5. Building Nutrition Skills with the Breakfast Cafe Webquest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Diane

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the nutrition component of a Home and Career Skills curriculum at Hommocks Middle School (Larchmont, NY) that includes the Breakfast Cafe Webquest, which encourages 7th graders to increase the amounts of fruits and vegetables in their diets as well as reduce serving sizes. Using this Webquest, students "help the Breakfast…

  6. Cafe: A Generic Configurable Customizable Composite Cloud Application Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietzner, Ralph; Unger, Tobias; Leymann, Frank

    In this paper we present Cafe (Composite Application Framework) an approach to describe configurable composite service-oriented applications and to automatically provision them across different providers. Cafe enables independent software vendors to describe their composite service-oriented applications and the components that are used to assemble them. Components can be internal to the application or external and can be deployed in any of the delivery models present in the cloud. The components are annotated with requirements for the infrastructure they later need to be run on. Providers on the other hand advertise their infrastructure services by describing them as infrastructure capabilities. The separation of software vendors and providers enables end users and providers to follow a best-of-breed strategy by combining arbitrary applications with arbitrary providers. We show how such applications can be automatically provisioned and present an architecture and a prototype that implements the concepts.

  7. CAFE: an R package for the detection of gross chromosomal abnormalities from gene expression microarray data.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Sander; Leddin, Mathias; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Mah, Nancy

    2014-05-15

    The current methods available to detect chromosomal abnormalities from DNA microarray expression data are cumbersome and inflexible. CAFE has been developed to alleviate these issues. It is implemented as an R package that analyzes Affymetrix *.CEL files and comes with flexible plotting functions, easing visualization of chromosomal abnormalities. CAFE is available from https://bitbucket.org/cob87icW6z/cafe/ as both source and compiled packages for Linux and Windows. It is released under the GPL version 3 license. CAFE will also be freely available from Bioconductor. sander.h.bollen@gmail.com or nancy.mah@mdc-berlin.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. The Word Writing CAFE: Assessing Student Writing for Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Dorothy J.

    2005-01-01

    The Word Writing CAFE is a new assessment tool designed for teachers to evaluate objectively students' word-writing ability for fluency, accuracy, and complexity. It is designed to be given to the whole class at one time. This article describes the development of the CAFE and provides directions for administering and scoring it. The author also…

  9. The CAFE model: A net production model for global ocean phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silsbe, Greg M.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Milligan, Allen J.; Westberry, Toby K.

    2016-12-01

    The Carbon, Absorption, and Fluorescence Euphotic-resolving (CAFE) net primary production model is an adaptable framework for advancing global ocean productivity assessments by exploiting state-of-the-art satellite ocean color analyses and addressing key physiological and ecological attributes of phytoplankton. Here we present the first implementation of the CAFE model that incorporates inherent optical properties derived from ocean color measurements into a mechanistic and accurate model of phytoplankton growth rates (μ) and net phytoplankton production (NPP). The CAFE model calculates NPP as the product of energy absorption (QPAR), and the efficiency (ϕμ) by which absorbed energy is converted into carbon biomass (CPhyto), while μ is calculated as NPP normalized to CPhyto. The CAFE model performance is evaluated alongside 21 other NPP models against a spatially robust and globally representative set of direct NPP measurements. This analysis demonstrates that the CAFE model explains the greatest amount of variance and has the lowest model bias relative to other NPP models analyzed with this data set. Global oceanic NPP from the CAFE model (52 Pg C m-2 yr-1) and mean division rates (0.34 day-1) are derived from climatological satellite data (2002-2014). This manuscript discusses and validates individual CAFE model parameters (e.g., QPAR and ϕμ), provides detailed sensitivity analyses, and compares the CAFE model results and parameterization to other widely cited models.

  10. Educational Computer Use in Leisure Contexts: A Phenomenological Study of Adolescents' Experiences at Internet Cafes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cilesiz, Sebnem

    2009-01-01

    Computer use is a widespread leisure activity for adolescents. Leisure contexts, such as Internet cafes, constitute specific social environments for computer use and may hold significant educational potential. This article reports a phenomenological study of adolescents' experiences of educational computer use at Internet cafes in Turkey. The…

  11. Teaching Cafe' Waiter Skills to Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Real Setting Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavkaytar, Atilla

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine effectiveness of the Cafe' Waiter Education Program by providing the least prompting to three adult subjects with intellectual disability in a real-life setting. A multiple probe research design across subjects was used. Cafe' waiter skills included five main tasks incorporating 125 skill steps. Task…

  12. Secondhand smoke emission levels in waterpipe cafes in Doha, Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al Mulla, Ahmad; Fanous, Nadia; Seidenberg, Andrew B; Rees, Vaughan W

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to the emissions of a tobacco waterpipe is associated with increased health risks among its users as well as those exposed to its secondhand smoke. Waterpipe use is an emerging concern to the tobacco control community, particularly among countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region. In 2002, Qatar adopted legislation that prohibited cigarette smoking inside public venues, but exempted tobacco waterpipe smoking. To inform the development and enforcement of effective policy, the impact of cigarette and waterpipe use on indoor air quality was monitored in waterpipe cafes in Doha, Qatar. Particulate matter (PM2.5) levels were measured inside and outside of a sample of 40 waterpipe cafes and 16 smoke-free venues in Doha, Qatar between July and October 2012. In addition, the number of waterpipes being smoked and the number of cigarette smokers were counted within each venue. Non-paired and paired sample t tests were used to assess differences in mean PM2.5 measurements between venue type (waterpipe vs smoke-free) and environment (indoor vs outdoor). The mean PM2.5 level inside waterpipe venues (476 μg/m(3)) was significantly higher than the mean PM2.5 level inside smoke-free venues (17 μg/m(3); p<0.001), and significantly higher than the mean PM2.5 level found immediately outside waterpipe venues (35 μg/m(3); p<0.001). In smoke-free venues, the outside mean PM2.5 level (30 μg/m(3)) did not differ significantly from the mean PM2.5 inside levels inside these venues (p=0.121). Elevated levels of particulate pollution were found in waterpipe cafes in Doha, Qatar, potentially endangering the health of employees and patrons. To protect the public from the dangers of secondhand tobacco smoke, and to change social norms around tobacco use, smoke-free policies that apply to all forms of combusted tobacco products, including the waterpipe, are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  13. CAFE: Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Aceituno, J.; Thiele, U.; Grupp, F.; Dreizler, S.; Bean, J.; Benitez, D.

    2011-11-01

    The Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph (CAFE) is an instrument underconstruction at CAHA to replace FOCES, the high-resolution echellespectrograph at the 2.2 m telescope of the observatory. FOCES is a property ofthe Observatory of the Munich University, and it was recalled it from Calar Altoin 2009. The instrument comprised a substantial fraction of thetelescope time during its operational life-time, and it is due to that it wastaken the decision to build a replacement.CAFE shares its basic characteristics with those of FOCES. However, significantimprovements have been introduced in the original design, the quality of thematerials, and the overall stability of the system. In particular: (i) a newcalibration Iodine cell is foreseen to operate together with the standard ThArlamps; (ii) the optical quality of all the components has been selected to belambda/20, instead of the original lambda/10; (iii) an isolated room hasbeen selected to place the instrument, termalized and stabilized againstvibrations (extensive tests have been performed to grant the stability); (iv)most of the mobile parts in FOCES has been substituted by fixed elements, toincrease the stability of the system; and finally (v) a new more efficientCCD, with a smaller pixel has been acquired. It is expected that the overallefficiency and the quality of the data will be significantly improved withrespect to its precesor. In particular, CAFE is design and built to achieveresolutions of R ˜ 70000, which will be kept in the final acquired data,allowing it to compete with current operational extrasolar planets hunters.After two years of work all the components are in place. The instrument is nowfinally assembled, and we are performing the the first alignment tests. It isexpected that the commissioning on the laboratory will finish at the end of2010, followed by the commissioning on telescope along the first semester of2011. If everything goes well, we will offer the instrument in a shared

  14. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) must set Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for light trucks. This was authorized by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, which added Title V: Imporving Automotive Fuel Effici...

  15. CAFE: Calar Alto Fiber-fed Échelle spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Grupp, F.; Lillo, J.; Hernán-Obispo, M.; Benitez, D.; Montoya, L. M.; Thiele, U.; Pedraz, S.; Barrado, D.; Dreizler, S.; Bean, J.

    2013-04-01

    We present here CAFE, the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Échelle spectrograph, a new instrument built at the Centro Astronomico Hispano Alemán (CAHA). CAFE is a single-fiber, high-resolution (R ~ 70 000) spectrograph, covering the wavelength range between 3650-9800 Å. It was built on the basis of the common design for Échelle spectrographs. Its main aim is to measure radial velocities of stellar objects up to V ~ 13-14 mag with a precision as good as a few tens of m s-1. To achieve this goal the design was simplified at maximum, removing all possible movable components, the central wavelength is fixed, as is the wavelength coverage; there is no filter wheel, etc. Particular care was taken with the thermal and mechanical stability. The instrument is fully operational and publically accessible at the 2.2 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory. In this article we describe (i) the design, summarizing its manufacturing phase; (ii) characterize the main properties of the instrument; (iii) describe the reduction pipeline; and (iv) show the results from the first light and commissioning runs. The preliminar results indicate that the instrument fulfills the specifications and can achieve the planned goals. In particular, the results show that the instrument is more efficient than anticipated, reaching a signal-to-noise of ~20 for a stellar object as faint as V ~ 14.5 mag in ~2700 s integration time. The instrument is a wonderful machine for exoplanetary research (by studying large samples of possible systems cotaining massive planets), galactic dynamics (highly precise radial velocities in moving groups or stellar associations), or astrochemistry.

  16. Smoke-free cafe in an unregulated European city: highly welcomed and economically successful

    PubMed Central

    Kunzli, N; Mazzoletti, P; Adam, M; Gotschi, T; Mathys, P; Monn, C; Brandli, O

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In a unique setting with two identical cafes, which only differed in their smoking ordinances, this study assessed the influence of smoking policies on the choice of the cafe, investigated regulatory preferences among customers, and evaluated the claim that smoking cafes have better sales performance in a city without smoking bans. Methods: In a parallel assessment, customers of both cafes answered a questionnaire. Sales were compared and air pollutants were measured to confirm air quality differences. Results: The two customer groups (n = 177) differed only with regard to smoking status (p < 0.01). The smoking regulation was the most often cited selection criterion (83%). In the non-smoking café, 89% indicated that they were usually annoyed by smoke in coffee houses, and 62% would avoid or leave cafes for this reason. Two thirds stated that all cafe/restaurants should offer the opportunity of a smoke-free environment. However, almost half stated that mandatory regulations are not needed and that customers should make individual arrangements based on tolerance and courtesy. Those who were informed about the health effects of secondhand smoke were more likely to call for clear policies. Whereas sales showed no differences, tips were 22% (p < 0.001) higher in the non-smoking cafe. Conclusion: In a generation raised in smoking friendly environments, customers paradoxically ask for a landmark shift towards smoke-free opportunities, while substantially adhering to the tobacco industry paradigm of promoting "tolerance" rather than smoke-free policies. Given the clear preference of a large number of customers, hospitality businesses could, however, greatly profit from offering smoke-free environments even in the absence of regulatory policies. PMID:12958388

  17. Smoke-free cafe in an unregulated European city: highly welcomed and economically successful.

    PubMed

    Künzli, N; Mazzoletti, P; Adam, M; Götschi, T; Mathys, P; Monn, C; Brändli, O

    2003-09-01

    In a unique setting with two identical cafes, which only differed in their smoking ordinances, this study assessed the influence of smoking policies on the choice of the cafe, investigated regulatory preferences among customers, and evaluated the claim that smoking cafes have better sales performance in a city without smoking bans. In a parallel assessment, customers of both cafes answered a questionnaire. Sales were compared and air pollutants were measured to confirm air quality differences. The two customer groups (n = 177) differed only with regard to smoking status (p < 0.01). The smoking regulation was the most often cited selection criterion (83%). In the non-smoking café, 89% indicated that they were usually annoyed by smoke in coffee houses, and 62% would avoid or leave cafes for this reason. Two thirds stated that all cafe/restaurants should offer the opportunity of a smoke-free environment. However, almost half stated that mandatory regulations are not needed and that customers should make individual arrangements based on tolerance and courtesy. Those who were informed about the health effects of secondhand smoke were more likely to call for clear policies. Whereas sales showed no differences, tips were 22% (p < 0.001) higher in the non-smoking cafe. In a generation raised in smoking friendly environments, customers paradoxically ask for a landmark shift towards smoke-free opportunities, while substantially adhering to the tobacco industry paradigm of promoting "tolerance" rather than smoke-free policies. Given the clear preference of a large number of customers, hospitality businesses could, however, greatly profit from offering smoke-free environments even in the absence of regulatory policies.

  18. Tobacco sales and promotion in bars, cafes and nightclubs from large cities around the world.

    PubMed

    Shahrir, Shahida; Wipfli, Heather; Avila-Tang, Erika; Breysse, Patrick N; Samet, Jonathan M; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2011-07-01

    Little is known about tobacco promotion activities in low and middle-income countries. Information on tobacco sales, advertisement and promotion in bars, cafes and nightclubs is needed to develop interventions to reduce smoking initiation and relapse, particularly among youths and young adults. To evaluate cigarette sales and tobacco advertisement and promotion in bars, cafes and nightclubs using a volunteer survey approach in large cities throughout the world. Between 2007 and 2009, we administered an interview-based survey to 231 bar/cafe/nightclub owners/managers in 24 large cities in Africa, the Americas, Asia and eastern Europe. Cigarette sales and tobacco advertisement and promotions were found in bars/cafes/nightclubs in most cities. Examples of promotions included cigarette giveaways and event sponsorship. Establishments that allowed smoking were more likely to sell cigarettes compared to smoke-free establishments (OR 8.67, 95% CI 3.25 to 23.1). Larger establishments (maximum occupancy ≥ 100 vs <100 customers) were more likely to have tobacco advertising (OR 4.35, 95% CI 2.04 to 9.24) and to receive promotional items from tobacco companies (OR 3.18, 95% CI 1.41 to 7.17). Cigarette sales and tobacco promotions were common in bars, cafes and nightclubs in the majority of cities. Socialising and hospitality venues must be covered by legislation banning tobacco sales and promotions to limit exposure among populations at high risk of tobacco initiation and relapse from quitting.

  19. CaFe2O4 as a self-sufficient solar energy converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tablero, C.

    2017-10-01

    An ideal solar energy to electricity or fuel converter should work without the use of any external bias potential. An analysis of self-sufficiency when CaFe2O4 is used to absorb the sunlight is carried out based on the CaFe2O4 absorption coefficient. We started to obtain this coefficient theoretically within the experimental bandgap range in order to fix the interval of possible values of photocurrents, maximum absorption efficiencies, and photovoltages and thus that of self-sufficiency considering only the radiative processes. Also for single-gap CaFe2O4, we evaluate an alternative for increasing the photocurrent and maximum absorption efficiency based on inserting an intermediate band using high doping or alloying.

  20. Low Temperature X-Ray Diffraction Study on CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyan, Shuyuan; Deng, Liangzi; Wu, Zheng; Zhao, Kui; Lv, Bing; Xue, Yiyu; Chu, Ching-Wu; B. Lv Collaboration; HPLT (Paul C. W. Chu) Team

    For undoped CaFe2As2 single crystals, we observed that utilizing thermal treatments could stabilize two pure tetragonal phases PI and PII. Both phases are non-superconducting, while the superconductivity with a Tc up to 25 K can be induced through proper thermal treatment. Room temperature X-ray studies suggest that the origin of superconductivity arises from the interface of the mesoscopically stacked layers of PI and PII. To further investigate, a systematic low temperature X-ray study was conducted over a series of thermal treated CaFe2As2 single crystals. From which, we observed the phase aggregation of PI and PII upon cooling, more importantly, an ordered stacking structure exists at low temperature, which closely related to superconducting volume fraction and the ratio of PI and PII. These results further support the proposal of interface-enhanced superconductivity in undoped CaFe2As2. UT Dallas

  1. Magnetocrystalline two-fold symmetry in CaFe2O4 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhaganlal Gandhi, Ashish; Das, Rajasree; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Lin, Jauyn Grace

    2017-05-01

    Understanding of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in CaFe2O4 is a matter of importance for its future applications. A high quality single crystal CaFe2O4 sample is studied by using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, a magnetometer and the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. A broad feature of the susceptibility curve around room temperature is observed, indicating the development of 1D spin interactions above the on-set of antiferromagnetic transition. The angular dependency of ESR reveals an in-plane two-fold symmetry, suggesting a strong correlation between the room temperature spin structure and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. This finding opens an opportunity for the device utilizing the anisotropy field of CaFe2O4.

  2. Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Rikabi, Ammar C; Ramaswamy, Jyothi C; Bhat, Venkatraman V

    2005-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical, radiological and histopathological features of the Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome as seen in a 6-year-old Qatari male patient who was initially misdiagnosed as a case of systemic neurofibromatosis. Our case has all the diagnostic stigmata of Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome as described in the literature and these include cafe au lait macules, skeletal deformities and multiple histologically confirmed non-ossifying fibromas of the long bones.

  3. Speakeasy Studio and Cafe: Information Literacy, Web-based Library Instruction, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of academic library instruction and information literacy focuses on a Web-based program developed at Washington State University called Speakeasy Studio and Cafe that is used for bibliographic instruction. Highlights include the research process; asking the right question; and adapting to students' differing learning styles. (LRW)

  4. CAFES 2009 New Student Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speerstra, Mandy; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    During Academic Day, September 1, 2009, incoming freshmen and transfer students in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences (CAFES) were asked to complete a one-page questionnaire designed to find out: (1) how they learned about UW-River Falls as an option for their tertiary education; (2) what factors most influenced their…

  5. The Poetry Cafe Is Open! Teaching Literary Devices of Sound in Poetry Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalcik, Beth; Certo, Janine L.

    2007-01-01

    A six-week long intervention that introduced second graders to poetry writing is described in this article, ending in a classroom "poetry cafe" culminating event. This article details the established classroom "writing workshop" structure and environment and the perceptions and observations of how students responded to the instruction. Four poetry…

  6. The Petrol Station and the Internet Cafe: Rural Technospaces for Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laegran, Anne Sofie

    2002-01-01

    A study in two Norwegian villages focused on the local gas station and the Internet cafe as "technospaces" for rural youth cultures--spaces at the intersection of technology and human interaction. The car and the Internet were given different symbolic and utility values in various youth subcultures. Local contexts influenced technology…

  7. CaFE: a tool for binding affinity prediction using end-point free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-07-15

    Accurate prediction of binding free energy is of particular importance to computational biology and structure-based drug design. Among those methods for binding affinity predictions, the end-point approaches, such as MM/PBSA and LIE, have been widely used because they can achieve a good balance between prediction accuracy and computational cost. Here we present an easy-to-use pipeline tool named Calculation of Free Energy (CaFE) to conduct MM/PBSA and LIE calculations. Powered by the VMD and NAMD programs, CaFE is able to handle numerous static coordinate and molecular dynamics trajectory file formats generated by different molecular simulation packages and supports various force field parameters. CaFE source code and documentation are freely available under the GNU General Public License via GitHub at https://github.com/huiliucode/cafe_plugin It is a VMD plugin written in Tcl and the usage is platform-independent. tingjunhou@zju.edu.cn. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) Model: A Framework for School Counselor Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Erin C. M.; Ockerman, Melissa S.; Chen-Hayes, Stuart F.

    2013-01-01

    Significant recent influences in the profession have provided clear direction about what school counseling programs should look like but have not explicitly defined the professional identity necessary to enact these programs. A Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) Model draws from the American School Counselor Association National Model (2003, 2005,…

  9. Crossroads Cafe: An ESOL Program for Adult Learners. Formative Evaluation Study, Summer 1996 Pilot Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Seymour; Rayman, Irene C.

    The reports presents findings of a formative evaluation of "Crossroads Cafe," an adult-level distance learning program designed to teach English to speakers of other languages (ESOL). The study focused on how 22 programs were implemented in 6 different regions of New York State. The program is a collaborative efforts of the Department of…

  10. An overview of CAFE credits and incorporation of the benefits of on-board carbon capture.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-05-01

    This report discusses the application of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) : credits that are currently available to vehicle manufacturers in the U.S., and the implications of : on-board carbon capture and sequestration (on-board CCS) on fu...

  11. Hydrogen and electricity production in a light-assisted microbial photoelectrochemical cell with CaFe2O4 photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qing-Yun; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Jian-Shan; Wang, Yun-Hai

    2017-04-01

    A microbial photoelectrochemical cell (MPEC) was designed with a p-type CaFe2O4 semiconductor as the photoelectrode for simultaneous hydrogen and electricity production under light illumination. The CaFe2O4 photoelectrode was synthesized by the sol-gel method and well characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, and UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer. The linear sweep voltammogram of the CaFe2O4 photoelectrode presented the cathodic photocurrent output. For the MPEC, with an external resistance of 2000 Ω, the maximum power density of 143 mW was obtained. Furthermore, with an external resistance of 100 Ω, the maximum hydrogen production rate of 6.7 μL·cm-2 could be achieved. The MPEC with CaFe2O4 photocathode was compared to MPEC with other photocathodes as well as photocatalytic water splitting technology.

  12. CAFE — A New On-Line Resource for Planning Scientific Field Investigations in Planetary Analogue Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. J.; Barber, S. J.; Grady, M. M.

    2012-03-01

    The Concepts for Activities in the Field for Exploration (CAFE) project is creating a complete catalogue of terrestrial analogue environments that are appropriate for testing human space exploration-related scientific field activities.

  13. Fabrication of CaFe2O4 nanofibers via electrospinning method with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianmin; Wang, Yunan; Liu, Yinglei; Li, Song; Cao, Feng; Qin, Gaowu

    CaFe2O4 nanofibers with diameters of about 130nm have been fabricated via a facile electrospinning method. The structures, morphologies and optical properties of the obtained CaF2O4 nanofibers have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-Visible UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum. The photocatalytic activities of the CaFe2O4 nanofibers are evaluated by the photo-degradation of Methyl orange (MO). The results show that the CaFe2O4 nanofibers (72%) exhibit much higher photocatalytic performance than the CaFe2O4 powders (27%) prepared by conventional method under visible light irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic performance of CaFe2O4 nanofibers could be attributed to the large surface area, high photogenerated charge carriers density and low charge transfer resistance, as revealed by photoelectrochemical measurement. And fundamentally, it could be attributed to the decreased particle size and the fibrous nanostructure. This work not only provides an efficient way to improve the photocatalytic activity of CaFe2O4, but also provides a new method for preparing materials with nanofibrous structure.

  14. Orphan Spins in the S=5/2 Antiferromagnet CaFe_{2}O_{4}.

    PubMed

    Stock, C; Rodriguez, E E; Lee, N; Demmel, F; Fouquet, P; Laver, M; Niedermayer, Ch; Su, Y; Nemkovski, K; Green, M A; Rodriguez-Rivera, J A; Kim, J W; Zhang, L; Cheong, S-W

    2017-12-22

    CaFe_{2}O_{4} is an anisotropic S=5/2 antiferromagnet with two competing A (↑↑↓↓) and B (↑↓↑↓) magnetic order parameters separated by static antiphase boundaries at low temperatures. Neutron diffraction and bulk susceptibility measurements, show that the spins near these boundaries are weakly correlated and a carry an uncompensated ferromagnetic moment that can be tuned with a magnetic field. Spectroscopic measurements find these spins are bound with excitation energies less than the bulk magnetic spin waves and resemble the spectra from isolated spin clusters. Localized bound orphaned spins separate the two competing magnetic order parameters in CaFe_{2}O_{4}.

  15. The Child Affective Facial Expression (CAFE) set: validity and reliability from untrained adults

    PubMed Central

    LoBue, Vanessa; Thrasher, Cat

    2014-01-01

    Emotional development is one of the largest and most productive areas of psychological research. For decades, researchers have been fascinated by how humans respond to, detect, and interpret emotional facial expressions. Much of the research in this area has relied on controlled stimulus sets of adults posing various facial expressions. Here we introduce a new stimulus set of emotional facial expressions into the domain of research on emotional development—The Child Affective Facial Expression set (CAFE). The CAFE set features photographs of a racially and ethnically diverse group of 2- to 8-year-old children posing for six emotional facial expressions—angry, fearful, sad, happy, surprised, and disgusted—and a neutral face. In the current work, we describe the set and report validity and reliability data on the set from 100 untrained adult participants. PMID:25610415

  16. Orphan Spins in the S =5/2 Antiferromagnet CaFe2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, C.; Rodriguez, E. E.; Lee, N.; Demmel, F.; Fouquet, P.; Laver, M.; Niedermayer, Ch.; Su, Y.; Nemkovski, K.; Green, M. A.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Kim, J. W.; Zhang, L.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2017-12-01

    CaFe2O4 is an anisotropic S =5/2 antiferromagnet with two competing A (↑↑↓↓) and B (↑↓↑↓) magnetic order parameters separated by static antiphase boundaries at low temperatures. Neutron diffraction and bulk susceptibility measurements, show that the spins near these boundaries are weakly correlated and a carry an uncompensated ferromagnetic moment that can be tuned with a magnetic field. Spectroscopic measurements find these spins are bound with excitation energies less than the bulk magnetic spin waves and resemble the spectra from isolated spin clusters. Localized bound orphaned spins separate the two competing magnetic order parameters in CaFe2 O4 .

  17. The Child Affective Facial Expression (CAFE) set: validity and reliability from untrained adults.

    PubMed

    LoBue, Vanessa; Thrasher, Cat

    2014-01-01

    Emotional development is one of the largest and most productive areas of psychological research. For decades, researchers have been fascinated by how humans respond to, detect, and interpret emotional facial expressions. Much of the research in this area has relied on controlled stimulus sets of adults posing various facial expressions. Here we introduce a new stimulus set of emotional facial expressions into the domain of research on emotional development-The Child Affective Facial Expression set (CAFE). The CAFE set features photographs of a racially and ethnically diverse group of 2- to 8-year-old children posing for six emotional facial expressions-angry, fearful, sad, happy, surprised, and disgusted-and a neutral face. In the current work, we describe the set and report validity and reliability data on the set from 100 untrained adult participants.

  18. Infrared spectroscopic study of CaFe0.7Co0.3O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. X.; Xia, H. L.; Dai, Y. M.; Qiu, Z. Y.; Sui, Q. T.; Long, Y. W.; Qiu, X. G.

    2017-08-01

    Temperature-dependent infrared spectroscopy has been investigated for CaFe0.7Co0.3O3 which undergoes a ferromagnetic transition at TC≈177 K . It is observed that the spectral weight is transferred from ˜4800 -14 000 cm-1 to ˜0 -4800 cm-1 as the temperature is lowered around TC. Such a large-range spectral weight transfer is attributed to the Hund's interaction. The phonons in CaFe0.7Co0.3O3 show minor asymmetric line shapes, implying relatively weak electron-phonon coupling compared with the parent compound CaFeO3. The optical conductivity also reveals a broad peak structure in the range of ˜700 -1500 cm-1. Fit by the model of single-polaron absorption, the broad peak is interpreted by the excitation of polarons. From the fitting parameters of the polaron peak, we estimate the electron-phonon coupling constant α ˜ 0.4 -0.5 , implying that CaFe0.7Co0.3O3 falls into the weak-coupling regime.

  19. FARE-CAFE: a database of functional and regulatory elements of cancer-associated fusion events.

    PubMed

    Korla, Praveen Kumar; Cheng, Jack; Huang, Chien-Hung; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Liu, Yu-Hsuan; Kurubanjerdjit, Nilubon; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation (CT) is of enormous clinical interest because this disorder is associated with various major solid tumors and leukemia. A tumor-specific fusion gene event may occur when a translocation joins two separate genes. Currently, various CT databases provide information about fusion genes and their genomic elements. However, no database of the roles of fusion genes, in terms of essential functional and regulatory elements in oncogenesis, is available. FARE-CAFE is a unique combination of CTs, fusion proteins, protein domains, domain-domain interactions, protein-protein interactions, transcription factors and microRNAs, with subsequent experimental information, which cannot be found in any other CT database. Genomic DNA information including, for example, manually collected exact locations of the first and second break points, sequences and karyotypes of fusion genes are included. FARE-CAFE will substantially facilitate the cancer biologist's mission of elucidating the pathogenesis of various types of cancer. This database will ultimately help to develop 'novel' therapeutic approaches. Database URL: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/FARE-CAFE. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. FARE-CAFE: a database of functional and regulatory elements of cancer-associated fusion events

    PubMed Central

    Korla, Praveen Kumar; Cheng, Jack; Huang, Chien-Hung; Tsai, Jeffrey J. P.; Liu, Yu-Hsuan; Kurubanjerdjit, Nilubon; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation (CT) is of enormous clinical interest because this disorder is associated with various major solid tumors and leukemia. A tumor-specific fusion gene event may occur when a translocation joins two separate genes. Currently, various CT databases provide information about fusion genes and their genomic elements. However, no database of the roles of fusion genes, in terms of essential functional and regulatory elements in oncogenesis, is available. FARE-CAFE is a unique combination of CTs, fusion proteins, protein domains, domain–domain interactions, protein–protein interactions, transcription factors and microRNAs, with subsequent experimental information, which cannot be found in any other CT database. Genomic DNA information including, for example, manually collected exact locations of the first and second break points, sequences and karyotypes of fusion genes are included. FARE-CAFE will substantially facilitate the cancer biologist’s mission of elucidating the pathogenesis of various types of cancer. This database will ultimately help to develop ‘novel’ therapeutic approaches. Database URL: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/FARE-CAFE PMID:26384373

  1. Through the eyes of a child: preschoolers' identification of emotional expressions from the child affective facial expression (CAFE) set.

    PubMed

    LoBue, Vanessa; Baker, Lewis; Thrasher, Cat

    2017-08-10

    Researchers have been interested in the perception of human emotional expressions for decades. Importantly, most empirical work in this domain has relied on controlled stimulus sets of adults posing for various emotional expressions. Recently, the Child Affective Facial Expression (CAFE) set was introduced to the scientific community, featuring a large validated set of photographs of preschool aged children posing for seven different emotional expressions. Although the CAFE set was extensively validated using adult participants, the set was designed for use with children. It is therefore necessary to verify that adult validation applies to child performance. In the current study, we examined 3- to 4-year-olds' identification of a subset of children's faces in the CAFE set, and compared it to adult ratings cited in previous research. Our results demonstrate an exceptionally strong relationship between adult ratings of the CAFE photos and children's ratings, suggesting that the adult validation of the set can be applied to preschool-aged participants. The results are discussed in terms of methodological implications for the use of the CAFE set with children, and theoretical implications for using the set to study the development of emotion perception in early childhood.

  2. A Nanoindentation Study of the Plastic Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms in Single-Crystalline CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frawley, Keara G.; Bakst, Ian; Sypek, John T.; Vijayan, Sriram; Weinberger, Christopher R.; Canfield, Paul C.; Aindow, Mark; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2018-04-01

    The plastic deformation and fracture mechanisms in single-crystalline CaFe2As2 has been studied using nanoindentation and density functional theory simulations. CaFe2As2 single crystals were grown in a Sn-flux, resulting in homogeneous and nearly defect-free crystals. Nanoindentation along the [001] direction produces strain bursts, radial cracking, and lateral cracking. Ideal cleavage simulations along the [001] and [100] directions using density functional theory calculations revealed that cleavage along the [001] direction requires a much lower stress than cleavage along the [100] direction. This strong anisotropy of cleavage strength implies that CaFe2As2 has an atomic-scale layered structure, which typically exhibits lateral cracking during nanoindentation. This special layered structure results from weak atomic bonding between the (001) Ca and Fe2As2 layers.

  3. A Nanoindentation Study of the Plastic Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms in Single-Crystalline CaFe 2As 2

    DOE PAGES

    Frawley, Keara G.; Bakst, Ian; Sypek, John T.; ...

    2018-04-10

    In this paper, the plastic deformation and fracture mechanisms in single-crystalline CaFe 2As 2 has been studied using nanoindentation and density functional theory simulations. CaFe 2As 2 single crystals were grown in a Sn-flux, resulting in homogeneous and nearly defect-free crystals. Nanoindentation along the [001] direction produces strain bursts, radial cracking, and lateral cracking. Ideal cleavage simulations along the [001] and [100] directions using density functional theory calculations revealed that cleavage along the [001] direction requires a much lower stress than cleavage along the [100] direction. This strong anisotropy of cleavage strength implies that CaFe 2As 2 has an atomic-scalemore » layered structure, which typically exhibits lateral cracking during nanoindentation. This special layered structure results from weak atomic bonding between the (001) Ca and Fe 2As 2 layers.« less

  4. A Nanoindentation Study of the Plastic Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms in Single-Crystalline CaFe 2As 2

    SciT

    Frawley, Keara G.; Bakst, Ian; Sypek, John T.

    In this paper, the plastic deformation and fracture mechanisms in single-crystalline CaFe 2As 2 has been studied using nanoindentation and density functional theory simulations. CaFe 2As 2 single crystals were grown in a Sn-flux, resulting in homogeneous and nearly defect-free crystals. Nanoindentation along the [001] direction produces strain bursts, radial cracking, and lateral cracking. Ideal cleavage simulations along the [001] and [100] directions using density functional theory calculations revealed that cleavage along the [001] direction requires a much lower stress than cleavage along the [100] direction. This strong anisotropy of cleavage strength implies that CaFe 2As 2 has an atomic-scalemore » layered structure, which typically exhibits lateral cracking during nanoindentation. This special layered structure results from weak atomic bonding between the (001) Ca and Fe 2As 2 layers.« less

  5. The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects database (CAFE), a tool that supports assessments of chemical spills in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Adriana C; Farr, James K; Jenne, Polly; Chu, Valerie; Hielscher, Al

    2016-06-01

    The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects (CAFE) database is a centralized repository that allows for rapid and unrestricted access to data. Information in CAFE is integrated into a user-friendly tool with modules containing fate and effects data for 32 377 and 4498 chemicals, respectively. Toxicity data are summarized in the form of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) with associated 1st and 5th percentile hazard concentrations (HCs). An assessment of data availability relative to reported chemical incidents showed that CAFE had fate and toxicity data for 32 and 20 chemicals, respectively, of 55 chemicals reported in the US National Response Center database (2000-2014), and fate and toxicity data for 86 and 103, respectively, of 205 chemicals reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (2003-2014). Modeled environmental concentrations of 2 hypothetical spills (acrylonitrile, 625 barrels; and denatured ethanol, 857 barrels) were used to demonstrate CAFE's practical application. Most species in the 24-h SSD could be potentially impacted by acrylonitrile and denatured ethanol during the first 35 min and 15 h post spill, respectively, with concentrations falling below their HC5s (17 mg/L and 2676 mg/L) at 45 min and 60 h post spill, respectively. Comparisons of CAFE-based versus published HC5 values for 100 chemicals showed that nearly half of values were within a 2-fold difference, with a relatively small number of comparisons exceeding a 10-fold difference. The development of CAFE facilitates access to relevant environmental information, with potential uses likely expanding beyond those related to assessment of spills in aquatic environments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1576-1586. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  6. Vehicle Modeling for use in the CAFE model: Process description and modeling assumptions

    SciT

    Moawad, Ayman; Kim, Namdoo; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a process that, at a minimum, provides more robust information that can be used to calibrate inputs applicable under the CAFE model’s existing structure. The project will be more fully successful if a process can be developed that minimizes the need for decision trees and replaces the synergy factors by inputs provided directly from a vehicle simulation tool. The report provides a description of the process that was developed by Argonne National Laboratory and implemented in Autonomie.

  7. Impact of densification on microstructure and transport properties of CaFe5O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacotte, C.; Hébert, S.; Hardy, V.; Bréard, Y.; Maki, R.; Mori, T.; Pelloquin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Monophasic CaFe5O7 ceramic has been synthesized by solid state route. Its microstructural features have been studied by diffraction techniques and electron microscopy images before and after Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) annealings. This work is completed by measurements of electrical and thermal properties. Especially, attention is focused around the structural and electronic transition at 360 K for which specific heat measurements have revealed a sharp peak. Densification by SPS techniques led to a significant improvement of electrical conductivity above 360 K.

  8. Superconducting fluctuation effect in CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Gao, B.; Ma, Y. H.; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    2016-11-01

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF single crystals. Superconducting fluctuations, featured by magnetic field enhanced and exponential temperature dependent diamagnetism, are observed above the superconducting transition temperature T c, which is similar to that of cuprate superconductors, but less pronounced. In addition, the ratio of T c versus superfluid density follows well the Uemura line of high-T c cuprates, which suggests the exotic nature of the superconductivity in CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF.

  9. CAFE simulation of columnar-to-equiaxed transition in Al-7wt%Si alloys directionally solidified under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. R.; Mangelinck-Noël, N.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Zimmermann, G.; Sturz, L.; Nguyen Thi, H.; Billia, B.

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional multi-scale cellular automaton - finite element (CAFE) model is used to simulate grain structure evolution and microsegregation formation during solidification of refined Al-7wt%Si alloys under microgravity. The CAFE simulations are first qualitatively compared with the benchmark experimental data under microgravity. Qualitative agreement is obtained for the position of columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) and the CET transition mode (sharp or progressive). Further comparisons of the distributions of grain elongation factor and equivalent diameter are conducted and reveal a fair quantitative agreement.

  10. Complex structures of different CaFe2As2 samples

    PubMed Central

    Saparov, Bayrammurad; Cantoni, Claudia; Pan, Minghu; Hogan, Thomas C.; II, William Ratcliff; Wilson, Stephen D.; Fritsch, Katharina; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between magnetism and crystal structures in three CaFe2As2 samples is studied. For the nonmagnetic quenched crystals, different crystalline domains with varying lattice parameters are found, and three phases (orthorhombic, tetragonal, and collapsed tetragonal) coexist between TS = 95 K and 45 K. Annealing of the quenched crystals at 350°C leads to a strain relief through a large (~1.3%) expansion of the c-parameter and a small (~0.2%) contraction of the a-parameter, and to local ~0.2 Å displacements at the atomic-level. This annealing procedure results in the most homogeneous crystals for which the antiferromagnetic and orthorhombic phase transitions occur at TN/TS = 168(1) K. In the 700°C-annealed crystal, an intermediate strain regime takes place, with tetragonal and orthorhombic structural phases coexisting between 80 to 120 K. The origin of such strong shifts in the transition temperatures are tied to structural parameters. Importantly, with annealing, an increase in the Fe-As length leads to more localized Fe electrons and higher local magnetic moments on Fe ions. Synergistic contribution of other structural parameters, including a decrease in the Fe-Fe distance, and a dramatic increase of the c-parameter, which enhances the Fermi surface nesting in CaFe2As2, are also discussed. PMID:24844399

  11. Evolution of Spin fluctuations in CaFe2As2 with Co-doping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, A.; Das, P.; Böhmer, A. E.; Abernathy, D. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; McQueeney, R. J.; Goldman, A. I.

    Spin fluctuations are an essential ingredient for superconductivity in Fe-based supercondcutors. In Co-doped BaFe2As2, the system goes from the antiferromagnetic (AFM) state to the superconducting (SC) state with Co doping, and the spin fluctuations also evolve from well-defined spin waves with spin gap in the AFM regime to gapless overdamped or diffused fluctuations in the SC regime. CaFe2As2 has a stronger magneto-elastic coupling than BaFe2As2 and no co-existence of SC and AFM region as observed in BaFe2As2 with Co doping. Here, we will discuss the evolution of spin fluctuations in CaFe2As2 with Co doping. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by US DOE, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material Sciences and Engineering, under contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. This research used resources of SNS, a DOE office of science user facility operated by ORNL.

  12. Thin film growth of CaFe2As2 by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Nakamura, I.; Mori, Y.; Harada, S.; Ujihara, T.; Ikuta, H.

    2016-01-01

    Film growth of CaFe2As2 was realized by molecular beam epitaxy on six different substrates that have a wide variation in the lattice mismatch to the target compound. By carefully adjusting the Ca-to-Fe flux ratio, we obtained single-phase thin films for most of the substrates. Interestingly, an expansion of the CaFe2As2 lattice to the out-of-plane direction was observed for all films, even when an opposite strain was expected. A detailed microstructure observation of the thin film grown on MgO by transmission electron microscope revealed that it consists of cube-on-cube and 45°-rotated domains. The latter domains were compressively strained in plane, which caused a stretching along the c-axis direction. Because the domains were well connected across the boundary with no appreciable discontinuity, we think that the out-of-plane expansion in the 45°-rotated domains exerted a tensile stress on the other domains, resulting in the unexpectedly large c-axis lattice parameter, despite the apparently opposite lattice mismatch.

  13. Would the "Real" Girl Gamer Please Stand Up? Gender, LAN Cafes and the Reformulation of the "Girl" Gamer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavis, Catherine; Charles, Claire

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we consider the significance of cyber "LAN" cafes as sites where on and off-line practices meet in way that complicates binary notions of the gendered gamer. Existing research into computer games culture suggests a male dominated environment and points to girls' lower levels of competence and participation in games. Building on…

  14. (En)Countering Social and Environmental Messages in the Rainforest Cafe [sic], Children's Picturebooks, and Other Visual Culture Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisberg, Mira; Han, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    Our study critically examines social and environmental messages in a range of visual sites educating about rainforest environments. We focus primarily on the Rainforest Cafe, an international series of rainforest-themed edutainment restaurant/stores, whose inherent contradictions between consumption and conservation are quite disturbing when…

  15. Mechanically - induced disorder in CaFe2As2: a 57Fe Mössbauer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoming; Ran, Sheng; Canfield, Paul C.; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.

    57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to study an extremely pressure and strain sensitive compound, CaFe2As2, with different degrees of strain introduced by grinding and annealing. At the base temperature, in the antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic phase, compared to a sharp sextet Mössbauer spectrum of single crystal CaFe2As2, which is taken as an un-strained sample, an obviously broadened sextet and an extra doublet were observed for ground CaFe2As2 powders with different degrees of strain. The Mössbauer results suggest that the magnetic phase transition of CaFe2As2 can be inhomogeneously suppressed by the grinding induced strain to such an extent that the antiferromagnetic order in parts of the grains forming the powdered sample remain absent all the way down to 4.6 K. However, strain has almost no effect on the temperature dependent hyperfine magnetic field in the grains with magnetic order. The quadrupole shift in the magnetic phase approachs zero with increasing degrees of strain, indicating that the strain reduces the average lattice asymmetry at Fe atom position. Supported by US DOE under the Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 and by the China Scholarship Council.

  16. From School to Cafe and Back Again: Responding to the Learning Demands of the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Erica

    2011-01-01

    This paper traces the historical origins of formal and informal lifelong learning to argue that optimal twenty-first-century education can and should draw on the traditions of both the school and the coffee house or cafe. For some time now, educational policy documents and glossy school brochures have come wrapped in the mantle of lifelong…

  17. DIFFERENTIATING PASSENGER VEHICLES BY FUEL ECONOMY: STRATEGIC INCENTIVES AND THE COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF TRADABLE CAFE STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The welfare and distributional effects of alternative fuel economy regulations will be compared, including an increase in existing CAFE standards, allowing for tradable credits, and implementing other design options in a trading scheme, such as sliding standards based on ve...

  18. Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and d+Au collisions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    In this talk I will review PHOBOS data on charged particle multiplicities, obtained in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC. The general features of the Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions results will be discussed and compared to those of /line{p}p collisions. The total charged particle multiplicity, scaled by the number of participant pairs, is observed to be about 40% higher in Au+Au collisions than in /line{p}p and d+Au systems, but, surprisingly at the same level of e+e- collisions. Limiting fragmentation scaling is seen to be obeyed in Au+Au collisions.

  19. Solitary Magnons in the S =5/2 Antiferromagnet CaFe2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, C.; Rodriguez, E. E.; Lee, N.; Green, M. A.; Demmel, F.; Ewings, R. A.; Fouquet, P.; Laver, M.; Niedermayer, Ch.; Su, Y.; Nemkovski, K.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2016-07-01

    CaFe2O4 is a S =5/2 anisotropic antiferromagnet based upon zig-zag chains having two competing magnetic structures, denoted as the A (↑↑↓↓) and B (↑↓↑↓) phases, which differ by the c -axis stacking of ferromagnetic stripes. We apply neutron scattering to demonstrate that the competing A and B phase order parameters result in magnetic antiphase boundaries along c which freeze on the time scale of ˜1 ns at the onset of magnetic order at 200 K. Using high resolution neutron spectroscopy, we find quantized spin wave levels and measure 9 such excitations localized in regions ˜1 - 2 c -axis lattice constants in size. We discuss these in the context of solitary magnons predicted to exist in anisotropic systems. The magnetic anisotropy affords both competing A +B orders as well as localization of spin excitations in a classical magnet.

  20. CARMENES at PPVI. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of M Dwarfs with FEROS, CAFE and HRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Montes, D.; Jeffers, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Zechmeister, M.; Mundt, R.; Reiners, A.; Amado, P. J.; Casal, E.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Modroño, Z.; Ribas, I.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Quirrenbach, A.

    2013-07-01

    To ensure an efficient use of CARMENES observing time, and the highest chances of success, it is necessary first to select the most promising targets. To achieve this, we are observing ~500 M dwarfs at high-resolution (R = 30,000-48,000), from which we determine the projected rotational velocity vsini with an accuracy better than 0.5-0.2 km/s and radial-velocity stability better than 0.2-0.1 km/s. Our aim is to have at least two spectra at different epochs of the final 300 CARMENES targets. Our observations with FEROS at ESO/MPG 2.2m La Silla , CAFE at 2.2m Calar Alto and HRS at Hobby Eberly Telescope allow us to identify single- and double-line spectroscopic binaries and, especially, fast rotators, which should be discarded from the target list for exoplanet searches. Here we present preliminary results.

  1. 3D CAFE modeling of grain structures: application to primary dendritic and secondary eutectic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carozzani, T.; Digonnet, H.; Gandin, Ch-A.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional model is presented for the prediction of grain structures formed in casting. It is based on direct tracking of grain boundaries using a cellular automaton (CA) method. The model is fully coupled with a solution of the heat flow computed with a finite element (FE) method. Several unique capabilities are implemented including (i) the possibility to track the development of several types of grain structures, e.g. dendritic and eutectic grains, (ii) a coupling scheme that permits iterations between the FE method and the CA method, and (iii) tabulated enthalpy curves for the solid and liquid phases that offer the possibility to work with multicomponent alloys. The present CAFE model is also fully parallelized and runs on a cluster of computers. Demonstration is provided by direct comparison between simulated and recorded cooling curves for a directionally solidified aluminum-7 wt% silicon alloy.

  2. Unconventional superconductivity in CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF evidenced by torque measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hong; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF single crystals. Abnormal superconducting fluctuation, featured by enhanced diamagnetism with magnetic field, is detected up to about 1.5 times superconducting transition temperature Tc. Compared to cuprate superconductors, the fluctuation effect in iron-based superconductor is less pronounced. Anisotropy parameter γ is obtained from the mixed state torque data and it is found that γ shows both magnetic field and temperature depenence, pointing to multiband superconductivity. The temperature dependence of penetration depth λ (T) suggests unconventional superconductivity in CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF.

  3. Influence of growth flux solvent on anneal-tuning of ground states in CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncaioli, Connor; Drye, Tyler; Saha, Shanta R.; Paglione, Johnpierre

    2018-04-01

    The effects of anneal-tuning of single-crystalline samples of CaFe2As2 synthesized via a molten Sn-flux method are investigated using x-ray diffraction, chemical composition, electrical transport, and magnetic susceptibility measurements in order to understand the role of growth conditions on the resultant phase diagram. Previous studies of CaFe2As2 crystals synthesized using a self-flux (FeAs) method revealed an ability to tune the structural and magnetic properties of this system by control of post-synthesis annealing conditions, resulting in an ambient pressure phase diagram that spans from tetragonal/orthorhombic antiferromagnetism to the collapsed tetragonal phase of this system. In this work, we compare previous results to those obtained on crystals synthesized via Sn flux, finding similar tunability in both self- and Sn-flux cases, but less sensitivity to annealing temperatures in the latter case, resulting in a temperature-shifted phase diagram.

  4. Mechanically-induced disorder in CaFe 2As 2: A 57Fe Mössbauer study

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiaoming; Ran, Sheng; Canfield, Paul C.; ...

    2015-10-17

    57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to perform a microscopic study on the extremely pressure and strain sensitive compound, CaFe 2As 2, with different degrees of strain introduced by grinding and annealing. At the base temperature, in the antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic phase, compared to a sharp sextet Mössbauer spectrum of single crystal CaFe 2As 2, which is taken as an un-strained sample, an obviously broadened sextet and an extra doublet were observed for ground CaFe 2As 2 powders with different degrees of strain. The Mössbauer results suggest that the magnetic phase transition of CaFe 2As 2 can be inhomogeneously suppressed by the grindingmore » induced strain to such an extent that the antiferromagnetic order in parts of the grains forming the powdered sample remain absent all the way down to 4.6 K. However, strain has almost no effect on the temperature dependent hyperfine magnetic field in the grains with magnetic order. Additional electronic and asymmetry information was obtained from the isomer shift and quadrupole splitting. Similar isomer shift values in the magnetic phase for samples with different degrees of strain, indicate that the stain does not bring any significant variation of the electronic density at 57Fe nucleus position. As a result, the absolute values of quadrupole shift in the magnetic phase decrease and approach zero with increasing degrees of strain, indicating that the strain reduces the average lattice asymmetry at Fe atom position.« less

  5. Integrating community assembly and biodiversity to better understand ecosystem function: the Community Assembly and the Functioning of Ecosystems (CAFE) approach.

    PubMed

    Bannar-Martin, Katherine H; Kremer, Colin T; Ernest, S K Morgan; Leibold, Mathew A; Auge, Harald; Chase, Jonathan; Declerck, Steven A J; Eisenhauer, Nico; Harpole, Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Isbell, Forest; Koffel, Thomas; Larsen, Stefano; Narwani, Anita; Petermann, Jana S; Roscher, Christiane; Cabral, Juliano Sarmento; Supp, Sarah R

    2018-02-01

    The research of a generation of ecologists was catalysed by the recognition that the number and identity of species in communities influences the functioning of ecosystems. The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) is most often examined by controlling species richness and randomising community composition. In natural systems, biodiversity changes are often part of a bigger community assembly dynamic. Therefore, focusing on community assembly and the functioning of ecosystems (CAFE), by integrating both species richness and composition through species gains, losses and changes in abundance, will better reveal how community changes affect ecosystem function. We synthesise the BEF and CAFE perspectives using an ecological application of the Price equation, which partitions the contributions of richness and composition to function. Using empirical examples, we show how the CAFE approach reveals important contributions of composition to function. These examples show how changes in species richness and composition driven by environmental perturbations can work in concert or antagonistically to influence ecosystem function. Considering how communities change in an integrative fashion, rather than focusing on one axis of community structure at a time, will improve our ability to anticipate and predict changes in ecosystem function. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cannula-Assisted Flap Elevation (CAFE): a novel technique for developing flaps during skin-sparing mastectomies.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    One of the most challenging procedures in breast surgery is the skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM). Various techniques and incisions have evolved that characterize this procedure; however, what is common in all of them is the smaller the incision, the more difficult it is to develop the skin flaps. A procedure was developed that incorporates the use of liposuction cannulas (without suction) to create the skin flaps. The technique and results are described in this manuscript. From October of 2012 to April 2014, 289 mastectomies (171 patients) were performed using the CAFE procedure on women of all shapes and sizes. Postoperatively, no problems were experienced with flap viability using this technique. The main difference in side effects between the CAFE technique and other standard techniques for developing flaps in SSMs was more bruising than normal, but this resolved rapidly. The results for use of this technique were consistently impressive. The learning curve for this procedure is very short, especially for those who perform SSMs using sharp technique (scissors). Residents and fellows became proficient with the CAFE technique in a relatively short amount of time. Plastic surgeons were pleased with the cosmetic outcomes of their reconstructions that follow this type of mastectomy. Patients were extremely satisfied with their reconstructions as well. Incorporating the use of liposuction cannulas (without suction) makes the creation of flaps for SSM a relatively simple and rapid method. It is especially useful to assist in developing skin flaps with even the smallest of skin incisions.

  7. L’évaluation et le traitement du nourrisson exposé au virus d’immunodéficience humaine de type 1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ Dans les pays industrialisés, des soins et un traitement sont offerts aux femmes enceintes et aux nourrissons, afin de faire chuter à 2 % ou moins le taux d’infection périnatale au virus d’immunodéficience humaine de type 1 (VIH-1). Le pédiatre joue un rôle de premier plan dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH-1 de la mère à l’enfant par le dépistage des nourrissons exposés au VIH dont l’infection au VIH de la mère n’a pas été diagnostiquée avant l’accouchement. Il prescrit une prophylaxie antirétrovirale à ces nourrissons, afin de réduire le risque d’acquisition de l’infection au VIH-1 et d’en éviter le plus possible la transmission par le lait maternel. De plus, le pédiatre peut soigner les nourrissons exposés au VIH-1 en les surveillant pour obtenir un dépistage précoce de l’infection au VIH-1 et évaluer les toxicités à court et à long terme de l’exposition aux antirétroviraux, assurer une chimioprophylaxie de la pneumonie à Pneumocystis et soutenir les familles qui vivent avec une infection au VIH-1, grâce à des conseils thérapeutiques aux parents ou aux soignants.

  8. CAFE: a seismic investigation of water percolation in the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondenay, S.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Malone, S. D.; MacKenzie, L.; Zhang, Z.; van Keken, P. E.; Wech, A. G.; Sweet, J. R.; Melbourne, T. I.; Hacker, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Subduction zones transport water into the Earth's interior. The subsequent release of this water through dehydration reactions may trigger intraslab earthquakes and arc volcanism, regulate slip on the plate interface, control plate buoyancy, and regulate the long-term budget of water on the planet's surface. As part of Earthscope, we have undertaken an experiment named CAFE (Cascadia Arrays for Earthscope) seeking to better constrain these effects in the Cascadia subduction zone. The basic experiment has four components: (1) a 47-element broadband imaging array of Flexible Array instruments integrated with Bigfoot; (2) three small-aperture seismic arrays with 15 additional short-period instruments near known sources of Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events; (3) analysis of the PBO and PANGA GPS data sets to define the details of episodic slip events; and (4) integrative modeling with complementary constraints from petrology and geodynamics. Here, we present a summary of the results that have been obtained to date by CAFE, with a focus on high-resolution seismic imaging. A 250 km-long by 120 km-deep seismic profile extending eastward from the Washington coast was generated by 2-D Generalized Radon Transform Inversion of the broadband data. It images the subducted crust as a shallow-dipping, low-velocity layer from 20km depth beneath the coast to 40km depth beneath the forearc. The termination of the low-velocity layer is consistent with the depth at which hydrated metabasalts of the subducted crust are expected to undergo eclogitization, a reaction that is accompanied by the release of water and an increase in seismic velocities. Slab earthquakes are located in both the oceanic crust and mantle at depths <40 km, and exclusively in the oceanic mantle at greater depth, as would be expected if they are related to slab dehydration. Two ETS events have occurred during the course of the deployment. They were precisely located and are confined to the region above which the

  9. 'Enter at your own risk': a multimethod study of air quality and biological measures in Canadian waterpipe cafes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Haji, Farzana; Kaufman, Pamela; Muir, Sarah; Ferrence, Roberta

    2015-03-01

    Tobacco and non-tobacco-based waterpipe smoking has increased exponentially in many countries in recent decades, particularly among youth and young adults. Although tobacco smoking is banned in many indoor public places, waterpipe smoking, ostensibly non-tobacco, continues in Ontario and other jurisdictions where only tobacco smoking is prohibited. This study assessed air quality and exposure in waterpipe cafes using multiple methods and markers. Indoor (n=12) and outdoor (n=5) air quality was assessed in Toronto, Canada waterpipe cafes from 30 August to 11 October 2012. Real-time measurements of air nicotine, fine particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) and ambient carbon monoxide (CO) were collected in 2 h sessions. Levels of CO in breath were collected in non-smoking field staff before entering and upon leaving venues. Observations of occupant behaviour, environmental changes and venue characteristics were also recorded. In indoor venues, mean values were 1419 µg/m(3) for PM2.5, 17.7 ppm for ambient CO, and 3.3 µg/m(3) for air nicotine. Levels increased with increasing number of active waterpipes. On outdoor patios, mean values were 80.5 µg/m(3) for PM2.5, 0.5 ppm for ambient CO, and 0.6 µg/m(3) for air nicotine. Air quality levels in indoor waterpipe cafes are hazardous for human health. Outdoor waterpipe cafes showed less harmful particulate levels than indoors, but mean PM2.5 levels (80.5 µg/m(3)) were still 'poor'. Staff and patrons of waterpipe cafes are exposed to air quality levels considered hazardous to human health. Results support eliminating waterpipe smoking in hospitality venues indoors and out. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. STAR Au + Au Fixed Target Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, Kathryn; STAR Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program was proposed to look for the turn-off of signatures of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), search for a possible QCD critical point, and study the nature of the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. The results from the NA49 experiment at CERN have been used to claim that the onset of deconfinement occurs at a collision energy around a center-of-mass energy of 7 GeV, the low end of the BES range. Data from lower energies are needed to test if this onset occurs. The goal of the STAR Fixed-Target Program is to extend the collision energy range in BES II with the same detector to energies that are likely below the onset of deconfinement. Currently, STAR has inserted a gold target into the beam pipe and conducted test runs at center-of-mass energies 3.9 and 4.5 GeV. Tests have been done with both Au and Al beams. First physics results from a Coulomb analysis of Au + Au fixed-target collisions, which are found to be consistent with previous experiments, will be presented. These results demonstrate that STAR has good particle identification capabilities in this novel detector setup. Furthermore, the Coulomb potential, which is sensitive to the Z of the projectile and degree of baryonic stopping, will be compared with published results from the AGS. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1068833.

  11. Superelasticity and cryogenic linear shape memory effects of CaFe 2As 2

    DOE PAGES

    Sypek, John T.; Yu, Hang; Dusoe, Keith J.; ...

    2017-10-20

    Shape memory materials have the ability to recover their original shape after a significant amount of deformation when they are subjected to certain stimuli, for instance, heat or magnetic fields. But, their performance is often limited by the energetics and geometry of the martensitic-austenitic phase transformation. We report a unique shape memory behavior in CaFe 2As 2, which exhibits superelasticity with over 13% recoverable strain, over 3 GPa yield strength, repeatable stress–strain response even at the micrometer scale, and cryogenic linear shape memory effects near 50 K. These properties are acheived through a reversible uni-axial phase transformation mechanism, the tetragonal/orthorhombic-to-collapsed-tetragonalmore » phase transformation. These results offer the possibility of developing cryogenic linear actuation technologies with a high precision and high actuation power per unit volume for deep space exploration, and more broadly, suggest a mechanistic path to a class of shape memory materials, ThCr 2Si 2-structured intermetallic compounds.« less

  12. Solitary Magnons in the S=5/2 Antiferromagnet CaFe_{2}O_{4}.

    PubMed

    Stock, C; Rodriguez, E E; Lee, N; Green, M A; Demmel, F; Ewings, R A; Fouquet, P; Laver, M; Niedermayer, Ch; Su, Y; Nemkovski, K; Rodriguez-Rivera, J A; Cheong, S-W

    2016-07-01

    CaFe_{2}O_{4} is a S=5/2 anisotropic antiferromagnet based upon zig-zag chains having two competing magnetic structures, denoted as the A (↑↑↓↓) and B (↑↓↑↓) phases, which differ by the c-axis stacking of ferromagnetic stripes. We apply neutron scattering to demonstrate that the competing A and B phase order parameters result in magnetic antiphase boundaries along c which freeze on the time scale of ∼1  ns at the onset of magnetic order at 200 K. Using high resolution neutron spectroscopy, we find quantized spin wave levels and measure 9 such excitations localized in regions ∼1-2 c-axis lattice constants in size. We discuss these in the context of solitary magnons predicted to exist in anisotropic systems. The magnetic anisotropy affords both competing A+B orders as well as localization of spin excitations in a classical magnet.

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of sol-gel derived CaFe2O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arnab Kumar; Govindaraj, Ramanujan; Srinivasan, Ananthakrishnan

    2018-04-01

    Calcium ferrite nanoparticles with average crystallite size of ∼11 nm have been synthesized by sol-gel method by mixing calcium and ferric nitrates in stoichiometric ratio in the presence of ethylene glycol. As-synthesized nanoparticles were annealed at different temperatures and their structural and magnetic properties have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction studies showed that unlike most ferrites, as-synthesized cubic calcium ferrite showed a slow transformation to orthorhombic structure when annealed above 400 °C. Single phase orthorhombic CaFe2O4 was obtained upon annealing at 1100 °C. Divergence of zero field cooled and field cooled magnetization curves at low temperatures indicated superparamagnetic behavior in cubic calcium ferrite particles. Superparamagnetism persisted in cubic samples annealed up to 500 °C. As-synthesized nanoparticles heat treated at 1100 °C exhibited mixed characteristics of antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic grains with saturation magnetization of 0.4 emu/g whereas nanoparticles calcined at 400 °C exhibited superparamagnetic characteristics with saturation magnetization of 22.92 emu/g. An antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition was observed between 170 and 190 K in the sample annealed at 1100 °C, which was further confirmed by Mössbauer studies carried out at different temperatures across the transition.

  14. Interlayer interaction in Ca-Fe layered double hydroxides intercalated with nitrate and chloride species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jaberi, Muayad; Naille, Sébastien; Dossot, Manuel; Ruby, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Ca-Fe layered double hydroxide (LDH) intercalated with chloride and nitrate ions has been synthesized with varying CaII:FeIII molar ratios of the initial solution. Phase pure LDH is observed with CaII:FeIII molar ratio of 2:1 and a mixture of LDH and Ca(OH)2 is formed for CaII:FeIII molar ratios higher than 2:1. Vibrational spectroscopies (Raman and IR) were used successfully to understand the interaction between the cationic and anionic sheets. The Raman bands positions at lower frequencies (150-600 cm-1) are intimately correlated to the nature of the divalent and trivalent ions but also to the nature of the anions. Indeed, a shift of ˜9 cm-1 is observed for the Raman double bands situated in the 300-400 cm-1 region when comparing Raman spectra of CaFe-LDH containing either nitrate or chloride ions. Two types of nitrate environments are observed namely free (non-hydrogen bonded) nitrate and nitrate hydrogen bonded to the interlayer water or to the 'brucite-like' hydroxyl surface. Multiple types of water structure are observed and would result from different hydrogen bond structures. Water bending modes are identified at 1645 cm-1 greater than the one observed for LDH intercalated with chloride anions (1618 cm-1), indicating that the water is strongly hydrogen bonded to the nitrate anions.

  15. Spectroscopic Characterisation of CARMENES Target Candidates from FEROS, CAFE and HRS High-Resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passegger, Vera Maria; Reiners, Ansgar; Jeffers, Sandra V.; Wende, Sebastian; Schöfer, Patrick; Amado, Pedro J.; Caballero, Jose A.; Montes, David; Mundt, Reinhard; Ribas, Ignasi; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Échelle Spectrographs) started a new planet survey on M-dwarfs in January this year. The new high-resolution spectrographs are operating in the visible and near-infrared at Calar Alto Observatory. They will perform high-accuracy radial-velocity measurements (goal 1 m s-1) of about 300 M-dwarfs with the aim to detect low-mass planets within habitable zones. We characterised the candidate sample for CARMENES and provide fundamental parameters for these stars in order to constrain planetary properties and understand star-planet systems. Using state-of-the-art model atmospheres (PHOENIX-ACES) and χ2-minimization with a downhill-simplex method we determine effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity [Fe/H] for high-resolution spectra of around 480 stars of spectral types M0.0-6.5V taken with FEROS, CAFE and HRS. We find good agreement between the models and our observed high-resolution spectra. We show the performance of the algorithm, as well as results, parameter and spectral type distributions for the CARMENES candidate sample, which is used to define the CARMENES target sample. We also present first preliminary results obtained from CARMENES spectra.

  16. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    SciT

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H.; Tahara, S.

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquidmore » Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.« less

  17. Estimating gene gain and loss rates in the presence of error in genome assembly and annotation using CAFE 3.

    PubMed

    Han, Mira V; Thomas, Gregg W C; Lugo-Martinez, Jose; Hahn, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Current sequencing methods produce large amounts of data, but genome assemblies constructed from these data are often fragmented and incomplete. Incomplete and error-filled assemblies result in many annotation errors, especially in the number of genes present in a genome. This means that methods attempting to estimate rates of gene duplication and loss often will be misled by such errors and that rates of gene family evolution will be consistently overestimated. Here, we present a method that takes these errors into account, allowing one to accurately infer rates of gene gain and loss among genomes even with low assembly and annotation quality. The method is implemented in the newest version of the software package CAFE, along with several other novel features. We demonstrate the accuracy of the method with extensive simulations and reanalyze several previously published data sets. Our results show that errors in genome annotation do lead to higher inferred rates of gene gain and loss but that CAFE 3 sufficiently accounts for these errors to provide accurate estimates of important evolutionary parameters.

  18. Observational study of the visibility of branded tobacco packaging and smoking at outdoor bars/cafes in Wellington, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Martin, Natasha; McHugh, Hugh; Murtagh, Jono; Oliver-Rose, Connor; Panesar, Div; Pengelly, Harriet; Rieper, Scott; Schofield, Henry; Singh, Vidit; Speed, Amanda; Strachan, Rhona; Tapsell, Te Kahui; Trafford, Sara; van Ryn, Stefan; Ward, Ethan; Whiting, Rosie; Wilson-van Duin, Merryn; Wu, Zhou; Purdie, Gordon; van der Deen, Frederieke S; Thomson, George; Pearson, Amber L; Wilson, Nick

    2014-10-17

    To collect data on tobacco brand visibility on packaging on outdoor tables at bars/cafes in a downtown area, prior to a proposed plain packaging law. The study was conducted in the Central Business District of Wellington City in March 2014. Observational data were systematically collected on tobacco packaging visibility and smoking by patrons at 55 bars/cafes with outdoor tables. A total of 19,189 patrons, 1707 tobacco packs and 1357 active smokers were observed. One tobacco pack was visible per 11.0 patrons and the active smoking prevalence was 7.1% (95%CI: 4.9-9.2%), similar to Australian results (8.3%). Eighty percent of packs were positioned face-up (showing the brand), 8% face-down (showing the large pictorial warning), and 12% in other positions. Pack visibility per patron was significantly greater in areas without child patrons (RR=3.1, p<0.0001). Both smoking and pack visibility tended to increase from noon into the evenings on weekends. Inter-observer reliability for key measures in this study was high (Bland-Altman plots). Tobacco branding on packaging was frequently visible because of the way smokers position their packs. These results highlight the residual problem posed by this form of marketing. The results also provide baseline data for the future evaluation of plain packaging if a proposed law is implemented in New Zealand. Other results warrant further research, particularly the reasons for lower pack visibility and smoking when children were present.

  19. 3D morphology of Au and Au@Ag nanobipyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgin, Julien; Florea, Ileana; Majimel, Jérôme; Dobri, Adam; Ersen, Ovidiu; Tréguer-Delapierre, Mona

    2012-02-01

    The morphologies of Au and Au@Ag nanobipyramids were investigated using electron tomography. The 3D reconstruction reveals that the Au bipyramids have an irregular six-fold twinning structure with highly stepped dominant {151} facets. These short steps/edges stabilized via surface adsorbed CTAB favor the growth of silver on the lateral facets leading to strong blue shifts in longitudinal plasmon surface resonance.The morphologies of Au and Au@Ag nanobipyramids were investigated using electron tomography. The 3D reconstruction reveals that the Au bipyramids have an irregular six-fold twinning structure with highly stepped dominant {151} facets. These short steps/edges stabilized via surface adsorbed CTAB favor the growth of silver on the lateral facets leading to strong blue shifts in longitudinal plasmon surface resonance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11454b

  20. Imaging Subduction, Episodic Tremor and Slip in the Pacific Northwest: Cascadia Arrays For Earthscope (CAFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, G. A.; Rondenay, S.; Creager, K. C.; Malone, S. D.; Zhang, Z.; Wech, A. G.; Sweet, J. R.; Melbourne, T. I.; Hacker, B. R.

    2007-12-01

    Subduction delivers fluids into the Earth's mantle by transport of hydrated crust downward in subducting plates. These fluids are released at depth and may be responsible for a wide variety of phenomena including weakened thrust faults, episodic tremor and slip (ETS), intraslab earthquakes, forearc serpentinization, and arc magmatism. Cascadia is the volcanic arc associated with the youngest subducting plate, and hence a primary EarthScope target. In 2006 we launched Cascadia Arrays For Earthscope (CAFE), an EarthScope effort utilizing Flexible Array, Transportable Array, and PBO facilities, and integrating these data with complementary constraints from geodynamics and geochemistry. Seismic imaging, the emphasis of this presentation, is employed to illuminate (i) the descending oceanic plate, from where fluids are expelled by metamorphism, and (ii) the mantle wedge, where fluids migrate to produce hydrous phases such as serpentine or, beneath the volcanic arc, primary magmas, and (iii) the interface between them where ETS may be produced. The experiment traverses a section of the Cascadia system where earthquakes extend to nearly 100 km depth, thus permitting an investigation of the relationship between the release of fluids and the generation of Wadati-Benioff-zone earthquakes, and crosses regions of ETS excitation. The basic experiment has four components: (1) a 47-element broadband imaging array of Flexible Array instruments integrated with Bigfoot; (2) three small-aperture seismic arrays with 15 additional short-period instruments near known sources of ETS; (3) analysis of the PBO and PANGA GPS data sets to define the details of episodic slip events; and (4) integrative modeling. Sixty-two seismographs were deployed in July 2006; here we present a first look at the experiment and the data collected. Initial data recovery has been excellent, with approximately 12 months of continuous data recovered as of this writing, most delivered to the IRIS DMC. This time

  1. A Tale of Blue Rain Cafe: A Study on the Online Narrative Construction about a Community of English Learners on the Chinese Mainland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Xuesong

    2007-01-01

    The study analyzes a strand of online discussion messages entitled "a Tale of Blue Rain Cafe" from an online community of English learners on the Chinese mainland. The strand of messages was part of the collective reflection made by members of an English learning club on their participation. Using sociocultural learning theory, the paper…

  2. Facile synthesis of novel CaFe2O4/g-C3N4 nanocomposites for degradation of methylene blue under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, S; Maruthamani, D; Habibi-Yangjeh, A; Paul, Bappi; Dhar, Siddhartha Sankar; Selvam, Kaliyamoorthy

    2016-10-15

    Hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites comprised of calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4) and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) were prepared via a simple two-step process. The hybridized CaFe2O4/g-C3N4 heterostructure was characterized by a variety of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and photoelectrochemical studies. Photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples was evaluated against degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible-light irradiation. The photocatalytic activity of CaFe2O4 30%/g-C3N4 nanocomposite, as optimum photocatalyst, for degradation of MB was superior to the pure CaFe2O4 and g-C3N4 samples. It was demonstrated that the photogenerated holes and superoxide ion radicals were the two main reactive species towards the photocatalytic degradation of MB over the nanocomposite. Based on the experimental results, a possible photocatalytic mechanism for the MB degradation over the nanocomposite was proposed. This work may provide some inspiration for the fabrication of spinel ferrites with efficient photocatalytic performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  4. An analysis of variation in expression of neurofibromatosis (NF) type I (NFI): Evidence for modifying genes

    SciT

    Easton, D.F.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Huson, S.M.

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 (NF1) is notable for its variable expression. To determine whether variation in expression has an inherited component, the authors examined 175 individuals in 48 NF families, including six MZ twin pairs. Three quantitative traits were scored - number of cafe-au-lait patches, number of cutaneous neurofibromas, and head circumference; and five binary traits were scored - the presence or absence of plexiform neurofibromas, optic gliomas, scoliosis, epilepsy, and referral for remedial education. For cafe-au-lait patches and neurofibromas, correlation was highest between MZ twins, less high between first-degree relatives, and lower still between more distant relatives. The highmore » correlation between distant relatives suggests that the type of mutation at the NF1 locus itself plays only a minor role. All of the five binary traits, with the exception of plexiformneurofibromas, also showed significant familial clustering. The familial effects for these traits were consistent with polygenic effects, but there were insufficient data to rule out other models, including a significant effect of different NF1 mutations. There was no evidence of any association between the different traits in affected individuals. The authors conclude that the phenotypic expression of NF1 is to a large extent determined by the genotype at other [open quotes]modifying[close quotes] loci and that these modifying genes are trait specific. 22 refs., 8 tabs.« less

  5. Ullrich-Turner syndrome and neurofibromatosis-1

    SciT

    Schorry, E.K.; Lovell, A.M.; Saal, H.M.

    There is a well-known association between neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) and Noonan syndrome-like manifestations, including short stature, short broad neck, and hypertelorism. These anomalies are thought to be due to variable expression of the NF1 gene. We report on two girls with NF1 who were found to have the Ullrich-Turner syndrome. Case 1, a 12-year-old white girl, was followed in a Neurofibromatosis Clinic because of multiple cafe-au-lait spots and a family history of NF1 in her mother and sister. On examination, she had short stature, hypertelorism, and short neck with low posterior hairline. Karyotype was 86% 46,XY/14% 45,X. Case 2, the firstmore » child of a woman with NF1, presented at birth with lymphedema of hands and feet and a short broad neck. Karyotype was 45,X. At age 23 months she was short, had epicanthic folds, hypertelorism, narrow palate, right simian crease, 19 cafe-au-lait spots, and axillary freckling. We conclude that chromosome studies should be performed in girls with NF1 who have short stature and Noonan- or Ullrich-Turner-like findings. Dilemmas raised by the dual diagnoses of NF1 and Ullrich-Turner syndrome include potential risks of growth hormone therapy and estrogen replacement therapy. 14 refs., 2 figs.« less

  6. A Case of Atypical McCune-Albright Syndrome with Vaginal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rostampour, Noushin; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Hovsepian, Silva; Hekmatnia, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare non-inherited disorder characterized by the clinical triad of precocious puberty, cafe-au-lait skin lesions, and fibrous dysplasia of bone. Case Presentation We report a girl with MAS, presenting initially with vaginal bleeding at the age of 17 months. Ultrasonography revealed unilateral ovarian cysts and ureteral and ovarian enlargement. Considering the clinical and paraclinical findings, the patient diagnosed as a case of gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty was treated with medroxy-progestrone acetate (MPA) for three months. During the follow up, recurrent episodes of bleeding, ovarian activation and cyst formation, as well as breast size development were reported. At the age of 5.5 years, fibrous dysplasia was detected, which in coexistence with precocious puberty confirmed the diagnosis of MAS. The patient had no cafe-au-lait skin macles during follow up. Conclusion Considering that clinical manifestations of MAS appear later in the course of recurrent periods of ovarian activation and cyst formation, a careful clinical observation and follow up of patients is necessary and the diagnosis of MAS must be kept in mind in cases with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. PMID:23056821

  7. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-02-07

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.

  8. Cluster-to-cluster transformation among Au6, Au8 and Au11 nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiuqing; Fu, Junhong; Lin, Xinzhang; Fu, Xuemei; Yan, Jinghui; Wu, Ren'an; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jiahui

    2018-05-22

    We present the cluster-to-cluster transformations among three gold nanoclusters, [Au6(dppp)4]2+ (Au6), [Au8(dppp)4Cl2]2+ (Au8) and [Au11(dppp)5]3+ (Au11). The conversion process follows a rule that states that the transformation of a small cluster to a large cluster is achieved through an oxidation process with an oxidizing agent (H2O2) or with heating, while the conversion of a large cluster to a small one occurs through a reduction process with a reducing agent (NaBH4). All the reactions were monitored using UV-Vis spectroscopy and ESI-MS. This work may provide an alternative approach to the synthesis of novel gold nanoclusters and a further understanding of the structural transformation relationship of gold nanoclusters.

  9. Dramatic changes in the electronic structure upon transition to the collapsed tetragonal phase in CaFe 2As 2

    SciT

    Dhaka, R. S.; Jiang, Rui; Ran, S.

    2014-01-31

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations to study the electronic structure of CaFe 2As 2 in the collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase. This unusual phase of iron arsenic high-temperature superconductors was hard to measure as it exists only under pressure. By inducing internal strain, via the postgrowth thermal treatment of single crystals, we were able to stabilize the CT phase at ambient pressure. We find significant differences in the Fermi surface topology and band dispersion data from the more common orthorhombic-antiferromagnetic or tetragonal-paramagnetic phases, consistent with electronic structure calculations. The top of the hole bands sinks belowmore » the Fermi level, which destroys the nesting present in parent phases. The absence of nesting in this phase, along with an apparent loss of Fe magnetic moment, are now clearly experimentally correlated with the lack of superconductivity in this phase.« less

  10. Radial velocity confirmation of Kepler-91 b. Additional evidence of its planetary nature using the Calar Alto/CAFE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Henning, Th.; Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2014-08-01

    The object transiting the star Kepler-91 was recently assessed as being of planetary nature. The confirmation was achieved by analysing the light-curve modulations observed in the Kepler data. However, quasi-simultaneous studies claimed a self-luminous nature for this object, thus rejecting it as a planet. In this work, we apply anindependent approach to confirm the planetary mass of Kepler-91b by using multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph (CAFE). We obtain the physical and orbital parameters with the radial velocity technique. In particular, we derive a value of 1.09 ± 0.20 MJup for the mass of Kepler-91b, in excellent agreement with our previous estimate that was based on the orbital brightness modulation.

  11. Combined effects of Sr substitution and pressure on the ground states in CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knöner, S.; Gati, E.; Köhler, S.; Wolf, B.; Tutsch, U.; Ran, S.; Torikachvili, M. S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Lang, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the combined effects of Sr substitution and hydrostatic pressure on the ground-state properties of CaFe2As2 . Measurements of the electrical resistance and magnetic susceptibility, both at ambient and finite pressure P ≤2 GPa, were performed on Ca1 -xSrxFe2As2 single crystals grown out of Sn flux. We find that by Sr substitution the transition temperature to the magnetic/structural phase is enhanced and therefore a higher pressure is needed to suppress the transition to lowest temperature. In addition, the transition to the collapsed tetragonal phase is found at a pressure, which is distinctly higher than in the pure compound. This implies that the stability ranges of both phases shift on the pressure-axis upon doping, but the latter one with a higher rate. These observations suggest the possibility of separating the two phase lines, which intersect already at elevated temperatures for x =0 and low Sr concentration levels. For x =0.177 , we find strong evidence that both phases remain separated down to the lowest temperature and that a zero-resistance state emerges in this intermediate pressure window. This observation indicates that Sr substitution combined with hydrostatic pressure provides another route for stabilizing superconductivity in CaFe2As2 . Our results are consistent with the notion that (i) preserving the fluctuations associated with the structural-magnetic transition to low temperatures is vital for superconductivity to form in this material and that (ii) the nonmagnetic collapsed tetragonal phase is detrimental for superconductivity.

  12. Combined effects of Sr substitution and pressure on the ground states in CaFe 2 As 2

    SciT

    Knoner, S.; Gati, E.; Kohler, S.

    2016-10-21

    Here, we present a detailed study of the combined effects of Sr substitution and hydrostatic pressure on the ground-state properties of CaFe 2As 2. Measurements of the electrical resistance and magnetic susceptibility, both at ambient and finite pressure P ≤ 2 GPa, were performed on Ca 1–xSr xFe 2As 2 single crystals grown out of Sn flux. We find that by Sr substitution the transition temperature to the magnetic/structural phase is enhanced and therefore a higher pressure is needed to suppress the transition to lowest temperature. In addition, the transition to the collapsed tetragonal phase is found at a pressure,more » which is distinctly higher than in the pure compound. This implies that the stability ranges of both phases shift on the pressure-axis upon doping, but the latter one with a higher rate. These observations suggest the possibility of separating the two phase lines, which intersect already at elevated temperatures for x = 0 and low Sr concentration levels. For x = 0.177, we find strong evidence that both phases remain separated down to the lowest temperature and that a zero-resistance state emerges in this intermediate pressure window. This observation indicates that Sr substitution combined with hydrostatic pressure provides another route for stabilizing superconductivity in CaFe 2As 2. Lastly, our results are consistent with the notion that (i) preserving the fluctuations associated with the structural-magnetic transition to low temperatures is vital for superconductivity to form in this material and that (ii) the nonmagnetic collapsed tetragonal phase is detrimental for superconductivity.« less

  13. Thermal equation of state of CaFe 2O 4-type MgAl 2O 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueda, Yuichiro; Irifune, Tetsuo; Sanehira, Takeshi; Yagi, Takehiko; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Kikegawa, Takumi; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2009-05-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction measurements of CaFe 2O 4-type MgAl 2O 4 have been conducted at pressures up to 42 GPa and temperatures to 2400 K using Kawai-type multianvil apparatus with sintered diamond anvils. Additional measurements have also been conducted at pressures to 12 GPa using diamond anvil cell with helium as a pressure medium at room temperature, and at temperatures to 836 K at the ambient pressure using a high-temperature X-ray diffractometer. The analysis of room-temperature data yielded V0 = 240.1(2) Å 3, K0 = 205(6) GPa, and K0=4.1(3). A fit of the present data to high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EOS) yielded (∂ K0/∂ T) P = -0.030(2) GPa/K and α0 = a0 + b0T with values of a0 = 1.96(13) × 10 -5 K -1 and b0 = 1.64(24) × 10 -8 K -2. The present data set was also fitted to Mie-Grüneisen-Debye (MGD) EOS and we obtained γ0 = 1.73(7), q = 2.03(37), and θ0 = 1546(104) K. Density changes of MORB have been estimated using the newly obtained thermoelastic parameters, assuming that the Al-rich phase in this composition possesses the CaFe 2O 4-type structure under the lower mantle P, T conditions. The calculated densities along geotherms for the normal mantle and subducting cold slabs are both significantly higher than those of typical seismological models, confirming the conclusion of some recent results on MORB by laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments.

  14. Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    2010-01-14

    This image, produced from instrument data aboard NASA Space Shuttle Endeavour, is a perspective view of the topography of Port-au-Prince, Haiti where a magnitude 7.0 earthquake occurred on January 12, 2010.

  15. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of CaFe2O4-type β-CaCr2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shuangmeng; Yin, Yuan; Shieh, Sean R.; Shan, Shuangming; Xue, Weihong; Wang, Ching-Pao; Yang, Ke; Higo, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    In situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies of orthorhombic CaFe2O4-type β-CaCr2O4 chromite were carried out up to 16.2 and 32.0 GPa at room temperature using multi-anvil apparatus and diamond anvil cell, respectively. No phase transition was observed in this study. Fitting a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to the P-V data yields a zero-pressure volume of V 0 = 286.8(1) Å3, an isothermal bulk modulus of K 0 = 183(5) GPa and the first pressure derivative of isothermal bulk modulus K 0' = 4.1(8). Analyses of axial compressibilities show anisotropic elasticity for β-CaCr2O4 since the a-axis is more compressible than the b- and c-axis. Based on the obtained and previous results, the compressibility of several CaFe2O4-type phases was compared. The high-pressure Raman spectra of β-CaCr2O4 were analyzed to determine the pressure dependences and mode Grüneisen parameters of Raman-active bands. The thermal Grüneisen parameter of β-CaCr2O4 is determined to be 0.93(2), which is smaller than those of CaFe2O4-type CaAl2O4 and MgAl2O4.

  16. Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

    2014-05-01

    Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

  17. Flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt Tonjes, Marguerite; the PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    The study of flow can provide information on the initial state dynamics and the degree of equilibration attained in heavy-ion collisions. This contribution presents results for both elliptic and directed flow as determined from data recorded by the PHOBOS experiment in Au+Au runs at RHIC at \\sqrt{sNN} = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. The PHOBOS detector provides a unique coverage in pseudorapidity for measuring flow at RHIC. The systematic dependence of flow on pseudorapidity, transverse momentum, centrality and energy is discussed.

  18. Flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt Tonjes, Marguerite; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    The study of flow can provide information on the initial state dynamics and the degree of equilibration attained in heavy-ion collisions. This contribution presents results for both elliptic and directed flow as determined from data recorded by the PHOBOS experiment in Au+Au runs at RHIC at \\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. The PHOBOS detector provides a unique coverage in pseudorapidity for measuring flow at RHIC. The systematic dependence of flow on pseudorapidity, transverse momentum, centrality and energy is discussed.

  19. Angular dependent torque measurements on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Gao, B.; Ma, Y. H.; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    2016-08-01

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF (Ca1 1 1 1) single crystals. In the normal state, the torque data shows \\sin 2θ angular dependence and H 2 magnetic field dependence, as a result of paramagnetism. In the mixed state, the torque signal is a combination of the vortex torque and paramagnetic torque, and the former allows the determination of the anisotropy parameter γ. At T   =  11.5 K, γ (11.5 K ≃ 0.5 T c)  =  19.1, which is similar to the result of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2, γ ≃ 23 at T≃ 0.4{{T}\\text{c}} . So the 11 1 1 is more anisotropic compared to 11 and 122 families of iron-based superconductors. This may suggest that the electronic coupling between layers in 1 1 1 1 is less effective than in 11 and 122 families.

  20. Cafe Variome: general-purpose software for making genotype-phenotype data discoverable in restricted or open access contexts.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Owen; Beck, Tim; Atlan, David; Swertz, Morris; Thangavelu, Dhiwagaran; Veal, Colin; Dalgleish, Raymond; Brookes, Anthony J

    2015-10-01

    Biomedical data sharing is desirable, but problematic. Data "discovery" approaches-which establish the existence rather than the substance of data-precisely connect data owners with data seekers, and thereby promote data sharing. Cafe Variome (http://www.cafevariome.org) was therefore designed to provide a general-purpose, Web-based, data discovery tool that can be quickly installed by any genotype-phenotype data owner, or network of data owners, to make safe or sensitive content appropriately discoverable. Data fields or content of any type can be accommodated, from simple ID and label fields through to extensive genotype and phenotype details based on ontologies. The system provides a "shop window" in front of data, with main interfaces being a simple search box and a powerful "query-builder" that enable very elaborate queries to be formulated. After a successful search, counts of records are reported grouped by "openAccess" (data may be directly accessed), "linkedAccess" (a source link is provided), and "restrictedAccess" (facilitated data requests and subsequent provision of approved records). An administrator interface provides a wide range of options for system configuration, enabling highly customized single-site or federated networks to be established. Current uses include rare disease data discovery, patient matchmaking, and a Beacon Web service. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. Suppression of Υ production in d + Au + and Au + Au collisions at √ sNN =200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    None

    2014-07-01

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y|more » < 1 in d + Au collisions of R dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state part on energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  2. Chiral magnetic effect search in p+Au, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Metastable domains of fluctuating topological charges can change the chirality of quarks and induce local parity violation in quantum chromodynamics. This can lead to observable charge separation along the direction of the strong magnetic field produced by spectator protons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, a phenomenon called the chiral magnetic effect (CME). A major background source for CME measurements using the charge-dependent azimuthal correlator (Δϒ) is the intrinsic particle correlations (such as resonance decays) coupled with the azimuthal elliptical anisotropy (v2). In heavy-ion collisions, the magnetic field direction and event plane angle are correlated, thus the CME and the v2-induced background are entangled. In this report, we present two studies from STAR to shed further lights on the background issue. (1) The Δϒ should be all background in small system p+Au and d+Au collisions, because the event plane angles are dominated by geometry fluctuations uncorrelated to the magnetic field direction. However, significant Δϒ is observed, comparable to the peripheral Au+Au data, suggesting a background dominance in the latter, and likely also in the mid-central Au+Au collisions where the multiplicity and v2 scaled correlator is similar. (2) A new approach is devised to study Δϒ as a function of the particle pair invariant mass (minv) to identify the resonance backgrounds and hence to extract the possible CME signal. Signal is consistent with zero within uncertainties at high minv. Signal at low minv, extracted from a two-component model assuming smooth mass dependence, is consistent with zero within uncertainties.

  3. Chiral Magnetic Effect Search in p(d)+Au, Au+Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie

    The chiral magnetic effect (CME) refers to charge separation along a strong magnetic field of single-handed quarks, caused by interactions with topological gluon fields from QCD vacuum fluctuations. A major background of CME measurements in heavy-ion collisions comes from resonance decays coupled with elliptical flow anisotropy. These proceedings present two new studies from STAR to shed further light on the background issue: (1) small system p+Au and d+Au collisions where the CME signal is not expected, and (2) pair invariant mass dependence where resonance peaks can be identified.

  4. Evolution of Excited-State Dynamics in Periodic Au 28, Au 36, Au 44, and Au 52 Nanoclusters

    SciT

    Zhou, Meng; Zeng, Chenjie; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    An understanding of the correlation between the atomic structure and optical properties of gold nanoclusters is essential for exploration of their functionalities and applications involving light harvesting and electron transfer. We report the femto-nanosecond excited state dynamics of a periodic series of face-centered cubic (FCC) gold nanoclusters (including Au 28, Au 36, Au 44, and Au 52), which exhibit a set of unique features compared with other similar sized clusters. Molecular-like ultrafast S n → S 1 internal conversions (i.e., radiationless electronic transitions) are observed in the relaxation dynamics of FCC periodic series. Excited-state dynamics with near-HOMO–LUMO gap excitation lacksmore » ultrafast decay component, and only the structural relaxation dominates in the dynamical process, which proves the absence of core–shell relaxation. Interestingly, both the relaxation of the hot carriers and the band-edge carrier recombination become slower as the size increases. The evolution in excited-state properties of this FCC series offers new insight into the structure-dependent properties of metal nanoclusters, which will benefit their optical energy harvesting and photocatalytic applications.« less

  5. Evolution of Excited-State Dynamics in Periodic Au 28, Au 36, Au 44, and Au 52 Nanoclusters

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Meng; Zeng, Chenjie; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; ...

    2017-08-10

    An understanding of the correlation between the atomic structure and optical properties of gold nanoclusters is essential for exploration of their functionalities and applications involving light harvesting and electron transfer. We report the femto-nanosecond excited state dynamics of a periodic series of face-centered cubic (FCC) gold nanoclusters (including Au 28, Au 36, Au 44, and Au 52), which exhibit a set of unique features compared with other similar sized clusters. Molecular-like ultrafast S n → S 1 internal conversions (i.e., radiationless electronic transitions) are observed in the relaxation dynamics of FCC periodic series. Excited-state dynamics with near-HOMO–LUMO gap excitation lacksmore » ultrafast decay component, and only the structural relaxation dominates in the dynamical process, which proves the absence of core–shell relaxation. Interestingly, both the relaxation of the hot carriers and the band-edge carrier recombination become slower as the size increases. The evolution in excited-state properties of this FCC series offers new insight into the structure-dependent properties of metal nanoclusters, which will benefit their optical energy harvesting and photocatalytic applications.« less

  6. Au36(SPh)23 nanomolecules.

    PubMed

    Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Dass, Amala

    2011-06-22

    A new core size protected completely by an aromatic thiol, Au(36)(SPh)(23), is synthesized and characterized by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and UV-visible spectroscopy. The synthesis involving core size changes is studied by MS, and the complete ligand coverage by aromatic thiol group is shown by NMR.

  7. Doping evolution of spin fluctuations and their peculiar suppression at low temperatures in Ca(Fe 1 -xCox)2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, A.; Das, P.; Böhmer, A. E.; Ueland, B. G.; Abernathy, D. L.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; McQueeney, R. J.

    2018-05-01

    Results of inelastic neutron scattering measurements are reported for two annealed compositions of Ca(Fe 1 -xCox)2As2,x =0.026 and 0.030, which possess stripe-type antiferromagnetically ordered and superconducting ground states, respectively. In the AFM ground state, well-defined and gapped spin waves are observed for x =0.026 , similar to the parent CaFe2As2 compound. We conclude that the well-defined spin waves are likely to be present for all x corresponding to the AFM state. This behavior is in contrast to the smooth evolution to overdamped spin dynamics observed in Ba(Fe 1 -xCox)2As2 , wherein the crossover corresponds to microscopically coexisting AFM order and SC at low temperature. The smooth evolution is likely absent in Ca(Fe 1 -xCox)2As2 due to the mutual exclusion of AFM ordered and SC states. Overdamped spin dynamics characterize paramagnetism of the x =0.030 sample and high-temperature x =0.026 sample. A sizable loss of magnetic intensity is observed over a wide energy range upon cooling the x =0.030 sample, at temperatures just above and within the superconducting phase. This phenomenon is unique amongst the iron-based superconductors and is consistent with a temperature-dependent reduction in the fluctuating moment. One possible scenario ascribes this loss of moment to a sensitivity to the c -axis lattice parameter in proximity to the nonmagnetic collapsed tetragonal phase and another scenario ascribes the loss to a formation of a pseudogap.

  8. Ca-Fe and Alkali-Halide Alteration of an Allende Type B CAI: Aqueous Alteration in Nebular or Asteroidal Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-Fe and alkali-halide alteration of CAIs is often attributed to aqueous alteration by fluids circulating on asteroidal parent bodies after the various chondritic components have been assembled, although debate continues about the roles of asteroidal vs. nebular modification processes [1-7]. Here we report de-tailed observations of alteration products in a large Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende, one of the oxidized subgroup of CV3s, and propose a speculative model for aqueous alteration of CAIs in a nebular setting. Ca-Fe alteration in this CAI consists predominantly of end-member hedenbergite, end-member andradite, and compositionally variable, magnesian high-Ca pyroxene. These phases are strongly concentrated in an unusual "nodule" enclosed within the interior of the CAI (Fig. 1). The Ca, Fe-rich nodule superficially resembles a clast that pre-dated and was engulfed by the CAI, but closer inspection shows that relic spinel grains are enclosed in the nodule, and corroded CAI primary phases interfinger with the Fe-rich phases at the nodule s margins. This CAI also contains abundant sodalite and nepheline (alkali-halide) alteration that occurs around the rims of the CAI, but also penetrates more deeply into the CAI. The two types of alteration (Ca-Fe and alkali-halide) are adjacent, and very fine-grained Fe-rich phases are associated with sodalite-rich regions. Both types of alteration appear to be replacive; if that is true, it would require substantial introduction of Fe, and transport of elements (Ti, Al and Mg) out of the nodule, and introduction of Na and Cl into alkali-halide rich zones. Parts of the CAI have been extensively metasomatized.

  9. Chemical doping in pnictides superconductors: The case of Ca(Fe1-xXx) 2As2 , X = Co, Ni, Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continenza, Alessandra; Profeta, Gianni

    2018-04-01

    We present a comparative and detailed study of transition metal doping in CaFe2As2. Comparing with several experimental results and carefully analyzing how the states at the Fermi level are affected by doping we show that: i) simulation of real doping and considering induces structural relaxations are crucial to correctly address the physical mechanisms induced by transition metal substitutions; ii) different dopant concentration induces changes on the band structure that can not be described within a simple rigid-band picture; iii) careful comparison with the available ARPES results shows that the main effects on band filling and symmetry can be caught within DFT.

  10. Impact of statin therapy on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics: principal results of the Conduit Artery Function Evaluation-Lipid-Lowering Arm (CAFE-LLA) Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan; Lacy, Peter S; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Collier, David; Hughes, Alun D; Stanton, Alice; Thom, Simon; Thurston, Herbert

    2009-01-06

    Statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in people with hypertension. This benefit could arise from a beneficial effect of statins on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics. The Conduit Artery Function Evaluation-Lipid-Lowering Arm (CAFE-LLA) study, an Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT) substudy, investigated this hypothesis in a prospective placebo-controlled study of treated patients with hypertension. CAFE-LLA recruited 891 patients randomized to atorvastatin 10 mg/d or placebo from 5 centers in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Radial artery applanation tonometry and pulse-wave analysis were used to derive central aortic pressures and hemodynamic indices at repeated visits over 3.5 years of follow-up. Atorvastatin lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 32.4 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], 28.6 to 36.3) and total cholesterol by 35.1 mg/dL (95% confidence interval, 30.9 to 39.4) relative to placebo. Time-averaged brachial blood pressure was similar in CAFE-LLA patients randomized to atorvastatin or placebo (change in brachial systolic blood pressure, -0.1 mm Hg [95% CI, -1.8 to 1.6], P=0.9; change in brachial pulse pressure, -0.02 mm Hg [95% CI, -1.6 to 1.6], P=0.9). Atorvastatin did not influence central aortic pressures (change in aortic systolic blood pressure, -0.5 mm Hg [95% CI, -2.3 to 1.2], P=0.5; change in aortic pulse pressure, -0.4 mm Hg [95% CI, -1.9 to 1.0], P=0.6) and had no influence on augmentation index (change in augmentation index, -0.4%; 95% CI, -1.7 to 0.8; P=0.5) or heart rate (change in heart rate, 0.25 bpm; 95% CI, -1.3 to 1.8; P=0.7) compared with placebo. The effect of statin or placebo therapy was not modified by the blood pressure-lowering treatment strategy in the factorial design. Statin therapy sufficient to significantly reduce cardiovascular events in treated hypertensive patients in ASCOT did not influence central aortic blood pressure or hemodynamics in a large representative cohort of ASCOT

  11. Tetragonal and collapsed-tetragonal phases of CaFe2As2 : A view from angle-resolved photoemission and dynamical mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Richard, Pierre; Shi, Xun; Wu, Shangfei; Zeng, Lingkun; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Qian, Tian; Sefat, Athena S.; Biermann, Silke; Ding, Hong

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the tetragonal to collapsed-tetragonal transition of CaFe2As2 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and dynamical mean field theory-based electronic structure calculations. We observe that the collapsed-tetragonal phase exhibits reduced correlations and a higher coherence temperature due to the stronger Fe-As hybridization. Furthermore, a comparison of measured photoemission spectra and theoretical spectral functions shows that momentum-dependent corrections to the density functional band structure are essential for the description of low-energy quasiparticle dispersions. We introduce those using the recently proposed combined "screened exchange + dynamical mean field theory" scheme.

  12. Biosynthesis and stabilization of Au and Au Ag alloy nanoparticles by fungus, Fusarium semitectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasaratrao Sawle, Balaji; Salimath, Basavaraja; Deshpande, Raghunandan; Dhondojirao Bedre, Mahesh; Krishnamurthy Prabhakar, Belawadi; Venkataraman, Abbaraju

    2008-09-01

    Crystallized and spherical-shaped Au and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles have been synthesized and stabilized using a fungus, F . semitectum in an aqueous system. Aqueous solutions of chloroaurate ions for Au and chloroaurate and Ag+ ions (1 : 1 ratio) for Au-Ag alloy were treated with an extracellular filtrate of F . semitectum biomass for the formation of Au nanoparticles (AuNP) and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles (Au-AgNP). Analysis of the feasibility of the biosynthesized nanoparticles and core-shell alloy nanoparticles from fungal strains is particularly significant. The resultant colloidal suspensions are highly stable for many weeks. The obtained Au and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles were characterized by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks using a UV-vis spectrophotometer, and the structure, morphology and size were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Possible optoelectronics and medical applications of these nanoparticles are envisaged.

  13. Noncentrosymmetric superconductor BeAu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, A.; Svanidze, E.; Cardoso-Gil, R.; Wilson, M. N.; Rosner, H.; Bobnar, M.; Schnelle, W.; Lynn, J. W.; Gumeniuk, R.; Hennig, C.; Luke, G. M.; Borrmann, H.; Leithe-Jasper, A.; Grin, Yu.

    2018-01-01

    Mixed spin-singlet and spin-triplet pairing can occur in noncentrosymmetric superconductors. In this respect, a comprehensive characterization of the noncentrosymmetric superconductor BeAu was carried out. It was established that BeAu undergoes a structural phase transition from a low-temperature noncentrosymmetric FeSi structure type to a high-temperature centrosymmetric structure in the CsCl type at Ts=860 K. The low-temperature modification exhibits a superconducting transition below Tc=3.3 K. The values of lower (Hc1=32 Oe) and upper (Hc2=335 Oe) critical fields are rather small, confirming that this type-II (κG-L=2.3 ) weakly coupled (λe-p=0.5 ,Δ Ce/γnTc≈1.26 ) superconductor can be well understood within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. The muon spin relaxation analysis indicates that the time-reversal symmetry is preserved when the superconducting state is entered, supporting conventional superconductivity in BeAu. From the density functional band structure calculations, a considerable contribution of the Be electrons to the superconducting state was established. On average, a rather small mass renormalization was found, consistent with the experimental data.

  14. How Does Amino Acid Ligand Modulate Au Core Structure and Characteristics in Peptide Coated Au Nanocluster?

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hongkang; Zhao, Lina

    2018-03-01

    The atomic structures and the corresponding physicochemical properties of peptide coated Au nanoclusters determine their distinctive biological targeting applications. To learn the modulation of amino acid ligand on the atomic structure and electronic characteristics of coated Au core is the fundamental knowledge for peptide coated Au nanocluster design and construction. Based on our recent coated Au nanocluster configuration study (Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 11454), we built the typically simplified Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) system to more clearly learn the basic modulation information of amino acid ligand on Au core by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. There are two isomers as ligand adjacent bonding (Iso1) and diagonal bonding (Iso2) to Au13 cores. The geometry optimizations indicate the adjacent bonding Iso1 is more stable than Iso2. More important, the Au13 core of Iso1 distorts much more significantly than that of Iso2 by Cys-Au-Cys bonding through the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) analysis, which modulate their electronic characteristics in different ways. In addition, the frontier molecular orbital results of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) isomers confirm that the Au cores mainly determine the blue shifts of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) systems versus the original Au13 core in their UV-visible absorption spectrum studies. The configuration of Au13 core performs deformation under Cys-Au-Cys ligand modulation to reach new stability with distinct atomic structure and electronic properties, which could be the theory basis for peptide coated AuNCs design and construction.

  15. The 'PUCE CAFE' Project: the First 15K Coffee Microarray, a New Tool for Discovering Candidate Genes correlated to Agronomic and Quality Traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of coffee biology will have an impact on future agronomical improvements for this economically important tree. During the past years, EST collections were generated in Coffee, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics. Results The "PUCE CAFE" Project, organized by the scientific consortium NESTLE/IRD/CIRAD, has developed an oligo-based microarray using 15,721 unigenes derived from published coffee EST sequences mostly obtained from different stages of fruit development and leaves in Coffea Canephora (Robusta). Hybridizations for two independent experiments served to compare global gene expression profiles in three types of tissue matter (mature beans, leaves and flowers) in C. canephora as well as in the leaves of three different coffee species (C. canephora, C. eugenoides and C. arabica). Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation by Q-PCR analysis are presented in this study. Conclusion We have generated the first 15 K coffee array during this PUCE CAFE project, granted by Génoplante (the French consortium for plant genomics). This new tool will help study functional genomics in a wide range of experiments on various plant tissues, such as analyzing bean maturation or resistance to pathogens or drought. Furthermore, the use of this array has proven to be valid in different coffee species (diploid or tetraploid), drastically enlarging its impact for high-throughput gene expression in the community of coffee research. PMID:21208403

  16. The 'PUCE CAFE' Project: the first 15K coffee microarray, a new tool for discovering candidate genes correlated to agronomic and quality traits.

    PubMed

    Privat, Isabelle; Bardil, Amélie; Gomez, Aureliano Bombarely; Severac, Dany; Dantec, Christelle; Fuentes, Ivanna; Mueller, Lukas; Joët, Thierry; Pot, David; Foucrier, Séverine; Dussert, Stéphane; Leroy, Thierry; Journot, Laurent; de Kochko, Alexandre; Campa, Claudine; Combes, Marie-Christine; Lashermes, Philippe; Bertrand, Benoit

    2011-01-05

    Understanding the genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of coffee biology will have an impact on future agronomical improvements for this economically important tree. During the past years, EST collections were generated in Coffee, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics. The "PUCE CAFE" Project, organized by the scientific consortium NESTLE/IRD/CIRAD, has developed an oligo-based microarray using 15,721 unigenes derived from published coffee EST sequences mostly obtained from different stages of fruit development and leaves in Coffea Canephora (Robusta). Hybridizations for two independent experiments served to compare global gene expression profiles in three types of tissue matter (mature beans, leaves and flowers) in C. canephora as well as in the leaves of three different coffee species (C. canephora, C. eugenoides and C. arabica). Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation by Q-PCR analysis are presented in this study. We have generated the first 15 K coffee array during this PUCE CAFE project, granted by Génoplante (the French consortium for plant genomics). This new tool will help study functional genomics in a wide range of experiments on various plant tissues, such as analyzing bean maturation or resistance to pathogens or drought. Furthermore, the use of this array has proven to be valid in different coffee species (diploid or tetraploid), drastically enlarging its impact for high-throughput gene expression in the community of coffee research.

  17. Pleasure and practice: a qualitative study of the individual and social underpinnings of shisha use in cafes among youth in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Haberer, Jessica E; O’Neil, Ivy

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To explore (1) the social function of shisha cafes for young people living in the UK and (2) other alternative activities (existing or potential) that do not involve tobacco smoking. Methods We conducted qualitative interviews with young adults (age 18–30) in Leeds, UK. Snowballing sampling was used in selecting the participants. Interviews were audio-recorded and explored the perspectives and experiences of young people in as well as potential alternative activities. Data were transcribed and analysed thematically. Results Shisha use plays a central role in social interactions. Youth described using shisha because of emotional and sensory pleasure. Shisha use was implicitly endorsed by respected professionals, such as doctors and university lecturers, who were seen smoking it. Most, but not all, shisha smokers acknowledged that shisha use is harmful. Suggestions for reducing shisha use included use of non- tobacco alternatives, legislation to reduce access and alternative means for socialising, such as sports. Conclusion For young people in the UK, the known health dangers of shisha are outweighed by its social benefits and shisha is perceived as acceptable. Interventions to reverse the increase in shisha cafes should focus on both individual smoker as well as the community, without sacrificing the importance of social interactions. PMID:29654007

  18. Transition to collapsed tetragonal phase in CaFe 2As 2 single crystals as seen by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    SciT

    Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Ma, Xiaoming; Tomić, Milan

    Temperature dependent measurements of 57Fe Mössbauer spectra on CaFe 2As 2 single crystals in the tetragonal and collapsed tetragonal phases are reported. Clear features in the temperature dependencies of the isomer shift, relative spectra area, and quadrupole splitting are observed at the transition from the tetragonal to the collapsed tetragonal phase. From the temperature dependent isomer shift and spectral area data, an average stiffening of the phonon modes in the collapsed tetragonal phase is inferred. The quadrupole splitting increases by ~25% on cooling from room temperature to ~100 K in the tetragonal phase and is only weakly temperature dependent atmore » low temperatures in the collapsed tetragonal phase, in agreement with the anisotropic thermal expansion in this material. In order to gain microscopic insight about these measurements, we perform ab initio density functional theory calculations of the electric field gradient and the electron density of CaFe 2As 2 in both phases. By comparing the experimental data with the calculations we are able to fully characterize the crystal structure of the samples in the collapsed-tetragonal phase through determination of the As z coordinate. Furthermore, based on the obtained temperature dependent structural data we are able to propose charge saturation of the Fe-As bond region as the mechanism behind the stabilization of the collapsed-tetragonal phase at ambient pressure.« less

  19. Fermi-Surface Topological Phase Transition and Horizontal Order-Parameter Nodes in CaFe2As2 Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnelli, R. S.; Daghero, D.; Tortello, M.; Ummarino, G. A.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Reuvekamp, P. G.; Kremer, R. K.; Profeta, G.; Suzuki, K.; Kuroki, K.

    2016-05-01

    Iron-based compounds (IBS) display a surprising variety of superconducting properties that seems to arise from the strong sensitivity of these systems to tiny details of the lattice structure. In this respect, systems that become superconducting under pressure, like CaFe2As2, are of particular interest. Here we report on the first directional point-contact Andreev-reflection spectroscopy (PCARS) measurements on CaFe2As2 crystals under quasi-hydrostatic pressure, and on the interpretation of the results using a 3D model for Andreev reflection combined with ab-initio calculations of the Fermi surface (within the density functional theory) and of the order parameter symmetry (within a random-phase-approximation approach in a ten-orbital model). The almost perfect agreement between PCARS results at different pressures and theoretical predictions highlights the intimate connection between the changes in the lattice structure, a topological transition in the holelike Fermi surface sheet, and the emergence on the same sheet of an order parameter with a horizontal node line.

  20. Filling the holes in the CaFe4As3 structure: Synthesis and magnetism of CaCo5As3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.

    2017-07-01

    Here, we investigate single crystals of CaCo5As3 by means of single-crystal x-ray diffraction, microprobe, magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, and pressure-dependent transport measurements. CaCo5As3 shares the same structure of CaFe4As3 with an additional Co atom filling a lattice vacancy and undergoes a magnetic transition at TM=16 K associated with a frustrated magnetic order. CaCo5As3 displays metallic behavior and its Sommerfeld coefficient (γ =70 mJ/mol K2) indicates a moderate enhancement of electron-electron correlations. Transport data under pressures to 2.5 GPa reveal a suppression of TM at a rate of -0.008 K/GPa. First-principles electronic structure calculations show a complex three-dimensional band structure and magnetic moments that depend on the local environment at each Co site. Our results are compared with previous data on CaFe4As3 and provide a scenario for a magnetically frustrated ground state in this family of compounds.

  1. Transition to collapsed tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 single crystals as seen by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Ma, Xiaoming; Tomić, Milan; Ran, Sheng; Valentí, Roser; Canfield, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Temperature dependent measurements of 57Fe Mössbauer spectra on CaFe2As2 single crystals in the tetragonal and collapsed tetragonal phases are reported. Clear features in the temperature dependencies of the isomer shift, relative spectra area, and quadrupole splitting are observed at the transition from the tetragonal to the collapsed tetragonal phase. From the temperature dependent isomer shift and spectral area data, an average stiffening of the phonon modes in the collapsed tetragonal phase is inferred. The quadrupole splitting increases by ˜25 % on cooling from room temperature to ˜100 K in the tetragonal phase and is only weakly temperature dependent at low temperatures in the collapsed tetragonal phase, in agreement with the anisotropic thermal expansion in this material. In order to gain microscopic insight about these measurements, we perform ab initio density functional theory calculations of the electric field gradient and the electron density of CaFe2As2 in both phases. By comparing the experimental data with the calculations we are able to fully characterize the crystal structure of the samples in the collapsed-tetragonal phase through determination of the As z coordinate. Based on the obtained temperature dependent structural data we are able to propose charge saturation of the Fe-As bond region as the mechanism behind the stabilization of the collapsed-tetragonal phase at ambient pressure.

  2. Fermi-Surface Topological Phase Transition and Horizontal Order-Parameter Nodes in CaFe2As2 Under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, R. S.; Daghero, D.; Tortello, M.; Ummarino, G. A.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Reuvekamp, P. G.; Kremer, R. K.; Profeta, G.; Suzuki, K.; Kuroki, K.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-based compounds (IBS) display a surprising variety of superconducting properties that seems to arise from the strong sensitivity of these systems to tiny details of the lattice structure. In this respect, systems that become superconducting under pressure, like CaFe2As2, are of particular interest. Here we report on the first directional point-contact Andreev-reflection spectroscopy (PCARS) measurements on CaFe2As2 crystals under quasi-hydrostatic pressure, and on the interpretation of the results using a 3D model for Andreev reflection combined with ab-initio calculations of the Fermi surface (within the density functional theory) and of the order parameter symmetry (within a random-phase-approximation approach in a ten-orbital model). The almost perfect agreement between PCARS results at different pressures and theoretical predictions highlights the intimate connection between the changes in the lattice structure, a topological transition in the holelike Fermi surface sheet, and the emergence on the same sheet of an order parameter with a horizontal node line. PMID:27216477

  3. Effects of magnetic impurities on upper critical fields in the high-T c superconductor La-doped CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soon-Gil; Shin, Soohyeon; Jang, Harim; Mikheenko, Pavlo; Johansen, Tom H.; Park, Tuson

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effects of magnetic impurities on the upper critical field (μ 0 H c2) in La-doped CaFe2As2 (LaCa122) single crystals. The magnetic field dependency of the superconducting transition temperature (T c) for LaCa122 is rapidly suppressed at low fields up to ˜1 kOe despite its large μ 0 H c2(0) value on the order of tens of Tesla, resulting in a large positive curvature of μ 0 H c2(T) near T c. The magnetization hysteresis (M-H) loop at temperatures above T c shows a ferromagnetic-like signal and the M(H) value rapidly increases with increasing magnetic field up to ˜1 kOe. Taken together with the linear suppression of T c with the magnetization in the normal state, these results suggest that the large upward curvature of μ 0 H c2(T) near T c in La-doped CaFe2As2 mainly originates from the suppression of superconductivity due to the presence of magnetic impurities.

  4. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    SciT

    Furukawa, Yuji; Roy, Beas; Ran, Sheng

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magneticmore » susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.« less

  5. Transport characteristics in Au/pentacene/Au diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toshiaki; Naka, Akiyoshi; Hiroki, Masanobu; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Someya, Takao; Fujiwara, Akira

    2018-03-01

    We have used scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM and TEM) to study the structure of a pentacene thin film grown on a Au layer with and shown that it consists of randomly oriented amorphous pentacene clusters. We have also investigated the transport properties of amorphous pentacene in a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) diode structure and shown that the current is logarithmically proportional to the square root of the applied voltage, which indicates that transport occurs as the result of hopping between localized sites randomly distributed in space and energy.

  6. Au38(SPh)24: Au38 Protected with Aromatic Thiolate Ligands.

    PubMed

    Rambukwella, Milan; Burrage, Shayna; Neubrander, Marie; Baseggio, Oscar; Aprà, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dass, Amala

    2017-04-06

    Au 38 (SR) 24 is one of the most extensively investigated gold nanomolecules along with Au 25 (SR) 18 and Au 144 (SR) 60 . However, so far it has only been prepared using aliphatic-like ligands, where R = -SC 6 H 13 , -SC 12 H 25 and -SCH 2 CH 2 Ph. Au 38 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 24 when reacted with HSPh undergoes core-size conversion to Au 36 (SPh) 24 , and existing literature suggests that Au 38 (SPh) 24 cannot be synthesized. Here, contrary to prevailing knowledge, we demonstrate that Au 38 (SPh) 24 can be prepared if the ligand exchanged conditions are optimized, under delicate conditions, without any formation of Au 36 (SPh) 24 . Conclusive evidence is presented in the form of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), electrospray ionization mass spectra (ESI-MS) characterization, and optical spectra of Au 38 (SPh) 24 in a solid glass form showing distinct differences from that of Au 38 (S-aliphatic) 24 . Theoretical analysis confirms experimental assignment of the optical spectrum and shows that the stability of Au 38 (SPh) 24 is not negligible with respect to that of its aliphatic analogous, and contains a significant component of ligand-ligand attractive interactions. Thus, while Au 38 (SPh) 24 is stable at RT, it converts to Au 36 (SPh) 24 either on prolonged etching (longer than 2 hours) at RT or when etched at 80 °C.

  7. Successful synthesis and thermal stability of immiscible metal Au-Rh, Au-Ir andAu-Ir-Rh nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubin, Yury; Plyusnin, Pavel; Sharafutdinov, Marat; Makotchenko, Evgenia; Korenev, Sergey

    2017-05-01

    We successfully prepared face-centred cubic nanoalloys in systems of Au-Ir, Au-Rh and Au-Ir-Rh, with large bulk miscibility gaps, in one-run reactions under thermal decomposition of specially synthesised single-source precursors, namely, [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6], [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6] х [Rh(NO2)6]1-х and [AuEn2][Rh(NO2)6]. The precursors employed contain all desired metals ‘mixed’ at the atomic level, thus providing significant advantages for obtaining alloys. The observations using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the nanoalloy structures are composed of well-dispersed aggregates of crystalline domains with a mean size of 5 ± 3 nm. Еnergy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) measurements confirm the formation of AuIr, AuRh, AuIr0.75Rh0.25, AuIr0.50Rh0.50 and AuIr0.25Rh0.75 metastable solid solutions. In situ high-temperature synchrotron XRD (HTXRD) was used to study the formation mechanism of nanoalloys. The observed transformations are described by the ‘conversion chemistry’ mechanism characterised by the primary development of particles comprising atoms of only one type, followed by a chemical reaction resulting in the final formation of a nanoalloy. The obtained metastable nanoalloys exhibit essential thermal stability. Exposure to 180 °C for 30 h does not cause any dealloying process.

  8. Successful synthesis and thermal stability of immiscible metal Au-Rh, Au-Ir andAu-Ir-Rh nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Yury; Plyusnin, Pavel; Sharafutdinov, Marat; Makotchenko, Evgenia; Korenev, Sergey

    2017-05-19

    We successfully prepared face-centred cubic nanoalloys in systems of Au-Ir, Au-Rh and Au-Ir-Rh, with large bulk miscibility gaps, in one-run reactions under thermal decomposition of specially synthesised single-source precursors, namely, [AuEn 2 ][Ir(NO 2 ) 6 ], [AuEn 2 ][Ir(NO 2 ) 6 ] х [Rh(NO 2 ) 6 ] 1-х and [AuEn 2 ][Rh(NO 2 ) 6 ]. The precursors employed contain all desired metals 'mixed' at the atomic level, thus providing significant advantages for obtaining alloys. The observations using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the nanoalloy structures are composed of well-dispersed aggregates of crystalline domains with a mean size of 5 ± 3 nm. Еnergy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) measurements confirm the formation of AuIr, AuRh, AuIr 0.75 Rh 0.25 , AuIr 0.50 Rh 0.50 and AuIr 0.25 Rh 0.75 metastable solid solutions. In situ high-temperature synchrotron XRD (HTXRD) was used to study the formation mechanism of nanoalloys. The observed transformations are described by the 'conversion chemistry' mechanism characterised by the primary development of particles comprising atoms of only one type, followed by a chemical reaction resulting in the final formation of a nanoalloy. The obtained metastable nanoalloys exhibit essential thermal stability. Exposure to 180 °C for 30 h does not cause any dealloying process.

  9. Pituitary and ovarian abnormalities demonstrated by CT and ultrasound in children with features of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    SciT

    Rieth, K.G.; Comite, F.; Shawker, T.H.

    1984-11-01

    In a random series of 97 children referred to the National Institutes of Health with a presumptive diagnosis of precocious puberty, eight girls were found to have features of the McCune-Albright syndrome, including fibrous dysplasia of bone and/or skin lesions resembling cafe au lait spots. Radiographic evaluation of these patients included computed tomography of the head and pelvic ultrasound. The pituitary glands were suspicious for abnormality in five of the eight girls. Seven girls underwent pelvic ultrasound, and in all of them the ovaries were considered to be abnormal for their chronological age; in addition, two had functional ovarian cysts.more » The role of diagnostic radiological studies in the diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed.« less

  10. Staff Development: Cafe Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arns, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In most cases, memorable learning opportunities are fun, collaborative, and influential. Jennifer Arns, instructional programs director for the Organization for Education Technology and Curriculum, outlines the EdTech Professional Development Cadre, a refreshing and engaging PD approach. (Contains 3 resources.)

  11. From Cafeteria to Cafe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    If school architects, cafeteria designers, and some food service personnel have their way, the long, grey serving line characterizing most school cafeterias will go the way of meatloaf and mashed potatoes. This means booths and restaurant-like tables, school colors, brightly lit menu boards, windows overlooking courtyards, and mall-like…

  12. Morin-like spin canting in the magnetic CaFe5O7 ferrite: A combined neutron and Mössbauer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacotte, C.; Bréard, Y.; Caignaert, V.; Hardy, V.; Greneche, J. M.; Hébert, S.; Suard, E.; Pelloquin, D.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic structure of CaFe5O7 ferrite has been studied jointly from neutron powder diffraction data and spectroscopic Mössbauer measurements in the thermal range from 5 to 500 K. This coupled work highlights three distinct magnetic domains around two specific temperatures: TM=125 K and TN=360 K. The latter corroborates the structural monoclinic-orthorhombic transition previously reported by transmission electron microscopy techniques and X-ray thermodiffractometry. Complementary heat capacity measurements have confirmed this first order transition with a sharp peak at 360 K. Interestingly, this large study has revealed a second magnetic transition associated to a spin rotation at 125 K similar to this one reported by Morin in α-Fe2O3 hematite at TM=260 K.

  13. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe 1-xCo x) 2As 2 studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; ...

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe 1–xCo x) 2As 2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350°C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (T N=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (T N=106 K) and x=0.028 (T N=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T 1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuationsmore » are realized in the paramagnetic state as in the case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ρc(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ρa(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T 1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe 1–xCo x) 2As 2.« less

  14. Connected Au network in annealed Ni/Au thin films on p-GaN

    SciT

    Lee, S. P.; Jang, H. W.; Noh, D. Y.

    2007-11-12

    We report the formation of a connected Au network in annealed Ni/Au thin films on p-GaN, which was studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. As the Ni was oxidized into NiO upon annealing at 530 deg. C in air, the Au layer was transformed to an interconnected network with an increased thickness. During annealing, Ni atoms diffuse out onto the Au through defects to form NiO, while Au atoms replace the Ni positions. The Au network grows downward until it reaches the p-GaN substrate, and NiO columns fill the space between the Au network.

  15. Comment on “the ground-state structures of Au10-, Au8Ni and Au9Ni clusters”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ben-Xia; Die, Dong; Li, Qian-Qian; Dai, Ming-Liang; Li, Zhi-Qin; Yang, Ji-Xian

    2017-09-01

    The lowest energy structures of Aun+1- and AunNi (n = 2-9) clusters have been researched using the CALYPSO structure searching method in conjunction with the density functional theory. It is found that the most stable structures of Au10-, Au8Ni and Au9Ni clusters reported by Tang et al. [C. M. Tang, X. X. Chen and X. D. Yang, Int. J. Mod. Phys. B 28, 1450138 (2014)] are low-lying isomers. The correct ground states and vibrational spectra are given in this paper.

  16. Aspects cliniques, électrocardiographiques et échocardiographiques de l’hypertendu âgé au Sénégal

    PubMed Central

    Sarr, Simon Antoine; Babaka, Kana; Mboup, Mouhamadou Cherif; Fall, Pape Diadie; Dia, Khadidiatou; Bodian, Malick; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou Bamba; Kane, Adama; Diao, Maboury; Ba, Serigne Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Introduction L’hypertension artérielle (HTA) du sujet âgé est un facteur indépendant de maladie cardio-vasculaire. Nos objectifs étaient de décrire les aspects cliniques, électrocardiographique et échocardiographiques de l’HTA du sujet âgé. Méthodes Nous avons mené une étude descriptive et transversale de Janvier à Septembre 2013. Etaient inclus les sujets hypertendus âgés d’au moins 60 ans suivis en ambulatoire au service de cardiologie de l’Hôpital Principal de Dakar. Les données statistiques étaient analysées par le logiciel Epi Info 7 et une valeur de p < 0,05 était retenue comme significative. Résultats Au total, 208 patients étaient inclus. L’âge moyen était de 69,9 ans avec une prédominance féminine (sex-ratio de 0,85). La pression artérielle moyenne était de 162/90mmHg. L’HTA était contrôlée dans 13% des cas. A l’électrocardiogramme, on notait un trouble du rythme (17,78%), une hypertrophie auriculaire gauche (45,19%), une hypertrophie ventriculaire gauche (28,85%) et 2 cas de bloc auriculo-ventriculaire complet. Le Holter ECG révélait 4 cas de tachycardie ventriculaire non soutenue (IVb de Lown), 6 cas de fibrillation atriale paroxystique et 1 cas de flutter atrial paroxystique. L’échocardiographie réalisée chez 140 patients retrouvait une HVG à prédominance concentrique chez 25 patients, plus fréquente chez les hommes (p=0,04) et une dilatation de l’oreillette gauche dans 56,42% des cas, plus fréquente chez les patients plus âgés (p= 0,01). Conclusion Les aspects électrocardiographiques et échocardiographiques dans la population hypertendue âgée sont caractérisés par l’hypertrophie ventriculaire gauche notamment concentrique, la fréquence des arythmies révélées quelques fois par l’enregistrement électrocardiographique de longue durée. PMID:28292040

  17. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  18. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... designed to measure differences in characteristics among applicants against those characteristics... survey of all host family and au pair participants regarding satisfaction with the program, its strengths... the Department of Homeland Security's Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS...

  19. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... designed to measure differences in characteristics among applicants against those characteristics... survey of all host family and au pair participants regarding satisfaction with the program, its strengths... the Department of Homeland Security's Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS...

  20. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... designed to measure differences in characteristics among applicants against those characteristics... survey of all host family and au pair participants regarding satisfaction with the program, its strengths... the Department of Homeland Security's Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS...

  1. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... designed to measure differences in characteristics among applicants against those characteristics... survey of all host family and au pair participants regarding satisfaction with the program, its strengths... the Department of Homeland Security's Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS...

  2. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... designed to measure differences in characteristics among applicants against those characteristics... survey of all host family and au pair participants regarding satisfaction with the program, its strengths... the Department of Homeland Security's Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS...

  3. Initial Eccentricity in Deformed 197Au+197Au and 238U+238U Collisions at RHIC

    SciT

    Filip, Peter; Lednicky, Richard; Masui, Hiroshi

    2010-07-07

    Initial eccentricity and eccentricity fluctuations of the interaction volume created in relativistic collisions of deformed {sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U nuclei are studied using optical and Monte-Carlo (MC) Glauber simulations. It is found that the non-sphericity noticeably influences the average eccentricity in central collisions and eccentricity fluctuations are enhanced due to deformation. Quantitative results are obtained for Au+Au and U+U collisions at energy {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV.

  4. Plasmonic behaviour of sputtered Au nanoisland arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvarožek, V.; Szabó, O.; Novotný, I.; Kováčová, S.; Škriniarová, J.; Šutta, P.

    2017-02-01

    The specificity of the formation of Au sputtered nanoisland arrays (NIA) on a glass substrate or on a ZnO thin film doped by Ga is demonstrated. Statistical analysis of morphology images (SEM, AFM) exhibited the Log-normal distribution of the size (area) of nanoislands-their modus AM varied from 8 to 328 nm2 depending on the sputtering power density, which determined the nominal thicknesses in the range of 2-8 nm. Preferential polycrystalline texture (111) of Au NIA increased with the power density and after annealing. Transverse localised surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR; evaluated by transmission UV-vis spectroscopy) showed the red shift of the extinction peaks (Δl ≤ 100 nm) with an increase of the nominal thickness, and the blue shift (Δλ ≤ -65 nm) after annealing of Au NIA. The plasmonic behaviour of Au NIA was described by modification of a size-scaling universal model using the nominal thin film thickness as a technological scaling parameter. Sputtering of a Ti intermediate adhesive ultrathin film between the glass substrate and gold improves the adhesion of Au nanoislands as well as supporting the formation of more defined Au NIA structures of smaller dimensions.

  5. Diphosphine-protected ultrasmall gold nanoclusters: opened icosahedral Au 13 and heart-shaped Au 8 clusters

    SciT

    Zhang, Shan-Shan; Feng, Lei; Senanayake, Ravithree D.

    Two ultrasmall gold clusters, Au 13 and Au 8 , were identified as a distorted I h icosahedral Au 13 and edge-shared “core + 4 exo ” structure Au 8 S 2 cores, respectively. They showed interesting luminescence and electrochemical properties.

  6. Diphosphine-protected ultrasmall gold nanoclusters: opened icosahedral Au 13 and heart-shaped Au 8 clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Shan-Shan; Feng, Lei; Senanayake, Ravithree D.; ...

    2018-01-01

    Two ultrasmall gold clusters, Au 13 and Au 8 , were identified as a distorted I h icosahedral Au 13 and edge-shared “core + 4 exo ” structure Au 8 S 2 cores, respectively. They showed interesting luminescence and electrochemical properties.

  7. Toward hybrid Au nanorods @ M (Au, Ag, Pd and Pt) core-shell heterostructures for ultrasensitive SERS probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaobin; Gao, Guanhui; Kang, Shendong; Lei, Yanhua; Pan, Zhengyin; Shibayama, Tamaki; Cai, Lintao

    2017-06-01

    Being able to precisely control the morphologies of noble metallic nanostructures is of essential significance for promoting the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Herein, we demonstrate an overgrowth strategy for synthesizing Au @ M (M = Au, Ag, Pd, Pt) core-shell heterogeneous nanocrystals with an orientated structural evolution and highly improved properties by using Au nanorods as seeds. With the same reaction condition system applied, we obtain four well-designed heterostructures with diverse shapes, including Au concave nanocuboids (Au CNs), Au @ Ag crystalizing face central cube nanopeanuts, Au @ Pd porous nanocuboids and Au @ Pt nanotrepangs. Subsequently, the exact overgrowth mechanism of the above heterostructural building blocks is further analysed via the systematic optimiziation of a series of fabrications. Remarkably, the well-defined Au CNs and Au @ Ag nanopeanuts both exhibit highly promoted SERS activity. We expect to be able to supply a facile strategy for the fabrication of multimetallic heterogeneous nanostructures, exploring the high SERS effect and catalytic activities.

  8. Isomorphism and solid solutions among Ag- and Au-selenides

    SciT

    Palyanova, Galina A.; Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Novosibirsk State University

    Au-Ag selenides were synthesized by heating stoichiometric mixtures of elementary substances of initial compositions Ag{sub 2−x}Au{sub x}Se with a step of x=0.25 (0≤x≤2) to 1050 °C and annealing at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to study synthesized samples. Results of studies of synthesized products revealed the existence of three solid solutions with limited isomorphism Ag↔Au: naumannite Ag{sub 2}Se – Ag{sub 1.94}Au{sub 0.06}Se, fischesserite Ag{sub 3}AuSe{sub 2} - Ag{sub 3.2}Au{sub 0.8}Se{sub 2} and gold selenide AuSe - Au{sub 0.94}Ag{sub 0.06}Se. Solid solutions and AgAuSe phases were added tomore » the phase diagram of Ag-Au-Se system. Crystal-chemical interpretation of Ag-Au isomorphism in selenides was made on the basis of structural features of fischesserite, naumannite, and AuSe. - Highlights: • Au-Ag selenides were synthesized. • Limited Ag-Au isomorphism in the selenides is affected by structural features. • Some new phases were introduced to the phase diagram Ag-Au-Se.« less

  9. The extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from Au concentrate by thiourea solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongju; Cho, Kanghee; On, Hyunsung; Choi, Nagchoul; Park, Cheonyoung

    2013-04-01

    The cyanidation process has been used commercially for the past 100 years, there are ores that are not amenable to treatment by cyanide. Interest in alternative lixiviants, such as thiourea, halogens, thiosulfate and malononitrile, has been revived as a result of a major increase in gold price, which has stimulated new developments in extraction technology, combined with environmental concern. The Au extraction process using the thiourea solvent has many advantages over the cyanidation process, including higher leaching rates, faster extraction time and less than toxicity. The purpose of this study was investigated to the extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from two different Au concentrate (sulfuric acid washing and roasting) under various experiment conditions (thiourea concentration, pH of solvent, temperature) by thiourea solvent. The result of extraction experiment showed that the Au-Ag extraction was a fast extraction process, reaching equilibrium (maximum extraction rate) within 30 min. The Au-Ag extraction rate was higher in the roasted concentrate than in the sulfuric acid washing. The higher the Au-Ag extraction rate (Au - 70.87%, Ag - 98.12%) from roasted concentrate was found when the more concentration of thiourea increased, pH decreased and extraction temperature increased. This study informs extraction method basic knowledge when thiourea was a possibility to eco-/economic resources of Au-Ag utilization studies including the hydrometallurgy.

  10. Identified particles in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phobos Collaboration; Wosiek, Barbara; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The yields of identified particles have been measured at RHIC for Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV using the PHOBOS spectrometer. The ratios of antiparticle to particle yields near mid-rapidity are presented. The first measurements of the invariant yields of charged pions, kaons and protons at very low transverse momenta are also shown.

  11. Comparison of the space-time extent of the emission source in d +Au and Au + Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajitanand, N. N.; Phenix Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Two-pion interferometry measurements in d +Au and Au + Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV are used to extract and compare the Gaussian source radii Rout, Rside and Rlong, which characterize the space-time extent of the emission sources. The comparisons, which are performed as a function of collision centrality and the mean transverse momentum for pion pairs, indicate strikingly similar patterns for the d +Au and Au + Au systems. They also indicate a linear dependence of Rside on the initial transverse geometric size R bar , as well as a smaller freeze-out size for the d +Au system. These patterns point to the important role of final-state re-scattering effects in the reaction dynamics of d +Au collisions.

  12. Direct visualization of phase separation between superconducting and nematic domains in Co-doped CaFe 2 As 2 close to a first-order phase transition

    DOE PAGES

    Fente, Antón; Correa-Orellana, Alexandre; Böhmer, Anna E.; ...

    2018-01-09

    We show that biaxial strain induces alternating tetragonal superconducting and orthorhombic nematic domains in Co substituted CaFe 2As 2. We use Atomic Force, Magnetic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (AFM, MFM and STM) to identify the domains and characterize their properties, nding in particular that tetragonal superconducting domains are very elongated, more than several tens of μm long and about 30 nm wide, have the same Tc than unstrained samples and hold vortices in a magnetic eld. Thus, biaxial strain produces a phase separated state, where each phase is equivalent to what is found at either side of the rstmore » order phase transition between antiferromagnetic orthorhombic and superconducting tetragonal phases found in unstrained samples when changing Co concentration. Having such alternating superconducting domains separated by normal conducting domains with sizes of order of the coherence length opens opportunities to build Josephson junction networks or vortex pinning arrays and suggests that first order quantum phase transitions lead to nanometric size phase separation under the influence of strain.« less

  13. Direct visualization of phase separation between superconducting and nematic domains in Co-doped CaFe2As2 close to a first-order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fente, Antón; Correa-Orellana, Alexandre; Böhmer, Anna E.; Kreyssig, Andreas; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Mompean, Federico J.; García-Hernández, Mar; Munuera, Carmen; Guillamón, Isabel; Suderow, Hermann

    2018-01-01

    We show that biaxial strain induces alternating tetragonal superconducting and orthorhombic nematic domains in Co-substituted CaFe2As2 . We use atomic force, magnetic force, and scanning tunneling microscopy to identify the domains and characterize their properties, finding in particular that tetragonal superconducting domains are very elongated, more than several tens of micrometers long and about 30 nm wide; have the same Tc as unstrained samples; and hold vortices in a magnetic field. Thus, biaxial strain produces a phase-separated state, where each phase is equivalent to what is found on either side of the first-order phase transition between antiferromagnetic orthorhombic and superconducting tetragonal phases found in unstrained samples when changing Co concentration. Having such alternating superconducting domains separated by normal conducting domains with sizes of the order of the coherence length opens opportunities to build Josephson junction networks or vortex pinning arrays and suggests that first-order quantum phase transitions lead to nanometric-size phase separation under the influence of strain.

  14. Growth and characterization of CaFe1-xCoxAsF single crystals by CaAs flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yonghui; Hu, Kangkang; Ji, Qiucheng; Gao, Bo; Zhang, Hui; Mu, Gang; Huang, Fuqiang; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-10-01

    Millimeter sized single crystals of CaFe1-x Cox AsF were grown using a self-flux method. It is found that high-quality single crystals can be grown from three approaches with different initial raw materials. The chemical compositions and crystal structure were characterized carefully. Compared with the undoped parent phase CaFeAsF, the crystal lattice along the c-axis is suppressed by the Co substitution while that along the a-axis expands slightly. Superconductivity with the critical transition Tc as high as 21 K was confirmed by both the resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements in the sample with x=0.118. Moreover, it is found that Tc can be enhanced for about 1 K under the very small hydrostatic pressure of 0.22 GPa, which is more quick than that reported in the polycrystalline samples. Our results are a promotion for the physical investigations of 1111 phase iron-pnictide superconductors.

  15. Strong anisotropy effect in an iron-based superconductor CaFe0.882Co0.118AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yonghui; Ji, Qiucheng; Hu, Kangkang; Gao, Bo; Li, Wei; Mu, Gang; Xie, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    The anisotropy of iron-based superconductors is much smaller than that of the cuprates and that predicted by theoretical calculations. A credible understanding for this experimental fact is still lacking up to now. Here we experimentally study the magnetic-field-angle dependence of electronic resistivity in the superconducting phase of an iron-based superconductor CaFe{}0.882Co{}0.118AsF, and find the strongest anisotropy effect of the upper critical field among the iron-based superconductors based on the framework of Ginzburg-Landau theory. The evidence of the energy band structure and charge density distribution from electronic structure calculations demonstrates that the observed strong anisotropic effect mainly comes from the strong ionic bonding in between the ions of Ca2+ and F-, which weakens the interlayer coupling between the layers of FeAs and CaF. This finding provides a significant insight into the nature of the experimentally-observed strong anisotropic effect of electronic resistivity, and also paves the way for designing exotic two-dimensional artificial unconventional superconductors in the future.

  16. Unusual superconducting state at 49 K in electron-doped CaFe2As2 at ambient pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bing; Deng, Liangzi; Gooch, Melissa; Wei, Fengyan; Sun, Yanyi; Meen, James K.; Xue, Yu-Yi; Lorenz, Bernd; Chu, Ching-Wu

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of unusual superconductivity up to 49 K in single crystalline CaFe2As2 via electron-doping by partial replacement of Ca by rare-earth. The superconducting transition observed suggests the possible existence of two phases: one starting at 49 K, which has a low critical field < 4 Oe, and the other at 21 K, with a much higher critical field > 5 T. Our observations are in strong contrast to previous reports of doping or pressurizing layered compounds AeFe2As2 (or Ae122), where Ae = Ca, Sr, or Ba. In Ae122, hole-doping has been previously observed to generate superconductivity with a transition temperature (Tc) only up to 38 K and pressurization has been reported to produce superconductivity with a Tc up to 30 K. The unusual 49 K phase detected will be discussed. PMID:21911404

  17. Secondhand smoke exposure within semi-open air cafes and tobacco specific 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) concentrations among nonsmoking employees.

    PubMed

    Vardavas, Constantine I; Karabela, Maria; Agaku, Israel T; Matsunaga, Yuko; Myridakis, Antonis; Kouvarakis, Antonis; Stephanou, Euripides G; Lymperi, Maria; Behrakis, Panagiotis K

    2014-10-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a defined occupational hazard. The association though between SHS exposure in semi-open air venues and tobacco specific carcinogen uptake is an area of debate. A cross sectional survey of 49 semi-open air cafes in Athens, Greece was performed during the summer of 2008, prior to the adoption of the national smoke free legislation. All venues had at least 1 entire wall open to allow for free air exchange. Indoor concentrations of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) attributable to SHS were assessed during a work shift, while 1 non-smoking employee responsible for indoor and outdoor table service from each venue provided a post work shift urine sample for analysis of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL). Post work shift NNAL concentrations were correlated with work shift PM2.5 concentrations attributable to SHS (r = 0.376, p = 0.0076). Urinary NNAL concentrations among employees increased by 9.5%, per 10 μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 concentrations attributable to SHS after controlling for the time of day and day of week. These results indicate that the commonly proposed practice of maintaining open sliding walls as a means of free air exchange does not lead to the elimination of employee exposure to tobacco specific carcinogens attributable to workplace SHS.

  18. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales Pérez, M.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, M.; Gayou, V. L.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  19. Au nanorice assemble electrolytically into mesostars.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Rizia; Neumann, Oara; Mirin, Nikolay; Wang, Hui; Halas, Naomi J

    2009-02-24

    Star-shaped mesotructures are formed when an aqueous suspension of Au nanorice particles, which consist of prolate hematite cores and a thin Au shell, is subjected to an electric current. The nanorice particles assemble to form hyperbranched micrometer-scale mesostars. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of nanoparticle assembly into larger ordered structures under the influence of an electrochemical process (H(2)O electrolysis). The assembly is accompanied by significant modifications in the morphology, dimensions, chemical composition, crystallographic structure, and optical properties of the constituent nanoparticles.

  20. Initiation of Collapsing Pentacene Crystal by Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihm, Kyuwook; Lee, Kyoung-Jae; Chung, Sukmin; Kang, Tai-Hee

    2011-12-01

    Metal contacts with gold on organics are an essential factor in organic electronics. The unveiled key challenge is to probe dynamic details of the microscopic evolution of the organic crystal when the atomic Au is introduced. Here, we show how the collapse of the pentacene crystal is initiated even by a few Au atoms. Our photoemission and x-ray absorption results indicate that the gentle decoupling of intra and inter-molecular π-π interactions causes the localization of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital as well as the removal of cohesive forces between molecules, leading to the subsequent crystal collapse.

  1. Plasmon-enhanced versatile optical nonlinearities in a Au-Ag-Au multi-segmental hybrid structure.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lin-Hua; Zhang, Jun-Pei; Dai, Hong-Wei; Wang, Ming-Shan; Zhang, Lu-Man; Wang, Xia; Han, Jun-Bo

    2018-06-27

    A Au-Ag-Au multi-segmental hybrid structure has been synthesized by using an electrodeposition method based on an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. The third-order optical nonlinearities, second harmonic generation (SHG) and photoluminescence (PL) properties containing ultrafast supercontinuum generation and plasmon mediated thermal emission have been investigated. Significant optical enhancements have been obtained near surface plasmon resonance wavelength in all the abovementioned nonlinear processes. Comparative studies between the Au-Ag-Au multi-segmental hybrid structure and the corresponding single-component Au and Ag hybrid structures demonstrate that the Au-Ag-Au multi-segmental hybrid structure has much larger optical nonlinearities than its counterparts. These results demonstrate that the Au-Ag-Au hybrid structure is a promising candidate for applications in plasmonic devices and enhancement substrates.

  2. Local structure and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism of Au in Au-Co nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurizio, C.; Michieli, N.; Kalinic, B.; Mattarello, V.; Bello, V.; Wilhelm, F.; Ollefs, K.; Mattei, G.

    2018-03-01

    Coupling a plasmonic metal with a magnetic one in thin films and nanostructures is very interesting for the emerging field of magnetoplasmonics. In particular, coupling through alloying is a promising strategy to induce a magnetic moment on the plasmonic metal atoms, in a way that is intimately related to the local structure of the (metastable) alloy material. In this framework, Au:Co bimetallic films have been produced via magnetron co-sputtering deposition. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at both Au- and Co-edges clearly indicates the formation of a full-metallic layer composed for the major part of a binary AuxCo1-x alloy, with x = 0.7-0.8. XAS and transmission electron microscopy analyses suggest the presence of a minor fraction of segregated metals. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) analysis at Au L2,3 edges detected a net magnetic moment of Au atoms (μ = 0.06 μB), significantly larger (≈3.5 times) that the one for Au-capped Co nanoclusters and comparable to the one for a Co-rich Au/Co multilayer, despite the 4 times larger concentration of Co with respect to the present case. This Au-Co magnetic coupling is favored by a high degree of mixing of the two metals in the alloy.

  3. Evidence of final-state suppression of high-p{_ T} hadrons in Au + Au collisions using d + Au measurements at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons with pT < 6 GeV/c have been measured near mid-rapidity (0.2 < ɛ < 1.4) by the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC in Au + Au and d + Au collisions at {√ {s{NN}} = {200 GeV}}. The spectra for different collision centralities are compared to {p + ¯ {p}} collisions at the same energy. The resulting nuclear modification factor for central Au + Au collisions shows evidence of strong suppression of charged hadrons in the high-pT region (>2 GeV/c). In contrast, the d + Au nuclear modification factor exhibits no suppression of the high-pT yields. These measurements suggest a large energy loss of the high-pT particles in the highly interacting medium created in the central Au + Au collisions. The lack of suppression in d + Au collisions suggests that it is unlikely that initial state effects can explain the suppression in the central Au + Au collisions. PACS: 25.75.-q

  4. Nanoporous Au structures by dealloying Au/Ag thermal- or laser-dewetted bilayers on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffino, F.; Torrisi, V.; Grillo, R.; Cacciato, G.; Zimbone, M.; Piccitto, G.; Grimaldi, M. G.

    2017-03-01

    Nanoporous Au attracts great technological interest and it is a promising candidate for optical and electrochemical sensors. In addition to nanoporous Au leafs and films, recently, interest was focused on nanoporous Au micro- and nano-structures on surfaces. In this work we report on the study of the characteristics of nanoporous Au structures produced on surfaces. We developed the following procedures to fabricate the nanoporous Au structures: we deposited thin Au/Ag bilayers on SiO2 or FTO (fluorine-doped tin oxide) substrates with thickness xAu and xAg of the Au and Ag layers; we induced the alloying and dewetting processes of the bilayers by furnace annealing processes of the bilayers deposited on SiO2 and by laser irradiations of the bilayers deposited on FTO; the alloying and dewetting processes result in the formation of AuxAgy alloy sub-micron particles being x and y tunable by xAu and xAg. These particles are dealloyed in HNO3 solution to remove the Ag atoms. We obtain, so, nanoporous sub-micron Au particles on the substrates. Analyzing the characteristics of these particles we find that: a) the size and shape of the particles depend on the nature of the dewetting process (solid-state dewetting on SiO2, molten-state dewetting on FTO); b) the porosity fraction of the particles depends on how the alloying process is reached: about 32% of porosity for the particles fabricated by the furnace annealing at 900 °C, about 45% of porosity for the particles fabricated by the laser irradiation at 0.5 J/cm2, in both cases independently on the Ag concentration in the alloy; c) After the dealloying process the mean volume of the Au particles shrinks of about 39%; d) After an annealing at 400 °C the nanoporous Au particles reprise their initial volume while the porosity fraction is reduced. Arguments to justify these behaviors are presented.

  5. Facile Syntheses of Monodisperse Ultra-Small Au Clusters

    SciT

    Bertino, Massimo F.; Sun, Zhong-Ming; Zhang, Rui

    2006-11-02

    During our effort to synthesize the tetrahedral Au20 cluster, we found a facile synthetic route to prepare monodisperse suspensions of ultra-small Au clusters AuN (N<12) using diphosphine ligands. In our monophasic and single-pot synthesis, a Au precursor ClAu(I)PPh3 and a bidentate phosphine ligand P(Ph)2(CH2)MP(Ph)2 (Ph = phenyl) are dissolved in an organic solvent. Au(I) is reduced slowly by a borane-tert-butylamine complex to form Au clusters coordinated by the diphosphine ligand. The Au clusters are characterized by both high resolution mass spectrometry and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. We found that the mean cluster size obtained depends on the chain length M ofmore » the ligand. In particular, a single monodispersed Au11 cluster is obtained with the P(Ph)2(CH2)3P(Ph)2 ligand, whereas P(Ph)2(CH2)MP(Ph)2 ligands with M = 5 and 6 yield Au10 and Au8 clusters. The simplicity of our synthetic method makes it suitable for large-scale production of nearly monodisperse ultrasmall Au clusters. It is suggested that diphosphines provide a set of flexible ligands to allow size-controlled synthesis of Au nanoparticles.« less

  6. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Gerrit; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p T from 0.25 to 5 GeV/C is studied as a function of collision centrality. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  7. Au-nanocluster emission based glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A M P; Sarangi, S N; Kesarwani, J A; Sahu, S N

    2011-11-15

    Fabrication of a glucose biosensor based on Au-cluster emission quenching in the UV region is reported. The glucose biosensor is highly sensitive to β-d-glucose in 2.5-25.0mM range as confirmed from a linear calibration plot between Au-cluster colloid emission intensity as a function of β-d-glucose concentration. The interaction of β-d-glucose with l-cysteine capped Au cluster colloids has been confirmed from their Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. It has been found that the biomolecules present in the serum such as ascorbic and uric acids, proteins and peptides do not interfere and affect in glucose estimation as confirmed from their absorption and fluorescence (FL) emission measurements. Practical utility of this sensor based on FL quenching method has been demonstrated by estimating the glucose level in human serum that includes diabetes and the data were found to be comparable or more accurate than those of the pathological data obtained from a local hospital. In addition, this biosensor is useful to detect glucose level over a wide range with sensor response time of the order of nano to picoseconds that is emission lifetime of Au clusters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiotherapy Improvements by Using Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Au nanoparticles can be prepared inside biological solutions and incorporated in special molecules for their transport through blood, drugs and proteins up to the tumour sites or directly injected in their volume when it is possible. The Au nanoparticles are biocompatible and can be accepted locally in the organism also at relatively high concentrations. The use of Au nanoparticles injected in the tumour site enhances significantly the effective atomic number of the medium, depending on the used concentration, and consequently the proton and electron energy loss and the X-ray absorption coefficient determining an increment of the local absorbed dose during radiotherapy. Traditional radiotherapy using electrons, X-rays and gamma rays, and innovative protontherapy can benefit the increment of the effective atomic number of the tissue in the presence of Au-nanoparticles embedded in the tumour volume with an adaptive up-take procedure. This method decreases the dose released to the healthy tissues permitting a better cantering of the irradiated targets and shielding the healthy tissue placed behind the tumour. The presented theoretical study approach permits to evaluate an enhancement of the radiotherapy dose of the order of 1 % using 60 MeV protons, of the order of 10% using 6 MeV electrons and of the order of 100 % using 100 keV X-ray photons. Here, we also disccused for patents relaed to the topic.

  9. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciT

    Zhang, S. Y.

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014more » is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.« less

  10. A comparative theoretical study of the catalytic activities of Au2(-) and AuAg(-) dimers for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Song, Ke; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2012-05-01

    The detailed mechanisms of catalytic CO oxidation over Au(2)(-) and AuAg(-) dimers, which represent the simplest models for monometal Au and bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles, have been studied by performing density functional theory calculations. It is found that both Au(2)(-) and AuAg(-) dimers catalyze the reaction according to the similar mono-center Eley-Rideal mechanism. The catalytic reaction is of the multi-channel and multi-step characteristic, which can proceed along four possible pathways via two or three elementary steps. In AuAg(-), the Au site is more active than the Ag site, and the calculated energy barrier values for the rate-determining step of the Au-site catalytic reaction are remarkably smaller than those for both the Ag-site catalytic reaction and the Au(2)(-) catalytic reaction. The better catalytic activity of bimetallic AuAg(-) dimer is attributed to the synergistic effect between Au and Ag atom. The present results provide valuable information for understanding the higher catalytic activity of Au-Ag nanoparticles and nanoalloys for low-temperature CO oxidation than either pure metallic catalyst.

  11. pH-Induced transformation of ligated Au25 to brighter Au23 nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Waszkielewicz, Magdalena; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Bertorelle, Franck; Dagany, Xavier; Bansal, Ashu K; Sajjad, Muhammad T; Samuel, Ifor D W; Sanader, Zeljka; Rozycka, Miroslawa; Wojtas, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Antoine, Rodolphe; Ozyhar, Andrzej; Samoc, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters have recently attracted considerable attention due to their size-dependent luminescence characterized by a long lifetime and large Stokes shift. However, the optimization of nanocluster properties such as the luminescence quantum yield is still a challenge. We report here the transformation of Au25Capt18 (Capt labels captopril) nanoclusters occurring at low pH and yielding a product with a much increased luminescence quantum yield which we have identified as Au23Capt17. We applied a simple method of treatment with HCl to accomplish this transformation and we characterized the absorption and emission of the newly created ligated nanoclusters as well as their morphology. Based on DFT calculations we show which Au nanocluster size transformations can lead to highly luminescent species such as Au23Capt17.

  12. Au/ZnO nanoarchitectures with Au as both supporter and antenna of visible-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Chen, Wei; Hua, Yuxiang; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we fabricate Au/ZnO nanostructure with smaller ZnO nanoparticles loaded onto bigger gold nanoparticles via combining seed-mediated method and sol-gel method. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposites exhibit excellent properties in photocatalysis process like methyl orange (MO) degradation and oxidative conversion of methanol into formaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The enhanced properties were ascribed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Au nanoparticles, which could contribute to the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes and facilitate the process of absorbing visible light. This paper contributes to the emergence of multi-functional nanocomposites with possible applications in visible-light driven photocatalysts and makes the Au/ZnO photocatalyst an exceptional choice for practical applications such as environmental purification of organic pollutants in aqueous solution and the synthesis of fine chemicals and intermediates.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammad Bilal; Ahmad, Sultan; Parwaz, M.; Rahul, Khan, Zishan H.

    2018-05-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of pure and Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires. These nanowires are synthesized using thermal vapor transport method. The luminescence intensity of Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires are recorded to be higher than that of pure Alq3 nanowires, which is found to increase with the increase in Au concentration. Fluorescence quenching is also observed when Au concentration is increased beyond the certain limit.

  14. Flow and bose-einstein correlations in Au-Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phobos Collaboration; Manly, Steven; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyinski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    Argonne flow and Bose-Einstein correlations have been measured in Au-Au collisions at S=130 and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. The systematic dependencies of the flow signal on the transverse momentum, pseudorapidity, and centrality of the collision, as well as the beam energy are shown. In addition, results of a 3-dimensional analysis of two-pion correlations in the 200 GeV data are presented.

  15. Interface-induced superconductivity at ∼25 K at ambient pressure in undoped CaFe2As2 single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kui; Lv, Bing; Deng, Liangzi; Huyan, Shu-Yuan; Xue, Yu-Yi; Chu, Ching-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Superconductivity has been reversibly induced/suppressed in undoped CaFe2As2 (Ca122) single crystals through proper thermal treatments, with Tc at ∼25 K at ambient pressure and up to 30 K at 1.7 GPa. We found that Ca122 can be stabilized in two distinct tetragonal (T) phases at room temperature and ambient pressure: PI with a nonmagnetic collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase at low temperature and PII with an antiferromagnetic orthorhombic (O) phase at low temperature, depending on the low-temperature annealing condition. Neither phase at ambient pressure is superconducting down to 2 K. However, systematic annealing for different time periods at 350 °C on the as-synthesized crystals, which were obtained by quenching the crystal ingot from 850 °C, reveals the emergence of superconductivity over a narrow time window. Whereas the onset Tc is insensitive to the anneal time, the superconductive volume fraction evolves with the time in a dome-shaped fashion. Detailed X-ray diffraction profile analyses further reveal mesoscopically stacked layers of the PI and the PII phases. The deduced interface density correlates well with the superconducting volume measured. The transport anomalies of the T–cT transition, which is sensitive to lattice strain, and the T–O transition, which is associated with the spin-density-wave (SDW) transition, are gradually suppressed over the superconductive region, presumably due to the interface interactions between the nonmagnetic metallic cT phase and the antiferromagnetic O phase. The results provide the most direct evidence to date for interface-enhanced superconductivity in undoped Ca122, consistent with the recent theoretical prediction. PMID:27799564

  16. Sharp Transition from Nonmetallic Au246 to Metallic Au279 with Nascent Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Tatsuya; Zhou, Meng; Lambright, Kelly J; Kirschbaum, Kristin; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Jin, Rongchao

    2018-05-02

    The optical properties of metal nanoparticles have attracted wide interest. Recent progress in controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision (often called nanoclusters) provide new opportunities for investigating many fundamental questions, such as the transition from excitonic to plasmonic state, which is a central question in metal nanoparticle research because it provides insights into the origin of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) as well as the formation of metallic bond. However, this question still remains elusive because of the extreme difficulty in preparing atomically precise nanoparticles larger than 2 nm. Here we report the synthesis and optical properties of an atomically precise Au 279 (SR) 84 nanocluster. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic analysis reveals that the Au 279 nanocluster shows a laser power dependence in its excited state lifetime, indicating metallic state of the particle, in contrast with the nonmetallic electronic structure of the Au 246 (SR) 80 nanocluster. Steady-state absorption spectra reveal that the nascent plasmon band of Au 279 at 506 nm shows no peak shift even down to 60 K, consistent with plasmon behavior. The sharp transition from nonmetallic Au 246 to metallic Au 279 is surprising and will stimulate future theoretical work on the transition and many other relevant issues.

  17. Growth of germanium on Au(111): formation of germanene or intermixing of Au and Ge atoms?

    PubMed

    Cantero, Esteban D; Solis, Lara M; Tong, Yongfeng; Fuhr, Javier D; Martiarena, María Luz; Grizzi, Oscar; Sánchez, Esteban A

    2017-07-19

    We studied the growth of Ge layers on Au(111) under ultra-high vacuum conditions from the submonolayer regime up to a few layers with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Direct Recoiling Spectroscopy (DRS) and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED). Most STM images for the thicker layers are consistent with a commensurate 5 × 8 arrangement. The high surface sensitivity of TOF-DRS allows us to confirm the coexistence of Au and Ge atoms in the top layer for all stages of growth. An estimation of the Au to Ge ratio at the surface of the thick layer gives about 1 Au atom per 2 Ge ones. When the growth is carried out at sample temperatures higher than about 420 K, a fraction of the deposited Ge atoms migrate into the bulk of Au. This incorporation of Ge into the bulk reduces the growth rate of the Ge films, making it more difficult to obtain films thicker than a few layers. After sputtering the Ge/Au surface, the segregation of bulk Ge atoms to the surface occurs for temperatures ≥600 K. The surface obtained after segregation of Ge reaches a stable condition (saturation) with an n × n symmetry with n on the order of 14.

  18. Nanoporous Au: An experimental study on the porosity of dealloyed AuAg leafs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, R.; Torrisi, V.; Ruffino, F.

    2016-12-01

    We present a study on the fraction of porosity for dealloyed nanoporous Au leafs. Nanoporous Au is attracting great scientific interest due to its peculiar plasmonic properties and the high exposed surface (∼10 m2/g). As examples, it was used in prototypes of chemical and biological devices. However, the maximization of the devices sensitivity is subjected to the maximization of the exposed surface by the nanoporous Au, i. e. maximization of the porosity fraction. So, we report on the analyses of the porosity fraction in nanoporous Au leafs as a function of the fabrication process parameters. We dealloyed 60 μm-thick Au23Ag77 at.% leafs and we show that: a) for dealloying time till to 6 h, only a 450 nm-thick surface layer of the leafs assumes a nanoporous structure with a porosity fraction of 32%. For a dealloying time of 20 h the leafs result fragmented in small black pieces with a porosity fraction increased to 60%. b) After 600 °C-30 minutes annealing of the previous samples, the nanopores disappear due to the Au/residual Ag inter-diffusion. c) After a second dealloying process on the previously annealed samples, the surface nanoporous structure is, again, obtained with the porosity fraction increased to 50%.

  19. The effect of Au amount on size uniformity of self-assembled Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-H.; Wang, D.-C.; Chen, G.-Y.; Chen, K.-Y.

    2008-03-01

    The self-assembled fabrication of nanostructure, a dreaming approach in the area of fabrication engineering, is the ultimate goal of this research. A finding was proved through previous research that the size of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles could be controlled with the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol. In this study, the moles of Au were fixed, only the moles of thiol were adjusted. Five different mole ratios of Au/S with their effect on size uniformity were investigated. The mole ratios were 1:1/16, 1:1/8, 1:1, 1:8, 1:16, respectively. The size distributions of the gold nanoparticles were analyzed by Mac-View analysis software. HR-TEM was used to derive images of self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The result reached was also the higher the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol the bigger the self-assembled gold nanoparticles. Under the condition of moles of Au fixed, the most homogeneous nanoparticles in size distribution derived with the mole ratio of 1:1/8 between AuCl4- and thiol. The obtained nanoparticles could be used, for example, in uniform surface nanofabrication, leading to the fabrication of ordered array of quantum dots.

  20. Controlling Au Nanorod Dispersion in Thin Film Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hore, Michael J. A.; Composto, Russell J.

    2012-02-01

    Dispersion of Au nanorods (Au NRs) in polymer thin films is studied using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques. Here, we incorporate small volume fractions of polystyrene-functionalized Au NRs (φrod 0.05) into polystyrene (PS) thin films. By controlling the ratio of the brush length (N) to that of the matrix polymers (P), we can selectively obtain dispersed or aggregated Au NR structures in the PS-Au(N):PS(P) films. A dispersion map of these structures allows one to choose N and P to obtain either uniformly dispersed Au NRs or aggregates of closely packed, side-by-side aligned Au NRs. Furthermore, by blending poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) (PPO) into the PS films, we demonstrate that the Au nanorod morphology can be further tuned by reducing depletion-attraction forces and promoting miscibility of the Au NRs. These predictable structures ultimately give rise to tunable optical absorption in the films resulting from surface plasmon resonance coupling between the Au NRs. Finally, self-consistent field theoretic (SCFT) calculations for both the PS-Au(N):PS(P) and PS-Au(N):PS(P):PPO systems provide insight into the PS brush structure, and allow us to interpret morphology and optical property results in terms of wet and dry PS brush states.

  1. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Lee, J. W.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The spectra were measured for transverse momenta pT from 0.25 to 4.5 GeV/c in a pseudorapidity range of 0.2<η<1.4. The evolution of the spectra is studied as a function of collision centrality, from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. The results are compared to data from proton-antiproton collisions and Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energies. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing semi-peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at high pT exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  2. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions atsqrt sNN=200 GeV

    SciT

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.

    2003-10-06

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons and antiprotons are reported for {radical}sNN = 200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The transverse mass distributions are rapidity independent within |y| < 0.5, consistent with a boost-invariant system in this rapidity interval. Spectral shapes and relative particle yields are similar in pp and peripheral Au+Au collisions and change smoothly to central Au+Au collisions. No centrality dependence was observed in the kaon and antiproton production rates relative to the pion production rate from medium-central to central collisions. Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data revealmore » strong radial flow and relatively long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.« less

  3. AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is

  4. Slab melting and the origin of gold in Au and Au-Cu deposits: geochemical clues from recent adakites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polve, M.; Maury, R.; Joron, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    Understanding the genetic processes responsible for the common occurrence of Au and Au-Cu deposits in subduction environments is a fairly "hot" question nowadays, as it is clear that most subduction-related magmatic rocks are barren. Studies of space and time relationships between magmatic intrusions, hydrothermal episodes and Au deposits have shown that, very often, Au deposits are associated with adakitic intrusions (Thieblemont et al, 1997, Sajona and Maury, 1998). Adakites are here understood as being generated by melting of the subducting oceanic crust. This study aims to check wether or not magmas derived from melted oceanic crust do contain significantly more Au than regular calc-alkaline magmas by measuring directly Au concentrations in fresh (and barren) adakites and equivalent calc-alkaline andesites. There is a lack of reliable data on Au content in unaltered adakites and andesites, because Au analyses are generally done on hydrothermalized rocks in connection with Au deposits and also because old measurements may give overestimated Au contents, due to technical limitations. Therefore we compiled recent literature data on gold contents of fresh calc-alkaline rocks, and measured Au on a selection of 40 well studied and dated adakites from different localities (Philippines, Baja California). Analyses have been performed either by INAA or by ICP-MS after Au extraction with aqua regia, following the method described by Terashima (1988). Preliminary results show that, for equivalent Si02 contents, adakites are systematically enriched in Au compared to regular dacites, even if regional trends also exist. Moreover, Au seems to behave as an incompatible element in adakitic magmas, whereas in calc-alkaline dacites it is controlled by sulfide crystallization. Our data suggest that, not excluding any other processes related to the hydrothermal phase in the deposit generation, adakites may indeed represent the source of Au, a possible explanation for the adakite-Au

  5. Influence of Au and TiO2 structures on hydrogen dissociation over TiO2/Au(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, I.; Mantoku, H.; Furukawa, T.; Takahashi, A.; Fujitani, T.

    2012-11-01

    We performed H2-D2 exchange reactions over TiOx/Au(100) and compared the observed reaction kinetics with those reported for TiOx/Au(111) in order to clarify the influence of the Au and TiO2 structures on dissociation of H2 molecules. Low energy electron diffraction observations showed that the TiO2 produced on Au(100) was disordered, in contrast to the comparatively ordered TiO2 structure formed on Au(111). The activation energies and the turnover frequencies for HD formation over TiO2/Au(100) agreed well with those for TiO2/Au(111), clearly indicating that the hydrogen dissociation sites created over TiO2/Au(100) were the perimeter interface between stoichiometric TiO2 and Au, as was previously concluded for TiO2/Au(111). We concluded that the creation of active sites for hydrogen dissociation was independent of the Au and TiO2 structures consisting perimeter interface, and that local bonds that formed between Au and O atoms of stoichiometric TiO2 were essential for the creation of active sites.

  6. Disentangling flow and signals of Chiral Magnetic Effect in U+U, Au+Au and p+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribedy, Prithwish; STAR Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    We present STAR measurements of the charge-dependent three-particle correlator γ a , b = 〈 cos ⁡ (ϕ1a + ϕ2b - 2ϕ3) 〉 /v2 { 2 } and elliptic flow v2 { 2 } in U+U, Au+Au and p+Au collisions at RHIC. The difference Δγ = γ (opposite-sign) - γ (same-sign) measures charge separation across the reaction plane, a predicted signal of the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). Although charge separation has been observed, it has been argued that the measured separation can also be explained by elliptic flow related backgrounds. In order to separate the two effects we perform measurements of the γ-correlator where background expectations differ from magnetic field driven effects. A differential measurement of γ with the relative pseudorapidity (Δη) between the first and second particles indicate that Δγ in peripheral A+A and p+A collisions are dominated by short-range correlations in Δη. However, a relatively wider component of the correlation in Δη tends to vanish the same way as projected magnetic field as predicted by MC-Glauber simulations.

  7. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  8. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-10-23

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher formore » leading non-pions than pions. As a result, the consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.« less

  9. From the ternary Eu(Au/In) 2 and EuAu 4(Au/In) 2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu 5Au 16(Au/In) 6 structure

    DOE PAGES

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In) 2 (EuAu 0.46In 1.54 (2)) (I), EuAu 4(Au/In) 2 (EuAu 4+xIn 2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu 5Au 16(Au/In) 6 (Eu 5Au 17.29In 4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu 2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl 4Mo 2-type (tI14; I4/ mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed ofmore » an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squared Au 8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu 5Au 16(Au/In) 6 (Eu 5Au 17.29In 4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu 2–“EuAu 4In 2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu 4(Au/In) 2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu 5In” and “EuAu 4In 2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.« less

  10. From the ternary Eu(Au/In) 2 and EuAu 4(Au/In) 2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu 5Au 16(Au/In) 6 structure

    SciT

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    The ternary Eu(Au/In) 2 (EuAu 0.46In 1.54 (2)) (I), EuAu 4(Au/In) 2 (EuAu 4+xIn 2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu 5Au 16(Au/In) 6 (Eu 5Au 17.29In 4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu 2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl 4Mo 2-type (tI14; I4/ mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed ofmore » an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squared Au 8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu 5Au 16(Au/In) 6 (Eu 5Au 17.29In 4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu 2–“EuAu 4In 2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu 4(Au/In) 2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu 5In” and “EuAu 4In 2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.« less

  11. Surface effects on the radiation response of nanoporous Au foams

    SciT

    Fu, E. G.; Caro, M.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2012-11-05

    We report on an experimental and simulation campaign aimed at exploring the radiation response of nanoporous Au (np-Au) foams. We find different defect accumulation behavior by varying radiation dose-rate in ion-irradiated np-Au foams. Stacking fault tetrahedra are formed when np-Au foams are irradiated at high dose-rate, but they do not seem to be formed in np-Au at low dose-rate irradiation. A model is proposed to explain the dose-rate dependent defect accumulation based on these results.

  12. Positron annihilation study of cavities in black Au films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhova, O.; Čížek, J.; Hruška, P.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Novotný, M.; Bulíř, J.

    2017-01-01

    Defects in a black Au film were studied using variable energy positron annihilation spectroscopy. Black Au films exhibit porous morphology similar to cauliflower. This type of structure enhances the optical absorption due to a multiple reflections in the micro-cavities. A nanostructured black Au film was compared with conventional smooth Au films with high reflectivity. The black Au film exhibited a remarkably enhanced S-parameter in sub-surface region. This is caused by a narrow para-Positronium contribution to the annihilation peak.

  13. First results on d+Au collisions from PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Noell, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Teng, R.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in d+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV, in the range 0.25 < pT < 6.0 GeV/c. With increasing collision centrality, the yield at high transverse momenta increases more rapidly than the overall particle density, leading to a strong modification of the spectral shape. This change in spectral shape is qualitatively different from observations in Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The results provide important information for discriminating between different models for the suppression of high-pT hadrons observed in Au+Au collisions.

  14. Synthesis, structure, and bonding in K12Au21Sn4. A polar intermetallic compound with dense Au20 and open AuSn4 layers.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sung-Jin; Miller, Gordon J; Corbett, John D

    2009-12-07

    The new phase K(12)Au(21)Sn(4) has been synthesized by direct reaction of the elements at elevated temperatures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction established its orthorhombic structure, space group Pmmn (No. 59), a = 12.162(2); b = 18.058(4); c = 8.657(2) A, V = 1901.3(7) A(3), and Z = 2. The structure consists of infinite puckered sheets of vertex-sharing gold tetrahedra (Au(20)) that are tied together by thin layers of alternating four-bonded-Sn and -Au atoms (AuSn(4)). Remarkably, the dense but electron-poorer blocks of Au tetrahedra coexist with more open and saturated Au-Sn layers, which are fragments of a zinc blende type structure that maximize tetrahedral heteroatomic bonding outside of the network of gold tetrahedra. LMTO band structure calculations reveal metallic properties and a pseudogap at 256 valence electrons per formula unit, only three electrons fewer than in the title compound and at a point at which strong Au-Sn bonding is optimized. Additionally, the tight coordination of the Au framework atoms by K plays an important bonding role: each Au tetrahedra has 10 K neighbors and each K atom has 8-12 Au contacts. The appreciably different role of the p element Sn in this structure from that in the triel members in K(3)Au(5)In and Rb(2)Au(3)Tl appears to arise from its higher electron count which leads to better p-bonding (valence electron concentrations = 1.32 versus 1.22).

  15. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; themore » remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. As a result, the sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  16. Isomorphism and solid solutions among Ag- and Au-selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palyanova, Galina A.; Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Kokh, Konstantin A.; Bakakin, Vladimir V.

    2016-09-01

    Au-Ag selenides were synthesized by heating stoichiometric mixtures of elementary substances of initial compositions Ag2-xAuxSe with a step of х=0.25 (0≤х≤2) to 1050 °С and annealing at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to study synthesized samples. Results of studies of synthesized products revealed the existence of three solid solutions with limited isomorphism Ag↔Au: naumannite Ag2Se - Ag1.94Au0.06Se, fischesserite Ag3AuSe2 - Ag3.2Au0.8Se2 and gold selenide AuSe - Au0.94Ag0.06Se. Solid solutions and AgAuSe phases were added to the phase diagram of Ag-Au-Se system. Crystal-chemical interpretation of Ag-Au isomorphism in selenides was made on the basis of structural features of fischesserite, naumannite, and AuSe.

  17. Highly Stable [C60AuC60]+/- Dumbbells.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Marcelo; Kuhn, Martin; Martini, Paul; Chen, Lei; Hagelberg, Frank; Kaiser, Alexander; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M

    2018-05-17

    Ionic complexes between gold and C 60 have been observed for the first time. Cations and anions of the type [Au(C 60 ) 2 ] +/- are shown to have particular stability. Calculations suggest that these ions adopt a C 60 -Au-C 60 sandwich-like (dumbbell) structure, which is reminiscent of [XAuX] +/- ions previously observed for much smaller ligands. The [Au(C 60 ) 2 ] +/- ions can be regarded as Au(I) complexes, regardless of whether the net charge is positive or negative, but in both cases, the charge transfer between the Au and C 60 is incomplete, most likely because of a covalent contribution to the Au-C 60 binding. The C 60 -Au-C 60 dumbbell structure represents a new architecture in fullerene chemistry that might be replicable in synthetic nanostructures.

  18. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švorčík, V.; Chaloupka, A.; Řezanka, P.; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Kasálková, N.; Hubáček, T.; Siegel, J.

    2010-03-01

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  19. Mechanical properties and grindability of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-06-01

    Experimental Ti-Au alloys (5, 10, 20 and 40 mass% Au) were made. Mechanical properties and grindability of the castings of the Ti-Au alloys were examined. As the concentration of gold increased to 20%, the yield strength and the tensile strength of the Ti-Au alloys became higher without markedly deteriorating their ductility. This higher strength can be explained by the solid-solution strengthening of the a titanium. The Ti-40%Au alloy became brittle because the intermetallic compound Ti3Au precipitated intensively near the grain boundaries. There was no significant difference in the grinding rate and grinding ratio among all the Ti-Au alloys and the pure titanium at any speed.

  20. Interstellar Pickup Ion Observations to 38 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Bzowski, M.; Elliott, H. A.; Randol, B.; Schwadron, N. A.; Sokół, J. M.; Szalay, J. R.; Olkin, C.; Spencer, J.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H.

    2017-11-01

    We provide the first direct observations of interstellar H+ and He+ pickup ions in the solar wind from 22 to 38 au. We use the Vasyliunas and Siscoe model functional form to quantify the pickup ion distributions, and while the fit parameters generally lie outside their physically expected ranges, this form allows fits that quantify variations in the pickup H+ properties with distance. By ˜20 au, the pickup ions already provide the dominant internal pressure in the solar wind. We determine the radial trends and extrapolate them to the termination shock at ˜90 au, where the pickup H+ to core solar wind density reaches ˜0.14. The pickup H+ temperature and thermal pressure increase from 22 to 38 au, indicating additional heating of the pickup ions. This produces very large extrapolated ratios of pickup H+ to solar wind temperature and pressure, and an extrapolated ratio of the pickup ion pressure to the solar wind dynamic pressure at the termination shock of ˜0.16. Such a large ratio has profound implications for moderating the termination shock and the overall outer heliospheric interaction. We also identify suprathermal tails in the H+ spectra and complex features in the He+ spectra, likely indicating variations in the pickup ion history and processing. Finally, we discover enhancements in both H+ and He+ populations just below their cutoff energies, which may be associated with enhanced local pickup. This study serves to document the release and serves as a citable reference of these pickup ion data for broad community use and analysis.

  1. Mammalian sensitivity to elemental gold (Au?)

    Eisler, R.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of allergic contact dermatitis and other effects from gold jewelry, gold dental restorations, and gold implants. These effects were especially pronounced among females wearing body-piercing gold objects. One estimate of the prevalence of gold allergy worldwide is 13%, as judged by patch tests with monovalent organogold salts. Eczema of the head and neck was the most common response of individuals hypersensitive to gold, and sensitivity can last for at least several years. Ingestion of beverages containing flake gold can result in allergic-type reactions similar to those seen in gold-allergic individuals exposed to gold through dermal contact and other routes. Studies with small laboratory mammals and injected doses of colloidal gold showed increased body temperatures, accumulations in reticular cells, and dose enhancement in tumor therapy; gold implants were associated with tissue injuries. It is proposed that Au? toxicity to mammals is associated, in part, with formation of the more reactive Au+ and Au3+ species.

  2. Structure-activity relationships in cytotoxic Au(I)/Au(III) complexes derived from 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole.

    PubMed

    Maiore, Laura; Aragoni, Maria Carla; Deiana, Carlo; Cinellu, Maria Agostina; Isaia, Francesco; Lippolis, Vito; Pintus, Anna; Serratrice, Maria; Arca, Massimiliano

    2014-04-21

    Gold(I) and gold(III) complexes derived from 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole (pbiH) were proven to be a promising class of in vitro antitumor agents against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. In this paper, a comparative electrochemical, UV-vis absorption, and emission spectroscopic investigation is reported on pbiH, the two mononuclear Au(III) complexes [(pbi)AuX2] (X = Cl (1), AcO (2)), the four mononuclear Au(I) derivatives [(pbiH)AuCl] (3), [(pbiH)Au(PPh3)]PF6 ((4(+))(PF6(-))), [(pbi)Au(PPh3)] (5), and [(pbi)Au(TPA)] (6), the three mixed-valence Au(III)/Au(I) complexes [(μ-pbi)Au2Cl3] (7), [(Ph3P)Au(μ-pbi)AuX2]PF6 (X = Cl ((8(+))(PF6(-))), AcO ((9(+))(PF6(-)))), and the binuclear Au(I)-Au(I) compound [(μ-pbi)Au2(PPh3)2]PF6 ((10(+))(PF6(-))). All complexes feature irreversible reduction processes related to the Au(III)/Au(I) or Au(I)/Au(0) processes and peculiar luminescent emission at about 360-370 nm in CH2Cl2, with quantum yields that are remarkably lower ((0.7-14.5) × 10(-2)) in comparison to that determined for the free pbiH ligand (31.5 × 10(-2)) in the same solvent. The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of all complexes were interpreted on the grounds of time-dependent PBE0/DFT calculations carried out both in the gas phase and in CH2Cl2 implicitly considered within the IEF-PCM SCRF approach. The electronic structure of the complexes, and in particular the energy and composition of the Kohn-Sham LUMOs, can be related to the antiproliferative properties against the A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line, providing sound quantitative structure-activity relationships and shedding a light on the role played by the global charge and nature of ancillary ligands in the effectiveness of Au-based antitumor drugs.

  3. Optimization of the crystal growth of the superconductor CaKFe4As4 from solution in the FeAs -CaFe2As2-KFe2As2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, W. R.; Kong, T.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of the anisotropic properties of single crystals play a crucial role in probing the physics of new materials. Determining a growth protocol that yields suitable high-quality single crystals can be particularly challenging for multicomponent compounds. Here we present a case study of how we refined a procedure to grow single crystals of CaKFe4As4 from a high temperature, quaternary liquid solution rich in iron and arsenic ("FeAs self-flux"). Temperature dependent resistance and magnetization measurements are emphasized, in addition to the x-ray diffraction, to detect intergrown CaKFe4As4 , CaFe2As2 , and KFe2As2 within what appear to be single crystals. Guided by the rules of phase equilibria and these data, we adjusted growth parameters to suppress formation of the impurity phases. The resulting optimized procedure yielded phase-pure single crystals of CaKFe4As4 . This optimization process offers insight into the growth of quaternary compounds and a glimpse of the four-component phase diagram in the pseudoternary FeAs -CaFe2As2-KFe2As2 system.

  4. 57Fe Mössbauer study of stoichiometric iron-based superconductor CaKFe 4As 4: a comparison to KFe 2As 2 and CaFe 2As 2

    SciT

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Kong, Tai; Meier, William R.

    57Fe Mössbauer spectra at different temperatures between ~5 and ~300 K were measured on an oriented mosaic of single crystals of CaKFe 4 As 4. The data indicate that is a well formed compound with narrow spectral lines, no traces of other, Fe – containing, secondary phases in the spectra and no static magnetic order. There is no discernible feature at the superconducting transition temperature in any of the hyperfine parameters. The temperature dependence of the quadrupole splitting approximately follows the empirical ‘ T 3/2 law’. Furthermore, the hyperfine parameters of CaKFe 4 As 4 are compared with those formore » measured in this work, and the literature data for CaFe 2 As 2, and were found to be in between those for these two, ordered, 122 compounds, in agreement with the gross view of CaKFe 4 As 4 as a structural analog of KFe 2 As 2 and CaFe 2 As 2 that has alternating Ca- and K-layers in the structure.« less

  5. 57Fe Mössbauer study of stoichiometric iron-based superconductor CaKFe 4As 4: a comparison to KFe 2As 2 and CaFe 2As 2

    DOE PAGES

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Kong, Tai; Meier, William R.; ...

    2017-07-06

    57Fe Mössbauer spectra at different temperatures between ~5 and ~300 K were measured on an oriented mosaic of single crystals of CaKFe 4 As 4. The data indicate that is a well formed compound with narrow spectral lines, no traces of other, Fe – containing, secondary phases in the spectra and no static magnetic order. There is no discernible feature at the superconducting transition temperature in any of the hyperfine parameters. The temperature dependence of the quadrupole splitting approximately follows the empirical ‘ T 3/2 law’. Furthermore, the hyperfine parameters of CaKFe 4 As 4 are compared with those formore » measured in this work, and the literature data for CaFe 2 As 2, and were found to be in between those for these two, ordered, 122 compounds, in agreement with the gross view of CaKFe 4 As 4 as a structural analog of KFe 2 As 2 and CaFe 2 As 2 that has alternating Ca- and K-layers in the structure.« less

  6. Au99(SPh)42 nanomolecules: aromatic thiolate ligand induced conversion of Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60.

    PubMed

    Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Dass, Amala

    2014-12-10

    A new aromatic thiolate protected gold nanomolecule Au99(SPh)42 has been synthesized by reacting the highly stable Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 with thiophenol, HSPh. The ubiquitous Au144(SR)60 is known for its high stability even at elevated temperature and in the presence of excess thiol. This report demonstrates for the first time the reactivity of the Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 with thiophenol to form a different 99-Au atom species. The resulting Au99(SPh)42 compound, however, is unreactive and highly stable in the presence of excess aromatic thiol. The molecular formula of the title compound is determined by high resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and confirmed by the preparation of the 99-atom nanomolecule using two ligands, namely, Au99(SPh)42 and Au99(SPh-OMe)42. This mass spectrometry study is an unprecedented advance in nanoparticle reaction monitoring, in studying the 144-atom to 99-atom size evolution at such high m/z (∼12k) and resolution. The optical and electrochemical properties of Au99(SPh)42 are reported. Other substituents on the phenyl group, HS-Ph-X, where X = -F, -CH3, -OCH3, also show the Au144 to Au99 core size conversion, suggesting minimal electronic effects for these substituents. Control experiments were conducted by reacting Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 with HS-(CH2)n-Ph (where n = 1 and 2), bulky ligands like adamantanethiol and cyclohexanethiol. It was observed that conversion of Au144 to Au99 occurs only when the phenyl group is directly attached to the thiol, suggesting that the formation of a 99-atom species is largely influenced by aromaticity of the ligand and less so on the bulkiness of the ligand.

  7. Photoluminescence from Au nanoparticles embedded in Au:oxide composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hongbo; Wen, Weijia; Wong, George K.

    2006-12-01

    Au:oxide composite multilayer films with Au nanoparticles sandwiched by oxide layers (such as SiO2, ZnO, and TiO2) were prepared in a magnetron sputtering system. Their photoluminescence (PL) spectra were investigated by employing a micro-Raman system in which an Argon laser with a wavelength of 514 nm was used as the pumping light. Distinct PL peaks located at a wavelength range between 590 and 680 nm were observed in most of our samples, with Au particle size varying from several to hundreds of nanometers. It was found that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in these composites exerted a strong influence on the position of the PL peaks but had little effect on the PL intensity.

  8. Evidence of significant covalent bonding in Au(CN)(2)(-).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Yi-Lei; Yang, Jie; Xing, Xiao-Peng; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2009-11-18

    The Au(CN)(2)(-) ion is the most stable Au compound known for centuries, yet a detailed understanding of its chemical bonding is still lacking. Here we report direct experimental evidence of significant covalent bonding character in the Au-C bonds in Au(CN)(2)(-) using photoelectron spectroscopy and comparisons with its lighter congeners, Ag(CN)(2)(-) and Cu(CN)(2)(-). Vibrational progressions in the Au-C stretching mode were observed for all detachment transitions for Au(CN)(2)(-), in contrast to the atomic-like transitions for Cu(CN)(2)(-), revealing the Au-C covalent bonding character. In addition, rich electronic structural information was obtained for Au(CN)(2)(-) by employing 118 nm detachment photons. Density functional theory and high-level ab initio calculations were carried out to understand the photoelectron spectra and obtain insight into the nature of the chemical bonding in the M(CN)(2)(-) complexes. Significant covalent character in the Au-C bonding due to the strong relativistic effects was revealed in Au(CN)(2)(-), consistent with its high stability.

  9. Au particle formation on the electron beam induced membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Myoung Jin; Han, Chul Hee; Oh, Sae-Joong; Kim, Sung-In; Park, Nam Kyou; Park, Doo-Jae; Choi, Soo Bong; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2017-02-01

    Recently the single molecules such as protein and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been successfully characterized by using a portable solidstate nanopore (MinION) with an electrical detection technique. However, there have been several reports about the high error rates of the fabricated nanopore device, possibly due to an electrical double layer formed inside the pore channel. The current DNA sequencing technology utilized is based on the optical detection method. In order to utilize the current optical detection technique, we will present the formation of the Au nano-pore with Au particle under the various electron beam irradiations. In order to provide the diffusion of Au atoms, a 2 keV electron beam irradiation has been performed During electron beam irradiations by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Au and C atoms would diffuse together and form the binary mixture membrane. Initially, the Au atoms diffused in the membrane are smaller than 1 nm, below the detection limit of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), so that we are unable to observe the Au atoms in the formed membrane. However, after several months later, the Au atoms became larger and larger with expense of the smaller particles: Ostwald ripening. Furthermore, we also observe the Au crystalline lattice structure on the binary Au-C membrane. The formed Au crystalline lattice structures were constantly changing during electron beam imaging process due to Spinodal decomposition; the unstable thermodynamic system of Au-C binary membrane. The fabricated Au nanopore with an Au nanoparticle can be utilized as a single molecule nanobio sensor.

  10. Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, K. H.; Adams, N.; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Allgower, C.; Amsbaugh, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderssen, E.; Arnesen, H.; Arnold, L.; Averichev, G. S.; Baldwin, A.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Beddo, M.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Berger, J.; Betts, W.; Bichsel, H.; Bieser, F.; Bland, L. C.; Bloomer, M.; Blyth, C. O.; Boehm, J.; Bonner, B. E.; Bonnet, D.; Bossingham, R.; Botlo, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouillo, N.; Bouvier, S.; Bradley, K.; Brady, F. P.; Braithwaite, E. S.; Braithwaite, W.; Brandin, A.; Brown, R. L.; Brugalette, G.; Byrd, C.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carr, L.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Caylor, B.; Cebra, D.; Chatopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Chrin, J.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Conin, L.; Consiglio, C.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Danilov, V. I.; Dayton, D.; Demello, M.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, H.; Deyoung, P. A.; Didenko, L.; Dimassimo, D.; Dioguardi, J.; Dominik, W.; Drancourt, C.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Eggert, T.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Etkin, A.; Fachini, P.; Feliciano, C.; Ferenc, D.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fessler, H.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Flores, I.; Foley, K. J.; Fritz, D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gojak, C.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grau, M.; Greiner, D.; Greiner, L.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gross, J.; Guilloux, G.; Gushin, E.; Hall, J.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harper, G.; Harris, J. W.; He, P.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hill, D.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Howe, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Hunt, W.; Hunter, J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jacobson, S.; Jared, R.; Jensen, P.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kenney, V. P.; Khodinov, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Koehler, G.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kormilitsyne, V.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotov, I.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krupien, T.; Kuczewski, P.; Kuhn, C.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Lamont, M. A.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lecompte, T.; Leonhardt, W. J.; Leontiev, V. M.; Leszczynski, P.; Levine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Z.; Liaw, C.-J.; Lin, J.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Locurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Lopiano, D.; Love, W. A.; Lutz, J. R.; Lynn, D.; Madansky, L.; Maier, R.; Majka, R.; Maliszewski, A.; Margetis, S.; Marks, K.; Marstaller, R.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; Matyushevski, E. A.; McParland, C.; McShane, T. S.; Meier, J.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Middlekamp, P.; Mikhalin, N.; Miller, B.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Minor, B.; Mitchell, J.; Mogavero, E.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moltz, D.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; Morse, R.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mutchler, G. S.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Ngo, T.; Nguyen, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Noggle, T.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Nussbaum, T.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Olchanski, K.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Ososkov, G. A.; Ott, G.; Padrazo, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Pentia, M.; Perevotchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pinganaud, W.; Pirogov, S.; Platner, E.; Pluta, J.; Polk, I.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Puskar-Pasewicz, J.; Rai, G.; Rasson, J.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J.; Renfordt, R. E.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Riso, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Roehrich, D.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Russ, D.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sanchez, R.; Sandler, Z.; Sandweiss, J.; Sappenfield, P.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Scheblien, J.; Scheetz, R.; Schlueter, R.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schulz, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Sedlmeir, J.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, J.; Seyboth, P.; Seymour, R.; Shakaliev, E. I.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shi, Y.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shuman, D.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L. P.; Snellings, R.; Solberg, K.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Stone, N.; Stone, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Stroebele, H.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Symons, T. J.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarchini, A.; Tarzian, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Tikhomirov, V.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tonse, S.; Trainor, T.; Trentalange, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Vakula, I.; van Buren, G.; Vandermolen, A. M.; Vanyashin, A.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Visser, G.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vu, C.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Weerasundara, D.; Weidenbach, R.; Wells, R.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitfield, J. P.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wilson, K.; Wirth, J.; Wisdom, J.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wolf, J.; Wood, L.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yokosawa, A.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhu, J.; Zimmerman, D.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  11. Photon interferometry of Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider.

    PubMed

    Bass, Steffen A; Müller, Berndt; Srivastava, Dinesh K

    2004-10-15

    We calculate the two-body correlation function of direct photons produced in central Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. Our calculation includes contributions from the early preequilibrium phase in which photons are produced via hard parton scatterings as well as radiation of photons from a thermalized quark-gluon plasma and the subsequent expanding hadron gas. We find that high energy photon interferometry provides a faithful probe of the details of the space-time evolution and of the early reaction stages of the system.

  12. Energy Dependence of Particle Multiplicities in Central Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Corbo, J.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hicks, D.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Rafelski, M.; Rbeiz, M.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 200 GeV. For the 6% most central collisions, we obtain dNch/dη\\|\\|η\\|<1 = 650+/-35(syst). Compared to collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV, the highest energy studied previously, an increase by a factor of 1.14+/-0.05 at 90% confidence level, is found. The energy dependence of the pseudorapidity density is discussed in comparison with data from proton-induced collisions and theoretical predictions.

  13. Fermi surfaces properties of AuAl2, AuGa2, and AuIn2 with the CaF2-type cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Kakihana, M.; Suzuki, F.; Yara, T.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; Ōnuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2018-05-01

    We grew high-quality single crystals of AuAl2, AuGa2, and AuIn2 with the fluorite (CaF2)-type cubic structure and determined the Fermi surface properties by the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments using full-potential LAPW bad calculations. The Fermi surface and optical properties for three compounds were once studied from an interest of colors because AuAl2 has a striking bright reddish-purple color, whereas AuGa2 and AuIn2 are, respectively, neutral and bluish. The detected dHvA frequencies in the present study are found to be in a wide range of (0.1-13)×107 Oe. The main dHvA branches for three compounds are in excellent agreement with the theoretical ones, but some dHvA branches with small dHvA frequencies are slightly deviated from the theoretical ones, especially in AuGa2 and AuIn2.

  14. On the nature of L1{sub 0} ordering in equiatomic AuNi and AuCu thin films grown on Au(001)

    SciT

    Dynna, M.; Marty, A.; Gilles, B.

    1997-01-01

    The L1{sub 0} ordering of thin epitaxial films having a (001) surface normal subject to elastic constraints imposed by a similarly oriented substrate has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Thin AuNi films grown by MBE at room temperature on Au(001) by means of the alternating deposition of Au and Ni are found to possess a L1{sub 0} structure free of periodic antiphase boundaries when growth is controlled in such a way as to ensure that the quantity of Au or Ni deposited is almost exactly equal to one monolayer. If such control is not exercised during growth, a structuremore » having periodic antiphase boundaries is formed. This behavior stands in contrast to that of AuCu during room temperature MBE growth on Au(001), where a strongly ordered L2{sub 0} structure free of antiphase boundaries is formed even on the codeposition of Au and Cu. The effect of elastic constraints on the state of order in an alloy film which undergoes an L2{sub 0} order-disorder transition is examined as a function of temperature, lattice mismatch, and film thickness within the context of a model which allows for the introduction of dislocations in order to relieve misfit strain. Calculations are performed in detail for the case of AuCu, where particular attention is paid to the coupling between film thickness, the number of misfit dislocations present at equilibrium, and the state of order.« less

  15. Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)

    DOE PAGES

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Yohaselly; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Curet-Arana, Maria C.; ...

    2014-05-02

    Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH 3 < NO < CO < CH 3 < HCO < NH 2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH 2 < H < N < NH Au(111); the desorption of NH 3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.« less

  16. Conductive Au nanowires regulated by silk fibroin nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bo-Ju; Lu, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Conductive Au-biopolymer composites have promising applications in tissue engineering such as nerve tissue regeneration. In this study, silk fibroin nanofibers were formed in aqueous solution by regulating silk self-assembly process and then used as template for Au nanowire fabrication. We performed the synthesis of Au seeds by repeating the seeding cycles for several times in order to increase the density of Au seeds on the nanofibers. After electroless plating, densely decorated Au seeds grew into irregularly shaped particles following silk nanofiber to fill the gaps between particles and finally form uniform continuous nanowires. The conductive property of the Au-silk fibroin nanowires was studied with current-voltage ( I-V) measurement. A typical ohmic behavior was observed, which highlighted their potential applications in nerve tissue regeneration.

  17. First-principles study of Au-decorated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Weiwei; Li, Tongwei; Zhou, Qingxiao; Li, Haisheng; Li, Xiaohong

    2018-07-01

    The electronic structures and spin-orbit (SO) coupling of carbon nanotubes with adsorbed Au atoms are investigated based on density functional theory. Three kinds of zigzag single-walled CNT (8,0), (10,0) and (12,0) are selected. The Au atoms prefer to adsorb on the top of C atoms. The adsorption of Au atoms can introduce impurity states in the band gap, modifying the electronic properties of systems. Furthermore, the influence of SO coupling on these impurity states is also explored. Considerable SO splitting (∼130 meV) can be obtained. We find that the SO splitting decreases with the increase of the concentration of Au atoms, which can be ascribed to the interaction between Au atoms, suppressing the SO splitting. Our work provides imperative understanding on the electronic properties and SO coupling effect in Au-decorated CNTs.

  18. Lateral spreading of Au contacts on InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1990-01-01

    The contact spreading phenomenon observed when small area Au contacts on InP are annealed at temperatures above about 400 C was investigated. It was found that the rapid lateral expansion of the contact metallization which consumes large quantities of InP during growth is closely related to the third stage in the series of solid state reactions that occur between InP and Au, i.e., to the Au3In-to-Au9In4 transition. Detailed descriptions are presented of both the spreading process and the Au3In-to-Au9In4 transition along with arguments that the two processes are manifestations of the same basic phenomenon.

  19. Forming Super-Puffs Beyond 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2017-06-01

    Super-puffs are an uncommon class of short-period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4-10 Rearth, 2-6 Mearth). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ˜1AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. These puffy planets probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit atmospheric characteristics consistent with formation at large distances. I will also discuss, in general, how densities of planets can be used to infer their formation locations.

  20. L'optique spatiale au CES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, M.; Otrio, G.

    2018-04-01

    Jai le plaisir d'inaugurer cette troisieme conference ICS0'97 consacree a l'optique patialc Les techniques evoluent tres vite; l'optique et l'optoelectronique n'echappent pas a c:ene regle. Depuis Garmisch. en 1994, bien des evenements concemant ces domaines se som produits le rappellerai !es faits les plus saillants dans la premiere panie de mon expose Je donncrai ensuite un apercu des activites en cours au Cnes et je tenninerai en parlant du futur quelles sont les technologies emergentes et quels projets peuvent en decouler ?

  1. Nucleon shadowing effects in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at RHIC within the HIJING code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Waged, Khaled; Felemban, Nuha

    2018-02-01

    The centrality dependence of pseudorapidity density of charged particles ({{{d}}{N}}{{ch}}/{{d}}η ) in Cu + Cu (Au + Au) collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy of \\sqrt{{s}{{NN}}}=22.4, 62.4 and 200 (19.6, 62.4 and 200) GeV, is investigated within an improved HIJING code. The standard HIJING model is enhanced by a prescription for collective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions and more modern parton distribution functions. The collective NN-interactions are used to induce both cascade and nucleon shadowing effects. We find collective cascade broadens the pseudorapidity distributions in the tails (at | η | > {y}{beam}) above 25%-30% collision centrality to be consistent with the {{{d}}{N}}{{ch}}/{{d}}η data at \\sqrt{{s}{{NN}}} =19.6,22.4,62.4 {GeV}. The overall contribution of nucleon shadowing is shown to depress the whole shape of {{{d}}{N}}{{ch}}/{{d}}η in the primary interaction region (at | η | < {y}{beam}) for semiperipheral (20%-25%) and peripheral (≥slant 35 % {--}40 % ) Cu + Cu (Au + Au) interactions at \\sqrt{{s}{{NN}}}=200 {GeV}, in accordance with the PHOBOS data.

  2. Recent HBT results in Au+Au and p+p collisions from PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PHENIX Collaboration; Glenn, Andrew; PHENIX Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    We present Hanbury-Brown Twiss measurements from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC for final results for charged kaon pairs from s=200 GeV Au+Au collisions and preliminary results for charged pion pairs from s=200 GeVp+p collisions. We find that for kaon pairs from Au+Au, each traditional 3D Gaussian radius shows approximately the same linear increase as a function of Npart1/3. An imaging analysis reveals a significant non-Gaussian tail for r≳10 fm. The presence of a tail for kaon pairs demonstrates that similar non-Gaussian tails observed in earlier pion measurements cannot be fully explained by decays of long-lived resonances. The preliminary analysis of pions from s=200 GeV p+p minimum biased collisions show correlations which are well suited to traditional 3D HBT radii extraction via the Bowler-Sinyukov method, and we present R, R, and R as a function of mean transverse pair mass.

  3. Nonlinear absorption enhancement of AuNPs based polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulina, Natalia A.; Baranov, Mikhail A.; Kniazev, Kirill I.; Kaliabin, Viacheslav O.; Denisyuk, Igor Yu.; Achor, Susan U.; Sitnikova, Vera E.

    2018-07-01

    Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) based polymer nanocomposites with high nonlinear absorption coefficient were synthesized by UV-photocuring. AuNPs were synthesized by laser ablation method in liquid monomer isodecyl acrylate (IDA). In this research, two colloids with 70 nm and 20 nm nanoparticles average sizes were studied. Size control was performed with SEM and STEM. Prepared nanomaterials exhibit strong third-order nonlinear optical responses under CW laser irradiation at 532 nm, which was estimated by using z-scan technique performed with open aperture. It was found experimentally that nonlinear absorption β is almost twice higher for nanocomposites with smaller AuNPs.

  4. Identifying Au-based Te alloys for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamwangi, D.; Detemple, R.; Woeltgens, H.-W.; Wuttig, M.; Zhang, X.

    2004-06-01

    Au18Sb23Te59 and Au19In26Te55 have been investigated to determine their suitability as phase change recording alloys. Recrystallization experiments identify Au18Sb23Te59 as a suitable phase change material with a recrystallization time of 110 ns and high optical contrast. Coupled to the high optical contrast is a considerable density increase of 4% upon crystallization which allows phase change recording for the Au18Sb23Te59 alloy. On the other hand no recrystallization has been observed optically for Au19In26Te55 due to its low optical contrast of less than 1%. This is related to a lower density contrast of 2%. The crystallization for the Au18Sb23Te59 and Au19In26Te55 alloys observed from temperature-dependent sheet resistance measurements have yielded transition temperatures of 113 and 175 °C, and activation barriers of 1.61±0.01 eV and 2.42±0.02 eV, respectively. We report a cubic structure (a=2.99±0.002 Å) for the Au18Sb23Te59 alloy and a chalcopyrite structure (a=6.50±0.018 Å and 12.27±0.025 Å) for the Au19In26Te55 material. These results confirm that suitable phase change alloys possess cubic structures rather than the chalcopyrite structure typical for sp3 bonded semiconductors.

  5. AuNP-PE interface/phase and its effects on the tensile behaviour of AuNP-PE composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Wang, Ruijie; Wang, Chengyuan; Yu, Xiaozhu

    2018-06-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted for a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-polyethylene (PE) composite. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were employed to construct the AuNP-PE systems, achieve their constitutive relations, and measure their tensile properties. Specifically, the AuNP-PE interface/phase was studied via the mass density profile, and its effect was evaluated by comparing the composite with a pure PE matrix. These research studies were followed by the study of the fracture mechanisms and the size and volume fraction effects of AuNPs. Efforts were also made to reveal the underlying physics of the MD simulations. In the present work, an AuNP-PE interface and a densified PE interphase were achieved due to the AuNP-PE van der Waals interaction. Such an interface/phase is found to enhance the Young's modulus and yield stress but decrease the fracture strength and strain.

  6. Measurements of Strangeness Production on Au+Au collisions at 62 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Munhoz, M. G.; Takahashi, J.; Moura, M. M.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Cosentino, M.

    2005-10-01

    The STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) experiment is a large acceptance collider detector that measures primarily hadronic observables to search for signatures of the quark-gluon plasma phase transition and study strongly interacting matter at high energy density. Operational since June 2000, the new heavy ion collider RHIC has already provided Au+Au collisions at σNN = 62, 130 and 200 GeV as well as p+p and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV. The various collision energies and systems allow the systematic study of particle production in heavy ion collisions. In particular, the production of strange (anti-)particles is one of the major topics of STAR. This detector allows the measurement of a variety of particle species at mid-rapidity, like neutral kaons; Λ, Ξ, and Ω. hyperons; and their anti-particles that are reconstructed via their decay topology. The strangeness measurements should provide important information on various phenomenological aspects of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The goal of this work is to perform the measurement of neutral kaons on Au+Au collisions at 62 GeV. This measurement will bring important information about strangeness production in the energy range between the top RHIC energy and the top SPS energy, where important questions regarding particle production are still open. In this poster, preliminary results of the analysis will be presented, mainly the evaluation of the topological cuts necessary for the neutral kaon reconstruction and the corrections that are necessary to obtain the transverse momentum spectra.

  7. Imaging Prominence Eruptions out to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Howard, Russell A.; Linton, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Views of two bright prominence eruptions trackable all the way to 1 AU are here presented, using the heliospheric imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The two events first erupted from the Sun on 2011 June 7 and 2012 August 31, respectively. Only these two examples of clear prominence eruptions observable this far from the Sun could be found in the STEREO image database, emphasizing the rarity of prominence eruptions this persistently bright. For the 2011 June event, a time-dependent 3D reconstruction of the prominence structure is made using point-by-point triangulation. This is not possible for the August event due to a poor viewing geometry. Unlike the coronal mass ejection (CME) that accompanies it, the 2011 June prominence exhibits little deceleration from the Sun to 1 AU, as a consequence moving upwards within the CME. This demonstrates that prominences are not necessarily tied to the CME's magnetic structure far from the Sun. A mathematical framework is developed for describing the degree of self-similarity for the prominence's expansion away from the Sun. This analysis suggests only modest deviations from self-similar expansion, but close to the Sun the prominence expands radially somewhat more rapidly than self-similarity would predict.

  8. IMAGING PROMINENCE ERUPTIONS OUT TO 1 AU

    SciT

    Wood, Brian E.; Howard, Russell A.; Linton, Mark G., E-mail: brian.wood@nrl.navy.mil

    2016-01-10

    Views of two bright prominence eruptions trackable all the way to 1 AU are here presented, using the heliospheric imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The two events first erupted from the Sun on 2011 June 7 and 2012 August 31, respectively. Only these two examples of clear prominence eruptions observable this far from the Sun could be found in the STEREO image database, emphasizing the rarity of prominence eruptions this persistently bright. For the 2011 June event, a time-dependent 3D reconstruction of the prominence structure is made using point-by-point triangulation. This is not possible for the August event due to amore » poor viewing geometry. Unlike the coronal mass ejection (CME) that accompanies it, the 2011 June prominence exhibits little deceleration from the Sun to 1 AU, as a consequence moving upwards within the CME. This demonstrates that prominences are not necessarily tied to the CME's magnetic structure far from the Sun. A mathematical framework is developed for describing the degree of self-similarity for the prominence's expansion away from the Sun. This analysis suggests only modest deviations from self-similar expansion, but close to the Sun the prominence expands radially somewhat more rapidly than self-similarity would predict.« less

  9. Measurements of charmonium production in p+p, p+Au, and Au+Au collisions at s NN = 200  GeV with the STAR experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Todoroki, Takahito

    2017-09-25

    Here, we present the first results from the STAR MTD of mid-rapidity charmonium measurements via the di-muon decay channel in p+p, p+Au, and Au+Au collisions at √S NN = 200 GeV at RHIC. The inclusive J/Ψ production cross section in p+p collisions can be described by the Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism coupled with the color glass condensate e ective theory (CGC) at low transverse momentum (p T) and next-to-leading order NRQCD at high p T. The nuclear modification factor in p+Au collisions for inclusive J/Ψ is below unity at low p T and consistent with unity at high p T,more » which can be described by calculations including both nuclear PDF and nuclear absorption e ects. The double ratio of inclusive J/Ψ and Ψ(2S) production rates for 0 < p T < 10 GeV/c at mid-rapidity between p+p and p+Au collisions is measured to be 1.37 0.42 0.19. The nuclear modification factor in Au+Au collisions for inclusive J/Ψ shows significant J/Ψ suppression at high p T in central collisions and can be qualitatively described by transport models including dissociation and regeneration contributions.« less

  10. Measurements of charmonium production in p+p, p+Au, and Au+Au collisions at s NN = 200  GeV with the STAR experiment

    SciT

    Todoroki, Takahito

    Here, we present the first results from the STAR MTD of mid-rapidity charmonium measurements via the di-muon decay channel in p+p, p+Au, and Au+Au collisions at √S NN = 200 GeV at RHIC. The inclusive J/Ψ production cross section in p+p collisions can be described by the Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism coupled with the color glass condensate e ective theory (CGC) at low transverse momentum (p T) and next-to-leading order NRQCD at high p T. The nuclear modification factor in p+Au collisions for inclusive J/Ψ is below unity at low p T and consistent with unity at high p T,more » which can be described by calculations including both nuclear PDF and nuclear absorption e ects. The double ratio of inclusive J/Ψ and Ψ(2S) production rates for 0 < p T < 10 GeV/c at mid-rapidity between p+p and p+Au collisions is measured to be 1.37 0.42 0.19. The nuclear modification factor in Au+Au collisions for inclusive J/Ψ shows significant J/Ψ suppression at high p T in central collisions and can be qualitatively described by transport models including dissociation and regeneration contributions.« less

  11. Strange baryon resonance production in sqrt s NN=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-09-29

    We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s{NN}]=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p(T) spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur.

  12. Internet Roadside Cafe #6. [Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    This 30-minute videotape takes an in-depth look at World Wide Web business transactions, potential risks, client privacy and security issues by asking businesses and consumers how they do business on the Internet. Also featured in the program is advice about choosing a secure password, the use of credit cards for Web purchasing and a review of…

  13. Charge optimized many body (COMB) potentials for Pt and Au.

    PubMed

    Antony, A C; Akhade, S A; Lu, Z; Liang, T; Janik, M J; Phillpot, S R; Sinnott, S B

    2017-06-07

    Interatomic potentials for Pt and Au are developed within the third generation charge optimized many-body (COMB3) formalism. The potentials are capable of reproducing phase order, lattice constants, and elastic constants of Pt and Au systems as experimentally measured or calculated by density functional theory. We also fit defect formation energies, surface energies and stacking fault energies for Pt and Au metals. The resulting potentials are used to map a 2D contour of the gamma surface and simulate the tensile test of 16-grain polycrystalline Pt and Au structures at 300 K. The stress-strain behaviour is investigated and the primary slip systems {1 1 1}〈1 [Formula: see text] 0〉 are identified. In addition, we perform high temperature (1800 K for Au and 2300 K for Pt) molecular dynamics simulations of 30 nm Pt and Au truncated octahedron nanoparticles and examine morphological changes of each particle. We further calculate the activation energy barrier for surface diffusion during simulations of several nanoseconds and report energies of [Formula: see text] eV for Pt and [Formula: see text] eV for Au. This initial parameterization and application of the Pt and Au potentials demonstrates a starting point for the extension of these potentials to multicomponent systems within the COMB3 framework.

  14. Registration of ‘AU-1101’ peanut

    AU-1101’ (Reg. No. CV-xxx, PI 661498) is a large-seeded virginia-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) with high yield and medium maturity, uniform pod size and shape, high grade, superior shelling characters, low oil content, normal oleic acid content, and good flavor. AU-...

  15. CO oxidation on Alsbnd Au nano-composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, C.; Majumder, C.

    2018-03-01

    Using first principles method we report the CO oxidation behaviour of Alsbnd Au nano-composites in three different size ranges: Al6Au8, Al13Au42 and a periodic slab of Alsbnd Au(1 1 1) surface. The clusters prefer enclosed structures with alternating arrangement of Al and Au atoms, maximising Auδ-sbnd Alδ+ bonds. Charge distribution analysis suggests the charge transfer from Al to Au atoms, corroborated by the red shift in the density of states spectrum. Further, CO oxidation on these nano-composite systems was investigated through both Eley - Rideal and Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism. While, these clusters interact with O2 non-dissociatively with an elongation of the Osbnd O bond, further interaction with CO led to formation of CO2 spontaneously. On contrary, the CO2 evolution by co-adsorption of O2 and CO molecules has a transition state barrier. On the basis of the results it is inferred that nano-composite material of Alsbnd Au shows significant promise toward effective oxidative catalysis.

  16. Role of Au(NPs) in the enhanced response of Au(NPs)-decorated MWCNT electrochemical biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Shahid; Ciancio, Regina; Carlino, Elvio; Bhatti, Arshad S

    2018-01-01

    Background The combination of Au-metallic-NPs and CNTs are a new class of hybrid nanomaterials for the development of electrochemical biosensor. Concentration of Au(nanoparticles [NPs]) in the electrochemical biosensor is crucial for the efficient charge transfer between the Au-NPs-MWCNTs modified electrode and electrolytic solution. Methods In this work, the charge transfer kinetics in the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with Au(NPs)–multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanohybrid with varied concentrations of Au(NPs) in the range 40–100 nM was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the attachment of Au(NPs) on the surface of MWCNTs. Results The cyclic voltammetry and EIS results showed that the charge transfer mechanism was diffusion controlled and the rate of charge transfer was dependent on the concentration of Au(NPs) in the nanohybrid. The formation of spherical diffusion zone, which was dependent on the concentration of Au(NPs) in nanohybrids, was attributed to result in 3 times the increase in the charge transfer rate ks, 5 times increase in mass transfer, and 5% (9%) increase in Ipa (Ipc) observed in cyclic voltammetry in 80 nM Au(NP) nanohybrid-modified GCE from MWCNT-modified GCE. The work was extended to probe the effect of charge transfer rates at various concentrations of Au(NPs) in the nanohybrid-modified electrodes in the presence of Escherichia coli. The cyclic voltammetry results clearly showed the best results for 80 nM Au(NPs) in nanohybrid electrode. Conclusion The present study suggested that the formation of spherical diffusion zone in nanohybrid-modified electrodes is critical for the enhanced electrochemical biosensing applications. PMID:29713161

  17. Development of amperometric lysine biosensors based on Au nanoparticles/multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polymers modified Au electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nidhi; Singh, Anamika; Narang, Jagriti; Dahiya, Swati; Pundir, C S

    2012-11-07

    The construction of two amperometric l-lysine biosensors is described in this study. The construction comprises the covalent immobilization of lysine oxidase (LOx) onto nanocomposite composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNT), decorated on (i) polyaniline (PANI) and (ii) poly 1,2 diaminobenzene (DAB), electrodeposited on Au electrodes. The biosensors were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. The optimum response (current) was observed within 2 s at pH 7.0 and 25 °C for LOx/AuNPs/c-MWCNT/PANI/Au, and 4 s at pH 7.0 and 30 °C for LOx/AuNPs/c-MWCNT/DAB/Au electrodes. There was a linear relationship between current and lysine concentration ranging from 5.0 to 600 μM for LOx/AuNPs/c-MWCNT/PANI/Au with a detection limit of 5.0 μM, and 20 to 600 μM for the LOx/AuNPs/c-MWCNT/DAB/Au electrode with a detection limit of 20 μM. The PANI modified electrode was in good agreement with the standard HPLC method, with a better correlation (r = 0.992) compared to the DAB modified electrode (r = 0.986). These observations revealed that the PANI modified Au electrode was better than the DAB modified electrode, and hence it was employed for the determination of lysine in milk, pharmaceutical tablets and sera. The PANI modified electrode showed a half life of 120 days, compared to that of 90 days for the DAB modified electrode, after their 100 uses, when stored at 4 °C.

  18. Largely enhanced photocatalytic activity of Au/XS2/Au (X = Re, Mo) antenna-reactor hybrids: charge and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Ding, Si-Jing; Luo, Zhi-Jun; Pan, Gui-Ming; Wang, Jia-Hong; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Li; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2018-02-22

    An antenna-reactor hybrid coupling plasmonic antenna with catalytic nanoparticles is a new strategy to optimize photocatalytic activity. Herein, we have rationally proposed a Au/XS 2 /Au (X = Re, Mo) antenna reactor, which has a large Au core as the antenna and small satellite Au nanoparticles as the reactor separated by an ultrathin two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide XS 2 shell (∼2.6 nm). Due to efficient charge transfer across the XS 2 shell as well as energy transfer via coupling of the Au antenna and Au reactor, the photocatalytic activity has been largely enhanced: Au/ReS 2 /Au exhibits a 3.59-fold enhancement, whereas Au/MoS 2 /Au exhibits a 2.66-fold enhancement as compared to that of the sum of the three individual components. The different enhancement in the Au/ReS 2 /Au and Au/MoS 2 /Au antenna-reactor hybrid is related to the competition and cooperation of charge and energy transfer. These results indicate the great potential of the Au/XS 2 /Au antenna-reactor hybrid for the development of highly efficient plasmonic photocatalysts.

  19. Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-08-15

    We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions.

  20. Identification of Au–S complexes on Au(100)

    DOE PAGES

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; ...

    2016-01-25

    In this study, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have identified a set of related Au–S complexes that form on Au(100), when sulfur adsorbs and lifts the hexagonal surface reconstruction. The predominant complex is diamond-shaped with stoichiometry Au 4S 5. All of the complexes can be regarded as combinations of S–Au–S subunits. The complexes exist within, or at the edges of, p(2 × 2) sulfur islands that cover the unreconstructed Au regions, and are observed throughout the range of S coverage examined in this study, 0.009 to 0.12 monolayers. A qualitative modelmore » is developed which incorporates competitive formation of complexes, Au rafts, and p(2 × 2) sulfur islands, as Au atoms are released by the surface structure transformation.« less

  1. Ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in multifragmentation of Au + Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Fang, D. Q.; Li, S. X.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2012-06-01

    The ratio of the shear viscosity (η) to entropy density (s) for the intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions has been calculated by using the Green-Kubo method in the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The theoretical curve of η/s as a function of the incident energy for the head-on Au + Au collisions displays that a minimum region of η/s has been approached at higher incident energies, where the minimum η/s value is about 7 times Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) bound (1/4π). We argue that the onset of minimum η/s region at higher incident energies corresponds to the nuclear liquid gas phase transition in nuclear multifragmentation.

  2. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  3. Deep sub-threshold ϕ production in Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Arnold, O.; Behnke, C.; Belounnas, A.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Chlad, L.; Deveaux, C.; Dreyer, J.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Filip, P.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Golubeva, M.; Greifenhagen, R.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Maurus, S.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Mihaylov, D. M.; Morozov, S.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Nowakowski, K. N.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petukhov, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramos, S.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, P.; Rosier, P.; Rost, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schuldes, H.; Schwab, E.; Scozzi, F.; Seck, F.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Szala, M.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Usenko, E.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wiebusch, M. G.; Wirth, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.; Hades Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    We present data on charged kaons (K±) and ϕ mesons in Au(1.23A GeV)+Au collisions. It is the first simultaneous measurement of K- and ϕ mesons in central heavy-ion collisions below a kinetic beam energy of 10A GeV. The ϕ /K- multiplicity ratio is found to be surprisingly high with a value of 0.52 ± 0.16 and shows no dependence on the centrality of the collision. Consequently, the different slopes of the K+ and K- transverse-mass spectra can be explained solely by feed-down, which substantially softens the spectra of K- mesons. Hence, in contrast to the commonly adapted argumentation in literature, the different slopes do not necessarily imply diverging freeze-out temperatures of K+ and K- mesons caused by different couplings to baryons.

  4. Azimuthal Angle Dependence of HBT Radii in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niida, Takafumi

    Measurement of Hanbury-Brown and Twiss (HBT) interferometry with respect to the event plane have been performed in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV at PHENIX, which is a unique tool to study the spatial extent of the created matter at final state in heavy ion collisions and the detailed picture of the space-time evolution from the initial state to the final state. The Gaussian source radii was measured for charged pions and kaons with respect to 2nd-order event plane. There was a difference in final eccentricity between both species, which may imply the different freeze-out mechanism by the particle species. The pion source radii was also measured relative to 3rd-order event plane, and the azimuthal angle dependence of the radii was observed, which qualitatively agrees with the recent hydrodynamic calculation and the oscillation may be driven from the triangular flow.

  5. Measurements of mass-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in central p + Au, d + Au, and He 3 + Au collisions at s N N = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; ...

    2018-06-11

    Here, we present measurements of the transverse-momentum dependence of elliptic flow v 2 for identified pions and (anti)protons at midrapidity (|η| < 0.35), in 0%–5% central p+Au and 3He+Au collisions at √ s NN = 200 GeV. When taken together with previously published measurements in d + Au collisions at √ s NN = 200 GeV, the results cover a broad range of small-collision-system multiplicities and intrinsic initial geometries. We observe a clear mass-dependent splitting of v 2(p T) in d + Au and 3He + Au collisions, just as in large nucleus-nucleus (A + A) collisions, and a smallermore » splitting in p + Au collisions. Both hydrodynamic and transport model calculations successfully describe the data at low p T (< 1.5GeV/c), but fail to describe various features at higher p T. In all systems, the v 2 values follow an approximate quark-number scaling as a function of the hadron transverse kinetic energy per constituent quark (KE T/n q), which was also seen previously in A + A collisions.« less

  6. Measurements of mass-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in central p + Au, d + Au, and He 3 + Au collisions at s N N = 200 GeV

    SciT

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.

    Here, we present measurements of the transverse-momentum dependence of elliptic flow v 2 for identified pions and (anti)protons at midrapidity (|η| < 0.35), in 0%–5% central p+Au and 3He+Au collisions at √ s NN = 200 GeV. When taken together with previously published measurements in d + Au collisions at √ s NN = 200 GeV, the results cover a broad range of small-collision-system multiplicities and intrinsic initial geometries. We observe a clear mass-dependent splitting of v 2(p T) in d + Au and 3He + Au collisions, just as in large nucleus-nucleus (A + A) collisions, and a smallermore » splitting in p + Au collisions. Both hydrodynamic and transport model calculations successfully describe the data at low p T (< 1.5GeV/c), but fail to describe various features at higher p T. In all systems, the v 2 values follow an approximate quark-number scaling as a function of the hadron transverse kinetic energy per constituent quark (KE T/n q), which was also seen previously in A + A collisions.« less

  7. Measurements of mass-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in central p + Au, d + Au, and 3He + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alfred, M.; Andrieux, V.; Apadula, N.; Asano, H.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bagoly, A.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Blau, D. S.; Boer, M.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bumazhnov, V.; Campbell, S.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cervantes, R.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Chujo, T.; Citron, Z.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Dixit, D.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fan, W.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukuda, Y.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, K.; Hodges, A.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Ji, Z.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Jorjadze, V.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapukchyan, D.; Karthas, S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, M. H.; Kimelman, B.; Kincses, D.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Kotov, D.; Kudo, S.; Kurgyis, B.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leung, Y. H.; Lewis, N. A.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Loggins, V.-R.; Lökös, S.; Lovasz, K.; Lynch, D.; Majoros, T.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masuda, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mihalik, D. E.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Morrow, S. I.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagai, K.; Nagashima, K.; Nagashima, T.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ottino, G. J.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Peng, W.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perezlara, C. E.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Phipps, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Pun, A.; Purschke, M. L.; Radzevich, P. V.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richford, D.; Rinn, T.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Runchey, J.; Safonov, A. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shioya, T.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skoby, M. J.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takeda, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnai, G.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Ueda, Y.; Ujvari, B.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Carson, S.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vukman, N.; Wang, X. R.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; White, A. S.; Wong, C. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamamoto, H.; Yanovich, A.; Yin, P.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zharko, S.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    We present measurements of the transverse-momentum dependence of elliptic flow v2 for identified pions and (anti)protons at midrapidity (|η |<0.35 ), in 0%-5% central p +Au and 3He+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. When taken together with previously published measurements in d +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV, the results cover a broad range of small-collision-system multiplicities and intrinsic initial geometries. We observe a clear mass-dependent splitting of v2(pT) in d +Au and 3He+Au collisions, just as in large nucleus-nucleus (A +A ) collisions, and a smaller splitting in p +Au collisions. Both hydrodynamic and transport model calculations successfully describe the data at low pT (<1.5 GeV /c ), but fail to describe various features at higher pT. In all systems, the v2 values follow an approximate quark-number scaling as a function of the hadron transverse kinetic energy per constituent quark (K ET/nq ), which was also seen previously in A +A collisions.

  8. Stream dynamics between 1 AU and 2 AU: A detailed comparison of observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Pizzo, V.; Lazarus, A.; Gazis, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    A radial alignment of three solar wind stream structures observed by IMP-7 and -8 (at 1.0 AU) and Voyager 1 and 2 (in the range 1.4 to 1.8 AU) in late 1977 is presented. It is demonstrated that several important aspects of the observed dynamical evolution can be both qualitatively and quantitatively described with a single-fluid 2-D MHD numerical model of quasi-steady corotating flow, including accurate prediction of: (1) the formation of a corotating shock pair at 1.75 AU in the case of a simple, quasi-steady stream; (2) the coalescence of the thermodynamic and magnetic structures associated with the compression regions of two neighboring, interacting, corotating streams; and (3) the dynamical destruction of a small (i.e., low velocity-amplitude, short spatial-scale) stream by its overtaking of a slower moving, high-density region associated with a preceding transient flow. The evolution of these flow systems is discussed in terms of the concepts of filtering and entrainment.

  9. Cross section of the 197Au(n,2n)196Au reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamara, A.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Diakaki, M.; Serris, M.; Patronis, N.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2017-09-01

    The 197Au(n,2n)196Au reaction cross section has been measured at two energies, namely at 17.1 MeV and 20.9 MeV, by means of the activation technique, relative to the 27Al(n,α)24Na reference reaction cross section. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were produced at the 5.5 MV Tandem T11/25 accelerator laboratory of NCSR "Demokritos", by means of the 3H(d,n)4He reaction, implementing a new Ti-tritiated target of ˜ 400 GBq activity. The induced γ-ray activity at the targets and reference foils has been measured with HPGe detectors. The cross section for the population of the second isomeric (12-) state m2 of 196Au was independently determined. Auxiliary Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the MCNP code. The present results are in agreement with previous experimental data and with theoretical calculations of the measured reaction cross sections, which were carried out with the use of the EMPIRE code.

  10. Kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV at the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidrych, Jindřich

    2018-02-01

    In this proceedings, the STAR preliminary results on femtoscopic correlations of identical kaons from Au+Au collisions at =200 GeV are presented. The measured kaon source radii are studied as a function of collision energy as well as centrality and transverse pair mass mT. In addition, extracted kaon blast-wave freeze-out parameters are presented.

  11. Charged particle multiplicity fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200\\, {\\rm GeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the first PHOBOS results on charged particle multiplicity fluctuations measured for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy within a wide pseudorapidity range of |eegr| < 3. The dependence on collision geometry is removed in the analysis by using the normalized difference between the number of particles in separate eegr bins. We compare our data to HIJING model predictions.

  12. Charged particle multiplicity fluctuations in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; the PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the first PHOBOS results on charged particle multiplicity fluctuations measured for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy within a wide pseudorapidity range of |η| < 3. The dependence on collision geometry is removed in the analysis by using the normalized difference between the number of particles in separate η bins. We compare our data to HIJING model predictions.

  13. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    SciT

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaledmore » by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.« less

  14. Ordered arrays of Au catalysts by FIB assisted heterogeneous dewetting.

    PubMed

    Benkouider, A; Ronda, A; David, T; Favre, L; Abbarchi, M; Naffouti, M; Osmond, J; Delobbe, A; Sudraud, P; Berbezier, I

    2015-12-18

    Synthesizing Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts that are homogeneous in size and have controlled position is becoming a challenging and crucial prequisite for the fabrication of ordered semiconductor nanowires. In this study, Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts are synthesized via dewetting of Au layers on Si(111) during thermal annealing in an ultra-high vacuum. In the first part of the paper, the mechanism of homogeneous dewetting is analyzed as a function of the Au-deposited thickness (h Au). We distinguish three different dewetting regimes: (I) for a low thickness ([Formula: see text]), a submonolyer coverage of Au is stabilized and there is no dewetting. (II) For an intermediate thickness ([Formula: see text]), there is both dewetting and Au0.8Si0.2 phase formation. The size and density of the Au0.8Si0.2 clusters are directly related to h Au. When cooling down to room temperature, the clusters decompose and reject the Si at the Au/Si substrate interface. (III) For a large thickness ([Formula: see text]), only dewetting takes place, without forming AuSi clusters. In this regime, the dewetting is kinetically controlled by the self-diffusion of Au (activation energy ∼0.43 eV) without evidence of an Si-alloying effect. As a practical consequence, when relying solely on the homogeneous dewetting of Au/Si(111) to form the Au0.8Si0.2 catalysts (without a supply of Si atoms from vapor), regime II should be used to obtain good size and density control. In the second part of the paper, a process for ordering the catalysts using focused ion beam-(FIB) assisted dewetting (heterogeneous dewetting) is developed. We show that no matter what the FIB milling conditions and the Au nominal thickness are, dewetting is promoted by ion beam irradiation and is accompanied by the formation of Au0.8Si0.2 droplets. The droplets preferentially form on the patterned areas, while in similar annealing conditions, they do not form on the unpatterned areas. This behavior is attributed to the larger Au

  15. Uptake of Au(III) Ions by Aluminum Hydroxide and Their Spontaneous Reduction to Elemental Gold (Au(0)).

    PubMed

    Yokoyama; Matsukado; Uchida; Motomura; Watanabe; Izawa

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of AuCl(4)(-) ions during the formation of aluminum hydroxide at pH 6 was examined. With an increase in NaCl concentration, the content of gold taken up by aluminum hydroxide decreased, suggesting that chloro-hydroxy complexes of Au(III) ion were taken up due to the formation of Al-O-Au bonds. It was found unexpectedly that the Au(III) ions taken up were spontaneously reduced to elemental gold without addition of a specific reducing reagent and then colloidal gold particles were formed. The mechanisms for the uptake of Au(III) ions by aluminum hydroxide and for their spontaneous reduction are discussed. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. Autonomous Repair Mechanism of Creep Damage in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Kwakernaak, C.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Sloof, W. G.; Kuzmina, M.; Herbig, M.; Raabe, D.; Brück, E.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2015-12-01

    The autonomous repair mechanism of creep cavitation during high-temperature deformation has been investigated in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N alloys. Combined electron-microscopy techniques and atom probe tomography reveal how the improved creep properties result from Au precipitation within the creep cavities, preferentially formed on grain boundaries oriented perpendicular to the applied stress. The selective precipitation of Au atoms at the free creep cavity surface results in pore filling, and thereby, autonomous repair of the creep damage. The large difference in atomic size between the Au and Fe strongly hampers the nucleation of precipitates in the matrix. As a result, the matrix acts as a reservoir for the supersaturated solute until damage occurs. Grain boundaries and dislocations are found to act as fast transport routes for solute gold from the matrix to the creep cavities. The mechanism responsible for the self-healing can be characterized by a simple model for cavity growth and cavity filling.

  17. High-temperature stability of Au/Pd/Cu and Au/Pd(P)/Cu surface finishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. E.; Hsieh, W. Z.; Lee, P. T.; Huang, Y. H.; Kuo, T. T.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal reliability of Au/Pd/Cu and Au/Pd(4-6 wt.% P)/Cu trilayers in the isothermal annealing at 180 °C were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The pure Pd film possessed a nanocrystalline structure with numerous grain boundaries, thereby facilitating the interdiffusion between Au and Cu. Out-diffusion of Cu through Pd and Au grain boundaries yielded a significant amount of Cu oxides (CuO and Cu2O) over the Au surface and gave rise to void formation in the Cu film. By contrast, the Pd(P) film was amorphous and served as a good diffusion barrier against Cu diffusion. The results of this study indicated that amorphous Pd(P) possessed better oxidation resistance and thermal reliability than crystalline Pd.

  18. Observation of D 0 meson nuclear modifications in Au + Au collisions at s NN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; ...

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D 0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D 0→K -+π +) in Au+Au collisions at √ sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, N bin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D 0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by N bin, for transverse momenta p T>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate p Tmore » is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  19. Electronic and geometric structures of Au30 clusters: a network of 2e-superatom Au cores protected by tridentate protecting motifs with u3-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhimei; Cheng, Longjiu

    2015-12-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the experimentally synthesized Au30S(SR)18 and two related Au30(SR)18 and Au30S2(SR)18 clusters. The patterns of thiolate ligands on the gold cores for the three thiolate-protected Au30 nanoclusters are on the basis of the ``divide and protect'' concept. A novel extended protecting motif with u3-S, S(Au2(SR)2)2AuSR, is discovered, which is termed the tridentate protecting motif. The Au cores of Au30S(SR)18, Au30(SR)18 and Au30S2(SR)18 clusters are Au17, Au20 and Au14, respectively. The superatom-network (SAN) model and the superatom complex (SAC) model are used to explain the chemical bonding patterns, which are verified by chemical bonding analysis based on the adaptive natural density partitioning (AdNDP) method and aromatic analysis on the basis of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) method. The Au17 core of the Au30S(SR)18 cluster can be viewed as a SAN of one Au6 superatom and four Au4 superatoms. The shape of the Au6 core is identical to that revealed in the recently synthesized Au18(SR)14 cluster. The Au20 core of the Au30(SR)18 cluster can be viewed as a SAN of two Au6 superatoms and four Au4 superatoms. The Au14 core of Au30S2(SR)18 can be regarded as a SAN of two pairs of two vertex-sharing Au4 superatoms. Meanwhile, the Au14 core is an 8e-superatom with 1S21P6 configuration. Our work may aid understanding and give new insights into the chemical synthesis of thiolate-protected Au clusters.Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the experimentally synthesized Au30S(SR)18 and two related Au30(SR)18 and Au30S2(SR)18 clusters. The patterns of thiolate ligands on the gold cores for the three thiolate-protected Au30 nanoclusters are on the basis of the ``divide and protect'' concept. A novel extended protecting motif with u3-S, S(Au2(SR)2)2AuSR, is discovered, which is termed the tridentate protecting motif. The Au cores of Au30S(SR)18, Au30(SR)18 and Au30S

  20. Enhanced middle-infrared light transmission through Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au aperture arrays.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gongli; Yao, Xiang; Ji, Xinming; Zhou, Jia; Bao, Zongming; Huang, Yiping

    2011-12-01

    The enhanced middle-infrared light transmission through Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au aperture arrays by changing the refractive index and the thickness of a dielectric layer was studied experimentally. The results indicated that the transmission spectra was highly dependent on the refractive index and the thickness of SiO(x)N(y). We found that the transmission peaks redshifted regularly along with the refractive index from 1.6 to 1.8, owing to the role of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) coupling in the Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au cascaded metallic structure. Simultaneously, a higher transmission efficiency and narrower transmission peak was obtained in Au/SiO2.1N0.3/Au cascaded metallic structure with small refractive index (1.6) than in Au/SiO0.6N1/Au cascaded metallic structure with large refractive index (1.8). When the thickness of SiO(x)N(y) changes from 0.2 to 0.4 microm, the shape of transmission spectra exhibits a large change. It was found that a higher transmission efficiency and narrower transmission peak was obtained in Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au cascaded metallic structure with a thin dielectric film (0.2 microm), with the increase of SiO(x)N(y) film's thickness, the transmission peak gradually widened and disappeared finally. This effect is useful in applications of biochemical sensing and tunable integrated plasmonic devices in the middle-infrared region.

  1. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

    2012-08-01

    Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and

  2. Stabilizing ultrasmall Au clusters for enhanced photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Bo; Lu, Kang-Qiang; Tang, Zichao; Chen, Hao Ming; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2018-04-18

    Recently, loading ligand-protected gold (Au) clusters as visible light photosensitizers onto various supports for photoredox catalysis has attracted considerable attention. However, the efficient control of long-term photostability of Au clusters on the metal-support interface remains challenging. Herein, we report a simple and efficient method for enhancing the photostability of glutathione-protected Au clusters (Au GSH clusters) loaded on the surface of SiO 2 sphere by utilizing multifunctional branched poly-ethylenimine (BPEI) as a surface charge modifying, reducing and stabilizing agent. The sequential coating of thickness controlled TiO 2 shells can further significantly improve the photocatalytic efficiency, while such structurally designed core-shell SiO 2 -Au GSH clusters-BPEI@TiO 2 composites maintain high photostability during longtime light illumination conditions. This joint strategy via interfacial modification and composition engineering provides a facile guideline for stabilizing ultrasmall Au clusters and rational design of Au clusters-based composites with improved activity toward targeting applications in photoredox catalysis.

  3. Corrosion behavior and microstructures of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

    2004-06-01

    Anodic polarization was performed in 0.9% NaCl and 1% lactic acid solutions to characterize the relationship between the corrosion behavior and microstructures of cast Ti-Au (5-40%) alloys. An abrupt increase in the current density occurred at approximately 0.6 V vs. SCE for the 30% and 40% Au alloys in the 0.9% NaCl solution. The microstructures after corrosion testing indicated that this breakdown may have been caused by the preferential dissolution of the Ti3Au. However, the potential for preferential dissolution was higher than the breakdown potential of stainless steel or Co-Cr alloy, which meant that the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was superior. In 1% lactic acid solution, the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was excellent, with no breakdown at any composition. In the present test solutions, the Ti-Au alloys up to 20% Au had good corrosion resistance comparable to that for pure titanium.

  4. Exfoliation restacking route to Au nanoparticle-clay nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Seung-Min; Jang, Jae-Up; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2006-05-01

    A novel gold-pillared aluminosilicate (Au-PILC) were synthesized with positively charged gold nanoparticles capped by mercaptoammonium and exfoliated silicate layers. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by NaBH4 reduction of AuCl4- in the presence of N,N,N-Trimethyl (11-mercaptoundecyl)ammonium (HS(CH2)11NMe3+) protecting ligand in an aqueous solution, and purified by dialysis. The resulting positively charged and water-soluble gold nanoparticles were hybridized with exfoliated silicate sheets by electrostatic interaction. The formation of Au clay hybrids could be easily confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction with the increased basal spacing of clay upon insertion of Au nanoparticles. TEM image clearly revealed that the Au particles with an average size of 4 nm maintain their structure even after intercalation. The Au nanoparticles supported by clay matrix were found to be thermally more stable, suggesting that the Au nanoparticles were homogeneously protected with clay nanoplates. The present synthetic route could be further applicable to various hybrid systems between metal nanoparticles and clays.

  5. Investigation of the thermal annealing effect on electrical properties of Ni/Au, Ni/Mo/Au and Mo/Au Schottky barriers on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleptsov, E. V.; Chernykh, A. V.; Chernykh, S. V.; Dorofeev, A. A.; Gladysheva, N. B.; Kondakov, M. N.; Sleptsova, A. A.; Panichkin, A. V.; Konovalov, M. P.; Didenko, S. I.

    2017-03-01

    Investigation of the thermal annealing effect on Schottky barrier parameters and the leakage current of Ni/Au, Ni/Mo/Au and Mo/Au Schottky barriers on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures has been performed. Improvement of Schottky barrier parameters after annealing of the investigated metallization schemes was observed. Ni/Au and Mo/Au contacts drastically degrade after annealing at the temperatures higher than 400 °C, whereas the Ni/Mo/Au contact exhibits excellent parameters after 500 °C annealing (qϕb = 1.00 eV, n = 1.13 и Ileak = 5 μA).

  6. Extreme interplanetary rotational discontinuities at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.

    2005-11-01

    This study is concerned with the identification and description of a special subset of four Wind interplanetary rotational discontinuities (from an earlier study of 134 directional discontinuities by Lepping et al. (2003)) with some "extreme" characteristics, in the sense that every case has (1) an almost planar current sheet surface, (2) a very large discontinuity angle (ω), (3) at least moderately strong normal field components (>0.8 nT), and (4) the overall set has a very broad range of transition layer thicknesses, with one being as thick as 50 RE and another at the other extreme being 1.6 RE, most being much thicker than are usually studied. Each example has a well-determined surface normal (n) according to minimum variance analysis and corroborated via time delay checking of the discontinuity with observations at IMP 8 by employing the local surface planarity. From the variance analyses, most of these cases had unusually large ratios of intermediate-to-minimum eigenvalues (λI/λmin), being on average 32 for three cases (with a fourth being much larger), indicating compact current sheet transition zones, another (the fifth) extreme property. For many years there has been a controversy as to the relative distribution of rotational (RDs) to tangential discontinuities (TDs) in the solar wind at 1 AU (and elsewhere, such as between the Sun and Earth), even to the point where some authors have suggested that RDs with large ∣Bn∣s are probably not generated or, if generated, are unstable and therefore very rare. Some of this disagreement apparently has been due to the different selection criteria used, e.g., some allowed eigenvalue ratios (λI/λmin) to be almost an order of magnitude lower than 32 in estimating n, usually introducing unacceptable error in n and therefore also in ∣Bn∣. However, we suggest that RDs may not be so rare at 1 AU, but good quality cases (where ∣Bn∣ confidently exceeds the error in ∣Bn∣) appear to be uncommon, and further

  7. Epitaxial CdSe-Au nanocrystal heterostructures by thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Albert; van Huis, Marijn; Zanella, Marco; Genovese, Alessandro; Marras, Sergio; Falqui, Andrea; Zandbergen, Henny W; Cingolani, Roberto; Manna, Liberato

    2010-08-11

    The thermal evolution of a collection of heterogeneous CdSe-Au nanosystems (Au-decorated CdSe nanorods, networks, vertical assemblies) prepared by wet-chemical approaches was monitored in situ in the transmission electron microscope. In contrast to interfaces that are formed during kinetically controlled wet chemical synthesis, heating under vacuum conditions results in distinct and well-defined CdSe/Au interfaces, located at the CdSe polar surfaces. The high quality of these interfaces should make the heterostructures more suitable for use in nanoscale electronic devices.

  8. AuScope VLBI Project and Hobart 26-m Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Jim; Dickey, John; Reid, Brett; McCallum, Jamie; Shabala, Stas; Watson, Christopher; Ellingsen, Simon; Memin, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on the activities carried out at the three AuScope VLBI observatories and the Hobart 26-m antenna. In 2012 the three AuScope 12-m antennas at Hobart (Hb), Katherine (Ke), and Yarragadee (Yg) completed their first full year of operations as an array. The Hobart 26-m antenna (Ho) continued to make a contribution to IVS, providing overlap with the Hb time series. In total the AuScope antennas and the Hobart 26 m observed for 146 antenna days in 2012. In this report we also briefly highlight our research activities during 2012 and our plans for 2013.

  9. First steps towards small arrays of Mo/Au microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, J.; Kirk, E. C.; Thomsen, K.; van den Brandt, B.; Lerch, Ph; Scandella, L.; Zehnder, A.; Mango, S.; Ott, H. R.; Huber, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Martinis, J. M.

    2000-04-01

    We are developing small arrays of microcalorimeters based on transition edge sensors made with Mo/Au bilayers deposited on silicon nitride membranes and Au absorbers. The superconducting transition of the bilayers is adjusted to be around 130 mK with a transition width better than a millikelvin by use of the proximity effect between the Au and Mo films. We built a dilution refrigerator and wired it for 2 channel operation in order to study thermal coupling issues between thermometers within the array. The device fabrication procedure as well as preliminary results are presented.

  10. Au plasmonics in a WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} photocatalyst for significantly enhanced hydrogen generation

    SciT

    Cheng, Zhongzhou; School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083; Wang, Zhenxing, E-mail: wangzx@nanoctr.cn, E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn

    2015-11-30

    Promoting the activities of photocatalysts is still the critical challenge in H{sub 2} generation area. Here, a Au plasmon enhanced photocatalyst of WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} is developed by inserting Au nanoparticles between WS{sub 2} nanotubes and CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) nanoparticles. Due to the localized surface plasmonic resonance properties from Au nanoparticles, WS{sub 2}-Au-CIS shows the best performance as compared to Au-CIS, CIS, WS{sub 2}-CIS, CIS-Au, WS{sub 2}-Au, and WS{sub 2}-CIS-Au. The surface plasmonic resonance effects dramatically intensify the absorption of visible light and help to inject hot electrons into the semiconductors. Our findings open up an efficient method to optimizemore » the type-II structures for photocatalytic water splitting.« less

  11. The rational design of a Au(I) precursor for focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Marashdeh, Ali; Tiesma, Thiadrik; van Velzen, Niels J C; Harder, Sjoerd; Havenith, Remco W A; De Hosson, Jeff T M; van Dorp, Willem F

    2017-01-01

    Au(I) complexes are studied as precursors for focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP). FEBIP is an advanced direct-write technique for nanometer-scale chemical synthesis. The stability and volatility of the complexes are characterized to design an improved precursor for pure Au deposition. Aurophilic interactions are found to play a key role. The short lifetime of ClAuCO in vacuum is explained by strong, destabilizing Au-Au interactions in the solid phase. While aurophilic interactions do not affect the stability of ClAuPMe 3 , they leave the complex non-volatile. Comparison of crystal structures of ClAuPMe 3 and MeAuPMe 3 shows that Au-Au interactions are much weaker or partially even absent for the latter structure. This explains its high volatility. However, MeAuPMe 3 dissociates unfavorably during FEBIP, making it an unsuitable precursor. The study shows that Me groups reduce aurophilic interactions, compared to Cl groups, which we attribute to electronic rather than steric effects. Therefore we propose MeAuCO as a potential FEBIP precursor. It is expected to have weak Au-Au interactions, making it volatile. It is stable enough to act as a volatile source for Au deposition, being stabilized by 6.5 kcal/mol. Finally, MeAuCO is likely to dissociate in a single step to pure Au.

  12. Design and Preparation of Supported Au Catalyst with Enhanced Catalytic Activities by Rationally Positioning Au Nanoparticles on Anatase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Rice, Andrew E; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Mingshu; Meng, Xiangju; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-06-18

    A synergistic effect between individual components is crucial for increasing the activity of metal/metal oxide catalysts. The greatest challenge is how to control the synergistic effect to obtain enhanced catalytic performance. Through density functional theory calculations of model Au/TiO2 catalysts, it is suggested that there is strong interaction between Au nanoparticles and Ti species at the edge/corner sites of anatase, which is favorable for the formation of stable oxygen vacancies. Motivated by this theoretical analysis, we have rationally prepared Au nanoparticles attached to edge/corner sites of anatase support (Au/TiO2-EC), confirmed by their HR-TEM images. As expected, this strong interaction is well characterized by Raman, UV-visible, and XPS techniques. Very interestingly, compared with conventional Au catalysts, Au/TiO2-EC exhibits superior catalytic activity in the oxidations using O2. Our approach to controlling Au nanoparticle positioning on anatase to obtain enhanced catalytic activity offers an efficient strategy for developing more novel supported metal catalysts.

  13. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Macdonald, Charles L. B.; Northwood, Derek O.; Gyenge, Elod L.

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20 wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bönneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH 4 -, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH 4 - oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5 mg cm -2 colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47 V at 100 mA cm -2 and 333 K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17 V.

  14. Gold surfaces and nanoparticles are protected by Au(0)-thiyl species and are destroyed when Au(I)-thiolates form.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ford, Michael J; Halder, Arnab; Ulstrup, Jens; Hush, Noel S

    2016-03-15

    The synthetic chemistry and spectroscopy of sulfur-protected gold surfaces and nanoparticles is analyzed, indicating that the electronic structure of the interface is Au(0)-thiyl, with Au(I)-thiolates identified as high-energy excited surface states. Density-functional theory indicates that it is the noble character of gold and nanoparticle surfaces that destabilizes Au(I)-thiolates. Bonding results from large van der Waals forces, influenced by covalent bonding induced through s-d hybridization and charge polarization effects that perturbatively mix in some Au(I)-thiolate character. A simple method for quantifying these contributions is presented, revealing that a driving force for nanoparticle growth is nobleization, minimizing Au(I)-thiolate involvement. Predictions that Brust-Schiffrin reactions involve thiolate anion intermediates are verified spectroscopically, establishing a key feature needed to understand nanoparticle growth. Mixing of preprepared Au(I) and thiolate reactants always produces Au(I)-thiolate thin films or compounds rather than monolayers. Smooth links to O, Se, Te, C, and N linker chemistry are established.

  15. Characteristics of Au Migration and Concentration Distributions in Au-Doped HgCdTe LPE Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Quanzhi; Yang, Jianrong; Wei, Yanfeng; Zhang, Juan; Sun, Ruiyun

    2015-08-01

    Annealing techniques and secondary ion mass spectrometry have been used to study the characteristics of Au migration and concentration distributions in HgCdTe materials grown by liquid phase epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements showed that Au concentrations had obvious positive correlations with Hg-vacancy concentration and dislocation density of the materials. Au atoms migrate toward regions of high Hg-vacancy concentration or move away from these regions when the Hg-vacancy concentration decreases during annealing. The phenomenon can be explained by defect chemical equilibrium theory if Au atoms have a very large migration velocity compared with Hg vacancies. Au atoms will also migrate toward regions of high dislocation density, leading to a peak concentration in the inter-diffusion region of HgCdTe materials near the substrate. By use of an Hg and Te-rich annealing technique, different concentration distributions of both Au atoms and Hg vacancies in HgCdTe materials were obtained, indicating that Au-doped HgCdTe materials can be designed and prepared to satisfy the requirements of HgCdTe devices.

  16. Probing Phase Evolutions of Au-Methyl-Propyl-Thiolate Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au(111) at the Molecular Level.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jianzhi; Lin, Haiping; Qin, Xuhui; Zhang, Xin; Ding, Haoxuan; Wang, Yitao; Rokni Fard, Mahroo; Kaya, Dogan; Zhu, Gangqiang; Li, Qing; Li, Youyong; Pan, Minghu; Guo, Quanmin

    2018-06-18

    A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) consisting of a mixture of CH 3 S-Au-SCH 3 , CH 3 S-Au-S(CH 2 ) 2 CH 3 , and CH 3 (CH 2 ) 2 S-Au-S(CH 2 ) 2 CH 3 was studied systematically using scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional calculations. We find that the SAM is subjected to frequent changes at the molecular level on the time scale of ∼minutes. The presence of CH 3 S or CH 3 S-Au as a dissociation product of CH 3 S-Au-SCH 3 plays a key role in the dynamical behavior of the mixed SAM. Slow phase separation takes place at room temperature over hours to days, leading to the formation of methyl-thiolate-rich and propyl-thiolate-rich phases. Our results provide new insights into the chemistry of the thiolate-Au interface, especially for ligand exchange reaction in the RS-Au-SR staple motif.

  17. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of R dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  18. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    SciT

    Adamczyk, L.

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of R dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  19. Si--Au Schottky barrier nuclear battery

    SciT

    Tse, Anthony N.

    1972-11-01

    A long-life, high-power-density, high-reliability, compact microwatt battery is needed in many applications. In the field of medicine, for example, such a battery could power an artificial pacemaker which would greatly extend the residence time of the device. Various alternatives are analyzed and discussed. Betavoltaic conversion systems with Si-Au Schottky barrier cells coupled with 147Pm metal foil were selected for investigation. Characterization experiments were performed to obtain optimized silicon resistivity and promethium metal foil thickness. Radiation dose rates were measured and the safety aspects of the battery were analyzed. A prototype battery was assembled and tested. The economics of the batterymore » were demonstrated for special applications. It is concluded that a microwatt nuclear battery can be built with a conversion efficiency of 1 to 2%, a power density of 60 to 300 pW/cm 3 depending on the power level, and a useful life of 5 to 10 years. Further research areas are recommended.« less

  20. Predicting ICME properties at 1AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, A.; Braga, C. R.; Mesquita, A. L.; De Mendonça, R. R. S.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are among the main origins of geomagnetic disturbances. They change the properties of the near-earth interplanetary medium, enhancing some key parameters, such as the southward interplanetary magnetic field and the solar wind speed. Both quantities are known to be related to the energy transfer from the solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere via the magnetic reconnection process. Many attempts have been made to predict the magnetic filed and the solar wind speed from coronagraph observations. However, we still have much to learn about the dynamic evolution of ICMEs as they propagate through the interplanetary space. Increased observation capability is probably needed. Among the several attempts to establish correlations between CME and ICME properties, it was found that the average CME propagation speed to 1AU is highly correlated to the ICME peak speed (Dal Lago et al, 2004). In this work, we present an extended study of such correlation, which confirms the results found in our previous study. Some suggestions on how to use this kind of results for space weather estimates are explored.

  1. Evaluation of the Olympus AU-510 analyser.

    PubMed

    Farré, C; Velasco, J; Ramón, F

    1991-01-01

    The selective multitest Olympus AU-510 analyser was evaluated according to the recommendations of the Comision de Instrumentacion de la Sociedad Española de Quimica Clinica and the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The evaluation was carried out in two stages: an examination of the analytical units and then an evaluation in routine work conditions. The operational characteristics of the system were also studied.THE FIRST STAGE INCLUDED A PHOTOMETRIC STUDY: dependent on the absorbance, the inaccuracy varies between +0.5% to -0.6% at 405 nm and from -5.6% to 10.6% at 340 nm; the imprecision ranges between -0.22% and 0.56% at 405 nm and between 0.09% and 2.74% at 340 nm. Linearity was acceptable, apart from a very low absorbance for NADH at 340 nm; and the imprecision of the serum sample pipetter was satisfactory.TWELVE SERUM ANALYTES WERE STUDIED UNDER ROUTINE CONDITIONS: glucose, urea urate, cholesterol, triglycerides, total bilirubin, creatinine, phosphate, iron, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase.The within-run imprecision (CV%) ranged from 0.67% for phosphate to 2.89% for iron and the between-run imprecision from 0.97% for total bilirubin to 7.06% for iron. There was no carryover in a study of the serum sample pipetter. Carry-over studies with the reagent and sample pipetters shows some cross contamination in the iron assay.

  2. The AuScope geodetic VLBI array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Reid, P. B.; McCulloch, P. M.; Baynes, B. E.; Dickey, J. M.; Shabala, S. S.; Watson, C. S.; Titov, O.; Ruddick, R.; Twilley, R.; Reynolds, C.; Tingay, S. J.; Shield, P.; Adada, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Morgan, J. S.; Bignall, H. E.

    2013-06-01

    The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry array consists of three new 12-m radio telescopes and a correlation facility in Australia. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) facilities. The correlation facility is based in Perth (Western Australia). This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere, and subsequently enhance the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. This, combined with the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia, will enable the improved measurement of intraplate deformation across the Australian tectonic plate. In this paper, we present a description of this new infrastructure and present some initial results, including telescope performance measurements and positions of the telescopes in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. We show that this array is already capable of achieving centimetre precision over typical long-baselines and that network and reference source systematic effects must be further improved to reach the ambitious goals of VLBI2010.

  3. Carney Complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the condition. Significant freckling without darkly pigmented spots or typical pattern Blue nevus, if multiple and confirmed by biopsy Café-au-lait spots, which are light brown spots on skin, or ...

  4. Size exclusion chromatography for semipreparative scale separation of Au38(SR)24 and Au40(SR)24 and larger clusters.

    PubMed

    Knoppe, Stefan; Boudon, Julien; Dolamic, Igor; Dass, Amala; Bürgi, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) on a semipreparative scale (10 mg and more) was used to size-select ultrasmall gold nanoclusters (<2 nm) from polydisperse mixtures. In particular, the ubiquitous byproducts of the etching process toward Au(38)(SR)(24) (SR, thiolate) clusters were separated and gained in high monodispersity (based on mass spectrometry). The isolated fractions were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, MALDI mass spectrometry, HPLC, and electron microscopy. Most notably, the separation of Au(38)(SR)(24) and Au(40)(SR)(24) clusters is demonstrated.

  5. A comparative study of the electrostatic potential of fullerene-like structures of Au 32 and Au 42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Lai; Sun, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hong-Tao; Hou, Dong-Yan; Zhai, Yu-Chun

    2008-05-01

    By using density functional theory calculations, it is found that the most negative MEP inside the gold cage occurs at the center of the sphere. The largest regions with the most negative MEP outside the sphere are localized in the neighborhood of the bridge sites and the vertex regions of the five-coordinated are more positive. The absolute values of the most negative potentials in both the inner and outer cages as well as the vertex regions of the five-coordinated of Au 32 structure are much larger than those of Au 42, which means Au 32 is preferable for electrophilic attack or nucleophilic processes.

  6. Composition distributions in FePt(Au) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, C.; Nikles, D. E.; Harrell, J. W.; Thompson, G. B.

    2010-08-01

    Ternary alloy FePt(Au) nanoparticles were prepared by the co-reduction of platinum(II) acetylacetonate and gold(III) acetate and the thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl in hot phenyl ether in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine ligands. This gave spherical particles with an average diameter of 4.4 nm with a range of diameters from approximately 1.6-9 nm. The as-synthesized particles had a solid solution, face-centered-cubic structure. Though the average composition of the particles was Fe44Pt45Au11, individual particle analysis by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy-X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy showed a broad distribution in composition. In general, smaller-sized particles tended to have a lower amount of Au as compared to larger-sized particles. As the Au content increased, the ratio of Fe/Pt widened.

  7. Fabrication of Pt/Au concentric spheres from triblock copolymer.

    PubMed

    Koh, Haeng-Deog; Park, Soojin; Russell, Thomas P

    2010-02-23

    Dispersion of an aqueous H(2)PtCl(6) solution into a trifluorotoluene (TFT) solution of a polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO) triblock copolymer produced an emulsion-induced hollow micelle (EIHM), comprising a water nanodroplet stabilized by PEO, H(2)PtCl(6)/P2VP, and PS, sequentially. The following addition of an aqueous LiAuCl(4) solution into the dispersion led to a coordination of LiAuCl(4) and PEO. The resulting spherical EIHM structure was transformed to a hollow cylindrical micelle by the fusion of spherical EIHM with the addition of methanol. This structural transition was reversible by the alternative addition of methanol and TFT. Oxygen plasma was used to generate Pt/Au concentric spheres and hollow cylindrical Pt/Au nano-objects.

  8. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; ...

    2016-05-26

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), displaymore » less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.« less

  9. Distributions of charged hadrons associated with high transverse momentum particles in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Vandermolen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Yuting, B; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zhaomin, Z P; Zizong, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2005-10-07

    Charged hadrons in [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] associated with particles of [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] are reconstructed in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV. The associated multiplicity and p magnitude sum are found to increase from pp to central Au+Au collisions. The associated p distributions, while similar in shape on the nearside, are significantly softened on the awayside in central Au+Au relative to pp and not much harder than that of inclusive hadrons. The results, consistent with jet quenching, suggest that the awayside fragments approach equilibration with the medium traversed.

  10. Surface alloying in Sn/Au(111) at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Pampa; Singh, Vipin Kumar; Rai, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Kuntala; Barman, Sudipta Roy

    2018-04-01

    On the basis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that when Sn is deposited on Au(111) single crystal surface at a substrate temperature TS=373 K, surface alloying occurs with the formation of AuSn phase. The evolution of the surface structure and the surface morphology has been studied by low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, respectively as a function of Sn coverage and substrate temperatures.

  11. Melting curve of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Pham Dinh; Hoc, Nguyen Quang; Tinh, Bui Duc; Tan, Pham Duy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the dependence of the melting temperature of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure in the interval from 0 kbar to 40 kbar is studied by the statistical moment method (SMM). This dependence has the form of near linearity and the calculated slopes of melting curve are 3.9 for Cu, 5.7 for Ag and 6 for Au. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Synthesis of Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24, Au36(SPh-tBu)24, and Au30(S-tBu)18 Nanomolecules from a Common Precursor Mixture.

    PubMed

    Rambukwella, Milan; Dass, Amala

    2017-10-17

    Phenylethanethiol protected nanomolecules such as Au 25 , Au 38 , and Au 144 are widely studied by a broad range of scientists in the community, owing primarily to the availability of simple synthetic protocols. However, synthetic methods are not available for other ligands, such as aromatic thiol and bulky ligands, impeding progress. Here we report the facile synthesis of three distinct nanomolecules, Au 38 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 24 , Au 36 (SPh-tBu) 24 , and Au 30 (S-tBu) 18 , exclusively, starting from a common Au n (glutathione) m (where n and m are number of gold atoms and glutathiolate ligands) starting material upon reaction with HSCH 2 CH 2 Ph, HSPh-tBu, and HStBu, respectively. The systematic synthetic approach involves two steps: (i) synthesis of kinetically controlled Au n (glutathione) m crude nanocluster mixture with 1:4 gold to thiol molar ratio and (ii) thermochemical treatment of the purified nanocluster mixture with excess thiols to obtain thermodynamically stable nanomolecules. Thermochemical reactions with physicochemically different ligands formed highly monodispersed, exclusively three different core-size nanomolecules, suggesting a ligand induced core-size conversion and structural transformation. The purpose of this work is to make available a facile and simple synthetic method for the preparation of Au 38 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 24 , Au 36 (SPh-tBu) 24 , and Au 30 (S-tBu) 18 , to nonspecialists and the broader scientific community. The central idea of simple synthetic method was demonstrated with other ligand systems such as cyclopentanethiol (HSC 5 H 9 ), cyclohexanethiol(HSC 6 H 11 ), para-methylbenzenethiol(pMBT), 1-pentanethiol(HSC 5 H 11 ), 1-hexanethiol(HSC 6 H 13 ), where Au 36 (SC 5 H 9 ) 24 , Au 36 (SC 6 H 11 ) 24 , Au 36 (pMBT) 24 , Au 38 (SC 5 H 11 ) 24 , and Au 38 (SC 6 H 13 ) 24 were obtained, respectively.

  13. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

    SciT

    De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.

    2011-08-30

    Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenacmore » after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.« less

  14. Spin Polarization and Quantum Spins in Au Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chi-Yen; Karna, Sunil K.; Wang, Chin-Wei; Li, Wen-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    The present study focuses on investigating the magnetic properties and the critical particle size for developing sizable spontaneous magnetic moment of bare Au nanoparticles. Seven sets of bare Au nanoparticle assemblies, with diameters from 3.5 to 17.5 nm, were fabricated with the gas condensation method. Line profiles of the X-ray diffraction peaks were used to determine the mean particle diameters and size distributions of the nanoparticle assemblies. The magnetization curves M(Ha) reveal Langevin field profiles. Magnetic hysteresis was clearly revealed in the low field regime even at 300 K. Contributions to the magnetization from different size particles in the nanoparticle assemblies were considered when analyzing the M(Ha) curves. The results show that the maximum particle moment will appear in 2.4 nm Au particles. A similar result of the maximum saturation magnetization appearing in 2.3 nm Au particles is also concluded through analysis of the dependency of the saturation magnetization MP on particle size. The MP(d) curve departs significantly from the 1/d dependence, but can be described by a log-normal function. Magnetization can be barely detected for Au particles larger than 27 nm. Magnetic field induced Zeeman magnetization from the quantum confined Kubo gap opening appears in Au nanoparticles smaller than 9.5 nm in diameter. PMID:23989607

  15. Structural and dynamical properties of liquid Al-Au alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Voigtmann, Th.; Kolland, G.; Kobatake, H.; Brillo, J.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate temperature- and composition-dependent structural and dynamical properties of Al-Au melts. Experiments are performed to obtain accurate density and viscosity data. The system shows a strong negative excess volume, similar to other Al-based binary alloys. We develop a molecular-dynamics (MD) model of the melt based on the embedded-atom method (EAM), gauged against the available experimental liquid-state data. A rescaling of previous EAM potentials for solid-state Au and Al improves the quantitative agreement with experimental data in the melt. In the MD simulation, the admixture of Au to Al can be interpreted as causing a local compression of the less dense Al system, driven by less soft Au-Au interactions. This local compression provides a microscopic mechanism explaining the strong negative excess volume of the melt. We further discuss the concentration dependence of self- and interdiffusion and viscosity in the MD model. Al atoms are more mobile than Au, and their increased mobility is linked to a lower viscosity of the melt.

  16. Novel condensation of Au-centered trigonal prisms in rare-earth-metal-rich tellurides: Er7Au2Te2 and Lu7Au2Te2.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shalabh; Corbett, John D

    2010-07-14

    A new monoclinic structure occurs for Er(7)Au(2)Te(2) according to X-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals grown at 1200 degrees C: C2/m, Z = 4, a = 17.8310(9) A, b = 3.9819(5) A, c = 16.9089(9) A, beta = 104.361(4) degrees. The isostructural Lu(7)Au(2)Te(2) also exists according to X-ray powder pattern means, a = 17.536(4) A, b = 3.9719(4) A, c = 16.695(2) A, beta = 104.33(1) degrees. The structure contains zigzag chains of condensed, Au-centered tricapped trigonal prisms (TCTP) of Er along c that also share basal faces along b to generate puckered sheets. Further bi-face-capping Er atoms between these generate the three dimensional network along a, with tellurium in cavities outlined by augmented trigonal prismatic Er polyhedra. Bonding analysis via LMTO-DFT methods reveal very significant Er-Au bonding interactions, as quantified by their energy-weighted Hamilton overlap populations (-ICOHP), approximately 49% of the total for all interactions. These and similar Er-Te contributions sharply contrast with the small Er-Er population, only approximately 14% of the total in spite of the high proportion of Er-Er contacts. The strong polar bonding of Er to the electronegative Au and Te leaves Er relatively oxidized, with many of its 5d states falling above the Fermi level and empty. The contradiction with customary representations of structures that highlight rare-earth metal clusters is manifest. The large Er-Au Hamilton overlap population is in accord with the strong bonding between early and late transition metals first noted by Brewer in 1973. The relationship of this structure to the more distorted orthorhombic (Imm2) structure type of neighboring Dy(7)Ir(2)Te(2) is considered.

  17. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au +Au collisions for energies ranging from √{sN N }=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v32{2 }=⟨cos 3 (ϕ1-ϕ2)⟩ , where ϕ1-ϕ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δ η =η1-η2 . Nonzero v32{2 } is directly related to the previously observed large-Δ η narrow-Δ ϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v32{2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v32{2 } is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v32{2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √{sN N }=20 GeV .

  18. QUELS FUTURS TRAITEMENTS POUR LA DEPENDANCE AU TABAC ET AU CANNABIS?

    PubMed Central

    LE FOLL, Bernard; JUSTINOVA, Zuzana; TANDA, Gianlugi; GOLDBERG, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    RESUME Plus de trois millions de morts sont attribués au tabagisme dans le monde par an, et l’usage de tabac est en progression dans les pays en voie de développement. L’usage de tabac est donc une des rares causes de mortalité qui augmente, avec une prévision de plus de 10 millions de morts par an dans 30–40 ans. Le cannabis ou marijuana est la drogue illicite la plus consommée dans le monde et il n’y a actuellement pas de traitement disponible. Bien que les systèmes dopaminergiques jouent un rôle central dans les effets renforçants des drogues, d’autres systèmes sont impliqués. Nous présentons ici des résultats récents obtenus avec des antagonistes des récepteurs cannabinoides CB1, des récepteurs D3 de la dopamine et des récepteurs opioïdes. Ces antagonistes qui modulent de façon directe ou indirecte la transmission dopaminergique cérébrale représentent des approches prometteuses pour le traitement du tabagisme ou de la dépendance au cannabis. Ces approches sont à valider dans des essais cliniques. PMID:18663981

  19. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v 2{2} and v 2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √ SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v 2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions.more » As a result, we also show that v 2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

  20. Au-Pt-Au nanoraspberry structures used for mercury ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiang-Hao; Huang, Shuai; Wen, Xiaoyan; Li, Min; Lu, Haifei

    2017-12-01

    Detection of Hg2+ with high sensitivity is of great significance in the biochemical sensing field. Quantitative of Hg2+ was realized based on the influence of Hg2+ on the UV-vis absorption performance of Au-Pt-Au core-shell nanoraspberry (APA)-rhodamine-6G (R6G) structure. First, APA sol was added into R6G indicator solution and the UV-vis absorption signal intensity of R6G was evidently promoted. The signal intensity monotonously increased as more APA sol was added. However, when HgCl2 solution was introduced, the signal intensity declined. A linear relationship between Hg2+ concentration and signal intensity at 527 nm was revealed, based on which quantitative determination of Hg2+ could be realized. Hg2+ detection sensitivity was measured to be 0.031 a.u./M with a limit of detection of 10-7 M and the response time was 20 s. A high Hg2+ detection selectivity over Cu2+, Na+, Li+, and K+ was demonstrated. Due to its simplicity and high sensitivity, the proposed method could find an extensive application prospect in the Hg2+ detection field.

  1. Proton, Deuteron and Helion Spectra from Central Au+Au collisions at the AG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Stephen

    2002-10-01

    The AGS E895 experiment ran Au+Au collisions at bombarding energies of 2, 4, 6 and 8 AGeV. For central collisions, particle spectra have been measured for pions, kaons, protons, deuterons, and helions. From these spectra, the dN/dy distributions have been determined across a rapidity range from approximately -1.5 to 1.5 at maximum beam energy. Integration of the rapidity densities gives the total yields of each particle species. The final charge of the system can be calculated from the total yields to show that all of the initial charge is accounted for. The conclusions from the analyses of the condensate particle spectra will be presented. Fits to the spectra determine the freeze-out temperatures, radial flow velocities, and chemical potentials. The rapidity density distributions are used to estimate the longitudinal flow. The proton phase space density can be estimated by combining the proton spectra with the gaussian freeze-out radii intrepreted from a coalescence model employing the yields of protons, deuterons, tritons, and helions. Comparisons of the above results will be made to the experimental evidence from SIS, the AGS, the SPS, and RHIC.

  2. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au + Au Collisions at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; ...

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au + Au collisions for energies ranging from √sNN = 7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic vmore » $$2\\atop{3}$${ 2 } = , where Φ1 - Φ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δη = η1-η2 . Nonzero v$$2\\atop{3}$${ 2 } is directly related to the previously observed large- Δη narrow- ΔΦ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v$$2\\atop{3}$${ 2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v$$2\\atop{3}$${ 2 } is consistent with zero. Finally, when scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v$$2\\atop{3}$${ 2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √sNN = 20 GeV .« less

  3. Collective flow measurements with HADES in Au+Au collisions at 1.23A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, Behruz; Hades Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    HADES has a large acceptance combined with a good mass-resolution and therefore allows the study of dielectron and hadron production in heavy-ion collisions with unprecedented precision. With the statistics of seven billion Au-Au collisions at 1.23A GeV recorded in 2012, the investigation of higher-order flow harmonics is possible. At the BEVALAC and SIS18 directed and elliptic flow has been measured for pions, charged kaons, protons, neutrons and fragments, but higher-order harmonics have not yet been studied. They provide additional important information on the properties of the dense hadronic medium produced in heavy-ion collisions. We present here a high-statistics, multidifferential measurement of v1 and v2 for protons in Au+Au collisions at 1.23A GeV.

  4. Centrality and collision system dependence of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions at AGS energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sako, H.; Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.; Ashktorab, K.; Baker, M. D.; Beavis, D.; Britt, H. C.; Chang, J.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; hide

    1997-01-01

    Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions reflects subtle interplay between initial production and absorption by nucleons. Because the AGS energies (10--20 A(center-dot)GeV/c) are close to the antiproton production threshold, antiproton may be sensitive to cooperative processes such as QGP and hadronic multi-step processes. On the other hand, antiproton has been proposed as a probe of baryon density due to large N(anti N) annihilation cross sections. Cascade models predict the maximum baryon density reaches about 10 times the normal nucleus density in central Au+Au collisions, where the strong antiproton absorption is expected. In this paper, the authors show systematic studies of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions.

  5. Scaling Properties of Proton and Antiproton Production in (sNN)=200 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, J.-S.; Chand, P.; Chang, W. C.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Constantin, P.; D'Enterria, D. G.; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, Y. V.; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, D. E.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fung, S.-Y.; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, T. K.; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, G.; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hill, J. C.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Isenhower, L. D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jang, W. Y.; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, J. H.; Kapoor, S. S.; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, E.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M. J.; Li, X. H.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, Y.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, M. D.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, P. L.; Melnikov, E.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Mühlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, B. K.; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P.; Pantuev, V. S.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, S. F.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, J.-C.; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, S. S.; Sadler, M. E.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, M. R.; Shea, T. K.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarján, P.; Tepe, J. D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Volkov, M. A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, Y.; White, S. N.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2003-10-01

    We report on the yield of protons and antiprotons, as a function of centrality and transverse momentum, in Au+Au collisions at (sNN)=200 GeV measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In central collisions at intermediate transverse momenta (1.5Au+Au, p+p, and e+e- collisions. This enhancement is limited to pT<5 GeV/c as deduced from the ratio of charged hadrons to π0 measured in the range 1.5

  6. Homoepitaxial electrodeposition on reconstructed and unreconstructed Au(100): An in-situ STM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shakran, Mohammad; Kibler, Ludwig A.; Jacob, Timo

    2015-01-01

    A study of homoepitaxial electrodeposition on reconstructed and unreconstructed Au(100) surfaces is presented. The growth behavior has been investigated by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy for Au(100) in contact with 0.1 M H2SO4 + 5 μM K[AuCl4]. It is shown that the initial surface structure is decisive for the emerging Au structures, giving rise to clearly different surface morphologies for electro-crystallization of Au on the unreconstructed and on the reconstructed Au(100) surface. A layer-by-layer growth is observed at more positive potentials for unreconstructed Au(100). The electrodeposition proceeds initially by the formation of Au islands followed by island coalescence due to the high mobility of surface atoms. Monatomic recessed stripes are formed as a result of the coalescence of deposited Au islands. At more negative potentials, the growth of Au proceeds strongly anisotropic on the reconstructed surface by the formation of reconstructed elongated islands.

  7. Coincidence studies of He ionized by C{sup 6+}, Au{sup 24+}, and Au{sup 53+}

    SciT

    McGovern, M.; Walters, H. R. J.; Assafrao, D.

    2010-04-15

    A recently developed [Phys. Rev. A 79, 042707 (2009)] impact parameter coupled pseudostate approximation (CP) is applied to calculate triple differential cross sections for single ionization of He by C{sup 6+}, Au{sup 24+}, and Au{sup 53+} projectiles at impact energies of 100 and 2 MeV/amu for C{sup 6+} and 3.6 MeV/amu for Au{sup 24+} and Au{sup 53+}. For C{sup 6+}, satisfactory, but not perfect, agreement is found with experimental measurements in coplanar geometry, but there is substantial disagreement with data taken in a perpendicular plane geometry. The CP calculations firmly contradict a projectile-nucleus interaction model which has been used tomore » support the perpendicular plane measurements. For Au{sup 24+} and Au{sup 53+}, there is a complete lack of accord with the available experiments. However, for Au{sup 24+} the theoretical position appears to be quite firm with clear indications of convergence in the CP approximation and very good agreement between CP and the completely different three-distorted-waves eikonal-initial-state (3DW-EIS) approximation. The situation for Au{sup 53+} is different. At the momentum transfers at which the measurements were made, there are doubts about the convergence of the CP approximation and a factor of 2 difference between the CP and 3DW-EIS predictions. The discord between theory and experiment is even greater with the experiment giving cross sections a factor of 10 larger than the theory. A study of the convergence of the CP approximation shows that it improves rapidly with reducing momentum transfer. As a consequence, lower-order cross sections than the triple are quite well converged and present an opportunity for a more reliable test of the experiment.« less

  8. Azimuthally sensitive hanbury brown-twiss interferometry in Au + Au collisions sqrt S sub NN = 200 GeV

    SciT

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.

    2004-06-30

    We present the results of a systematic study of the shape of the pion distribution in coordinate space at freeze-out in Au+Au collisions at RHIC using two-pion Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) interferometry. Oscillations of the extracted HBT radii vs. emission angle indicate sources elongated perpendicular to the reaction plane. The results indicate that the pressure and expansion time of the collision system are not sufficient to completely quench its initial shape.

  9. Au crystal growth on natural occurring Au-Ag aggregate elucidated by means of precession electron diffraction (PED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roqué Rosell, Josep; Portillo Serra, Joaquim; Aiglsperger, Thomas; Plana-Ruiz, Sergi; Trifonov, Trifon; Proenza, Joaquín A.

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, a lamella from an Au-Ag aggregate found in Ni-laterites has been examined using Transmission Electron Microscope to produce a series of Precision Electron Diffraction (PED) patterns. The analysis of the structural data obtained, coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis, made it possible to determine the orientation of twinned native gold growing on the Au-Ag aggregate. The native Au crystal domains are found to have grown at the outermost part of the aggregate whereas the inner core of the aggregate is an Au-Ag alloy (∼4 wt% Ag). The submicron structural study of the natural occurring Au aggregate points to the mobilization and precipitation of gold in laterites and provides insights on Au aggregates development at supergene conditions. This manuscript demonstrates the great potential of electron crystallographic analysis, and in particular, PED to study submicron structural features of micron sized mineral aggregates by using the example of a gold grain found in a Ni-laterite deposits.

  10. Identified hadron transverse momentum spectra in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. Van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.

    2007-02-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at sNN = 62.4 GeV have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The identification of particles relies on three different methods: low momentum particles stopping in the first detector layers; the specific energy loss (dE/dx) in the silicon spectrometer, and time-of-flight measurement. These methods cover the transverse momentum ranges 0.03 0.2, 0.2 1.0, and 0.5 3.0 GeV/c, respectively. Baryons are found to have substantially harder transverse momentum spectra than mesons. The pT region in which the proton to pion ratio reaches unity in central Au+Au collisions at sNN = 62.4 GeV fits into a smooth trend as a function of collision energy. At low transverse mass, the spectra of various species exhibit a significant deviation from transverse mass scaling. The observed particle yields at very low pT are comparable to extrapolations from higher pT for kaons, protons and antiprotons. By comparing our results to Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV, we conclude that the net proton yield at midrapidity is proportional to the number of participant nucleons in the collision.

  11. Heterojunction metal-oxide-metal Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au single nanowire device for spintronics

    SciT

    Reddy, K. M., E-mail: mrkongara@boisestate.edu; Punnoose, Alex; Hanna, Charles

    2015-05-07

    In this report, we present the synthesis of heterojunction magnetite nanowires in alumina template and describe magnetic and electrical properties from a single nanowire device for spintronics applications. Heterojunction Au-Fe-Au nanowire arrays were electrodeposited in porous aluminum oxide templates, and an extensive and controlled heat treatment process converted Fe segment to nanocrystalline cubic magnetite phase with well-defined Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} interfaces as confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed Verwey transition shoulder around 120 K and a room temperature coercive field of 90 Oe. Current–voltage (I-V) characteristics of a single Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au nanowire have exhibited Ohmic behavior. Anomalous positivemore » magnetoresistance of about 0.5% is observed on a single nanowire, which is attributed to the high spin polarization in nanowire device with pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase and nanocontact barrier. This work demonstrates the ability to preserve the pristine Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and well defined electrode contact metal (Au)–magnetite interface, which helps in attaining high spin polarized current.« less

  12. Measurement of D 0 Azimuthal Anisotropy at Midrapidity in Au + Au Collisions at s N N = 200 GeV

    SciT

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.

    In this paper, we report the first measurement of the elliptic anisotropy (v2) of the charm meson D 0 at midrapidity (|y| < 1) in Au + Au collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$$_ {NN}$$ = 200 GeV. The measurement was conducted by the STAR experiment at RHIC utilizing a new high-resolution silicon tracker. The measured D 0 v 2 in 0%–80% centrality Au + Au collisions can be described by a viscous hydrodynamic calculation for a transverse momentum (p T) of less than 4 GeV/c . The D 0 v 2 as a function of transverse kinetic energy (m T - m 0 , where m T = $$\\sqrt{p}$$$2\\atop{T}$$ + m$$2\\atop{0}$$) is consistent with that of light mesons in 10%–40% centrality Au + Au collisions. These results suggest that charm quarks have achieved local thermal equilibrium with the medium created in such collisions. In conclusion, several theoretical models, with the temperature-dependent, dimensionless charm spatial diffusion coefficient (2πTD s) in the range of ~2–12 , are able to simultaneously reproduce our D 0 v 2 result and our previously published results for the D 0 nuclear modification factor.« less

  13. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGES

    An, Wei; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-18

    Improving the activity and stability of Pt-based core–shell nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells while lowering Pt loading has been one of the big challenges in electrocatalysis. Here, using density functional theory, we report the effect of adding Au as the third element to enhance the durability and activity of Ni@Pt core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results show that the durability and activity of a Ni@Pt NP can be finely tuned by controlling Au concentration and distribution. For a NiAu@Pt NP, the durability can be greatly promoted by thermodynamically favorable segregation of Au tomore » replace the Pt atoms at vertex, edge, and (100) facets on the shell, while still keeping the ORR activity on the active Pt(111) shell as high as that of Ni@Pt nanoparticles. Such behavior strongly depends on a direct interaction with the Ni interlayer. The results not only highlight the importance of interplay between surface strain on the shell and the interlayer–shell interaction in determining the durability and activity but also provide guidance on how to maximize the usage of Au to optimize the performance of core–shell (Pt) nanoparticles. As a result, such understanding has allowed us to discover a novel NiAu@Pt nanocatalyst for the ORR.« less

  14. Measurement of D 0 Azimuthal Anisotropy at Midrapidity in Au + Au Collisions at s N N = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; ...

    2017-05-26

    In this paper, we report the first measurement of the elliptic anisotropy (v2) of the charm meson D 0 at midrapidity (|y| < 1) in Au + Au collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$$_ {NN}$$ = 200 GeV. The measurement was conducted by the STAR experiment at RHIC utilizing a new high-resolution silicon tracker. The measured D 0 v 2 in 0%–80% centrality Au + Au collisions can be described by a viscous hydrodynamic calculation for a transverse momentum (p T) of less than 4 GeV/c . The D 0 v 2 as a function of transverse kinetic energy (m T - m 0 , where m T = $$\\sqrt{p}$$$2\\atop{T}$$ + m$$2\\atop{0}$$) is consistent with that of light mesons in 10%–40% centrality Au + Au collisions. These results suggest that charm quarks have achieved local thermal equilibrium with the medium created in such collisions. In conclusion, several theoretical models, with the temperature-dependent, dimensionless charm spatial diffusion coefficient (2πTD s) in the range of ~2–12 , are able to simultaneously reproduce our D 0 v 2 result and our previously published results for the D 0 nuclear modification factor.« less

  15. Disappearance of back-to-back high-pT hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN ] =200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Corral, M M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Magestro, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2003-02-28

    Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudorapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes previously observed in high-energy collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au+Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

  16. Two Barium Gold Iodates: Syntheses, Structures, and Properties of Polar BaAu(IO3)5 and Nonpolar HBa4Au(IO3)12 Materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Ping; Hu, Chun-Li; Mao, Fei-Fei; Xu, Xiang; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2017-06-19

    Two new barium gold iodates, namely, BaAu(IO 3 ) 5 and HBa 4 Au(IO 3 ) 12 , have been prepared. BaAu(IO 3 ) 5 crystallizes in the polar space group Pca2 1 , whereas HBa 4 Au(IO 3 ) 12 crystallizes in the centrosymmetric space group P2 1 /c. BaAu(IO 3 ) 5 consists of unique polar [Au(IO 3 ) 4 ] - anions whose four iodate groups are located at both sides of the AuO 4 plane and the polarity points in the [001̅] direction. BaAu(IO 3 ) 5 displays strong second-harmonic-generation (SHG) effects about 0.6KTiOPO 4 (KTP) and is phase-matchable. Thermal properties, optical spectra analyses, and theoretical calculations are also reported.

  17. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN)=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-03-19

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons, and antiprotons are reported for square root of [sNN]=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heary Ion Collider (RHIC). Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

  18. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

    SciT

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie

    2016-01-12

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Aumore » adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.« less

  19. Précipitation sélective de cations métalliques au moyen d'acide azélaïque issu de l'oxydation de l'acide oléique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, F.; Meux, E.; Oget, N.; Lecuire, J. M.; Mieloszynski, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Actuellement, les métaux présents dans les effluents liquides industriels sont précipités sous forme d'hydroxydes métalliques par ajout de lait de chaux. Les boues obtenues sont dirigées vers des centres de stockage de déchets ultimes sans possibilité de valorisation. Cette étude propose comme alternative au traitement actuel, une précipitation sélective par des réactifs qui peuvent être préparés à partir d'acides carboxyliques résultant de l'oxydation de l'acide oléique présent dans les huiles végétales. Cette publication présente dans un premier temps l'oxydation de l'acide oléique par le système oxydant NaIO4/RuO4 pour l'obtention de deux acides carboxyliques. Le rendement de l'oxydation de l'acide oléique est de 100% avec production des acides pélargonïque et azélaïque qui sont facilement purifiés par recristallisation dans l’eau. Dans un deuxième temps, cette étude présente la caractérisation de différents azélates métalliques. La détermination de leur stœchiométrie conduit à des composés de type MAz pour les cations divalents et M2Az3 pour les trivalents. Des mesures de solubilités ont été réalisées pour les azélates de Fe(III), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) et Ca(II). La gamme de solubilité s'étend de 1,17.10-2 M pour CaAz à 1,58.10-6 M pour Fe2Az3.

  20. Thiol ligand-induced transformation of Au38(SC2H4Ph)24 to Au36(SPh-t-Bu)24.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chenjie; Liu, Chunyan; Pei, Yong; Jin, Rongchao

    2013-07-23

    We report a disproportionation mechanism identified in the transformation of rod-like biicosahedral Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 to tetrahedral Au36(TBBT)24 nanoclusters. Time-dependent mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy analyses unambiguously map out the detailed size-conversion pathway. The ligand exchange of Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 with bulkier 4-tert-butylbenzenethiol (TBBT) until a certain extent starts to trigger structural distortion of the initial biicosahedral Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 structure, leading to the release of two Au atoms and eventually the Au36(TBBT)24 nanocluster with a tetrahedral structure, in which process the number of ligands is interestingly preserved. The other product of the disproportionation process, i.e., Au40(TBBT)m+2(SCH2CH2Ph)24-m, was concurrently observed as an intermediate, which was the result of addition of two Au atoms and two TBBT ligands to Au38(TBBT)m(SCH2CH2Ph)24-m. The reaction kinetics on the Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 to Au36(TBBT)24 conversion process was also performed, and the activation energies of the structural distortion and disproportionation steps were estimated to be 76 and 94 kJ/mol, respectively. The optical absorption features of Au36(TBBT)24 are interpreted on the basis of density functional theory simulations.

  1. Optical and electrical properties of colloidal (spherical Au)-(spinel ferrite nanorod) heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Chandramohan; Genovese, Alessandro; Qiao, Fen; Korobchevskaya, Kseniya; Comin, Alberto; Falqui, Andrea; Marras, Sergio; Roig, Anna; Zhang, Yang; Krahne, Roman; Manna, Liberato

    2011-11-01

    We report here a simple synthetic route to Au-FexOy heterostructures in which spinel ferrite (FexOy) grows as a nanorod on a spherical gold (Au) seed. The large red shift in the plasmon resonance in the heterostructures could be explained by a dielectric effect (although we could not entirely exclude a contribution due to electron transfer from Au to defect states at the Au-FexOy interface), while the magnetic properties of the Au-FexOy heterostructures were basically the same as those of the corresponding nanocrystals after Au leaching. In films of Au-FexOy heterostructures the electrical conductivity appeared to be mediated by the Au domains.We report here a simple synthetic route to Au-FexOy heterostructures in which spinel ferrite (FexOy) grows as a nanorod on a spherical gold (Au) seed. The large red shift in the plasmon resonance in the heterostructures could be explained by a dielectric effect (although we could not entirely exclude a contribution due to electron transfer from Au to defect states at the Au-FexOy interface), while the magnetic properties of the Au-FexOy heterostructures were basically the same as those of the corresponding nanocrystals after Au leaching. In films of Au-FexOy heterostructures the electrical conductivity appeared to be mediated by the Au domains. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM/HRTEM images of (i) aliquots at the earliest stages of the growth of Au-FexOy HSs; (ii) Au-FexOy HSs synthesized at low DDAB concentrations; (iii) spherical iron oxide nanocrystals synthesized under the same conditions as the HSs, but in the absence of Au seeds; (iv) Au-FexOy urchin like nanostructures, also after attempts to leach out Au; (v) Au-FexOy HSs after treatment with hydrazine; (vi) FexOy HSs after Au leaching from Au-FexOy HSs; additional optical absorption spectra; additional I-V curves, also from films made of Au-FexOy dumbbells; and additional SEM images; vii) X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of a sample of Au

  2. A new electrochemical sensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of nitrite in food samples based on sonochemical synthesized Calcium Ferrite (CaFe2O4) clusters modified screen printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Paramasivam; Settu, Ramki; Chen, Shen-Ming; Chen, Tse-Wei; Sharmila, Ganapathi

    2018-08-15

    Herein, we report a novel, disposable electrochemical sensor for the detection of nitrite ions in food samples based on the sonochemical synthesized orthorhombic CaFe 2 O 4 (CFO) clusters modified screen printed electrode. As synthesized CFO clusters were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry (i-t). Under optimal condition, the CFO modified electrode displayed a rapid current response to nitrite, a linear response range from 0.016 to 1921 µM associated with a low detection limit 6.6 nM. The suggested sensor also showed the excellent sensitivity of 3.712 μA μM -1  cm -2 . Furthermore, a good reproducibility, long-term stability and excellent selectivity were also attained on the proposed sensor. In addition, the practical applicability of the sensor was investigated via meat samples, tap water and drinking water, and showed desirable recovery rate, representing its possibilities for practical application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimization of the crystal growth of the superconductor CaKFe 4 As 4 from solution in the FeAs - CaFe 2 As 2 - KFe 2 As 2 system

    SciT

    Meier, W. R.; Kong, T.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    Measurements of the anisotropic properties of single crystals play a crucial role in probing the physics of new materials. Determining a growth protocol that yields suitable high-quality single crystals can be particularly challenging for multicomponent compounds. Here we present a case study of how we refined a procedure to grow single crystals of CaKFe 4As 4 from a high temperature, quaternary liquid solution rich in iron and arsenic (“FeAs self-flux”). Temperature dependent resistance and magnetization measurements are emphasized, in addition to the x-ray diffraction, to detect intergrown CaKFe 4As 4, CaFe 2As 2, and KFe 2As 2 within what appearmore » to be single crystals. Guided by the rules of phase equilibria and these data, we adjusted growth parameters to suppress formation of the impurity phases. The resulting optimized procedure yielded phase-pure single crystals of CaKFe 4As 4. In conclusion, this optimization process offers insight into the growth of quaternary compounds and a glimpse of the four-component phase diagram in the pseudoternary FeAs–CaFe 2As 2–KFe 2As 2 system.« less

  4. orbital selective correlation reduce in collapse tetragonal phase of CaFe2(As0.935P0.065)2 and electronic structure reconstruction studied by angel resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lingkun

    We performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study of the CaFe2(As0.935P0.065)2 in the collapse tetragonal(CT) phase and uncollapse tetragonal(UCT) phase. We find in the CT phase the electronic correlation dramatically reduces respective to UCT phase. Meanwhile, the reduction of correlation in CT phase show an orbital selective effect: correlation in dxy reduces the most, and then dxz/yz, while the one in dz2-r2 almost keeps the same. In CT phase, almost all bands sink downwards to higher binding energy, leading to the hole like bands around Brillouin zone(BZ) center sink below EF compared with UCT phase. However, the electron pocket around Brillouin Zone(BZ) corner(M) in UCT phase, forms a hole pocket around BZ center(Z point) in CT phase. Moreover, the dxy exhibits larger movement down to higher binding energy, resulting in farther away from dyz/xz and closer to dxy.We propose the electron filling ,namely high spin state in UCT phase to low spin state in CT phase(due to competing between crystal structure field and Hund's coupling), other than the Fermi surface nesting might be responsible for the absent of magnetic ordering.

  5. Optimization of the crystal growth of the superconductor CaKFe 4 As 4 from solution in the FeAs - CaFe 2 As 2 - KFe 2 As 2 system

    DOE PAGES

    Meier, W. R.; Kong, T.; Bud'ko, S. L.; ...

    2017-06-19

    Measurements of the anisotropic properties of single crystals play a crucial role in probing the physics of new materials. Determining a growth protocol that yields suitable high-quality single crystals can be particularly challenging for multicomponent compounds. Here we present a case study of how we refined a procedure to grow single crystals of CaKFe 4As 4 from a high temperature, quaternary liquid solution rich in iron and arsenic (“FeAs self-flux”). Temperature dependent resistance and magnetization measurements are emphasized, in addition to the x-ray diffraction, to detect intergrown CaKFe 4As 4, CaFe 2As 2, and KFe 2As 2 within what appearmore » to be single crystals. Guided by the rules of phase equilibria and these data, we adjusted growth parameters to suppress formation of the impurity phases. The resulting optimized procedure yielded phase-pure single crystals of CaKFe 4As 4. In conclusion, this optimization process offers insight into the growth of quaternary compounds and a glimpse of the four-component phase diagram in the pseudoternary FeAs–CaFe 2As 2–KFe 2As 2 system.« less

  6. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Combined with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Elucidates Differential Substitution Pathways of Au(I) and Au(III) with Zinc Fingers.

    PubMed

    Abbehausen, Camilla; de Paiva, Raphael Enoque Ferraz; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Gomes, Saulo Quintana; Du, Zhifeng; Corbi, Pedro Paulo; Lima, Frederico Alves; Farrell, Nicholas

    2018-01-02

    A combination of two elements' (Au, Zn) X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) allowed the elucidation of differential substitution pathways of Au(I) and Au(III) compounds reacting with biologically relevant zinc fingers (ZnFs). Gold L 3 -edge XAS probed the interaction of gold and the C-terminal Cys 2 HisCys finger of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7, and the Cys 2 His 2 human transcription factor Sp1. The use of model compounds helped assign oxidation states and the identity of the gold-bound ligands. The computational studies accurately reproduced the experimental XAS spectra and allowed the proposition of structural models for the interaction products at early time points. The direct electrophilic attack on the ZnF by the highly thiophilic Au(I) resulted in a linear P-Au-Cys coordination sphere after zinc ejection whereas for the Sp1, loss of PEt 3 results in linear Cys-Au-Cys or Cys-Au-His arrangements. Reactions with Au(III) compounds, on the other hand, showed multiple binding modes. Prompt reaction between [AuCl(dien)] 2+ and [Au(dien)(DMAP)] 3+ with Sp1 showed a partially reduced Au center and a final linear His-Au-His coordination. Differently, in the presence of NCp7, [AuCl(dien)] 2+ readily reduces to Au(I) and changes from square-planar to linear geometry with Cys-Au-His coordination, while [Au(dien)(DMAP)] 3+ initially maintains its Au(III) oxidation state and square-planar geometry and the same first coordination sphere. The latter is the first observation of a "noncovalent" interaction of a Au(III) complex with a zinc finger and confirms early hypotheses that stabilization of Au(III) occurs with N-donor ligands. Modification of the zinc coordination sphere, suggesting full or partial zinc ejection, is observed in all cases, and for [Au(dien)(DMAP)] 3+ this represents a novel mechanism for nucleocapsid inactivation. The combination of XAS and TD-DFT presents the first direct experimental

  7. Dielectron production in Au + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Issah, M.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masumoto, S.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of e+e- production at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. The invariant yield is studied within the PHENIX detector acceptance over a wide range of mass (me e<5 GeV /c2) and pair transverse momentum (pT<5 GeV /c ) for minimum bias and for five centrality classes. The e+e- yield is compared to the expectations from known sources. In the low-mass region (me e=0.30 - 0.76 GeV /c2 ) there is an enhancement that increases with centrality and is distributed over the entire pair pT range measured. It is significantly smaller than previously reported by the PHENIX experiment and amounts to 2.3 ±0.4 (stat )±0.4 (syst )±0.2 (model ) or to 1.7 ±0.3 (stat )±0.3 (syst )±0.2 (model ) for minimum bias collisions when the open heavy-flavor contribution is calculated with pythia or mc@nlo, respectively. The inclusive mass and pT distributions, as well as the centrality dependence, are well reproduced by model calculations where the enhancement mainly originates from the melting of the ρ meson resonance as the system approaches chiral symmetry restoration. In the intermediate-mass region (me e=1.2 - 2.8 GeV /c2 ), the data hint at a significant contribution in addition to the yield from the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor mesons.

  8. Drowned reefs and antecedent karst topography, Au'au channel, S.E. Hawaiian Islands

    Grigg, R.W.; Grossman, E.E.; Earle, S.A.; Gittings, S.R.; Lott, D.; McDonough, J.

    2002-01-01

    During the last glacial maximum (LGM), about 21,000 years ago, the Hawaiian Islands of Maui, Lanai, and Molokai were interconnected by limestone bridges, creating a super-island known as Maui-Nui. Approximately 120 m of sea-level rise during the Holocene Transgression flooded, and then drowned, these bridges separating the islands by inter-island channels. A new multibeam high-resolution bathymetric survey of the channels between the islands, coupled with observations and video-transects utilizing DeepWorker-2000 submersibles, has revealed the existence of numerous drowned reef features including concentric solution basins, solution ridges (rims), sand and sediment plains, and conical-shaped reef pinnacles. The concentric basins contain flat lagoon-like bottoms that are rimmed by steep-sided limestone walls. Undercut notches rim the basins at several depths, marking either sea-level still stands or paleo-lake levels. All of the solution basins shallower than 120 m were subaerial at the LGM, and at one stage or another may have been shallow shoreline lakes. Today, about 70 drowned reef pinnacles are scattered across the Maui-Lanai underwater bridge and all are situated in wave-sheltered positions. Most drowned during the interval between 14,000 and 10,000 years ago when sea-level rise averaged 15 mm/year. Virtually all of the surficial topography in the Au'au Channel today is a product of karst processes accentuated by marginal reef growth during the Holocene. Both the submerged basins and the drowned reefs represent an archive of sea-level and climate history in Hawaii during the late Quaternary.

  9. Extraordinary epitaxial alignment of graphene islands on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Joseph M.; Starodub, Elena; Walter, Andrew L.; Nie, Shu; Bostwick, Aaron; Bartelt, Norman C.; Thürmer, Konrad; Rotenberg, Eli; McCarty, Kevin F.; Dubon, Oscar D.

    2012-05-01

    Pristine, single-crystalline graphene displays a unique collection of remarkable electronic properties that arise from its two-dimensional, honeycomb structure. Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy, we show that when deposited on the (111) surface of Au carbon forms such a structure. The resulting monolayer, epitaxial film is formed by the coalescence of dendritic graphene islands that nucleate at a high density. Over 95% of these islands can be identically aligned with respect to each other and to the Au substrate. Remarkably, the dominant island orientation is not the better lattice-matched 30° rotated orientation but instead one in which the graphene [01] and Au [011] in-plane directions are parallel. The epitaxial graphene film is only weakly coupled to the Au surface, which maintains its reconstruction under the slightly p-type doped graphene. The linear electronic dispersion characteristic of free-standing graphene is retained regardless of orientation. That a weakly interacting, non-lattice matched substrate is able to lock graphene into a particular orientation is surprising. This ability, however, makes Au(111) a promising substrate for the growth of single crystalline graphene films.

  10. Acetanilide mediated reversible assembly and disassembly of Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Murugadoss, A; Kar, Manoranjan; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2008-08-01

    Herein we report the generation of Au nanoparticles (NPs) by sparingly soluble acetanilide in water. We also report the formation of linear chain-like superstructures of self-assembled Au NPs, in the presence of excess acetanilide. This was achieved in two different ways. In the first method, acetanilide was added, with increasing concentration, into aqueous HAuCl(4) to produce Au NPs as well as for the formation of assembly, which varied according to the concentration of acetanilide. The other route involved formation of spherical Au NPs at the lowest concentration of acetanilide, which was followed by the formation of assembly of various lengths upon further addition of variable amount of acetanilide. The assemblies were stable in aqueous solution for days with characteristic UV-vis absorption spectra consisting of two peaks. While the wavelength of the first peak remained the same, the position of the second peak changed to longer wavelength with increasing acetanilide concentration. Interestingly, the linear chain-like arrays could be broken into individual particles by first dilution of the solution concentration followed by treatment with ultrasonic waves. The individual Au NPs again formed linear chain-like arrays upon addition of excess acetanilide.

  11. Au nanoinjectors for electrotriggered gene delivery into the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mijeong; Kim, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of exogenous materials is an essential technique required for many fundamental biological researches and medical treatments. As our understanding of cell structure and function has been improved and diverse therapeutic agents with a subcellular site of action have been continuously developed, there is a demand to enhance the performance of delivering devices. Ideal intracellular delivery devices should convey various kinds of exogenous materials without deteriorating cell viability regardless of cell type and, furthermore, precisely control the location and the timing of delivery as well as the amount of delivered materials for advanced researches.In this chapter the development of a new intracellular delivery device, a nanoinjector made of a Au (gold) nanowire (a Au nanoinjector) is described in which delivery is triggered by external application of an electric pulse. As a model study, a gene was delivered directly into the nucleus of a neuroblastoma cell, and successful delivery without cell damage was confirmed by the expression of the delivered gene. The insertion of a Au nanoinjector directly into a cell can be generally applied to any kind of cell, and a high degree of surface modification of Au allows attachment of diverse materials such as proteins, small molecules, or nanoparticles as well as genes on Au nanoinjectors. This expands their applicability, and it is expected that they will provide important information on the effects of delivered exogenous materials and consequently contribute to the development of related therapeutic or clinical technologies.

  12. Polarization properties of fluorescent BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Rich, Ryan; Shumilov, Dmytro; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-04-21

    BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and studied their steady state and time resolved fluorescence properties including polarization behavior in different solvents: glycerol, propylene glycol and water. We demonstrated that the nanocluster absorption spectrum can be separated from the extinction spectrum by subtraction of Rayleigh scattering. The nanocluster absorption spectrum is well approximated by three Gaussian components. By a comparison of the emissions from BSA Au25 clusters and rhodamine B in water, we estimated the quantum yield of nanoclusters to be higher than 0.06. The fluorescence lifetime of BSA Au25 clusters is long and heterogeneous with an average value of 1.84 μs. In glycerol at -20 °C the anisotropy is high, reaching a value of 0.35. However, the excitation anisotropy strongly depends on the excitation wavelengths indicating a significant overlap of the different transition moments. The anisotropy decay in water reveals a correlation time below 0.2 μs. In propylene glycol the measured correlation time is longer and the initial anisotropy depends on the excitation wavelength. BSA Au25 clusters, due to long lifetime and high polarization, can potentially be used in studying large macromolecules such as protein complexes with large molecular weight.

  13. Multiple Nonstoichiometric Phases with Discrete Composition Ranges in the CaAu5−CaAu4Bi−BiAu2 System. A Case Study of the Chemistry of Spinodal Decomposition

    SciT

    Lin, Qisheng; Corbett, John D.

    2010-04-01

    Synthetic explorations in the CaAu{sub 5}-CaAu{sub 4}Bi-BiAu{sub 2} system at 400 C reveal five separate solid solution regions that show three distinct substitution patterns in the CaAu{sub 5} parent: (I) CaAu{sub 4}(Au{sub 1-m}Bi{sub m}) with 0 {le} m {le} 0.15(1), (II) 0.33(1) {le} m {le} 0.64(1), (III) 0.85(4) {le} m {le} 0.90(2); (IV) (Ca{sub 1-r}Au{sub r})Au{sub 4}(Bi{sub 1-s}Au{sub s}) with 0 {le} r {le} 0.39(1) and 0 {le} s {le} 0.12(2); (V) (Ca{sub 1-p-q}Au{sub p}Bi{sub q})Au{sub 4}Bi with 0.09(2) {le} p {le} 0.13(1) and 0.31(2) {le} q {le} 0.72(4). Single crystal X-ray studies establish that all of these phase regionsmore » have common cubic symmetry F{sub 4}3m and that their structures (MgCu{sub 4}Sn-type, an ordered derivative of MgCu{sub 2}) all feature three-dimensional networks of Au{sub 4} tetrahedra, in which the truncated tetrahedra are centered and capped by Ca/Au, Au/Bi, or Ca/Au/Bi mixtures to give 16-atom Friauf polyhedra. TB-LMTO-ASA and -COHP calculations also reveal that direct interactions between Ca-Au and Ca-Bi pairs of atoms are relatively weak and that the Bi-Au interactions in the unstable ideal CaAu{sub 4}Bi are antibonding in character at E{sub F} but that their bonding is optimized at {+-}1 e. Compositions between the five nonstoichiometric phases appear to undergo spinodal decompositions. The last phenomenon has been confirmed by HRTEM, STEM-HAADF, EPMA, and XRD studies of the nominal composition CaAu{sub 4.25}Bi{sub 0.75}. Its DTA analyses suggest that the phases resulting from spinodal decomposition have nearly the same melting point ({approx}807 C), as expected, and that they are interconvertible through peritectic reactions at {approx}717 C.« less

  14. AuRu/AC as an effective catalyst for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Villa, Alberto; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Campisi, Sebastiano; ...

    2015-03-23

    AuRu bimetallic catalysts have been prepared by sequential deposition of Au on Ru or vice versa obtaining different nanostructures: when Ru has been deposited on Au, a Au core–Ru shell has been observed, whereas the deposition of Au on Ru leads to a bimetallic phase with Ru enrichment on the surface. In the latter case, the unexpected Ru enrichment could be attributed to the weak adhesion of Ru on the carbon support, thus allowing Ru particles to diffuse on Au particles. Both structures result very active in catalysing the liquid phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol and levulinic acid but the activity,more » the selectivity and the stability depend on the structure of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Ru@Au/AC core–shell structure mostly behaved as the monometallic Ru, whereas the presence of bimetallic AuRu phase in Au@Ru/AC provides a great beneficial effect on both activity and stability.« less

  15. The rational design of a Au(I) precursor for focused electron beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Marashdeh, Ali; Tiesma, Thiadrik; van Velzen, Niels J C; Harder, Sjoerd; Havenith, Remco W A; De Hosson, Jeff T M

    2017-01-01

    Au(I) complexes are studied as precursors for focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP). FEBIP is an advanced direct-write technique for nanometer-scale chemical synthesis. The stability and volatility of the complexes are characterized to design an improved precursor for pure Au deposition. Aurophilic interactions are found to play a key role. The short lifetime of ClAuCO in vacuum is explained by strong, destabilizing Au–Au interactions in the solid phase. While aurophilic interactions do not affect the stability of ClAuPMe3, they leave the complex non-volatile. Comparison of crystal structures of ClAuPMe3 and MeAuPMe3 shows that Au–Au interactions are much weaker or partially even absent for the latter structure. This explains its high volatility. However, MeAuPMe3 dissociates unfavorably during FEBIP, making it an unsuitable precursor. The study shows that Me groups reduce aurophilic interactions, compared to Cl groups, which we attribute to electronic rather than steric effects. Therefore we propose MeAuCO as a potential FEBIP precursor. It is expected to have weak Au–Au interactions, making it volatile. It is stable enough to act as a volatile source for Au deposition, being stabilized by 6.5 kcal/mol. Finally, MeAuCO is likely to dissociate in a single step to pure Au. PMID:29354346

  16. Atomic and electronic structures of Si(1 1 1)-(√3 x √3)R30°-Au and (6 × 6)-Au surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C H

    2015-12-02

    Si(1 1 1)-Au surfaces with around one monolayer of Au exhibit many ordered structures and structures containing disordered domain walls. Hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations presented here reveal the origin of these complex structures and tendency to form domain walls. The conjugate honeycomb chain trimer (CHCT) structure of the [Formula: see text]-Au phase contains Si atoms with non-bonding surface states which can bind Au atoms in pairs in interstices of the CHCT structure and make this surface metallic. Si adatoms adsorbed on the [Formula: see text]-Au surface induce a gapped surface through interaction with the non-bonding states. Adsorption of extra Au atoms in interstitial sites of the [Formula: see text]-Au surface is stabilized by interaction with the non-bonding orbitals and leads to higher coverage ordered structures including the [Formula: see text]-Au phase. Extra Au atoms bound in interstitial sites of the [Formula: see text]-Au surface result in top layer Si atoms with an SiAu4 butterfly wing configuration. The structure of a [Formula: see text]-Au phase, whose in-plane top atomic layer positions were previously determined by an electron holography technique (Grozea et al 1998 Surf. Sci. 418 32), is calculated using total energy minimization. The Patterson function for this structure is calculated and is in good agreement with data from an in-plane x-ray diffraction study (Dornisch et al 1991 Phys. Rev. B 44 11221). Filled and empty state scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images are calculated for domain walls and the [Formula: see text]-Au structure. The [Formula: see text]-Au phase is 2D chiral and this is evident in computed and actual STM images. [Formula: see text]-Au and domain wall structures contain the SiAu4 motif with a butterfly wing shape. Chemical bonding within the Si-Au top layers of the [Formula: see text]-Au and [Formula: see text]-Au surfaces is analyzed and an explanation for the SiAu4 motif structure is given.

  17. Reduced Solar Wind Speeds at New Horizons Beyond 30 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Zirnstein, E.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.

    2017-12-01

    Prior comparisons between Voyager 2 and IMP 8 observations found the solar wind had clearly decrease by 8% at a distance of 25 AU. Since mid-2016 solar rotation averaged speeds at New Horizons have been elevated relative to speeds observed in 2014 and 2015. However, we find a clear decrease in the New Horizons speeds beyond 30 AU when compared to those of ACE near Earth. At distances between 30-38.5 AU the relative speed reduction is in the 8-11% range. We will further this work by also comparing with available STEREO observations. By including STEREO, we can assess how sensitive the speed comparisons are to longitude separations and determine the appropriate time scale to average over.

  18. Experimental determination of exchange constants in antiferromagnetic Mn2Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnik, A. A.; Luo, C.; Ryll, H.; Radu, F.; Jourdan, M.; Zabel, H.; Elmers, Hans-Joachim

    2018-05-01

    Mn2Au is an important antiferromagnetic (AF) material for spintronics applications. Due to its very high Néel temperature of about 1500 K, some of the basic properties are difficult to explore, such as the AF susceptibility and the exchange constants. Experimental determination of these parameters is further hampered in thin films by the unavoidable presence of uncompensated and quasiloose spins on antisites and at interfaces. Using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), we measured induced perpendicular spin and orbital moments for a Mn2Au (001) film in fields up to ±8 T. By performing these measurements at a low temperature of 7 K and at room temperature (RT), we were able to separate the loose spin contribution from the susceptibility of AF coupled spins. The value of the AF exchange constant obtained with this method for a 10-nm-thick Mn2Au (001) film is (22 ±5 )meV .

  19. Tri-metallic PtPdAu mesoporous nanoelectrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunjie; Wang, Hongjing; Li, Yinghao; Yu, Hongjie; Yin, Shuli; Xue, Hairong; Li, Xiaonian; Xu, You; Wang, Liang

    2018-06-01

    The design of mesoporous materials with multi-metallic compositions is highly important for various electrocatalytic applications. In this paper, we demonstrate an efficient method to directly fabricate tri-metallic PtPdAu mesoporous nanoparticles (PtPdAu MNs) in a high yield, which is simply performed by heating treatment of the reaction mixture aqueous solution at 40 °C for 4 h. Profiting from its mesoporous structure and multi-metallic components, the as-prepared PtPdAu MNs exhibit enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward both methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction in comparison with bi-metallic PtPd MNs and commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  20. Tri-metallic PtPdAu mesoporous nanoelectrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjie; Wang, Hongjing; Li, Yinghao; Yu, Hongjie; Yin, Shuli; Xue, Hairong; Li, Xiaonian; Xu, You; Wang, Liang

    2018-06-22

    The design of mesoporous materials with multi-metallic compositions is highly important for various electrocatalytic applications. In this paper, we demonstrate an efficient method to directly fabricate tri-metallic PtPdAu mesoporous nanoparticles (PtPdAu MNs) in a high yield, which is simply performed by heating treatment of the reaction mixture aqueous solution at 40 °C for 4 h. Profiting from its mesoporous structure and multi-metallic components, the as-prepared PtPdAu MNs exhibit enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward both methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction in comparison with bi-metallic PtPd MNs and commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  1. Magneto-optical microcavity with Au plasmonic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailova, T. V.; Lyashko, S. D.; Tomilin, S. V.; Karavainikov, A. V.; Prokopov, A. R.; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Berzhansky, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    Optical and Faraday rotation spectra of magneto-optical microcavity coated with Au plasmonic layer of gradient thickness were investigated theoretically and experimentally. It was shown that the Tamm plasmon-polaritons mode forms near the long-wavelength edge of photonic band gap. The presence of Au coating of thickness of 90.4 nm increase the Faraday rotation at Tamm plasmon-polaritons and cavity resonances in 1.3 and 7 times, respectively. By transfer matrix method it were found that the incorporation of SiO2 buffer layer with a thickness in the range from 155 to 180 nm between microcavity and Au coating leads to the strong coupling between cavity mode and Tamm plasmon-polaritons. In this case, one or two resonances arise in the vicinity of the cavity mode depending on the thickness of plasmonic layer. The Faraday rotation for coupled mode in twice less than the value of rotation for single cavity mode.

  2. Au11Re: A hollow or endohedral binary cluster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod Carey, Desmond; Muñoz-Castro, Alvaro

    2018-06-01

    In this letter, we discussed the plausible formation of [Au11Re] as a superatom with an electronic structure accounted by the 1S21P61D10 shell order, denoting similar stability to [W@Au12]. The possible hollow or endohedral structures show a variable HOMO-LUMO gap according to the given structure (from 0.33 to 1.30 eV, at the PBE/ZORA level). Our results show that the energy minimum is an endohedral arrangement, where Re is encapsulated in a D3h-Au11 cage, retaining a higher gold-dopant stoichiometric ratio. This approach is useful for further rationalization and design of novel superatoms expanding the libraries of endohedral clusters.

  3. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; ...

    2015-12-02

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. We prepared gold surfaces modified by pits, starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface; we then used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Finally, pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with definedmore » defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.« less

  4. Surface plasmon aided high sensitive non-enzymatic glucose sensor using Au/NiAu multilayered nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lanfang; Zhu, Weiqi; Lu, Wenbo; Qin, Xiufang; Xu, Xiaohong

    2018-07-15

    A novel plasmon aided non-enzymatic glucose sensor was first constructed based on the unique half-rough Au/NiAu multilayered nanowire arrays. These multilayered and half-rough nanowires provide high chemical activity and large surface area for glucose oxidation in an alkaline solution. Under visible light irradiation, the surface plasmons originated from Au part enhance the electron transfer in the vertically aligned nanowires, leading to high sensitivity and wide detection range. The resulting sensor exhibits a wide glucose detection concentration range, low detection limit, and high sensitivity for plasmon aided non-enzymatic glucose sensor. Moreover, the detection sensitivity is enhanced by almost 2 folds compared to that in the dark, which significantly enhanced the performance of Au/NiAu multilayered nanowire arrays sensor. An excellent selectivity and acceptable stability were also achieved. These results indicate that surface plasmon aided nanostructures are promising new platforms for the construction of non-enzymatic glucose sensors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The electric dipole moments in the ground states of gold oxide, AuO, and gold sulfide, AuS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruohan; Yu, Yuanqin; Steimle, Timothy C; Cheng, Lan

    2017-02-14

    The B 2 Σ - - X 2 Π 3/2 (0,0) bands of a cold molecular beam sample of gold monoxide, AuO, and gold monosulfide, AuS, have been recorded at high resolution both field free and in the presence of a static electric field. The observed electric field induced splittings and shifts were analyzed to produce permanent electric dipole moments, μ→ el , of 2.94±0.06 D and 2.22±0.05 D for the X 2 Π 3/2 (v = 0) states of AuO and AuS, respectively. A molecular orbital correlation diagram is used to rationalize the trend in ground state μ→ el values for AuX (X = F, Cl, O, and S) molecules. The experimentally determined μ→ el are compared to those computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level augmented with a perturbative inclusion of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) level of theory.

  6. Comparison of the Effects of Magnetic Field on Low Noise MoAu and TiAu TES Bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Khosropanah, P.; Ridder, M.; Gao, J. R.; Hoevers, H.; Jackson, B.; Goldie, D.; Withington, S.; Kozorezov, A. G.

    2014-08-01

    Recently we have reported on the effects of magnetic field on our low noise (NEP = 4 W/Hz) [1] TiAu TES bolometers that are being developed at SRON for the SAFARI FIR Imaging Spectrometer on SPICA telescope that will be operated in three different wavelength bands: S-band for 30-60 , M-band for 60-110 and L-band for 110-210 . The arrays for the S- and M- band will be based on TiAu TES bolometer arrays, developed by SRON. The L-band array will be based on a MoAu TES bolometer developed by University of Cambridge. We have investigated the effect of the magnetic field on the current, responsivity, speed and critical current for both the TiAu and MoAu TES bolometers in our high accuracy magnetic field set-up. A clear difference in weak link behavior is observed between the two types of TES bolometers in both strength of the effect and period of the oscillations.

  7. Epitaxial growth of a mono-crystalline metastable AuIn layer at the Au/InP(001) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renda, M.; Morita, K.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal annealing of a gold layer deposited on the InP(001)-p(2×4) surface has been studied in-situ by means of LEED, AES and RBS techniques and by post analysis of RBS-channeling and glancing incidence X-ray diffraction. A clean LEED pattern of p(2×2) spots was observed for the specimen annealed for 10 min at 300°C. The composition ratio of Au/In in the epitaxial compound layer was found to be 49/51 by RBS and several at% of P was also detected by post sputter-AES analysis. It was also found that the epitaxial layer shows a clear channeling dip for an incident ion beam which is aligned along the <001> axis of InP substrate. The glancing incidence X-ray diffraction analysis indicates diffraction peaks from the pseudo-orthorombic phase of AuIn. From these experimental results, it is concluded that the epitaxial Au-compound layer is a mono-crystalline metastable phase of AuIn, of which every three atomic rows of Au or In in the [110] direction would be situated on every four atomic rows in the [010] direction of the In(001) face of the InP crystal.

  8. Microstructure and opto-electronic properties of Sn-rich Au-Sn diffusive solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerek, T.; Skowronski, L.; Kobierski, M.; Naparty, M. K.; Derkowska-Zielinska, B.

    2018-09-01

    Microstructural and opto-electronic properties of Au ⧹ Sn and Sn ⧹ Au bilayers, obtained by sequential evaporating of metals on the Si substrate, were investigated by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thicknesses of individual films were established to obtain the atomic ratio of Au:Sn atoms 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4, which were favor the formation of AuSn, AuSn2 and AuSn4, respectively. However, the produced intermatallic compounds were detected as AuSn and AuSn2. Additionally, the unbounded Sn was found. The sequence of deposition of Au and Sn films as well as their thickness strongly affect on the composition, microstructure, optical and electrical properties of the produced layers. The Au ⧹ Sn (Sn on the top) layers were more smooth than Sn ⧹ Au (Au on the top) films. Generally, the Au ⧹ Sn layers exhibit a better electrical and optical properties than Sn ⧹ Au films. The optical parameters: plasma energy, free-carrier damping, mean relaxation time of conduction electrons and optical resistivity were determined from the effective complex dielectric function of the formed Au, Sn and Au-Sn films. The optical resistivity values are in the range from 17.8 μΩ cm to 85.1 μΩ cm and from 29.6 μΩ cm to 113.3 μΩ cm for Au ⧹ Sn and Sn ⧹ Au layers, respectively.

  9. Electron flow in large metallomacromolecules and electronic switch of nanoparticle stabilization: new click ferrocenyl dentromers that reduce Au(III) to Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Astruc, Didier; Wang, Qi; Fu, Fangyu; Martinez-Villacorta, Angel M; Moya, Sergio; Salmon, Lionel; Ruiz, Jaime; Hunel, Julien; Vax, Amélie

    2018-06-04

    Click ferrocenyl-terminal dentromers, a family of arene-cored dendrimers with triple branching (9-Fc, 27-Fc, 81-Fc and 243-Fc) reduce Au(III) to ferricinium dentromer-stabilized Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry studies in CH2Cl2 show reversible CV waves with some adsorption for the 243-Fc dentromer and a number of redox groups found, 255 ± 25, using the Bard-Anson method, close to the theoretical number of 243. The dentromers reduce aqueous HAuCl4 to water-soluble ferricinium chloride dentromer-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with core sizes between 30 and 47 nm. These triazolylferricinium dentromer-stabilized AuNPs are reduced by cobaltocene to cobalticinium chloride and ferrocene dentromer-weakly stabilized AuNPs together with red shift of the AuNP plasmon. The weakness of the AuNP stabilization is characterized by dentromer extraction with CH2Cl2 along with irreversible AuNP agglomeration for the 9, 27 and 81-ferrocenyl dentromer, only the 243-ferrocenyl dentromer-AuNP withstanding this process. Altogether this demonstrates the electronic switch of the dentromer-mediated AuNP stabilization. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co3O4) composite for in situ SERS monitoring and degradation of organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shuzhen; Cai, Qian; Lu, Kailing; Liao, Fan; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-01-01

    The bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co3O4) composite was fabricated by in situ reducing Au nanoparticles onto the surface of FeS (Co3O4). The as-prepared FeS possessed a multi-structure composed of plenty of nanoplates, which were coated by Au nanoparticles with an average size of 47.5 nm. While the Co3O4 showed a thin hexagonal sheet containing Au nanoparticles on its surface with an average size of 79.0 nm. Both the as-prepared Au/FeS and Au/Co3O4 composites exhibited excellent SERS performance, capable of enhancing the Raman signals of R6G molecules with the enhancement factor up to 1.81 × 106 and 7.60 × 104, respectively. Moreover, Au/FeS (Au/Co3O4) composite also has been verified to have intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, which could decompose H2O2 into hydroxyl radicals and then degrade organic pollutants into small molecules. Therefore, SERS can be used to real-time and in situ monitoring the degradation process of R6G molecules, employing the Au/FeS (Au/Co3O4) composite both as SERS substrate and catalyst.

  11. Electronic behaviour of Au-Pt alloys and the 4f binding energy shift anomaly in Au bimetallics- X-ray spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongniu; Cui, Xiaoyu; Xiao, Qunfeng; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.

    2018-06-01

    The electronic structure and charge redistribution of 6s conduction charge and 5d charge in Au and Pt alloys, Au9Pt and AuPt9 have been investigated using a charge compensation model. It is found that, both the Au and Pt 4f binding energy (BE) exhibits a negative shift in the alloys relatively to the pure metal in apparent disagreement with electroneutrality considerations (Au is the most electronegative metallic element); more interestingly, the negative Au 4f BE shift in Au-Pt alloy is in contrast to previous observations for a large number of Au bimetallic systems with more electropositive hosts in which the more electropositive the host„ the more positive the Au 4f BE shift. This anomaly is counter intuitive to electronegativity considerations. This dilemma was resolved by the charge compensation model in which both electronegativity and charge neutrality can be satisfied and the overall charge flow δ, onto Au is small and positive and δ arises from charge flow of 6s conduction charge, Δnc onto Au site, which is partially compensated by the depletion of 6d charge Δnd at the Au site (δ = Δnc+ Δnd ˜0.1 >0). The much larger Coulomb interaction between 4f and 5d than that between 4f and 6s results in positive 4f BE shifts. The Au 4f BE shift in Au-Pt alloys together with 193Au Mössbauer data were used in the charge compensation model analysis which shows that the model is still valid in that the Au 4f shift in Au-Pt alloy arises from mainly conduction charge gain with little depletion of d charge at the Au site. The model also works for Pt. The Au and Pt 5d character in the alloys have been examined with valence band spectra which show both maintain their d characteristic in dilute alloys with Pt d piling up at the Fermi level, and the top of the Au valence band being pushed toward the Fermi level; this is confirmed with DFT densities of state calculations. When Pt is diluted in Au, it gains d charge as evident from the reduction in whiteline intensity

  12. Fluorescent probe for turn-on sensing of L-cysteine by ensemble of AuNCs and polymer protected AuNPs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaozhe; Qiao, Juan; Li, Nan; Qi, Li; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-06-16

    A new fluorescent probe based on ensemble of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and polymer protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for turn-on sensing of L-cysteine was designed and prepared. The AuNCs were protected by bovine serum albumin and had strong fluorescence. The polymer protected AuNPs were synthesized by a facile in situ strategy at room temperature and could quench the fluorescence of AuNCs due to the Förster resonance energy transfer. Interestingly, it has been observed that the quenched fluorescence of AuNCs was recovered by L-cysteine, which could induce the aggregation of polymer protected AuNPs by sulfur group. Then the prepared fluorescent probe was successfully used for determination of L-Cys in human urines, which would have an evolving aspect and promote the subsequent exploration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Compound formation and superconductivity in Au-Si: X-ray absorption measurements on ion-beam-mixed Au-Si films

    SciT

    Jeon, Y.; Jisrawi, N.; Liang, G.

    Multilayered Au-Si thin films have been deposited with the net compositions ''Au/sub 1-//sub x/Si/sub x/,'' x = 0.29, 0.5, and 0.8. After ion-beam mixing these films exhibited superconductivity in the 0.3--1.2 K range despite the nonsuperconducting character of both Au and Si. Near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements on the Au L/sub 3/ edge in these films indicate that metastable Au-Si compound formation occurs in these ion-mixed materials. Specifically, the XAS measurements indicate changes in Au 5d-orbital occupancy and changes in the local Au structural environment which are both consistent with local compound formation.

  14. Structural paradox in submonolayer chlorine coverage on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheltov, V. V.; Cherkez, V. V.; Andryushechkin, B. V.; Zhidomirov, G. M.; Kierren, B.; Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Malterre, D.; Eltsov, K. N.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we present a combined low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) study of chlorine adsorption on Au(111) at low coverages. Our STM study of Cl/Au(111) system has shown that at submonolayer coverages (θ < 0.1 ML) chlorine atoms form chainlike structures with abnormally short distances of 3.8 Å between them. Our DFT calculations have shown that chlorine atoms can interact with each other through distortion of the substrate and this indirect elastic interaction is strong enough to affect their arrangement in the chainlike structures.

  15. Effect of tautomerism on Au-6-mercaptopurine nanocluster stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidpour, Neda; Kashid, Vikas; Shah, Vaishali

    2013-02-01

    We have investigated the stability of conjugated nanoparticles of Au-6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) using ab initio density functional theory. We have studied the conjugation of the 6 tautomers of 6-MP via the different atomic sites with the gold nanoparticles. Our results show that the least stable tautomer has the strongest adsorption with the Au nanoparticles whereas the most stable tautomer has the weakest adsorption. We will discuss our results to explain the experimentally observed increased plasma half life time of the conjugated drug in vitro.

  16. Early stages of collapsing pentacene crystal by Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihm, Kyuwook; Chung, Sukmin; Kang, Tai-Hee; Cheong, Sang-Wook

    2008-10-01

    The characteristic feature of metal contacts with gold on organics is deterioration of the organic crystals during the contact formation. The unveiled key challenge is to probe dynamic details of the microscopic evolution of the organic crystal when the atomic Au is introduced. Here, we report how the collapse of the pentacene crystal is initiated even by a few Au atoms. Our results indicate that the gentle decoupling of intra and intermolecular π-π interactions causes the localization of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital as well as the removal of cohesive forces between molecules, leading to the subsequent crystal collapse.

  17. Time behavior of solar flare particles to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haffner, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A simple model of solar flare radiation event particle transport is developed to permit the calculation of fluxes and related quantities as a function of distance from the sun (R). This model assumes the particles spiral around the solar magnetic field lines with a constant pitch angle. The particle angular distributions and onset plus arrival times as functions of energy at 1 AU agree with observations if the pitch angle distribution peaks near 90 deg. As a consequence the time dependence factor is essentially proportional to R/1.7, (R in AU), and the event flux is proportional to R/2.

  18. Atomic Structure of Au 329(SR) 84 Faradaurate Plasmonic Nanomolecules

    DOE PAGES

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Jan; ...

    2015-04-03

    To design novel nanomaterials, it is important to precisely control the composition, determine the atomic structure, and manipulate the structure to tune the materials property. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the material whose composition is Au 329(SR) 84 precisely, therefore referred to as a nanomolecule. The size homogeneity was shown by electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and mass spectrometry. We proposed its atomic structure to contain the Au 260 core using experiments and modeling of a total-scattering-based atomic-pair distribution functional analysis. HAADF-STEM images shows fcc-like 2.0 ± 0.1 nm diameter nanomolecules.

  19. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Kesler, Stephen E.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Walshe, John; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquity of Au-bearing arsenian pyrite in hydrothermal ore deposits suggests that the coupled geochemical behaviour of Au and As in this sulfide occurs under a wide range of physico-chemical conditions. Despite significant advances in the last 20 years, fundamental factors controlling Au and As ratios in pyrite from ore deposits remain poorly known. Here we explore these constraints using new and previously published EMPA, LA-ICP-MS, SIMS, and μ-PIXE analyses of As and Au in pyrite from Carlin-type Au, epithermal Au, porphyry Cu, Cu-Au, and orogenic Au deposits, volcanogenic massive sulfide (VHMS), Witwatersrand Au, iron oxide copper gold (IOCG), and coal deposits. Pyrite included in the data compilation formed under temperatures from ∼30 to ∼600 °C and in a wide variety of geological environments. The pyrite Au-As data form a wedge-shaped zone in compositional space, and the fact that most data points plot below the solid solubility limit defined by Reich et al. (2005) indicate that Au1+ is the dominant form of Au in arsenian pyrite and that Au-bearing ore fluids that deposit this sulfide are mostly undersaturated with respect to native Au. The analytical data also show that the solid solubility limit of Au in arsenian pyrite defined by an Au/As ratio of 0.02 is independent of the geochemical environment of pyrite formation and rather depends on the crystal-chemical properties of pyrite and post-depositional alteration. Compilation of Au-As concentrations and formation temperatures for pyrite indicates that Au and As solubility in pyrite is retrograde; Au and As contents decrease as a function of increasing temperature from ∼200 to ∼500 °C. Based on these results, two major Au-As trends for Au-bearing arsenian pyrite from ore deposits are defined. One trend is formed by pyrites from Carlin-type and orogenic Au deposits where compositions are largely controlled by fluid-rock interactions and/or can be highly perturbed by changes in temperature and

  20. Structures and magnetic properties of Fe and Ni monoatomic chains encapsulated by an Au nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhi-Dong; Li, Xiu-Yan; Yang, Zhi; Liu, Rui-Ping; Liu, Shao-Ding; Zhang, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Structures and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM) Fe or Ni monoatomic chains (MACs) encapsulated by a Au (5, 5) nanotube (Fe@Au and Ni@Au) are investigated using the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results show that both Fe@Au and Ni@Au prefer to adopt ferromagnetic (FM) orders as ground states. In particular, the Fe@Au keeps the magnetic properties of free-standing Fe MAC, indicating that this system may be viewed as a new candidate in electromagnetic devices.

  1. A Water-Damaged Home and Health of Occupants: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R.; Kilburn, Kaye H.; Dennis, Donald P.; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings. PMID:22220187

  2. A water-damaged home and health of occupants: a case study.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R; Kilburn, Kaye H; Dennis, Donald P; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings.

  3. Effect of wavelength on cutaneous pigment using pulsed irradiation

    SciT

    Sherwood, K.A.; Murray, S.; Kurban, A.K.

    Several reports have been published over the last two decades describing the successful removal of benign cutaneous pigmented lesions such as lentigines, cafe au lait macules' nevi, nevus of Ota, and lentigo maligna by a variety of lasers such as the excimer (351 nm), argon (488,514 nm), ruby (694 nm), Nd:YAG (1060 nm), and CO/sub 2/ (10,600 nm). Laser treatment has been applied to lesions with a range of pigment depths from superficial lentigines in the epidermis to the nevus of Ota in the reticular dermis. Widely divergent laser parameters of wavelength, pulse duration, energy density, and spotsizes have beenmore » used, but the laser parameters used to treat this range of lesions have been arbitrary, with little effort focused on defining optimal laser parameters for removal of each type. In this study, miniature black pig skin was exposed to five wavelengths (504, 590, 694, 720, and 750 nm) covering the absorption spectrum of melanin. At each wavelength, a range of energy densities was examined. Skin biopsies taken from laser-exposed sites were examined histologically in an attempt to establish whether optimal laser parameters exist for destroying pigment cells in skin. Of the five wavelengths examined, 504 nm produced the most pigment specific injury; this specificity being maintained even at the highest energy density of 7.0 J/cm2. Thus, for the destruction of melanin-containing cells in the epidermal compartment, 504 nm wavelength appears optimal.« less

  4. A Rare de novo Interstitial Duplication at 4p15.2 in a Boy with Severe Congenital Heart Defects, Limb Anomalies, Hypogonadism, and Global Developmental Delay.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liyang; Xie, Yingjun; Shen, Yiping; Yin, Qibin; Yuan, Haiming

    2016-01-01

    Proximal 4p deletion syndrome is a relatively rare genetic condition characterized by dysmorphic facial features, limb anomalies, minor congenital heart defects, hypogonadism, cafe-au-lait spots, developmental delay, tall and thin habitus, and intellectual disability. At present, over 20 cases of this syndrome have been published. However, duplication of the same region in proximal 4p has never been reported. Here, we describe a 2-year-5-month-old boy with severe congenital heart defects, limb anomalies, hypogonadism, distinctive facial features, pre- and postnatal developmental delay, and mild cognitive impairments. A de novo 4.5-Mb interstitial duplication at 4p15.2p15.1 was detected by chromosomal microarray analysis. Next-generation sequencing was employed and confirmed the duplication, but revealed no additional pathogenic variants. Several candidate genes in this interval responsible for the complex clinical phenotype were identified, such as RBPJ, STIM2, CCKAR, and LGI2. The results suggest a novel contiguous gene duplication syndrome. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Leiomyoma of uterus in a patient with ring chromosome 12: Case presentation and literature review

    SciT

    Hajianpour, M.J.; Habibian, R.; Hajianpour, A.K.

    1996-05-17

    We report on a 30-year-old woman with de novo ring chromosome 12 mosaicism, 46,XX,r(12)(p13.3q24.3)/46,XX. In addition to the clinical manifestations generally observed in {open_quotes}ring syndrome{close_quotes} cases such as growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and mental deficiency, she had a broad nasal bridge, micrognathia with overbite, underdeveloped breasts, mild dorsal scoliosis, clinodactyly of the fifth fingers with a single interdigital crease, symphalangism of thumbs, tapering fingers, mild cutaneous syndactyly between the second and third toes, multiple cafe-au-lait spots, sebaceous acne on the face and back, and mild dystrophic toenails. She developed a large, pedunculated uterine leiomyoma at age 28 years. Tomore » our knowledge, uterine leiomyoma in association with r(12) has not been reported previously. However, a gain of chromosome 12 and translocations involving 12q14-15 have been described. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  6. An activating G{sub s}{alpha} mutation is present in fibrous dysplasia of bone in the McCune-Albright syndrome

    SciT

    Shenker, A.; Weinstein, L.S.; Spiegel, A.M.

    1994-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a sporadic disease characterized by polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, cafe-au-lait spots, and multiple endocrinopathies. The etiology of fibrous dysplasia is unknown. Activating mutations of codon 201 in the gene encoding the {alpha}-subunit of G{sub s}, the G-protein that stimulates adenylyl cyclase, have been found in all affected MAS tissues that have been studied. Initial attempts to amplify DNA from decalcified paraffin-embedded bone specimens from frozen surgical bone specimens from five MAS patients using polymerase chain reaction and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. Most of the cells in four specimens of dysplastic bone contained a heterozygous mutation encoding substitution ofmore » Arg{sup 201} of G{sub s}{alpha} with His, but the mutation was barely detectable in peripheral blood specimens from the patients. Only a small amount of mutant allele was detected in a specimen of normal cortical bone from the fifth patient, although this patients had a high proportion of mutation in other, affected tissues. The mosaic distribution of mutant alleles is consistent with an embryological somatic cell mutation of the G{sub s}{alpha} gene in MAS. The presence of an activating mutation of G{sub s}{alpha} in osteoblastic progenitor cells may cause them to exhibit increased proliferation and abnormal differentiation, thereby producing the lesions of fibrous dysplasia. 43 refs., 2 figs.« less

  7. Facile preparation of SERS and catalytically active Au nanostructures using furfuryl derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Jung; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Park, Minsun; Huh, Seong

    2017-08-01

    Six different types of Au nanostructures with rough surfaces were readily prepared through the redox reactions between Au precursor, AuCl4-, and furfuryl derivatives without extra metal surface capping ligands, in deionized water at room temperature. Furfuryl alcohol (FA) or furfurylamine (FFA) was used as a sole reducing agent for the reduction of Au precursor. Both FA and FFA effectively polymerized during the redox reactions to form polyfuran polymers. These polymers are thought to act as surface capping ligands during the formation of Au nanostructures. Experiments were conducted with three different concentrations of each furfuryl derivative. Interestingly, Au particles prepared from the reaction with varying concentration of FA or FFA showed large differences in size, and revealed that the higher the ratios of [FA]/[AuCl4-] or [FFA]/[AuCl4-], the smaller the size of Au particles. The size of Au particles was in the range of 1 μm to under 30 nm. Among these samples, two nanostructured Au particles, AuFA-4 and AuFFA-1, deposited on a Si wafer by a simple drop-casting method, were revealed as highly active surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates for the detection of methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). High SERS enhancement factors (EFs) of 106 ∼ 108 for MB and CV were observed. Small size Au nanoparticles (AuFFA-2 and AuFFA-4) were also found to be very active for the catalytic hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4 at room temperature. AuFFA-2 could be recycled eight times, without losing its activity.

  8. Synthesis and electrocatalytic activity of Au/Pt bimetallic nanodendrites for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinyi; Wang, Dawei; Liu, Dong; Huang, Jianshe; You, Tianyan

    2012-02-01

    Gold/Platinum (Au/Pt) bimetallic nanodendrites were successfully synthesized through seeded growth method using preformed Au nanodendrites as seeds and ascorbic acid as reductant. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) of a series of Au/Pt nanodendrites modified electrodes in 1M KOH solution containing 1M ethanol showed that the electrocatalyst with a molar ratio (Au:Pt) of 3 exhibited the highest peak current density and the lowest onset potential. The peak current density of ethanol electro-oxidation on the Au(3)Pt(1) nanodendrites modified glassy carbon electrode (Au(3)Pt(1) electrode) is about 16, 12.5, and 4.5 times higher than those on the polycrystalline Pt electrode, polycrystalline Au electrode, and Au nanodendrites modified glassy carbon electrode (Au dendrites electrode), respectively. The oxidation peak potential of ethanol electro-oxidation on the Au(3)Pt(1) electrode is about 299 and 276 mV lower than those on the polycrystalline Au electrode and Au dendrites electrode, respectively. These results demonstrated that the Au/Pt bimetallic nanodendrites may find potential application in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (ADEFCs). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Study on plasmon absorption of hybrid Au-GO-GNP films for SPR sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtar, Wan Maisarah; Ahmad, Farah Hayati; Samsuri, Nurul Diyanah; Murat, Noor Faezah

    2018-06-01

    This study proposed the development of hybrid Au-GO-GNP films for the enhancement of plasmon absorption in SPR sensing. Several thicknesses of Au at t=40nm, t=50nm and t=300nm were sputtered on the glass substrate. The hybridization of bilayer and trilayer films were formed by depositing GO-GNP layers and GNP-GO layers on top of various thicknesses of Au coated substrates. UV-Vis spectra analysis was conducted to characterize the plasmon absorption for each configuration. The plasmon absorption was successfully amplified by employing hybrid trilayer Au-GO-GNP with the thickness of Au film was fixed at t=50nm. It is noteworthy to highlight that the employment of bilayer and trilayer configurations are the key success to enhance the SPP excitation. Au-GNP and Au-GNP-GO results no significant outcome in comparison with Au-GO and Au-GO-GNP. A redshift of the absorbance wavelength evinces the presence of GO on Au-GO sample and GNP on Au-GO-GNP sample due to the surface reconstruction. It is important to emphasize that not all bilayer and trilayer configurations able to enhance the plasmon absorption where no significant output was obtained with the hybridization order of Au-GNP and Au-GNP-GO.

  10. Dielectron azimuthal anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au + Au collisions at s N N = 200 GeV

    SciT

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v2) of dielectrons (e+e- pairs) at mid-rapidity from √sNN=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c2 the dielectron v2 measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π0,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1

  11. Direct observation of dijets in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, H A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Guo, Y; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-10-20

    The STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider reports measurements of azimuthal correlations of high transverse momentum (pT) charged hadrons in Au+Au collisions at higher pT than reported previously. As (pT) is increased, a narrow, back-to-back peak emerges above the decreasing background, providing a clear dijet signal for all collision centralities studied. Using these correlations, we perform a systematic study of dijet production and suppression in nuclear collisions, providing new constraints on the mechanisms underlying partonic energy loss in dense matter.

  12. Pion-Kaon correlations in central Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-12-31

    Pion-kaon correlation functions are constructed from central Au+Au STAR data taken at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results suggest that pions and kaons are not emitted at the same average space-time point. Space-momentum correlations, i.e., transverse flow, lead to a space-time emission asymmetry of pions and kaons that is consistent with the data. This result provides new independent evidence that the system created at RHIC undergoes a collective transverse expansion.

  13. Picosecond laser fabricated Ag, Au and Ag-Au nanoparticles for detecting ammonium perchlorate using a portable Raman spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byram, Chandu; Moram, Sree Sathya Bharathi; Soma, Venugopal Rao

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results from fabrication studies of Ag, Au, and Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles (NPs) using picosecond laser ablation technique in the presence of liquid media. The alloy formation in the NPs was confirmed from UV-Visible measurements. The shape and crystallinity of NPs were investigated by using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area diffraction pattern (SAED) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The SERS effect of fabricated NPs was tested with methylene blue and an explosive molecule (ammonium perchlorate) using a portable Raman spectrometer and achieved EFs of ˜106.

  14. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    SciT

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg; Ke, Feixiang

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  15. Elliptic flow due to charged hadrons for Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy 62.4 GeV

    SciT

    Kumar, Somani Ajit, E-mail: ajit.somani@gmail.com; Sudhir, Bhardwaj; Ashish, Agnihotri

    Elliptic flow is an important observable in search of Quark Gluon Plasma. The elliptic flow parameter dependence on centrality due to charged hadrons were studied using events generated by event generator AMPT at center of mass energy of 62.4 GeV per nucleon pair for Au+Au collisions. This study performed for pseudorapidity range from −0.35 to 0.35 and transverse momentum bins p{sub t} = 0.2 to 1 GeV/c and 1 to 2 GeV/c. We compared the results obtained from simulated data and RHIC-PHENIX data.

  16. Forward-backward multiplicity correlations in sNN=200 GeV Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Noucier, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. Van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2006-07-01

    Forward-backward correlations of charged-particle multiplicities in symmetric bins in pseudorapidity are studied to gain insight into the underlying correlation structure of particle production in Au+Au collisions. The PHOBOS detector is used to measure integrated multiplicities in bins centered at η, defined within |η|<3, and covering intervals Δη. The variance σC2 of a suitably defined forward-backward asymmetry variable C is calculated as a function of η,Δη, and centrality. It is found to be sensitive to short-range correlations, and the concept of “clustering” is used to interpret comparisons to phenomenological models.

  17. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong; Ke, Feixiang

    2014-06-01

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  18. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √ sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-01-12

    In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √ sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  19. Dijet imbalance measurements in Au + Au and p p collisions at s N N = 200 GeV at STAR

    SciT

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.

    In this paper, we report the first dijet transverse momentum asymmetry measurements from Au + Au and pp collisions at RHIC. The two highest-energy back-to-back jets reconstructed from fragments with transverse momenta above 2 GeV/c display a significantly higher momentum imbalance in heavy-ion collisions than in the pp reference. Finally, when reexamined with correlated soft particles included, we observe that these dijets then exhibit a unique new feature—momentum balance is restored to that observed in pp for a jet resolution parameter of R = 0.4, while rebalancing is not attained with a smaller value of R = 0.2.

  20. Elliptic Flow of Identified Hadrons in Au+Au Collisions at (sNN)=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, J.-S.; Chand, P.; Chang, W. C.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Constantin, P.; D'Enterria, D. G.; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, Y. V.; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, D. E.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fung, S.-Y.; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, T. K.; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hill, J. C.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Isenhower, L. D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jang, W. Y.; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, J. H.; Kapoor, S. S.; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, E.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M. J.; Li, X. H.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, Y.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, M. D.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, P. L.; Melnikov, E.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Mühlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, B. K.; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P.; Pantuev, V. S.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, S. F.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, J.-C.; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, S. S.; Sadler, M. E.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, M. R.; Shea, T. K.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarján, P.; Tepe, J. D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Volkov, M. A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, Y.; White, S. N.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2003-10-01

    The anisotropy parameter (v2), the second harmonic of the azimuthal particle distribution, has been measured with the PHENIX detector in Au+Au collisions at (sNN)=200 GeV for identified and inclusive charged particle production at central rapidities (|η|<0.35) with respect to the reaction plane defined at high rapidities (|η|=3 4 ). We observe that the v2 of mesons falls below that of (anti)baryons for pT>2 GeV/c, in marked contrast to the predictions of a hydrodynamical model. A quark-coalescence model is also investigated.

  1. Dijet imbalance measurements in Au + Au and p p collisions at s N N = 200 GeV at STAR

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; ...

    2017-08-10

    In this paper, we report the first dijet transverse momentum asymmetry measurements from Au + Au and pp collisions at RHIC. The two highest-energy back-to-back jets reconstructed from fragments with transverse momenta above 2 GeV/c display a significantly higher momentum imbalance in heavy-ion collisions than in the pp reference. Finally, when reexamined with correlated soft particles included, we observe that these dijets then exhibit a unique new feature—momentum balance is restored to that observed in pp for a jet resolution parameter of R = 0.4, while rebalancing is not attained with a smaller value of R = 0.2.

  2. Using Dawn to Observe SEP Events Past 2 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, M. N.; Russell, C. T.; Prettyman, T. H.

    2017-12-01

    The launch of the STEREO spacecraft provided much insight into the longitudinal and radial distribution of solar energetic particles (SEPs) relative to their origin site. However, almost all of the observations of SEP events have been made exclusively near 1 AU. The Dawn mission, which orbited around Vesta before arriving at Ceres, provides an opportunity to analyze these events at much further distances. Although Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) is not optimized for SEP characterization, it is sensitive to protons greater than 4 MeV, making it capable of detecting a solar energetic particle event in its vicinity. Solar energetic particles in this area of the solar system are important as they are believed to cause sputtering at bodies such as Ceres and comets (Villarreal et al., 2017; Wurz et al., 2015). In this study, we use Dawn's GRaND data from 2011-2015 when Dawn was at distances between 2-3 AU. We compare the SEP events seen by Dawn with particle measurements at 1 AU using STEREO, Wind, and ACE to understand how the SEP events evolved past 1 AU.References: Villarreal, M. N., et al. (2017), The dependence of the Cerean exosphere on solar energetic particle events, Astrophys. J. Lett., 838, L8.Wurz, P. et al. (2015), Solar wind sputtering of dust on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, A&A, 583, A22.

  3. Using Dawn to Observe SEP Events Past 2 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Michaela; Russell, Christopher T.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2017-10-01

    The launch of the STEREO spacecraft provided much insight into the longitudinal and radial distribution of solar energetic particles (SEPs) relative to their origin site. However, almost all of the observations of SEP events have been made exclusively near 1 AU. The Dawn mission, which orbited around Vesta before arriving at Ceres, provides an opportunity to analyze these events at much further distances. Although Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) is not optimized for SEP characterization, it is sensitive to protons greater than 4 MeV, making it capable of detecting a solar energetic particle event in its vicinity. Solar energetic particles in this area of the solar system are important as they are believed to cause sputtering at bodies such as Ceres and comets (Villarreal et al., 2017; Wurz et al., 2015). In this study, we use Dawn’s GRaND data from 2011-2015 when Dawn was at distances between 2-3 AU. We compare the SEP events seen by Dawn with particle measurements at 1 AU using STEREO, Wind, and ACE to understand how the SEP events evolved past 1 AU.References: Villarreal, M. N., et al. (2017), The dependence of the Cerean exosphere on solar energetic particle events, Astrophys. J. Lett., 838, L8.Wurz, P. et al. (2015), Solar wind sputtering of dust on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, A&A, 583, A22.

  4. Syn-deformational features of Carlin-type Au deposits

    Peters, S.G.

    2004-01-01

    Syn-deformational ore deposition played an important role in some Carlin-type Au deposits according to field and laboratory evidence, which indicates that flow of Au-bearing fluids was synchronous with regional-scale deformation events. Gold-related deformation events linked to ore genesis were distinct from high-level, brittle deformation that is typical of many epithermal deposits. Carlin-type Au deposits, with brittle-ductile features, most likely formed during tectonic events that were accompanied by significant fluid flow. Interactive deformation-fluid processes involved brittle-ductile folding, faulting, shearing, and gouge development that were focused along illite-clay and dissolution zones caused by hydrothermal alteration. Alteration along these deformation zones resulted in increased porosity and enhancement of fluid flow, which resulted in decarbonated, significant dissolution, collapse, and volume and mass reduction. Carlin-type Au deposits commonly are hosted in Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks (limestone, siltstone, argillite, shale, and quartzite) on the margins of cratons. The sedimentary basins containing the host rocks underwent tectonic events that influenced the development of stratabound, structurally controlled orebodies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Epitaxial growth of thermally stable cobalt films on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, N.; Laux, M.; Stöckl, J.; Kollamana, J.; Seidel, J.; Großmann, N.; Fetzer, R.; Kelly, L. L.; Wei, Z.; Stadtmüller, B.; Cinchetti, M.; Aeschlimann, M.

    2016-10-01

    Ferromagnetic thin films play a fundamental role in spintronic applications as a source for spin polarized carriers and in fundamental studies as ferromagnetic substrates. However, it is challenging to produce such metallic films with high structural quality and chemical purity on single crystalline substrates since the diffusion barrier across the metal-metal interface is usually smaller than the thermal activation energy necessary for smooth surface morphologies. Here, we introduce epitaxial thin Co films grown on an Au(111) single crystal surface as a thermally stable ferromagnetic thin film. Our structural investigations reveal an identical growth of thin Co/Au(111) films compared to Co bulk single crystals with large monoatomic Co terraces with an average width of 500 Å, formed after thermal annealing at 575 K. Combining our results from photoemission and Auger electron spectroscopy, we provide evidence that no significant diffusion of Au into the near surface region of the Co film takes place for this temperature and that no Au capping layer is formed on top of Co films. Furthermore, we show that the electronic valence band is dominated by a strong spectral contribution from a Co 3d band and a Co derived surface resonance in the minority band. Both states lead to an overall negative spin polarization at the Fermi energy.

  6. Fibres Optiques En Therapie Laser Au Contact Du Tissu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, P.; Sabben, G.; Lambert, R.; Berger, F.

    1984-03-01

    Les fibres en quartz, non protegees par un courant de gaz et placees au contact du tissu, peuvent etre utilisees pratiquement indefiniment grace a un "autonettoyage" et une "regenera-tion". Elles provoquent des lesions tissulaires semblables a celles obtenues avec les fibres conventionnelles.

  7. Manipulation of Spin-Torque Generation Using Ultrathin Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hongyu; Haku, Satoshi; Kanno, Yusuke; Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Maki, Hideyuki; Shi, Ji; Ando, Kazuya

    2018-06-01

    The generation and the manipulation of current-induced spin-orbit torques are of essential interest in spintronics. However, in spite of the vital progress in spin orbitronics, electric control of the spin-torque generation still remains elusive and challenging. We report on electric control of the spin-torque generation using ionic-liquid gating of ultrathin Au. We show that by simply depositing a SiO2 capping layer on an ultrathin-Au /Ni81Fe19 bilayer, the spin-torque generation efficiency is drastically enhanced by a maximum of 7 times. This enhancement is verified to be originated from the rough ultrathin-Au /Ni81Fe19 interface induced by the SiO2 deposition, which results in the enhancement of the interface spin-orbit scattering. We further show that the spin-torque generation efficiency from the ultrathin Au film can be reversibly manipulated by a factor of 2 using the ionic gating with an external electric field within a small range of 1 V. These results pave a way towards the efficient control of the spin-torque generation in spintronic applications.

  8. Inverse Catalysts for CO Oxidation: Enhanced Oxide–Metal Interactions in MgO/Au(111), CeO 2/Au(111), and TiO 2/Au(111)

    DOE PAGES

    Palomino, Robert M.; Gutiérrez, Ramón A.; Liu, Zongyuan; ...

    2017-09-26

    Au(111) does not bind CO and O 2 well. The deposition of small nanoparticles of MgO, CeO 2, and TiO 2 on Au(111) produces excellent catalysts for CO oxidation at room temperature. In an inverse oxide/metal configuration there is a strong enhancement of the oxide–metal interactions, and the inverse catalysts are more active than conventional Au/MgO(001), Au/CeO 2(111), and Au/TiO 2(110) catalysts. An identical trend was seen after comparing the CO oxidation activity of TiO2/Au and Au/TiO 2 powder catalysts. In the model systems, the activity increased following the sequence: MgO/Au(111) < CeO 2/Au(111) < TiO 2/Au(111). Ambient pressure X-raymore » photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) was used to elucidate the role of the titania–gold interface in inverse TiO 2/Au(111) model catalysts during CO oxidation. Stable surface intermediates such as CO(ads), CO 3 2–(ads), and OH(ads) were identified under reaction conditions. CO 3 2–(ads) and OH(ads) behaved as spectators. The concentration of CO(ad) initially increased and then decreased with increasing TiO 2 coverage, demonstrating a clear role of the Ti–Au interface and the size of the TiO 2 nanostructures in the catalytic process. Overall, our results show an enhancement in the strength of the oxide–metal interactions when working with inverse oxide/metal configurations, a phenomenon that can be utilized for the design of efficient catalysts useful for green and sustainable chemistry.« less

  9. Inverse Catalysts for CO Oxidation: Enhanced Oxide–Metal Interactions in MgO/Au(111), CeO 2/Au(111), and TiO 2/Au(111)

    SciT

    Palomino, Robert M.; Gutiérrez, Ramón A.; Liu, Zongyuan

    Au(111) does not bind CO and O 2 well. The deposition of small nanoparticles of MgO, CeO 2, and TiO 2 on Au(111) produces excellent catalysts for CO oxidation at room temperature. In an inverse oxide/metal configuration there is a strong enhancement of the oxide–metal interactions, and the inverse catalysts are more active than conventional Au/MgO(001), Au/CeO 2(111), and Au/TiO 2(110) catalysts. An identical trend was seen after comparing the CO oxidation activity of TiO2/Au and Au/TiO 2 powder catalysts. In the model systems, the activity increased following the sequence: MgO/Au(111) < CeO 2/Au(111) < TiO 2/Au(111). Ambient pressure X-raymore » photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) was used to elucidate the role of the titania–gold interface in inverse TiO 2/Au(111) model catalysts during CO oxidation. Stable surface intermediates such as CO(ads), CO 3 2–(ads), and OH(ads) were identified under reaction conditions. CO 3 2–(ads) and OH(ads) behaved as spectators. The concentration of CO(ad) initially increased and then decreased with increasing TiO 2 coverage, demonstrating a clear role of the Ti–Au interface and the size of the TiO 2 nanostructures in the catalytic process. Overall, our results show an enhancement in the strength of the oxide–metal interactions when working with inverse oxide/metal configurations, a phenomenon that can be utilized for the design of efficient catalysts useful for green and sustainable chemistry.« less

  10. Synthesis of Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with concave Au nanocuboids as seeds and their enhanced electrocatalytic properties in the ethanol oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lingyu; Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Guo, Lin

    2015-12-18

    Herein, a new type of uniform and well-structured Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) with highly active concave Au nanocuboids (NCs) as seeds was successfully synthesized by using the classic seed-mediated method. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to demonstrate their greatly enhanced catalytic performance in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). It was found that the electrochemical performance for Au@Pt BNPs with the concave Au NCs as seeds, which were enclosed by {611} high-index facets, could be seven times higher than that of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with regular spherical Au NPs as seeds. Furthermore, our findings show that the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Au@Pt BNPs can be tuned simply by changing the compositional ratios of the growth solution. The lower the amount of H2PtCl6 used in the growth solution, the thinner the Pt shell grew, and the more high-index facets of concave Au NCs seeds were exposed in Au@Pt BNPs, leading to higher electrochemical activity. These as-prepared concave Au@Pt BNPs will open up new strategies for improving catalytic efficiency and reducing the use of the expensive and scarce resource of platinum in the ethanol oxidation reaction, and are potentially applicable as electrochemical catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  11. Synthesis of Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with concave Au nanocuboids as seeds and their enhanced electrocatalytic properties in the ethanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lingyu; Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Guo, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Herein, a new type of uniform and well-structured Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) with highly active concave Au nanocuboids (NCs) as seeds was successfully synthesized by using the classic seed-mediated method. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to demonstrate their greatly enhanced catalytic performance in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). It was found that the electrochemical performance for Au@Pt BNPs with the concave Au NCs as seeds, which were enclosed by {611} high-index facets, could be seven times higher than that of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with regular spherical Au NPs as seeds. Furthermore, our findings show that the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Au@Pt BNPs can be tuned simply by changing the compositional ratios of the growth solution. The lower the amount of H2PtCl6 used in the growth solution, the thinner the Pt shell grew, and the more high-index facets of concave Au NCs seeds were exposed in Au@Pt BNPs, leading to higher electrochemical activity. These as-prepared concave Au@Pt BNPs will open up new strategies for improving catalytic efficiency and reducing the use of the expensive and scarce resource of platinum in the ethanol oxidation reaction, and are potentially applicable as electrochemical catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  12. Reduction of HAuCl 4 by Na 2S revisited: The case for Au nanoparticle aggregates and against Au 2S/Au core/shell particles

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartzberg, A. M.; Grant, C. D.; van Buuren, Tony; ...

    2007-03-10

    The reaction of sodium sulfide with chloroauric acid has been surrounded by a controversy over the structure of the resulting product. The original report proposed a Au 2S/Au core/shell structure based on strong near-IR resonance and limited transmission electron microscopy. Subsequent reports used the same model without further attempts to determine the structure of the products. With a significant body of experimental work compiled over a period of several years, we have shown that the major product of this reaction is aggregated spherical nanoparticles of gold with a minority component consisting of triangular and rod-like structures. This is in contradictionmore » to the core/shell structures as originally proposed. Recently, there have been additional reports that again suggest a Au 2S/Au core/shell structure or irregularly shaped Au nanoparticles as an explanation for the near-IR resonance. To help resolve this issue, we have carried out further experiments to determine how the reaction products may depend on experimental conditions such as concentration and aging of the reactants, particularly Na 2S. It has been determined that sodium thiosulfate is the likely product from Na 2S aging. In addition, persistent spectral hole burning experiments have been conducted on gold nanoparticle aggregate (GNA) samples at excitation intensities that are lower than that required to melt the nanostructures. We have observed a decrease in optical absorption on resonance with the excitation laser wavelength, with simultaneous increases in absorption to the blue and red of this wavelength region. However, in the presence of the stabilizer poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), no increase in absorbance was observed but rather a blue shifting and decrease in intensity of the near-IR plasmon resonance. These results imply that the non-stabilized GNAs are able to break apart and reform into off resonant aggregate structures. In contrast, this behavior is suppressed in PVP stabilized

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with Au-nanoparticle substrate fabricated by using femtosecond pulse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wending; Li, Cheng; Gao, Kun; Lu, Fanfan; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Zhang, Lu; Mao, Dong; Gao, Feng; Huang, Ligang; Mei, Ting; Zhao, Jianlin

    2018-05-18

    Au-nanoparticle (Au-NP) substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were fabricated by grid-like scanning a Au-film using a femtosecond pulse. The Au-NPs were directly deposited on the Au-film surface due to the scanning process. The experimentally obtained Au-NPs presented local surface plasmon resonance effect in the visible spectral range, as verified by finite difference time domain simulations and measured reflection spectrum. The SERS experiment using the Au-NP substrates exhibited high activity and excellent substrate reproducibility and stability, and a clearly present Raman spectra of target analytes, e.g. Rhodamine-6G, Rhodamine-B and Malachite green, with concentrations down to 10 -9 M. This work presents an effective approach to producing Au-NP SERS substrates with advantages in activity, reproducibility and stability, which could be used in a wide variety of practical applications for trace amount detection.

  14. Exploring the Photoreduction of Au(III) Complexes in the Gas-Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Kaufman, Sydney H.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2010-06-01

    We have used photodissociation spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure and photoreduction of Au(III) in gas-phase complexes containing Cl- and OH-. The gas-phase electronic spectrum of [AuCl_4]- closely resembles the aqueous solution spectrum, showing a lack of strong solvatochromic shifts. Substitution of Cl- ligands with OH- results in a strong blue shift, in agreement with ligand-field theory. Upon excitation, [AuCl_4]- can dissociate by loss of either one or two neutral Cl atoms, resulting in the reduction of gold from Au(III) to Au(II) and Au(I) respectively. The hydroxide substituted complex, [AuCl_2(OH)_2]-, demonstrates similar behavior but the only observable fragment channel is the loss of two neutral OH ligands, leading only to Au(I).

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with Au-nanoparticle substrate fabricated by using femtosecond pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wending; Li, Cheng; Gao, Kun; Lu, Fanfan; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Zhang, Lu; Mao, Dong; Gao, Feng; Huang, Ligang; Mei, Ting; Zhao, Jianlin

    2018-05-01

    Au-nanoparticle (Au-NP) substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were fabricated by grid-like scanning a Au-film using a femtosecond pulse. The Au-NPs were directly deposited on the Au-film surface due to the scanning process. The experimentally obtained Au-NPs presented local surface plasmon resonance effect in the visible spectral range, as verified by finite difference time domain simulations and measured reflection spectrum. The SERS experiment using the Au-NP substrates exhibited high activity and excellent substrate reproducibility and stability, and a clearly present Raman spectra of target analytes, e.g. Rhodamine-6G, Rhodamine-B and Malachite green, with concentrations down to 10‑9 M. This work presents an effective approach to producing Au-NP SERS substrates with advantages in activity, reproducibility and stability, which could be used in a wide variety of practical applications for trace amount detection.

  16. XANES and EXAFS study of Au-substituted YBa2Cu3O(7-delta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruckman, Mark W.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    1990-01-01

    The near-edge structure (XANES) of the Au L3 and Cu K edges of YBa2Au(0.3)Cu(2.7)O(7-delta) was studied. X ray diffraction suggests that Au goes on the Cu(1) site and XANES shows that this has little effect on the oxidation state of the remaining copper. The gold L3 edge develops a white line feature whose position lies between that of trivalent gold oxide (Au2O3) and monovalent potassium gold cyanide (KAu(CN)2) and whose intensity relative to the edge step is smaller than in the two reference compounds. The L3 EXAFS for Au in the superconductor resembles that of Au2O3. However, differences in the envelope of the Fourier filtered component for the first shell suggest that the local structure of the Au in the superconductor is not equivalent to Au2O3.

  17. Theoretical prediction of a new stable structure of Au28(SR)20 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiangxiang; Wang, Pu; Xiong, Lin; Pei, Yong

    2018-07-01

    A new stable structure of Au28(SR)20 cluster is predicted, which has the same gold core as two known structures but different Au-S framework. The new Au28(SR)20 cluster is proposed to be a key link in the evolution of Au22(SR)18, Au34(SR)22 and Au40(SR)24 clusters. The four clusters belong to a homogenous Au16+6N(SR)16+2N series (N = 1-4). The relative stabilities of the new Au28 isomer structure were confirmed by density functional theory calculations including dispersion corrections (DFT-D). It is found that upon protection of certain SR ligands, the new isomer structure has lower or comparable energies to two known cluster structures.

  18. Fabrication of Au 25(SG) 18–ZIF-8 Nanocomposites: A Facile Strategy to Position Au 25(SG) 18 Nanoclusters Inside and Outside ZIF-8

    SciT

    Luo, Yucheng; Fan, Shiyan; Yu, Wenqian

    Multifunctional composite materials are currently highly desired for sustainable energy applications. A general strategy to integrate atomically precise Au 25(SG) 18 with ZIF-8 (Zn(MeIm) 2, MeIm = 2-methylimidazole), is developed in this paper via the typical Zn-carboxylate type of linkage. Au 25(SG) 18 are uniformly encapsulated into a ZIF-8 framework (Au 25(SG) 18@ZIF-8) by coordination-assisted self-assembly. In contrast, Au 25(SG) 18 integrated by simple impregnation is oriented along the outer surface of ZIF-8 (Au 25(SG) 18/ZIF-8). The porous structure and thermal stability of these nanocomposites are characterized by N 2 adsorption–desorption isothermal analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The distribution ofmore » Au 25(SG) 18 in the two nanocomposites is confirmed by electron microscopy, and the accessibility of Au 25(SG) 18 is evaluated by the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction. The as-prepared nanocomposites retain the high porosity and thermal stability of the ZIF-8 matrix, while also exhibiting the desired catalytic and optical properties derived from the integrated Au 25(SG) 18 nanoclusters (NCs). Au 25(SG) 18@ZIF-8 with isolated Au 25 sites is a promising heterogenous catalyst with size selectivity imparted by the ZIF-8 matrix. Finally, the structural distinction between Au 25(SG) 18@ZIF-8 and Au 25(SG) 18/ZIF-8 determines their different emission features, and provides a new strategy to adjust the optical behavior of Au 25(SG) 18 for applications in bioimaging and biotherapy.« less

  19. Fabrication of Au 25(SG) 18–ZIF-8 Nanocomposites: A Facile Strategy to Position Au 25(SG) 18 Nanoclusters Inside and Outside ZIF-8

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yucheng; Fan, Shiyan; Yu, Wenqian; ...

    2017-12-22

    Multifunctional composite materials are currently highly desired for sustainable energy applications. A general strategy to integrate atomically precise Au 25(SG) 18 with ZIF-8 (Zn(MeIm) 2, MeIm = 2-methylimidazole), is developed in this paper via the typical Zn-carboxylate type of linkage. Au 25(SG) 18 are uniformly encapsulated into a ZIF-8 framework (Au 25(SG) 18@ZIF-8) by coordination-assisted self-assembly. In contrast, Au 25(SG) 18 integrated by simple impregnation is oriented along the outer surface of ZIF-8 (Au 25(SG) 18/ZIF-8). The porous structure and thermal stability of these nanocomposites are characterized by N 2 adsorption–desorption isothermal analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The distribution ofmore » Au 25(SG) 18 in the two nanocomposites is confirmed by electron microscopy, and the accessibility of Au 25(SG) 18 is evaluated by the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction. The as-prepared nanocomposites retain the high porosity and thermal stability of the ZIF-8 matrix, while also exhibiting the desired catalytic and optical properties derived from the integrated Au 25(SG) 18 nanoclusters (NCs). Au 25(SG) 18@ZIF-8 with isolated Au 25 sites is a promising heterogenous catalyst with size selectivity imparted by the ZIF-8 matrix. Finally, the structural distinction between Au 25(SG) 18@ZIF-8 and Au 25(SG) 18/ZIF-8 determines their different emission features, and provides a new strategy to adjust the optical behavior of Au 25(SG) 18 for applications in bioimaging and biotherapy.« less

  20. Fabrication of Au25 (SG)18 -ZIF-8 Nanocomposites: A Facile Strategy to Position Au25 (SG)18 Nanoclusters Inside and Outside ZIF-8.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yucheng; Fan, Shiyan; Yu, Wenqian; Wu, Zili; Cullen, David A; Liang, Chaolun; Shi, Jianying; Su, Chengyong

    2018-02-01

    Multifunctional composite materials are currently highly desired for sustainable energy applications. A general strategy to integrate atomically precise Au 25 (SG) 18 with ZIF-8 (Zn(MeIm) 2 , MeIm = 2-methylimidazole), is developed via the typical Zn-carboxylate type of linkage. Au 25 (SG) 18 are uniformly encapsulated into a ZIF-8 framework (Au 25 (SG) 18 @ZIF-8) by coordination-assisted self-assembly. In contrast, Au 25 (SG) 18 integrated by simple impregnation is oriented along the outer surface of ZIF-8 (Au 25 (SG) 18 /ZIF-8). The porous structure and thermal stability of these nanocomposites are characterized by N 2 adsorption-desorption isothermal analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The distribution of Au 25 (SG) 18 in the two nanocomposites is confirmed by electron microscopy, and the accessibility of Au 25 (SG) 18 is evaluated by the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction. The as-prepared nanocomposites retain the high porosity and thermal stability of the ZIF-8 matrix, while also exhibiting the desired catalytic and optical properties derived from the integrated Au 25 (SG) 18 nanoclusters (NCs). Au 25 (SG) 18 @ZIF-8 with isolated Au 25 sites is a promising heterogenous catalyst with size selectivity imparted by the ZIF-8 matrix. The structural distinction between Au 25 (SG) 18 @ZIF-8 and Au 25 (SG) 18 /ZIF-8 determines their different emission features, and provides a new strategy to adjust the optical behavior of Au 25 (SG) 18 for applications in bioimaging and biotherapy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Photoinduced Glycerol Oxidation over Plasmonic Au and AuM (M = Pt, Pd and Bi) Nanoparticle-Decorated TiO2 Photocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Jedsukontorn, Trin; Saito, Nagahiro; Hunsom, Mali

    2018-01-01

    In this study, sol-immobilization was used to prepare gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-decorated titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysts at different Au weight % (wt. %) loading (Aux/TiO2, where x is the Au wt. %) and Au–M NP-decorated TiO2 photocatalysts (Au3M3/TiO2), where M is bismuth (Bi), platinum (Pt) or palladium (Pd) at 3 wt. %. The Aux/TiO2 photocatalysts exhibited a stronger visible light absorption than the parent TiO2 due to the localized surface plasmon resonance effect. Increasing the Au content from 1 wt. % to 7 wt. % led to increased visible light absorption due to the increasing presence of defective structures that were capable of enhancing the photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared catalyst. The addition of Pt and Pd coupled with the Au3/TiO2 to form Au3M3/TiO2 improved the photocatalytic activity of the Au3/TiO2 photocatalyst by maximizing their light-absorption property. The Au3/TiO2, Au3Pt3/TiO2 and Au3Pd3/TiO2 photocatalysts promoted the formation of glyceraldehyde from glycerol as the principle product, while Au3Bi3/TiO2 facilitated glycolaldehyde formation as the major product. Among all the prepared photocatalysts, Au3Pd3/TiO2 exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity with a 98.75% glycerol conversion at 24 h of reaction time. PMID:29690645

  2. The shape of Au8: gold leaf or gold nugget?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serapian, Stefano A.; Bearpark, Michael J.; Bresme, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    The size at which nonplanar isomers of neutral, pristine gold nanoclusters become energetically favored over planar ones is still debated amongst theoreticians and experimentalists. Spectroscopy confirms planarity is preferred at sizes up to Au7, however, starting with Au8, the uncertainty remains for larger nanoclusters. Au8 computational studies have had different outcomes: the planar D4h ``cloverleaf'' isomer competes with the nonplanar Td, C2v and D2d ``nugget'' isomers for greatest energetic stability. We here examine the 2D vs. 3D preference in Au8 by presenting our own B2PLYP, MP2 and CCSD(T) calculations on these isomers: these methods afford a better treatment of long-range correlation, which is at the root of gold's characteristic aurophilicity. We then use findings from these high-accuracy computations to evaluate two less expensive DFT approaches, applicable to much larger nanoclusters: alongside the standard functional PBE, we consider M06-L (highly parametrized to incorporate long-range dispersive interactions). We find that increasing basis set size within the B2PLYP framework has a greater destabilizing effect on the nuggets than it has on the Au8 cloverleaf. Our CCSD(T) and B2PLYP predictions, replicated by DFT-PBE, all identify the cloverleaf as the most stable isomer; MP2 and DFT-M06-L show overestimation of aurophilicity, and favor, respectively, the nonplanar D2d and Td nuggets in its stead. We conclude that PBE, which more closely reproduces CCSD(T) findings, may be a better candidate density functional for the simulation of gold nanoclusters in this context.The size at which nonplanar isomers of neutral, pristine gold nanoclusters become energetically favored over planar ones is still debated amongst theoreticians and experimentalists. Spectroscopy confirms planarity is preferred at sizes up to Au7, however, starting with Au8, the uncertainty remains for larger nanoclusters. Au8 computational studies have had different outcomes: the planar D4

  3. Ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline medium on electrochemically synthesized Co(OH)2/Au composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Sreejith P.; Elumalai, Perumal

    2017-01-01

    Gold (Au), cobalt hydroxide (Co(OH)2) and different Co(OH)2/Au compositions were electro-deposited onto stainless steel by a potentiodynamic method from the respective metal-ion solutions. The deposits were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). The XRD and IR data confirmed that the deposits were Au, α-Co(OH)2 or Co(OH)2/Au composites. The SEM observations confirmed that the morphology of the Au was spherical, while the α-Co(OH)2 was flakey with pores. The morphology of the Co(OH)2/Au composites consisted of highly agglomerated Au grains distributed on the Co(OH)2 matrix. The electrocatalytic activity of each of the Au, Co(OH)2 and Co(OH)2/Au-composite electrodes towards ethanol electrooxidation in an alkaline medium was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. It turned out that the Co(OH)2/Au-composite electrodes exhibited superior catalytic activity for ethanol electrooxidation compared with the pristine Au or Co(OH)2 electrodes. A peak current density as high as 25 mA cm-2 was exhibited by the Co(OH)2/ Au composite while the Au and Co(OH)2 showed only 0.9 and 13 mA cm-2, respectively. The enhanced conductivity of the Co(OH)2/Au matrix due to the presence of Au, as well as the combined catalytic activity, seemed to be responsible for the superior performance of the Co(OH)2/Au-composite electrodes.

  4. Reconstruction of K*+/-(892) in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, He; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) produces a hot, dense and deconfined Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) medium, called the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), with Au +Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The K*+/-(892) resonance is a short-lived particle with a lifetime shorter than the expected lifetime of the QGP. The K* production may provide an effective tool to probe the QGP properties, such as strangeness enhancement. Experimentally, K*+/- analysis is difficult and less studied previously because of large combinatorial background. In recent years, improvements in data sample statistics and particle identification capability promise better K*+/- measurements. In this presentation, we report the reconstruction of K*+/- resonance via the hadronic decay channel K*+/- (892) ->KS0π+/- as a function of transverse momentum (pT) up to 5 GeV/c for various collision centrality classes. The data are Au +Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV collected in the year 2011 run from the STAR experiment. Physics implications of our measurements will also be discussed. For the STAR collaboration.

  5. Nanoporous Au-based chronocoulometric aptasensor for amplified detection of Pb(2+) using DNAzyme modified with Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Lai, Cui; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Tang, Lin; Yang, Chunping; Zhou, Yaoyu; Qin, Lei; Cheng, Min

    2016-07-15

    The authors herein described an amplified detection strategy employing nanoporous Au (NPG) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to detect Pb(2+) ions in aqueous solution. The thiol modified Pb(2+)-specific DNAzyme was self-assembled onto the surface of the NPG modified electrode for hybridizing with the AuNPs labeled oligonucleotide and for forming the DNA double helix structure. Electrochemical signal, redox charge of hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex), was measured by chronocoulometry. Taking advantage of amplification effects of the NPG electrode for increasing the reaction sites of capture probe and DNA-AuNPs complexes for bringing about the adsorption of large numbers of RuHex molecules, this electrochemical sensor could detect Pb(2+) quantitatively, in the range of 0.05-100nM, with a limit of detection as low as 0.012nM. Selectivity measurements revealed that the sensor was specific for Pb(2+) even with interference by high concentrations of other metal ions. This sensor was also used to detect Pb(2+) ions from samples of tap water, river water, and landfill leachate samples spiked with Pb(2+) ions, and the results showed good agreement with the found values determined by an atomic fluorescence spectrometer. This simple aptasensor represented a promising potential for on-site detecting Pb(2+) in drinking water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tuning the Kondo effect in thin Au films by depositing a thin layer of Au on molecular spin-dopants.

    PubMed

    Ataç, D; Gang, T; Yilmaz, M D; Bose, S K; Lenferink, A T M; Otto, C; de Jong, M P; Huskens, J; van der Wiel, W G

    2013-09-20

    We report on the tuning of the Kondo effect in thin Au films containing a monolayer of cobalt(II) terpyridine complexes by altering the ligand structure around the Co(2+) ions by depositing a thin Au capping layer on top of the monolayer on Au by magnetron sputtering (more energetic) and e-beam evaporation (softer). We show that the Kondo effect is slightly enhanced with respect to that of the uncapped film when the cap is deposited by evaporation, and significantly enhanced when magnetron sputtering is used. The Kondo temperature (TK) increases from 3 to 4.2/6.2 K for the evaporated/sputtered caps. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy investigation showed that the organic ligands remain intact upon Au e-beam evaporation; however, sputtering inflicts significant change in the Co(2+) electronic environment. The location of the monolayer-on the surface or embedded in the film-has a small effect. However, the damage of Co-N bonds induced by sputtering has a drastic effect on the increase of the impurity-electron interaction. This opens up the way for tuning of the magnetic impurity states, e.g. spin quantum number, binding energy with respect to the host Fermi energy, and overlap via the ligand structure around the ions.

  7. Size-induced chemical and magnetic ordering in individual Fe-Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pinaki; Manchanda, Priyanka; Kumar, Pankaj; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J; Kashyap, Arti; Skomski, Ralph; Sellmyer, David; Shield, Jeffrey E

    2014-08-26

    Formation of chemically ordered compounds of Fe and Au is inhibited in bulk materials due to their limited mutual solubility. However, here we report the formation of chemically ordered L12-type Fe3Au and FeAu3 compounds in Fe-Au sub-10 nm nanoparticles, suggesting that they are equilibrium structures in size-constrained systems. The stability of these L12-ordered Fe3Au and FeAu3 compounds along with a previously discovered L10-ordered FeAu has been explained by a size-dependent equilibrium thermodynamic model. Furthermore, the spin ordering of these three compounds has been computed using ab initio first-principle calculations. All ordered compounds exhibit a substantial magnetization at room temperature. The Fe3Au had a high saturation magnetization of about 143.6 emu/g with a ferromagnetic spin structure. The FeAu3 nanoparticles displayed a low saturation magnetization of about 11 emu/g. This suggests a antiferromagnetic spin structure, with the net magnetization arising from uncompensated surface spins. First-principle calculations using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP) indicate that ferromagnetic ordering is energetically most stable in Fe3Au, while antiferromagnetic order is predicted in FeAu and FeAu3, consistent with the experimental results.

  8. 33 CFR 80.835 - Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu Pass, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.835 Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu Pass, LA. (a) A line drawn from Point Au Fer to Atchafalaya Channel Light 34, to Point...

  9. 33 CFR 80.835 - Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu Pass, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.835 Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu Pass, LA. (a) A line drawn from Point Au Fer to Atchafalaya Channel Light 34, to Point...

  10. Au-rich filamentary behavior and associated subband gap optical absorption in hyperdoped Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Akey, A. J.; Smillie, L. A.; Mailoa, J. P.; Johnson, B. C.; McCallum, J. C.; Macdonald, D.; Buonassisi, T.; Aziz, M. J.; Williams, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Au-hyperdoped Si, synthesized by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting, is known to exhibit a strong sub-band gap photoresponse that scales monotonically with the Au concentration. However, there is thought to be a limit to this behavior since ultrahigh Au concentrations (>1 ×1020c m-3 ) are expected to induce cellular breakdown during the rapid resolidification of Si, a process that is associated with significant lateral impurity precipitation. This work shows that the cellular morphology observed in Au-hyperdoped Si differs from that in conventional, steady-state cellular breakdown. In particular, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry combined with channeling and transmission electron microscopy revealed an inhomogeneous Au distribution and a subsurface network of Au-rich filaments, within which the Au impurities largely reside on substitutional positions in the crystalline Si lattice, at concentrations as high as ˜3 at. %. The measured substitutional Au dose, regardless of the presence of Au-rich filaments, correlates strongly with the sub-band gap optical absorptance. Upon subsequent thermal treatment, the supersaturated Au forms precipitates, while the Au substitutionality and the sub-band gap optical absorption both decrease. These results offer insight into a metastable filamentary regime in Au-hyperdoped Si that has important implications for Si-based infrared optoelectronics.

  11. Tuning SPT-3G Transition-Edge-Sensor Electrical Properties with a Four-Layer Ti-Au-Ti-Au Thin-Film Stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, F. W.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Anderson, A. J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avva, J. S.; Thakur, R. Basu; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Cecil, T.; Chang, C. L.; Cliche, J. F.; Cukierman, A.; Denison, E. V.; de Haan, T.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Foster, A.; Gannon, R. N.; Gilbert, A.; Groh, J. C.; Halverson, N. W.; Harke-Hosemann, A. H.; Harrington, N. L.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Huang, N.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O. B.; Jonas, M.; Khaire, T.; Kofman, A. M.; Korman, M.; Kubik, D.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuo, C. L.; Kutepova, V.; Lee, A. T.; Lowitz, A. E.; Meyer, S. S.; Michalik, D.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Noble, G. I.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Posada, C. M.; Rahlin, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saunders, L. J.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirley, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smecher, G.; Sobrin, J. A.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suzuki, A.; Tang, Q. Y.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vale, L. R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Young, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    We have developed superconducting Ti transition-edge sensors with Au protection layers on the top and bottom for the South Pole Telescope's third-generation receiver (a cosmic microwave background polarimeter, due to be upgraded this austral summer of 2017/2018). The base Au layer (deposited on a thin Ti glue layer) isolates the Ti from any substrate effects; the top Au layer protects the Ti from oxidation during processing and subsequent use of the sensors. We control the transition temperature and normal resistance of the sensors by varying the sensor width and the relative thicknesses of the Ti and Au layers. The transition temperature is roughly six times more sensitive to the thickness of the base Au layer than to that of the top Au layer. The normal resistance is inversely proportional to sensor width for any given film configuration. For widths greater than five micrometers, the critical temperature is independent of width.

  12. Au13(8e): A secondary block for describing a special group of liganded gold clusters containing icosahedral Au13 motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen Wu; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gao, Yi

    2017-05-01

    A grand unified model (GUM) has been proposed recently to understand structure anatomy and evolution of liganded gold clusters. In this work, besides the two types of elementary blocks (triangular Au3(2e) and tetrahedral Au4(2e)), we introduce a secondary block, namely, the icosahedral Au13 with 8e valence electrons, noted as Au13(8e). Using this secondary block, structural anatomy and evolution of a special group of liganded gold nanoclusters containing icosahedral Au13 motifs can be conveniently analyzed. In addition, a new ligand-protected cluster Au49(PR3)10(SR)15Cl2 is predicted to exhibit high chemical and thermal stability, suggesting likelihood of its synthesis in the laboratory.

  13. J/ψ suppression at forward rapidity in Au + Au collisions at sNN=39 and 62.4 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hanks, J.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masumoto, S.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, R.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sarsour, M.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of the J/ψ invariant yields in sNN=39 and 62.4 GeV Au + Au collisions at forward rapidity (1.2<|y|<2.2). Invariant yields are presented as a function of both collision centrality and transverse momentum. Nuclear modifications are obtained for central relative to peripheral Au + Au collisions (RCP) and for various centrality selections in Au + Au relative to scaled p + p cross sections obtained from other measurements (RAA). The observed suppression patterns at 39 and 62.4 GeV are quite similar to those previously measured at 200 GeV. This similar suppression presents a challenge to theoretical models that contain various competing mechanisms with different energy dependencies, some of which cause suppression and others enhancement.

  14. Parameterization and study of elliptic flow coefficient for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at RHIC energy 200 GeV/A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Somani Ajit; Bright, Keswani; Sudhir, Bhardwaj; Ashish, Agnihotri

    2018-05-01

    Elliptic flow coefficient is important observable in search of Quark Gluon Plasma. The variation of elliptic flow coefficient with centrality were studied using events generated by AMPT (Default) for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at center of mass energy of 200 GeV/A. We compared the simulated data results with RHIC-PHENIX experimental results and found close agreement between them. The study of the variation of the v2 for Au+Au and Cu+Cu was parameterized by fitting. We proposed a new formula to predict the expected value of v2 at particular centrality for Au+Au or Cu+Cu at 200 GeV/A.

  15. Glucose-functionalized Au nanoprisms for optoacoustic imaging and near-infrared photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jishu; Zhang, Jingjing; Yang, Meng; Cui, Daxiang; de La Fuente, Jesus M.

    2015-12-01

    Targeted imaging and tumor therapy using nanomaterials has stimulated research interest recently, but the high cytotoxicity and low cellular uptake of nanomaterials limit their bioapplication. In this paper, glucose (Glc) was chosen to functionalize Au nanoprisms (NPrs) for improving the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs into cancer cells. Glucose is a primary source of energy at the cellular level and at cellular membranes for cell recognition. A coating of glucose facilitates the accumulation of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs in a tumor region much more than Au@PEG NPrs. Due to the high accumulation and excellent photoabsorbing property of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs, enhanced optoacoustic imaging of a tumor in vivo was achieved, and visualization of the tumor further guided cancer treatment. Based on the optical-thermal conversion performance of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs, the tumor in vivo was effectively cured through photothermal therapy. The current work demonstrates the great potential of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs in optoacoustic imaging and photothermal cancer therapy in future.Targeted imaging and tumor therapy using nanomaterials has stimulated research interest recently, but the high cytotoxicity and low cellular uptake of nanomaterials limit their bioapplication. In this paper, glucose (Glc) was chosen to functionalize Au nanoprisms (NPrs) for improving the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs into cancer cells. Glucose is a primary source of energy at the cellular level and at cellular membranes for cell recognition. A coating of glucose facilitates the accumulation of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs in a tumor region much more than Au@PEG NPrs. Due to the high accumulation and excellent photoabsorbing property of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs, enhanced optoacoustic imaging of a tumor in vivo was achieved, and visualization of the tumor further guided cancer treatment. Based on the optical-thermal conversion performance of Au@PEG-Glc NPrs, the tumor in vivo was effectively cured through

  16. The Influence of Interstitial Ga and Interfacial Au (sub 2)P (sub 3) on the Electrical and Metallurgical Behavior of Au-Contacted III-V Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction of a very small amount of Ga into Au contact metallization on InP is shown to have a significant effect on both the metallurgical and electrical behavior of that contact system. Ga atoms in the interstices of the Au lattice are shown to be effective in preventing the solid state reactions that normally take place between Au and InP during contact sintering. In addition to suppressing the metallurgical interaction, the presence of small amounts of Ga is shown to cause an order of magnitude reduction in the specific contact resistivity. Evidence is presented that the reactions of GaP and GaAs with Au contacts are also drastically affected by the presence of Ga. The sintering behavior of the Au-GaP and the Au-GaAs systems (as contrasted with that of the Au-InP system) is explained as due to the presence of interstitial Ga in the contact metallization. Finally the large, two-to-three order of magnitude drop in the contact resistance that occurs in the Au-InP system upon sintering at 400 degrees Centigrade is shown to be a result of the formation of an Au (sub 2) P (sub 3) layer at the metal-semiconductor interface. Contact resistivities in the 10 (sup -6) ohm square centimeter range are obtained for as-deposited Au on InP when a thin (20 Angstrom) layer of Au (sub 2) P (sub 3) is introduced between the InP and the Au contacts.

  17. Crystal Structure of Faradaurate-279: Au279(SPh-tBu)84 Plasmonic Nanocrystal Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Naga Arjun; Theivendran, Shevanuja; Ganeshraj, Vigneshraja; Oliver, Allen G; Dass, Amala

    2017-11-01

    We report the discovery of an unprecedentedly large, 2.2 nm diameter, thiolate protected gold nanocrystal characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography (sc-XRD), Au 279 (SPh-tBu) 84 named Faradaurate-279 (F-279) in honor of Michael Faraday's (1857) pioneering work on nanoparticles. F-279 nanocrystal has a core-shell structure containing a truncated octahedral core with bulk face-centered cubic-like arrangement, yet a nanomolecule with a precise number of metal atoms and thiolate ligands. The Au 279 S 84 geometry was established from a low-temperature 120 K sc-XRD study at 0.90 Å resolution. The atom counts in core-shell structure of Au 279 follows the mathematical formula for magic number shells: Au@Au 12 @Au 42 @Au 92 @Au 54 , which is further protected by a final shell of Au 48 . Au 249 core is protected by three types of staple motifs, namely: 30 bridging, 18 monomeric, and 6 dimeric staple motifs. Despite the presence of such diverse staple motifs, Au 279 S 84 structure has a chiral pseudo-D 3 symmetry. The core-shell structure can be viewed as nested, concentric polyhedra, containing a total of five forms of Archimedean solids. A comparison between the Au 279 and Au 309 cuboctahedral superatom model in shell-wise growth is illustrated. F-279 can be synthesized and isolated in high purity in milligram quantities using size exclusion chromatography, as evidenced by mass spectrometry. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry independently verifies